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Sample records for genome scanning detects

  1. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

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    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  2. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition

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    Schopen, G.C.B.; Koks, P.D.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.; Visker, M.H.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein–Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A gen

  3. Genome-wide scans detect adaptation to aridity in a widespread forest tree species.

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    Steane, Dorothy A; Potts, Brad M; McLean, Elizabeth; Prober, Suzanne M; Stock, William D; Vaillancourt, René E; Byrne, Margaret

    2014-05-01

    Patterns of adaptive variation within plant species are best studied through common garden experiments, but these are costly and time-consuming, especially for trees that have long generation times. We explored whether genome-wide scanning technology combined with outlier marker detection could be used to detect adaptation to climate and provide an alternative to common garden experiments. As a case study, we sampled nine provenances of the widespread forest tree species, Eucalyptus tricarpa, across an aridity gradient in southeastern Australia. Using a Bayesian analysis, we identified a suite of 94 putatively adaptive (outlying) sequence-tagged markers across the genome. Population-level allele frequencies of these outlier markers were strongly correlated with temperature and moisture availability at the site of origin, and with population differences in functional traits measured in two common gardens. Using the output from a canonical analysis of principal coordinates, we devised a metric that provides a holistic measure of genomic adaptation to aridity that could be used to guide assisted migration or genetic augmentation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for bovine milk protein composition.

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    Schopen, G C B; Koks, P D; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H; Visker, M H P W

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk protein composition in 849 Holstein-Friesian cows originating from seven sires. One morning milk sample was analysed for the major milk proteins using capillary zone electrophoresis. A genetic map was constructed with 1341 single nucleotide polymorphisms, covering 2829 centimorgans (cM) and 95% of the cattle genome. The chromosomal regions most significantly related to milk protein composition (P(genome) casein, alpha(S2)-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein. The QTL on BTA11 was found at 124 cM, and affected beta-lactoglobulin, and the QTL on BTA14 was found at 0 cM, and affected protein percentage. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL was 3.6% for beta-casein and 7.9% for kappa-casein on BTA6, 28.3% for beta-lactoglobulin on BTA11, and 8.6% for protein percentage on BTA14. The QTL affecting alpha(S2)-casein on BTA6 and 17 showed a significant interaction. We investigated the extent to which the detected QTL affecting milk protein composition could be explained by known polymorphisms in beta-casein, kappa-casein, beta-lactoglobulin and DGAT1 genes. Correction for these polymorphisms decreased the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTL previously found on BTA6, 11 and 14. Thus, several significant QTL affecting milk protein composition were found, of which some QTL could partially be explained by polymorphisms in milk protein genes.

  5. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting haematological traits in swine via genome scanning

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    Niu Xiao-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haematological traits, which consist of mainly three components: leukocyte traits, erythrocyte traits and platelet traits, play extremely important role in animal immune function and disease resistance. But knowledge of the genetic background controlling variability of these traits is very limited, especially in swine. Results In the present study, 18 haematological traits (7 leukocyte traits, 7 erythrocyte traits and 4 platelet traits were measured in a pig resource population consisting of 368 purebred piglets of three breeds (Landrace, Large White and Songliao Black Pig, after inoculation with the swine fever vaccine when the pigs were 21 days old. A whole-genome scan of QTL for these traits was performed using 206 microsatellite markers covering all 18 autosomes and the X chromosome. Using variance component analysis based on a linear mixed model and the false discovery rate (FDR test, 35 QTL with FDR FDR FDR Conclusions Very few QTL were previously identified for hematological traits of pigs and never in purebred populations. Most of the QTL detected here, in particular the QTL for the platelet traits, have not been reported before. Our results lay important foundation for identifying the causal genes underlying the hematological trait variations in pigs.

  6. Genome Scans for Detecting Footprints of Local Adaptation Using a Bayesian Factor Model

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    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Bazin, Eric; Blum, Michael G.B.

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable impetus in population genomics to pinpoint loci involved in local adaptation. A powerful approach to find genomic regions subject to local adaptation is to genotype numerous molecular markers and look for outlier loci. One of the most common approaches for selection scans is based on statistics that measure population differentiation such as FST. However, there are important caveats with approaches related to FST because they require grouping individuals into populations and they additionally assume a particular model of population structure. Here, we implement a more flexible individual-based approach based on Bayesian factor models. Factor models capture population structure with latent variables called factors, which can describe clustering of individuals into populations or isolation-by-distance patterns. Using hierarchical Bayesian modeling, we both infer population structure and identify outlier loci that are candidates for local adaptation. In order to identify outlier loci, the hierarchical factor model searches for loci that are atypically related to population structure as measured by the latent factors. In a model of population divergence, we show that it can achieve a 2-fold or more reduction of false discovery rate compared with the software BayeScan or with an FST approach. We show that our software can handle large data sets by analyzing the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the Human Genome Diversity Project. The Bayesian factor model is implemented in the open-source PCAdapt software. PMID:24899666

  7. The relative power of genome scans to detect local adaptation depends on sampling design and statistical method.

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    Lotterhos, Katie E; Whitlock, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Although genome scans have become a popular approach towards understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation, the field still does not have a firm grasp on how sampling design and demographic history affect the performance of genome scans on complex landscapes. To explore these issues, we compared 20 different sampling designs in equilibrium (i.e. island model and isolation by distance) and nonequilibrium (i.e. range expansion from one or two refugia) demographic histories in spatially heterogeneous environments. We simulated spatially complex landscapes, which allowed us to exploit local maxima and minima in the environment in 'pair' and 'transect' sampling strategies. We compared F(ST) outlier and genetic-environment association (GEA) methods for each of two approaches that control for population structure: with a covariance matrix or with latent factors. We show that while the relative power of two methods in the same category (F(ST) or GEA) depended largely on the number of individuals sampled, overall GEA tests had higher power in the island model and F(ST) had higher power under isolation by distance. In the refugia models, however, these methods varied in their power to detect local adaptation at weakly selected loci. At weakly selected loci, paired sampling designs had equal or higher power than transect or random designs to detect local adaptation. Our results can inform sampling designs for studies of local adaptation and have important implications for the interpretation of genome scans based on landscape data. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Whole-genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci associated with milk protein composition in 3 French dairy cattle breeds.

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    Sanchez, M P; Govignon-Gion, A; Ferrand, M; Gelé, M; Pourchet, D; Amigues, Y; Fritz, S; Boussaha, M; Capitan, A; Rocha, D; Miranda, G; Martin, P; Brochard, M; Boichard, D

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the PhénoFinLait project, a genome-wide analysis was performed to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect milk protein composition estimated using mid-infrared spectrometry in the Montbéliarde (MO), Normande (NO), and Holstein (HO) French dairy cattle breeds. The 6 main milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, β-, and κ-caseins) expressed as grams per 100g of milk (% of milk) or as grams per 100g of protein (% of protein) were estimated in 848,068 test-day milk samples from 156,660 cows. Genotyping was performed for 2,773 MO, 2,673 NO, and 2,208 HO cows using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Individual test-day records were adjusted for environmental effects and then averaged per cow to define the phenotypes analyzed. Quantitative trait loci detection was performed within each breed using a linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis approach. A total of 39 genomic regions distributed on 20 of the 29 Bos taurus autosomes (BTA) were significantly associated with milk protein composition at a genome-wide level of significance in at least 1 of the 3 breeds. The 9 most significant QTL were located on BTA2 (133 Mbp), BTA6 (38, 47, and 87 Mbp), BTA11 (103 Mbp), BTA14 (1.8 Mbp), BTA20 (32 and 58 Mbp), and BTA29 (8 Mbp). The BTA6 (87 Mbp), BTA11, and BTA20 (58 Mbp) QTL were found in all 3 breeds, and they had highly significant effects on κ-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin, expressed as a percentage of protein, respectively. Each of these QTL explained between 13% (BTA14) and 51% (BTA11) of the genetic variance of the trait. Many other QTL regions were also identified in at least one breed. They were located on 14 additional chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, and 27), and they explained 2 to 8% of the genetic variance of 1 or more protein composition traits. Concordance analyses, performed between QTL status and sequence-derived polymorphisms from

  9. Detecting loci under recent positive selection in dairy and beef cattle by combining different genome-wide scan methods.

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    Yuri Tani Utsunomiya

    Full Text Available As the methodologies available for the detection of positive selection from genomic data vary in terms of assumptions and execution, weak correlations are expected among them. However, if there is any given signal that is consistently supported across different methodologies, it is strong evidence that the locus has been under past selection. In this paper, a straightforward frequentist approach based on the Stouffer Method to combine P-values across different tests for evidence of recent positive selection in common variations, as well as strategies for extracting biological information from the detected signals, were described and applied to high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data generated from dairy and beef cattle (taurine and indicine. The ancestral Bovinae allele state of over 440,000 SNP is also reported. Using this combination of methods, highly significant (P<3.17×10(-7 population-specific sweeps pointing out to candidate genes and pathways that may be involved in beef and dairy production were identified. The most significant signal was found in the Cornichon homolog 3 gene (CNIH3 in Brown Swiss (P = 3.82×10(-12, and may be involved in the regulation of pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. Other putative pathways under selection are the glucolysis/gluconeogenesis, transcription machinery and chemokine/cytokine activity in Angus; calpain-calpastatin system and ribosome biogenesis in Brown Swiss; and gangliosides deposition in milk fat globules in Gyr. The composite method, combined with the strategies applied to retrieve functional information, may be a useful tool for surveying genome-wide selective sweeps and providing insights in to the source of selection.

  10. Sex-specific variability and a 'cage effect' independently mask a neuropathic pain quantitative trait locus detected in a whole genome scan.

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    Devor, Marshall; Gilad, Amit; Arbilly, Michal; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Yakir, Benjamin; Raber, Pnina; Minert, Anne; Pisanté, Anne; Darvasi, Ariel

    2007-08-01

    Sex and environment may dramatically affect genetic studies, and thus should be carefully considered. Beginning with two inbred mouse strains with contrasting phenotype in the neuroma model of neuropathic pain (autotomy), we established a backcross population on which we conducted a genome-wide scan. The backcross population was partially maintained in small social groups and partially in isolation. The genome scan detected one previously reported quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 (pain1), but no additional QTLs were found. Interestingly, group caging introduced phenotypic noise large enough to completely mask the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL. The reason appears to be that group-caging animals from the low-autotomy strain together with animals from the high-autotomy strain dramatically increases autotomy in the otherwise low-autotomy mice (males or females). The converse, suppression of pain behaviour in the high-autotomy strain when caged with the low-autotomy strain was also observed, but only in females. Even in isolated mice, the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL was significant only in females. To determine why, we evaluated autotomy levels of females in 12 different inbred stains of mice and compared them to previously reported levels for males. Strikingly larger environmental variation was observed in males than in females for this pain phenotype. The high baseline variance in males can explain the difficulty in detecting the genetic effect, which was readily seen in females. Our study emphasizes the importance of sex and environment in the genetic analysis of pain.

  11. AFLP genome scan to detect genetic structure and candidate loci under selection for local adaptation of the invasive weed Mikania micrantha.

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    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Why some species become successful invaders is an important issue in invasive biology. However, limited genomic resources make it very difficult for identifying candidate genes involved in invasiveness. Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae, one of the world's most invasive weeds, has adapted rapidly in response to novel environments since its introduction to southern China. In its genome, we expect to find outlier loci under selection for local adaptation, critical to dissecting the molecular mechanisms of invasiveness. An explorative amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP genome scan was used to detect candidate loci under selection in 28 M. micrantha populations across its entire introduced range in southern China. We also estimated population genetic parameters, bottleneck signatures, and linkage disequilibrium. In binary characters, such as presence or absence of AFLP bands, if all four character combinations are present, it is referred to as a character incompatibility. Since character incompatibility is deemed to be rare in populations with extensive asexual reproduction, a character incompatibility analysis was also performed in order to infer the predominant mating system in the introduced M. micrantha populations. Out of 483 AFLP loci examined using stringent significance criteria, 14 highly credible outlier loci were identified by Dfdist and Bayescan. Moreover, remarkable genetic variation, multiple introductions, substantial bottlenecks and character compatibility were found to occur in M. micrantha. Thus local adaptation at the genome level indeed exists in M. micrantha, and may represent a major evolutionary mechanism of successful invasion. Interactions between genetic diversity, multiple introductions, and reproductive modes contribute to increase the capacity of adaptive evolution.

  12. Genome-wide scan for bats and dolphin to detect their genetic basis for new locomotive styles.

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    Yong-Yi Shen

    Full Text Available For most mammals, running is their major locomotive style, however, cetaceans and bats are two mammalian groups that have independently developed new locomotive styles (swimming and flying from their terrestrial ancestors. In this study, we used a genome-wide comparative analysis in an attempt to identify the selective imprint of the development of new locomotive styles by cetaceans and bats to adapt to their new ecological niches. We found that an elevated proportion of mitochondrion-associated genes show evidence of adaptive evolution in cetaceans and on the common ancestral lineage leading to bats, compared to other terrestrial mammals. This result is consistent with the fact that during the independent developments of swimming and flying in these two groups, the changes of energy metabolism ratios would be among the most important factors to overcome elevated energy demands. Furthermore, genes that show evidence of sequence convergence or parallel evolution in these two lineages were overrepresented in the categories of energy metabolism, muscle contraction, heart, and glucose metabolism, genes that perform functions which are essential for locomotion. In conclusion, our analyses showed that on the dolphin and bat lineages, genes associated with locomotion not only both show a greater propensity to adaptively evolve, but also show evidence of sequence convergence, which likely reflects a response to a common requirement during their development of these two drastic locomotive styles.

  13. AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus) from Madagascar: detecting genetic markers undergoing plague-mediated selection.

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    Tollenaere, C; Duplantier, J-M; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Brouat, C

    2011-03-01

    The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar's rural zones. Black rats are highly resistant to plague within the plague focus (central highland), whereas they are susceptible where the disease is absent (low altitude zone). To better understand plague wildlife circulation and host evolution in response to a highly virulent pathogen, we attempted to determine genetic markers associated with plague resistance in this species. To this purpose, we combined a population genomics approach and an association study, both performed on 249 AFLP markers, in Malagasy R. rattus. Simulated distributions of genetic differentiation were compared to observed data in four independent pairs, each consisting of one population from the plague focus and one from the plague-free zone. We found 22 loci (9% of 249) with higher differentiation in at least two independent population pairs or with combining P-values over the four pairs significant. Among the 22 outlier loci, 16 presented significant association with plague zone (plague focus vs. plague-free zone). Population genetic structure inferred from outlier loci was structured by plague zone, whereas the neutral loci dataset revealed structure by geography (eastern vs. western populations). A phenotype association study revealed that two of the 22 loci were significantly associated with differentiation between dying and surviving rats following experimental plague challenge. The 22 outlier loci identified in this study may undergo plague selective pressure either directly or more probably indirectly due to hitchhiking with selected loci. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. A genome scan to detect QTL affecting dairy traits in a dairy sheep backcross Sarda x Lacaune population

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    L. Mura

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently in Mediterranean countries as France, Italy and Spain, dairy sheep selection has been efficiently oriented towards milk yield and milk composition. More attention has been now paid to traits related to the reduction of production costs (milkability, functional traits, longevity, health (resistance to mastitis or parasitic diseases, safety of food (reduction in contaminants and quality (milk fatty acids composition. Therefore, research combining classical quantitative approach and QTL detection is needed, either on-farm by implementing experimental recording schemes......

  15. Genome-wide scan for serum ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: results from the Viva La Familia study.

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    Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald H H; Diego, Vincent P; Cai, Guowen; Mehta, Nitesh R; Haack, Karin; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n=1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducted according to standard procedures. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and serum ghrelin were 11+/-0.13 y, 25+/-0.24 kg/m2 and 38+/-0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Significant heritabilities (p<0.001) were obtained for BMI, weight, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and ghrelin. Bivariate analyses of ghrelin with adiposity traits showed significant negative genetic correlations (p<0.0001) with weight, BMI, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. A genome-wide scan for ghrelin detected significant linkage on chromosome 1p36.2 between STR markers D1S2697 and D1S199 (LOD=3.2). The same region on chromosome 1 was the site of linkage for insulin (LOD=3.3), insulinlike growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) (LOD=3.4), homeostatic model assessment method (HOMA) (LOD=2.9), and C-peptide (LOD=2.0). Several family-based studies have reported linkages for obesity-related phenotypes in the region of 1p36. These results indicate the importance of this region in relation to adiposity in children from the VFS.

  16. An Adaptive Algorithm to Detect Port Scans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单蓉胜; 李小勇; 李建华

    2004-01-01

    Detection of port scan is an important component in a network intrusion detection and prevention system. Traditional statistical methods can be easily evaded by stealthy scans and are prone to DeS attacks. This paper presents a new mechanism termed PSD(port scan detection), which is based on TCP packet anomaly evaluation. By learning the port distribution and flags of TCP packets arriving at the protected hosts, PSD can compute the anomaly score of each packet and effectively detect port scans including slow scans and stealthy scans. Experiments show that PSD has high detection accuracy and low detection latency.

  17. A novel method, digital genome scanning detects KRAS gene amplification in gastric cancers: involvement of overexpressed wild-type KRAS in downstream signaling and cancer cell growth

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    Yanagihara Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy affecting the general population worldwide. Aberrant activation of KRAS is a key factor in the development of many types of tumor, however, oncogenic mutations of KRAS are infrequent in gastric cancer. We have developed a novel quantitative method of analysis of DNA copy number, termed digital genome scanning (DGS, which is based on the enumeration of short restriction fragments, and does not involve PCR or hybridization. In the current study, we used DGS to survey copy-number alterations in gastric cancer cells. Methods DGS of gastric cancer cell lines was performed using the sequences of 5000 to 15000 restriction fragments. We screened 20 gastric cancer cell lines and 86 primary gastric tumors for KRAS amplification by quantitative PCR, and investigated KRAS amplification at the DNA, mRNA and protein levels by mutational analysis, real-time PCR, immunoblot analysis, GTP-RAS pull-down assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The effect of KRAS knock-down on the activation of p44/42 MAP kinase and AKT and on cell growth were examined by immunoblot and colorimetric assay, respectively. Results DGS analysis of the HSC45 gastric cancer cell line revealed the amplification of a 500-kb region on chromosome 12p12.1, which contains the KRAS gene locus. Amplification of the KRAS locus was detected in 15% (3/20 of gastric cancer cell lines (8–18-fold amplification and 4.7% (4/86 of primary gastric tumors (8–50-fold amplification. KRAS mutations were identified in two of the three cell lines in which KRAS was amplified, but were not detected in any of the primary tumors. Overexpression of KRAS protein correlated directly with increased KRAS copy number. The level of GTP-bound KRAS was elevated following serum stimulation in cells with amplified wild-type KRAS, but not in cells with amplified mutant KRAS. Knock-down of KRAS in gastric cancer cells that carried amplified wild

  18. Genomic scanning using AFLP to detect loci under selection in the moss Funaria hygrometrica along a climate gradient in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Spain.

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    Magdy, M; Werner, O; McDaniel, S F; Goffinet, B; Ros, R M

    2016-03-01

    The common cord moss Funaria hygrometrica has a worldwide distribution and thrives in a wide variety of environments. Here, we studied the genetic diversity in F. hygrometrica along an abiotic gradient in the Mediterranean high mountain of Sierra Nevada (Spain) using a genome scan method. Eighty-four samples from 17 locations from 24 to 2700 m were fingerprinted based on their amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) banding pattern. Using PCA and Bayesian inference we found that the genetic diversity was structured in three or four clusters, respectively. Using a genome scan method we identified 13 outlier loci, which showed a signature of positive selection. Partial Mantel tests were performed between the Euclidean distance matrices of geographic and climatic variables, versus the pair-wise genetic distance of the AFLP dataset and AFLP-positive outliers dataset. AFLP-positive outlier data were significantly correlated with the gradient of the climatic variables, suggesting adaptive variation among populations of F. hygrometrica along the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We highlight the additional analyses necessary to identify the nature of these loci, and their biological role in the adaptation process.

  19. A whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for gestation length and sow maternal ability related traits in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population.

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    Chen, C Y; Guo, Y M; Zhang, Z Y; Ren, J; Huang, L S

    2010-06-01

    Gestation length and maternal ability are important to improve the sow reproduction efficiency and their offspring survival. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for gestation length and maternal ability related traits including piglet survival rate and average body weight of piglets at weaning, more than 200 F2 sows from a White Duroc × Erhualian resource population were phenotyped. A genome-wide scan was performed with 194 microsatellite markers covering the whole pig genome. QTL analysis was carried out using a composite regression interval mapping method via QTL express. The results showed that total number of born piglets was significantly correlated with gestation length (r = -0.13, P gestation length. The QTL on SSC2 achieved the 5% genome-wide significant level and the QTL on SSC8 was consistent with previous reports. Four suggestive QTL were identified for maternal ability related traits including 1 QTL for survival rate of piglets at weaning on SSC8, 3 QTL for average body weight of piglet at weaning on SSC3, 11 and 13.

  20. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmeijer, AMA; Arngrimsson, R; Bastiaans, EJ; Frigge, ML; Pals, G; Sigurdardottir, S; Stefansson, H; Palsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, JG; Gulcher, [No Value; Dekker, GA; ten Kate, LP; Stefansson, K

    2001-01-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New

  1. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

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    Imumorin, I.G.; Kim, B.; Li, Y.; Koning, de D.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Donato, S.

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We

  2. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imumorin, I.G.; Kim, B.; Li, Y.; Koning, de D.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Donato, S.

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We ident

  3. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  4. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 complex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  5. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 com-plex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  6. Accounting for Linkage Disequilibrium in genome scans for selection without individual genotypes: the local score approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariello, María Inés; Boitard, Simon; Mercier, Sabine; Robelin, David; Faraut, Thomas; Arnould, Cécile; Recoquillay, Julien; Bouchez, Olivier; Salin, Gérald; Dehais, Patrice; Gourichon, David; Leroux, Sophie; Pitel, Frédérique; Leterrier, Christine; SanCristobal, Magali

    2017-04-10

    Detecting genomic footprints of selection is an important step in the understanding of evolution. Accounting for linkage disequilibrium in genome scans increases detection power, but haplotype-based methods require individual genotypes and are not applicable on pool-sequenced samples. We propose to take advantage of the local score approach to account for linkage disequilibrium in genome scans for selection, cumulating (possibly small) signals from single markers over a genomic segment, to clearly pinpoint a selection signal. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate that this approach detects selection with higher power than several state-of-the-art single marker, windowing or haplotype-based approaches. We illustrate this on two benchmark data sets including individual genotypes, for which we obtain similar results with the local score and one haplotype-based approach. Finally, we apply the local score approach to Pool-Seq data obtained from a divergent selection experiment on behavior in quail, and obtain precise and biologically coherent selection signals: while competing methods fail to highlight any clear selection signature, our method detects several regions involving genes known to act on social responsiveness or autistic traits. Although we focus here on the detection of positive selection from multiple population data, the local score approach is general and can be applied to other genome scans for selection or other genome-wide analyses such as GWAS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q R S T U V W X Y Z We want to hear from you You are here: News & Events 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of ...

  8. Asthma and atopy - a total genome scan for susceptibility genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schiøtz, P O;

    2002-01-01

    atopy, allergic asthma and increased total IgE. We performed a total genome scan using 446 microsatellite markers and obtained nonparametric linkage results from the MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. RESULTS: Our study revealed four candidate regions (MLS > 2) on chromosome 1p36, 3q21-q22, 5q31 and 6p24-p...

  9. Genetic analyses and quantitative trait loci detection, using a partial genome scan, for intramuscular fatty acid composition in Scottish Blackface sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichou, E; Richardson, R I; Nute, G R; Gibson, K P; Bishop, S C

    2006-12-01

    Genetic parameters for LM fatty acid composition were estimated in Scottish Blackface sheep, previously divergently selected for carcass lean content (LEAN and FAT lines). Furthermore, QTL were identified for the same fatty acids. Fatty acid phenotypic measurements were made on 350 male lambs, at approximately 8 mo of age, and 300 of these lambs were genotyped across candidate regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 14, 18, 20, and 21. Fatty acid composition measurements included in total 17 fatty acids of 3 categories: saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated. Total i.m. fat content was estimated as the sum of the fatty acids. The FAT line had a greater i.m. fat content and more oleic acid, but less linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3) than did the LEAN line. Saturated fatty acids were moderately heritable, ranging from 0.19 to 0.29, and total SFA were highly heritable (0.90). Monounsaturated fatty acids were moderately to highly heritable, with cis-vaccenic acid (18:1 n-7) being the most heritable (0.67), and total MUFA were highly heritable (0.73). Polyunsaturated fatty acids were also moderately to highly heritable; arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and CLA were the most heritable, with values of 0.60 and 0.48, respectively. The total PUFA were moderately heritable (0.40). The QTL analyses were performed using regression interval mapping techniques. In total, 21 chromosome-wide QTL were detected in 6 out of 8 chromosomal regions. The chromosome-wide, significant QTL affected 3 SFA, 5 MUFA, and 13 PUFA. The most significant result was a QTL affecting linolenic acid (18:3 n-3) on chromosome 2. This QTL segregated in 2 of the 9 families and explained 37.6% of the phenotypic variance. Also, 10 significant QTL were identified on chromosome 21, where 8 out of 10 QTL were segregating in the same families and detected at the same position. The results of this study demonstrate that altering carcass fatness will simultaneously change i.m. fat

  10. In silico whole genome association scan for murine prepulse inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Todd Webb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complex trait of prepulse inhibition (PPI is a sensory gating measure related to schizophrenia and can be measured in mice. Large-scale public repositories of inbred mouse strain genotypes and phenotypes such as PPI can be used to detect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs in silico. However, the method has been criticized for issues including insufficient number of strains, not controlling for false discoveries, the complex haplotype structure of inbred mice, and failing to account for genotypic and phenotypic subgroups. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have implemented a method that addresses these issues by incorporating phylogenetic analyses, multilevel regression with mixed effects, and false discovery rate (FDR control. A genome-wide scan for PPI was conducted using over 17,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 37 strains phenotyped. Eighty-nine SNPs were significant at a false discovery rate (FDR of 5%. After accounting for long-range linkage disequilibrium, we found 3 independent QTLs located on murine chromosomes 1 and 13. One of the PPI positives corresponds to a region of human chromosome 6p which includes DTNBP1, a gene implicated in schizophrenia. Another region includes the gene Tsn which alters PPI when knocked out. These genes also appear to have correlated expression with PPI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support the usefulness of using an improved in silico mapping method to identify QTLs for complex traits such as PPI which can be then be used for to help identify loci influencing schizophrenia in humans.

  11. AluScan: a method for genome-wide scanning of sequence and structure variations in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Lingling

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To complement next-generation sequencing technologies, there is a pressing need for efficient pre-sequencing capture methods with reduced costs and DNA requirement. The Alu family of short interspersed nucleotide elements is the most abundant type of transposable elements in the human genome and a recognized source of genome instability. With over one million Alu elements distributed throughout the genome, they are well positioned to facilitate genome-wide sequence amplification and capture of regions likely to harbor genetic variation hotspots of biological relevance. Results Here we report on the use of inter-Alu PCR with an enhanced range of amplicons in conjunction with next-generation sequencing to generate an Alu-anchored scan, or 'AluScan', of DNA sequences between Alu transposons, where Alu consensus sequence-based 'H-type' PCR primers that elongate outward from the head of an Alu element are combined with 'T-type' primers elongating from the poly-A containing tail to achieve huge amplicon range. To illustrate the method, glioma DNA was compared with white blood cell control DNA of the same patient by means of AluScan. The over 10 Mb sequences obtained, derived from more than 8,000 genes spread over all the chromosomes, revealed a highly reproducible capture of genomic sequences enriched in genic sequences and cancer candidate gene regions. Requiring only sub-micrograms of sample DNA, the power of AluScan as a discovery tool for genetic variations was demonstrated by the identification of 357 instances of loss of heterozygosity, 341 somatic indels, 274 somatic SNVs, and seven potential somatic SNV hotspots between control and glioma DNA. Conclusions AluScan, implemented with just a small number of H-type and T-type inter-Alu PCR primers, provides an effective capture of a diversity of genome-wide sequences for analysis. The method, by enabling an examination of gene-enriched regions containing exons, introns, and

  12. A genome-wide scan for Eysenckian personality dimensions in adolescent twin sibships: psychoticism, extraversion, neuroticism, and lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Zhu, Gu; Evans, David M; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margie J; Martin, Nick G

    2008-12-01

    We report the first genome-wide scan of adolescent personality. We conducted a genome-wide scan to detect linkage for measures of adolescent Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Lie from the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Data are based on 1,280 genotyped Australian adolescent twins and their siblings. The highest linkage peaks were found on chromosomes 16 and 19 for Neuroticism, on chromosomes 1, 7, 10, 13 m, and 18 for Psychoticism, and on chromosomes 2 and 3 for Extraversion.

  13. An EST-based genome scan using 454 sequencing in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, J; Grahame, J W; Butlin, R K

    2010-09-01

    Genome scans have been used in the studies of ecological speciation to find genomic regions ('outlier loci') showing reduced gene flow between divergent populations/species. High-throughput sequencing ('454') offers new opportunities in this field via transcriptome sequencing. Divergent ecotypes of the marine gastropod Littorina saxatilis represent a good example of incipient ecological speciation. We performed a 454-based genome scan between H and M ecotypes of L. saxatilis from the British Isles using cDNA of pooled individuals. Allele frequencies were calculated for 2454 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within 572 contigs, and 7% of loci were detected as outliers. Functional annotation of the contigs containing outlier SNPs showed that they included shell matrix and muscle proteins (lithostathine, mucin, titin), proteins involved in energetic metabolism (arginine kinase, NADH dehydrogenase) and reverse transcriptases. Follow-up investigations into these proteins and unannotated outliers will be a promising route in the study of ecological speciation in L. saxatilis.

  14. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  15. Asthma and atopy - a total genome scan for susceptibility genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schiøtz, P O

    2002-01-01

    . Investigation of different populations will further clarify the topic. We therefore evaluated allergic asthma and increased total and specific IgE in 39, 45 and 57 sib-pairs from 100 Danish allergy families. METHODS: Affected sib-pairs meeting a narrow phenotype definition were selected for the three phenotypes...... atopy, allergic asthma and increased total IgE. We performed a total genome scan using 446 microsatellite markers and obtained nonparametric linkage results from the MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. RESULTS: Our study revealed four candidate regions (MLS > 2) on chromosome 1p36, 3q21-q22, 5q31 and 6p24-p...

  16. Noninvasive genomic detection of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsman, W; Morhenn, V; Palmer, T; Walls, L; Hata, T; Zalla, J; Scheinberg, R; Sofen, H; Mraz, S; Gross, K; Rabinovitz, H; Polsky, D; Chang, S

    2011-04-01

    Early detection and treatment of melanoma is important for optimal clinical outcome, leading to biopsy of pigmented lesions deemed suspicious for the disease. The vast majority of such lesions are benign. Thus, a more objective and accurate means for detection of melanoma is needed to identify lesions for excision. To provide proof-of-principle that epidermal genetic information retrieval (EGIR™; DermTech International, La Jolla, CA, U.S.A.), a method that noninvasively samples cells from stratum corneum by means of adhesive tape stripping, can be used to discern melanomas from naevi. Skin overlying pigmented lesions clinically suspicious for melanoma was harvested using EGIR. RNA isolated from the tapes was amplified and gene expression profiled. All lesions were removed for histopathological evaluation. Supervised analysis of the microarray data identified 312 genes differentially expressed between melanomas, naevi and normal skin specimens (Pclassifier that discriminates these skin lesions. Upon testing with an independent dataset, this classifier discerned in situ and invasive melanomas from naevi with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity, with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0·955. These results demonstrate that EGIR-harvested specimens can be used to detect melanoma accurately by means of a 17-gene genomic biomarker. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  17. Genome scan for meat quality traits in Nelore beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizioto, P C; Decker, J E; Taylor, J F; Schnabel, R D; Mudadu, M A; Silva, F L; Mourão, G B; Coutinho, L L; Tholon, P; Sonstegard, T S; Rosa, A N; Alencar, M M; Tullio, R R; Medeiros, S R; Nassu, R T; Feijó, G L D; Silva, L O C; Torres, R A; Siqueira, F; Higa, R H; Regitano, L C A

    2013-11-01

    Meat quality traits are economically important because they affect consumers' acceptance, which, in turn, influences the demand for beef. However, selection to improve meat quality is limited by the small numbers of animals on which meat tenderness can be evaluated due to the cost of performing shear force analysis and the resultant damage to the carcass. Genome wide-association studies for Warner-Bratzler shear force measured at different times of meat aging, backfat thickness, ribeye muscle area, scanning parameters [lightness, redness (a*), and yellowness] to ascertain color characteristics of meat and fat, water-holding capacity, cooking loss (CL), and muscle pH were conducted using genotype data from the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip array to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) in all phenotyped Nelore cattle. Phenotype count for these animals ranged from 430 to 536 across traits. Meat quality traits in Nelore are controlled by numerous QTL of small effect, except for a small number of large-effect QTL identified for a*fat, CL, and pH. Genomic regions harboring these QTL and the pathways in which the genes from these regions act appear to differ from those identified in taurine cattle for meat quality traits. These results will guide future QTL mapping studies and the development of models for the prediction of genetic merit to implement genomic selection for meat quality in Nelore cattle.

  18. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamont R. Jones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63% were hypomethylated and 56 (37% hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation.

  19. High-throughput DNA Stretching in Continuous Elongational Flow for Genome Sequence Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Robert; Griffis, Joshua; Safranovitch, Mikhail; Malkin, Gene; Cameron, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    Genome Sequence Scanning (GSS) identifies and compares bacterial genomes by stretching long (60 - 300 kb) genomic DNA restriction fragments and scanning for site-selective fluorescent probes. Practical application of GSS requires: 1) high throughput data acquisition, 2) efficient DNA stretching, 3) reproducible DNA elasticity in the presence of intercalating fluorescent dyes. GSS utilizes a pseudo-two-dimensional micron-scale funnel with convergent sheathing flows to stretch one molecule at a time in continuous elongational flow and center the DNA stream over diffraction-limited confocal laser excitation spots. Funnel geometry has been optimized to maximize throughput of DNA within the desired length range (>10 million nucleobases per second). A constant-strain detection channel maximizes stretching efficiency by applying a constant parabolic tension profile to each molecule, minimizing relaxation and flow-induced tumbling. The effect of intercalator on DNA elasticity is experimentally controlled by reacting one molecule of DNA at a time in convergent sheathing flows of the dye. Derivations of accelerating flow and non-linear tension distribution permit alignment of detected fluorescence traces to theoretical templates derived from whole-genome sequence data.

  20. Parabola detection using matched filtering for ultrasound B-scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petcher, P A; Dixon, S

    2012-01-01

    Time of flight diffraction (ToFD) outputs B-scans using an ultrasound emitter and receiver at a constant separation, scanned over a sample surface parallel to the line between the transducers. The B-scan, with time and scan position axes, contains parabolic features characteristic of a point-like scatterer. Human vision effectively detects these shapes, but this is time consuming and requires training. A parabola matched filter has been developed that is simple to implement and transforms parabolic shapes to peaks whilst reducing noise in the scan. The scan can then be displayed as depth versus lateral position. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-random mate choice in humans: insights from a genome scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, R; Toupance, B; Chaix, R

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors influencing mate choice in humans. Still, there is evidence for non-random mate choice with respect to physical traits. In addition, some studies suggest that the Major Histocompatibility Complex may affect pair formation. Nowadays, the availability of high density genomic data sets gives the opportunity to scan the genome for signatures of non-random mate choice without prior assumptions on which genes may be involved, while taking into account socio-demographic factors. Here, we performed a genome scan to detect extreme patterns of similarity or dissimilarity among spouses throughout the genome in three populations of African, European American, and Mexican origins from the HapMap 3 database. Our analyses identified genes and biological functions that may affect pair formation in humans, including genes involved in skin appearance, morphogenesis, immunity and behaviour. We found little overlap between the three populations, suggesting that the biological functions potentially influencing mate choice are population specific, in other words are culturally driven. Moreover, whenever the same functional category of genes showed a significant signal in two populations, different genes were actually involved, which suggests the possibility of evolutionary convergences.

  2. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  3. A genome scan for positive selection in thoroughbred horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Gu

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred horses have been selected for exceptional racing performance resulting in system-wide structural and functional adaptations contributing to elite athletic phenotypes. Because selection has been recent and intense in a closed population that stems from a small number of founder animals Thoroughbreds represent a unique population within which to identify genomic contributions to exercise-related traits. Employing a population genetics-based hitchhiking mapping approach we performed a genome scan using 394 autosomal and X chromosome microsatellite loci and identified positively selected loci in the extreme tail-ends of the empirical distributions for (1 deviations from expected heterozygosity (Ewens-Watterson test in Thoroughbred (n = 112 and (2 global differentiation among four geographically diverse horse populations (F(ST. We found positively selected genomic regions in Thoroughbred enriched for phosphoinositide-mediated signalling (3.2-fold enrichment; P<0.01, insulin receptor signalling (5.0-fold enrichment; P<0.01 and lipid transport (2.2-fold enrichment; P<0.05 genes. We found a significant overrepresentation of sarcoglycan complex (11.1-fold enrichment; P<0.05 and focal adhesion pathway (1.9-fold enrichment; P<0.01 genes highlighting the role for muscle strength and integrity in the Thoroughbred athletic phenotype. We report for the first time candidate athletic-performance genes within regions targeted by selection in Thoroughbred horses that are principally responsible for fatty acid oxidation, increased insulin sensitivity and muscle strength: ACSS1 (acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 1, ACTA1 (actin, alpha 1, skeletal muscle, ACTN2 (actinin, alpha 2, ADHFE1 (alcohol dehydrogenase, iron containing, 1, MTFR1 (mitochondrial fission regulator 1, PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 and TNC (tenascin C. Understanding the genetic basis for exercise adaptation will be crucial for the identification of genes

  4. Genome scan for parent-of-origin QTL effects on bovine growth and carcass traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhide G. Imumorin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Parent-of-origin effects (POE such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus x Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs of which 6 were significant at 5% genome-wide level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 [linkage region of 0 – 9 cM; genomic region of 5.0 – 10.8 Mb], for which only one imprinted orthologue is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4% ~ 5.1% of each trait’s phenotypic variance. Comparative in-silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologues map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only 2 (GNAS and PEG3 have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologues of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits.

  5. Genome Scan for Parent-of-Origin QTL Effects on Bovine Growth and Carcass Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imumorin, Ikhide G; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yun-Mi; De Koning, Dirk-Jan; van Arendonk, Johan A; De Donato, Marcos; Taylor, Jeremy F; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which six were significant at 5% genome-wide (GW) level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide (CW) significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 (linkage region of 0-9 cM; genomic region of 5.0-10.8 Mb), for which only one imprinted ortholog is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4 ∼ 5.1% of each trait's phenotypic variance. Comparative in silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologs map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only two (GNAS and PEG3) have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologs of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits.

  6. Acquired tracheomalacia: detection by expiratory CT scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, S L; Shepard, J A; Ginns, L C; Moore, R H; Halpern, E; Grillo, H C; McLoud, T C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether cross-sectional area and coronal and sagittal diameter measurements of the trachea between inspiration and end-expiration on CT are significantly different between patients with acquired tracheomalacia and those without this condition. Inspiratory and end-expiratory CT scans of the trachea of 23 normal patients and 10 patients with acquired tracheomalacia were analyzed. Percent changes in cross-sectional area, coronal, and sagittal diameters were calculated. For patients with tracheomalacia, mean percent changes in the upper and middle trachea between inspiration and expiration were 49 and 44%; mean changes in the coronal and sagittal diameters in the upper and middle tracheal were 4 and 10% and 39 and 54%, respectively. Control group mean percent changes in the upper and middle tracheal area were 12 and 14%, respectively, and mean changes in the coronal and sagittal diameters in the upper and middle trachea were 4 and 4% and 11 and 13%, respectively. Significant differences were calculated for changes in cross-sectional area and sagittal diameter between groups (p 18% change in the upper trachea and 28% change in the midtrachea between inspiration and expiration were observed; the probability of tracheomalacia was 89-100%. The probability of tracheomalacia was > 89%, especially if the change in sagittal diameter was > 28%. By measuring changes in tracheal cross-sectional area and sagittal diameters between inspiratory and end-expiratory CT, a significant difference can be identified between normal patients and those with acquired tracheomalacia.

  7. A flexibly shaped spatial scan statistic for detecting clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Kunihiko

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff has been applied to a wide variety of epidemiological studies for cluster detection. This scan statistic, however, uses a circular window to define the potential cluster areas and thus has difficulty in correctly detecting actual noncircular clusters. A recent proposal by Duczmal and Assunção for detecting noncircular clusters is shown to detect a cluster of very irregular shape that is much larger than the true cluster in our experiences. Methods We propose a flexibly shaped spatial scan statistic that can detect irregular shaped clusters within relatively small neighborhoods of each region. The performance of the proposed spatial scan statistic is compared to that of Kulldorff's circular spatial scan statistic with Monte Carlo simulation by considering several circular and noncircular hot-spot cluster models. For comparison, we also propose a new bivariate power distribution classified by the number of regions detected as the most likely cluster and the number of hot-spot regions included in the most likely cluster. Results The circular spatial scan statistics shows a high level of accuracy in detecting circular clusters exactly. The proposed spatial scan statistic is shown to have good usual powers plus the ability to detect the noncircular hot-spot clusters more accurately than the circular one. Conclusion The proposed spatial scan statistic is shown to work well for small to moderate cluster size, up to say 30. For larger cluster sizes, the method is not practically feasible and a more efficient algorithm is needed.

  8. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  9. Scanning the macula for detecting glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viquar U Begum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the advent of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT, there has been a renewed interest in macular region for detection of glaucoma. However, most macular SDOCT parameters currently are thickness parameters which evaluate thinning of the macular layers but do not quantify the extent of area over which the thinning has occurred. We therefore calculated a new macular parameter, "ganglion cell complex surface abnormality ratio (GCC SAR" that represented the surface area over which the macular thickness was decreased. Purpose: To evaluate the ability of SAR in detecting perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Design: Retrospective image analysis. Materials and Methods: 68 eyes with perimetric glaucoma, 62 eyes with preperimetric glaucoma and 165 control eyes underwent GCC imaging with SDOCT. SAR was calculated as the ratio of the abnormal to total area on the GCC significance map. Statistical Analysis: Diagnostic ability of SAR in glaucoma was compared against that of the standard parameters generated by the SDOCT software using area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC and sensitivities at fixed specificities. Results: AUC of SAR (0.91 was statistically significantly better than that of GCC average thickness (0.86, P = 0.001 and GCC global loss volume (GLV; 0.88, P = 0.01 in differentiating perimetric glaucoma from control eyes. In differentiating preperimetric glaucoma from control eyes, AUC of SAR (0.72 was comparable to that of GCC average thickness (0.70, P > 0.05 and GLV (0.72, P > 0.05. Sensitivities at specificities of 80% and 95% of SAR were comparable (P > 0.05 for all comparisons to that of GCC average thickness and GLV in diagnosing perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Conclusion: GCC SAR had a better ability to diagnose perimetric glaucoma compared to the SDOCT software provided global GCC parameters. However, in diagnosing preperimetric glaucoma, the ability of SAR was similar to that of

  10. Genome scan of M. tuberculosis infection and disease in Ugandans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Catherine M; Zalwango, Sarah; Malone, LaShaunda L; Won, Sungho; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mugerwa, Roy D; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Thompson, Cheryl L; Cartier, Kevin C; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K; Boom, W Henry; Whalen, Christopher C

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI) or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-); this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate). We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10(-3)) was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002). We also observed linkage at the nominal alpha = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02), IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01), IL12BR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.006), IL12A (TB p = 0.02) and IFNGR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.002). These results confirm not

  11. Genome scan of M. tuberculosis infection and disease in Ugandans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Stein

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-; this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate. We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10(-3 was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002. We also observed linkage at the nominal alpha = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02, IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01, IL12BR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.006, IL12A (TB p = 0.02 and IFNGR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.002. These results confirm

  12. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  13. Fluorescence detection in capillary arrays based on galvanometer step scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, G; Yeung, E S

    2001-10-01

    A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluoresceins is 3 x 10(-11) M (S/N = 3) for 5 mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  14. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  15. Diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas by CT scan. Detection of the microadenoma by high resolution coronal scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, K.; Uozumi, T. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-10-01

    Following a detection of abnormality of pituitary hormone, it is very important to know whether the abnormality is due to pituitary microadenoma for deciding treatment methods. To diagnose pituitary microadenoma, polytomography of the sella turcica has been used. The recently developed high resolution coronal CT scan is prone to be more valuable in diagnosing microadenoma. New findings by this method were reported.

  16. Whole Genome PCR Scanning (WGPS) of C. burnetii strains from ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Adam, Gilbert; Angen, Oysten; Aspán, A.; Bossers, A.; Roest, H.I.J.; Prigent, Myriam; Thiéry, R.; Rousset, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever, a zoonosis that spreads from ruminants to humans via the inhalation of aerosols contaminated by livestock's birth products. This study aimed to compare the genomes of strains isolated from ruminants by “Whole Genome PCR Scanning (WGPS)” in order t

  17. Cross-laboratory validation of the OncoScan® FFPE Assay, a multiplex tool for whole genome tumour profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Joseph M.; Oumie, Assa; Togneri, Fiona S; Vasques, Fabiana Ramos; Hau, Debra; Taylor, Morag; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Southward, Katie; Medlow, Paul; McGreeghan-Crosby, Keith; Halfpenny, Iris; McMullan, Dominic J.; Quirke, Phil; Keating, Katherine E; Griffiths, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoption of new technology in both basic research and clinical settings requires rigorous validation of analytical performance. The OncoScan® FFPE Assay is a multiplexing tool that offers genome-wide copy number and loss of heterozygosity detection, as well as identification of frequently tested somatic mutations. Methods In this study, 162 formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples, representing six different tumour types, were profiled in triplicate across three independent laborat...

  18. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  19. Processing of Graphene combining Optical Detection and Scanning Probe Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Sören

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental setup tailored for robotic processing of graphene with in-situ vision based control. A robust graphene detection approach is presented applying multiple image processing operations of the visual feedback provided by a high-resolution light microscope. Detected graphene flakes can be modified using a scanning probe based lithographical process that is directly linked to the in-situ optical images. The results of this process are discussed with respect to further application scenarios.

  20. Asteroid detection using a single multi-wavelength CCD scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Asteroid detection is a topic of great interest due to the possibility of diverting possibly dangerous asteroids or mining potentially lucrative ones. Currently, asteroid detection is generally performed by taking multiple images of the same patch of sky separated by 10-15 minutes, then subtracting the images to find movement. However, this is time consuming because of the need to revisit the same area multiple times per night. This paper describes an algorithm that can detect asteroids using a single CCD camera scan, thus cutting down on the time and cost of an asteroid survey. The algorithm is based on the fact that some telescopes scan the sky at multiple wavelengths with a small time separation between the wavelength components. As a result, an object moving with sufficient speed will appear in different places in different wavelength components of the same image. Using image processing techniques we detect the centroids of points of light in the first component and compare these positions to the centroids in the other components using a nearest neighbor algorithm. The algorithm was used on a test set of 49 images obtained from the Sloan telescope in New Mexico and found 100% of known asteroids with only 3 false positives. This algorithm has the advantage of decreasing the amount of time required to perform an asteroid scan, thus allowing more sky to be scanned in the same amount of time or freeing a telescope for other pursuits.

  1. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Georges

    Full Text Available A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  2. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Anouk; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naïma; Karim, Latifa; Georges, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  3. A scan statistic to extract causal gene clusters from case-control genome-wide rare CNV data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Stephen W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several statistical tests have been developed for analyzing genome-wide association data by incorporating gene pathway information in terms of gene sets. Using these methods, hundreds of gene sets are typically tested, and the tested gene sets often overlap. This overlapping greatly increases the probability of generating false positives, and the results obtained are difficult to interpret, particularly when many gene sets show statistical significance. Results We propose a flexible statistical framework to circumvent these problems. Inspired by spatial scan statistics for detecting clustering of disease occurrence in the field of epidemiology, we developed a scan statistic to extract disease-associated gene clusters from a whole gene pathway. Extracting one or a few significant gene clusters from a global pathway limits the overall false positive probability, which results in increased statistical power, and facilitates the interpretation of test results. In the present study, we applied our method to genome-wide association data for rare copy-number variations, which have been strongly implicated in common diseases. Application of our method to a simulated dataset demonstrated the high accuracy of this method in detecting disease-associated gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. Conclusions The scan statistic approach proposed here shows a high level of accuracy in detecting gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. This study has provided a sound statistical framework for analyzing genome-wide rare CNV data by incorporating topological information on the gene pathway.

  4. The detection of large deletions or duplications in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A L; Barton, D E; Cockburn, D J; Taylor, G R

    2002-11-01

    While methods for the detection of point mutations and small insertions or deletions in genomic DNA are well established, the detection of larger (>100 bp) genomic duplications or deletions can be more difficult. Most mutation scanning methods use PCR as a first step, but the subsequent analyses are usually qualitative rather than quantitative. Gene dosage methods based on PCR need to be quantitative (i.e., they should report molar quantities of starting material) or semi-quantitative (i.e., they should report gene dosage relative to an internal standard). Without some sort of quantitation, heterozygous deletions and duplications may be overlooked and therefore be under-ascertained. Gene dosage methods provide the additional benefit of reporting allele drop-out in the PCR. This could impact on SNP surveys, where large-scale genotyping may miss null alleles. Here we review recent developments in techniques for the detection of this type of mutation and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize that comprehensive mutation analysis should include scanning for large insertions and deletions and duplications. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audemard Eric

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS  Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations.

  6. A study on diffuse source detection by HXMT scanning observation

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Ju; Wu, Mei; Song, Li-Ming; Huo, Zhuo-Xi

    2015-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) is a collimated scan X-ray satellite mainly devoted to a sensitive all-sky survey and pointed observations in 1-250 keV. We expect various diffuse sources to be detected in its scanning observations due to the large rigidity factor of the telescope. Diffuse source detection performance of HXMT scanning observation depends not only on the instrument but also on its data analysis method since images have to be reconstructed from HXMT observed data. In this paper, we introduce a multiscale maximum entropy (MSME) algorithm for HXMT image restoration and propose an improved method, ensemble multiscale maximum entropy (EMSME) method, to alleviate the problem of mode mixing exiting in MSME. Simulation have been performed on the detection of the diffuse source Cen A by HXMT in the all-sky survey mode. The results show that the MSME method is adapted to the deconvolution task of HXMT for diffuse source detection and the improved method could suppress noise and improve the cor...

  7. Colitis detection on abdominal CT scans by rich feature hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lay, Nathan; Wei, Zhuoshi; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Colitis is inflammation of the colon due to neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn disease), infection and immune compromise. Colitis is often associated with thickening of the colon wall. The wall of a colon afflicted with colitis is much thicker than normal. For example, the mean wall thickness in Crohn disease is 11-13 mm compared to the wall of the normal colon that should measure less than 3 mm. Colitis can be debilitating or life threatening, and early detection is essential to initiate proper treatment. In this work, we apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals to detect potential colitis on CT scans. Our method first generates around 3000 category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using selective search. Then, a fixed-length feature vector is extracted from each region proposal using a CNN. Finally, each region proposal is classified and assigned a confidence score with linear SVMs. We applied the detection method to 260 images from 26 CT scans of patients with colitis for evaluation. The detection system can achieve 0.85 sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for colon cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Walters, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the potential to discriminate between cancerous and noncancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. However, to date, these techniques have not been effectively translated to real-time endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents new technology that may be well suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the initial feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging for measuring changes in fluorescence excitation spectrum concurrent with colonic adenocarcinoma using a small pre-pilot-scale sample size. Ex vivo analysis was performed using resected pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) permanent sections. Specimens were imaged using a custom hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation-scanning microscope system. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation range of 390 to 450 nm that could be the basis for wavelength-dependent detection of colorectal cancers. Hence, excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for discriminating adenocarcinoma from surrounding normal colonic mucosa, but further studies will be required to evaluate the accuracy of this approach using a larger patient cohort.

  9. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, K J; Hulme, D J; Callaghan, M J; Leish, Z; Lenane, I; Windon, R G; Maddox, J F

    2002-04-01

    A genome linkage scan was carried out using a resource flock of 1029 sheep in six half-sib families. The families were offspring of sires derived by crossing divergent lines of sheep selected for response to challenge with the intestinal parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis. All animals in the resource flock were phenotypically assessed for worm resistance soon after weaning using a vaccination/challenge regime. After correcting for fixed effects using a least squares linear model the faecal egg count data obtained following the first challenge and the faecal egg count data obtained after the second challenge were designated Trait 1 and Trait 2, respectively. A total of 472 lambs drawn from the phenotypic extremes of the Trait 2 faecal egg count distribution were genotyped with a panel of 133 microsatellite markers covering all 26 sheep autosomes. Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for each of the faecal egg count traits was determined using interval analysis with the Animap program with recombination rates between markers derived from an existing marker map. No chromosomal regions attained genome-wide significance for QTL influencing either of the traits. However, one region attained chromosome-wide significance and five other regions attained point-wise significance for the presence of QTL affecting parasite resistance.

  10. Efficient strategies for genome scanning using maximum-likelihood affected-sib-pair analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmans, P.; Craddock, N. [Univ. of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Detection of linkage with a systematic genome scan in nuclear families including an affected sibling pair is an important initial step on the path to cloning susceptibility genes for complex genetic disorders, and it is desirable to optimize the efficiency of such studies. The aim is to maximize power while simultaneously minimizing the total number of genotypings and probability of type I error. One approach to increase efficiency, which has been investigated by other workers, is grid tightening: a sample is initially typed using a coarse grid of markers, and promising results are followed up by use of a finer grid. Another approach, not previously considered in detail in the context of an affected-sib-pair genome scan for linkage, is sample splitting: a portion of the sample is typed in the screening stage, and promising results are followed up in the whole sample. In the current study, we have used computer simulation to investigate the relative efficiency of two-stage strategies involving combinations of both grid tightening and sample splitting and found that the optimal strategy incorporates both approaches. In general, typing half the sample of affected pairs with a coarse grid of markers in the screening stage is an efficient strategy under a variety of conditions. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds, it is most efficient not to type parents in the screening stage. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold (e.g., because of stratification) failure to type parents in the first stage increases the amount of genotyping required, although the overall probability of type I error is not greatly increased, provided the parents are used in the final analysis. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  12. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  13. Surface flaw detection in structural ceramics by scanning photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Wakefield, T. D.; Silversmith, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser-scanned photoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect tightly closed surface cracks in three structural ceramic materials: sintered silicon nitride, reaction-bonded silicon nitride, and sintered silicon carbide. It is found that the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal from the flaws is greater for the silicon nitrides than for silicon carbide, which is attributed to the lower thermal diffusivity of silicon nitride as well as differences in the grain size distribution and chemical composition. Signal amplitude, reproducibility, and signal-to-noise ratio are acceptable for effective flaw detection

  14. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates

    OpenAIRE

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (i...

  15. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Aggarwal; Ramakrishna Ramaswamy

    2002-02-01

    We compare the annotation of three complete genomes using the ab initio methods of gene identification GeneScan and GLIMMER. The annotation given in GenBank, the standard against which these are compared, has been made using GeneMark. We find a number of novel genes which are predicted by both methods used here, as well as a number of genes that are predicted by GeneMark, but are not identified by either of the nonconsensus methods that we have used. The three organisms studied here are all prokaryotic species with fairly compact genomes. The Fourier measure forms the basis for an efficient non-consensus method for gene prediction, and the algorithm GeneScan exploits this measure. We have bench-marked this program as well as GLIMMER using 3 complete prokaryotic genomes. An effort has also been made to study the limitations of these techniques for complete genome analysis. GeneScan and GLIMMER are of comparable accuracy insofar as gene-identification is concerned, with sensitivities and specificities typically greater than 0.9. The number of false predictions (both positive and negative) is higher for GeneScan as compared to GLIMMER, but in a significant number of cases, similar results are provided by the two techniques. This suggests that there could be some as-yet unidentified additional genes in these three genomes, and also that some of the putative identifications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail.

  16. A Genome-wide Pleiotropy Scan for Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Travis, Ruth C; Campa, Daniele; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Siddiq, Afshan; Papatheodorou, Stefania I.; Stanford, Janet L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hunter, DavidJ.; Koutros, Stella; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wacholder, Sholom; Key, Timothy J.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K

    2014-01-01

    Background No single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific for aggressive prostate cancer have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Objective To test if SNPs associated with other traits may also affect the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Design, setting, and participants SNPs implicated in any phenotype other than prostate cancer (p ≤ 10−7) were identified through the catalog of published GWAS and tested in 2891 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4592 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). The 40 most significant SNPs were followed up in 4872 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 24 534 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aggressive prostate cancer were estimated. Results and limitations A total of 4666 SNPs were evaluated by the BPC3. Two signals were seen in regions already reported for prostate cancer risk. rs7014346 at 8q24.21 was marginally associated with aggressive prostate cancer in the BPC3 trial (p = 1.6 × 10-6), whereas after meta-analysis by PRACTICAL the summary OR was 1.21 (95%CI 1.16–1.27; p = 3.22 × 10−18). rs9900242 at 17q24.3 was also marginally associated with aggressive disease in the meta-analysis (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86–0.94; p = 2.5 × 10−6). Neither of these SNPs remained statistically significant when conditioning on correlated known prostate cancer SNPs. The meta-analysis by BPC3 and PRACTICAL identified a third promising signal, marked by rs16844874 at 2q34, independent of known prostate cancer loci (OR 1.12,95% CI 1.06–1.19; p = 4.67 × 10−5); it has been shown that SNPs correlated with this signal affect glycine concentrations. The main limitation is the heterogeneity in the definition of aggressive prostate cancer between BPC3 and PRACTICAL. Conclusions We did

  17. X-Ray Scan Detection for Cargo Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Juan D.; Miller, Steven D.

    2011-04-18

    ABSTRACT The increase of terrorism and its global impact has made the determination of the contents of cargo containers a necessity. Existing technology allows non-intrusive inspections to determine the contents of a container rapidly and accurately. However, some cargo shipments are exempt from such inspections. Hence, there is a need for a technology that enables rapid and accurate means of detecting whether such containers were non-intrusively inspected. Non-intrusive inspections are most commonly performed utilizing high powered X-ray equipment. The challenge is creating a device that can detect short duration X-ray scans while maintaining a portable, battery powered, low cost, and easy to use platform. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a methodology and prototype device focused on this challenge. The prototype, developed by PNNL, is a battery powered electronic device that continuously measures its X-ray and Gamma exposure, calculates the dose equivalent rate, and makes a determination of whether the device has been exposed to the amount of radiation experienced during an X-ray inspection. Once an inspection is detected, the device will record a timestamp of the event and relay the information to authorized personnel via a visual alert, USB connection, and/or wireless communication. The results of this research demonstrate that PNNL’s prototype device can be effective at determining whether a container was scanned by X-ray equipment typically used for cargo container inspections. This paper focuses on laboratory measurements and test results acquired with the PNNL prototype device using several X-ray radiation levels. Keywords: Radiation, Scan, X-ray, Gamma, Detection, Cargo, Container, Wireless, RF

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Damage Detection Using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Vanlanduit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV can perform vibration measurements with a high spatial resolution, it is an ideal instrument to accurately locate damage in a structure. Unfortunately, the use of linear damage detection features, as for instance FRFs or modal parameters, does not always lead to a successful identification of the damage location. Measurement noise and nonlinear distortions can make the damage detection procedure difficult. In this article, a combined linear-nonlinear strategy to detect and locate damage in a structure with the aid of a SLV, will be proposed. To minimize the effect of noise, the modal parameters will be estimated using a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. Both noise and nonlinear distortion levels are extracted using the residuals of a two-dimensional spline fit. The validation of the technique will be performed on SLV measurements of a delaminated composite plate.

  19. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  20. Comparative genomic hybridization: Detection of segmental aneusomies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, J.E.; Magrane, G.G.; Gray, J.W. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been used successfully to detect whole chromosome and segmental aneusomies. However, its sensitivity for detection of segmental aneusomies is still not well known. We present here an analysis of CGH sensitivity with emphasis on detection of abnormalities commonly found during pre-and neo-natal diagnosis. CGH is performed by hybridizing green and red fluorescing test and normal DNA samples, respectively, to normal metaphase spreads and measuring green:red fluorescence ratios along all chromosomes. The ratios are normalized such that 2 copies of a normal chromosome region in the test sample gives a ratio of 1.0. Alterations in test vs. control gene copy number range from 1.5 [trisomy] to 0.5 [monosomy]. Clinical samples analyzed included Wolf Hirschhorn (4p-), Cri du Chat (5p-) and DiGeorge (22q-). In addition, 7 cell lines with chromosome 21 segmental aneusomies were analyzed. These included 3 with terminal duplications, 1 with a terminal deletion, 1 with an interstitial deletion and 2 with interstitial amplifications. The DiGeorge deletion was the only deletion not deleted by CGH. This is not surprising as standard G banding does not routinely detect this 1-2 megabase deletion. The 4p- and 5p- monosomies were detected and breakpoints correctly assigned prospectively. Proximal alterations involving 21q22.11 are unambiguously defined. Specifically, two interstitial aneusomies involving this region are detected. Studies involving late prophase chromosome normal spreads gave identical breakpoints. Thus, analysis of extended chromosomes did not improve the sensitivity of the technique. Taken together, these data suggest that CGH can detect segmental aneusomies greater than 8 megabases in extent. Smaller aneusomies can, at times, be detected. Work is now underway to modify the analysis software to increase sensitivity and to decrease the amount of material needed for analysis.

  1. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Børglum Anders D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. Results This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Conclusion Our study indicates that archived DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  2. Genome scans for divergent selection in natural populations of the widespread hardwood species Eucalyptus grandis (Myrtaceae) using microsatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhijiao; Zhang, Miaomiao; Li, Fagen; Weng, Qijie; Zhou, Chanpin; Li, Mei; Li, Jie; Huang, Huanhua; Mo, Xiaoyong; Gan, Siming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of loci or genes under natural selection is important for both understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation and practical applications, and genome scans provide a powerful means for such identification purposes. In this study, genome-wide simple sequence repeats markers (SSRs) were used to scan for molecular footprints of divergent selection in Eucalyptus grandis, a hardwood species occurring widely in costal areas from 32° S to 16° S in Australia. High population diversity levels and weak population structure were detected with putatively neutral genomic SSRs. Using three FST outlier detection methods, a total of 58 outlying SSRs were collectively identified as loci under divergent selection against three non-correlated climatic variables, namely, mean annual temperature, isothermality and annual precipitation. Using a spatial analysis method, nine significant associations were revealed between FST outlier allele frequencies and climatic variables, involving seven alleles from five SSR loci. Of the five significant SSRs, two (EUCeSSR1044 and Embra394) contained alleles of putative genes with known functional importance for response to climatic factors. Our study presents critical information on the population diversity and structure of the important woody species E. grandis and provides insight into the adaptive responses of perennial trees to climatic variations. PMID:27748400

  3. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Smith, Susan [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. M. [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Dempfle, Astrid; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Bakker, Steven C; Banaschewski, Tobias; Biederman, Joseph; Buitelaar, Jan; Castellanos, F Xavier; Doyle, Alysa; Ebstein, Richard P; Ekholm, Jenny; Forabosco, Paola; Franke, Barbara; Freitag, Christine; Friedel, Susann; Gill, Michael; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Jacob, Christian; Lesch, Klaus Peter; Loo, Sandra K; Lopera, Francisco; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Meyer, Jobst; Mick, Eric; Miranda, Ana; Muenke, Maximilian; Mulas, Fernando; Nelson, Stanley F; Nguyen, T Trang; Oades, Robert D; Ogdie, Matthew N; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Roeyers, Herbert; Romanos, Marcel; Rothenberger, Aribert; Schäfer, Helmut; Sergeant, Joseph; Sinke, Richard J; Smalley, Susan L; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; van der Meulen, Emma; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Lewis, Cathryn M; Faraone, Stephen V; Asherson, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Genetic contribution to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. Seven independent genome-wide linkage scans have been performed to map loci that increase the risk for ADHD. Although significant linkage signals were identified in some of the studies, th

  5. Genetic dissection of Al tolerance QTLs in the maize genome by high density SNP scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is an important limitation to food security in the tropical and subtropical regions. High Al saturation in acid soils limits root development and its ability to uptake water and nutrients. In this study, we present a genome scan for Al tolerance loci with over 50,000 GBS-based...

  6. A novel scan statistics approach for clustering identification and comparison in binary genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Danilo; Di Serio, Clelia

    2016-09-22

    In biomedical research a relevant issue is to identify time intervals or portions of a n-dimensional support where a particular event of interest is more likely to occur than expected. Algorithms that require to specify a-priori number/dimension/length of clusters assumed for the data suffer from a high degree of arbitrariness whenever no precise information are available, and this may strongly affect final estimation on parameters. Within this framework, spatial scan-statistics have been proposed in the literature, representing a valid non-parametric alternative. We adapt the so called Bernoulli-model scan statistic to the genomic field and we propose a multivariate extension, named Relative Scan Statistics, for the comparison of two series of Bernoulli r.v. defined over a common support, with the final goal of highlighting unshared event rate variations. Using a probabilistic approach based on success probability estimates and comparison (likelihood based), we can exploit an hypothesis testing procedure to identify clusters and relative clusters. Both the univariate and the novel multivariate extension of the scan statistic confirm previously published findings. The method described in the paper represents a challenging application of scan statistics framework to problem related to genomic data. From a biological perspective, these tools offer the possibility to clinicians and researcher to improve their knowledge on viral vectors integrations process, allowing to focus their attention to restricted over-targeted portion of the genome.

  7. Identifying signatures of natural selection in Tibetan and Andean populations using dense genome scan data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Bigham

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude hypoxia (reduced inspired oxygen tension due to decreased barometric pressure exerts severe physiological stress on the human body. Two high-altitude regions where humans have lived for millennia are the Andean Altiplano and the Tibetan Plateau. Populations living in these regions exhibit unique circulatory, respiratory, and hematological adaptations to life at high altitude. Although these responses have been well characterized physiologically, their underlying genetic basis remains unknown. We performed a genome scan to identify genes showing evidence of adaptation to hypoxia. We looked across each chromosome to identify genomic regions with previously unknown function with respect to altitude phenotypes. In addition, groups of genes functioning in oxygen metabolism and sensing were examined to test the hypothesis that particular pathways have been involved in genetic adaptation to altitude. Applying four population genetic statistics commonly used for detecting signatures of natural selection, we identified selection-nominated candidate genes and gene regions in these two populations (Andeans and Tibetans separately. The Tibetan and Andean patterns of genetic adaptation are largely distinct from one another, with both populations showing evidence of positive natural selection in different genes or gene regions. Interestingly, one gene previously known to be important in cellular oxygen sensing, EGLN1 (also known as PHD2, shows evidence of positive selection in both Tibetans and Andeans. However, the pattern of variation for this gene differs between the two populations. Our results indicate that several key HIF-regulatory and targeted genes are responsible for adaptation to high altitude in Andeans and Tibetans, and several different chromosomal regions are implicated in the putative response to selection. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaption and provide a basis for future genotype/phenotype association

  8. Development of Genome-Wide Scan for Selection Signature in Farm Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-guang

    2013-01-01

    Identifying targets of positive selection in farm animals has, until recently, been frustratingly slow, relying on the analysis of individual candidate genes. Genomics, however, has provided the necessary resources to systematically interrogate the entire genome for signatures of selection. This review described important recent results derived from the application of genome-wide scan to the study of genetic changes in farm animals. These included findings of regions of the genome that showed breed differentiation, evidence of selective sweeps within individual genomes and signatures of demographic events. Particular attention is focused on the study of the implications for domestication. To date, sixteen genome-wide scans for recent or ongoing positive selection have been performed in farm animals. A key challenge is to begin synthesizing these newly constructed maps of selection into a coherent narrative of animal breed evolutionary history and derive a deeper mechanistic understanding of how animal populations improve or evolve. The major insights from the surveyed studies are highlighted and directions for future study are suggested.

  9. Genome-wide scans using archived neonatal dried blood spot samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiuf Carsten

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of disease susceptible genes requires access to DNA from numerous well-characterised subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot samples from national newborn screening programs may provide DNA from entire populations and medical registries the corresponding clinical information. The amount of DNA available in these samples is however rarely sufficient for reliable genome-wide scans, and whole-genome amplification may thus be necessary. This study assess the quality of DNA obtained from different amplification protocols by evaluating fidelity and robustness of the genotyping of 610,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the Illumina Infinium HD Human610-Quad BeadChip. Whole-genome amplified DNA from 24 neonatal dried blood spot samples stored between 15 to 25 years was tested, and high-quality genomic DNA from 8 of the same individuals was used as reference. Results Using 3.2 mm disks from dried blood spot samples the optimal DNA-extraction and amplification protocol resulted in call-rates between 99.15% – 99.73% (mean 99.56%, N = 16, and conflicts with reference DNA in only three per 10,000 genotype calls. Conclusion Whole-genome amplified DNA from archived neonatal dried blood spot samples can be used for reliable genome-wide scans and is a cost-efficient alternative to collecting new samples.

  10. A genome-wide SNP scan accelerates trait-regulatory genomic loci identification in chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Das, Shouvik; Ranjan, Rajeev; Shree, Tanima; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C.L.L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    We identified 44844 high-quality SNPs by sequencing 92 diverse chickpea accessions belonging to a seed and pod trait-specific association panel using reference genome- and de novo-based GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing) assays. A GWAS (genome-wide association study) in an association panel of 211, including the 92 sequenced accessions, identified 22 major genomic loci showing significant association (explaining 23–47% phenotypic variation) with pod and seed number/plant and 100-seed weight. Eighteen trait-regulatory major genomic loci underlying 13 robust QTLs were validated and mapped on an intra-specific genetic linkage map by QTL mapping. A combinatorial approach of GWAS, QTL mapping and gene haplotype-specific LD mapping and transcript profiling uncovered one superior haplotype and favourable natural allelic variants in the upstream regulatory region of a CesA-type cellulose synthase (Ca_Kabuli_CesA3) gene regulating high pod and seed number/plant (explaining 47% phenotypic variation) in chickpea. The up-regulation of this superior gene haplotype correlated with increased transcript expression of Ca_Kabuli_CesA3 gene in the pollen and pod of high pod/seed number accession, resulting in higher cellulose accumulation for normal pollen and pollen tube growth. A rapid combinatorial genome-wide SNP genotyping-based approach has potential to dissect complex quantitative agronomic traits and delineate trait-regulatory genomic loci (candidate genes) for genetic enhancement in crop plants, including chickpea. PMID:26058368

  11. An Automated Road Roughness Detection from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Angelats, E.

    2017-05-01

    Rough roads influence the safety of the road users as accident rate increases with increasing unevenness of the road surface. Road roughness regions are required to be efficiently detected and located in order to ensure their maintenance. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems provide a rapid and cost-effective alternative by providing accurate and dense point cloud data along route corridor. In this paper, an automated algorithm is presented for detecting road roughness from MLS data. The presented algorithm is based on interpolating smooth intensity raster surface from LiDAR point cloud data using point thinning process. The interpolated surface is further processed using morphological and multi-level Otsu thresholding operations to identify candidate road roughness regions. The candidate regions are finally filtered based on spatial density and standard deviation of elevation criteria to detect the roughness along the road surface. The test results of road roughness detection algorithm on two road sections are presented. The developed approach can be used to provide comprehensive information to road authorities in order to schedule maintenance and ensure maximum safety conditions for road users.

  12. Identification of outliers in a genomic scan for selection along environmental gradients in the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Zhou

    2015-09-03

    Identification of loci under divergent selection is a key step in understanding the evolutionary process because those loci are responsible for the genetic variations that affect fitness in different environments. Understanding how environmental forces give rise to adaptive genetic variation is a challenge in pest control. Here, we performed an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan in populations of the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu, to search for candidate loci that are influenced by selection along an environmental gradient in southern China. In outlier locus detection, loci that demonstrate significantly higher or lower among-population genetic differentiation than expected under neutrality are identified as outliers. We used several outlier detection methods to study the features of C. kiangsu, including method DFDIST, BayeScan, and logistic regression. A total of 97 outlier loci were detected in the C. kiangsu genome with very high statistical supports. Moreover, the results suggested that divergent selection arising from environmental variation has been driven by differences in temperature, precipitation, humidity and sunshine. These findings illustrate that divergent selection and potential local adaptation are prevalent in locusts despite seemingly high levels of gene flow. Thus, we propose that native environments in each population may induce divergent natural selection.

  13. Raman detected differential scanning calorimetry of polymorphic transformations in acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, John F; Batykefer, Linda M; Tuschel, David D

    2008-12-15

    Acetaminophen is known to crystallize in three polymorphic forms. Thermally induced transformations between the crystalline forms and the super-cooled liquid have been observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), but the assignment of calorimetric transitions to specific polymorphic transformations remains challenging, because the transition temperatures for several transformations are close to one another, and the characteristics of the observed transitions depend on experimental variables that are often poorly controlled. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous application of DSC and Raman microscopy for the observation of thermally driven transitions between polymorphs of pharmaceutical materials. Raman detected differential scanning calorimetry (RD-DSC) has been used to monitor the DSC thermograms of super-cooled liquid acetaminophen and confirms the assignment of two exothermic transitions to specific polymorphic transformations. Principal component analysis of the Raman spectra have been used to determine the number of independent components that participate in the phase transformations, and multivariate regression has been used to determine transition temperatures from the spectral data. The influence of the laser excitation source on measured DSC thermograms has also been investigated, and it has been demonstrated that a baseline shift occurs in RD-DSC when a polymorphic transformation occurs between crystalline and amorphous forms. RD-DSC has been used to examine the influence of sample aging and sample pan configuration on the observed polymorphic transformations, and both of these variables were found to influence the thermal behavior of the sample. The results demonstrate the advantage of simultaneous Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry for the unambiguous assignment of thermally driven polymorphic transformations.

  14. Pedestrian Detection by Laser Scanning and Depth Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, A.; Lovas, T.; Molnar, B.; Somogyi, A.; Igazvolgyi, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events), security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas) and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall).

  15. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Takamiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath of rice (Oryza sativa L. using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS, and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression.

  16. DETECTION OF Tg BY MODULATED DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The glassy transition of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples which have been subjected to solvent induced crystallization (SINC) was investigated by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and density measurement. The differential of heat capacity signal, d Cp/dT from MDSC, was used to monitor the SINC process. It reveals that the Tg temperature shifts to higher value with the advancement of SINC. When the toluene-immersing time was longer (168h), the detection of Tg become more difficult, because some smaller peaks emerged at the lower temperatures and these are explained as the movement of small segments in the amorphous region. These observed results are due to the morphology and structure introduced by the SINC process.

  17. Autosomal genomic scan for loci linked to obesity and energy metabolism in Pima Indians.

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, R. A.; Tataranni, P A; Pratley, R; Thompson, D B; Hanson, R. L.; Prochazka, M; Baier, L; Ehm, M. G.; Sakul, H; Foroud, T; Garvey, W. T.; Burns, D.; Knowler, W. C.; Bennett, P. H.; Bogardus, C

    1998-01-01

    An autosomal genomic scan to search for linkage to obesity and energy metabolism was completed in Pima Indians, a population prone to obesity. Obesity was assessed by percent body fat (by hydrodensitometry) and fat distribution (the ratio of waist circumference to thigh circumference). Energy metabolism was measured in a respiratory chamber as 24-h metabolic rate, sleeping metabolic rate, and 24-h respiratory quotient (24RQ), an indicator of the ratio of carbohydrate oxidation to fat oxidatio...

  18. gmos: Rapid Detection of Genome Mosaicism over Short Evolutionary Distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet-Lošo, Mirjana; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic and viral genomes are often altered by recombination and horizontal gene transfer. The existing methods for detecting recombination are primarily aimed at viral genomes or sets of loci, since the expensive computation of underlying statistical models often hinders the comparison of complete prokaryotic genomes. As an alternative, alignment-free solutions are more efficient, but cannot map (align) a query to subject genomes. To address this problem, we have developed gmos (Genome MOsaic Structure), a new program that determines the mosaic structure of query genomes when compared to a set of closely related subject genomes. The program first computes local alignments between query and subject genomes and then reconstructs the query mosaic structure by choosing the best local alignment for each query region. To accomplish the analysis quickly, the program mostly relies on pairwise alignments and constructs multiple sequence alignments over short overlapping subject regions only when necessary. This fine-tuned implementation achieves an efficiency comparable to an alignment-free tool. The program performs well for simulated and real data sets of closely related genomes and can be used for fast recombination detection; for instance, when a new prokaryotic pathogen is discovered. As an example, gmos was used to detect genome mosaicism in a pathogenic Enterococcus faecium strain compared to seven closely related genomes. The analysis took less than two minutes on a single 2.1 GHz processor. The output is available in fasta format and can be visualized using an accessory program, gmosDraw (freely available with gmos).

  19. High-Speed Edge-Detecting Line Scan Smart Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Norman F.

    2012-01-01

    A high-speed edge-detecting line scan smart camera was developed. The camera is designed to operate as a component in a NASA Glenn Research Center developed inlet shock detection system. The inlet shock is detected by projecting a laser sheet through the airflow. The shock within the airflow is the densest part and refracts the laser sheet the most in its vicinity, leaving a dark spot or shadowgraph. These spots show up as a dip or negative peak within the pixel intensity profile of an image of the projected laser sheet. The smart camera acquires and processes in real-time the linear image containing the shock shadowgraph and outputting the shock location. Previously a high-speed camera and personal computer would perform the image capture and processing to determine the shock location. This innovation consists of a linear image sensor, analog signal processing circuit, and a digital circuit that provides a numerical digital output of the shock or negative edge location. The smart camera is capable of capturing and processing linear images at over 1,000 frames per second. The edges are identified as numeric pixel values within the linear array of pixels, and the edge location information can be sent out from the circuit in a variety of ways, such as by using a microcontroller and onboard or external digital interface to include serial data such as RS-232/485, USB, Ethernet, or CAN BUS; parallel digital data; or an analog signal. The smart camera system can be integrated into a small package with a relatively small number of parts, reducing size and increasing reliability over the previous imaging system..

  20. Autosomal genomic scan for loci linked to obesity and energy metabolism in Pima Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R A; Tataranni, P A; Pratley, R; Thompson, D B; Hanson, R L; Prochazka, M; Baier, L; Ehm, M G; Sakul, H; Foroud, T; Garvey, W T; Burns, D; Knowler, W C; Bennett, P H; Bogardus, C; Ravussin, E

    1998-01-01

    An autosomal genomic scan to search for linkage to obesity and energy metabolism was completed in Pima Indians, a population prone to obesity. Obesity was assessed by percent body fat (by hydrodensitometry) and fat distribution (the ratio of waist circumference to thigh circumference). Energy metabolism was measured in a respiratory chamber as 24-h metabolic rate, sleeping metabolic rate, and 24-h respiratory quotient (24RQ), an indicator of the ratio of carbohydrate oxidation to fat oxidation. Five hundred sixteen microsatellite markers with a median spacing of 6.4 cM were analyzed, in 362 siblings who had measurements of body composition and in 220 siblings who had measurements of energy metabolism. These comprised 451 sib pairs in 127 nuclear families, for linkage analysis to obesity, and 236 sib pairs in 82 nuclear families, for linkage analysis to energy metabolism. Pointwise and multipoint methods for regression of sib-pair differences in identity by descent, as well as a sibling-based variance-components method, were used to detect linkage. LOD scores >=2 were found at 11q21-q22, for percent body fat (LOD=2.1; P=.001), at 11q23-q24, for 24-h energy expenditure (LOD=2.0; P=.001), and at 1p31-p21 (LOD=2.0) and 20q11.2 (LOD=3.0; P=.0001), for 24RQ, by pointwise and multipoint analyses. With the variance-components method, the highest LOD score (LOD=2.3 P=.0006) was found at 18q21, for percent body fat, and at 1p31-p21 (LOD=2.8; P=.0003), for 24RQ. Possible candidate genes include LEPR (leptin receptor), at 1p31, and ASIP (agouti-signaling protein), at 20q11.2. PMID:9497255

  1. A genome scan for QTL affecting resistance to Haemonchus contortus in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, G; Jacquiet, P; Gruner, L; Cortet, J; Sauvé, C; Prévot, F; Grisez, C; Bergeaud, J P; Schibler, L; Tircazes, A; François, D; Pery, C; Bouvier, F; Thouly, J C; Brunel, J C; Legarra, A; Elsen, J M; Bouix, J; Rupp, R; Moreno, C R

    2012-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are one of the main health issues in sheep breeding. To identify loci affecting the resistance to Haemonchus contortus, a genome scan was carried out using 1,275 Romane × Martinik Black Belly backcross lambs. The entire population was challenged with Haemonchus contortus in 2 consecutive experimental infections, and fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volumes were measured. A subgroup of 332 lambs with extreme FEC was necropsied to determine the total worm burden, length of female worms, sex ratio in the worm population, abomasal pH, and serum and mucosal G immunoglobulins (IgG) responses. Pepsinogen concentration was measured in another subset of 229 lambs. For QTL detection, 160 microsatellite markers were used as well as the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip that provided 42,469 SNP markers after quality control. Linkage, association, and joint linkage and association analyses were performed with the QTLMAP software. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated within each pure breed, and association analyses were carried out either considering or not the breed origin of the haplotypes. Four QTL regions on sheep chromosomes (OAR)5, 12, 13, and 21 were identified as key players among many other QTL with small to moderate effects. A QTL on OAR21 affecting pepsinogen concentration exactly matched the pepsinogen (PGA5) locus. A 10-Mbp region affecting FEC after the 1st and 2nd infections was found on OAR12. The SNP markers outperformed microsatellites in the linkage analysis. Taking advantage of the LD helped to refine the locations of the QTL mapped on OAR5 and 13.

  2. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  3. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2005-04-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a modified in-situ hybridization technique. In this type of analysis, two differentially labeled genomic DNAs (study and reference) are cohybridized to normal metaphase spreads or to microarray. Chromosomal locations of copy number changes in the DNA segments of the study genome are revealed by a variable fluorescence intensity ratio along each target chromosome. Thus, CGH allows detection and mapping of DNA sequence copy differences between two genomes in a single experiment. Since its development, comparative genomic hybridization has been applied mostly as a research tool in the field of cancer cytogenetics to identify genetic changes in many previously unknown regions. It is also a powerful tool for detection and identification of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities in prenatal, postnatal and preimplantation diagnostics. The development of comparative genomic hybridization and increase in resolution analysis by using the microarray-based technique offer new information on chromosomal pathologies and thus better management of patients.

  4. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model.

  5. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    OpenAIRE

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Michael N. Weedon; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Nicholas J Timpson; Perry, John R B; Nigel W Rayner; Freathy, Rachel M; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Andrew P Morris; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibilit...

  6. Combined genome scans for body stature in 6,602 European twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perola, Markus; Sammalisto, Sampo; Hiekkalinna, Tero

    2007-01-01

    Twin cohorts provide a unique advantage for investigations of the role of genetics and environment in the etiology of variation in common complex traits by reducing the variance due to environment, age, and cohort differences. The GenomEUtwin (http://www.genomeutwin.org) consortium consists...... of eight twin cohorts (Australian, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, and United Kingdom) with the total resource of hundreds of thousands of twin pairs. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of one of the most heritable human complex traits, adult stature (body height......) using genome-wide scans performed for 3,817 families (8,450 individuals) derived from twin cohorts from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden, and United Kingdom with an approximate ten-centimorgan microsatellite marker map. The marker maps for different studies differed and they were...

  7. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  8. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Nielsen, M; Lamberth, K;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399-404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  9. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C.; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  10. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  11. Detecting uber-operons in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Dongsheng; Li, Guojun; Mao, Fenglou; Wu, Hongwei; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on computational identification of uber-operons in a prokaryotic genome, each of which represents a group of operons that are evolutionarily or functionally associated through operons in other (reference) genomes. Uber-operons represent a rich set of footprints of operon evolution, whose full utilization could lead to new and more powerful tools for elucidation of biological pathways and networks than what operons have provided, and a better understanding of prokaryotic genome structures and evolution. Our prediction algorithm predicts uber-operons through identifying groups of functionally or transcriptionally related operons, whose gene sets are conserved across the target and multiple reference genomes. Using this algorithm, we have predicted uber-operons for each of a group of 91 genomes, using the other 90 genomes as references. In particular, we predicted 158 uber-operons in Escherichia coli K12 covering 1830 genes, and found that many of the uber-operons correspond to parts of known regulons or biological pathways or are involved in highly related biological processes based on their Gene Ontology (GO) assignments. For some of the predicted uber-operons that are not parts of known regulons or pathways, our analyses indicate that their genes are highly likely to work together in the same biological processes, suggesting the possibility of new regulons and pathways. We believe that our uber-operon prediction provides a highly useful capability and a rich information source for elucidation of complex biological processes, such as pathways in microbes. All the prediction results are available at our Uber-Operon Database: http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/uber, the first of its kind.

  12. Detecting Single-Nucleotide Substitutions Induced by Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    The detection of genome editing is critical in evaluating genome-editing tools or conditions, but it is not an easy task to detect genome-editing events-especially single-nucleotide substitutions-without a surrogate marker. Here we introduce a procedure that significantly contributes to the advancement of genome-editing technologies. It uses droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) and allele-specific hydrolysis probes to detect single-nucleotide substitutions generated by genome editing (via homology-directed repair, or HDR). HDR events that introduce substitutions using donor DNA are generally infrequent, even with genome-editing tools, and the outcome is only one base pair difference in 3 billion base pairs of the human genome. This task is particularly difficult in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, in which editing events can be very rare. Therefore, the technological advances described here have implications for therapeutic genome editing and experimental approaches to disease modeling with iPS cells.

  13. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-12-30

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6-7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p value value value < 0.05 for 7-14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage.

  14. A comparison in association and linkage genome-wide scans for alcoholism susceptibility genes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liu, Su-Yun; Tsai, Ya-Yu

    2005-12-30

    We conducted genome-wide linkage scans using both microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Regions showing the strongest evidence of linkage to alcoholism susceptibility genes were identified. Haplotype analyses using a sliding-window approach for SNPs in these regions were performed. In addition, we performed a genome-wide association scan using SNP data. SNPs in these regions with evidence of association (P alcoholism (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 0.030) as those identified from association genomic screening (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 2.0 x 10(-8)).

  15. Event-based progression detection strategies using scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K.A.; Lo, B.; Zhou, Q.; Vos, F.M.; Vossepoel, A.M.; Lemij, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring glaucoma patients and ensuring optimal treatment requires accurate and precise detection of progression. Many glaucomatous progression detection strategies may be formulated for Scanning Laser Polarimetry (SLP) data of the local nerve fiber thickness. In this paper, several strategies, al

  16. Event-based progression detection strategies using scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K.A.; Lo, B.; Zhou, Q.; Vos, F.M.; Vossepoel, A.M.; Lemij, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring glaucoma patients and ensuring optimal treatment requires accurate and precise detection of progression. Many glaucomatous progression detection strategies may be formulated for Scanning Laser Polarimetry (SLP) data of the local nerve fiber thickness. In this paper, several strategies, al

  17. Does the truth come out in the writing? Scan as a lie detection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahari, Galit; Vrij, Aldert; Fisher, Ronald P

    2012-02-01

    We tested the accuracy of Scientific Content Analysis (SCAN), a verbal lie detection tool that is used world-wide by federal law enforcement and military agencies. Sixty-one participants were requested to write down the truth, an outright lie or a concealment lie about activities they had just completed. The statements were coded with SCAN and with another verbal lie detection tool, Reality Monitoring (RM). RM discriminated significantly between truth tellers and outright liars and between truth tellers and concealment liars, whereas SCAN did not discriminate between truth tellers and either kind of liar. Implications of the findings for the suitability of SCAN as a lie detection tool are discussed.

  18. Meta analysis of whole-genome linkage scans with data uncertainty: an application to Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide linkage scans have often been successful in the identification of genetic regions containing susceptibility genes for a disease. Meta analysis is used to synthesize information and can even deliver evidence for findings missed by original studies. If researchers are not contributing their data, extracting valid information from publications is technically challenging, but worth the effort. We propose an approach to include data extracted from published figures of genome wide linkage scans. The validity of the extraction was examined on the basis of those 25 markers, for which sufficient information was reported. Monte Carlo simulations were used to take into account the uncertainty in marker position and in linkage test statistic. For the final meta analysis we compared the Genome Search Meta Analysis method (GSMA and the Corrected p-value Meta analysis Method (CPMM. An application to Parkinson's disease is given. Because we had to use secondary data a meta analysis based on original summary values would be desirable. Results Data uncertainty by replicated extraction of marker position is shown to be much smaller than 30 cM, a distance up to which a maximum LOD score may usually be found away from the true locus. The main findings are not impaired by data uncertainty. Conclusion Applying the proposed method a novel linked region for Parkinson's disease was identified on chromosome 14 (p = 0.036. Comparing the two meta analysis methods we found in this analysis more regions of interest being identified by GSMA, whereas CPMM provides stronger evidence for linkage. For further validation of the extraction method comparisons with raw data would be required.

  19. Meta analysis of whole-genome linkage scans with data uncertainty: an application to Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Albert; Sharma, Manu; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Gasser, Thomas; Bickeböller, Heike

    2007-01-01

    Background Genome wide linkage scans have often been successful in the identification of genetic regions containing susceptibility genes for a disease. Meta analysis is used to synthesize information and can even deliver evidence for findings missed by original studies. If researchers are not contributing their data, extracting valid information from publications is technically challenging, but worth the effort. We propose an approach to include data extracted from published figures of genome wide linkage scans. The validity of the extraction was examined on the basis of those 25 markers, for which sufficient information was reported. Monte Carlo simulations were used to take into account the uncertainty in marker position and in linkage test statistic. For the final meta analysis we compared the Genome Search Meta Analysis method (GSMA) and the Corrected p-value Meta analysis Method (CPMM). An application to Parkinson's disease is given. Because we had to use secondary data a meta analysis based on original summary values would be desirable. Results Data uncertainty by replicated extraction of marker position is shown to be much smaller than 30 cM, a distance up to which a maximum LOD score may usually be found away from the true locus. The main findings are not impaired by data uncertainty. Conclusion Applying the proposed method a novel linked region for Parkinson's disease was identified on chromosome 14 (p = 0.036). Comparing the two meta analysis methods we found in this analysis more regions of interest being identified by GSMA, whereas CPMM provides stronger evidence for linkage. For further validation of the extraction method comparisons with raw data would be required. PMID:17605797

  20. Genome-wide linkage scan for loci associated with epilepsy in Belgian shepherd dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan Kelly R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd dog is known to have a substantial genetic component. The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions associated with the expression of generalized seizures in the Belgian Tervuren and Sheepdog. Results DNA from 366 dogs, of which 74 were classified as epileptic, representing two extended families were subjected to a genome-wide linkage scan using 410 microsatellite markers yielding informative coverage averaging 5.95 ± 0.21 Mb. Though previous studies based on pedigree analyses proposed a major gene of influence, the present study demonstrated the trait to be highly polygenic. Studies of complex disorders in humans indicate that a liberal composite evaluation of genetic linkage is needed to identify underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs. Four chromosomes yielded tentative linkage based upon LOD scores in excess of 1.0. Possible QTLs within these regions were supported also by analyses of multipoint linkage, allele frequency, TDT, and transmission of haplotype blocks. Conclusions Taken together the data tentatively indicate six QTLs, three on CFA 2, and one on each of CFA 6, 12, and 37, that support fine mapping for mutations associated with epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd. The study also underscores the complexity of genomic linkage studies for polygenic disorders.

  1. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  2. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  3. Integrating landscape genomics and spatially explicit approaches to detect loci under selection in clinal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew R; Forester, Brenna R; Teufel, Ashley I; Adams, Rachael V; Anstett, Daniel N; Goodrich, Betsy A; Landguth, Erin L; Joost, Stéphane; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptation hinges on the ability to detect loci under selection. However, population genomics outlier approaches to detect selected loci may be inappropriate for clinal populations or those with unclear population structure because they require that individuals be clustered into populations. An alternate approach, landscape genomics, uses individual-based approaches to detect loci under selection and reveal potential environmental drivers of selection. We tested four landscape genomics methods on a simulated clinal population to determine their effectiveness at identifying a locus under varying selection strengths along an environmental gradient. We found all methods produced very low type I error rates across all selection strengths, but elevated type II error rates under "weak" selection. We then applied these methods to an AFLP genome scan of an alpine plant, Campanula barbata, and identified five highly supported candidate loci associated with precipitation variables. These loci also showed spatial autocorrelation and cline patterns indicative of selection along a precipitation gradient. Our results suggest that landscape genomics in combination with other spatial analyses provides a powerful approach for identifying loci potentially under selection and explaining spatially complex interactions between species and their environment.

  4. Super-resolution scanning laser microscopy through virtually structured detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong-Wen; Wang, Ben-Quan; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    High resolution microscopy is essential for advanced study of biological structures and accurate diagnosis of medical diseases. The spatial resolution of conventional microscopes is light diffraction limited. Structured illumination has been extensively explored to break the diffraction limit in wide field light microscopy. However, deployable application of the structured illumination in scanning laser microscopy is challenging due to the complexity of the illumination system and possible ph...

  5. Airborne laser scanning to detect pipeline area invasions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falat, Denise R.; Sallem Filho, Silas [ESTEIO Engenharia e Aerolevantamentos S.A, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The occupation of the surface on the pipeline right-of-ways needs constant detailing and updating. The speed of changes in the vegetation areas and the irregular growth of urbanization prove the need for quick answers on the identification of invasions and on the elaboration of technical reports showing spatially referenced elements. In this context, this technical paper seeks to identify changes on the surface, making use of data derived from airborne LASER (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiance) sensor scanning performed in different periods in the same study right-of-way. This technique has been successfully used in a number of applications, however, in most of the cases the LASER data are combined with digital photogrammetric products. This paper aims at the identification of alterations on the surface of right-of-ways and pipelines, using data exclusively from LASER scanning, performed in distinct periods. From the data processing are generated the DSM's (Digital Surface Models). The automatic comparison between the DSM's allows the identification of changes occurred between the surveys. Based on the configuration of the altered areas, we then expect to distinguish the several types of changes occurred as: new buildings, the advance of vegetation over right-of-ways and objects. For the validation of this methodology, photographic images of the regions have been used, obtained through photogrammetry in the same period of the LASER scanning. (author)

  6. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS across populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Brion S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA. Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6–7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS. Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p p-value p-value p-value

  7. A flexibly shaped space-time scan statistic for disease outbreak detection and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tango Toshiro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of disease outbreaks enables public health officials to implement disease control and prevention measures at the earliest possible time. A time periodic geographical disease surveillance system based on a cylindrical space-time scan statistic has been used extensively for disease surveillance along with the SaTScan software. In the purely spatial setting, many different methods have been proposed to detect spatial disease clusters. In particular, some spatial scan statistics are aimed at detecting irregularly shaped clusters which may not be detected by the circular spatial scan statistic. Results Based on the flexible purely spatial scan statistic, we propose a flexibly shaped space-time scan statistic for early detection of disease outbreaks. The performance of the proposed space-time scan statistic is compared with that of the cylindrical scan statistic using benchmark data. In order to compare their performances, we have developed a space-time power distribution by extending the purely spatial bivariate power distribution. Daily syndromic surveillance data in Massachusetts, USA, are used to illustrate the proposed test statistic. Conclusion The flexible space-time scan statistic is well suited for detecting and monitoring disease outbreaks in irregularly shaped areas.

  8. Scanning for signatures of geographically restricted selection based on population genomics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural selection, as the driving force of human evolution, has direct impact on population differentiation. However, it is still unclear to what extent the genetic differentiation has been caused by natural selection. To explore this question, we performed a genome-wide scan with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the International HapMap Project. Single locus FST analysis was applied to assess the frequency difference among populations in autosomes. Based on the empirical distribution of FST, we identified 12669 SNPs correlating to population differentiation and 1853 candidate genes subjected to geographic restricted natural selection. Further interpretation of gene ontogeny revealed 121 categories of biological process with the enrichments of candidate genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may play an important role in human population differentiation. In addition, our analysis provides new clues as well as research methods for our understanding of population differentiation and natural selection.

  9. A genome-wide scan in families with maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frayling, Timothy M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Chevre, Jean Claude;

    2003-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous single gene disorder characterized by non-insulin-dependent diabetes, an early onset and autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in six genes have been shown to cause MODY. Approximately 15-20% of families fitting MODY criteria do...... not have mutations in any of the known genes. These families provide a rich resource for the identification of new MODY genes. This will potentially enable further dissection of clinical heterogeneity and bring new insights into mechanisms of beta-cell dysfunction. To facilitate the identification of novel...... MODY loci, we combined the results from three genome-wide scans on a total of 23 families fitting MODY criteria. We used both a strict parametric model of inheritance with heterogeneity and a model-free analysis. We did not identify any single novel locus but provided putative evidence for linkage...

  10. A Genome-wide Scan for Selective Sweeps in Racing Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Jin Woo; Shin, Donghyun; Shin, Kwang-Yun; Kim, Jun; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Heebal

    2015-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing, we conducted a genome-wide scan of selective sweeps associated with selection toward genetic improvement in Thoroughbreds. We investigated potential phenotypic consequence of putative candidate loci by candidate gene association mapping for the finishing time in 240 Thoroughbred horses. We found a significant association with the trait for Ral GApase alpha 2 (RALGAP2) that regulates a variety of cellular processes of signal trafficking. Neighboring genes around RALGAP2 included insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1), pallid (PLDN), and Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2) genes have similar roles in signal trafficking, suggesting that a co-evolving gene cluster located on the chromosome 22 is under strong artificial selection in racehorses. PMID:26333666

  11. A Genome-wide Scan for Selective Sweeps in Racing Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjin Moon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Using next-generation sequencing, we conducted a genome-wide scan of selective sweeps associated with selection toward genetic improvement in Thoroughbreds. We investigated potential phenotypic consequence of putative candidate loci by candidate gene association mapping for the finishing time in 240 Thoroughbred horses. We found a significant association with the trait for Ral GApase alpha 2 (RALGAP2 that regulates a variety of cellular processes of signal trafficking. Neighboring genes around RALGAP2 included insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, pallid (PLDN, and Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2 genes have similar roles in signal trafficking, suggesting that a co-evolving gene cluster located on the chromosome 22 is under strong artificial selection in racehorses.

  12. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  13. Detection Mechanism of Parallel Defect using Scanning Inductive Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xianzhang; Song, Benchu; Hu, Yongjiang; He, Yunze

    2017-06-01

    Aiming at the requirement of workpiece integrity for parts processing line, on-line detection using inductive heating thermography for the moving workpieces on the assembly line is studied. In this paper, the detection mechanism of pulsed eddy current thermography for moving workpieces defects is analysed. A two-dimensional model of a magnetic material (45 steel), on which there is a crack parallel to the coil is established by the finite element software named COMSOL 5.2. By analysing the changes of the temperature curves, normalized curves and the temperature difference curves, the optimal detection area for parallel cracks is proposed. The consistency of the conclusions is verified by the experimental platform. The paper can provide a theoretical guidance for quantitative detection using eddy current thermography.

  14. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  15. Recovery of known T-cell epitopes by computational scanning of a viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logean, Antoine; Rognan, Didier

    2002-04-01

    A new computational method (EpiDock) is proposed for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC proteins, from the amino acid sequence of any protein of immunological interest. Starting from the primary structure of the target protein, individual three-dimensional structures of all possible MHC-peptide (8-, 9- and 10-mers) complexes are obtained by homology modelling. A free energy scoring function (Fresno) is then used to predict the absolute binding free energy of all possible peptides to the class I MHC restriction protein. Assuming that immunodominant epitopes are usually found among the top MHC binders, the method can thus be applied to predict the location of immunogenic peptides on the sequence of the protein target. When applied to the prediction of HLA-A*0201-restricted T-cell epitopes from the Hepatitis B virus, EpiDock was able to recover 92% of known high affinity binders and 80% of known epitopes within a filtered subset of all possible nonapeptides corresponding to about one tenth of the full theoretical list. The proposed method is fully automated and fast enough to scan a viral genome in less than an hour on a parallel computing architecture. As it requires very few starting experimental data, EpiDock can be used: (i) to predict potential T-cell epitopes from viral genomes (ii) to roughly predict still unknown peptide binding motifs for novel class I MHC alleles.

  16. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting body conformation traits in Spanish Churra dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Alvarez, L; de la Fuente, L F; Sanchez, J P; San Primitivo, F; Arranz, J J

    2011-08-01

    A genome scan for chromosomal regions influencing body conformation traits was conducted for a population of Spanish Churra dairy sheep following a daughter design. A total of 739 ewes from 11 half-sib sire families were included in the study. The ewes were scored for the 5 linear traits used in the breeding scheme of the Churra breed to assess body conformation: stature, rear legs-rear view, foot angle, rump width, and general appearance. All the animals, including the 11 sires, were genotyped for 181 microsatellite markers evenly distributed across the 26 sheep autosomes. Using the yield deviations of the raw scores adjusted for fixed factors as phenotypic measurements, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on the basis of a multi-marker regression method. Seven suggestive QTL were identified on chromosomes Ovis aries (OAR)2, OAR5, OAR16, OAR23, and OAR26, but none reached a genome-wise significance level. Putative QTL were identified for all of the traits analyzed, except for general appearance score. The suggestive QTL showing the highest test statistic influenced rear legs-rear view and was localized on OAR16, close to the growth hormone receptor coding gene, GHR. Some of the putative linkage associations reported here are consistent with previously reported QTL in cattle for similar traits. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first report of QTL for body conformation traits in dairy sheep; further studies will be needed to confirm and redefine the linkage associations reported herein. It is expected that future genome-wide association analyses of larger families will help identify genes underlying these putative genetic effects and provide useful markers for marker-assisted selection of such functional traits.

  17. Terrestrial laser scanning used to detect asymmetries in boat hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pardiñas, Javier; López-Alvarez, Francisco; Ordóñez, Celestino; Menéndez, Agustín; Bernardo-Sánchez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We describe a methodology for identifying asymmetries in boat hull sections reconstructed from point clouds captured using a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). A surface was first fit to the point cloud using a nonparametric regression method that permitted the construction of a continuous smooth surface. Asymmetries in cross-sections of the surface were identified using a bootstrap resampling technique that took into account uncertainty in the coordinates of the scanned points. Each reconstructed section was analyzed to check, for a given level of significance, that it was within the confidence interval for the theoretical symmetrical section. The method was applied to the study of asymmetries in a medium-sized yacht. Identified were differences of up to 5 cm between the real and theoretical sections in some parts of the hull.

  18. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Chapman

    Full Text Available Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  20. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Chain, Patrick S G; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  1. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early...... adulthood, asthma is frequently associated also with quantitative measures of atopy. Genome wide quantitative multipoint linkage analysis was conducted for serum IgE levels and percentage of positive skin prick test (SPT(per)) using three large groups of families originally ascertained for asthma...

  2. A genome-wide scan for selection signatures in Nellore cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, A L; Sonstegard, T S; Higa, R H; Rosa, A N; Siqueira, F; Silva, L O C; Torres Júnior, R A A; Coutinho, L L; Mudadu, M A; Alencar, M M; Regitano, L C A

    2014-12-01

    Brazilian Nellore cattle (Bos indicus) have been selected for growth traits for over more than four decades. In recent years, reproductive and meat quality traits have become more important because of increasing consumption, exports and consumer demand. The identification of genome regions altered by artificial selection can potentially permit a better understanding of the biology of specific phenotypes that are useful for the development of tools designed to increase selection efficiency. Therefore, the aims of this study were to detect evidence of recent selection signatures in Nellore cattle using extended haplotype homozygosity methodology and BovineHD marker genotypes (>777,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms) as well as to identify corresponding genes underlying these signals. Thirty-one significant regions (P meat quality, fatty acid profiles and immunity. In addition, 545 genes were identified in regions harboring selection signatures. Within this group, 58 genes were associated with growth, muscle and adipose tissue metabolism, reproductive traits or the immune system. Using relative extended haplotype homozygosity to analyze high-density single nucleotide polymorphism marker data allowed for the identification of regions potentially under artificial selection pressure in the Nellore genome, which might be used to better understand autozygosity and the effects of selection on the Nellore genome.

  3. Picometer stable scan mechanism for gravitational wave detection in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnveld, N.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Detection and observation of gravitational waves requires extremely accurate displacement measurement in the frequency range 0.03 mHz to 1 Hz. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission will attain this by creating a giant interferometer in space, based on free floating proof masses in th

  4. Picometer stable scan mechanism for gravitational wave detection in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnveld, N.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Detection and observation of gravitational waves requires extremely accurate displacement measurement in the frequency range 0.03 mHz to 1 Hz. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission will attain this by creating a giant interferometer in space, based on free floating proof masses in

  5. Detection of Recurrent Cervical Cancer by Whole-body FDG PET Scans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaxin Yang; Jinhui Wang; Zhaohui Zhu; Keng Shen; Bocheng Wang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the role of whole-body {18F} fluro-2-dexoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans in the detection of recurrent cervical cancer.METHODS Between June, 2000 and January, 2006, 25 patients had undergone a PET scan at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital to evaluate possible recurrent cervical cancer. All the PET findings were reviewed and compared to available clinical data to classify each PET scan result as a true positive, true negative, false positive, or false negative.RESULTS A total of 38 PET scans were conducted on the 25patients whose median age was 46 years. The Stage distributions were IA (n = 1), IB (n = 11), IIA (n = 5), IIB (n = 4), IIIB (n = 2), WB (n= 1), and unknown Stage (n = 1). There were 22 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 3 cases of adenocarcinoma resulting in 9 true positive PET scans, 27 true negatives, 2 false positives and no false negatives. The sensitivity of the FDG PET scans for detecting recurrent cervical cancer was 100%, specificity 93.1%, positive predictive value 81.8%, and negative predictive value 100%.CONCLUSION The whole body FDG PET scans are a sensitive and specific imaging modality for the detection of recurrent cervical cancer. However the cost of PET scans is too high at this time. A large prospective study will determine whether this modality should be used routinely and take the place of other imaging methods in the early detection of recurrent cervical carcinoma

  6. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information.

  7. Genome-wide scan in Portuguese Island families implicates multiple loci in bipolar disorder: fine mapping adds support on chromosomes 6 and 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Carlos N; Pato, M T; Kirby, A; Petryshen, T L; Medeiros, H; Carvalho, C; Macedo, A; Dourado, A; Coelho, I; Valente, J; Soares, M J; Ferreira, C P; Lei, M; Verner, A; Hudson, T J; Morley, C P; Kennedy, J L; Azevedo, M H; Daly, M J; Sklar, P

    2004-05-15

    As part of an extensive study in the Portuguese Island population of families with multiple patients suffering from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we performed an initial genome-wide scan of 16 extended families with bipolar disorder that identified three regions on chromosomes 2, 11, and 19 with genome-wide suggestive linkage and several other regions, including chromosome 6q, also approached suggestive levels of significance. Dick et al. [2003: Am J Hum Genet 73:107-114] recently reported in a study of 250 families with bipolar disorder a maxLOD score of 3.61 near marker D6S1021 on chromosome 6q. This study replicates this finding having detected a peak NPL = 2.02 (P = 0.025) with the same marker D6S1021(104.7 Mb). Higher-density mapping provided additional support for loci on chromosome 6 including marker D6S1021 with an NPL = 2.59 (P = 0.0068) and peaking at marker D6S1639 (125 Mb) with an NPL = 3.06 (P = 0.0019). A similar pattern was detected with higher-density mapping of chromosome 11 with an NPL = 3.15 (P = 0.0014) at marker D11S1883 (63.1 Mb). Simulations at the density of our fine mapping data indicate that less than 1 scan out of 10 would find two such scores genome-wide in the same scan by chance. Our findings provide additional support for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder on 6q, as well as, suggesting the importance of denser scans. Published 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivals Eric

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker. Results Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp, regardless of motif. Conclusion Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions.

  9. Migratory birds use head scans to detect the direction of the earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Kropp, Wiebke

    2004-11-09

    Night-migratory songbirds are known to use a magnetic compass , but how do they detect the reference direction provided by the geomagnetic field, and where is the sensory organ located? The most prominent characteristic of geomagnetic sensory input, whether based on visual patterns or magnetite-mediated forces , is the predicted symmetry around the north-south or east-west magnetic axis. Here, we show that caged migratory garden warblers perform head-scanning behavior well suited to detect this magnetic symmetry plane. In the natural geomagnetic field, birds move toward their migratory direction after head scanning. In a zero-magnetic field , where no symmetry plane exists, the birds almost triple their head-scanning frequency, and the movement direction after a head scan becomes random. Thus, the magnetic sensory organ is located in the bird's head, and head scans are used to locate the reference direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  10. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  11. SNP detection for massively parallel whole-genome resequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Fang, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    of this information was integrated into a single quality score for each base under Bayesian theory to measure the accuracy of consensus calling. We tested this methodology using a large-scale human resequencing data set of 36x coverage and assembled a high-quality nonrepetitive consensus sequence for 92......-genome or target region resequencing. Here, we have developed a consensus-calling and SNP-detection method for sequencing-by-synthesis Illumina Genome Analyzer technology. We designed this method by carefully considering the data quality, alignment, and experimental errors common to this technology. All...

  12. An evolutionary genome scan for longevity-related natural selection in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Richard W; Nabholz, Benoit; Galtier, Nicolas

    2010-04-01

    Aging is thought to occur through the accumulation of biochemical damage affecting DNA, proteins, and lipids. The major source of cellular damage involves the generation of reactive oxygen species produced during mitochondrial respiratory activity of the electron transport chain. Energetic metabolism, antioxidative processes, genome maintenance, and cell cycle are the cellular functions most commonly associated with aging, from experimental studies of model organisms. The significance of these experiments with respect to longevity-related selective constraints in nature remains unclear. Here we took a phylogenomic approach to identify the genetic targets of natural selection for elongated life span in mammals. By comparing the nonsynonymous and synonymous evolution of approximately 5.7 million codon sites across 25 species, we identify codons and genes showing a stronger level of amino acid conservation in long-lived than in short-lived lineages. We show that genes involved in lipid composition and (collagen associated) vitamin C binding have collectively undergone increased selective pressure in long-lived species, whereas genes involved in DNA replication/repair or antioxidation have not. Most of the candidate genes experimentally associated with aging (e.g., PolG, Sod, Foxo) have played no detectable role in the evolution of longevity in mammals. A large body of current medical research aims at discovering how to increase longevity in human. In this study, we uncovered the way natural selection has completed this task during mammalian evolution. Cellular membrane and extracellular collagen composition, not genome integrity, have apparently been the optimized features.

  13. Scanning for genes in large genomic regions: cosmid-based exon trapping of multiple exons in a single product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datson, N A; van de Vosse, E; Dauwerse, H G; Bout, M; van Ommen, G J; den Dunnen, J T

    1996-03-15

    To facilitate the scanning of large genomic regions for the presence of exonic gene segments we have constructed a cosmid-based exon trap vector. The vector serves a dual purpose since it is also suitable for contig construction and physical mapping. The exon trap cassette of vector sCOGH1 consists of the human growth hormone gene driven by the mouse mettallothionein-1 promoter. Inserts are cloned in the multicloning site located in intron 2 of the hGH gene. The efficiency of the system is demonstrated with cosmids containing multiple exons of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy gene. All exons present in the inserts were successfully retrieved and no cryptic products were detected. Up to seven exons were isolated simultaneously in a single spliced product. The system has been extended by a transcription-translation-test protocol to determine the presence of large open reading frames in the trapped products, using a combination of tailed PCR primers directing protein synthesis in three different reading frames, followed by in vitro transcription-translation. Having larger stretches of coding sequence in a single exon trap product rather than small single exons greatly facilitates further analysis of potential genes and offers new possibilities for direct mutation analysis of exon trap material.

  14. A genome scan for candidate genes involved in the adaptation of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Román; Vandamme, Sara G; Vera, Manuel; Bouza, Carmen; Maes, Gregory E; Volckaert, Filip A M; Martínez, Paulino

    2015-10-01

    Partitioning phenotypic variance in genotypic and environmental variance may benefit from the population genomic assignment of genes putatively involved in adaptation. We analyzed a total of 256 markers (120 microsatellites and 136 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms - SNPs), several of them associated to Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for growth and resistance to pathologies, with the aim to identify potential adaptive variation in turbot Scophthalmus maximus L. The study area in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean, from Iberian Peninsula to the Baltic Sea, involves a gradual change in temperature and an abrupt change in salinity conditions. We detected 27 candidate loci putatively under selection. At least four of the five SNPs identified as outliers are located within genes coding for ribosomal proteins or directly related with the production of cellular proteins. One of the detected outliers, previously identified as part of a QTL for growth, is a microsatellite linked to a gene coding for a growth factor receptor. A similar set of outliers was detected when natural populations were compared with a sample subjected to strong artificial selection for growth along four generations. The observed association between FST outliers and growth-related QTL supports the hypothesis of changes in growth as an adaptation to differences in temperature and salinity conditions. However, further work is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  15. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  16. Genomic Scans of Zygotic Disequilibrium and Epistatic SNPs in HapMap Phase III Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available Previous theory indicates that zygotic linkage disequilibrium (LD is more informative than gametic or composite digenic LD in revealing natural population history. Further, the difference between the composite digenic and maximum zygotic LDs can be used to detect epistatic selection for fitness. Here we corroborate the theory by investigating genome-wide zygotic LDs in HapMap phase III human populations. Results show that non-Africa populations have much more significant zygotic LDs than do Africa populations. Africa populations (ASW, LWK, MKK, and YRI possess more significant zygotic LDs for the double-homozygotes (DAABB than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABb, DAaBB, and DAaBb, while non-Africa populations generally have more significant DAaBb's than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABB, DAABb, and DAaBB. Average r-squares for any significant zygotic LDs increase generally in an order of populations YRI, MKK, CEU, CHB, LWK, JPT, CHD, TSI, GIH, ASW, and MEX. Average r-squares are greater for DAABB and DAaBb than for DAaBB and DAABb in each population. YRI and MKK can be separated from LWK and ASW in terms of the pattern of average r-squares. All population divergences in zygotic LDs can be interpreted with the model of Out of Africa for modern human origins. We have also detected 19735-95921 SNP pairs exhibiting strong signals of epistatic selection in different populations. Gene-gene interactions for some epistatic SNP pairs are evident from empirical findings, but many more epistatic SNP pairs await evidence. Common epistatic SNP pairs rarely exist among all populations, but exist in distinct regions (Africa, Europe, and East Asia, which helps to understand geographical genomic medicine.

  17. A CUSUM framework for detection of space-time disease clusters using scan statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Christian

    2007-11-20

    Several methods for timely detection of emerging clusters of diseases have recently been proposed. We focus our attention on one of the most popular types of method; a scan statistic. Different ways of constructing space-time scan statistics based on surveillance theory are presented. We bridge the ideas from space-time disease surveillance, public health surveillance and industrial quality control and show that previously suggested space-time scan statistics methods can be fitted into a general CUSUM framework. Crucial differences between the methods studied are due to different assumptions about the spatial process. An example is the specification of the spatial regions of interest for a possible cluster, another is the increased rate to be detected within a cluster. We evaluate the detection ability of the methods considering the possibility of a cluster emerging at any time during the surveillance period. The methods are applied to the detection of an increased incidence of Tularemia in Sweden.

  18. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  19. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramla Gary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gold nanoparticle (GNP aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA.

  20. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  1. Assessing performance of orthology detection strategies applied to eukaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available Orthology detection is critically important for accurate functional annotation, and has been widely used to facilitate studies on comparative and evolutionary genomics. Although various methods are now available, there has been no comprehensive analysis of performance, due to the lack of a genomic-scale 'gold standard' orthology dataset. Even in the absence of such datasets, the comparison of results from alternative methodologies contains useful information, as agreement enhances confidence and disagreement indicates possible errors. Latent Class Analysis (LCA is a statistical technique that can exploit this information to reasonably infer sensitivities and specificities, and is applied here to evaluate the performance of various orthology detection methods on a eukaryotic dataset. Overall, we observe a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity in orthology detection, with BLAST-based methods characterized by high sensitivity, and tree-based methods by high specificity. Two algorithms exhibit the best overall balance, with both sensitivity and specificity>80%: INPARANOID identifies orthologs across two species while OrthoMCL clusters orthologs from multiple species. Among methods that permit clustering of ortholog groups spanning multiple genomes, the (automated OrthoMCL algorithm exhibits better within-group consistency with respect to protein function and domain architecture than the (manually curated KOG database, and the homolog clustering algorithm TribeMCL as well. By way of using LCA, we are also able to comprehensively assess similarities and statistical dependence between various strategies, and evaluate the effects of parameter settings on performance. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of orthology detection on a divergent set of eukaryotic genomes, thus providing insights and guides for method selection, tuning and development for different applications. Many biological questions have been addressed by multiple

  2. Using Cognitive Control in Software Defined Networking for Port Scan Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-17

    ARL-TR-8059 ● July 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Using Cognitive Control in Software -Defined Networking for Port Scan...Cognitive Control in Software -Defined Networking for Port Scan Detection by Vinod K Mishra Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 June–31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Cognitive Control in Software -Defined Networking for

  3. The Role of Gallium scanning in the detection of bone and joint sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin, Anna; Laird, J. D.; Roberts, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The value of gallium (67Ga) scanning in the diagnosis of septic disease of bone or joint was assessed in 34 patients. The results show a sensitivity of 60 per cent and specificity of 64 per cent. The low accuracy of this method for the detection of bone and joint sepsis (62 per cent) means that gallium scanning can be used only as an adjunct to other investigative techniques.

  4. Target detection in pulse-Doppler radar based on multi-scanning signal integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Neuimin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Development of multi-scanning signal integration algorithms for pulseDoppler radars which are widely used in practice is of great practical importance. Problem statement. The problem of multi-scanning signal integration measuring range and range-rate is considered. The reflected signal from a target is a distorted white noise coherent packet of radio pulses with random initial phase and known amplitude. Target detection in a sequence of radar scans is reduced to the detection of target track. Development of a two-step multi-scanning incoherent signal integration algorithm. Two-step integration method is applied to reduce the number of tracks. In the first stage the initial signals detection with a sufficiently high probability of false alarm is performed. In the second stage the tracking problem for selection target markers is solved and the multiscanning signal integration is implemented. It provides an optimal target detection solution over K surveys with low signal-to-noise ratio. Expressions for the correct target detection probability and false alarm incorporating quality track tracking are obtained. Simulation results. Analysis of the algorithm is carried out as example of the little maneuvering target detection using the statistical modeling. The methods of calculating the output threshold (the cumulative statistics are compared on it is presented. Conclusions. Increasing the number of scans (in which the integration are performed leads to a significant decreasing the probability of false alarm, which allows to increase the signal-to-noise ratio compared with the detection in a single scan up to 3.5 dB.

  5. PE-CMOS based C-scan ultrasound for foreign object detection in soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T; Lasser, Marvin E; Kula, John; Sarcone, Anita; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a C-scan ultrasound prototype and three imaging modalities for the detection of foreign objects inserted in porcine soft tissue. The object materials include bamboo, plastics, glass and aluminum alloys. The images of foreign objects were acquired using the C-scan ultrasound, a portable B-scan ultrasound, film-based radiography, and computerized radiography. The C-scan ultrasound consists of a plane wave transducer, a compound acoustic lens system, and a newly developed ultrasound sensor array based on the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor coated with piezoelectric material (PE-CMOS). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the images were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the detectability using different imaging modalities. The experimental results indicate that the C-scan prototype has better CNR values in 4 out of 7 objects than other modalities. Specifically, the C-scan prototype provides more detail information of the soft tissues without the speckle artifacts that are commonly seen with conventional B-scan ultrasound, and has the same orientation as the standard radiographs but without ionizing radiation.

  6. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    of allergic rhinitis on the contrary have as yet been most sparse. To identify candidate regions holding genes for allergic rhinitis we performed a total genome-scan on affected sib-pair families. From 100 Danish sib-pair families selected for allergy, families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype...... definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed...

  7. Extension of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association scan results in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Allan F; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I; Franks, Paul W; Hanson, Robert L; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2008-09-01

    Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in beta-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B.

  8. Genome-wide linkage scan for the metabolic syndrome: the GENNID study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Karen L; Hutter, Carolyn M; Wan, Jia Yin; Kim, Helen; Monks, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    In the United States, the metabolic syndrome (MetS) constitutes a major public health problem with over 47 million persons meeting clinical criteria for MetS. Numerous studies have suggested genetic susceptibility to MetS. The goals of this study were (i) to identify susceptibility loci for MetS in well-characterized families with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in four ethnic groups and (ii) to determine whether evidence for linkage varies across the four groups. The GENNID study (Genetics of NIDDM) is a multicenter study established by the American Diabetes Association in 1993 and comprises a comprehensive, well-characterized resource of T2D families from four ethnic groups (whites, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and Japanese Americans). Principal component factor analysis (PCFA) was used to define quantitative phenotypes of the MetS. Variance components linkage analysis was conducted using microsatellite markers from a 10-cM genome-wide linkage scan, separately in each of the four ethnic groups. Three quantitative MetS factors were identified by PCFA and used as phenotypes for MetS: (i) a weight/waist factor, (ii) a blood pressure factor, and (iii) a lipid factor. Evidence for linkage to each of these factors was observed. For each ethnic group, our results suggest that several regions harbor susceptibility genes for the MetS. The strongest evidence for linkage for MetS phenotypes was observed on chromosome 2 (2q12.1-2q13) in the white sample and on chromosome 3 (3q26.1-3q29) in the Mexican-American sample. In conclusion, the results suggest that several regions harbor MetS susceptibility genes and that heterogeneity may exist across groups.

  9. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  10. Beyond an AFLP genome scan towards the identification of immune genes involved in plague resistance in Rattus rattus from Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Jacquet, S; Ivanova, S; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, J-M; Streiff, R; Brouat, C

    2013-01-01

    Genome scans using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers became popular in nonmodel species within the last 10 years, but few studies have tried to characterize the anonymous outliers identified. This study follows on from an AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus), the reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar. We successfully sequenced 17 of the 22 markers previously shown to be potentially affected by plague-mediated selection and associated with a plague resistance phenotype. Searching these sequences in the genome of the closely related species Rattus norvegicus assigned them to 14 genomic regions, revealing a random distribution of outliers in the genome (no clustering). We compared these results with those of an in silico AFLP study of the R. norvegicus genome, which showed that outlier sequences could not have been inferred by this method in R. rattus (only four of the 15 sequences were predicted). However, in silico analysis allowed the prediction of AFLP markers distribution and the estimation of homoplasy rates, confirming its potential utility for designing AFLP studies in nonmodel species. The 14 genomic regions surrounding AFLP outliers (less than 300 kb from the marker) contained 75 genes encoding proteins of known function, including nine involved in immune function and pathogen defence. We identified the two interleukin 1 genes (Il1a and Il1b) that share homology with an antigen of Y. pestis, as the best candidates for genes subject to plague-mediated natural selection. At least six other genes known to be involved in proinflammatory pathways may also be affected by plague-mediated selection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps in two broiler chicken lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Shou-Zhi; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Da, Yang; Wang, Ning; Hu, Xiao-Xiang; Zhang, Yuan-Dan; Wang, Yu-Xiang; Leng, Li; Tang, Zhi-Quan; Li, Hui

    2012-12-15

    Genomic regions controlling abdominal fatness (AF) were studied in the Northeast Agricultural University broiler line divergently selected for AF. In this study, the chicken 60KSNP chip and extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) test were used to detect genome-wide signatures of AF. A total of 5357 and 5593 core regions were detected in the lean and fat lines, and 51 and 57 reached a significant level (Pchickens. We provide a genome-wide map of selection signatures in the chicken genome, and make a contribution to the better understanding the mechanisms of selection for AF content in chickens. The selection for low AF in commercial breeding using this information will accelerate the breeding progress.

  12. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  13. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  14. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-03-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair.

  15. Improved detection of differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments through multiple scanning and image integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdi, Chiara; Trevisan, Silvia; Celegato, Barbara; Costa, Germano; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2003-01-01

    The variability of results in microarray technology is in part due to the fact that independent scans of a single hybridised microarray give spot images that are not quite the same. To solve this problem and turn it to our advantage, we introduced the approach of multiple scanning and of image integration of microarrays. To this end, we have developed specific software that creates a virtual image that statistically summarises a series of consecutive scans of a microarray. We provide evidence that the use of multiple imaging (i) enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes; (ii) increases the image homogeneity; and (iii) reveals false-positive results such as differentially expressed genes that are detected by a single scan but not confirmed by successive scanning replicates. The increase in the final number of differentially expressed genes detected in a microarray experiment with this approach is remarkable; 50% more for microarrays hybridised with targets labelled by reverse transcriptase, and 200% more for microarrays developed with the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique. The results have been confirmed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR tests. PMID:14627839

  16. On detection and assessment of statistical significance of Genomic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Probal

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the available methods for detecting Genomic Islands (GIs in prokaryotic genomes use markers such as transposons, proximal tRNAs, flanking repeats etc., or they use other supervised techniques requiring training datasets. Most of these methods are primarily based on the biases in GC content or codon and amino acid usage of the islands. However, these methods either do not use any formal statistical test of significance or use statistical tests for which the critical values and the P-values are not adequately justified. We propose a method, which is unsupervised in nature and uses Monte-Carlo statistical tests based on randomly selected segments of a chromosome. Such tests are supported by precise statistical distribution theory, and consequently, the resulting P-values are quite reliable for making the decision. Results Our algorithm (named Design-Island, an acronym for Detection of Statistically Significant Genomic Island runs in two phases. Some 'putative GIs' are identified in the first phase, and those are refined into smaller segments containing horizontally acquired genes in the refinement phase. This method is applied to Salmonella typhi CT18 genome leading to the discovery of several new pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance and metabolic islands that were missed by earlier methods. Many of these islands contain mobile genetic elements like phage-mediated genes, transposons, integrase and IS elements confirming their horizontal acquirement. Conclusion The proposed method is based on statistical tests supported by precise distribution theory and reliable P-values along with a technique for visualizing statistically significant islands. The performance of our method is better than many other well known methods in terms of their sensitivity and accuracy, and in terms of specificity, it is comparable to other methods.

  17. Genome scan for locus involved in mandibular prognathism in pedigrees from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that genetic components play an important role in the etiology of mandibular prognathism, but few susceptibility loci have been mapped. METHODOLOGY: In order to identify linkage regions for mandibular prognathism, we analyzed two Chinese pedigrees with 6,090 genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers from Illumina Linkage-12 DNA Analysis Kit (average spacing 0.58 cM. Multipoint parametric and non-parametric (model-free linkage analyses were used for the pedigrees. PRINCIPAL FINDING: The most statistically significant linkage results were with markers on chromosome 4 (LOD=3.166 and NPL=3.65 with rs 875864, 4p16.1, 8.38 cM. Candidate genes within the 4p16.1 include EVC, EVC2. CONCLUSION: We detected a novel suggestive linkage locus for mandibular prognathism in two Chinese pedigrees, and this linkage region provides target for susceptibility gene identification, a process that will provide important insights into the molecular and cellular basis of mandibular prognathism.

  18. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  19. Automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping of terrestrial laser scan data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rabah

    2013-12-01

    The current paper submits a method for automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping from the data that was obtained during laser scanning survey. The method of cracks detection and mapping is achieved by three steps, namely the step of shading correction in the original image, step of crack detection and finally step of crack mapping and processing steps. The detected crack is defined in a pixel coordinate system. To remap the crack into the referred coordinate system, a reverse engineering is used. This is achieved by a hybrid concept of terrestrial laser-scanner point clouds and the corresponding camera image, i.e. a conversion from the pixel coordinate system to the terrestrial laser-scanner or global coordinate system. The results of the experiment show that the mean differences between terrestrial laser scan and the total station are about 30.5, 16.4 and 14.3 mms in x, y and z direction, respectively.

  20. Ultrasonic C-scan Detection for Stainless Steel Spot Welding Based on Wavelet Package Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; XU Guocheng; XU Desheng; ZHOU Guanghao; FAN Qiuyue

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic test of spot welding for stainless steel is conducted. Based on wavelet packet decomposition, the ultrasonic echo signal has been analyzed deeply in time - frequency domain, which can easily distinguish the nugget from the corona bond. The 2D C-scan images produced by ultrasonic C scan which contribute to quantitatively calculate the nugget diameter for the computer are further analyzed. The spot welding nugget diameter can be automatically obtained by image enhancement, edge detection and equivalent diameter algorithm procedure. The ultrasonic detection values in this paper show good agreement with the metallographic measured values. The mean value of normal distribution curve is 0.006 67, and the standard deviation is 0.087 11. Ultrasonic C-scan test based on wavelet packet signal analysis is of high accuracy and stability.

  1. SkinScan©: A PORTABLE LIBRARY FOR MELANOMA DETECTION ON HANDHELD DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Lancaster, Keith; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a portable library for automated detection of melanoma termed SkinScan© that can be used on smartphones and other handheld devices. Compared to desktop computers, embedded processors have limited processing speed, memory, and power, but they have the advantage of portability and low cost. In this study we explored the feasibility of running a sophisticated application for automated skin cancer detection on an Apple iPhone 4. Our results demonstrate that the proposed library ...

  2. Real-time underwater object detection based on an electrically scanned high-resolution sonar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes an approach to real time detection and tracking of underwater objects, using image sequences from an electrically scanned high-resolution sonar. The use of a high resolution sonar provides a good estimate of the location of the objects, but strains the computers on board, beca...

  3. Detection of gait events using an F-Scan in-shoe pressure measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Paola; Moser, David; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2008-10-01

    A portable system capable of accurate detection of initial contact (IC) and foot off (FO) without adding encumbrance to the subject would be extremely useful in many gait analysis applications. Force platforms represent the gold standard method for determining these events and other methods including foot switches and kinematic data have also been proposed. These approaches, however, present limitations in terms of the number of steps that can be analysed per trial, the portability for outdoor measurements or the information needed beforehand. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the F-Scan((R)) Mobile pressure measurement system when detecting IC and FO. Two methods were used, one was the force detection (FD) in-built algorithm used by F-Scan software and a new area detection (AD) method using the loaded area during the gait cycle. Both methods were tested in ten healthy adults and compared with the detection provided by a kinetic detection (KT) algorithm. The absolute mean differences between KT and FD were (mean+/-standard deviation) 42+/-11 ms for IC and 37+/-11 ms for FO. The absolute mean differences between KT and AD were 22+/-9 ms for IC and 10+/-4 ms for FO. The AD method remained closer to KT detection for all subjects providing sufficiently accurate detection of both events and presenting advantages in terms of portability, number of steps analysed per trial and practicality as to make it a system of choice for gait event detection.

  4. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  5. An international collaborative family-based whole genome quantitative trait linkage scan for myopic refractive error

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Diana; Li, Yi-Ju; Guggenheim, Jeremy A;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate quantitative trait loci linked to refractive error, we performed a genome-wide quantitative trait linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism markers and family data from five international sites.......To investigate quantitative trait loci linked to refractive error, we performed a genome-wide quantitative trait linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism markers and family data from five international sites....

  6. Genome-wide detection of selective signature in Chinese Holstein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunfei Pan

    Full Text Available Selective signatures in whole genome can help us understand the mechanisms of selection and target causal variants for breeding program. In present study, we performed Extended Haplotype Homozygosity (EHH tests to identify significant core regions harboring such signals in Chinese Holstein, and then verified the biological significance of these identified regions based on commonly-used bioinformatics analyses. Results showed a total of 125 significant regions in entire genome containing some of important functional genes such as LEP, ABCG2, CSN1S1, CSN3 and TNF based on the Gene Ontology database. Some of these annotated genes involved in the core regions overlapped with those identified in our previous GWAS as well as those involved in a recently constructed candidate gene database for cattle, further indicating these genes under positive selection maybe underlie milk production traits and other important traits in Chinese Holstein. Furthermore, in the enrichment analyses for the second level GO terms and pathways, we observed some significant terms over represented in these identified regions as compared to the entire bovine genome. This indicates that some functional genes associated with milk production traits, as reflected by GO terms, could be clustered in core regions, which provided promising evidence for the exploitability of the core regions identified by EHH tests. Findings in our study could help detect functional candidate genes under positive selection for further genetic and breeding research in Chinese Holstein.

  7. Genome-wide linkage scan identifies two novel genetic loci for coronary artery disease: in GeneQuest families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hanxiang; Li, Lin; Rao, Shaoqi; Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing K

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for missing heritability". Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL  = 5.49) and 3q29 (NPL  = 6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL  = 3.18-4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD.

  8. Damage Detection on Thin-walled Structures Utilizing Laser Scanning and Standing Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Hyeok; Jeon, Jun Young; Kim, Du Hwan; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes wavenumber filtering for damage detection using single-frequency standing wave excitation and laser scanning sensing. An embedded piezoelectric sensor generates ultrasonic standing waves, and the responses are measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer and mirror tilting device. After scanning, newly developed damage detection techniques based on wavenumber filtering are applied to the full standing wave field. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed techniques, several experiments were performed on composite plates with delamination and aluminum plates with corrosion damage. The results demonstrated that the developed techniques could be applied to various structures to localize the damage, with the potential to improve the damage detection capability at a high interrogation speed.

  9. Whole genome PCR scanning reveals the syntenic genome structure of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae strains in the O1/O139 population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Pang

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is commonly found in estuarine water systems. Toxigenic O1 and O139 V. cholerae strains have caused cholera epidemics and pandemics, whereas the nontoxigenic strains within these serogroups only occasionally lead to disease. To understand the differences in the genome and clonality between the toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139, we employed a whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScanning method, an rrn operon-mediated fragment rearrangement analysis and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to analyze the genome structure of different strains. WGPScanning in conjunction with CGH revealed that the genomic contents of the toxigenic strains were conservative, except for a few indels located mainly in mobile elements. Minor nucleotide variation in orthologous genes appeared to be the major difference between the toxigenic strains. rrn operon-mediated rearrangements were infrequent in El Tor toxigenic strains tested using I-CeuI digested pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis and PCR analysis based on flanking sequence of rrn operons. Using these methods, we found that the genomic structures of toxigenic El Tor and O139 strains were syntenic. The nontoxigenic strains exhibited more extensive sequence variations, but toxin coregulated pilus positive (TCP+ strains had a similar structure. TCP+ nontoxigenic strains could be subdivided into multiple lineages according to the TCP type, suggesting the existence of complex intermediates in the evolution of toxigenic strains. The data indicate that toxigenic O1 El Tor and O139 strains were derived from a single lineage of intermediates from complex clones in the environment. The nontoxigenic strains with non-El Tor type TCP may yet evolve into new epidemic clones after attaining toxigenic attributes.

  10. A bi-dimensional genome scan for prolificacy traits in pigs shows the existence of multiple epistatic QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidanel Jean P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolificacy is the most important trait influencing the reproductive efficiency of pig production systems. The low heritability and sex-limited expression of prolificacy have hindered to some extent the improvement of this trait through artificial selection. Moreover, the relative contributions of additive, dominant and epistatic QTL to the genetic variance of pig prolificacy remain to be defined. In this work, we have undertaken this issue by performing one-dimensional and bi-dimensional genome scans for number of piglets born alive (NBA and total number of piglets born (TNB in a three generation Iberian by Meishan F2 intercross. Results The one-dimensional genome scan for NBA and TNB revealed the existence of two genome-wide highly significant QTL located on SSC13 (P SSC17 (P P P P P Conclusions The complex inheritance of prolificacy traits in pigs has been evidenced by identifying multiple additive (SSC13 and SSC17, dominant and epistatic QTL in an Iberian × Meishan F2 intercross. Our results demonstrate that a significant fraction of the phenotypic variance of swine prolificacy traits can be attributed to first-order gene-by-gene interactions emphasizing that the phenotypic effects of alleles might be strongly modulated by the genetic background where they segregate.

  11. Genome Fusion Detection: a novel method to detect fusion genes from SNP-array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sebastian; Groth, Philip

    2013-03-15

    Fusion genes result from genomic rearrangements, such as deletions, amplifications and translocations. Such rearrangements can also frequently be observed in cancer and have been postulated as driving event in cancer development. to detect them, one needs to analyze the transition region of two segments with different copy number, the location where fusions are known to occur. Finding fusion genes is essential to understanding cancer development and may lead to new therapeutic approaches. Here we present a novel method, the Genomic Fusion Detection algorithm, to predict fusion genes on a genomic level based on SNP-array data. This algorithm detects genes at the transition region of segments with copy number variation. With the application of defined constraints, certain properties of the detected genes are evaluated to predict whether they may be fused. We evaluated our prediction by calculating the observed frequency of known fusions in both primary cancers and cell lines. We tested a set of cell lines positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion and prostate cancers positive for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. We could detect the fusions in all positive cell lines, but not in the negative controls.

  12. USING POPULATION GENOMICS TO DETECT SELECTION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: KEY CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Phillips, Patrick C.; Cresko, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Natural selection shapes patterns of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species, and it does so differentially across genomes. The field of population genomics provides a comprehensive genome-scale view of the action of selection, even beyond traditional model organisms. However, even with nearly complete genomic sequence information, our ability to detect the signature of selection on specific genomic regions depends on choosing experimental and analytical tools appropriat...

  13. Empirical Bayes scan statistics for detecting clusters of disease risk variants in genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Kenneth J; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments of high-throughput genomic technologies offer an unprecedented detailed view of the genetic variation in various human populations, and promise to lead to significant progress in understanding the genetic basis of complex diseases. Despite this tremendous advance in data generation, it remains very challenging to analyze and interpret these data due to their sparse and high-dimensional nature. Here, we propose novel applications and new developments of empirical Bayes scan statistics to identify genomic regions significantly enriched with disease risk variants. We show that the proposed empirical Bayes methodology can be substantially more powerful than existing scan statistics methods especially so in the presence of many non-disease risk variants, and in situations when there is a mixture of risk and protective variants. Furthermore, the empirical Bayes approach has greater flexibility to accommodate covariates such as functional prediction scores and additional biomarkers. As proof-of-concept we apply the proposed methods to a whole-exome sequencing study for autism spectrum disorders and identify several promising candidate genes.

  14. Rapid super-resolution line-scanning microscopy through virtually structured detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-15

    Virtually structured detection (VSD) has been demonstrated to break the diffraction limit in scanning laser microscopy (SLM). VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase-artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, practical application of this method is challenging due to a limited image acquisition speed. We report here the combination of VSD and line-scanning microscopy (LSM) to improve the image acquisition speed. A motorized dove prism was used to achieve automatic control of four-angle (i.e., 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) scanning, thus ensuring isotropic resolution improvement. Both an optical resolution target and a living frog eyecup were used to verify resolution enhancement.

  15. MC-GenomeKey: a multicloud system for the detection and annotation of genomic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshazly, Hatem; Souilmi, Yassine; Tonellato, Peter J; Wall, Dennis P; Abouelhoda, Mohamed

    2017-01-20

    Next Generation Genome sequencing techniques became affordable for massive sequencing efforts devoted to clinical characterization of human diseases. However, the cost of providing cloud-based data analysis of the mounting datasets remains a concerning bottleneck for providing cost-effective clinical services. To address this computational problem, it is important to optimize the variant analysis workflow and the used analysis tools to reduce the overall computational processing time, and concomitantly reduce the processing cost. Furthermore, it is important to capitalize on the use of the recent development in the cloud computing market, which have witnessed more providers competing in terms of products and prices. In this paper, we present a new package called MC-GenomeKey (Multi-Cloud GenomeKey) that efficiently executes the variant analysis workflow for detecting and annotating mutations using cloud resources from different commercial cloud providers. Our package supports Amazon, Google, and Azure clouds, as well as, any other cloud platform based on OpenStack. Our package allows different scenarios of execution with different levels of sophistication, up to the one where a workflow can be executed using a cluster whose nodes come from different clouds. MC-GenomeKey also supports scenarios to exploit the spot instance model of Amazon in combination with the use of other cloud platforms to provide significant cost reduction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first solution that optimizes the execution of the workflow using computational resources from different cloud providers. MC-GenomeKey provides an efficient multicloud based solution to detect and annotate mutations. The package can run in different commercial cloud platforms, which enables the user to seize the best offers. The package also provides a reliable means to make use of the low-cost spot instance model of Amazon, as it provides an efficient solution to the sudden termination of spot

  16. Automated Detection of Healthy and Diseased Aortae from Images Obtained by Contrast-Enhanced CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gayhart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed the next stage of our computer assisted diagnosis (CAD system to aid radiologists in evaluating CT images for aortic disease by removing innocuous images and highlighting signs of aortic disease. Materials and Methods. Segmented data of patient’s contrast-enhanced CT scan was analyzed for aortic dissection and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU. Aortic dissection was detected by checking for an abnormal shape of the aorta using edge oriented methods. PAU was recognized through abnormally high intensities with interest point operators. Results. The aortic dissection detection process had a sensitivity of 0.8218 and a specificity of 0.9907. The PAU detection process scored a sensitivity of 0.7587 and a specificity of 0.9700. Conclusion. The aortic dissection detection process and the PAU detection process were successful in removing innocuous images, but additional methods are necessary for improving recognition of images with aortic disease.

  17. Using Information From Prior Satellite Scans to Improve Cloud Detection Near the Day-Night Terminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Christopher R.; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Qing Z.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Ayers, Jeffrey K.; Spangenberg, Doulas A.

    2012-01-01

    With geostationary satellite data it is possible to have a continuous record of diurnal cycles of cloud properties for a large portion of the globe. Daytime cloud property retrieval algorithms are typically superior to nighttime algorithms because daytime methods utilize measurements of reflected solar radiation. However, reflected solar radiation is difficult to accurately model for high solar zenith angles where the amount of incident radiation is small. Clear and cloudy scenes can exhibit very small differences in reflected radiation and threshold-based cloud detection methods have more difficulty setting the proper thresholds for accurate cloud detection. Because top-of-atmosphere radiances are typically more accurately modeled outside the terminator region, information from previous scans can help guide cloud detection near the terminator. This paper presents an algorithm that uses cloud fraction and clear and cloudy infrared brightness temperatures from previous satellite scan times to improve the performance of a threshold-based cloud mask near the terminator. Comparisons of daytime, nighttime, and terminator cloud fraction derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) radiance measurements show that the algorithm greatly reduces the number of false cloud detections and smoothes the transition from the daytime to the nighttime clod detection algorithm. Comparisons with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data show that using this algorithm decreases the number of false detections by approximately 20 percentage points.

  18. Scanning for genes in large genomic regions: cosmid-based exon trapping of multiple exons in a single product.

    OpenAIRE

    Datson, N.A.; Vosse, E van de; Dauwerse, H.G.; Bout, M; van Ommen, G J; J T den Dunnen

    1996-01-01

    To facilitate the scanning of large genomic regions for the presence of exonic gene segments we have constructed a cosmid-based exon trap vector. The vector serves a dual purpose since it is also suitable for contig construction and physical mapping. The exon trap cassette of vector sCOGH1 consists of the human growth hormone gene driven by the mouse mettallothionein-1 promoter. Inserts are cloned in the multicloning site located in intron 2 of the hGH gene. The efficiency of the system is de...

  19. Atlantoaxial Ankylosis Detected on Neck CT Scans in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Rheynmatology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause that principally affects the axial skeleton. The cervical spine is also vulnerable to this disease process and the characteristic feature of cervical involvement is atlantoaxial subluxation. However, only a few cases of atlantoaxial ankylosis have been reported to date. We report a case of atlantoaxial ankylosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis with radiologic findings incidentally detected on neck CT scans.

  20. GPR Signal Processing with Geography Adaptive Scanning using Vector Radar for Antipersonal Landmine Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shinsuke Sato; Zakarya Zyada; Takayuki Matsuno; Yasuhiro Kawai; Yasuhisa Hasegawa; Toshio Fukuda

    2007-01-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a promising sensor for landmine detection, however there are two major problems to overcome. One is the rough ground surface. The other problem is the distance between the antennas of GPR. It remains irremovable clutters on a sub-surface image output from GPR by first problem. Geography adaptive scanning is useful to image objects beneath rough ground surface. Second problem makes larger the nonlinearity of the relationship between the time for propagation an...

  1. A comparative study of the diagnostic accuracy on Waters view with CT scan in detecting midface fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Panjnoush M.; Shirani Gh.; Jozghanbari P.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aim: In recent years, CT scan has become available as an alternative to conventional radiography. To date, the utility of Waters view in detecting midface fractures has been rarely evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of Waters radiography with CT scan in detecting midface fractures. Materials and Methods: In this tests evaluation study, waters view and CT scan were performed for 42 patients with midface fracture admitted to ma...

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the gut of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Charlotte Holtfreter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gold standard for diagnosing Schistosoma mansoni infections is the detection of eggs from stool or biopsy specimens. The viability of collected eggs can be tested by the miracidium hatching procedure. Direct detection methods are often limited in patients with light or early infections, whereas serological tests and PCR methods fail to differentiate between an inactive and persistent infection and between schistosomal species. Recently, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM has been introduced as a diagnostic tool in several fields of medicine. In this study we evaluated CLSM for the detection of viable eggs of S. mansoni directly within the gut of infected mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The confocal laser scanning microscope used in this study is based on the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II scanning laser system in combination with the Rostock Cornea Module (image modality 1 or a rigid endoscope (image modality 2. Colon sections of five infected mice were examined with image modalities 1 and 2 for schistosomal eggs. Afterwards a biopsy specimen was taken from each colon section and examined by bright-field microscopy. Visualised eggs were counted and classified in terms of viability status. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We were able to show that CLSM visualises eggs directly within the gut and permits discrimination of schistosomal species and determination of egg viability. Thus, CLSM may be a suitable non-invasive tool for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in humans.

  3. Detecting tectonic tremor through frequency scanning at a single station: Application to the Cascadia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Stefany; Brudzinski, Michael; Kao, Honn

    2012-11-01

    The discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) spurred increased instrumentation and investigation of the Cascadia margin, which is now typified by the seismic phenomena. We utilize established detection and location techniques already present in the region to guide the development of a new single station detection method. While detailed network-wide investigations have led to exciting discoveries on the source location and migration patterns of tectonic tremor, single station detection has the ability to expand our search for tremor to more subduction zones and tectonic settings where instrumentation is not widely available. Our frequency scanning technique bandpass filters seismic data into three categories, 2-5 Hz, 10-15 Hz, and 0.02-0.1 Hz, where we expect prominent signals produced by tectonic tremor, local earthquakes, and surface waves, respectively. We combine amplitudes in each category into a ratio to determine tremor detection for a given hour. Results from our technique are evaluated in two ways: 1) combined in a network setting to compare with prominent location and detection methods and 2) assessed at an individual station and compared with other techniques that are capable of single station tremor detection. Network-wide processing over a two-year time period in both northern and southern Cascadia reveals common identification of larger ETS episodes when comparing our technique to both envelope waveform and combined single station detection methods. We find slight variations in the total duration of tremor and the onset timing between the different techniques, which may be due to the varying stations included in each technique. Frequency scanning identifies more inter-ETS episodes than envelope waveform and single station methods, particularly in the more sparsely instrumented region of southern Oregon. Our method also reduces erroneous signals more commonly found in other single station methods, discerned through comparison of nearby seismograms

  4. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, R L; Dunn, W L; Heider, S; Matthew, C; Yang, X

    2012-07-01

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of "signatures" obtained from a test target to a collection of "templates", sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8L and larger.

  5. Whole-Genome Scans Provide Evidence of Adaptive Evolution in Malawian Plasmodium falciparum Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocholla, Harold; Preston, Mark D; Mipando, Mwapatsa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Selection by host immunity and antimalarial drugs has driven extensive adaptive evolution in Plasmodium falciparum and continues to produce ever-changing landscapes of genetic variation. METHODS:  We performed whole-genome sequencing of 69 P. falciparum isolates from Malawi and used ...

  6. A Genome-Wide Scan for Breast Cancer Risk Haplotypes among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wan, Peggy; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Chris A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyzed the haplotype effects for breast cancer risk among 5,761 African American women (3,016 cases and 2,745 controls) using a sliding window approach on the genome-wide scale. Three regions on chromosomes 1, 4 and 18 exhibited moderate haplotype effects. Furthermore, among 21 breast cancer susceptibility loci previously established in European populations, 10p15 and 14q24 are likely to harbor novel haplotype effects. We also proposed a heuristic of determining the significance level and the effective number of independent tests by the permutation analysis on chromosome 22 data. It suggests that the effective number was approximately half of the total (7,794 out of 15,645), thus the half number could serve as a quick reference to evaluating genome-wide significance if a similar sliding window approach of haplotype analysis is adopted in similar populations using similar genotype density. PMID:23468962

  7. A large genome scan for rare CNVs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, H.M.; Al-Chalabi, A.; Andersen, P.M.; Vught, P.W. van; Diekstra, F.P.; Es, M.A. van; Saris, C.G.J.; Groen, E.J.; Rheenen, W. van; Koppers, M.; Slot, R. van 't; Strengman, E.; Estrada, K.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Vermeulen, H.H.M.; Birve, A.; Waibel, S.; Meyer, T.; Cronin, S.; McLaughlin, R.L.; Hardiman, O.; Sapp, P.C.; Tobin, M.D.; Wain, L.V.; Tomik, B.; Slowik, A.; Lemmens, R.; Rujescu, D.; Schulte, C.; Gasser, T.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Landers, J.E.; Robberecht, W.; Ludolph, A.C.; Ophoff, R.A.; Veldink, J.H.; Berg, L.H. van den

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease selectively affecting motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified several common variants which increase disease susceptibility. In contrast, rare copy-number

  8. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Boelte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; osey, David J.; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Ines; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD fa

  9. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Boelte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; osey, David J.; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Ines; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD fa

  10. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evid

  11. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the

  12. Revealing misassembled segments in the bovine reference genome by high resolution linkage disequilibrium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misassembly signatures, created by shuffling the order of sequences while assembling a genome, can be easily seen by analyzing the unexpected behaviour of the linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay. A heuristic process was proposed to identify those misassembly signatures and presented the ones found in ...

  13. Genome-wide linkage scan identifies two novel genetic loci for coronary artery disease: in GeneQuest families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxiang Gao

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI, but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of "missing heritability". Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL  = 5.49 and 3q29 (NPL  = 6.84. We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL  = 3.18-4.07. These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD.

  14. Five blood pressure loci identified by an updated genome-wide linkage scan: meta-analysis of the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simino, Jeannette; Shi, Gang; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Province, Michael A; Gu, C Charles; Kardia, Sharon; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ehret, Georg; Olshen, Richard A; Turner, Stephen T; Ho, Low-Tone; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Jaquish, Cashell; Paltoo, Dina; Cooper, Richard S; Weder, Alan; Curb, J David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary genome-wide linkage analysis of blood pressure in the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) was reported previously. We harnessed the power and ethnic diversity of the final pooled FBPP dataset to identify novel loci for blood pressure thereby enhancing localization of genes containing less common variants with large effects on blood pressure levels and hypertension. We performed one overall and 4 race-specific meta-analyses of genome-wide blood pressure linkage scans using data on 4,226 African-American, 2,154 Asian, 4,229 Caucasian, and 2,435 Mexican-American participants (total N = 13,044). Variance components models were fit to measured (raw) blood pressure levels and two types of antihypertensive medication adjusted blood pressure phenotypes within each of 10 subgroups defined by race and network. A modified Fisher's method was used to combine the P values for each linkage marker across the 10 subgroups. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on chromosomes 6p22.3, 8q23.1, 20q13.12, 21q21.1, and 21q21.3 based on significant linkage evidence (defined by logarithm of odds (lod) score ≥3) in at least one meta-analysis and lod scores ≥1 in at least 2 subgroups defined by network and race. The chromosome 8q23.1 locus was supported by Asian-, Caucasian-, and Mexican-American-specific meta-analyses. The new QTLs reported justify new candidate gene studies. They may help support results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that fall in these QTL regions but fail to achieve the genome-wide significance.

  15. Lateral resolution improvement of laser-scanning imaging for nano defects detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozeki, Hiroki; Kudo, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Demand for higher efficiency in the semiconductor manufacturing industry is continually increasing. In particular, nano defects measurement on patterned or bare Si semiconductor wafer surfaces is an important quality control factor for realizing high productivity and reliability of semiconductor device fabrication. Optical methods and electron beam methods are conventionally used for the inspection of semiconductor wafers. Because they are nondestructive and suitable for high-throughput inspection, optical methods are preferable to electron beam methods such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and so on. However, optical methods generally have an essential disadvantage about lateral spatial resolution than electron beam methods, because of the diffraction limit depending on the optical wavelength. In this research, we aim to develop a novel laser-scanning imaging method that can be applied to nano-/micro manufacturing processes such as semiconductor wafer surface inspection to allow lateral spatial super-resolution imaging with resolution beyond the diffraction limit. In our proposed method, instead of detecting the light intensity value from the beam spot on the inspection surface, the light intensity distribution, which is formed with infinity corrected optical system, coming from the beam spot on the inspection surface is detected. In addition, nano scale shifts in the beam spot are applied for laser spot scanning using a conventional laser-scanning method in which the spots are shifted at about a 100 nm pitch. By detecting multiple light intensity distributions due to the nano scale shifts, a super-resolution image reconstruction with resolution beyond the diffraction limit can be expected. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method, several numerical simulations were carried out.

  16. Detection of Dental Pathologies in Routine Paranasal CT Scans: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen

    2017-07-01

    Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) is a widespread method for evaluating paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity in daily practice. The maxillary teeth are in field of view in a paranasal sinus CT scan and it is possible to detect dental pathologies with CT. To determine the incidence of maxillary teeth pathologies in routine paranasal sinus CT scans. A retrospective study was conducted. Consecutive 395 paranasal sinus CT scans were evaluated. All CT images were obtained with a 64 detector-CT. Patients with previous facial trauma, operation, invasive tumors and repeated exams were excluded. Detected findings were classified as "tooth loss, dental restorations or procedures and dental pathologies (carious lesions, dental developmental anomalies, periapical lesions and periodontal diseases). The proportion of findings was reported as simple percentiles. Three hundred and eighty-four CT scans were included in the study. Dental restorations or procedures were determined in 129 (33.5%) patients. A total of 34 (8.8%) patients had normal teeth count and morphology. A total of 264 (64.3%) patients had at least one tooth loss. A total of 195 (51%) patients had at least one or more dental pathology. Number of dental carious lesions, dental developmental anomalies, periapical lesions and periodontal disease were 104 (27.0%), 78 (14.3%), 46 (11.9%), 44 (11.4%), respectively. Dental pathologies were encountered in more than half of the patients. Detecting dental pathologies may prevent tooth loss and improve oral health. The radiologist should keep in mind dental pathologies while evaluating paranasal sinus CT in daily practice.

  17. Efficient Haplotype Inference Algorithms in One Whole Genome Scan for Pedigree Data with Non-genotyped Founders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongxi Cheng; Hadi Sabaa; Zhipeng Cai; Randy Goebel; Guohui Lin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient rule-based algorithm is presented for haplotype inference from general pedigree genotype data, with the assumption of no recombination. This algorithm generalizes previous algorithms to handle the cases where some pedigree founders are not genotyped, provided that for each nuclear family at least one parent is genotyped and each non-genotyped founder appears in exactly one nuclear family. The importance of this generalization lies in that such cases frequently happen in real data, because some founders may have passed away and their genotype data can no longer be collected. The algorithm runs in O(m3n3) time, where m is the number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci under consideration and n is the number of genotyped members in the pedigree. This zero-recombination haplotyping algorithm is extended to a maximum parsimoniously haplotyping algorithm in one whole genome scan to minimize the total number of breakpoint sites, or equivalently, the number of maximal zero-recombination chromosomal regions. We show that such a whole genome scan haplotyping algorithm can be implemented in O(m3n3) time in a novel incremental fashion,here m denotes the total number of SNP loci along the chromosome.

  18. Genome scan for quantitative trait loci influencing HDL levels: evidence for multilocus inheritance in familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, France; Jarvik, Gail P; Badzioch, Michael D; Motulsky, Arno G; Brunzell, John D; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2005-09-01

    Several genome scans in search of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been performed. However, to date the actual identification of genes implicated in the regulation of common forms of HDL abnormalities remains unsuccessful. This may be due, in part, to the oligogenic and multivariate nature of HDL regulation, and potentially, pleiotropy affecting HDL and other lipid-related traits. Using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach, we recently provided evidence of linkage of HDL level variation to the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex, in familial combined hyperlipidemia pedigrees, with an estimated number of two to three large QTLs remaining to be identified. We also presented results consistent with pleiotropy affecting HDL and triglycerides at the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene complex. Here we use the same MCMC analytic strategy, which allows for oligogenic trait models, as well as simultaneous incorporation of covariates, in the context of multipoint analysis. We now present results from a genome scan in search for the additional HDL QTLs in these pedigrees. We provide evidence of linkage for additional HDL QTLs on chromosomes 3p14 and 13q32, with results on chromosome 3 further supported by maximum parametric and variance component LOD scores of 3.0 and 2.6, respectively. Weaker evidence of linkage was also obtained for 7q32, 12q12, 14q31-32 and 16q23-24.

  19. A CAD of fully automated colonic polyp detection for contrasted and non-contrasted CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulum, Gökalp; Bolat, Bülent; Osman, Onur

    2017-04-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are developed to help radiologists detect colonic polyps over CT scans. It is possible to reduce the detection time and increase the detection accuracy rates by using CAD systems. In this paper, we aimed to develop a fully integrated CAD system for automated detection of polyps that yields a high polyp detection rate with a reasonable number of false positives. The proposed CAD system is a multistage implementation whose main components are: automatic colon segmentation, candidate detection, feature extraction and classification. The first element of the algorithm includes a discrete segmentation for both air and fluid regions. Colon-air regions were determined based on adaptive thresholding, and the volume/length measure was used to detect air regions. To extract the colon-fluid regions, a rule-based connectivity test was used to detect the regions belong to the colon. Potential polyp candidates were detected based on the 3D Laplacian of Gaussian filter. The geometrical features were used to reduce false-positive detections. A 2D projection image was generated to extract discriminative features as the inputs of an artificial neural network classifier. Our CAD system performs at 100% sensitivity for polyps larger than 9 mm, 95.83% sensitivity for polyps 6-10 mm and 85.71% sensitivity for polyps smaller than 6 mm with 5.3 false positives per dataset. Also, clinically relevant polyps ([Formula: see text]6 mm) were identified with 96.67% sensitivity at 1.12 FP/dataset. To the best of our knowledge, the novel polyp candidate detection system which determines polyp candidates with LoG filters is one of the main contributions. We also propose a new 2D projection image calculation scheme to determine the distinctive features. We believe that our CAD system is highly effective for assisting radiologist interpreting CT.

  20. A 2cM genome-wide scan of European Holstein cattle affected by classical BSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Aparna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is an acquired prion disease that is invariably fatal in cattle and has been implicated as a significant human health risk. Polymorphisms that alter the prion protein of sheep or humans have been associated with variations in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy susceptibility or resistance. In contrast, there is no strong evidence that non-synonymous mutations in the bovine prion gene (PRNP are associated with classical BSE disease susceptibility. However, two bovine PRNP insertion/deletion polymorphisms, one within the promoter region and the other in intron 1, have been associated with susceptibility to classical BSE. These associations do not explain the full extent of BSE susceptibility, and loci outside of PRNP appear to be associated with disease incidence in some cattle populations. To test for associations with BSE susceptibility, we conducted a genome wide scan using a panel of 3,072 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers on 814 animals representing cases and control Holstein cattle from the United Kingdom BSE epidemic. Results Two sets of BSE affected Holstein cattle were analyzed in this study, one set with known family relationships and the second set of paired cases with controls. The family set comprises half-sibling progeny from six sires. The progeny from four of these sires had previously been scanned with microsatellite markers. The results obtained from the current analysis of the family set yielded both some supporting and new results compared with those obtained in the earlier study. The results revealed 27 SNPs representing 18 chromosomes associated with incidence of BSE disease. These results confirm a region previously reported on chromosome 20, and identify additional regions on chromosomes 2, 14, 16, 21 and 28. This study did not identify a significant association near the PRNP in the family sample set. The only association found in the PRNP

  1. Application of hotspot detection using spatial scan statistic: Study of criminality in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runadi, Taruga; Widyaningsih, Yekti

    2017-03-01

    According to the police registered data, the number of criminal cases tends to fluctuate during 2011 to 2013. It means there is no significant reduction cases number of criminal acts during that period. Local government needs to observe whether their area was a high risk of criminal case. The objectives of this study are to detect hotspot area of certain criminal cases using spatial scan statistic. This study analyzed the data of 22 criminal types cases based on province in Indonesia that occurred during 2013. The data was obtained from Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS) that was released in 2014. Hotspot detection was performed according to the likelihood ratio of the Poisson model using SaTScanTM software and then mapped using R. The spatial scan statistic method successfully detected provinces that was categorized as hotspot for 22 crime types cases being analyzed with p-value less than 0.05. The local governments of province that were detected as hotspot area of certain crime cases should provide more attention to improve security quality.

  2. Seismic Event Identification Using Scanning Detection: A Comparison of Denoising and Classification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; MacCarthy, J. K.; Giudicepietro, F.

    2005-12-01

    Automatic detection and classification methods are increasingly important in observatory operations, as the volume and rate of incoming data exceed the capacity of human analysis staff to process the data in near-real-time. We explore the success of scanning detection for similar event identification in a variety of seismic waveform catalogs. Several waveform pre-processing methods are applied to previously recorded events which are scanned through triggered and continuous waveform catalogs to determine the success and false alarm rate for detections of repeating signals. Pre-processing approaches include adaptive, cross-coherency filtering, adaptive, auto-associative neural network filtering, discrete wavelet package decomposition and linear predictive coding as well as suites of standard bandpass filters. Classification / detection methods for the various pre-processed signals are applied to investigate the robustness of the individual and combined approaches. The classifiers as applied to the processed waveforms include dendrogram-based clustering and neural network classifiers. We will present findings for the various combinations of methods as applied to tectonic earthquakes, mine blasts and volcanic seismicity.

  3. A Scan for Positively Selected Genes in the Genomes of Humans and Chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Bustamente, Carlos; Clark, Andrew G.

    2005-01-01

    of these genes may be driven by genomic conflict due to apoptosis during spermatogenesis. Genes with maximal expression in the brain show little or no evidence for positive selection, while genes with maximal expression in the testis tend to be enriched with positively selected genes. Genes on the X chromosome...... such evolutionary changes to leave a noticeable signature throughout the genome. We here compare 13,731 annotated genes from humans to their chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of positive selection. Many of the genes that present a signature of positive selection tend to be involved...... in sensory perception or immune defenses. However, the group of genes that show the strongest evidence for positive selection also includes a surprising number of genes involved in tumor suppression and apoptosis, and of genes involved in spermatogenesis. We hypothesize that positive selection in some...

  4. Scanning the genome for gene SNPs related to climate adaptation and estimating selection at the molecular level in boreal black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, Julien; Laroche, Jérôme; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2011-04-01

    Outlier detection methods were used to scan the genome of the boreal conifer black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.) for gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) potentially involved in adaptations to temperature and precipitation variations. The scan involved 583 SNPs from 313 genes potentially playing adaptive roles. Differentiation estimates among population groups defined following variation in temperature and precipitation were moderately high for adaptive quantitative characters such as the timing of budset or tree height (Q(ST) = 0.189-0.314). Average differentiation estimates for gene SNPs were null, with F(ST) values of 0.005 and 0.006, respectively, among temperature and precipitation population groups. Using two detection approaches, a total of 26 SNPs from 25 genes distributed among 11 of the 12 linkage groups of black spruce were detected as outliers with F(ST) as high as 0.078. Nearly half of the outlier SNPs were located in exons and half of those were nonsynonymous. The functional annotations of genes carrying outlier SNPs and regression analyses between the frequencies of these SNPs and climatic variables supported their implication in adaptive processes. Several genes carrying outlier SNPs belonged to gene families previously found to harbour outlier SNPs in a reproductively isolated but largely sympatric congeneric species, suggesting differential subfunctionalization of gene duplicates. Selection coefficient estimates (S) were moderate but well above the magnitude of drift (>1/N(e)), indicating that the signature of natural selection could be detected at the nucleotide level despite the recent establishment of these populations during the Holocene. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-03-19

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit.

  6. The difficulty of avoiding false positives in genome scans for natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Swapan; Gnerre, Sante; Muller, Paul; Reich, David

    2009-05-01

    Several studies have found evidence for more positive selection on the chimpanzee lineage compared with the human lineage since the two species split. A potential concern, however, is that these findings may simply reflect artifacts of the data: inaccuracies in the underlying chimpanzee genome sequence, which is of lower quality than human. To test this hypothesis, we generated de novo genome assemblies of chimpanzee and macaque and aligned them with human. We also implemented a novel bioinformatic procedure for producing alignments of closely related species that uses synteny information to remove misassembled and misaligned regions, and sequence quality scores to remove nucleotides that are less reliable. We applied this procedure to re-examine 59 genes recently identified as candidates for positive selection in chimpanzees. The great majority of these signals disappear after application of our new bioinformatic procedure. We also carried out laboratory-based resequencing of 10 of the regions in multiple chimpanzees and humans, and found that our alignments were correct wherever there was a conflict with the published results. These findings throw into question previous findings that there has been more positive selection in chimpanzees than in humans since the two species diverged. Our study also highlights the challenges of searching the extreme tails of distributions for signals of natural selection. Inaccuracies in the genome sequence at even a tiny fraction of genes can produce false-positive signals, which make it difficult to identify loci that have genuinely been targets of selection.

  7. Fast selective detection of polar brominated disinfection byproducts in drinking water using precursor ion scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangru; Talley, Jeffrey W; Boggess, Bill; Ding, Guoyu; Birdsell, Dennis

    2008-09-01

    Brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), formed from the reaction of disinfectant(s) with natural organic matter and bromide in raw water, are generally more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogues. Brominated DBPs have been intensively studied over the past 35 years, yet only a fraction of the total organic bromine formed during disinfection has been identified. A significant portion of the unaccounted total organic bromine may be attributed to polar/highly polar brominated DBPs. In this work, a method for fast selective detection of polar/ highly polar brominated DBPs in drinking water was developed using negative ion electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-tqMS) by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79 and 81. This method was conducted without liquid chromatography separation. The results demonstrate that the ESI-tqMS precursor ion scan is an effective tool for the selective detection of electrospray ionizable bromine-containing compounds in a complex mixture. Many polar/ highly polar bromine-containing DBPs were tentatively found in two drinking water samples, and some of them may be new brominated DBPs that have not been previously reported. This method was also extended for the selective detection of polar bromine-containing compounds/contaminants in groundwater, surface water and wastewater.

  8. A space-time permutation scan statistic for disease outbreak detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kulldorff

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to detect disease outbreaks early is important in order to minimize morbidity and mortality through timely implementation of disease prevention and control measures. Many national, state, and local health departments are launching disease surveillance systems with daily analyses of hospital emergency department visits, ambulance dispatch calls, or pharmacy sales for which population-at-risk information is unavailable or irrelevant. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We propose a prospective space-time permutation scan statistic for the early detection of disease outbreaks that uses only case numbers, with no need for population-at-risk data. It makes minimal assumptions about the time, geographical location, or size of the outbreak, and it adjusts for natural purely spatial and purely temporal variation. The new method was evaluated using daily analyses of hospital emergency department visits in New York City. Four of the five strongest signals were likely local precursors to citywide outbreaks due to rotavirus, norovirus, and influenza. The number of false signals was at most modest. CONCLUSION: If such results hold up over longer study times and in other locations, the space-time permutation scan statistic will be an important tool for local and national health departments that are setting up early disease detection surveillance systems.

  9. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  10. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, R.L.; Dunn, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States); Heider, S., E-mail: s79a81@ksu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States); Matthew, C.; Yang, X. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of 'signatures' obtained from a test target to a collection of 'templates', sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8 L and larger. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signature-based radiation-scanning techniques applied to detection of explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples served as surrogate explosive samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signatures of a target compared to collections of templates of surrogate explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Figure-of-merit determined for neutron and neutron-induced gamma-ray signatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discrimination of surrogate explosive from inert samples of 3.8 L and larger.

  11. Population genomic scan for candidate signatures of balancing selection to guide antigen characterization in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Amambua-Ngwa

    Full Text Available Acquired immunity in vertebrates maintains polymorphisms in endemic pathogens, leading to identifiable signatures of balancing selection. To comprehensively survey for genes under such selection in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we generated paired-end short-read sequences of parasites in clinical isolates from an endemic Gambian population, which were mapped to the 3D7 strain reference genome to yield high-quality genome-wide coding sequence data for 65 isolates. A minority of genes did not map reliably, including the hypervariable var, rifin, and stevor families, but 5,056 genes (90.9% of all in the genome had >70% sequence coverage with minimum read depth of 5 for at least 50 isolates, of which 2,853 genes contained 3 or more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for analysis of polymorphic site frequency spectra. Against an overall background of negatively skewed frequencies, as expected from historical population expansion combined with purifying selection, the outlying minority of genes with signatures indicating exceptionally intermediate frequencies were identified. Comparing genes with different stage-specificity, such signatures were most common in those with peak expression at the merozoite stage that invades erythrocytes. Members of clag, PfMC-2TM, surfin, and msp3-like gene families were highly represented, the strongest signature being in the msp3-like gene PF10_0355. Analysis of msp3-like transcripts in 45 clinical and 11 laboratory adapted isolates grown to merozoite-containing schizont stages revealed surprisingly low expression of PF10_0355. In diverse clonal parasite lines the protein product was expressed in a minority of mature schizonts (<1% in most lines and ∼10% in clone HB3, and eight sub-clones of HB3 cultured separately had an intermediate spectrum of positive frequencies (0.9 to 7.5%, indicating phase variable expression of this polymorphic antigen. This and other identified targets of balancing

  12. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Cecilia; Heid, Iris; Randall, Joshua; Lamina, Claudia; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen; Herrera, Blanca; Jackson, Anne; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals ...

  13. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M.; Randall, Joshua C.; Claudia Lamina; Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir; Lu Qi; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Gudmar Thorleifsson; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M; Jackson, Anne U.; Noha Lim; Paul Scheet; Nicole Soranzo; Najaf Amin

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified t...

  14. Simultaneous Detection and Tracking of Pedestrian from Panoramic Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian traffic flow estimation is essential for public place design and construction planning. Traditional data collection by human investigation is tedious, inefficient and expensive. Panoramic laser scanners, e.g. Velodyne HDL-64E, which scan surroundings repetitively at a high frequency, have been increasingly used for 3D object tracking. In this paper, a simultaneous detection and tracking (SDAT) method is proposed for precise and automatic pedestrian trajectory recovery. First, the dynamic environment is detected using two different methods, Nearest-point and Max-distance. Then, all the points on moving objects are transferred into a space-time (x, y, t) coordinate system. The pedestrian detection and tracking amounts to assign the points belonging to pedestrians into continuous trajectories in space-time. We formulate the point assignment task as an energy function which incorporates the point evidence, trajectory number, pedestrian shape and motion. A low energy trajectory will well explain the point observations, and have plausible trajectory trend and length. The method inherently filters out points from other moving objects and false detections. The energy function is solved by a two-step optimization process: tracklet detection in a short temporal window; and global tracklet association through the whole time span. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recover the pedestrians trajectories with accurate positions and low false detections and mismatches.

  15. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  16. Magnetic detection of cracks by fatigue in mild steels using a scanning Hall-sensor microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oota, A.; Ito, T.; Kawano, K.; Sugiyama, D.; Aoki, H.

    1999-01-01

    We fabricated a scanning Hall-sensor microscope with an active area 50 μm×50 μm that can be served as a simple and conventional tool for nondestructive evaluation of magnetic materials. Using this, we succeeded in magnetic detection of small cracks (˜10 mm long and ˜0.1 mm wide) in mild steels with a yield point of 29 kgf/mm2, caused by a plane-bending fatigue test at a stress amplitude of 28 kgf/mm2 and a frequency of 29.2 Hz.

  17. Lanthanum Deposition in the Stomach: Usefulness of Scanning Electron Microscopy for Its Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Tanaka, Takehiro; Ando, Akemi; Nada, Takahiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Yamauchi, Kenji; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Otsuka, Fumio; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    After having been treated with lanthanum carbonate administration for 4 years for hyperphosphatemia, a 75-year-old Japanese woman undergoing hemodialysis was diagnosed with lanthanum phosphate deposition in the stomach. The deposition, seen as white microgranules, was observed using esophagogastroduodenoscopy with magnifying observation. To the best of our knowledge, these are the minutest endoscopy images of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastric mucosa. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation enabled easier identification of the deposited material, which was visible as bright areas. The present case suggests the usefulness of SEM observation in the detection of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Motion Detection from Mobile Robots with Fuzzy Threshold Selection in Consecutive 2D Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion detection and tracking is a relevant problem for mobile robots during navigation to avoid collisions in dynamic environments or in applications where service robots interact with humans. This paper presents a simple method to distinguish mobile obstacles from the environment that is based on applying fuzzy threshold selection to consecutive two-dimensional (2D laser scans previously matched with robot odometry. The proposed method has been tested with the Auriga-α mobile robot in indoors to estimate the motion of nearby pedestrians.

  19. Targeted detection of murine colonic dysplasia in vivo with flexible multispectral scanning fiber endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Miller, Sharon J.; Lee, Cameron; Gustad, Adam; Seibel, Eric J.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectral scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) that collects fluorescence images in vivo from three target peptides that bind specifically to murine colonic adenomas. This ultrathin endoscope was demonstrated in a genetically engineered mouse model of spontaneous colorectal adenomas based on somatic Apc (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene inactivation. The SFE delivers excitation at 440, 532, 635 nm with advance early cancer detection and image-guided therapy in human patients by simultaneously visualizing multiple over expressed molecular targets unique to dysplasia.

  20. An Adaptive Algorithm to Detect Port Scans%一种检测端口扫描的自适应算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单蓉胜; 李小勇; 李建华

    2004-01-01

    Detection of port scan is an important component in a network intrusion detection and prevention system. Traditional statistical methods can be easily evaded by stealthy scans and are prone to DoS attacks. This paper presents a new mechanism termed PSD(port scan detection), which is based on TCP packet anomaly evaluation. By learning the port distribution and flags of TCP packets arriving at the protected hosts, PSD can compute the anomaly score of each packet and effectively detect port scans including slow scans and stealthy scans. Experiments show that PSD has high detection accuracy and low detection latency.

  1. A scan for positively selected genes in the genomes of humans and chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Nielsen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the divergence of humans and chimpanzees about 5 million years ago, these species have undergone a remarkable evolution with drastic divergence in anatomy and cognitive abilities. At the molecular level, despite the small overall magnitude of DNA sequence divergence, we might expect such evolutionary changes to leave a noticeable signature throughout the genome. We here compare 13,731 annotated genes from humans to their chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of positive selection. Many of the genes that present a signature of positive selection tend to be involved in sensory perception or immune defenses. However, the group of genes that show the strongest evidence for positive selection also includes a surprising number of genes involved in tumor suppression and apoptosis, and of genes involved in spermatogenesis. We hypothesize that positive selection in some of these genes may be driven by genomic conflict due to apoptosis during spermatogenesis. Genes with maximal expression in the brain show little or no evidence for positive selection, while genes with maximal expression in the testis tend to be enriched with positively selected genes. Genes on the X chromosome also tend to show an elevated tendency for positive selection. We also present polymorphism data from 20 Caucasian Americans and 19 African Americans for the 50 annotated genes showing the strongest evidence for positive selection. The polymorphism analysis further supports the presence of positive selection in these genes by showing an excess of high-frequency derived nonsynonymous mutations.

  2. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8. When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10−8 threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C. PMID:20663923

  3. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A; Folstein, Susan E; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M; Lamb, Janine A; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L; Lionel, Anath C; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M; Melhem, Nadine M; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J; Mirza, Ghazala K; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L; Bierut, Laura J; Rice, John P; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cantor, Rita M; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P; Nurnberger, John I; Paterson, Andrew D; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Scherer, Stephen W; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  4. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep.

  5. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner\\'s curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  6. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  7. Simultaneous Wood Defect and Species Detection with 3D Laser Scanning Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood grading and wood price are mainly connected with the wood defect and wood species. In this paper, a wood defect quantitative detection scheme and a wood species qualitative identification scheme are proposed simultaneously based on 3D laser scanning point cloud. First, an Artec 3D scanner is used to scan the wood surface to get the 3D point cloud. Each 3D point contains its X, Y, and Z coordinate and its RGB color information. After preprocessing, the Z coordinate value of current point is compared with the set threshold to judge whether it is a defect point (i.e., cavity, worm tunnel, and crack. Second, a deep preferred search algorithm is used to segment the retained defect points marked with different colors. The integration algorithm is used to calculate the surface area and volume of every defect. Finally, wood species identification is performed with the wood surface’s color information. The color moments of scanned points are used for classification, but the defect points are not used. Experiments indicate that our scheme can accurately measure the surface areas and volumes of cavity, worm tunnel, and crack on wood surface with measurement error less than 5% and it can also reach a wood species recognition accuracy of 95%.

  8. Dual-detection confocal microscopy: high-speed surface profiling without depth scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging without depth scanning that we refer to as the dual-detection confocal microscopy (DDCM). Compared to conventional confocal microscopy, DDCM utilizes two pinholes of different sizes. DDCM generates two axial response curves which have different stiffness according to the pinhole diameters. The two axial response curves can draw the characteristics curve of the system which shows the relationship between the axial position of the sample and the intensity ratio. Utilizing the characteristic curve, the DDCM reconstructs a 3-D surface profile with a single 2-D scanning. The height of each pixel is calculated by the intensity ratio of the pixel and the intensity ratio curve. Since the height information can be obtained directly from the characteristic curve without depth scanning, a major advantage of DDCM over the conventional confocal microscopy is a speed. The 3-D surface profiling time is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, DDCM can measure 3-D images without the influence of the sample condition since the intensity ratio is independent of the quantum yield and reflectance. We present two types of DDCM, such as a fluorescence microscopy and a reflectance microscopy. In addition, we extend the measurement range axially by varying the pupil function. Here, we demonstrate the working principle of DDCM and the feasibility of the proposed methods.

  9. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A;

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early ...

  10. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, BT; van den Oord, E; Akkari, A

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early ...

  11. a Feasibility Study on Use of Generic Mobile Laser Scanning System for Detecting Asphalt Pavement Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinqu; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm) within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  12. Event-based progression detection strategies using scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, K A; Lo, B; Zhou, Q; Vos, F M; Vossepoel, A M; Lemij, H G

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring glaucoma patients and ensuring optimal treatment requires accurate and precise detection of progression. Many glaucomatous progression detection strategies may be formulated for Scanning Laser Polarimetry (SLP) data of the local nerve fiber thickness. In this paper, several strategies, all based on repeated GDx VCC SLP measurements, are tested to identify the optimal one for clinical use. The parameters of the methods were adapted to yield a set specificity of 97.5% on real image series. For a fixed sensitivity of 90%, the minimally detectable loss was subsequently determined for both localized and diffuse loss. Due to the large size of the required data set, a previously described simulation method was used for assessing the minimally detectable loss. The optimal strategy was identified and was based on two baseline visits and two follow-up visits, requiring two-out-of-four positive tests. Its associated minimally detectable loss was 5-12 μm, depending on the reproducibility of the measurements.

  13. A FEASIBILITY STUDY ON USE OF GENERIC MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM FOR DETECTING ASPHALT PAVEMENT CRACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  14. SINGLE TREE DETECTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING A MARKED POINT PROCESS BASED METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree detection and reconstruction is of great interest in large-scale city modelling. In this paper, we present a marked point process model to detect single trees from airborne laser scanning (ALS data. We consider single trees in ALS recovered canopy height model (CHM as a realization of point process of circles. Unlike traditional marked point process, we sample the model in a constraint configuration space by making use of image process techniques. A Gibbs energy is defined on the model, containing a data term which judge the fitness of the model with respect to the data, and prior term which incorporate the prior knowledge of object layouts. We search the optimal configuration through a steepest gradient descent algorithm. The presented hybrid framework was test on three forest plots and experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Confocal laser scanning microscopy detection of chlorophylls and carotenoids in chloroplasts and chromoplasts of tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Lucio; Amenós, Montse; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are unique among eukaryotic cells because of the presence of plastids, including chloroplasts and chromoplasts. Chloroplasts are found in green tissues and harbor the photosynthetic machinery (including chlorophyll molecules), while chromoplasts are present in non-photosynthetic tissues and accumulate large amounts of carotenoids. During tomato fruit development, chloroplasts are converted into chromoplasts that accumulate high levels of lycopene, a linear carotenoid responsible for the characteristic red color of ripe fruit. Here, we describe a simple and fast method to detect both types of fully differentiated plastids (chloroplasts and chromoplasts), as well as intermediate stages, in fresh tomato fruits. The method is based on the differential autofluorescence of chlorophylls and carotenoids (lycopene) detected by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  16. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-07-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates ("wave-plate-enhanced RBS") that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia.

  17. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates (“wave-plate-enhanced RBS”) that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia. PMID:21750772

  18. Computer-aided detection and quantification of cavitary tuberculosis from CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Kubler, Andre; Luna, Brian; Jain, Sanjay; Bishai, William R.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present a computer-aided detection tool for identifying, quantifying, and evaluating tuberculosis (TB) cavities in the infected lungs from computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: The authors’ proposed method is based on a novel shape-based automated detection algorithm on CT scans followed by a fuzzy connectedness (FC) delineation procedure. In order to assess interaction between cavities and airways, the authors first roughly identified air-filled structures (airway, cavities, esophagus, etc.) by thresholding over Hounsfield unit of CT image. Then, airway and cavity structure detection was conducted within the support vector machine classification algorithm. Once airway and cavities were detected automatically, the authors extracted airway tree using a hybrid multiscale approach based on novel affinity relations within the FC framework and segmented cavities using intensity-based FC algorithm. At final step, the authors refined airway structures within the local regions of FC with finer control. Cavity segmentation results were compared to the reference truths provided by expert radiologists and cavity formation was tracked longitudinally from serial CT scans through shape and volume information automatically determined through the authors’ proposed system. Morphological evolution of the cavitary TB were analyzed accordingly with this process. Finally, the authors computed the minimum distance between cavity surface and nearby airway structures by using the linear time distance transform algorithm to explore potential role of airways in cavity formation and morphological evolution. Results: The proposed methodology was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on pulmonary CT images of rabbits experimentally infected with TB, and multiple markers such as cavity volume, cavity surface area, minimum distance from cavity surface to the nearest bronchial-tree, and longitudinal change of these markers (namely, morphological evolution of cavities) were

  19. A genome-wide scan study identifies a single nucleotide substitution in ASIP associated with white versus non-white coat-colour variation in sheep (Ovis aries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M-H; Tiirikka, T; Kantanen, J

    2014-02-01

    In sheep, coat colour (and pattern) is one of the important traits of great biological, economic and social importance. However, the genetics of sheep coat colour has not yet been fully clarified. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sheep coat colours by genotyping 47 303 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Finnsheep population in Finland. We identified 35 SNPs associated with all the coat colours studied, which cover genomic regions encompassing three known pigmentation genes (TYRP1, ASIP and MITF) in sheep. Eighteen of these associations were confirmed in further tests between white versus non-white individuals, but none of the 35 associations were significant in the analysis of only non-white colours. Across the tests, the s66432.1 in ASIP showed significant association (P=4.2 × 10(-11) for all the colours; P=2.3 × 10(-11) for white versus non-white colours) with the variation in coat colours and strong linkage disequilibrium with other significant variants surrounding the ASIP gene. The signals detected around the ASIP gene were explained by differences in white versus non-white alleles. Further, a genome scan for selection for white coat pigmentation identified a strong and striking selection signal spanning ASIP. Our study identified the main candidate gene for the coat colour variation between white and non-white as ASIP, an autosomal gene that has been directly implicated in the pathway regulating melanogenesis. Together with ASIP, the two other newly identified genes (TYRP1 and MITF) in the Finnsheep, bordering associated SNPs, represent a new resource for enriching sheep coat-colour genetics and breeding.

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

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    Chiao-Ling Lo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP. This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS, were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50% of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284 and intronic regions (169 with the least in exon's (4, suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a, excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1, neurotransmitters (Pomc, and synapses (Snap29. This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  1. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits.

  2. Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome prospectively detected by review of chest computed tomography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Jung; Park, Chul Hwan; Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Geun Dong; Byun, Min Kwang; Lee, Sungsoo; Lee, Kyung-A; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Seong Han; Yang, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Chul Min

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHD) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes folliculin (FLCN) and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. BHD is commonly accompanied by fibrofolliculomas, renal tumors, multiple pulmonary cysts, and spontaneous pneumothorax. The aim of this study was to detect BHD prospectively in patients undergoing chest computed tomography (CT) scans and to evaluate further the characteristics of BHD in Korea. Methods We prospectively checked and reviewed the chest CT scans obtained for 10,883 patients at Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea, from June 1, 2015 to May 31, 2016. Seventeen patients met the study inclusion criteria and underwent screening for FLCN mutation to confirm BHD. We analyzed the characteristics of the patients confirmed to have BHD and those for a further 6 patients who had previously been described in Korea. Results Six (0.06%) of the 10,883 patients reviewed were diagnosed with BHD. There was no difference in demographic or clinical features between the patients with BHD (n = 6) and those without BHD (n = 11). Pneumothorax was present in 50% of the patients with BHD but typical skin and renal lesions were absent. The maximum size of the cysts in the BHD group (median 39.4 mm; interquartile range [IQR] 11.4 mm) was significantly larger than that in the non-BHD group (median 15.8 mm; IQR 7.8 mm; P = 0.001). Variable morphology was seen in 100.0% of the cysts in the BHD group but in only 18.2% of the cysts in the non-BHD group (P = 0.002). Nine (95%) of the total of 12 Korean patients with BHD had experienced pneumothorax. Typical skin and renal lesions were present in 20.0% of patients with BHD. Conclusions Our findings suggest that BHD can be detected if chest CT scans are read in detail. PMID:28151982

  3. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

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    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  4. Genome-wide Scan of 29,141 African Americans Finds No Evidence of Directional Selection since Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Harris, Curtis C.; Henderson, Brian E.; Ingles, Sue A.; Isaacs, William; De Jager, Phillip L.; John, Esther M.; Kittles, Rick A.; Larkin, Emma; McNeill, Lorna H.; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Wiencke, John K.; Witte, John S.; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Reich, David; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection after admixture was reported on the basis of deviations in local ancestry, and selection before admixture was reported on the basis of allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations. The local-ancestry deviations reported by the previous study did not replicate in our very large sample, and we show that such deviations were expected purely by chance, given the number of hypotheses tested. We further show that the previous study’s conclusion of selection in African Americans before admixture is also subject to doubt. This is because the FST statistics they used were inflated and because true signals of unusual allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations would be best explained by selection that occurred in Africa prior to migration to the Americas. PMID:25242497

  5. Genome-wide scan of 29,141 African Americans finds no evidence of directional selection since admixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Henderson, Brian E; Ingles, Sue A; Isaacs, William; De Jager, Phillip L; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick A; Larkin, Emma; McNeill, Lorna H; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S; Tucker, Margaret A; Wiencke, John K; Witte, John S; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Reich, David; Price, Alkes L

    2014-10-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection after admixture was reported on the basis of deviations in local ancestry, and selection before admixture was reported on the basis of allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations. The local-ancestry deviations reported by the previous study did not replicate in our very large sample, and we show that such deviations were expected purely by chance, given the number of hypotheses tested. We further show that the previous study's conclusion of selection in African Americans before admixture is also subject to doubt. This is because the FST statistics they used were inflated and because true signals of unusual allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations would be best explained by selection that occurred in Africa prior to migration to the Americas.

  6. Quantitative linkage genome scan for atopy in a large collection of Caucasian families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webb, Bradley T.; van den Oord, Edwin; Akkari, Anthony; Wilton, Steve; Ly, Tina; Duv, Rachael; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Carlsen, Karin; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Lenney, Warren; Silverman, Michael; Sly, Peter; Sundy, John; Tsanakas, John; von Berg, Andrea; Whyte, Moira; Blumenthal, Malcolm; Vestbo, Jorgen; Middleton, Lefkos; Helms, Peter J.; Anderson, Wayne H.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative phenotypes correlated with a complex disorder offer increased power to detect linkage in comparison to affected-unaffected classifications. Asthma is a complex disorder characterized by periods of bronchial obstruction and increased bronchial hyper reactivity. In childhood and early adu

  7. Increased Detection of Colorectal Polyps in Screening Colonoscopy Using High Definition i-SCAN Compared with Standard White Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Sang Young; Park, Iksoo; Lee, Wook Jin; Park, Jaechan; Chon, Nuri; Oh, Tak Geun; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high definition (HD) i-SCAN for colorectal polyp detection in screening colonoscopy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 501 patients who had undergone screening colonoscopy performed by three endoscopists with either HD i-SCAN (n=149) or standard white light (n=352) from January 2, 2014 through June 30, 2014. Patient information and inter-endoscopist variation as well as polyp number, endoscopic findings, and pathologic characteristics were reviewed. Results: The detection rates of colorectal and neoplastic polyps were significantly higher using HD i-SCAN than standard white light colonoscopy (52% vs. 38.1%, p=0.004 for colorectal polyps; and 37.2% vs. 27.9%, p=0.041 for neoplastic polyps). Analysis of endoscopic findings revealed no difference in detected polyp size between HD i-SCAN and standard white light colonoscopy (4.59±2.35 mm vs. 4.82±2.81 mm, p=0.739), but non-protruding polyps were more commonly detected by i-SCAN than by standard white light colonoscopy (24.6% vs. 13.5%, p=0.007). Conclusions: Colonoscopy using HD i-SCAN had a significantly higher detection rate of colorectal polyps, including neoplastic polyps, because of improved sensitivity for detecting non-protruding lesions. PMID:26855927

  8. Detection of genomic signatures for pig hairlessness using high-density SNP data

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    Ying SU,Yi LONG,Xinjun LIAO,Huashui AI,Zhiyan ZHANG,Bin YANG,Shijun XIAO,Jianhong TANG,Wenshui XIN,Lusheng HUANG,Jun REN,Nengshui DING

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hair provides thermal regulation for mammals and protects the skin from wounds, bites and ultraviolet (UV radiation, and is important in adaptation to volatile environments. Pigs in nature are divided into hairy and hairless, which provide a good model for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of hairlessness. We conducted a genomic scan for genetically differentiated regions between hairy and hairless pigs using 60K SNP data, with the aim to better understand the genetic basis for the hairless phenotype in pigs. A total of 38405 SNPs in 498 animals from 36 diverse breeds were used to detect genomic signatures for pig hairlessness by estimating between-population (FST values. Seven diversifying signatures between Yucatan hairless pig and hairy pigs were identified on pig chromosomes (SSC 1, 3, 7, 8, 10, 11 and 16, and the biological functions of two notable genes, RGS17 and RB1, were revealed. When Mexican hairless pigs were contrasted with hairypigs, strong signatures were detected on SSC1 and SSC10, which harbor two functionally plausible genes, REV3L and BAMBI. KEGG pathway analysis showed a subset of overrepresented genes involved in the T cell receptor signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway and the tight junction pathways. All of these pathways may be important in local adaptability of hairless pigs. The potential mechanisms underlying the hairless phenotype in pigs are reported for the first time. RB1 and BAMBI are interesting candidate genes for the hairless phenotype in Yucatan hairless and Mexico hairless pigs, respectively. RGS17, REV3L, ICOS and RASGRP1 as well as other genes involved in the MAPK and T cell receptor signaling pathways may be important in environmental adaption by improved tolerance to UV damage in hairless pigs. These findings improve our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited hairlessness in pigs.

  9. Detecting benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by line-scan macro-scale Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Gonzalez, Maria; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-05-01

    Excessive use of benzoyl peroxide (BPO, a bleaching agent) in wheat flour can destroy flour nutrients and cause diseases to consumers. A macro-scale Raman chemical imaging method was developed for direct detection of BPO mixed in the wheat flour. A 785 nm line laser was used in a line-scan Hyperspectral Raman imaging system. Raman images were collected from wheat flour mixed with BPO at eight concentrations (w/w) from 50 to 6,400 ppm. A sample holder (150×100×2 mm3) was used to present a thin layer (2 mm thick) of the powdered sample for image acquisition. A baseline correction method was used to correct the fluctuating fluorescence signals from the wheat flour. To isolate BPO particles from the flour background, a simple thresholding method was applied to the single-band fluorescence-free images at a unique Raman peak wavenumber (i.e., 1001 cm-1) preselected for the BPO detection. Chemical images were created to detect and map the BPO particles. Limit of detection for the BPO was estimated in the order of 50 ppm, which is on the same level with regulatory standards.

  10. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  11. SEGMENTATION OF CT SCAN LUMBAR SPINE IMAGE USING MEDIAN FILTER AND CANNY EDGE DETECTION ALGORITHM

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    E.Punarselvam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The lumbar vertebrae are the largest segments of the movable part of the vertebral column, they are elected L1 to L5, starting at the top. The spinal column, more commonly called the backbone, is made up primarily of vertebrae discs, and the spinal cord. Acting as a communication conduit for the brain, signals are transmitted and received through the spinal cord. It is otherwise known as vertebralcolumn consists of 24 separate bony vertebrae together with 5 fused vertebrae, it is the unique interaction between the solid and fluid components that provides the disc strength and flexibility required to bear loading of the lumbar spine. In this work the Segmentation of Spine Image using Median Filter and Canny Edge Detection Algorithm between lumbar spine CT scan spine disc image. The result shows thatthe canny edge detection algorithm produced better result when compared other edge detection algorithm. Finding the correct boundary in a noisy image of spine disc is still a difficult one. To find outabsolute edges from noisy images, the comparative result can be verified and validated with the standard medical values. The result shows that the canny edge detection algorithm performs well and produced a solution very nearer to the optimal solution. This method is vigorous for all kinds of noisy images.

  12. Univariate/multivariate genome-wide association scans using data from families and unrelated samples.

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    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available As genome-wide association studies (GWAS are becoming more popular, two approaches, among others, could be considered in order to improve statistical power for identifying genes contributing subtle to moderate effects to human diseases. The first approach is to increase sample size, which could be achieved by combining both unrelated and familial subjects together. The second approach is to jointly analyze multiple correlated traits. In this study, by extending generalized estimating equations (GEEs, we propose a simple approach for performing univariate or multivariate association tests for the combined data of unrelated subjects and nuclear families. In particular, we correct for population stratification by integrating principal component analysis and transmission disequilibrium test strategies. The proposed method allows for multiple siblings as well as missing parental information. Simulation studies show that the proposed test has improved power compared to two popular methods, EIGENSTRAT and FBAT, by analyzing the combined data, while correcting for population stratification. In addition, joint analysis of bivariate traits has improved power over univariate analysis when pleiotropic effects are present. Application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16 data sets attests to the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  13. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  14. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting the Salmonella carrier-state in the chicken

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    Bumstead Nat

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection for increased resistance to Salmonella colonisation and excretion could reduce the risk of foodborne Salmonella infection. In order to identify potential loci affecting resistance, differences in resistance were identified between the N and 61 inbred lines and two QTL research performed. In an F2 cross, the animals were inoculated at one week of age with Salmonella enteritidis and cloacal swabs were carried out 4 and 5 wk post inoculation (thereafter called CSW4F2 and CSW4F2 and caecal contamination (CAECF2 was assessed 1 week later. The animals from the (N × 61 × N backcross were inoculated at six weeks of age with Salmonella typhimurium and cloacal swabs were studied from wk 1 to 4 (thereafter called CSW1BC to CSW4BC. A total of 33 F2 and 46 backcross progeny were selectively genotyped for 103 and 135 microsatellite markers respectively. The analysis used least-squares-based and non-parametric interval mapping. Two genome-wise significant QTL were observed on Chromosome 1 for CSW2BC and on Chromosome 2 for CSW4F2, and four suggestive QTL for CSW5F2 on Chromosome 2, for CSW5F2 and CSW2BC on chromosome 5 and for CAECF2 on chromosome 16. These results suggest new regions of interest and the putative role of SAL1.

  15. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

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    Avinash M. Veerappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4% than in UGT2B15 (17.6%. Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  17. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Lindgren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580 informative for adult waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR. We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11 and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9. A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8. The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  18. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  19. Automatic Feature Detection, Description and Matching from Mobile Laser Scanning Data and Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussnain, Zille; Oude Elberink, Sander; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    In mobile laser scanning systems, the platform's position is measured by GNSS and IMU, which is often not reliable in urban areas. Consequently, derived Mobile Laser Scanning Point Cloud (MLSPC) lacks expected positioning reliability and accuracy. Many of the current solutions are either semi-automatic or unable to achieve pixel level accuracy. We propose an automatic feature extraction method which involves utilizing corresponding aerial images as a reference data set. The proposed method comprise three steps; image feature detection, description and matching between corresponding patches of nadir aerial and MLSPC ortho images. In the data pre-processing step the MLSPC is patch-wise cropped and converted to ortho images. Furthermore, each aerial image patch covering the area of the corresponding MLSPC patch is also cropped from the aerial image. For feature detection, we implemented an adaptive variant of Harris-operator to automatically detect corner feature points on the vertices of road markings. In feature description phase, we used the LATCH binary descriptor, which is robust to data from different sensors. For descriptor matching, we developed an outlier filtering technique, which exploits the arrangements of relative Euclidean-distances and angles between corresponding sets of feature points. We found that the positioning accuracy of the computed correspondence has achieved the pixel level accuracy, where the image resolution is 12cm. Furthermore, the developed approach is reliable when enough road markings are available in the data sets. We conclude that, in urban areas, the developed approach can reliably extract features necessary to improve the MLSPC accuracy to pixel level.

  20. A Genome Scan for Modifiers of Age at Onset in Huntington Disease: The HD MAPS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Liang; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Durr, Alexandra; Dodé, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Cabrero, David Mayo; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Nance, Martha; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Jones, Randi; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madeline; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K.; Russ, Ana L.; Knowlton, Beth; Djoussé, Luc; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S.; Tariot, Suzanne; Gusella, Michael F.; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Atwood, Larry D.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Cha, Jang-Ho J.; Hersch, Steven M.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Myers, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat within the coding region of a novel gene on 4p16.3. Although the variation in age at onset is partly explained by the size of the expanded repeat, the unexplained variation in age at onset is strongly heritable (h2=0.56), which suggests that other genes modify the age at onset of HD. To identify these modifier loci, we performed a 10-cM density genomewide scan in 629 affected sibling pairs (295 pedigrees and 695 individuals), using ages at onset adjusted for the expanded and normal CAG repeat sizes. Because all those studied were HD affected, estimates of allele sharing identical by descent at and around the HD locus were adjusted by a positionally weighted method to correct for the increased allele sharing at 4p. Suggestive evidence for linkage was found at 4p16 (LOD=1.93), 6p21–23 (LOD=2.29), and 6q24–26 (LOD=2.28), which may be useful for investigation of genes that modify age at onset of HD. PMID:12900792

  1. Using rapid-scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möser, J; Lips, K; Tseytlin, M; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S; Schnegg, A

    2017-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid-scan and continuous-wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid-scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid-scan EPR results in signal-to-noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid-scan EPR is thus capable of improving the detection limit of quantitative EPR by at least one order of magnitude. In addition, we provide a recipe for setting up and calibrating a conventional pulsed and continuous-wave EPR spectrometer for rapid-scan EPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Heteropolymeric triplex-based genomic assay to detect pathogens or single-nucleotide polymorphisms in human genomic samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine I Daksis

    Full Text Available Human genomic samples are complex and are considered difficult to assay directly without denaturation or PCR amplification. We report the use of a base-specific heteropolymeric triplex, formed by native duplex genomic target and an oligonucleotide third strand probe, to assay for low copy pathogen genomes present in a sample also containing human genomic duplex DNA, or to assay human genomic duplex DNA for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, without PCR amplification. Wild-type and mutant probes are used to identify triplexes containing FVL G1691A, MTHFR C677T and CFTR mutations. The specific triplex structure forms rapidly at room temperature in solution and may be detected without a separation step. YOYO-1, a fluorescent bis-intercalator, promotes and signals the formation of the specific triplex. Genomic duplexes may be assayed homogeneously with single base pair resolution. The specific triple-stranded structures of the assay may approximate homologous recombination intermediates, which various models suggest may form in either the major or minor groove of the duplex. The bases of the stable duplex target are rendered specifically reactive to the bases of the probe because of the activity of intercalated YOYO-1, which is known to decondense duplex locally 1.3 fold. This may approximate the local decondensation effected by recombination proteins such as RecA in vivo. Our assay, while involving triplex formation, is sui generis, as it is not homopurine sequence-dependent, as are "canonical triplexes". Rather, the base pair-specific heteropolymeric triplex of the assay is conformation-dependent. The highly sensitive diagnostic assay we present allows for the direct detection of base sequence in genomic duplex samples, including those containing human genomic duplex DNA, thereby bypassing the inherent problems and cost associated with conventional PCR based diagnostic assays.

  3. Detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of dynamic enhancement magnetic resonance imaging and multiphase multirow-detector helical CT scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhao; Jin-Lin Yao; Ying Wang; Kang-Rong Zhou

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the gadolinium-enhanced multiphase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multiphase multirow-detector helical CT (MDCT)scanning for detection of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: MDCT scanning and baseline MRI with SE T1-WI and T2-WI sequence combined with FMPSPGR sequence were performed in 37 patients with 43 small HCCs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to analyze the results for modality.RESULTS: The areas below ROC curve (Az) were calculated. There was no statistical difference in dynamic enhancement MDCT and MRI. The detection rate of small HCC was 97.5%-97.6% on multiphase MDCT scanning and 90.7%-94.7% on MRI, respectively. The sensitivity of detection for small HCC on MDCT scanning was higher than that on dynamic enhancement MRI. The sensitivity of detection for minute HCC (tumor diameter ≤ 1 cm)was 90.0%-95.0% on MDCT scanning and 70.0%-85.0% on MRI, respectively.CONCLUSION: MDCT scanning should be performed for early detection and effective treatment of small HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis during follow-up.

  4. Detection of genomic instability in hypospadias patients by random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... in situ hybridization, comparative genomic hybridization. (CGH) and ... Gene Genius Bio Imaging System (Syngene; Frederick, Maryland,. USA). .... molecular genetic case control studies with high and low hypospadias grade ...

  5. The influence of scan mode and circle fitting on tree stem detection, stem diameter and volume extraction from terrestrial laser scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Pyare; Newnham, Glenn; Rock, Gilles; Udelhoven, Thomas; Werner, Willy; Hill, Joachim

    2013-03-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to estimate a number of biophysical and structural vegetation parameters. Of these stem diameter is a primary input to traditional forest inventory. While many experimental studies have confirmed the potential for TLS to successfully extract stem diameter, the estimation accuracies differ strongly for these studies - due to differences in experimental design, data processing and test plot characteristics. In order to provide consistency and maximize estimation accuracy, a systematic study into the impact of these variables is required. To contribute to such an approach, 12 scans were acquired with a FARO photon 120 at two test plots (Beech, Douglas fir) to assess the effects of scan mode and circle fitting on the extraction of stem diameter and volume. An automated tree stem detection algorithm based on the range images of single scans was developed and applied to the data. Extraction of stem diameter was achieved by slicing the point cloud and fitting circles to the slices using three different algorithms (Lemen, Pratt and Taubin), resulting in diameter profiles for each detected tree. Diameter at breast height (DBH) was determined using both the single value for the diameter fitted at the nominal breast height and by a linear fit of the stem diameter vertical profile. The latter is intended to reduce the influence of outliers and errors in the ground level determination. TLS-extracted DBH was compared to tape-measured DBH. Results show that tree stems with an unobstructed view to the scanner can be successfully extracted automatically from range images of the TLS data with detection rates of 94% for Beech and 96% for Douglas fir. If occlusion of trees is accounted for stem detection rates decrease to 85% (Beech) and 84% (Douglas fir). As far as the DBH estimation is concerned, both DBH extraction methods yield estimates which agree with reference measurements, however, the linear fit based approach proved to be more

  6. Super-Resolution Scanning Laser Microscopy Based on Virtually Structured Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanan; Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy plays a key role in biological studies and medical diagnosis. The spatial resolution of conventional optical microscopes is limited to approximately half the wavelength of the illumination light as a result of the diffraction limit. Several approaches-including confocal microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy, and structured illumination microscopy-have been established to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, none of these methods is suitable for the super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of retinal structures because of laser safety issues and inevitable eye movements. We recently experimentally validated virtually structured detection (VSD) as an alternative strategy to extend the diffraction limit. Without the complexity of structured illumination, VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution in scanning laser microscopy. In this article we summarize the basic principles of the VSD method, review our demonstrated single-point and line-scan super-resolution systems, and discuss both technical challenges and the potential of VSD-based instrumentation for super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of the retina.

  7. Automated surface-scanning detection of pathogenic bacteria on fresh produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Du, Songtao; Liu, Yuzhe; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Xi, Jianguo; Crumpler, Michael S.; Sirois, Donald L.; Best, Steve R.; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface-scanning detector position on the resonant frequency and signal amplitude of a wireless magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor for direct pathogen detection on solid surfaces. The experiments were conducted on the surface of a flat polyethylene (PE) plate as a model study. An ME biosensor (1 mm × 0.2 mm × 30 μm) was placed on the PE surface, and a surface-scanning detector was brought close and aligned to the sensor for wireless resonant frequency measurement. The position of the detector was accurately controlled by using a motorized three-axis translation system (i.e., controlled X, Y, and Z positions). The results showed that the resonant frequency variations of the sensor were -125 to +150 Hz for X and Y detector displacements of +/-600 μm and Z displacements of +100 to +500 μm. These resonant frequency variations were small compared to the sensor's initial resonant frequency (Z distance). Finally, additional experiments were conducted on the surface of cucumbers. Similar results were obtained.

  8. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine.

  9. Detection of a magnetic bead by hybrid nanodevices using scanning gate microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corte-León

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid ferromagnetic(Py/non-magnetic metal(Au junctions with a width of 400 nm are studied by magnetotransport measurements, magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM with a magnetic bead (MB attached to the probe, and micromagnetic simulations. In the transverse geometry, the devices demonstrate a characteristic magnetoresistive behavior that depends on the direction of the in plane magnetic field, with minimum/maximum variation when the field is applied parallel/perpendicular to the Py wire. The SGM is performed with a NdFeB bead of 1.6 μm diameter attached to the scanning probe. Our results demonstrate that the hybrid junction can be used to detect this type of MB. A rough approximation of the sensing volume of the junction has the shape of elliptical cylinder with the volume of ∼1.51 μm3. Micromagnetic simulations coupled to a magnetotransport model including anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effects are in good agreement with the experimental findings, enabling the interpretation of the SGM images.

  10. Detection of a magnetic bead by hybrid nanodevices using scanning gate microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F.; Manzin, A.; Schumacher, H. W.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid ferromagnetic(Py)/non-magnetic metal(Au) junctions with a width of 400 nm are studied by magnetotransport measurements, magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) with a magnetic bead (MB) attached to the probe, and micromagnetic simulations. In the transverse geometry, the devices demonstrate a characteristic magnetoresistive behavior that depends on the direction of the in plane magnetic field, with minimum/maximum variation when the field is applied parallel/perpendicular to the Py wire. The SGM is performed with a NdFeB bead of 1.6 μm diameter attached to the scanning probe. Our results demonstrate that the hybrid junction can be used to detect this type of MB. A rough approximation of the sensing volume of the junction has the shape of elliptical cylinder with the volume of ˜1.51 μm3. Micromagnetic simulations coupled to a magnetotransport model including anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effects are in good agreement with the experimental findings, enabling the interpretation of the SGM images.

  11. Geometry and intensity based culvert detection in mobile laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Hyyppa, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS), which recently has been developing so quickly as a promising technology for mapping and remote sensing (RS), offers a good means to measure the fundamental geographic data, e.g. culverts, for urban planning and road engineering. This study as the first try presents a new automatic method to detect culverts in MLS point clouds, in which actually only partial characterization of this category of objects can be presented due to the restricted scanning zenith of MLS. The schematic is based on the raster-form of the data, and the digital terrain models (DTMs) with multi-leveled resolutions are first yielded by local minimum filtering. Then, the common layout of the expanded areas containing culverts is generalized as the theoretical basis, and the schematic components are derived to deploy the concrete judgment. The geometry and intensity information about culverts are both utilized to determine the real locations from coarse- to fine-scales. Numerical analysis based on the real-measured MLS data at the Espoonlahti test site has basically validated the proposed approach. Concretely, the statistical errors of the retrieved lengths and widths of the pedestrian culverts are less than 9% and 16% compared to the real ones individually, notwithstanding the inner heights innately in-accessible.

  12. Improved eye-fixation detection using polarization-modulated retinal birefringence scanning, immune to corneal birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved method for remote eye-fixation detection, using a polarization-modulated approach to retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), without the need for individual calibration or separate background measurements and essentially independent of corneal birefringence. Polarization-modulated RBS detects polarization changes generated in modulated polarized light passing through a unique pattern of nerve fibers identifying and defining the retinal region where fixation occurs (the fovea). A proof-of-concept demonstration in human eyes suggests that polarization-modulated RBS has the potential to reliably detect true foveal fixation on a specified point with an accuracy of at least ± 0.75°, and that it can be applied to the general population, including individuals with sub-optimal eyes and young children, where early diagnosis of visual problems can be critical. As could be employed in an eye-controlled display or in other devices, polarization-modulated RBS also enables and paves the way for new and reliable eye-fixation-evoked human-machine interfaces.

  13. GPR Signal Processing with Geography Adaptive Scanning using Vector Radar for Antipersonal Landmine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Sato

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR is a promising sensor for landmine detection, however there are two major problems to overcome. One is the rough ground surface. The other problem is the distance between the antennas of GPR. It remains irremovable clutters on a sub-surface image output from GPR by first problem. Geography adaptive scanning is useful to image objects beneath rough ground surface. Second problem makes larger the nonlinearity of the relationship between the time for propagation and the depth of a buried object, imaging the small objects such as an antipersonnel landmine closer to the antennas. In this paper, we modify Kirchhoff migration so as to account for not only the variation of position of the sensor head, but also the antennas alignment of the vector radar. The validity of this method is discussed through application to the signals acquired in experiments.

  14. Detecting Distributed Scans Using High-Performance Query-DrivenVisualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockinger, Kurt; Bethel, E. Wes; Campbell, Scott; Dart, Eli; Wu,Kesheng

    2006-09-01

    Modern forensic analytics applications, like network trafficanalysis, perform high-performance hypothesis testing, knowledgediscovery and data mining on very large datasets. One essential strategyto reduce the time required for these operations is to select only themost relevant data records for a given computation. In this paper, wepresent a set of parallel algorithms that demonstrate how an efficientselection mechanism -- bitmap indexing -- significantly speeds up acommon analysist ask, namely, computing conditional histogram on verylarge datasets. We present a thorough study of the performancecharacteristics of the parallel conditional histogram algorithms. Asacase study, we compute conditional histograms for detecting distributedscans hidden in a dataset consisting of approximately 2.5 billion networkconnection records. We show that these conditional histograms can becomputed on interactive timescale (i.e., in seconds). We also show how toprogressively modify the selection criteria to narrow the analysis andfind the sources of the distributed scans.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Roadside/Obstacle Detection Method Using 3D Scanned Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Katsuyuki

    In this paper, we have reported the development of a snowblower support system which can safely navigate snowblowers, even during a whiteout, with the combination of a very accurate GPS system, so called RTK-GPS, and a unique and highly accurate map of roadsides and obstacles on roads. Particularly emphasized new techniques in this paper are ways to detect accurate geographical positions of roadsides and obstacles by utilizing and analyzing 3D laser scanned data, whose data has become available in recent days. The experiment has shown that the map created by the methods and RTK-GPS can sufficiently navigate snowblowers, whereby a secure and pleasant social environment can be archived in snow areas of Japan. In addition, proposed methods are expected to be useful for other systems such as a quick development of a highly accurate road map, a safely navigation of a wheeled chair, and so on.

  16. Copy number variation detection in whole-genome sequencing data using the Bayesian information criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ruibin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Luquette, Lovelace J; Kim, Tae-Min; Lee, Eunjung; Zhang, Jianhua; Johnson, Mark D; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Peter J

    2011-11-15

    DNA copy number variations (CNVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of cancer and confer susceptibility to a variety of human disorders. Array comparative genomic hybridization has been used widely to identify CNVs genome wide, but the next-generation sequencing technology provides an opportunity to characterize CNVs genome wide with unprecedented resolution. In this study, we developed an algorithm to detect CNVs from whole-genome sequencing data and applied it to a newly sequenced glioblastoma genome with a matched control. This read-depth algorithm, called BIC-seq, can accurately and efficiently identify CNVs via minimizing the Bayesian information criterion. Using BIC-seq, we identified hundreds of CNVs as small as 40 bp in the cancer genome sequenced at 10× coverage, whereas we could only detect large CNVs (> 15 kb) in the array comparative genomic hybridization profiles for the same genome. Eighty percent (14/16) of the small variants tested (110 bp to 14 kb) were experimentally validated by quantitative PCR, demonstrating high sensitivity and true positive rate of the algorithm. We also extended the algorithm to detect recurrent CNVs in multiple samples as well as deriving error bars for breakpoints using a Gibbs sampling approach. We propose this statistical approach as a principled yet practical and efficient method to estimate CNVs in whole-genome sequencing data.

  17. Imaging and analysis of subsurface Cu interconnects by detecting backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, L. M.; Kawasaki, M.; Boettcher, S. H.; Wells, O. C.

    2005-06-01

    Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnects that were located 0.65-2.7-μm below the surface of silicon-integrated circuits were imaged in a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope with a scanning attachment by detecting backscattered electrons (BSEs) with an incident electron-beam energy (Eo) in the range of 30-400keV. BSE images could be used to detect voids in subsurface Cu interconnects, even in regions covered with upper level Cu lines or vias. As Eo was increased from 30to400keV, structures could be seen as a result of atomic number (Z) contrast farther below the surface while structures closer to the surface had reduced Z contrast. The subsurface beam diameter was measured from BSE images as a function of Eo and depth below the surface. For all Eo, the subsurface beam diameter initially rapidly increased with SiO2 overlayer thickness but, for 150keV, a leveling off in the beam spread was seen for depths >1.7μm. Beam broadening affected whether the TaN /Ta liners that surrounded the Cu conductors could be seen at the edges of the lines; this contrast was observed only when the subsurface beam diameter was ⩽1.5× the liner thickness. The BSE information depth for imaging 0.2-μm-sized voids in subsurface Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnect structures at 30 and 150keV was estimated to be 0.65 and 3μm, respectively.

  18. A whole-genome scan in 164 Dutch sib pairs with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: suggestive evidence for linkage on chromosomes 7p and 15q.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, S.C.; Meulen, E.M. van der; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Pauls, D.L.; Monsuur, A.J.; Slot, R. van 't; Minderaa, R.B.; Gunning, W.B.; Pearson, P.L.; Sinke, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    A genome scan was performed on 164 Dutch affected sib pairs (ASPs) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). All subjects were white and of Dutch descent and were phenotyped according to criteria set out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. Initially

  19. A whole-genome scan in 164 Dutch sib pairs with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : Suggestive evidence for linkage on chromosomes 7p and 15q

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SC; van der Meulen, EM; Buitelaar, JK; Sandkuijl, LA; Pauls, DL; Monsuur, AJ; van't Slot, R; Minderaa, RB; Gunning, WB; Pearson, PL; Sinke, RJ

    2003-01-01

    A genome scan was performed on 164 Dutch affected sib pairs (ASPs) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). All subjects were white and of Dutch descent and were phenotyped according to criteria set out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. Initially

  20. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  1. Genome-wide scan for bovine milk-fat composition. I. Quantitative trait loci for short- and medium-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, W.M.; Schennink, A.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Mullaart, E.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2009-01-01

    A genome-wide scan was performed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for short- and medium-chain fatty acids (expressed in wt/wt %). Milk samples were available from 1,905 cows from 398 commercial herds in the Netherlands, and milk-fat composition was measured by gas chromatography. DNA was av

  2. Short communication: Genome-wide scan for bovine milk-fat composition. II. Quantitative trait loci for long-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schennink, A.; Stoop, W.M.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Poel, van der J.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a genome-wide scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to genetic variation in long-chain milk fatty acids. Milk-fat composition phenotypes were available on 1,905 Dutch Holstein-Friesian cows. A total of 849 cows and their 7 sires were genotyped for 1

  3. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  4. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan;

    2014-01-01

    than 1 kb. Excluding the 59 SVs (54 insertions/deletions, 5 inversions) that overlap with N-base gaps in the reference assembly hg19, 666 non-gap SVs remained, and 396 of them (60%) were verified by paired-end data from whole-genome sequencing-based re-sequencing or de novo assembly sequence from...... fosmid data. Of the remaining 270 SVs, 260 are insertions and 213 overlap known SVs in the Database of Genomic Variants. Overall, 609 out of 666 (90%) variants were supported by experimental orthogonal methods or historical evidence in public databases. At the same time, genome mapping also provides...

  5. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  6. Combining Frequency Doubling Technology Perimetry and Scanning Laser Polarimetry for Glaucoma Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Warren, Joshua L; Hochberg, Jessica T; Budenz, Donald L; Chang, Robert T; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2015-01-01

    To determine the ability of frequency doubling technology (FDT) and scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) to detect glaucoma when used individually and in combination. One hundred ten normal and 114 glaucomatous subjects were tested with FDT C-20-5 screening protocol and the GDx-VCC. The discriminating ability was tested for each device individually and for both devices combined using GDx-NFI, GDx-TSNIT, number of missed points of FDT, and normal or abnormal FDT. Measures of discrimination included sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and prediction confidence interval lengths. For detecting glaucoma regardless of severity, the multivariable model resulting from the combination of GDx-TSNIT, number of abnormal points on FDT (NAP-FDT), and the interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT (AIC: 88.28, AUC: 0.959, sensitivity: 94.6%, specificity: 89.5%) outperformed the best single-variable model provided by GDx-NFI (AIC: 120.88, AUC: 0.914, sensitivity: 87.8%, specificity: 84.2%). The multivariable model combining GDx-TSNIT, NAP-FDT, and interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT consistently provided better discriminating abilities for detecting early, moderate, and severe glaucoma than the best single-variable models. The multivariable model including GDx-TSNIT, NAP-FDT, and the interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT provides the best glaucoma prediction compared with all other multivariable and univariable models. Combining the FDT C-20-5 screening protocol and GDx-VCC improves glaucoma detection compared with using GDx or FDT alone.

  7. Detection of genome-wide polymorphisms in the AT-rich Plasmodium falciparum genome using a high-density microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyen Yentram

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mapping is a powerful method to identify mutations that cause drug resistance and other phenotypic changes in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. For efficient mapping of a target gene, it is often necessary to genotype a large number of polymorphic markers. Currently, a community effort is underway to collect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP from the parasite genome. Here we evaluate polymorphism detection accuracy of a high-density 'tiling' microarray with 2.56 million probes by comparing single feature polymorphisms (SFP calls from the microarray with known SNP among parasite isolates. Results We found that probe GC content, SNP position in a probe, probe coverage, and signal ratio cutoff values were important factors for accurate detection of SFP in the parasite genome. We established a set of SFP calling parameters that could predict mSFP (SFP called by multiple overlapping probes with high accuracy (≥ 94% and identified 121,087 mSFP genome-wide from five parasite isolates including 40,354 unique mSFP (excluding those from multi-gene families and ~18,000 new mSFP, producing a genetic map with an average of one unique mSFP per 570 bp. Genomic copy number variation (CNV among the parasites was also cataloged and compared. Conclusion A large number of mSFP were discovered from the P. falciparum genome using a high-density microarray, most of which were in clusters of highly polymorphic genes at chromosome ends. Our method for accurate mSFP detection and the mSFP identified will greatly facilitate large-scale studies of genome variation in the P. falciparum parasite and provide useful resources for mapping important parasite traits.

  8. Enhanced flat adenoma detection rate with high definition colonoscopy plus i-scan for average-risk colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-D'Jesús

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The usefulness of high definition colonoscopy plus i-scan (HD+i-SCAN for average-risk colorectal cancer screening has not been fully assessed. The detection rate of adenomas and other measurements such as the number of adenomas per colonoscopy and the flat adenoma detection rate have been recognized as markers of colonoscopy quality. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnostic performance of an HD+i-SCAN with that of standard resolution white-light colonoscope. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected screening colonoscopy database. A comparative analysis of the diagnostic yield of an HD+i-SCAN or standard resolution colonoscopy for average-risk colorectal screening was conducted. Results: During the period of study, 155/163 (95.1% patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 56.9 years. Sixty of 155 (39% colonoscopies were performed using a HD+i-SCAN. Adenoma-detection-rates during the withdrawal of the standard resolution versus HD+i-SCAN colonoscopies were 29.5% and 30% (p = n.s.. Adenoma/colonoscopy values for standard resolution versus HD+i-SCAN colonoscopies were 0.46 (SD = 0.9 and 0.72 (SD = 1.3 (p = n.s.. A greater number of flat adenomas were detected in the HD+i-SCAN group (6/60 vs. 2/95 (p < .05. Likewise, serrated adenomas/polyps per colonoscopy were also higher in the HD+i-SCAN group. Conclusions: A HD+i-SCAN colonoscopy increases the flat adenoma detection rate and serrated adenomas/polyps per colonoscopy compared to a standard colonoscopy in average-risk screening population. HD+i-SCAN is a simple, available procedure that can be helpful, even for experienced providers. The performance of HD+i-SCAN and substantial prevalence of flat lesions in our average-risk screening cohort support its usefulness in improving the efficacy of screening colonoscopies.

  9. SECOM: A novel hash seed and community detection based-approach for genome-scale protein domain identification

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Ming

    2012-06-28

    With rapid advances in the development of DNA sequencing technologies, a plethora of high-throughput genome and proteome data from a diverse spectrum of organisms have been generated. The functional annotation and evolutionary history of proteins are usually inferred from domains predicted from the genome sequences. Traditional database-based domain prediction methods cannot identify novel domains, however, and alignment-based methods, which look for recurring segments in the proteome, are computationally demanding. Here, we propose a novel genome-wide domain prediction method, SECOM. Instead of conducting all-against-all sequence alignment, SECOM first indexes all the proteins in the genome by using a hash seed function. Local similarity can thus be detected and encoded into a graph structure, in which each node represents a protein sequence and each edge weight represents the shared hash seeds between the two nodes. SECOM then formulates the domain prediction problem as an overlapping community-finding problem in this graph. A backward graph percolation algorithm that efficiently identifies the domains is proposed. We tested SECOM on five recently sequenced genomes of aquatic animals. Our tests demonstrated that SECOM was able to identify most of the known domains identified by InterProScan. When compared with the alignment-based method, SECOM showed higher sensitivity in detecting putative novel domains, while it was also three orders of magnitude faster. For example, SECOM was able to predict a novel sponge-specific domain in nucleoside-triphosphatase (NTPases). Furthermore, SECOM discovered two novel domains, likely of bacterial origin, that are taxonomically restricted to sea anemone and hydra. SECOM is an open-source program and available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. © 2012 Fan et al.

  10. Genome-wide scan identifies TNIP1, PSORS1C1, and RHOB as novel risk loci for systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Allanore

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an orphan, complex, inflammatory disease affecting the immune system and connective tissue. SSc stands out as a severely incapacitating and life-threatening inflammatory rheumatic disease, with a largely unknown pathogenesis. We have designed a two-stage genome-wide association study of SSc using case-control samples from France, Italy, Germany, and Northern Europe. The initial genome-wide scan was conducted in a French post quality-control sample of 564 cases and 1,776 controls, using almost 500 K SNPs. Two SNPs from the MHC region, together with the 6 loci outside MHC having at least one SNP with a P<10(-5 were selected for follow-up analysis. These markers were genotyped in a post-QC replication sample of 1,682 SSc cases and 3,926 controls. The three top SNPs are in strong linkage disequilibrium and located on 6p21, in the HLA-DQB1 gene: rs9275224, P = 9.18×10(-8, OR = 0.69, 95% CI [0.60-0.79]; rs6457617, P = 1.14×10(-7 and rs9275245, P = 1.39×10(-7. Within the MHC region, the next most associated SNP (rs3130573, P = 1.86×10(-5, OR = 1.36 [1.18-1.56] is located in the PSORS1C1 gene. Outside the MHC region, our GWAS analysis revealed 7 top SNPs (P<10(-5 that spanned 6 independent genomic regions. Follow-up of the 17 top SNPs in an independent sample of 1,682 SSc and 3,926 controls showed associations at PSORS1C1 (overall P = 5.70×10(-10, OR:1.25, TNIP1 (P = 4.68×10(-9, OR:1.31, and RHOB loci (P = 3.17×10(-6, OR:1.21. Because of its biological relevance, and previous reports of genetic association at this locus with connective tissue disorders, we investigated TNIP1 expression. A markedly reduced expression of the TNIP1 gene and also its protein product were observed both in lesional skin tissue and in cultured dermal fibroblasts from SSc patients. Furthermore, TNIP1 showed in vitro inhibitory effects on inflammatory cytokine-induced collagen production. The genetic signal of

  11. USING POPULATION GENOMICS TO DETECT SELECTION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: KEY CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenlohe, Paul A; Phillips, Patrick C; Cresko, William A

    2010-11-01

    Natural selection shapes patterns of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species, and it does so differentially across genomes. The field of population genomics provides a comprehensive genome-scale view of the action of selection, even beyond traditional model organisms. However, even with nearly complete genomic sequence information, our ability to detect the signature of selection on specific genomic regions depends on choosing experimental and analytical tools appropriate to the biological situation. For example, processes that occur at different timescales, such as sorting of standing genetic variation, mutation-selection balance, or fixed interspecific divergence, have different consequences for genomic patterns of variation. Inappropriate experimental or analytical approaches may fail to detect even strong selection or falsely identify a signature of selection. Here we outline the conceptual framework of population genomics, relate genomic patterns of variation to evolutionary processes, and identify major biological factors to be considered in studies of selection. As data-gathering technology continues to advance, our ability to understand selection in natural populations will be limited more by conceptual and analytical weaknesses than by the amount of molecular data. Our aim is to bring critical biological considerations to the fore in population genomics research and to spur the development and application of analytical tools appropriate to diverse biological systems.

  12. An autosomal genomic scan for loci linked to type II diabetes mellitus and body-mass index in Pima Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R L; Ehm, M G; Pettitt, D J; Prochazka, M; Thompson, D B; Timberlake, D; Foroud, T; Kobes, S; Baier, L; Burns, D K; Almasy, L; Blangero, J; Garvey, W T; Bennett, P H; Knowler, W C

    1998-01-01

    Genetic factors influence the development of type II diabetes mellitus, but genetic loci for the most common forms of diabetes have not been identified. A genomic scan was conducted to identify loci linked to diabetes and body-mass index (BMI) in Pima Indians, a Native American population with a high prevalence of type II diabetes. Among 264 nuclear families containing 966 siblings, 516 autosomal markers with a median distance between adjacent markers of 6.4 cM were genotyped. Variance-components methods were used to test for linkage with an age-adjusted diabetes score and with BMI. In multipoint analyses, the strongest evidence for linkage with age-adjusted diabetes (LOD = 1.7) was on chromosome 11q, in the region that was also linked most strongly with BMI (LOD = 3.6). Bivariate linkage analyses strongly rejected both the null hypothesis of no linkage with either trait and the null hypothesis of no contribution of the locus to the covariation among the two traits. Sib-pair analyses suggest additional potential diabetes-susceptibility loci on chromosomes 1q and 7q. PMID:9758619

  13. Genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci influencing LDL size and plasma triglyceride in familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A; Edwards, Karen L; Monks, Stephanie A; Koprowicz, Kent M; Brunzell, John D; Motulsky, Arno G; Mahaney, Michael C; Hixson, James E

    2003-11-01

    Small, dense LDLs and hypertriglyceridemia, two highly correlated and genetically influenced risk factors, are known to predict for risk of coronary heart disease. The objective of this study was to perform a whole-genome scan for linkage to LDL size and triglyceride (TG) levels in 26 kindreds with familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG). LDL size was estimated using gradient gel electrophoresis, and genotyping was performed for 355 autosomal markers with an average heterozygosity of 76% and an average spacing of 10.2 centimorgans (cMs). Using variance components linkage analysis, one possible linkage was found for LDL size [logarithm of odds (LOD) = 2.1] on chromosome 6, peak at 140 cM distal to marker F13A1 (closest marker D6S2436). With adjustment for TG and/or HDL cholesterol, the LOD scores were reduced, but remained in exactly the same location. For TG, LOD scores of 2.56 and 2.44 were observed at two locations on chromosome 15, with peaks at 29 and 61 cM distal to marker D15S822 (closest markers D15S643 and D15S211, respectively). These peaks were retained with adjustment for LDL size and/or HDL cholesterol. These findings, if confirmed, suggest that LDL particle size and plasma TG levels could be caused by two different genetic loci in FHTG.

  14. Genome scan for cognitive trait loci of dyslexia: rapid naming and rapid switching of letters, numbers, and colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Kevin; Raskind, Wendy H.; Berninger, Virginia W.; Matsushita, Mark M.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a common developmental disorder that affects 5–12% of school-aged children. Dyslexia and its component phenotypes, assessed categorically or quantitatively, have complex genetic bases. The ability to rapidly name letters, numbers, and colors from rows presented visually correlates strongly with reading in multiple languages and is a valid predictor of reading and spelling impairment. Performance on measures of rapid naming and switching, RAN and RAS, is stable throughout elementary school years, with slowed performance persisting in adults who still manifest dyslexia. Targeted analyses of dyslexia candidate regions have included RAN measures, but only one other genome-wide linkage study has been reported. As part of a broad effort to identify genetic contributors to dyslexia, we performed combined oligogenic segregation and linkage analyses of measures of RAN and RAS in a family-based cohort ascertained through probands with dyslexia. We obtained strong evidence for linkage of RAN letters to the DYX3 locus on chromosome 2p and RAN colors to chromosome 10q, but were unable to confirm the chromosome 6p21 linkage detected for a composite measure of RAN colors and objects in the previous genome-wide study. PMID:24807833

  15. Genome scan for cognitive trait loci of dyslexia: Rapid naming and rapid switching of letters, numbers, and colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Kevin B; Raskind, Wendy H; Berninger, Virginia W; Matsushita, Mark M; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-06-01

    Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a common developmental disorder that affects 5-12% of school-aged children. Dyslexia and its component phenotypes, assessed categorically or quantitatively, have complex genetic bases. The ability to rapidly name letters, numbers, and colors from rows presented visually correlates strongly with reading in multiple languages and is a valid predictor of reading and spelling impairment. Performance on measures of rapid naming and switching, RAN and RAS, is stable throughout elementary school years, with slowed performance persisting in adults who still manifest dyslexia. Targeted analyses of dyslexia candidate regions have included RAN measures, but only one other genome-wide linkage study has been reported. As part of a broad effort to identify genetic contributors to dyslexia, we performed combined oligogenic segregation and linkage analyses of measures of RAN and RAS in a family-based cohort ascertained through probands with dyslexia. We obtained strong evidence for linkage of RAN letters to the DYX3 locus on chromosome 2p and RAN colors to chromosome 10q, but were unable to confirm the chromosome 6p21 linkage detected for a composite measure of RAN colors and objects in the previous genome-wide study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Multiple People in Laser Scan Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Song, X.; Zhao, H.; Zha, H.; Shibasaki, R.

    This chapter presents an approach to detect and track multiple people ro bustly in real time using laser scan frames. The detection and tracking of people in real time is a problem that arises in a variety of different contexts. Examples in clude intelligent surveillance for security purposes, scene analysis for service robot, and crowd behavior analysis for human behavior study. Over the last several years, an increasing number of laser-based people-tracking systems have been developed in both mobile robotics platforms and fixed platforms using one or multiple laser scanners. It has been proved that processing on laser scanner data makes the tracker much faster and more robust than a vision-only based one in complex situations. In this chapter, we present a novel robust tracker to detect and track multiple people in a crowded and open area in real time. First, raw data are obtained that measures two legs for each people at a height of 16 cm from horizontal ground with multiple registered laser scanners. A stable feature is extracted using accumulated distribu tion of successive laser frames. In this way, the noise that generates split and merged measurements is smoothed well, and the pattern of rhythmic swinging legs is uti lized to extract each leg. Second, a probabilistic tracking model is presented, and then a sequential inference process using a Bayesian rule is described. A sequential inference process is difficult to compute analytically, so two strategies are presented to simplify the computation. In the case of independent tracking, the Kalman fil ter is used with a more efficient measurement likelihood model based on a region coherency property. Finally, to deal with trajectory fragments we present a concise approach to fuse just a little visual information from synchronized video camera to laser data. Evaluation with real data shows that the proposed method is robust and effective. It achieves a significant improvement compared with existing laser

  17. Detection and Characterization of Package Defects and Integrity Failure using Dynamic Scanning Infrared Thermography (DSIRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic scanning infrared thermography (DSIRT) system developed at the Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Packaging Lab relies on variation in transient thermal artifacts to indicate defects, and offers the possibility of characterization of many types of materials and structures. These include newer polymer and laminate-based structures for shelf-stable foods that lack a reliable, nondestructive method for inspection, which is a continuing safety issue. Preliminary trials were conducted on a polyester/aluminum foil/polypropylene retort pouch laminate containing artificially-induced failed seal and insulating inclusion defects ranging from 1 to 10 mm wide in the plane of the seal. The samples were placed in relative motion to a laterally positioned infrared laser, inducing heating through the plane of the seal. The emergent thermal artifact on the obverse side was sensed using either a bolometer camera or a thermopile sensor, with thermal anomalies indicating potential defects and the results of each sensors were compared. The bolometer camera detected defects to the limit of its measured optical resolution-approximately 1 mm at 20 cm-although the lower-resolution thermopile sensors were only capable of detecting 5 mm defects even at closer distances of approximately 5 mm. In addition, a supplementary magnification system was fitted to the bolometer camera which increased resolution but reduced field of view and would require a much higher frame rate to be useful. Automatic processing of the image data rapidly detected the model defects and can lead to development of an automated inspection system.  Much higher material throughput speeds are feasible using faster instruments, and the system is scalable. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. A unique circovirus-like genome detected in pig feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using a metagenomic approach and molecular cloning methods, we identified, cloned, and sequenced the complete genome of a novel circular DNA virus, porcine stool-associated virus (PoSCV4), from pig feces. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced replication initiator protein showed that PoSCV4 is most r...

  19. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  20. Detection and Segmentation of Small Trees in the Forest-Tundra Ecotone Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Hauglin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to expected climate change and increased focus on forests as a potential carbon sink, it is of interest to map and monitor even marginal forests where trees exist close to their tolerance limits, such as small pioneer trees in the forest-tundra ecotone. Such small trees might indicate tree line migrations and expansion of the forests into treeless areas. Airborne laser scanning (ALS has been suggested and tested as a tool for this purpose and in the present study a novel procedure for identification and segmentation of small trees is proposed. The study was carried out in the Rollag municipality in southeastern Norway, where ALS data and field measurements of individual trees were acquired. The point density of the ALS data was eight points per m2, and the field tree heights ranged from 0.04 to 6.3 m, with a mean of 1.4 m. The proposed method is based on an allometric model relating field-measured tree height to crown diameter, and another model relating field-measured tree height to ALS-derived height. These models are calibrated with local field data. Using these simple models, every positive above-ground height derived from the ALS data can be related to a crown diameter, and by assuming a circular crown shape, this crown diameter can be extended to a crown segment. Applying this model to all ALS echoes with a positive above-ground height value yields an initial map of possible circular crown segments. The final crown segments were then derived by applying a set of simple rules to this initial “map” of segments. The resulting segments were validated by comparison with field-measured crown segments. Overall, 46% of the field-measured trees were successfully detected. The detection rate increased with tree size. For trees with height >3 m the detection rate was 80%. The relatively large detection errors were partly due to the inherent limitations in the ALS data; a substantial fraction of the smaller trees was hit by no or just a few

  1. Surface scanning inspection system particle detection dependence on aluminum film morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Walter; Tran, Natalie; McGarvey, Steve

    2012-03-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) aluminum films present unique challenges when detecting particulate defects with a Surface Scanning Inspection System (SSIS). Aluminum (Al) films 4500Å thick were deposited on 300mm particle grade bare Si wafers at two temperatures using a Novellus Systems INOVA® NExT,.. Film surface roughness and morphology measurements were performed using a Veeco Vx310® atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM characterization found the high deposition temperature (TD) Al roughness (Root Mean Square 16.5 nm) to be five-times rougher than the low-TD Al roughness (rms 3.7 nm). High-TD Al had grooves at the grain boundaries that were measured to be 20 to 80 nm deep. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination, with a Hitachi RS6000 defect review SEM, confirmed the presence of pronounced grain grooves. SEM images established that the low-TD filmed wafers have fine grains (0.1 to 0.3 um diameter) and the high-TD film wafers have fifty-times larger equiaxed plateletshape grains (5 to 15 um diameter). Calibrated Poly-Styrene Latex (PSL) spheres ranging in size from 90 nm to 1 μm were deposited in circular patterns on the wafers using an aerosol deposition chamber. PSL sphere depositions at each spot were controlled to yield 2000 to 5000 counts. A Hitachi LS9100® dark field full wafer SSIS was used to experimentally determine the relationship of the PSL sphere scattered light intensity with S-polarized light, a measure of scattering cross-section, with respect to the calibrated PSL sphere diameter. Comparison of the SSIS scattered light versus PSL spot size calibration curves shows two distinct differences. Scattering cross-section (intensity) of the PSL spheres increased on the low-TD Al film with smooth surface roughness and the low-TD Al film defect detection sensitivity was 126 nm compared to 200 nm for the rougher high- TD Al film. This can be explained by the higher signal to noise attributed to the smooth low-TD Al. Dark field defect detection on

  2. Genome-wide scan for signatures of human population differentiation and their relationship with natural selection, functional pathways and diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Amato

    Full Text Available Genetic differences both between individuals and populations are studied for their evolutionary relevance and for their potential medical applications. Most of the genetic differentiation among populations are caused by random drift that should affect all loci across the genome in a similar manner. When a locus shows extraordinary high or low levels of population differentiation, this may be interpreted as evidence for natural selection. The most used measure of population differentiation was devised by Wright and is known as fixation index, or F(ST. We performed a genome-wide estimation of F(ST on about 4 millions of SNPs from HapMap project data. We demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of F(ST values between autosomes and heterochromosomes. When we compared the F(ST values obtained in this study with another evolutionary measure obtained by comparative interspecific approach, we found that genes under positive selection appeared to show low levels of population differentiation. We applied a gene set approach, widely used for microarray data analysis, to detect functional pathways under selection. We found that one pathway related to antigen processing and presentation showed low levels of F(ST, while several pathways related to cell signalling, growth and morphogenesis showed high F(ST values. Finally, we detected a signature of selection within genes associated with human complex diseases. These results can help to identify which process occurred during human evolution and adaptation to different environments. They also support the hypothesis that common diseases could have a genetic background shaped by human evolution.

  3. Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-08-15

    Identification of transgenic sequences in an unknown genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) by whole genome sequence analysis was demonstrated. Whole genome sequence data were generated for a GM-positive fresh papaya fruit commodity detected in monitoring using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequences obtained were mapped against an open database for papaya genome sequence. Transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences were identified as a GM papaya developed to resist infection from a Papaya ringspot virus. Based on the transgenic sequences, a specific real-time PCR detection method for GM papaya applicable to various food commodities was developed. Whole genome sequence analysis enabled identifying unknown transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences in GM papaya and development of a reliable method for detecting them in papaya food commodities.

  4. Lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for near video-rate Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of a unique lock-in-detection-free line-scan stimulated Raman scattering microscopy technique based on a linear detector with a large full well capacity controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for near video-rate Raman imaging. With the use of parallel excitation and detection scheme, the line-scan SRS imaging at 20 frames per second can be acquired with a ∼5-fold lower excitation power density, compared to conventional point-scan SRS imaging. The rapid data communication between the FPGA and the linear detector allows a high line-scanning rate to boost the SRS imaging speed without the need for lock-in detection. We demonstrate this lock-in-detection-free line-scan SRS imaging technique using the 0.5 μm polystyrene and 1.0 μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads mixed in water, as well as living gastric cancer cells.

  5. Effect of the degree of liver inflammation on FibroScan detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan LI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of the degree of liver inflammation on transient elastography(FibroScan detection value(FS.Methods A total of 282 patients with chronic hepatitis from 302 Hospital of PLA from April 2009 to December 2010 were enrolled in the current study.The patients were subjected to histologic examination of a liver biopsy and FibroScan detection.The patients were divided into two groups according to stage of fibrosis F0-2 and F3-4 to compare the FS values of the patients with different degrees of inflammation.The patients were divided into the G1-2 group and G3-4 group according to grade of histologic inflammation,and Receive Operating Characteristic(ROC curve were drawn for the two patient groups to diagnose liver cirrhosis using the FS values and to analyze the correlation between the FS value of patients with the different degrees of inflammation.Results Up to 115 patients had histologic inflammation grade(G1,109 patients had grade 2,54 had grade 3,and 4 patients had grade 4.Their FS values were 6.4(2.9,35.0,11.6(2.9,45.0,15.1(5.2,75.0,and 61.5(45.0,75.0,respectively.Significant differences were observed among the groups(P < 0.001,H=107.5.Among the patients in groups F0-2 and F3-4,the FS value increased with the degree of inflammation(P < 0.001.The area under the curve was 0.853 and 0.897 for the patients of G1-2 and G3-4 groups,respectively,using the FS value to diagnose liver cirrhosis.The FS threshold limit value was 17.7kPa and 18.7kPa,respectively.Conclusion Liver inflammation is one of the factors that affect FS values.The threshold limit for FS in diagnosing liver cirrhosis among patients with different degrees of liver inflammation varies.

  6. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills—Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels’ image width (1 m width of road surface with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel. Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians.

  7. Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry (FSCV) Detection of Endogenous Octopamine in Drosophila melanogaster Ventral Nerve Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Poojan; Privman Champaloux, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2016-08-17

    Octopamine is an endogenous biogenic amine neurotransmitter, neurohormone, and neuromodulator in invertebrates and has functional analogy with norepinephrine in vertebrates. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) can detect rapid changes in neurotransmitters, but FSCV has not been optimized for octopamine detection in situ. The goal of this study was to characterize octopamine release in the ventral nerve cord of Drosophila larvae for the first time. A FSCV waveform was optimized so that the potential for octopamine oxidation would not be near the switching potential where interferences can occur. Endogenous octopamine release was stimulated by genetically inserting either the ATP sensitive channel, P2X2, or the red-light sensitive channelrhodopsin, CsChrimson, into cells expressing tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), an octopamine synthesis enzyme. To ensure that release is due to octopamine and not the precursor tyramine, the octopamine synthesis inhibitor disulfiram was applied, and the signal decreased by 80%. Stimulated release was vesicular, and a 2 s continuous light stimulation of CsChrimson evoked 0.22 ± 0.03 μM of octopamine release in the larval ventral nerve cord. Repeated stimulations were stable with 2 or 5 min interstimulation times. With pulsed stimulations, the release was dependent on the frequency of applied light pulse. An octopamine transporter has not been identified, and blockers of the dopamine transporter and serotonin transporter had no significant effect on the clearance time of octopamine, suggesting that they do not take up octopamine. This study shows that octopamine can be monitored in Drosophila, facilitating future studies of how octopamine release functions in the insect brain.

  8. Use of differential scanning calorimetry to detect canola oil (Brassica napus L.) adulterated with lard stearin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marikkar, Jalaldeen Mohammed Nazrim; Rana, Sohel

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to detect and quantify lard stearin (LS) content in canola oil (CaO) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Authentic samples of CaO were obtained from a reliable supplier and the adulterant LS were obtained through a fractional crystallization procedure as reported previously. Pure CaO samples spiked with LS in levels ranging from 5 to 15% (w/w) were analyzed using DSC to obtain their cooling and heating profiles. The results showed that samples contaminated with LS at 5% (w/w) level can be detected using characteristic contaminant peaks appearing in the higher temperature regions (0 to 70°C) of the cooling and heating curves. Pearson correlation analysis of LS content against individual DSC parameters of the adulterant peak namely peak temperature, peak area, peak onset temperature indicated that there were strong correlations between these with the LS content of the CaO admixtures. When these three parameters were engaged as variables in the execution of the stepwise regression procedure, predictive models for determination of LS content in CaO were obtained. The predictive models obtained with single DSC parameter had relatively lower coefficient of determination (R(2) value) and higher standard error than the models obtained using two DSC parameters in combination. This study concluded that the predictive models obtained with peak area and peak onset temperature of the adulteration peak would be more accurate for prediction of LS content in CaO based on the highest coefficient of determination (R(2) value) and smallest standard error.

  9. Line-scan Raman microscopy complements optical coherence tomography for tumor boundary detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Qi, Ji; Young, Eric D.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Lev, Dina C.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Larin, Kirill V.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    Current technique for tumor resection requires biopsy of the tumor region and histological confirmation before the surgeon can be certain that the entire tumor has been resected. This confirmation process is time consuming both for the surgeon and the patient and also requires sacrifice of healthy tissue, motivating the development of novel technologies which can enable real-time detection of tumor-healthy tissue boundary for faster and more efficient surgeries. In this study, the potential of combining structural information from optical coherence tomography (OCT) and molecular information from line-scan Raman microscopy (LSRM) for such an application is presented. The results show a clear presence of boundary between myxoid liposarcoma and normal fat which is easily identifiable both from structural and molecular information. In cases where structural images are indistinguishable, for example, in normal fat and well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS) or gastrointestinal sarcoma tumor (GIST) and myxoma, distinct molecular spectra have been obtained. The results suggest LSRM can effectively complement OCT to tumor boundary demarcation with high specificity.

  10. CHARACTERISING THE EOS SLOT-SCANNING SYSTEM WITH THE EFFECTIVE DETECTIVE QUANTUM EFFICIENCY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, A H; Monnin, P; Létang, J M; Verdun, F R; Darbon, A

    2016-06-01

    As opposed to the standard detective quantum efficiency (DQE), effective DQE (eDQE) is a figure of merit that allows comparing the performances of imaging systems in the presence of scatter rejection devices. The geometry of the EOS™ slot-scanning system is such that the detector is self-collimated and rejects scattered radiation. In this study, the EOS system was characterised using the eDQE in imaging conditions similar to those used in clinical practice: with phantoms of different widths placed in the X-ray beam, for various incident air kerma and tube voltages corresponding to the phantom thickness. Scatter fractions in EOS images were extremely low, around 2 % for all configurations. Maximum eDQE values spanned 9-14.8 % for a large range of air kerma at the detector plane from 0.01 to 1.34 µGy. These figures were obtained with non-optimised EOS setting but still over-performed most of the maximum eDQEs recently assessed for various computed radiology and digital radiology systems with antiscatter grids.

  11. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36 versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04, P<0.01. R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51 compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46 P<0.05. Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage.

  12. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  13. Urban Road Detection in Airbone Laser Scanning Point Cloud Using Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczałek, B.; Borkowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to detect points that describe a road surface in an unclassified point cloud of the airborne laser scanning (ALS). For this purpose we use the Random Forest learning algorithm. The proposed methodology consists of two stages: preparation of features and supervised point cloud classification. In this approach we consider ALS points, representing only the last echo. For these points RGB, intensity, the normal vectors, their mean values and the standard deviations are provided. Moreover, local and global height variations are taken into account as components of a feature vector. The feature vectors are calculated on a basis of the 3D Delaunay triangulation. The proposed methodology was tested on point clouds with the average point density of 12 pts/m2 that represent large urban scene. The significance level of 15% was set up for a decision tree of the learning algorithm. As a result of the Random Forest classification we received two subsets of ALS points. One of those groups represents points belonging to the road network. After the classification evaluation we achieved from 90% of the overall classification accuracy. Finally, the ALS points representing roads were merged and simplified into road network polylines using morphological operations.

  14. URBAN ROAD DETECTION IN AIRBONE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUD USING RANDOM FOREST ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kaczałek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to detect points that describe a road surface in an unclassified point cloud of the airborne laser scanning (ALS. For this purpose we use the Random Forest learning algorithm. The proposed methodology consists of two stages: preparation of features and supervised point cloud classification. In this approach we consider ALS points, representing only the last echo. For these points RGB, intensity, the normal vectors, their mean values and the standard deviations are provided. Moreover, local and global height variations are taken into account as components of a feature vector. The feature vectors are calculated on a basis of the 3D Delaunay triangulation. The proposed methodology was tested on point clouds with the average point density of 12 pts/m2 that represent large urban scene. The significance level of 15% was set up for a decision tree of the learning algorithm. As a result of the Random Forest classification we received two subsets of ALS points. One of those groups represents points belonging to the road network. After the classification evaluation we achieved from 90% of the overall classification accuracy. Finally, the ALS points representing roads were merged and simplified into road network polylines using morphological operations.

  15. PAVEMENT DISTRESS DETECTION WITH PICUCHA METHODOLOGY FOR AREA-SCAN CAMERAS AND DARK IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reus Salini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The PICture Unsupervised Classification with Human Analysis (PICUCHA refers to a hybrid human-artificial intelligence methodology for pavement distresses assessment. It combines the human flexibility to recognize patterns and features in images with the neural network ability to expand such recognition to large volumes of images. In this study, the PICUCHA performance was tested with images taken with area-scan cameras and flash light illumination over a pavement with dark textures. These images are particularly challenging for the analysis because of the lens distortion and non-homogeneous illumination, generating artificial joints that happened at random positions inside the image cells. The chosen images were previously analyzed by other software without success because of the dark coluor. The PICUCHA algorithms could analyze the images with no noticeable problem and without any image pre-processing, such as contrast or brightness adjustments. Because of the special procedure used by the pavement engineer for the key patterns description, the distresses detection accuracy of the PICUCHA for the particular image set could reach 100%.

  16. A comparative study of the diagnostic accuracy on Waters view with CT scan in detecting midface fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In recent years, CT scan has become available as an alternative to conventional radiography. To date, the utility of Waters view in detecting midface fractures has been rarely evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of Waters radiography with CT scan in detecting midface fractures. Materials and Methods: In this tests evaluation study, waters view and CT scan were performed for 42 patients with midface fracture admitted to maxillofacial surgery department of Shariati hospital. All images were observed and interpreted by an oral and maxillofacial radiologist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Sensitivity, specificity and reliability for Waters view in detecting midface fractures were assessed by Cohen’s kappa test. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for Waters view in detection of midface fratures by the radiologist were 31.79% and 95.35% and by the surgeon were 29.59% and 93.75% respectively. The highest reliability in CT scan and Waters view (in nasal fractures by the radiologist was 66.67% and was 58.33% by the surgeon in buttress of zygoma. The highest agreement rate between the radiologist and the surgeon for CT scan was in zygomatic arch (78.95% and for Waters view was in nasal fracture (62.5%. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the specificity of Waters view is sufficient to diagnose fractures of lateral orbital wall, infraorbital rim, orbital floor, zygomatic arch, frontozygomatic suture, lateral wall of maxillary sinus and Lefort II fracture. The specificity is not sufficient to diagnose fractures of medial orbital wall and anterior, posterior and medial wall of maxillary sinus. Detection of these midface fractures needs other conventional radiographies or CT scan.

  17. Genome-wide SNP-based linkage scan identifies a locus on 8q24 for an age-related hearing impairment trait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huyghe, J.R.; Laer, L. Van; Hendrickx, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    the results of a cross-sectional family-based genetic study employing audiometric data. By using principal component analysis, we were able to reduce the dimensionality of this multivariate phenotype while capturing most of the variation and retaining biologically important features of the audiograms. We...... conducted a genome-wide association as well as a linkage scan with high-density SNP microarrays. Because of the presence of genetic population substructure, association testing was stratified after which evidence was combined by meta-analysis. No association signals reaching genome-wide significance were...

  18. Across Breed QTL Detection and Genomic Prediction in French and Danish Dairy Cattle Breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Irene; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Hozé, C

    Our objective was to investigate the potential benefits of using sequence data to improve across breed genomic prediction, using data from five French and Danish dairy cattle breeds. First, QTL for protein yield were detected using high density genotypes. Part of the QTL detected within breed was...

  19. Across Breed QTL Detection and Genomic Prediction in French and Danish Dairy Cattle Breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Irene; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Hozé, C

    Our objective was to investigate the potential benefits of using sequence data to improve across breed genomic prediction, using data from five French and Danish dairy cattle breeds. First, QTL for protein yield were detected using high density genotypes. Part of the QTL detected within breed was...

  20. Detection of chromosomal aberrations in seminomatous germ cell tumours using comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Kirchhoff, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    1997-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to evaluate tissue specimens from 16 seminomas in order to elucidate the pathogenesis of germ cell tumours in males. A characteristic pattern of losses and gains within the entire genomes was detected in 94% of the seminomas by comparing the ratio...... was demonstrated in the seminomas by improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in improved detection criteria, which increased specificity and sensitivity. The rare aberrations, which appeared only in tumours in clinical stage II...

  1. Genome scan of human systemic lupus erythematosus: Evidence for linkage on chromosome 1q in African-American pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Kathy L.; Neas, Barbara R.; Salmon, Jane E.; Yu, Hua; Gray-McGuire, Courtney; Asundi, Neeraj; Bruner, Gail R.; Fox, Jerome; Kelly, Jennifer; Henshall, Stephanie; Bacino, Debra; Dietz, Myron; Hogue, Robert; Koelsch, Gerald; Nightingale, Lydia; Shaver, Tim; Abdou, Nabih I.; Albert, Daniel A.; Carson, Craig; Petri, Michelle; Treadwell, Edward L.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by production of autoantibodies against intracellular antigens including DNA, ribosomal P, Ro (SS-A), La (SS-B), and the spliceosome. Etiology is suspected to involve genetic and environmental factors. Evidence of genetic involvement includes: associations with HLA-DR3, HLA-DR2, Fcγ receptors (FcγR) IIA and IIIA, and hereditary complement component deficiencies, as well as familial aggregation, monozygotic twin concordance >20%, λs > 10, purported linkage at 1q41–42, and inbred mouse strains that consistently develop lupus. We have completed a genome scan in 94 extended multiplex pedigrees by using model-based linkage analysis. Potential [log10 of the odds for linkage (lod) > 2.0] SLE loci have been identified at chromosomes 1q41, 1q23, and 11q14–23 in African-Americans; 14q11, 4p15, 11q25, 2q32, 19q13, 6q26–27, and 12p12–11 in European-Americans; and 1q23, 13q32, 20q13, and 1q31 in all pedigrees combined. An effect for the FcγRIIA candidate polymorphism) at 1q23 (lod = 3.37 in African-Americans) is syntenic with linkage in a murine model of lupus. Sib-pair and multipoint nonparametric analyses also support linkage (P 2.0). Our results are consistent with the presumed complexity of genetic susceptibility to SLE and illustrate racial origin is likely to influence the specific nature of these genetic effects. PMID:9843982

  2. Asymmetric Introgression in the Horticultural Living Fossil Cycas Sect. Asiorientales Using a Genome-Wide Scanning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shong Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct.

  3. Whole genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci for conformation and functional traits in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, C.; Bovenhuis, H.; Coppieters, W.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A granddaughter design was used to locate quantitative trait loci determining conformation and functional traits in dairy cattle. In this granddaughter design, consisting of 20 Holstein Friesian grandsires and 833 sons, genotypes were determined for 277 microsatellite markers covering the whole geno

  4. Genome Scan Detects Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Female Fertility Traits in Danish and Swedish Holstein Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Johanna Karolina; Guldbrandtsen, B; Su, G;

    2009-01-01

    Data from the joint Nordic breeding value prediction for Danish and Swedish Holstein grandsire families were used to locate quantitative trait loci (QTL) for female fertility traits in Danish and Swedish Holstein cattle. Up to 36 Holstein grandsires with over 2,000 sons were genotyped for 416 mic...

  5. Detection of Ground Clutter from Weather Radar Using a Dual-Polarization and Dual-Scan Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Golbon-Haghighi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel dual-polarization and dual-scan (DPDS classification algorithm is developed for clutter detection in weather radar observations. Two consecutive scans of dual-polarization radar echoes are jointly processed to estimate auto- and cross-correlation functions. Discriminants are then defined and estimated in order to separate clutter from weather based on their physical and statistical properties. An optimal Bayesian classifier is used to make a decision on clutter presence from the estimated discriminant functions. The DPDS algorithm is applied to the data collected with the KOUN polarimetric radar and compared with the existing detection methods. It is shown that the DPDS algorithm yields a higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rate in clutter detection.

  6. Comparative analysis of copy number detection by whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejjani Bassem A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a powerful diagnostic tool for the detection of DNA copy number gains and losses associated with chromosome abnormalities, many of which are below the resolution of conventional chromosome analysis. It has been presumed that whole-genome oligonucleotide (oligo arrays identify more clinically significant copy-number abnormalities than whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays, yet this has not been systematically studied in a clinical diagnostic setting. Results To determine the difference in detection rate between similarly designed BAC and oligo arrays, we developed whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide microarrays and validated them in a side-by-side comparison of 466 consecutive clinical specimens submitted to our laboratory for aCGH. Of the 466 cases studied, 67 (14.3% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome BAC array, and 73 (15.6% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome oligo array. However, because both platforms identified copy number variants of unclear clinical significance, we designed a systematic method for the interpretation of copy number alterations and tested an additional 3,443 cases by BAC array and 3,096 cases by oligo array. Of those cases tested on the BAC array, 17.6% were found to have a copy-number abnormality of potential clinical significance, whereas the detection rate increased to 22.5% for the cases tested by oligo array. In addition, we validated the oligo array for detection of mosaicism and found that it could routinely detect mosaicism at levels of 30% and greater. Conclusions Although BAC arrays have faster turnaround times, the increased detection rate of oligo arrays makes them attractive for clinical cytogenetic testing.

  7. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G. T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, a...

  8. Obstacle avoidance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior of glaucoma patients in a driving simulator: a preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado Vega, R.; Van Leeuwen, P.M.; Rendon Velez, E.; Lemij, H.G.; De Winter, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23) and control participants (n = 12) completed four 5-min driving sessi

  9. Improved detection and biopsy of solid liver lesions using pulse-inversion ultrasound scanning and contrast agent infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldbye, B.; Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Struckmann, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of pulse-inversion ultrasound (US) scanning (PIUS), combined with an IV contrast agent, to detect malignant liver lesions and its impact on patient management (resectability). Additionally, to determine the feasibility of US-guided biopsy of new...

  10. Obstacle avoidance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior of glaucoma patients in a driving simulator: a preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado Vega, R.; Van Leeuwen, P.M.; Rendon Velez, E.; Lemij, H.G.; De Winter, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23) and control participants (n = 12) completed four 5-min driving sessi

  11. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  12. Automatic lung segmentation from thoracic computed tomography scans using a hybrid approach with error detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikxoort, E.M. van; Hoop, B. de; Viergever, M.A.; Prokop, M.; Ginneken, B. van

    2009-01-01

    Lung segmentation is a prerequisite for automated analysis of chest CT scans. Conventional lung segmentation methods rely on large attenuation differences between lung parenchyma and surrounding tissue. These methods fail in scans where dense abnormalities are present, which often occurs in clinical

  13. Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker.

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Ratna Djuita; Rita Megia

    2010-01-01

    Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker. The research aims todetect genomic integrity of in vitro irradiated banana using microsatellite marker. These studies were done on bananacv. Pisang Mas irradiated by 15 Gy of gamma ray. The DNA was isolated from each accesion following Dixie.Amplification of DNA products were done by Perkin Elmer Gene Amp PCR 2400 using ten primers, and thenelectroforesis in agarose 1%. Finally a vertical polyacrylamide gel...

  14. Scanning Laser Polarimetry and Optical Coherence Tomography for Detection of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare the ability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) and Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect photographic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included 45 eyes of 45 consecutive glaucoma patients with RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The superior and inferior temporal quadrants in each eye were included for data analysis separately. The location and presence of RNFL defects seen in red-free fundus photographs were compared with those seen in GDx-VCC deviation maps and OCT RNFL analysis maps for each quadrant. Results Of the 90 quadrants (45 eyes), 31 (34%) had no apparent RNFL defects, 29 (32%) had focal RNFL defects, and 30 (33%) had diffuse RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The highest agreement between GDx-VCC and red-free photography was 73% when we defined GDx-VCC RNFL defects as a cluster of three or more color-coded squares (p<5%) along the traveling line of the retinal nerve fiber in the GDx-VCC deviation map (kappa value, 0.388; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.195 to 0.582). The highest agreement between OCT and red-free photography was 85% (kappa value, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.506 to 0.825) when a value of 5% outside the normal limit for the OCT analysis map was used as a cut-off value for OCT RNFL defects. Conclusions According to the kappa values, the agreement between GDx-VCC deviation maps and red-free photography was poor, whereas the agreement between OCT analysis maps and red-free photography was good. PMID:19794943

  15. Automatic detection of patients with invasive fungal disease from free-text computed tomography (CT) scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David; Ananda-Rajah, Michelle R; Suominen, Hanna; Slavin, Monica A; Thursky, Karin A; Cavedon, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) are associated with considerable health and economic costs. Surveillance of the more diagnostically challenging invasive fungal diseases, specifically of the sino-pulmonary system, is not feasible for many hospitals because case finding is a costly and labour intensive exercise. We developed text classifiers for detecting such IFDs from free-text radiology (CT) reports, using machine-learning techniques. We obtained free-text reports of CT scans performed over a specific hospitalisation period (2003-2011), for 264 IFD and 289 control patients from three tertiary hospitals. We analysed IFD evidence at patient, report, and sentence levels. Three infectious disease experts annotated the reports of 73 IFD-positive patients for language suggestive of IFD at sentence level, and graded the sentences as to whether they suggested or excluded the presence of IFD. Reliable agreement between annotators was obtained and this was used as training data for our classifiers. We tested a variety of Machine Learning (ML), rule based, and hybrid systems, with feature types including bags of words, bags of phrases, and bags of concepts, as well as report-level structured features. Evaluation was carried out over a robust framework with separate Development and Held-Out datasets. The best systems (using Support Vector Machines) achieved very high recall at report- and patient-levels over unseen data: 95% and 100% respectively. Precision at report-level over held-out data was 71%; however, most of the associated false-positive reports (53%) belonged to patients who had a previous positive report appropriately flagged by the classifier, reducing negative impact in practice. Our machine learning application holds the potential for developing systematic IFD surveillance systems for hospital populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  17. Scanning laser polarimetry and optical coherence tomography for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Yong Yeon

    2009-09-01

    To compare the ability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) and Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect photographic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 45 eyes of 45 consecutive glaucoma patients with RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The superior and inferior temporal quadrants in each eye were included for data analysis separately. The location and presence of RNFL defects seen in red-free fundus photographs were compared with those seen in GDx-VCC deviation maps and OCT RNFL analysis maps for each quadrant. Of the 90 quadrants (45 eyes), 31 (34%) had no apparent RNFL defects, 29 (32%) had focal RNFL defects, and 30 (33%) had diffuse RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The highest agreement between GDx-VCC and red-free photography was 73% when we defined GDx-VCC RNFL defects as a cluster of three or more color-coded squares (p<5%) along the traveling line of the retinal nerve fiber in the GDx-VCC deviation map (kappa value, 0.388; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.195 to 0.582). The highest agreement between OCT and red-free photography was 85% (kappa value, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.506 to 0.825) when a value of 5% outside the normal limit for the OCT analysis map was used as a cut-off value for OCT RNFL defects. According to the kappa values, the agreement between GDx-VCC deviation maps and red-free photography was poor, whereas the agreement between OCT analysis maps and red-free photography was good.

  18. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  19. RAPD-based detection of genomic instability in cucumber plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... ferent properties inherent in each marker system influen- ce their effectiveness ... detect somaclonal variation in somatic embryo-derived plants from two ... plant of cultivar Profito are represented in lanes 2 and 3 in. OPG-14.

  20. An HMM-based comparative genomic framework for detecting introgression in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One outcome of interspecific hybridization and subsequent effects of evolutionary forces is introgression, which is the integration of genetic material from one species into the genome of an individual in another species. The evolution of several groups of eukaryotic species has involved hybridization, and cases of adaptation through introgression have been already established. In this work, we report on PhyloNet-HMM-a new comparative genomic framework for detecting introgression in genomes. PhyloNet-HMM combines phylogenetic networks with hidden Markov models (HMMs to simultaneously capture the (potentially reticulate evolutionary history of the genomes and dependencies within genomes. A novel aspect of our work is that it also accounts for incomplete lineage sorting and dependence across loci. Application of our model to variation data from chromosome 7 in the mouse (Mus musculus domesticus genome detected a recently reported adaptive introgression event involving the rodent poison resistance gene Vkorc1, in addition to other newly detected introgressed genomic regions. Based on our analysis, it is estimated that about 9% of all sites within chromosome 7 are of introgressive origin (these cover about 13 Mbp of chromosome 7, and over 300 genes. Further, our model detected no introgression in a negative control data set. We also found that our model accurately detected introgression and other evolutionary processes from synthetic data sets simulated under the coalescent model with recombination, isolation, and migration. Our work provides a powerful framework for systematic analysis of introgression while simultaneously accounting for dependence across sites, point mutations, recombination, and ancestral polymorphism.

  1. A critical assessment of cross-species detection of gene duplicates using comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renn Suzy CP

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of genomic DNA among closely related strains or species is a powerful approach for identifying variation in evolutionary processes. One potent source of genomic variation is gene duplication, which is prevalent among individuals and species. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH has been successfully utilized to detect this variation among lineages. Here, beyond the demonstration that gene duplicates among species can be quantified with aCGH, we consider the effect of sequence divergence on the ability to detect gene duplicates. Results Using the X chromosome genomic content difference between male D. melanogaster and female D. yakuba and D. simulans, we describe a decrease in the ability to accurately measure genomic content (copy number for orthologs that are only 90% identical. We demonstrate that genome characteristics (e.g. chromatin environment and non-orthologous sequence similarity can also affect the ability to accurately measure genomic content. We describe a normalization strategy and statistical criteria to be used for the identification of gene duplicates among any species group for which an array platform is available from a closely related species. Conclusions Array CGH can be used to effectively identify gene duplication and genome content; however, certain biases are present due to sequence divergence and other genome characteristics resulting from the divergence between lineages. Highly conserved gene duplicates will be more readily recovered by aCGH. Duplicates that have been retained for a selective advantage due to directional selection acting on many loci in one or both gene copies are likely to be under-represented. The results of this study should inform the interpretation of both previously published and future work that employs this powerful technique.

  2. Novel Automatic Detection of Pleura and B-lines (Comet-Tail Artifacts) on In-Vivo Lung Ultrasound Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic method for detection of B-lines (comet-tail artifacts) in lung ultrasound scans. B-lines are the most commonly used artifacts for analyzing the pulmonary edema. They appear as laser-like vertical beams, which arise from the pleural line and spread down without...... images. The pleural line is first segmented on each image and then the B-line artifacts spreading down from the pleural line are detected and overlayed on the image. The resulting 300 images showed that the mean lateral distance between B-lines detected on images acquired from patients decreased by 20...

  3. A Low Cost, Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) Antenna Technology for Aviation Hazard Detection and Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will investigate the feasibility of utilizing ThinKom's low cost electronically scanned array (ESA) antenna concepts to enable affordable...

  4. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Es, van P.; Petersen, W.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  5. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsuiker, L; VAN Es, P; Petersen, W; VAN Leeuwen, T G; Terstappen, L W M M; Otto, C

    2011-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample preparation protocol was developed to enable imaging of cells and gold nanoparticles with a conventional below lens scanning electron microscopes. The negative influence of 'charging' on the quality of scanning electron microscopes' images could be limited by deposition of biological cells on a conductive (gold) surface. The novel protocol enabled high-resolution scanning electron microscopes' imaging of small clusters and individual gold nanoparticles on uncoated cell surfaces. Gold nanoparticles could be counted on cancer cells with automated routines.

  6. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  7. Genome-wide linkage scan and association study of PARL to the expression of LHON families in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phasukkijwatana, Nopasak; Kunhapan, Bussaraporn; Stankovich, Jim; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha L; Thomson, Russell; Thornton, Timothy; Bahlo, Melanie; Mushiroda, Taisei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Tun, Aung Win; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Limwongse, Chanin; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Sura, Thanyachai; Suthammarak, Wichit; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2010-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrially inherited disease causing blindness, preferentially in young adult males. Most of the patients carry the G11778A mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. However, the marked incomplete penetrance and the gender bias indicate some additional genetic and/or environmental factors to disease expression. Herein, we first conducted a genome-wide linkage scan with 400 microsatellite markers in 9 large Thai LHON G11778A pedigrees. Using an affecteds-only nonparametric linkage analysis, 4 regions on chromosomes 3, 12, 13 and 18 showed Zlr scores greater than 2 (P 2 in 10 of 16 allele sharing models tested) was then expanded to include the region 3q26.2-3q28 covering SLC7A14 (3q26.2), MFN1 (3q26.32), MRPL47 (3q26.33), MCCC1 (3q27.1), PARL (3q27.1) and OPA1 (3q28-q29). All of these candidate genes were selected from the Maestro database and had known to be localized in mitochondria. Sixty tag SNPs were genotyped in 86 cases, 211 of their relatives and 32 unrelated Thai controls, by multiplex-PCR-based Invader assay. Analyses using a powerful association testing tool that adjusts for relatedness (the M(QLS) statistic) showed the most evidence of association between two SNPs, rs3749446 and rs1402000 (located in PARL presenilins-associated rhomboid-like) and LHON expression (both P = 8.8 x 10(-5)). The mitochondrial PARL protease has been recently known to play a role with a dynamin-related OPA1 protein in preventing apoptotic events by slowing down the release of cytochrome c out of mitochondrial cristae junctions. Moreover, PARL is required to activate the intramembranous proteolyses resulting in the degradation of an accumulated pro-apoptotic protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Under these circumstances, variants of PARL are suggested to influence cell death by apoptosis which has long been believed to intrigue the neurodegeneration of LHON.

  8. Signal Processing and Its Effect on Scanning Efficiencies for a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-energy Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianno, Craig M

    2015-07-01

    Signal processing within a radiation detector affects detection efficiency. Currently, organizations such as private industry, the U.S. Navy, Army, and Air Force are coupling some detector systems with data collection devices to survey large land areas for radioactive contamination. As detector technology has advanced and analog data collection has turned to digital, signal processing is becoming prevalent in some instruments. Using a NIST traceable (241)Am source, detection efficiency for a field instrument for detecting low-energy radiation (FIDLER) was examined for both a static and scanning mode. Experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies. Stationary data compared nicely to the theoretical results. Conversely, scanning detection efficiencies were considerably different from their theoretical counterparts. As speed increased, differences in detection efficiency approached two orders of magnitude. To account for these differences, a quasi time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation was created mimicking the signal processing undertaken by the FIDLER detection system. By including signal processing, experimental results fell within the bounds of the Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies, thus demonstrating the negative effects of such processing on detection efficiencies.

  9. A method for accurate detection of genomic microdeletions using real-time quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassett Anne S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR is a well-established method for quantifying levels of gene expression, but has not been routinely applied to the detection of constitutional copy number alterations of human genomic DNA. Microdeletions or microduplications of the human genome are associated with a variety of genetic disorders. Although, clinical laboratories routinely use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to identify such cryptic genomic alterations, there remains a significant number of individuals in which constitutional genomic imbalance is suspected, based on clinical parameters, but cannot be readily detected using current cytogenetic techniques. Results In this study, a novel application for real-time qPCR is presented that can be used to reproducibly detect chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications. This approach was applied to DNA from a series of patient samples and controls to validate genomic copy number alteration at cytoband 22q11. The study group comprised 12 patients with clinical symptoms of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, 1 patient trisomic for 22q11 and 4 normal controls. 6 of the patients (group 1 had known hemizygous deletions, as detected by standard diagnostic FISH, whilst the remaining 6 patients (group 2 were classified as 22q11DS negative using the clinical FISH assay. Screening of the patients and controls with a set of 10 real time qPCR primers, spanning the 22q11.2-deleted region and flanking sequence, confirmed the FISH assay results for all patients with 100% concordance. Moreover, this qPCR enabled a refinement of the region of deletion at 22q11. Analysis of DNA from chromosome 22 trisomic sample demonstrated genomic duplication within 22q11. Conclusion In this paper we present a qPCR approach for the detection of chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications. The strategic use of in silico modelling for qPCR primer design to avoid regions of repetitive

  10. Detection of breed specific copy number variations in domestic chicken genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Saeed S; Mohammadabadi, Mohammadreza; Wu, Dong-Dong; Esmailizadeh, Ali

    2017-09-29

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are important large scale variants that are widespread in the genome and may contribute to phenotypic variation. Detection and characterization of CNVs can provide new insights into the genetic basis of important traits. Here, we performed whole genome short read sequence analysis to identify CNVs in two indigenous and commercial chicken breeds and evaluate the impact of the identified CNVs on breed specific traits. After filtration, a total of 12955 CNVs spanning (on average) about 9.42% of the chicken genome were found that made up 5467 CNV regions (CNVRs). Chicken quantitative trait loci (QTL) datasets and Ensembl gene annotations were used as resources for the estimation of potential phenotypic effects of our CNVRs on breed specific traits. In total, 34% of our detected CNVRs were also detected in earlier CNV studies. These CNVRs partly overlap with several previously reported QTL and gene ontology terms associated with some important traits, including shank length QTL in Creeper specific CNVRs and body weight and egg production characteristics as well as growth of muscles and body organs gene terms in the Arian commercial breed. Our findings provide new insights into the genomic structure of the chicken genome for an improved understanding of the potential roles of CNVRs in differentiating between breeds or lines.

  11. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-01

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinate system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.

  12. Combining tumor genome simulation with crowdsourcing to benchmark somatic single-nucleotide-variant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Adam D; Houlahan, Kathleen E; Hu, Yin; Ellrott, Kyle; Caloian, Cristian; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Bare, J Christopher; P'ng, Christine; Waggott, Daryl; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Kellen, Michael R; Norman, Thea C; Haussler, David; Friend, Stephen H; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Margolin, Adam A; Stuart, Joshua M; Boutros, Paul C

    2015-07-01

    The detection of somatic mutations from cancer genome sequences is key to understanding the genetic basis of disease progression, patient survival and response to therapy. Benchmarking is needed for tool assessment and improvement but is complicated by a lack of gold standards, by extensive resource requirements and by difficulties in sharing personal genomic information. To resolve these issues, we launched the ICGC-TCGA DREAM Somatic Mutation Calling Challenge, a crowdsourced benchmark of somatic mutation detection algorithms. Here we report the BAMSurgeon tool for simulating cancer genomes and the results of 248 analyses of three in silico tumors created with it. Different algorithms exhibit characteristic error profiles, and, intriguingly, false positives show a trinucleotide profile very similar to one found in human tumors. Although the three simulated tumors differ in sequence contamination (deviation from normal cell sequence) and in subclonality, an ensemble of pipelines outperforms the best individual pipeline in all cases. BAMSurgeon is available at https://github.com/adamewing/bamsurgeon/.

  13. Low-level mixing height detection in coastal locations with a scanning Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vakkari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixing height is one of the key parameters in describing lower tropospheric dynamics, and capturing the diurnal variability is crucial, especially in interpreting surface observations. In this paper we introduce a method for identifying mixing heights below the vertical minimum range of a scanning Doppler lidar. The method we propose is based on velocity variance in low elevation angle conical scanning, and is applied to measurements in two very different coastal environments: Limassol, Cyprus during summer; and Loviisa, Finland during winter. At both locations, the new method agrees well with mixing heights derived from turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate profiles obtained from vertically-pointing measurements. The low-level scanning routine frequently indicated non-zero mixing heights less than 100 m above the surface. Such low mixing heights were more common at wintertime Loviisa on the Baltic Sea coast than during summertime in Mediterranean Limassol.

  14. Detection of selection signatures in dairy and beef cattle using high-density genomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuping; McParland, Sinead; Kearney, Francis; Du, Lixin; Berry, Donagh P

    2015-06-19

    Artificial selection for economically important traits in cattle is expected to have left distinctive selection signatures on the genome. Access to high-density genotypes facilitates the accurate identification of genomic regions that have undergone positive selection. These findings help to better elucidate the mechanisms of selection and to identify candidate genes of interest to breeding programs. Information on 705 243 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3122 dairy and beef male animals from seven cattle breeds (Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental) were used to detect selection signatures by applying two complementary methods, integrated haplotype score (iHS) and global fixation index (FST). To control for false positive results, we used false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment to calculate adjusted iHS within each breed and the genome-wide significance level was about 0.003. Using the iHS method, 83, 92, 91, 101, 85, 101 and 86 significant genomic regions were detected for Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental cattle, respectively. None of these regions was common to all seven breeds. Using the FST approach, 704 individual SNPs were detected across breeds. Annotation of the regions of the genome that showed selection signatures revealed several interesting candidate genes i.e. DGAT1, ABCG2, MSTN, CAPN3, FABP3, CHCHD7, PLAG1, JAZF1, PRKG2, ACTC1, TBC1D1, GHR, BMP2, TSG1, LYN, KIT and MC1R that play a role in milk production, reproduction, body size, muscle formation or coat color. Fifty-seven common candidate genes were found by both the iHS and global FST methods across the seven breeds. Moreover, many novel genomic regions and genes were detected within the regions that showed selection signatures; for some candidate genes, signatures of positive selection exist in the human genome. Multilevel bioinformatic analyses of the detected candidate genes

  15. Improved detection and biopsy of solid liver lesions using pulse-inversion ultrasound scanning and contrast agent infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldbye, B.; Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Struckmann, J.;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of pulse-inversion ultrasound (US) scanning (PIUS), combined with an IV contrast agent, to detect malignant liver lesions and its impact on patient management (resectability). Additionally, to determine the feasibility of US-guided biopsy of new...... with additional findings by PIUS underwent US-guided biopsy. PIUS provided additional information in 18 patients (60%); of these, 13 (43%) had additional metastases. Of 19 patients found resectable by conventional US, 9 (47%) were considered inoperable using PIUS supported by biopsies. Biopsies of additional...... findings were performed in 17 of 18 patients. All biopsies of additional findings confirmed malignancy. PIUS with an IV contrast agent increased the ability to detect liver metastases compared to conventional US scanning. The technique had a high impact on patient management. The results showed that PIUS...

  16. Comparison of variations detection between whole-genome amplification methods used in single-cell resequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong; Wu, Kui; Shi, Xulian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-cell resequencing (SCRS) provides many biomedical advances in variations detection at the single-cell level, but it currently relies on whole genome amplification (WGA). Three methods are commonly used for WGA: multiple displacement amplification (MDA), degenerate-oligonucleoti...

  17. Hotspot detection using space-time scan statistics on children under five years of age in Depok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdiana, Miranti; Widyaningsih, Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Some problems that affect the health level in Depok is the high malnutrition rates from year to year and the more spread infectious and non-communicable diseases in some areas. Children under five years old is a vulnerable part of population to get the malnutrition and diseases. Based on this reason, it is important to observe the location and time, where and when, malnutrition in Depok happened in high intensity. To obtain the location and time of the hotspots of malnutrition and diseases that attack children under five years old, space-time scan statistics method can be used. Space-time scan statistic is a hotspot detection method, where the area and time of information and time are taken into account simultaneously in detecting the hotspots. This method detects a hotspot with a cylindrical scanning window: the cylindrical pedestal describes the area, and the height of cylinder describe the time. Cylinders formed is a hotspot candidate that may occur, which require testing of hypotheses, whether a cylinder can be summed up as a hotspot. Hotspot detection in this study carried out by forming a combination of several variables. Some combination of variables provides hotspot detection results that tend to be the same, so as to form groups (clusters). In the case of infant health level in Depok city, Beji health care center region in 2011-2012 is a hotspot. According to the combination of the variables used in the detection of hotspots, Beji health care center is most frequently as a hotspot. Hopefully the local government can take the right policy to improve the health level of children under five in the city of Depok.

  18. Comparative genomics provide a rapid detection ofFusarium oxysporum f. sp.conglutinans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Jian; ZHANG Ji-xiang; ZENG Feng; CAO Yue-xia; XIE Bing-yan; YANG Yu-hong

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporumf. sp. conglutinans(Foc) is the causal agent ofFusarium wilt disease ofBrassica oleracea. A rapid, accurate, and reliable method to detect and identify plant pathogens is vitaly important to integrated disease management. In this study, using a comparative genome analysis amongFusarium oxysporum (Fo), we developed aFoc-speciifc primer set (Focs-1/Focs-2) and established a multiplex-PCR assay. In the assay, the Focs-1/Focs-2 and universal primers for Fusariumspecies(W106R/F106S) could be used to detectFoc isolates in a single PCR reaction. With the optimized PCR parameters, the multiplex-PCR assay showed a high speciifcity for detectingFoc and was very sensitive to detect as little as 100 pg of pureFoc genomic DNA or 1000 spores in 1 g of twice-autoclaved soil. We also demonstrated thatFoc isolates were easily detected from infected plant tissues, as wel as from natural ifeld soils, using the multiplex-PCR assay. To our knowledge, this is a ifrst report on detectionFo by comparative genomic method.

  19. Scanning genomic areas under selection sweep and association mapping as tools to identify horticultural important genes in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) contains 88% water, sugars, and several important health-related compounds, including lycopene, citrulline, arginine, and glutathione. The current genetic diversity study uses microsatellites with known map positions to identify genomic regions that under...

  20. Outcome of fetuses with short femur length detected at second-trimester anomaly scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, J. M.; Aksglaede, L.; Skibsted, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between the finding of fetal femur diaphysis length (FL) below the 5th percentile at the second-trimester scan and pregnancy outcome, in a population in which more than 90% of women attend first-trimester screening. Methods This was a retrospective study of all...

  1. Patient-centered clinical impact of incidentally detected abnormalities on chest CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine G. Moftah

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The clinically significant different incidental abnormalities on chest CT scans represented 10.4% of all incidental findings, 3.3% were due to malignancies. The clinical impact of incidental abnormalities on chest CT may be of utmost importance on patient care.

  2. Electrochemical Dopamine Detection: Comparing Gold and Carbon Fiber Microelectrodes using Background Subtracted Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Zachek, Matthew K.; Hermans, Andre; Wightman, R. Mark; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical detection is becoming increasingly important for the detection of biological species. Most current biological research with electrochemical detection is done with carbon fiber electrodes due to their many beneficial properties. The ability to build electrochemical sensor from noble metals instead of carbon fibers may be beneficial in developing inexpensive multiplexed electrochemical detection schemes. To advance understanding and to test the feasibility of using noble metal e...

  3. Automatic detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules in thoracic CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most deadly cancer in both men and women. This can be largely attributed to the fact that lung cancer is usually detected in a late stage. If the disease is detected in an early stage, the survival rate is much better. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer, in which it is stil

  4. A genome-screen experiment to detect quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to facial eczema disease in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Henry, H M; Beattie, A E; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

    2009-02-01

    Facial eczema (FE) is a secondary photosensitization disease arising from liver cirrhosis caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin. The disease affects sheep, cattle, deer and goats, and costs the New Zealand sheep industry alone an estimated NZ$63M annually. A long-term sustainable solution to this century-old FE problem is to breed for disease-resistant animals by marker-assisted selection. As a step towards finding a diagnostic DNA test for FE sensitivity, we have conducted a genome-scan experiment to screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting this trait in Romney sheep. Four F(1) sires, obtained from reciprocal matings of FE resistant and susceptible selection-line animals, were used to generate four outcross families. The resulting half-sib progeny were artificially challenged with sporidesmin to phenotype their FE traits measured in terms of their serum levels of liver-specific enzymes, namely gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase. In a primary screen using selective genotyping on extreme progeny of each family, a total of 244 DNA markers uniformly distributed over all 26 ovine autosomes (with an autosomal genome coverage of 79-91%) were tested for linkage to the FE traits. Data were analysed using Haley-Knott regression. The primary screen detected one significant and one suggestive QTL on chromosomes 3 and 8 respectively. Both the significant and suggestive QTL were followed up in a secondary screen where all progeny were genotyped and analysed; the QTL on chromosome 3 was significant in this analysis.

  5. Fuzzy Clustering Applied to ROI Detection in Helical Thoracic CT Scans with a New Proposal and Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Alfonso; Rey, Alberto; Boveda, Carmen; Arcay, Bernardino; Sanjurjo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The detection of pulmonary nodules is one of the most studied problems in the field of medical image analysis due to the great difficulty in the early detection of such nodules and their social impact. The traditional approach involves the development of a multistage CAD system capable of informing the radiologist of the presence or absence of nodules. One stage in such systems is the detection of ROI (regions of interest) that may be nodules in order to reduce the space of the problem. This paper evaluates fuzzy clustering algorithms that employ different classification strategies to achieve this goal. After characterising these algorithms, the authors propose a new algorithm and different variations to improve the results obtained initially. Finally it is shown as the most recent developments in fuzzy clustering are able to detect regions that may be nodules in CT studies. The algorithms were evaluated using helical thoracic CT scans obtained from the database of the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium).

  6. Scan direction induced charging dynamics and the application for detection of gate to S/D shorts in logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Tian, Qing; Wu, Kevin; Zhao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Gate to source/drain (S/D) short is the most common and detrimental failure mechanism for advanced process technology development in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) device manufacturing. Especially for sub-1Xnm nodes, MOSFET device is more vulnerable to gate-S/D shorts due to the aggressive scaling. The detection of this kind of electrical short defect is always challenging for in-line electron beam inspection (EBI), especially new shorting mechanisms on atomic scale due to new material/process flow implementation. The second challenge comes from the characterization of the shorts including identification of the exact shorting location. In this paper, we demonstrate unique scan direction induced charging dynamics (SDCD) phenomenon which stems from the transistor level response from EBI scan at post metal contact chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) layers. We found that SDCD effect is exceptionally useful for gate-S/D short induced voltage contrast (VC) defect detection, especially for identification of shorting locations. The unique SDCD effect signatures of gate-S/D shorts can be used as fingerprint for ground true shorting defect detection. Correlation with other characterization methods on the same defective location from EBI scan shows consistent results from various shorting mechanism. A practical work flow to implement the application of SDCD effect for in-line EBI monitor of critical gate-S/D short defects is also proposed, together with examples of successful application use cases which mostly focus on static random-access memory (SRAM) array regions. Although the capability of gate-S/D short detection as well as expected device response is limited to passing transistors and pull-down transistors due to the design restriction from standard 6-cell SRAM structure, SDCD effect is proven to be very effective for gate-S/D short induced VC defect detection as well as yield learning for advanced technology development.

  7. Whole genome scan reveals the genetic signature of African Ankole cattle breed and potential for higher quality beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mengistie; Kim, Jaemin; Yoon, Sook Hee; Lee, Wonseok; Hanotte, Olivier; Dessie, Tadelle; Kemp, Stephen; Mwai, Okeyo Ally; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Cho, Seoae; Oh, Sung Jong; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Kim, Heebal

    2017-02-09

    Africa is home to numerous cattle breeds whose diversity has been shaped by subtle combinations of human and natural selection. African Sanga cattle are an intermediate type of cattle resulting from interbreeding between Bos taurus and Bos indicus subspecies. Recently, research has asserted the potential of Sanga breeds for commercial beef production with better meat quality as compared to Bos indicus breeds. Here, we identified meat quality related gene regions that are positively selected in Ankole (Sanga) cattle breeds as compared to indicus (Boran, Ogaden, and Kenana) breeds using cross-population (XP-EHH and XP-CLR) statistical methods. We identified 238 (XP-EHH) and 213 (XP-CLR) positively selected genes, of which 97 were detected from both statistics. Among the genes obtained, we primarily reported those involved in different biological process and pathways associated with meat quality traits. Genes (CAPZB, COL9A2, PDGFRA, MAP3K5, ZNF410, and PKM2) involved in muscle structure and metabolism affect meat tenderness. Genes (PLA2G2A, PARK2, ZNF410, MAP2K3, PLCD3, PLCD1, and ROCK1) related to intramuscular fat (IMF) are involved in adipose metabolism and adipogenesis. MB and SLC48A1 affect meat color. In addition, we identified genes (TIMP2, PKM2, PRKG1, MAP3K5, and ATP8A1) related to feeding efficiency. Among the enriched Gene Ontology Biological Process (GO BP) terms, actin cytoskeleton organization, actin filament-based process, and protein ubiquitination are associated with meat tenderness whereas cellular component organization, negative regulation of actin filament depolymerization and negative regulation of protein complex disassembly are involved in adipocyte regulation. The MAPK pathway is responsible for cell proliferation and plays an important role in hyperplastic growth, which has a positive effect on meat tenderness. Results revealed several candidate genes positively selected in Ankole cattle in relation to meat quality characteristics. The genes

  8. Detecting the somatic mutations spectrum of Chinese lung cancer by analyzing the whole mitochondrial DNA genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Fei; Chen, Hua-Mei; Hong, Zhi-Peng

    2015-02-01

    To detect the somatic mutations and character its spectrum in Chinese lung cancer patients. In this study, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes for 10 lung cancer patients including the primary cancerous, matched paracancerous normal and distant normal tissues. By analyzing the 30 whole mtDNA genomes, eight somatic mutations were identified from five patients investigated, which were confirmed with the cloning and sequencing of the somatic mutations. Five of the somatic mutations were detected among control region and the rests were found at the coding region. Heterogeneity was the main character of the somatic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Further potential disease-related screening showed that, except the C deletion at position 309 showed AD-weakly associated, most of them were not disease-related. Although the role of aforementioned somatic mutations was unknown, however, considering the relative higher frequency of somatic mutations among the whole mtDNA genomes, it hints that detecting the somatic mutation(s) from the whole mtDNA genomes can serve as a useful tool for the Chinese lung cancer diagnostic to some extent.

  9. A bioinformatics workflow for detecting signatures of selection in genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray eCadzow

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The detection of signatures of selection is now possible on a genome-wide scale in many plant and animal species, and can be performed in a population-specific manner due to the wealth of per-population genome-wide genotype data that is available. With genomic regions that exhibit evidence of selection having been shown to be enriched for genes associated with biologically important traits, detection of selective pressure is emerging as an additional approach for identifying novel gene-trait associations. While high-density genotype data is now relatively easy to obtain, for many researchers it is not immediately obvious how to go about identifying signatures of selection in these data sets. Here we describe a basic workflow, constructed from open source tools, for detecting and examining evidence of selection in genomic data. Code to install and implement the pipeline components, and instructions to run a basic analysis using the workflow described here, can be downloaded from our public GitHub repository:http://www.github.com/smilefreak/selectionTools/

  10. Simultaneous QTL detection and genomic breeding value estimation using high density SNP chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerkamp Roel F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The simulated dataset of the 13th QTL-MAS workshop was analysed to i detect QTL and ii predict breeding values for animals without phenotypic information. Several parameterisations considering all SNP simultaneously were applied using Gibbs sampling. Results Fourteen QTL were detected at the different time points. Correlations between estimated breeding values were high between models, except when the model was used that assumed that all SNP effects came from one distribution. The model that used the selected 14 SNP found associated with QTL, gave close to unity correlations with the full parameterisations. Conclusions Nine out of 18 QTL were detected, however the six QTL for inflection point were missed. Models for genomic selection were indicated to be fairly robust, e.g. with respect to accuracy of estimated breeding values. Still, it is worthwhile to investigate the number QTL underlying the quantitative traits, before choosing the model used for genomic selection.

  11. Edge detection in the presence of speckle noise in barcode scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Emanuel; Kresic-Juric, Sasa

    2003-05-01

    Speckle noise is inherent to laser barcode scanners since barcodes are usually printed on diffusive surfaces which generate speckle when illuminated by spatially coherent beams. In this paper statistical properties of barcode signals corrupted by speckle noise are analyzed. We derive closed form expressions for the autorcorrelation function and power spectral density of speckle noise for scanning beams with arbitrary field distributions. Since differentiation is often used for enhancement of barcode edges, we also analyze the properties of differentiated speckle noise. We derive estimates for signal-to-noise ratio when a laser beam scans over an edge. The random edge jitter in a barcode signal caused by speckle noise is also analyzed. The theory is illustrated by applying the results to Gaussian beams.

  12. Detecting submerged objects: the application of side scan sonar to forensic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, John J; Healy, Carrie A; Parker, Kenneth; Lowers, Bim

    2013-09-10

    Forensic personnel must deal with numerous challenges when searching for submerged objects. While traditional water search methods have generally involved using dive teams, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), and water scent dogs for cases involving submerged objects and bodies, law enforcement is increasingly integrating multiple methods that include geophysical technologies. There are numerous advantages for integrating geophysical technologies, such as side scan sonar and ground penetrating radar (GPR), with more traditional search methods. Overall, these methods decrease the time involved searching, in addition to increasing area searched. However, as with other search methods, there are advantages and disadvantages when using each method. For example, in instances with excessive aquatic vegetation or irregular bottom terrain, it may not be possible to discern a submersed body with side scan sonar. As a result, forensic personnel will have the highest rate of success during searches for submerged objects when integrating multiple search methods, including deploying multiple geophysical technologies. The goal of this paper is to discuss the methodology of various search methods that are employed for submerged objects and how these various methods can be integrated as part of a comprehensive protocol for water searches depending upon the type of underwater terrain. In addition, two successful case studies involving the search and recovery of a submerged human body using side scan sonar are presented to illustrate the successful application of integrating a geophysical technology with divers when searching for a submerged object.

  13. A comparison of digitally scanned radiographs with conventional film for the detection of small endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuge, K N; Stuck, A M; Love, R M

    1998-03-01

    The use of computers in dentistry is becoming common as a practice tool for a diverse number of tasks, including the storage and enhancement of intra-oral radiographs. Several systems of digital radiography are available to produce a digital image including irradiation of a charged-couple device and scanning conventional radiographs. This study compared various digital images of scanned periapical radiographs with the original radiographs to determine whether the digitized images offered any advantage when viewing small files at the radiographic apex. Twenty extracted permanent molar teeth were prepared by gaining straight line access to the root canals and a ISO size 06 K-file was introduced into one of the canals until the tip was flush with the apical foramen. Using a standardized technique, radiographs were taken of the teeth using E-speed film. The radiographs were scanned and five digital images: original, enhanced, negative to positive conversion, zoom and zoom of negative to positive were produced. Three evaluators compared each of the images with the radiograph for clarity of the endodontic file in relation to the radiographic apex. Results were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Kappa (kappa) test was used to measure the level of agreement between the three evaluators. The results revealed that all the digital images produced by this scanner were inferior to the radiograph (P < 0.001) and that there was high agreement between evaluators.

  14. Detecting genomic clustering of risk variants from sequence data: cases versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaid, Daniel J; Sinnwell, Jason P; McDonnell, Shannon K; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2013-11-01

    As the ability to measure dense genetic markers approaches the limit of the DNA sequence itself, taking advantage of possible clustering of genetic variants in, and around, a gene would benefit genetic association analyses, and likely provide biological insights. The greatest benefit might be realized when multiple rare variants cluster in a functional region. Several statistical tests have been developed, one of which is based on the popular Kulldorff scan statistic for spatial clustering of disease. We extended another popular spatial clustering method--Tango's statistic--to genomic sequence data. An advantage of Tango's method is that it is rapid to compute, and when single test statistic is computed, its distribution is well approximated by a scaled χ(2) distribution, making computation of p values very rapid. We compared the Type-I error rates and power of several clustering statistics, as well as the omnibus sequence kernel association test. Although our version of Tango's statistic, which we call "Kernel Distance" statistic, took approximately half the time to compute than the Kulldorff scan statistic, it had slightly less power than the scan statistic. Our results showed that the Ionita-Laza version of Kulldorff's scan statistic had the greatest power over a range of clustering scenarios.

  15. Phase Error Caused by Speed Mismatch Analysis in the Line-Scan Defect Detection by Using Fourier Transform Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryi Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase error caused by the speed mismatch issue is researched in the line-scan images capturing 3D profile measurement. The experimental system is constructed by a line-scan CCD camera, an object moving device, a digital fringe pattern projector, and a personal computer. In the experiment procedure, the detected object is moving relative to the image capturing system by using a motorized translation stage in a stable velocity. The digital fringe pattern is projected onto the detected object, and then the deformed patterns are captured and recorded in the computer. The object surface profile can be calculated by the Fourier transform profilometry. However, the moving speed mismatch error will still exist in most of the engineering application occasion even after an image system calibration. When the moving speed of the detected object is faster than the expected value, the captured image will be compressed in the moving direction of the detected object. In order to overcome this kind of measurement error, an image recovering algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the original compressed image. Thus, the phase values can be extracted much more accurately by the reconstructed images. And then, the phase error distribution caused by the speed mismatch is analyzed by the simulation and experimental methods.

  16. The value of chest CT scan and tumor markers detection in sputum for early diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; CAO Aihong; PENG Mengqing; HU Chunfeng; LIU Delin; GU Tao; LIU Hui

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of chest CT scan combined with telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation from exfoliated cells of sputum in 55 cases of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN; ≤30 mm)suspected early peripheral lung cancer. Methods The sputum specimens from 34 cases of cancer nodules and 21 cases of benign lesion were detected for telomerase activity by TRAP-PCR-ELISA and p16 gene methylation by PCR-based methylation analysis. Results The qualitative diagnostic accuracy of CT scan was 61.8%(34/55) for SPN provided by pathology. Cytology analysis of sputum was positive in 13 cases (38.2%). Telomerase activity was positive in 29 cases: sensitivity was 79.4%, specificity was 90.5%, accuracy was 83.6%; p16 gene methylation was found in 11 cases: sensitivity was 32.4%, specificity was 100.0%, and accuracy was 58.2%. The sensitivity was increased to 86.1% by combination of telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation. Compared with nodules without malignant CT signs, expression of telomerase activity and p16 methylation of SPN with malignant CT signs (lobulation or spiculate protuberance or spicule sign) had a significant difference (P<0.01). Conclusion The results suggest that chest CT scan combined with telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation detection in sputum for patients with peripheral lung cancer may enhance the diagnostic value of radiology and conventional cytology.

  17. Whole-genome resequencing of honeybee drones to detect genomic selection in a population managed for royal jelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, David; Marti-Marimon, Maria; Basso, Benjamin; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Labarthe, Emmanuelle; Bouchez, Olivier; Le Conte, Yves; Vignal, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Four main evolutionary lineages of A. mellifera have been described including eastern Europe (C) and western and northern Europe (M). Many apiculturists prefer bees from the C lineage due to their docility and high productivity. In France, the routine importation of bees from the C lineage has resulted in the widespread admixture of bees from the M lineage. The haplodiploid nature of the honeybee Apis mellifera, and its small genome size, permits affordable and extensive genomics studies. As a pilot study of a larger project to characterise French honeybee populations, we sequenced 60 drones sampled from two commercial populations managed for the production of honey and royal jelly. Results indicate a C lineage origin, whilst mitochondrial analysis suggests two drones originated from the O lineage. Analysis of heterozygous SNPs identified potential copy number variants near to genes encoding odorant binding proteins and several cytochrome P450 genes. Signatures of selection were detected using the hapFLK haplotype-based method, revealing several regions under putative selection for royal jelly production. The framework developed during this study will be applied to a broader sampling regime, allowing the genetic diversity of French honeybees to be characterised in detail. PMID:27255426

  18. Whole-genome resequencing of honeybee drones to detect genomic selection in a population managed for royal jelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, David; Marti-Marimon, Maria; Basso, Benjamin; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Labarthe, Emmanuelle; Bouchez, Olivier; Le Conte, Yves; Vignal, Alain

    2016-06-03

    Four main evolutionary lineages of A. mellifera have been described including eastern Europe (C) and western and northern Europe (M). Many apiculturists prefer bees from the C lineage due to their docility and high productivity. In France, the routine importation of bees from the C lineage has resulted in the widespread admixture of bees from the M lineage. The haplodiploid nature of the honeybee Apis mellifera, and its small genome size, permits affordable and extensive genomics studies. As a pilot study of a larger project to characterise French honeybee populations, we sequenced 60 drones sampled from two commercial populations managed for the production of honey and royal jelly. Results indicate a C lineage origin, whilst mitochondrial analysis suggests two drones originated from the O lineage. Analysis of heterozygous SNPs identified potential copy number variants near to genes encoding odorant binding proteins and several cytochrome P450 genes. Signatures of selection were detected using the hapFLK haplotype-based method, revealing several regions under putative selection for royal jelly production. The framework developed during this study will be applied to a broader sampling regime, allowing the genetic diversity of French honeybees to be characterised in detail.

  19. Detecting Heterogeneity in Population Structure Across the Genome in Admixed Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Caitlin; Brown, Lisa; Thornton, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    The genetic structure of human populations is often characterized by aggregating measures of ancestry across the autosomal chromosomes. While it may be reasonable to assume that population structure patterns are similar genome-wide in relatively homogeneous populations, this assumption may not be appropriate for admixed populations, such as Hispanics and African-Americans, with recent ancestry from two or more continents. Recent studies have suggested that systematic ancestry differences can arise at genomic locations in admixed populations as a result of selection and nonrandom mating. Here, we propose a method, which we refer to as the chromosomal ancestry differences (CAnD) test, for detecting heterogeneity in population structure across the genome. CAnD can incorporate either local or chromosome-wide ancestry inferred from SNP genotype data to identify chromosomes harboring genomic regions with ancestry contributions that are significantly different than expected. In simulation studies with real genotype data from phase III of the HapMap Project, we demonstrate the validity and power of CAnD. We apply CAnD to the HapMap Mexican-American (MXL) and African-American (ASW) population samples; in this analysis the software RFMix is used to infer local ancestry at genomic regions, assuming admixing from Europeans, West Africans, and Native Americans. The CAnD test provides strong evidence of heterogeneity in population structure across the genome in the MXL sample ([Formula: see text]), which is largely driven by elevated Native American ancestry and deficit of European ancestry on the X chromosomes. Among the ASW, all chromosomes are largely African derived and no heterogeneity in population structure is detected in this sample.

  20. Insertional translocation detected using FISH confirmation of array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Hae L; Shaw, Chad; Ou, Zhishuo; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Pursley, Amber N; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A; Chinault, A Craig; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-05-01

    Insertional translocations (ITs) are rare events that require at least three breaks in the chromosomes involved and thus qualify as complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR). In the current study, we identified 40 ITs from approximately 18,000 clinical cases (1:500) using array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in conjunction with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmation of the aCGH findings, and parental follow-up studies. Both submicroscopic and microscopically visible IT events were detected. They were divided into three major categories: (1) simple intrachromosomal and interchromosomal IT resulting in pure segmental trisomy, (2) complex IT involving more than one abnormality, (3) deletion inherited from a parent with a balanced IT resulting in pure segmental monosomy. Of the cases in which follow-up parental studies were available, over half showed inheritance from an apparently unaffected parent carrying the same unbalanced rearrangement detected in the propositi, thus decreasing the likelihood that these IT events are clinically relevant. Nevertheless, we identified six cases in which small submicroscopic events were detected involving known disease-associated genes/genomic segments and are likely to be pathogenic. We recommend that copy number gains detected by clinical aCGH analysis should be confirmed using FISH analysis whenever possible in order to determine the physical location of the duplicated segment. We hypothesize that the increased use of aCGH in the clinic will demonstrate that IT occurs more frequently than previously considered but can identify genomic rearrangements with unclear clinical significance.

  1. Outcome of gall bladder polypoidal lesions detected by transabdominal ultrasound scanning: A nine year experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Chattopadhyay; R Lochan; S Balupuri; BR Gopinath; KS Wynne

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the outcome of polypoidal lesions within the gall bladder (PLG) diagnosed by trans-abdominal scanning.METHODS: A nine-year (1993-2002) retrospective casenote review of all patients who underwent ultrasound scanning after referral to a single Upper GI Surgeon at a District General Hospital was conducted. Patients who were diagnosed with a PLG were included in our study. A database was constructed and patient details, investigations including ultrasound scan (USS) findings, treatment and histology and final diagnosis were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-three (out of 651) patients were diagnosed pre-operatively by USS to have a polyp-likegall bladder lesion (PLG). Post cholecystectomy histological examination revealed 12 gallstones, 7 cholesterol polyps, 3 adenocarcinomas within polyps and 1 normal gall bladder. The specificity of USS in the diagnosis of PLG was 92.3%. All the true polyps were malignant. Overall USS had 66.66% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the pre-operative suspicion of malignancy. Using size greater than 10 mm as measured on USS as a cut-off, we find 100% sensitivity and 86.95% specificity with a positive predictive value of 50% in the diagnosis of malignancy in PLG.CONCLUSION: A large number of PLG are in fact calculi within diseased gall bladder. In cases of gall bladder polyps more then 10 mm in size on USS further imaging (crosssectional and/or EUS) is indicated prior to surgery. This will help in the optimal management of patients and avoid histological surprises.

  2. Scanning for unstable trinucleotide repeats in neuropsychiatric disorders: Detection of a large CTG expansion in a schizophrenic patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirugo, G.; Haaf, T.; Kidd, K.K. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of unstable trinucleotide repeats have been associated so far with seven human genetic disorders including fragile X, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease. This newly discovered class of genetic mutations is almost invariably associated with genetic anticipation. Anticipation has been recently reported in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia pedigrees, suggesting a possible implication of genes with unstable triplets in these disorders. To explore this hypothesis we have analyzed large schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder kindreds by means of the Repeat Expansion Detection Method (RED) described by Schalling and modified in our laboratory. This method uses genomic DNA as a template for the annealing and ligation of repeat-specific oligonucleotides. The reactions were subjected to denaturing PAGE and then transferred onto nylon membrane by capillary transfer. The multimers were revealed after hybridization with an oligoprobe and 5 hours exposure on film. To date the kindreds have been screened for the presence of unstable (CTG)n. CTG multimers ranging from 51 to 119 CTG units were detected in both affected and normal individuals corresponding to a normal variation in length of one or more CTG loci. Although our results indicate that (CTG)n expansions are not the mechanism causing schziophrenia or bipolar affective disorder, in one schizophrenia patient we have detected a large (CTG)n constituted by at least 204 CTG units. The incomplete structure of the family does not allow us to determine if this large repeat segregates with the disease. Localization of this expanded locus by in situ hybridization is underway. Similar in situ studies using PCR-generated CCA multimers up to 1 kb in length as a probe have revealed the presence of long tracts of CCA repeats at discrete sites in the human genome. This shows the feasibility of the in situ approach to localize large arrays of triplets in the human genome.

  3. Genomic scan of selective sweeps in thin and fat tail sheep breeds for identifying of candidate regions associated with fat deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Mohammad Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection for phenotypic traits is one of the most important and challenging areas of research in animal genetics. However, currently there are relatively few genomic regions identified that have been subject to positive selection. In this study, a genome-wide scan using ~50,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs was performed in an attempt to identify genomic regions associated with fat deposition in fat-tail breeds. This trait and its modification are very important in those countries grazing these breeds. Results Two independent experiments using either Iranian or Ovine HapMap genotyping data contrasted thin and fat tail breeds. Population differentiation using FST in Iranian thin and fat tail breeds revealed seven genomic regions. Almost all of these regions overlapped with QTLs that had previously been identified as affecting fat and carcass yield traits in beef and dairy cattle. Study of selection sweep signatures using FST in thin and fat tail breeds sampled from the Ovine HapMap project confirmed three of these regions located on Chromosomes 5, 7 and X. We found increased homozygosity in these regions in favour of fat tail breeds on chromosome 5 and X and in favour of thin tail breeds on chromosome 7. Conclusions In this study, we were able to identify three novel regions associated with fat deposition in thin and fat tail sheep breeds. Two of these were associated with an increase of homozygosity in the fat tail breeds which would be consistent with selection for mutations affecting fat tail size several thousand years after domestication.

  4. Assessing principal component regression prediction of neurochemicals detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-06-07

    Principal component regression is a multivariate data analysis approach routinely used to predict neurochemical concentrations from in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry measurements. This mathematical procedure can rapidly be employed with present day computer programming languages. Here, we evaluate several methods that can be used to evaluate and improve multivariate concentration determination. The cyclic voltammetric representation of the calculated regression vector is shown to be a valuable tool in determining whether the calculated multivariate model is chemically appropriate. The use of Cook's distance successfully identified outliers contained within in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry training sets. This work also presents the first direct interpretation of a residual color plot and demonstrated the effect of peak shifts on predicted dopamine concentrations. Finally, separate analyses of smaller increments of a single continuous measurement could not be concatenated without substantial error in the predicted neurochemical concentrations due to electrode drift. Taken together, these tools allow for the construction of more robust multivariate calibration models and provide the first approach to assess the predictive ability of a procedure that is inherently impossible to validate because of the lack of in vivo standards.

  5. Whole-genome scan for quantitative trait loci associated with birth weight, gestation length and passive immune transfer in a Holstein x Jersey crossbred population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltecca, C; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H; Cowan, M; Bagnato, A

    2009-02-01

    We herein report results from a daughter design genome-scan study aiming to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with birth weight, direct gestation length and passive immune transfer in a backcross (Holstein x Jersey) x Holstein population. Two-hundred and seventy-six calves, offspring of seven crossbred sires, were genotyped for 161 microsatellite markers distributed along the 29 bovine autosomes. The genome scan was performed through interval mapping using an animal model in order to identify QTL accounting for phenotypic differences between individual animals. Based on significant chi-squared values, we identified putative QTL on BTA7 and BTA14 for gestation length, on BTA2, BTA6 and BTA14 for birth weight and on BTA20 for passive immune transfer. In total, these QTL accounted for 12%, 18% and 1% of the phenotypic variance in gestation length, birth weight and passive immune transfer respectively. We also report results from a supplementary and independent influential grand-daughter Holstein family. In this family, findings on BTA7 and BTA14 for direct gestation length were in agreement with results in the crossbred population. Two other regions on BTA6 and BTA21 putatively underlying QTL for direct gestation length variability were discovered with this analysis.

  6. SOAPsplice: genome-wide ab initio detection of splice junctions from RNA-Seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songbo eHuang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq, a method using next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the transcriptome, facilitates genome-wide analysis of splice junction sites. In this paper, we introduce SOAPsplice, a robust tool to detect splice junctions using RNA-Seq data without using any information of known splice junctions. SOAPsplice uses a novel two-step approach consisting of first identifying as many reasonable splice junction candidates as possible, and then, filtering the false positives with two effective filtering strategies. In both simulated and real datasets, SOAPsplice is able to detect many reliable splice junctions with low false positive rate. The improvement gained by SOAPsplice, when compared to other existing tools, becomes more obvious when the depth of sequencing is low. SOAPsplice is freely available at http://soap.genomics.org.cn/soapsplice.html.

  7. Ultrasensitive PCR and real-time detection from human genomic samples using a bidirectional flow microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; West, Jonathan; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; Manz, Andreas; Day, Philip J R

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we present a reliable bidirectional flow DNA amplification microreactor for processing real-world genomic samples. This system shares the low-power thermal responsiveness of a continuous flow reactor with the low surface area to volume ratio character of stationary reactors for reducing surface inhibitory effects. Silanization with dimethyldichlorosilane in combination with dynamic surface passivation was used to enhance PCR compatibility and enable efficient amplification. For real-time fragment amplification monitoring we have implemented an epimodal fluorescent detection capability. The passivated bidirectional flow system was ultrasensitive, achieving an RNase P gene detection limit of 24 human genome copies with a reaction efficiency of 77%. This starts to rival the performance of a conventional real-time PCR instrument with a reaction efficiency of 93% and revitalizes flow-through PCR as a viable component of lab on a chip DNA analysis formats.

  8. A direct detection of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using gold nanoprobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situation like diagnosis of clinical and forensic samples there exists a need for highly sensitive, rapid and specific DNA detection methods. Though conventional DNA amplification using PCR can provide fast results, it is not widely practised in diagnostic laboratories partially because it requires skilled personnel and expensive equipment. To overcome these limitations nanoparticles have been explored as signalling probes for ultrasensitive DNA detection that can be used in field applications. Among the nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have been extensively used mainly because of its optical property and ability to get functionalized with a variety of biomolecules. Results We report a protocol for the use of gold nanoparticles functionalized with single stranded oligonucleotide (AuNP- oligo probe as visual detection probes for rapid and specific detection of Escherichia coli. The AuNP- oligo probe on hybridization with target DNA containing complementary sequences remains red whereas test samples without complementary DNA sequences to the probe turns purple due to acid induced aggregation of AuNP- oligo probes. The color change of the solution is observed visually by naked eye demonstrating direct and rapid detection of the pathogenic Escherichia coli from its genomic DNA without the need for PCR amplification. The limit of detection was ~54 ng for unamplified genomic DNA. The method requires less than 30 minutes to complete after genomic DNA extraction. However, by using unamplified enzymatic digested genomic DNA, the detection limit of 11.4 ng was attained. Results of UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement and AFM imaging further support the hypothesis of aggregation based visual discrimination. To elucidate its utility in medical diagnostic, the assay was validated on clinical strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from local hospitals and spiked urine samples. It was found to be 100% sensitive and proves to

  9. Detecting central fixation by means of artificial neural networks in a pediatric vision screener using retinal birefringence scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikov, Boris I

    2017-04-27

    Reliable detection of central fixation and eye alignment is essential in the diagnosis of amblyopia ("lazy eye"), which can lead to blindness. Our lab has developed and reported earlier a pediatric vision screener that performs scanning of the retina around the fovea and analyzes changes in the polarization state of light as the scan progresses. Depending on the direction of gaze and the instrument design, the screener produces several signal frequencies that can be utilized in the detection of central fixation. The objective of this study was to compare artificial neural networks with classical statistical methods, with respect to their ability to detect central fixation reliably. A classical feedforward, pattern recognition, two-layer neural network architecture was used, consisting of one hidden layer and one output layer. The network has four inputs, representing normalized spectral powers at four signal frequencies generated during retinal birefringence scanning. The hidden layer contains four neurons. The output suggests presence or absence of central fixation. Backpropagation was used to train the network, using the gradient descent algorithm and the cross-entropy error as the performance function. The network was trained, validated and tested on a set of controlled calibration data obtained from 600 measurements from ten eyes in a previous study, and was additionally tested on a clinical set of 78 eyes, independently diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. In the first part of this study, a neural network was designed around the calibration set. With a proper architecture and training, the network provided performance that was comparable to classical statistical methods, allowing perfect separation between the central and paracentral fixation data, with both the sensitivity and the specificity of the instrument being 100%. In the second part of the study, the neural network was applied to the clinical data. It allowed reliable separation between normal subjects

  10. An improved method for detecting and delineating genomic regions with altered gene expression in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Genomic regions with altered gene expression are a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We present a novel method for identifying such regions in gene expression maps. This method is based on total variation minimization, a classical signal restoration technique. In systematic evaluations, we show that our method combines top-notch detection performance with an ability to delineate relevant regions without excessive over-segmentation, making it a significant advance over existing methods. ...

  11. Cloud computing for detecting high-order genome-wide epistatic interaction via dynamic clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xuan; Meng, Yu; Yu, Ning; Pan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud Taking the advan tage of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology, large genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been considered to hold promise for unravelling complex relationships between genotype and phenotype. At present, traditional single-locus-based methods are insufficient to detect interactions consisting of multiple-locus, which are broadly existing in complex traits. In addition, statistic tests for high order epistatic interactions...

  12. Genomic Imbalances in Neonates With Birth Defects: High Detection Rates by Using Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin-Yan; Phung, Mai T.; Shaw, Chad A.; Pham, Kim; Neil, Sarah E.; Patel, Ankita; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lee Kang, Sung-Hae; Lalani, Seema; Chinault, A. Craig; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our aim was to determine the frequency of genomic imbalances in neonates with birth defects by using targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, also known as chromosomal microarray analysis. METHODS Between March 2006 and September 2007, 638 neonates with various birth defects were referred for chromosomal microarray analysis. Three consecutive chromosomal microarray analysis versions were used: bacterial artificial chromosome-based versions V5 and V6 and bacterial artificial chromosome emulated oligonucleotide-based version V6 Oligo. Each version had targeted but increasingly extensive genomic coverage and interrogated >150 disease loci with enhanced coverage in genomic rearrangement-prone pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. RESULTS Overall, 109 (17.1%) patients were identified with clinically significant abnormalities with detection rates of 13.7%, 16.6%, and 19.9% on V5, V6, and V6 Oligo, respectively. The majority of these abnormalities would not be defined by using karyotype analysis. The clinically significant detection rates by use of chromosomal microarray analysis for various clinical indications were 66.7% for “possible chromosomal abnormality” ± “others” (other clinical indications), 33.3% for ambiguous genitalia ± others, 27.1% for dysmorphic features + multiple congenital anomalies ± others, 24.6% for dysmorphic features ± others, 21.8% for congenital heart disease ± others, 17.9% for multiple congenital anomalies ± others, and 9.5% for the patients referred for others that were different from the groups defined. In all, 16 (2.5%) patients had chromosomal aneuploidies, and 81 (12.7%) patients had segmental aneusomies including common microdeletion or microduplication syndromes and other genomic disorders. Chromosomal mosaicism was found in 12 (1.9%) neonates. CONCLUSIONS Chromosomal microarray analysis is a valuable clinical diagnostic tool that allows precise and rapid identification of genomic imbalances

  13. Automated Fovea Detection in Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Scans of Exudative Macular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT volumes, detection of the foveal center is required for accurate and reproducible follow-up studies, structure function correlation, and measurement grid positioning. However, disease can cause severe obscuring or deformation of the fovea, thus presenting a major challenge in automated detection. We propose a fully automated fovea detection algorithm to extract the fovea position in SD-OCT volumes of eyes with exudative maculopathy. The fovea is classified into 3 main appearances to both specify the detection algorithm used and reduce computational complexity. Based on foveal type classification, the fovea position is computed based on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Mean absolute distance between system and clinical expert annotated fovea positions from a dataset comprised of 240 SD-OCT volumes was 162.3 µm in cystoid macular edema and 262 µm in nAMD. The presented method has cross-vendor functionality, while demonstrating accurate and reliable performance close to typical expert interobserver agreement. The automatically detected fovea positions may be used as landmarks for intra- and cross-patient registration and to create a joint reference frame for extraction of spatiotemporal features in “big data.” Furthermore, reliable analyses of retinal thickness, as well as retinal structure function correlation, may be facilitated.

  14. Incidental detection of gastrointestinal stromal tumor by Tc-99m MDP bone scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Timothy M; Idakoji, Ibrahim A; Pampaloni, Miguel H

    2012-02-01

    This case demonstrates extraosseous 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) accumulation from a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. A 75-year-old woman underwent a temporal bone CT for conductive hearing loss that showed sclerosis in the right occipital condyle. Follow-up Tc-99m MDP bone scan for osseous metastases instead showed a mass-like extraosseous accumulation of Tc-99m MDP in the anterior left upper quadrant. Differential diagnoses included gastric cancer, lymphoma, metastatic melanoma, systemic hypercalcemia, or heterotopic mesenteric ossification. Contrast CT showed a well-circumscribed mass arising from the stomach, and subsequent pathology confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumor. These tumors rarely can contain osteoclast-like giant cells and should be considered for extraosseous Tc-99m MDP accumulation.

  15. Detection of a live cell in a microfluidic system by scanning capacitance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, S. Y.; Yi, I. J.; Choi, Y. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kang, C. J.

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, many studies on the biosensors using a microfluidic system have been performed. The system fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has many advantages such that it is portable, disposable, cost effective, and automatable. Scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) that has a good capacitance pickup sensor attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of measuring the capacitance variation with a resolution of better than 10-18F/V between a conducting tip and the sample. In this work, we present possibility of SCM as a biosensor by measuring a live cell which flows in the microchannel. By measuring the consecutive capacitance line profiles of a cell, which represent the charge distribution of a cell surface resulting from the ion channel or cell activity, we can get more information on the cell analysis and provide one solution for the realization of a lab-on-a-chip.

  16. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a modified atomic force microscope combined with pyroelectric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniow, J.-S.; Chirtoc, M.; Trannoy, N.; Raphael, O.; Pelzl, J.

    2005-06-01

    We propose a novel approach in scanning thermal microscopy of layered samples. The thermal probe (ThP) (Wollaston wire) acts as a local a.c. heat source at the front of a sample layer deposited on a pyroelectric (PE) sensor. The PE signal is proportional to the heat wave transmitted through the sample. The ThP and PE signals can be used to generate complementary thermal conductivity maps and with some restrictions, thermal diffusivity maps of the sample. Additionally, the topography map is obtained in the usual way from the atomic force microscope. We give the theoretical background for the interpretation of PE signal obtained at low and at high frequency, and we demonstrate that it carries information on the thermal diffusivity of a test sample (12 μm thick PET polymer sheet). Finally, we discuss the contributions of heat transfer channels between ThP and sample, and the role of contact thermal resistance.

  17. LASER SCANNING APPLICATION FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN POSTURE DISTORTION DURING MASS EXAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Voinov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human posture distortion in the early stages is an important task, which makes it possible to adjust the onset of the disease with just exercise and without the use of drugs. Existing methods for monitoring of human posture assessment do not meet modern requirements for speed of data acquisition and processing. Real time evaluation of human posture distortion in static and dynamic modes is possible by using a laser scanner. The paper deals with a three-dimensional laser scanning method for determining human posture. The device designed on the basis of its examination gives the possibility for real-time static and dynamic modes. Characteristic feature of the laser scanner is the presence of automated servo rotatable measuring head in two planes (vertical and horizontal with a density of up to tens of measurement points per square centimeter.

  18. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Pirastu; Maarten Kooyman; Antonietta Robino; Ashley van der Spek; Luciano Navarini; Najaf Amin; Lennart C. Karssen; Cornelia M van Duijn; Paolo Gasparini

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using...

  19. Isothermal rolling circle amplification of virus genomes for rapid antigen detection and typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael D; Cha, Jennifer N

    2015-08-01

    In this work, isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) of the multi-kilobase genome of engineered filamentous bacteriophage is used to report the presence and identification of specific protein analytes in solution. First, bacteriophages were chosen as sensing platforms because peptides or antibodies that bind medically relevant targets can be isolated through phage display or expressed as fusions to their p3 and p8 coat proteins. Second, the circular, single-stranded genome contained within the phage serves as a natural large DNA template for a RCA reaction to rapidly generate exponential amounts of double stranded DNA in a single isothermal step that can be easily detected using low-cost fluorescent nucleic acid stains. Amplifying the entire phage genome also provides high detection sensitivities. Furthermore, since the sequence of the viral DNA can be easily modified with multiple restriction enzyme sites, a simple DNA digest can be applied to detect and identify multiple antigens simultaneously. The methods developed here will lead to protein sensors that are highly scalable to produce, can be run without complex biological equipment and do not require the use of multiple antibodies or high-cost fluorescent DNA probes or nucleotides.

  20. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  1. Genome-wide linkage scan for primary open angle glaucoma: influences of ancestry and age at diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy R Crooks

    Full Text Available Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common form of glaucoma and one of the leading causes of vision loss worldwide. The genetic etiology of POAG is complex and poorly understood. The purpose of this work is to identify genomic regions of interest linked to POAG. This study is the largest genetic linkage study of POAG performed to date: genomic DNA samples from 786 subjects (538 Caucasian ancestry, 248 African ancestry were genotyped using either the Illumina GoldenGate Linkage 4 Panel or the Illumina Infinium Human Linkage-12 Panel. A total of 5233 SNPs was analyzed in 134 multiplex POAG families (89 Caucasian ancestry, 45 African ancestry. Parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed on the overall dataset and within race-specific datasets (Caucasian ancestry and African ancestry. Ordered subset analysis was used to stratify the data on the basis of age of glaucoma diagnosis. Novel linkage regions were identified on chromosomes 1 and 20, and two previously described loci-GLC1D on chromosome 8 and GLC1I on chromosome 15--were replicated. These data will prove valuable in the context of interpreting results from genome-wide association studies for POAG.

  2. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype.

  3. Detection of wheel rim by immersion scan of phased array ultrasonic flaw testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi-He; Guo, Jian-qiang; Wang, Ze-yong; Gao, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Xiang-dong; Li, Xi

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve the in-service detection to high speed train wheel rims, this article analyzed the effects of the number of array elements to image focusing and image quality using water immersion ultrasonic phased array technology. Also, the effects of the depth of water to detecting technique had been researched. According to the results of the experiments, the number of optimal array elements, the corresponding thickness of immersion layer, and the optimal range of water's depth had been obtained. Thus, appropriate references had been provided to water immersion ultrasonic phased array testing.

  4. Obstacle avoidance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior of glaucoma patients in a driving simulator: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Prado Vega

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23 and control participants (n = 12 completed four 5-min driving sessions in a simulator. The participants were instructed to maintain the car in the right lane of a two-lane highway while their speed was automatically maintained at 100 km/h. Additional tasks per session were: Session 1: none, Session 2: verbalization of projected letters, Session 3: avoidance of static obstacles, and Session 4: combined letter verbalization and avoidance of static obstacles. Eye-scanning behavior was recorded with an eye-tracker. Results showed no statistically significant differences between patients and control participants for lane keeping, obstacle avoidance, and eye-scanning behavior. Steering activity, number of missed letters, and letter reaction time were significantly higher for glaucoma patients than for control participants. In conclusion, glaucoma patients were able to avoid objects and maintain a nominal lane keeping performance, but applied more steering input than control participants, and were more likely than control participants to miss peripherally projected stimuli. The eye-tracking results suggest that glaucoma patients did not use extra visual search to compensate for their visual field loss. Limitations of the study, such as small sample size, are discussed.

  5. Entropic Profiler – detection of conservation in genomes using information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Francisco; Freitas, Ana T; Almeida, Jonas S; Vinga, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last decades, with the successive availability of whole genome sequences, many research efforts have been made to mathematically model DNA. Entropic Profiles (EP) were proposed recently as a new measure of continuous entropy of genome sequences. EP represent local information plots related to DNA randomness and are based on information theory and statistical concepts. They express the weighed relative abundance of motifs for each position in genomes. Their study is very relevant because under or over-representation segments are often associated with significant biological meaning. Findings The Entropic Profiler application here presented is a new tool designed to detect and extract under and over-represented DNA segments in genomes by using EP. It allows its computation in a very efficient way by recurring to improved algorithms and data structures, which include modified suffix trees. Available through a web interface and as downloadable source code, it allows to study positions and to search for motifs inside the whole sequence or within a specified range. DNA sequences can be entered from different sources, including FASTA files, pre-loaded examples or resuming a previously saved work. Besides the EP value plots, p-values and z-scores for each motif are also computed, along with the Chaos Game Representation of the sequence. Conclusion EP are directly related with the statistical significance of motifs and can be considered as a new method to extract and classify significant regions in genomes and estimate local scales in DNA. The present implementation establishes an efficient and useful tool for whole genome analysis. PMID:19416538

  6. Time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Ha, T.; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    1998-01-01

    We present the time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with an STM. The results indicate that the time resolved signal is due to rectification of coherently superimposed plasmon voltages. The comparison with differential reflectivity measurements shows that the tip itself influences...

  7. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  8. Tc-99m-Sestamibi scanning with SDZ PSC 833 as a functional detection method for resistance modulation in patients with solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M; Van der Graaf, WTA; Piers, DA; Franssen, EJF; Groen, HJM; Smit, EF; Kool, W; Hollema, H; Muller, EA; de Vries, EGE

    1999-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to determine the value of 99mTc-Sestamibi scanning as functional detection method of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) blockade by PSC 833 in solid tumour patients. Patients and methods: Day 1 and day 4 after 2,200 mg orally administered PSC 833 the tumour area was scanned after intraveno

  9. Automated terrestrial laser scanning with near-real-time change detection - monitoring of the Séchilienne landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Ryan A.; Abellán, Antonio; Hutchinson, D. Jean; Lato, Matt; Chanut, Marie-Aurelie; Dubois, Laurent; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-05-01

    We present an automated terrestrial laser scanning (ATLS) system with automatic near-real-time change detection processing. The ATLS system was tested on the Séchilienne landslide in France for a 6-week period with data collected at 30 min intervals. The purpose of developing the system was to fill the gap of high-temporal-resolution TLS monitoring studies of earth surface processes and to offer a cost-effective, light, portable alternative to ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-InSAR) deformation monitoring. During the study, we detected the flux of talus, displacement of the landslide and pre-failure deformation of discrete rockfall events. Additionally, we found the ATLS system to be an effective tool in monitoring landslide and rockfall processes despite missing points due to poor atmospheric conditions or rainfall. Furthermore, such a system has the potential to help us better understand a wide variety of slope processes at high levels of temporal detail.

  10. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  11. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States); Lit, Peter [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate

  12. acdc - Automated Contamination Detection and Confidence estimation for single-cell genome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Markus; Krüger, Jan; Rinke, Christian; Maus, Irena; Schlüter, Andreas; Woyke, Tanja; Sczyrba, Alexander; Hammer, Barbara

    2016-12-20

    A major obstacle in single-cell sequencing is sample contamination with foreign DNA. To guarantee clean genome assemblies and to prevent the introduction of contamination into public databases, considerable quality control efforts are put into post-sequencing analysis. Contamination screening generally relies on reference-based methods such as database alignment or marker gene search, which limits the set of detectable contaminants to organisms with closely related reference species. As genomic coverage in the tree of life is highly fragmented, there is an urgent need for a reference-free methodology for contaminant identification in sequence data. We present acdc, a tool specifically developed to aid the quality control process of genomic sequence data. By combining supervised and unsupervised methods, it reliably detects both known and de novo contaminants. First, 16S rRNA gene prediction and the inclusion of ultrafast exact alignment techniques allow sequence classification using existing knowledge from databases. Second, reference-free inspection is enabled by the use of state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that include fast, non-linear dimensionality reduction of oligonucleotide signatures and subsequent clustering algorithms that automatically estimate the number of clusters. The latter also enables the removal of any contaminant, yielding a clean sample. Furthermore, given the data complexity and the ill-posedness of clustering, acdc employs bootstrapping techniques to provide statistically profound confidence values. Tested on a large number of samples from diverse sequencing projects, our software is able to quickly and accurately identify contamination. Results are displayed in an interactive user interface. Acdc can be run from the web as well as a dedicated command line application, which allows easy integration into large sequencing project analysis workflows. Acdc can reliably detect contamination in single-cell genome data. In addition to

  13. Detection of Progressive Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss in Glaucoma Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Alencar, Luciana M.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Bowd, Christopher; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Sample, Pamela A.; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation to detect progressive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss in glaucoma patients and patients suspected of having the disease. Methods This was an observational cohort study that included 335 eyes of 195 patients. Images were obtained annually with the GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter, along with optic disc stereophotographs and standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields. The median follow-up time was 3.94 years. Progression was determined using commercial software for SAP and by masked assessment of optic disc stereophotographs performed by expert graders. Random coefficient models were used to evaluate the relationship between RNFL thickness measurements over time and progression as determined by SAP and/or stereophotographs. Results From the 335 eyes, 34 (10%) showed progression over time by stereophotographs and/or SAP. Average GDx VCC measurements decreased significantly over time for both progressors as well as non-progressors. However, the rate of decline was significantly higher in the progressing group (−0.70 μm/year) compared to the non-progressing group (−0.14 μm/year; P = 0.001). Black race and male sex were significantly associated with higher rates of RNFL loss during follow-up. Conclusions The GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter was able to identify longitudinal RNFL loss in eyes that showed progression in optic disc stereophotographs and/or visual fields. These findings suggest that this technology could be useful to detect and monitor progressive disease in patients with established diagnosis of glaucoma or suspected of having the disease. PMID:19029038

  14. Detecting and Identifying in vivo Metabolites of Brodimoprim via LC/ESI-MS with Data-dependent Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yan-ping; SI Duan-yun; LIU Chang-xiao

    2008-01-01

    The present article covers a simple approach to detect and subsequently identify in vivo metabolites of brodimoprim,using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometer(LC/ESI-MS),which is based on a data-dependent acquisition of isotope ions and result verified by full scan mass spectrum,The distinguished advantage of data-dependent scan is rapidness because it requires minimum sample preparation,and all the necessary data can be obtained in one chromatographic run,In addition,it is highly sensitive and selective,allowing detection of trace metabolites even in the presence of complex biomatrix,As a result,four phase-I(M1-M4) and four Phase-Ⅱ(M51-M8) metabolites of brodimoprim were identified in urine after the oral administration of brodimoprim to Wistar rats,Their chemical structures were proposed based on the interpretation of their CID fragmentation characterizations and the metabolic pathway was exhibited in this article.

  15. Power to detect risk alleles using genome-wide tag SNP panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Eberle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genotyping and the International HapMap Project have enabled association studies at the whole-genome level. We have constructed whole-genome genotyping panels of over 550,000 (HumanHap550 and 650,000 (HumanHap650Y SNP loci by choosing tag SNPs from all populations genotyped by the International HapMap Project. These panels also contain additional SNP content in regions that have historically been overrepresented in diseases, such as nonsynonymous sites, the MHC region, copy number variant regions and mitochondrial DNA. We estimate that the tag SNP loci in these panels cover the majority of all common variation in the genome as measured by coverage of both all common HapMap SNPs and an independent set of SNPs derived from complete resequencing of genes obtained from SeattleSNPs. We also estimate that, given a sample size of 1,000 cases and 1,000 controls, these panels have the power to detect single disease loci of moderate risk (lambda approximately 1.8-2.0. Relative risks as low as lambda approximately 1.1-1.3 can be detected using 10,000 cases and 10,000 controls depending on the sample population and disease model. If multiple loci are involved, the power increases significantly to detect at least one locus such that relative risks 20%-35% lower can be detected with 80% power if between two and four independent loci are involved. Although our SNP selection was based on HapMap data, which is a subset of all common SNPs, these panels effectively capture the majority of all common variation and provide high power to detect risk alleles that are not represented in the HapMap data.

  16. SNP detection and prediction of variability between chicken lines using genome resequencing of DNA pools

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    Carlborg Örjan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing technologies are widely used for detection of millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and also provide a means of assessing their variation. This information is useful for composing subsets of highly informative SNPs for region-specific or genome-wide analysis and to identify mutations regulating phenotypic differences within or between populations. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of SNP detection and introduced the flanking SNPs value (FSV as a novel measure for predicting SNP-variability using ~5X genome resequencing with ABI SOLID and DNA pools from two chicken lines divergently selected for juvenile bodyweight. Results Genotyping with a 60 K SNP chip revealed polymorphisms within or between two divergently selected chicken lines for 31 363 SNPs, 48% of which were also detected using resequencing of DNA pools. SNP detection using resequencing was more powerful for positions with larger differences in allele frequency between the lines. About 50% of the SNPs with non-reference allele frequencies in the range 0.5-0.6 and 67% of those with frequencies > 0.9 could be detected. On average, ~3.7 SNPs/kb were detected by resequencing, with about 5% lower density on microchromosomes than on macrochromosomes. There was a positive correlation between the observed between-line SNP variation from the 60 K chip analysis and our proposed FSV score computed from the genome resequencing data. The strongest correlations on macrochromosomes and microchromosomes were observed when the FSV was calculated with total flanking regions of 62 kb (correlation 0.55 and 38 kb (correlation 0.45, respectively. Conclusions Genome resequencing with limited coverage (~5X using pooled DNA samples and three non-reference reads as a threshold for SNP detection, identified 50 - 67% of the 60 K SNPs with a non-reference allele frequency larger than 0.5. The SNP density was around 5% lower on the

  17. Elimination Voltammetry with Linear Scan as a New Detection Method for DNA Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes successful coupling of adsorptive transfer stripping (AdTS andelimination voltammetry with linear scan (EVLS for the resolution of reduction signals of cytosine (Cand adenine (A residues in hetero-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs. Short ODNs (9-mers and 20-merswere adsorbed from a small volume on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE. After washing ofthe ODN-modified electrode by water and its transferring to an electrochemical cell, voltammetric curves were measured. The AdTS EVLS was able to determine of C/A ratio of ODNs through theelimination function conserving the diffusion current component and eliminating kinetic and chargingcurrent components. This function, which provides the elimination signal in a peak-counterpeak form,increased the current sensitivity for A and C resolution, and for the recognition of bases sequences inODN chains. Optimal conditions of elimination experiments such as pH, time of adsorption, and scanrate were found. The combination of EVLS with AdTS procedure can be considered as a newdetection method in a DNA sensor.

  18. Moving Object Detection Using Scanning Camera on a High-Precision Intelligent Holder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuoyang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During the process of moving object detection in an intelligent visual surveillance system, a scenario with complex background is sure to appear. The traditional methods, such as “frame difference” and “optical flow”, may not able to deal with the problem very well. In such scenarios, we use a modified algorithm to do the background modeling work. In this paper, we use edge detection to get an edge difference image just to enhance the ability of resistance illumination variation. Then we use a “multi-block temporal-analyzing LBP (Local Binary Pattern” algorithm to do the segmentation. In the end, a connected component is used to locate the object. We also produce a hardware platform, the core of which consists of the DSP (Digital Signal Processor and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array platforms and the high-precision intelligent holder.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Doppler Scanning for Detecting Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Yung Ng

    2010-06-01

    Conclusion: RDS might still be the diagnostic procedure of choice for screening outpatients for ARAS because it is inexpensive, convenient, able to detect severity, and avoids the use of contrast media. When RDS is negative in aged people who have smoked longer than 20 years, with coronary artery disease or serum creatinine > 4 mg/dL, MRA is recommended for further evaluation of ARAS.

  20. An International Comparison of Individual Tree Detection and Extraction Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Michael Wolf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the “Tree Extraction” project organized by EuroSDR (European Spatial data Research and ISPRS (International Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing was to evaluate the quality, accuracy, and feasibility of automatic tree extraction methods, mainly based on laser scanner data. In the final report of the project, Kaartinen and Hyyppä (2008 reported a high variation in the quality of the published methods under boreal forest conditions and with varying laser point densities. This paper summarizes the findings beyond the final report after analyzing the results obtained in different tree height classes. Omission/Commission statistics as well as neighborhood relations are taken into account. Additionally, four automatic tree detection and extraction techniques were added to the test. Several methods in this experiment were superior to manual processing in the dominant, co-dominant and suppressed tree storeys. In general, as expected, the taller the tree, the better the location accuracy. The accuracy of tree height, after removing gross errors, was better than 0.5 m in all tree height classes with the best methods investigated in this experiment. For forest inventory, minimum curvature-based tree detection accompanied by point cloud-based cluster detection for suppressed trees is a solution that deserves attention in the future.

  1. DETECTION OF CRACKS IN PAVED ROAD SURFACE USING LASER SCAN IMAGE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we developed a methodology for detecting cracks in the surface of paved road using 3D digital surface model of road created by measuring with three-dimensional laser scanner which works on the basis of the light-section method automatically. For the detection of cracks from the imagery data of the model, the background subtraction method (Rolling Ball Background Subtraction Algorithm was applied to the data for filtering out the background noise originating from the undulation and gradual slope and also for filtering the ruts that were caused by wearing, aging and excessive use of road and other reasons. We confirmed the influence from the difference in height (depth caused by forgoing reasons included in a data can be reduced significantly at this stage. Various parameters of ball radius were applied for checking how the result of data obtained with this process vary according to the change of parameter and it becomes clear that there are not important differences by the change of parameters if they are in a certain range radius. And then, image segmentation was performed by multi-resolution segmentation based on the object-based image analysis technique. The parameters for the image segmentation, scale, pixel value (height/depth and the compactness of objects were used. For the classification of cracks in the database, the height, length and other geometric property are used and we confirmed the method is useful for the detection of cracks in a paved road surface.

  2. Detection of Cracks in Paved Road Surface Using Laser Scan Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Zhu, L.; Kurosu, H.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, we developed a methodology for detecting cracks in the surface of paved road using 3D digital surface model of road created by measuring with three-dimensional laser scanner which works on the basis of the light-section method automatically. For the detection of cracks from the imagery data of the model, the background subtraction method (Rolling Ball Background Subtraction Algorithm) was applied to the data for filtering out the background noise originating from the undulation and gradual slope and also for filtering the ruts that were caused by wearing, aging and excessive use of road and other reasons. We confirmed the influence from the difference in height (depth) caused by forgoing reasons included in a data can be reduced significantly at this stage. Various parameters of ball radius were applied for checking how the result of data obtained with this process vary according to the change of parameter and it becomes clear that there are not important differences by the change of parameters if they are in a certain range radius. And then, image segmentation was performed by multi-resolution segmentation based on the object-based image analysis technique. The parameters for the image segmentation, scale, pixel value (height/depth) and the compactness of objects were used. For the classification of cracks in the database, the height, length and other geometric property are used and we confirmed the method is useful for the detection of cracks in a paved road surface.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Sapovirus Detected in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Lim; Suh, Chang-Il; Park, Seung-Won; Jin, Ji-Young; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-01-01

    Sapovirus (SaV), a virus residing in the intestines, is one of the important causes of gastroenteritis in human beings. Human SaV genomes are classified into various genogroups and genotypes. Whole-genome analysis and phylogenetic analysis of ROK62, the SaV isolated in South Korea, were carried out. The ROK62 genome of 7429 nucleotides contains 3 open-reading frames (ORF). The genotype of ROK62 is SaV GI-1, and 94% of its nucleotide sequence is identical with other SaVs, namely Manchester and Mc114. Recently, SaV infection has been on the rise throughout the world, particularly in countries neighboring South Korea; however, very few academic studies have been done nationally. As the first whole-genome sequence analysis of SaV in South Korea, this research will help provide reference for the detection of recombination, tracking of epidemic spread, and development of diagnosis methods for SaV.

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis of Sapovirus Detected in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Lim Choi

    Full Text Available Sapovirus (SaV, a virus residing in the intestines, is one of the important causes of gastroenteritis in human beings. Human SaV genomes are classified into various genogroups and genotypes. Whole-genome analysis and phylogenetic analysis of ROK62, the SaV isolated in South Korea, were carried out. The ROK62 genome of 7429 nucleotides contains 3 open-reading frames (ORF. The genotype of ROK62 is SaV GI-1, and 94% of its nucleotide sequence is identical with other SaVs, namely Manchester and Mc114. Recently, SaV infection has been on the rise throughout the world, particularly in countries neighboring South Korea; however, very few academic studies have been done nationally. As the first whole-genome sequence analysis of SaV in South Korea, this research will help provide reference for the detection of recombination, tracking of epidemic spread, and development of diagnosis methods for SaV.

  5. Detection of genomic variation by selection of a 9 mb DNA region and high throughput sequencing.

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    Sergey I Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Detection of the rare polymorphisms and causative mutations of genetic diseases in a targeted genomic area has become a major goal in order to understand genomic and phenotypic variability. We have interrogated repeat-masked regions of 8.9 Mb on human chromosomes 21 (7.8 Mb and 7 (1.1 Mb from an individual from the International HapMap Project (NA12872. We have optimized a method of genomic selection for high throughput sequencing. Microarray-based selection and sequencing resulted in 260-fold enrichment, with 41% of reads mapping to the target region. 83% of SNPs in the targeted region had at least 4-fold sequence coverage and 54% at least 15-fold. When assaying HapMap SNPs in NA12872, our sequence genotypes are 91.3% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 4-fold, and 97.9% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 15-fold. About 81% of the SNPs recovered with both thresholds are listed in dbSNP. We observed that regions with low sequence coverage occur in close proximity to low-complexity DNA. Validation experiments using Sanger sequencing were performed for 46 SNPs with 15-20 fold coverage, with a confirmation rate of 96%, suggesting that DNA selection provides an accurate and cost-effective method for identifying rare genomic variants.

  6. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  7. Genome scanning for interspecific differentiation between two closely related oak species [Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Mariette, Stéphanie; Porth, Ilga; Goicoechea, Pablo G; Barreneche, Teresa; Bodénès, Catherine; Burg, Kornel; Kremer, Antoine

    2004-11-01

    Interspecific differentiation values (G(ST)) between two closely related oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) were compiled across different studies with the aim to explore the distribution of differentiation at the genome level. The study was based on a total set of 389 markers (isozymes, AFLPs, SCARs, microsatellites, and SNPs) for which allelic frequencies were estimated in pairs of populations sampled throughout the sympatric distribution of the two species. The overall distribution of G(ST) values followed an L-shaped curve with most markers exhibiting low species differentiation (G(ST) 10% levels. Twelve percent of the loci exhibited significant G(ST) deviations to neutral expectations, suggesting that selection contributed to species divergence. Coding regions expressed higher differentiation than noncoding regions. Among the 389 markers, 158 could be mapped on the 12 linkage groups of the existing Q. robur genetic map. Outlier loci with large G(ST) values were distributed over 9 linkage groups. One cluster of three outlier loci was found within 0.51 cM; but significant autocorrelation of G(ST) was observed at distances <2 cM. The size and distribution of genomic regions involved in species divergence are discussed in reference to hitchhiking effects and disruptive selection.

  8. Advanced yellow fever virus genome detection in point-of-care facilities and reference laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Cristina; Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories.

  9. Experimental analysis of oligonucleotide microarray design criteria to detect deletions by comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moerman Donald G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is currently one of the most powerful techniques to measure DNA copy number in large genomes. In humans, microarray CGH is widely used to assess copy number variants in healthy individuals and copy number aberrations associated with various diseases, syndromes and disease susceptibility. In model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans the technique has been applied to detect mutations, primarily deletions, in strains of interest. Although various constraints on oligonucleotide properties have been suggested to minimize non-specific hybridization and improve the data quality, there have been few experimental validations for CGH experiments. For genomic regions where strict design filters would limit the coverage it would also be useful to quantify the expected loss in data quality associated with relaxed design criteria. Results We have quantified the effects of filtering various oligonucleotide properties by measuring the resolving power for detecting deletions in the human and C. elegans genomes using NimbleGen microarrays. Approximately twice as many oligonucleotides are typically required to be affected by a deletion in human DNA samples in order to achieve the same statistical confidence as one would observe for a deletion in C. elegans. Surprisingly, the ability to detect deletions strongly depends on the oligonucleotide 15-mer count, which is defined as the sum of the genomic frequency of all the constituent 15-mers within the oligonucleotide. A similarity level above 80% to non-target sequences over the length of the probe produces significant cross-hybridization. We recommend the use of a fairly large melting temperature window of up to 10°C, the elimination of repeat sequences, the elimination of homopolymers longer than 5 nucleotides, and a threshold of -1 kcal/mol on the oligonucleotide self-folding energy. We observed very little difference in data

  10. Two-dimensional radial laser scanning for circular marker detection and external mobile robot tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidó, Mercè; Pallejà, Tomàs; Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Moreno, Javier; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-11-28

    This paper presents the use of an external fixed two-dimensional laser scanner to detect cylindrical targets attached to moving devices, such as a mobile robot. This proposal is based on the detection of circular markers in the raw data provided by the laser scanner by applying an algorithm for outlier avoidance and a least-squares circular fitting. Some experiments have been developed to empirically validate the proposal with different cylindrical targets in order to estimate the location and tracking errors achieved, which are generally less than 20 mm in the area covered by the laser sensor. As a result of the validation experiments, several error maps have been obtained in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty of any location computed. This proposal has been validated with a medium-sized mobile robot with an attached cylindrical target (diameter 200 mm). The trajectory of the mobile robot was estimated with an average location error of less than 15 mm, and the real location error in each individual circular fitting was similar to the error estimated with the obtained error maps. The radial area covered in this validation experiment was up to 10 m, a value that depends on the radius of the cylindrical target and the radial density of the distance range points provided by the laser scanner but this area can be increased by combining the information of additional external laser scanners.

  11. Two-Dimensional Radial Laser Scanning for Circular Marker Detection and External Mobile Robot Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Palacín

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of an external fixed two-dimensional laser scanner to detect cylindrical targets attached to moving devices, such as a mobile robot. This proposal is based on the detection of circular markers in the raw data provided by the laser scanner by applying an algorithm for outlier avoidance and a least-squares circular fitting. Some experiments have been developed to empirically validate the proposal with different cylindrical targets in order to estimate the location and tracking errors achieved, which are generally less than 20 mm in the area covered by the laser sensor. As a result of the validation experiments, several error maps have been obtained in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty of any location computed. This proposal has been validated with a medium-sized mobile robot with an attached cylindrical target (diameter 200 mm. The trajectory of the mobile robot was estimated with an average location error of less than 15 mm, and the real location error in each individual circular fitting was similar to the error estimated with the obtained error maps. The radial area covered in this validation experiment was up to 10 m, a value that depends on the radius of the cylindrical target and the radial density of the distance range points provided by the laser scanner but this area can be increased by combining the information of additional external laser scanners.

  12. Burden of subclinical heart and lung disease detected on thoracic CT scans of HIV patients on HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Zona

    2014-11-01

    -infected individuals even in non-smokers. Reduced CD4 count (hence severity of HIV infection may be an important risk factor for chronic lung and heart disease. Thoracic CT scans may provide an excellent screening tool to detect MLHD in HIV-infected patients.

  13. Detection of integrated herpesvirus genomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used to visualize nucleotide sequences in interphase cells or on metaphase chromosomes using specific probes that are complementary to the respective targets. Besides its broad application in cytogenetics and cancer research, FISH facilitates the localization of virus genomes in infected cells. Some herpesviruses, including human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Marek's disease virus (MDV), have been shown to integrate their genetic material into host chromosomes, which allows transmission of HHV-6 via the germ line and is required for efficient MDV-induced tumor formation. We describe here the detection by FISH of integrated herpesvirus genomes in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells.

  14. Influence of Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy specific acquisition parameters on the detection and matching of Speeded-Up Robust Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanciu, Stefan G., E-mail: sgstanciu@gmail.com [Center for Microscopy-Microanalysis and Information Processing, University Politehnica Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, sector 6, Bucharest (Romania); Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A. [Center for Microscopy-Microanalysis and Information Processing, University Politehnica Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, sector 6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-04-15

    The robustness and distinctiveness of local features to various object or scene deformations and to modifications of the acquisition parameters play key roles in the design of many computer vision applications. In this paper we present the results of our experiments on the behavior of a recently developed technique for local feature detection and description, Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF), regarding image modifications specific to Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM). We analyze the repeatability of detected SURF keypoints and the precision-recall of their matching under modifications of three important CSLM parameters: pinhole aperture, photomultiplier (PMT) gain and laser beam power. During any investigation by CSLM these three parameters have to be modified, individually or together, in order to optimize the contrast and the Signal Noise Ratio (SNR), being also inherently modified when changing the microscope objective. Our experiments show that an important amount of SURF features can be detected at the same physical locations in images collected at different values of the pinhole aperture, PMT gain and laser beam power, and further on can be successfully matched based on their descriptors. In the final part, we exemplify the potential of SURF in CSLM imaging by presenting a SURF-based computer vision application that deals with the mosaicing of images collected by this technique. -- Research highlights: {yields} Influence of pinhole aperture modifications on SURF detection and matching in CSLM images. {yields} Influence of photomultiplier gain modifications on SURF detection and matching in CSLM images. {yields} Influence of laser beam power modifications on SURF detection and matching in CSLM images. {yields} SURF-based automated mosaicing of CSLM images.

  15. Detection of identity by descent using next-generation whole genome sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Shu-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identity by descent (IBD has played a fundamental role in the discovery of genetic loci underlying human diseases. Both pedigree-based and population-based linkage analyses rely on estimating recent IBD, and evidence of ancient IBD can be used to detect population structure in genetic association studies. Various methods for detecting IBD, including those implemented in the soft- ware programs fastIBD and GERMLINE, have been developed in the past several years using population genotype data from microarray platforms. Now, next-generation DNA sequencing data is becoming increasingly available, enabling the comprehensive analysis of genomes, in- cluding identifying rare variants. These sequencing data may provide an opportunity to detect IBD with higher resolution than previously possible, potentially enabling the detection of disease causing loci that were previously undetectable with sparser genetic data. Results Here, we investigate how different levels of variant coverage in sequencing and microarray genotype data influences the resolution at which IBD can be detected. This includes microarray genotype data from the WTCCC study, denser genotype data from the HapMap Project, low coverage sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project, and deep coverage complete genome data from our own projects. With high power (78%, we can detect segments of length 0.4 cM or larger using fastIBD and GERMLINE in sequencing data. This compares to similar power to detect segments of length 1.0 cM or higher with microarray genotype data. We find that GERMLINE has slightly higher power than fastIBD for detecting IBD segments using sequencing data, but also has a much higher false positive rate. Conclusion We further quantify the effect of variant density, conditional on genetic map length, on the power to resolve IBD segments. These investigations into IBD resolution may help guide the design of future next generation sequencing studies that

  16. Poor man’s 1000 genome project: Recent human population expansion confounds the detection of disease alleles in 7,098 complete mitochondrial genomes

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    Hie Lim eKim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of the human population has caused the accumulation of rare genetic variants that may play a role in the origin of genetic diseases. However, it is challenging to identify those rare variants responsible for specific diseases without genetic data from an extraordinarily large population sample. Here we focused on the accumulated data from the human mitochondrial (mt genome sequences because this data provided 7,098 whole genomes for analysis. In this dataset we identified 6,110 single nucleotide variants (SNVs and their frequency and determined that the best-fit demographic model for the 7,098 genomes included severe population bottlenecks and exponential expansions of the non-African population. Using this model, we simulated the evolution of mt genomes in order to ascertain the behavior of deleterious mutations. We found that such deleterious mutations barely survived during population expansion. We derived the threshold frequency of a deleterious mutation in separate African, Asian, and European populations and used it to identify pathogenic mutations in our dataset. Although threshold frequency was very low, the proportion of variants showing a lower frequency than that threshold was 82%, 83%, and 91% of the total variants for the African, Asian, and European populations, respectively. Within these variants, only 18 known pathogenic mutations were detected in the 7,098 genomes. This result showed the difficulty of detecting a pathogenic mutation within an abundance of rare variants in the human population, even with a large number of genomes available for study.

  17. Deciduous teeth occlusal caries detection with 655-nm diode laser confirmed by surface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Danilo; Fonseca, Yara P. C.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    2000-03-01

    The morphological complexity of the occlusal surface of deciduous molar teeth is considered as a factor to increase vulnerability to caries lesion. Occlusal surface of these teeth shows sulcus, pits and fissures which allow retention of both micro-organisms and food debris which make them more susceptible to caries. In the last decades there was a significant reduction on caries of smooth surface but not on the occlusal surface where dentinal caries develops under fissures which are apparently caries-free under eye observation. This is known as a hidden caries. The occlusal surface of sound extracted deciduous molar teeth were examined using a 655 nm diode laser (DIAGNOdent - KaVo) in order to detect hidden caries. When there was indication of a hidden caries, the area was examined using SEM and confirm or not the diagnosis. The authors concludes that the diagnosis of caries using 655 diode laser is reliable and precise method.

  18. Detecting genomic regions associated with a disease using variability functions and Adjusted Rand Index

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    Makarenkov Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of functional regions contained in a given multiple sequence alignment constitutes one of the major challenges of comparative genomics. Several studies have focused on the identification of conserved regions and motifs. However, most of existing methods ignore the relationship between the functional genomic regions and the external evidence associated with the considered group of species (e.g., carcinogenicity of Human Papilloma Virus. In the past, we have proposed a method that takes into account the prior knowledge on an external evidence (e.g., carcinogenicity or invasivity of the considered organisms and identifies genomic regions related to a specific disease. Results and conclusion We present a new algorithm for detecting genomic regions that may be associated with a disease. Two new variability functions and a bipartition optimization procedure are described. We validate and weigh our results using the Adjusted Rand Index (ARI, and thus assess to what extent the selected regions are related to carcinogenicity, invasivity, or any other species classification, given as input. The predictive power of different hit region detection functions was assessed on synthetic and real data. Our simulation results suggest that there is no a single function that provides the best results in all practical situations (e.g., monophyletic or polyphyletic evolution, and positive or negative selection, and that at least three different functions might be useful. The proposed hit region identification functions that do not benefit from the prior knowledge (i.e., carcinogenicity or invasivity of the involved organisms can provide equivalent results than the existing functions that take advantage of such a prior knowledge. Using the new algorithm, we examined the Neisseria meningitidis FrpB gene product for invasivity and immunologic activity, and human papilloma virus (HPV E6 oncoprotein for carcinogenicity, and confirmed

  19. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/.

  20. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  1. Minimum detection windows, PI-line existence and uniqueness for helical cone-beam scanning of variable pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yangbo; Zhu, Jiehua; Wang, Ge

    2004-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to study Cone-beam CT scanning along a helix of variable pitch. First the rationale and applications in medical imaging of variable pitch CT reconstruction are explained. Then formulas for the minimum detection window are derived. The main part of the paper proves a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence and uniqueness of PI-lines inside this variable pitch helix. These results are necessary steps toward an exact reconstruction algorithm for helix scanning of variable pitch, generalizing Katsevich's formula on constant pitch exact reconstruction. It is shown through an example that, when the derivative of the pitch function is not convex, or when the pitch function passes a inflection point and begins to slow down, PI-lines may be not unique near the rim of the helix cylinder. The conclusion is that the restriction on the pitch function is weaker, if the object is placed well within the helix cylinder and far from its rim, in order to preserve the uniqueness of PI-lines. If the object is near the rim, the restriction condition on the allowable pitch functions becomes stronger.

  2. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  3. Detection of primary breast cancer presenting as metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary origin by 111In-pentetreotide scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, R; Kim, E E; Raber, M N; Abbruzzese, J L

    1998-02-01

    Women with isolated metastatic carcinoma or adenocarcinoma involving axillary lymph nodes are a well-recognized group of unknown primary carcinoma (UPC) patients with a favorable prognosis. This group of patients are generally treated based on the assumption that they have occult breast cancer. However, to facilitate patient access to the whole spectrum of therapies available for patients with breast cancer, including strategies involving the use of high-dose chemotherapy, a precise diagnosis is increasingly important. In this clinical case we report the detection of a primary breast cancer by 111In-pentetreotide scanning in a woman who presented with metastatic carcinoma in axillary nodes, no palpable breast lesion, a nondiagnostic mammogram, and negative breast ultrasonography. Previous outcomes analysis of patients with UPC have emphasized the value of identifying women with breast cancer. This report suggests that the 111In-pentetreotide scan can contribute specific, clinically useful information in the evaluation of women presenting with metastatic carcinoma in axillary nodes and an occult primary and deserves prospective study in women with UPC presenting with isolated axillary metastases.

  4. A voting-based statistical cylinder detection framework applied to fallen tree mapping in terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewski, Przemyslaw; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Stilla, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    This paper introduces a statistical framework for detecting cylindrical shapes in dense point clouds. We target the application of mapping fallen trees in datasets obtained through terrestrial laser scanning. This is a challenging task due to the presence of ground vegetation, standing trees, DTM artifacts, as well as the fragmentation of dead trees into non-collinear segments. Our method shares the concept of voting in parameter space with the generalized Hough transform, however two of its significant drawbacks are improved upon. First, the need to generate samples on the shape's surface is eliminated. Instead, pairs of nearby input points lying on the surface cast a vote for the cylinder's parameters based on the intrinsic geometric properties of cylindrical shapes. Second, no discretization of the parameter space is required: the voting is carried out in continuous space by means of constructing a kernel density estimator and obtaining its local maxima, using automatic, data-driven kernel bandwidth selection. Furthermore, we show how the detected cylindrical primitives can be efficiently merged to obtain object-level (entire tree) semantic information using graph-cut segmentation and a tailored dynamic algorithm for eliminating cylinder redundancy. Experiments were performed on 3 plots from the Bavarian Forest National Park, with ground truth obtained through visual inspection of the point clouds. It was found that relative to sample consensus (SAC) cylinder fitting, the proposed voting framework can improve the detection completeness by up to 10 percentage points while maintaining the correctness rate.

  5. An Energy-Based Approach for Detection and Characterization of Subtle Entities Within Laser Scanning Point-Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav, Reuma; Filin, Sagi

    2016-06-01

    Airborne laser scans present an optimal tool to describe geomorphological features in natural environments. However, a challenge arises in the detection of such phenomena, as they are embedded in the topography, tend to blend into their surroundings and leave only a subtle signature within the data. Most object-recognition studies address mainly urban environments and follow a general pipeline where the data are partitioned into segments with uniform properties. These approaches are restricted to man-made domain and are capable to handle limited features that answer a well-defined geometric form. As natural environments present a more complex set of features, the common interpretation of the data is still manual at large. In this paper, we propose a data-aware detection scheme, unbound to specific domains or shapes. We define the recognition question as an energy optimization problem, solved by variational means. Our approach, based on the level-set method, characterizes geometrically local surfaces within the data, and uses these characteristics as potential field for minimization. The main advantage here is that it allows topological changes of the evolving curves, such as merging and breaking. We demonstrate the proposed methodology on the detection of collapse sinkholes.

  6. Catalytic kinetic determination of ultratrace amounts of nitrite with detection by linear scan voltammetry at a DME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi-Liang, J; Hai-Cuo, Q; Da-Qiang, W

    1992-10-01

    Nitrite has a very strong catalytic effect on the bromate oxidation of Methyl Orange in dilute sulphuric acid medium. The oxidation product of methyl orange exhibits a well derivative voltammetric wave at -0.41 V vs. SCE in sodium hydroxide medium. The linear scan voltammetric behaviour for the product at a DME has been studied, and it was selected as indicator component for the indicator reaction. Based on these studies, a novel and highly sensitive and selective catalytic reaction-voltammetric method for nitrite is proposed. A detection limit of 2 x 10(-9)M and calibration graph from 4 x 10(-7) to 4 x 10(-7)M nitrite are obtained. Nitrite in water samples was determined by this method, with satisfactory results.

  7. Detection of Vertical Pole-Like Objects in a Road Environment Using Vehicle-Based Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Kaartinen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate road environment information is needed in applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D city modelling. Vehicle-based laser scanning (VLS can produce dense point clouds from large areas efficiently from which the road and its environment can be modelled in detail. Pole-like objects such as traffic signs, lamp posts and tree trunks are an important part of road environments. An automatic method was developed for the extraction of pole-like objects from VLS data. The method was able to find 77.7% of the poles which were found by a manual investigation of the data. Correctness of the detection was 81.0%.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Soranzo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide (GW scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7 and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11. One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12 identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk and lower-body (hip axis and femur skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4, hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4, and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6. Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.

  9. GeneRegionScan: a Bioconductor package for probe-level analysis of specific, small regions of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Diez, Diego; Wheelock, Craig E; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Goto, Susumu; Eriksson, Per; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2009-08-01

    Whole-genome microarrays allow us to interrogate the entire transcriptome of a cell. Affymetrix microarrays are constructed using several probes that match to different regions of a gene and a summarization step reduces this complexity into a single value, representing the expression level of the gene or the expression level of an exon in the case of exon arrays. However, this simplification eliminates information that might be useful when focusing on specific genes of interest. To address these limitations, we present a software package for the R platform that allows detailed analysis of expression at the probe level. The package matches the probe sequences against a target gene sequence (either mRNA or DNA) and shows the expression levels of each probe along the gene. It also features functions to fit a linear regression based on several genetic models that enables study of the relationship between gene expression and genotype. The software is implemented as a platform-independent R package available through the Bioconductor repository at http://www.bioconductor.org/. It is licensed as GPL 2.0. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Utility of the pooling approach as applied to whole genome association scans with high-density Affymetrix microarrays

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    Gray Joanna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report an attempt to extend the previously successful approach of combining SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and DNA pooling (SNP-MaP employing high-density microarrays. Whereas earlier studies employed a range of Affymetrix SNP microarrays comprising from 10 K to 500 K SNPs, this most recent investigation used the 6.0 chip which displays 906,600 SNP probes and 946,000 probes for the interrogation of CNVs (copy number variations. The genotyping assay using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array is highly demanding on sample quality due to the small feature size, low redundancy, and lack of mismatch probes. Findings In the first study published so far using this microarray on pooled DNA, we found that pooled cheek swab DNA could not accurately predict real allele frequencies of the samples that comprised the pools. In contrast, the allele frequency estimates using blood DNA pools were reasonable, although inferior compared to those obtained with previously employed Affymetrix microarrays. However, it might be possible to improve performance by developing improved analysis methods. Conclusions Despite the decreasing costs of genome-wide individual genotyping, the pooling approach may have applications in very large-scale case-control association studies. In such cases, our study suggests that high-quality DNA preparations and lower density platforms should be preferred.

  11. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-12-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species.

  12. Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker.

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    Nina Ratna Djuita

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker. The research aims todetect genomic integrity of in vitro irradiated banana using microsatellite marker. These studies were done on bananacv. Pisang Mas irradiated by 15 Gy of gamma ray. The DNA was isolated from each accesion following Dixie.Amplification of DNA products were done by Perkin Elmer Gene Amp PCR 2400 using ten primers, and thenelectroforesis in agarose 1%. Finally a vertical polyacrylamide gel electroforesis was run and the products werevisualized by silver staining. The result shown that among the primers tested, eight primers produced clear, discrete,and reproducible bands. Number of DNA band exhibited ranging from one to two, following the ploidy level of pisangMas which is a diploid banana cultivar (AA. One band suggest homozygote allele while two bands showedheterozygote allele. Out of eight primers, six primers produced different allele among irradiated, in vitro, and in vivocontrol plant. Meanwhile, for the other two primers the allele were monomorph for all the accessions examined.Genomic modification was observed at all irradiated plants. The modification can happened at zygosity of certain allelethat may change from heterozygote to homozygote or vice versa. While modification in allele size that underlyinggenomic instability could be caused by several genetic events such as deletion, insertion, and amplification ofnucleotides.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

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    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure st