WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome cloning progress

  1. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic ...

  2. Recent Achievement in Gene Cloning and Functional Genomics in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a model plant for photoperiodism as well as for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, a rather low efficiency in soybean transformation hampers functional analysis of genes isolated from soybean. In comparison, rapid development and progress in flowering time and photoperiodic response have been achieved in Arabidopsis and rice. As the soybean genomic information has been released since 2008, gene cloning and functional genomic studies have been revived as indicated by successfully characterizing genes involved in maturity and nematode resistance. Here, we review some major achievements in the cloning of some important genes and some specific features at genetic or genomic levels revealed by the analysis of functional genomics of soybean.

  3. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  4. Mapping genomic library clones using oligonucleotide arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapolsky, R.J.; Lipshutz, R.J. [Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a high-density DNA probe array and accompanying biochemical and informatic methods to order clones from genomic libraries. This approach involves a series of enzymatic steps for capturing a set of short dispersed sequence markers scattered throughout a high-molecular-weight DNA. By this process, all the ambiguous sequences lying adjacent to a given Type IIS restriction site are ligated between two DNA adaptors. These markers, once amplified and labeled by PCR, can be hybridized and detected on a high-density olligonucleotide array bearing probes complementary to all possible markers. The array is synthesized using light-directed combinatorial chemistry. For each clone in a genomic library, a characteristic set of sequence markers can be determined. On the basis of the similarity between the marker sets for each pair of clones, their relative overlap can be measured. The library can be sequentially ordered into a contig map using this overlap information. This new methodology does not require gel-based methods or prior sequence information and involves manipulations that should allow for easy adaptation to automated processing and data collection. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Genetic stability of pestivirus genomes cloned into BACs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Uttenthal, Åse;

    chromosome (BAC) vector “pBeloBAC11”. This BAC vector provides a markedly higher stability of cloned sequences in E. coli compared to plasmids that form the basis for the existing pestivirus cDNA clones. In this study, two of the newly constructed BAC clones were analysed for genetic stability of the cloned...... pestivirus genomes to demonstrate the suitability of the BAC vector for harbouring pestivirus genomes. Two BAC clones, comprising the complete genomes of BDV Gifhorn (pBeloGif3) and CSFV Paderborn (pBeloPader10) were passaged 15 times in E.coli representing at least 360 bacteria generations. From 15th...... passage of the BAC clones, the entire 5’ and 3’ ends of the cloned genomes and parts of the open reading frame were sequenced and compared to the sequences of the parent BAC clones. The sequenced areas represent approximately 20 % of the cloned genome. No mutations were observed after the extensive...

  6. REVISITING MOLECULAR CLONING TO SOLVE GENOME SEQUENCING PROJECT CONFLICTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hugo A Barrera-Saldaña; Aarón Daniel Ramírez-Sánchez; Tiffany Editth Palacios-Tovar; Dionicio Aguirre-Treviño; Saúl Felipe Karr-de-León

    2017-01-01

    .... Molecular cloning was chosen as the most straight-forward strategy to solve the dilemma. The initial characterization of recombinant plasmids by restriction enzyme digestion confirmed the presence of two genomic sequences...

  7. Progress in interspecies cloning of mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Duancheng; BI Chunming; CHEN Dayuan

    2004-01-01

    Interspecies mammalian cloning can be achieved by application of two key techniques, i.e.the technique of interspecies nuclear transfer and the technique of interspecies pregnancy.The general principles, problems and possible solutions, as well as the recent advances of interspecies mammalian cloning have been summarized in this review.

  8. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  9. [A review of the genomic and gene cloning studies in trees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tong-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of U.S., the first tree genome, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), has been completely sequenced and publicly release. This is the milestone that indicates the beginning of post-genome era for forest trees. Identification and cloning genes underlying important traits are one of the main tasks for the post-genome-era tree genomic studies. Recently, great achievements have been made in cloning genes coordinating important domestication traits in some crops, such as rice, tomato, maize and so on. Molecular breeding has been applied in the practical breeding programs for many crops. By contrast, molecular studies in trees are lagging behind. Trees possess some characteristics that make them as difficult organisms for studying on locating and cloning of genes. With the advances in techniques, given also the fast growth of tree genomic resources, great achievements are desirable in cloning unknown genes from trees, which will facilitate tree improvement programs by means of molecular breeding. In this paper, the author reviewed the progress in tree genomic and gene cloning studies, and prospected the future achievements in order to provide a useful reference for researchers working in this area.

  10. RAPD-based screening of genomic libraries for positional cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioh, W; Tharreau, D; Lebrun, M H

    1997-12-15

    RAPD markers are frequently used for positional cloning. However, RAPD markers often contain repeated sequences which prevent genomic library screening by hybridisation. We have developed a simple RAPD analysis of genomic libraries based on the identification of cosmid pools and clones amplifying the RAPD marker of interest. Our method does not require the cloning or characterisation of the RAPD marker as it relies on the analysis of cosmid pools or clones using a simple RAPD protocol. We applied this strategy using four RAPD markers composed of single copy or repeated sequences linked to avirulence genes of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea . Cosmids containing these RAPD markers were easily and rapidly identified allowing the construction of physical contigs at these loci.

  11. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  12. Genomic clones of bovine parvovirus: Construction and effect of deletions and terminal sequence inversions on infectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, B.C.; Chen, K.C.; Lederman, M.; Stout, E.R.; Bates, R.C. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1988-02-01

    Genomic clones of the autonomous parvovirus bovine parvovirus (BPV) were constructed by blunt-end ligation of reannealed virion plus and minus DNA strands into the plasmid pUC8. These clones were stable during propagation in Escherichia coli JM107. All clones tested were found to be infectious by the criteria of plaque titer and progressive cytophathic effect after transfection into bovine fetal lung cells. Sequencing of the recombinant plasmids demonstrated that all of the BPV inserts had left-end (3{prime})-terminal deletions of up to 34 bases. Defective genomes could also be detected in the progeny DNA even though the infection was initiated with homogeneous, cloned DNA. Full-length genomic clones with 3{prime} flip and 3{prime} flop conformations were constructed and were found to have equal infectivity. Expression of capsid proteins from tranfected genomes was demonstrated by hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled cell lysates. Use of appropriate antiserum for immunoprecipitation showed the synthesis of BPV capsid and noncapsid proteins after transfection. Independently, a series of genomic clones with increasingly larger 3{prime}-terminal deletions was prepared from separately subcloned 3{prime}-terminal fragments. Transfection of these clones into bovine fetal lung cells revealed that deletions of up to 34 bases at the 3{prime} end lowered but did not abolish infectivity, while deletions of greater than 52 bases were lethal. End-label analysis showed that the 34-base deletion was repaired to wild-type length in the progeny virus.

  13. Genomic libraries: II. Subcloning, sequencing, and assembling large-insert genomic DNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Mike A; Matthews, Lucy; Sims, Sarah; Lloyd, Christine; Beasley, Helen; Baxter, Simon W

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing large insert clones to completion is useful for characterizing specific genomic regions, identifying haplotypes, and closing gaps in whole genome sequencing projects. Despite being a standard technique in molecular laboratories, DNA sequencing using the Sanger method can be highly problematic when complex secondary structures or sequence repeats are encountered in genomic clones. Here, we describe methods to isolate DNA from a large insert clone (fosmid or BAC), subclone the sample, and sequence the region to the highest industry standard. Troubleshooting solutions for sequencing difficult templates are discussed.

  14. A first generation physical map of the medaka genome in BACs essential for positional cloning and clone-by-clone based genomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Maryam Zadeh; Hennig, Steffen; Imre, Gabriele; Asakawa, Shuichi; Palczewski, Stefanie; Berger, Anja; Hori, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Lehrach, Hans; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Kondoh, Hisato; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2004-07-01

    In order to realize the full potential of the medaka as a model system for developmental biology and genetics, characterized genomic resources need to be established, culminating in the sequence of the medaka genome. To facilitate the map-based cloning of genes underlying induced mutations and to provide templates for clone-based genomic sequencing, we have created a first-generation physical map of the medaka genome in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. In particular, we exploited the synteny to the closely related genome of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes, by marker content mapping. As a first step, we clustered 103,144 public medaka EST sequences to obtain a set of 21,121 non-redundant sequence entities. Avoiding oversampling of gene-dense regions, 11,254 of EST clusters were successfully matched against the draft sequence of the fugu genome, and 2363 genes were selected for the BAC map project. We designed 35mer oligonucleotide probes from the selected genes and hybridized them against 64,500 BAC clones of strains Cab and Hd-rR, representing 14-fold coverage of the medaka genome. Our data set is further supplemented with 437 results generated from PCR-amplified inserts of medaka cDNA clones and BAC end-fragment markers. Our current, edited, first generation medaka BAC map consists of 902 map segments that cover about 74% of the medaka genome. The map contains 2721 markers. Of these, 2534 are from expressed sequences, equivalent to a non-redundant set of 2328 loci. The 934 markers (724 different) are anchored to the medaka genetic map. Thus, genetic map assignments provide immediate access to underlying clones and contigs, simplifying molecular access to candidate gene regions and their characterization.

  15. Genetics, genomes and cloning the biotechnology revolution

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    As this century draws to a close, spectacular advances in the fields of genomics and genetics are opening up dramatic new horizons for medicine. For much of the 20th century, genetic research has focused on rare diseases caused by mutations in a particular gene. However, more recently it has been realised that common genetic variations (polymorphisms), interacting with the environment, can influence an individual's susceptibility to diseases widely represented in our populations (e.g. mental illness and asthma), redefining the term "genetic disease". Officially starting in 1990, the Human Genome Project was a $3-billion, 15-year program to find the estimated 80,000 human genes and determine the sequence of the 3 billion DNA building blocks that underlie all of human biology and its diversity. The resulting boom in genetic information and technologies, not only from humans, but from many other organisms, means that we now have new tools to understand and treat normal and disease states. This information is bei...

  16. Genome modifications and cloning using a conjugally transferable recombineering system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J Hossain

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic modification of primary bacterial disease isolates is challenging due to the lack of highly efficient genetic tools. Herein we describe the development of a modified PCR-based, λ Red-mediated recombineering system for efficient deletion of genes in Gram-negative bacteria. A series of conjugally transferrable plasmids were constructed by cloning an oriT sequence and different antibiotic resistance genes into recombinogenic plasmid pKD46. Using this system we deleted ten different genes from the genomes of Edwardsiella ictaluri and Aeromonas hydrophila. A temperature sensitive and conjugally transferable flp recombinase plasmid was developed to generate markerless gene deletion mutants. We also developed an efficient cloning system to capture larger bacterial genetic elements and clone them into a conjugally transferrable plasmid for facile transferring to Gram-negative bacteria. This system should be applicable in diverse Gram-negative bacteria to modify and complement genomic elements in bacteria that cannot be manipulated using available genetic tools.

  17. Gene cloning: exploring cotton functional genomics and genetic improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diqiu LIU; Xianlong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Cotton is the most important natural fiber plant in the world. The genetic improvement of the quality of the cotton fiber and agricultural productivity is imperative under the situation of increasing consumption and rapid development of textile technology. Recently, the study of cotton molecular biology has progressed greatly. A lot of specifically or preferentially expressed cotton fiber genes were cloned and analyzed. On the other hand, identification of stress response genes expressed in cotton was performed by other research groups. The major stress factors were studied including the wilt pathogens Verticillium dahliae, Fusarium oxy-sporum f. sp. vasinfectum, bacterial blight, root-knot nematode, drought, and salt stress. What is more, a few genes related to the biosynthesis of gossypol, other sesquiterpene phytoalexins and the major seed oil fatty acids were isolated from cotton. In the present review, we focused on the major advances in cotton gene cloning and expression profiling in the recent years.

  18. Methodologies for in vitro cloning of small RNAs and application for plant genome(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, Eric J; Huang, Lingyan; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y

    2009-01-01

    The "RNA revolution" that started at the end of the 20th century with the discovery of post-transcriptional gene silencing and its mechanism via RNA interference (RNAi) placed tiny 21-24 nucleotide long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the forefront of biology as one of the most important regulatory elements in a host of physiologic processes. The discovery of new classes of ncRNAs including endogenous small interfering RNAs, microRNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs is a hallmark in the understanding of RNA-dependent gene regulation. New generation high-throughput sequencing technologies further accelerated the studies of this "tiny world" and provided their global characterization and validation in many biological systems with sequenced genomes. Nevertheless, for the many "yet-unsequenced" plant genomes, the discovery of small RNA world requires in vitro cloning from purified cellular RNAs. Thus, reproducible methods for in vitro small RNA cloning are of paramount importance and will remain so into the foreseeable future. In this paper, we present a description of existing small RNA cloning methods as well as next-generation sequencing methods that have accelerated this research along with a description of the application of one in vitro cloning method in an initial small RNA survey in the "still unsequenced" allotetraploid cotton genome.

  19. Genome size evolution in pufferfish: an insight from BAC clone-based Diodon holocanthus genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Xiaoni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in genome size within and between species have been observed since the 1950 s in diverse taxonomic groups. Serving as model organisms, smooth pufferfish possess the smallest vertebrate genomes. Interestingly, spiny pufferfish from its sister family have genome twice as large as smooth pufferfish. Therefore, comparative genomic analysis between smooth pufferfish and spiny pufferfish is useful for our understanding of genome size evolution in pufferfish. Results Ten BAC clones of a spiny pufferfish Diodon holocanthus were randomly selected and shotgun sequenced. In total, 776 kb of non-redundant sequences without gap representing 0.1% of the D. holocanthus genome were identified, and 77 distinct genes were predicted. In the sequenced D. holocanthus genome, 364 kb is homologous with 265 kb of the Takifugu rubripes genome, and 223 kb is homologous with 148 kb of the Tetraodon nigroviridis genome. The repetitive DNA accounts for 8% of the sequenced D. holocanthus genome, which is higher than that in the T. rubripes genome (6.89% and that in the Te. nigroviridis genome (4.66%. In the repetitive DNA, 76% is retroelements which account for 6% of the sequenced D. holocanthus genome and belong to known families of transposable elements. More than half of retroelements were distributed within genes. In the non-homologous regions, repeat element proportion in D. holocanthus genome increased to 10.6% compared with T. rubripes and increased to 9.19% compared with Te. nigroviridis. A comparison of 10 well-defined orthologous genes showed that the average intron size (566 bp in D. holocanthus genome is significantly longer than that in the smooth pufferfish genome (435 bp. Conclusion Compared with the smooth pufferfish, D. holocanthus has a low gene density and repeat elements rich genome. Genome size variation between D. holocanthus and the smooth pufferfish exhibits as length variation between homologous region and different

  20. Inferring tumor progression from genomic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Nicholas; Krasnitz, Alexander; Rodgers, Linda; Cook, Kerry; Meth, Jennifer; Kendall, Jude; Riggs, Michael; Eberling, Yvonne; Troge, Jennifer; Grubor, Vladimir; Levy, Dan; Lundin, Pär; Månér, Susanne; Zetterberg, Anders; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cancer progression in humans is difficult to infer because we do not routinely sample patients at multiple stages of their disease. However, heterogeneous breast tumors provide a unique opportunity to study human tumor progression because they still contain evidence of early and intermediate subpopulations in the form of the phylogenetic relationships. We have developed a method we call Sector-Ploidy-Profiling (SPP) to study the clonal composition of breast tumors. SPP involves macro-dissecting tumors, flow-sorting genomic subpopulations by DNA content, and profiling genomes using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Breast carcinomas display two classes of genomic structural variation: (1) monogenomic and (2) polygenomic. Monogenomic tumors appear to contain a single major clonal subpopulation with a highly stable chromosome structure. Polygenomic tumors contain multiple clonal tumor subpopulations, which may occupy the same sectors, or separate anatomic locations. In polygenomic tumors, we show that heterogeneity can be ascribed to a few clonal subpopulations, rather than a series of gradual intermediates. By comparing multiple subpopulations from different anatomic locations, we have inferred pathways of cancer progression and the organization of tumor growth.

  1. Complete sequence of the first chimera genome constructed by cloning the whole genome of Synechocystis strain PCC6803 into the Bacillus subtilis 168 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Shiwa, Yuh; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-12-01

    Genome synthesis of existing or designed genomes is made feasible by the first successful cloning of a cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803, in Gram-positive, endospore-forming Bacillus subtilis. Whole-genome sequence analysis of the isolate and parental B. subtilis strains provides clues for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 2 complete bacterial genomes in one cell.

  2. Full genome sequencing of the Newcastle disease viruses VS/GA and clone 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of the Villegas-Glisson/University of Georgia (VG/GA) strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and of a plaque purified clone (clone 5) exhibiting a different phenotype were sequenced and analyzed. The VG/GA strain, isolated from the intestine of healthy turkeys replicat...

  3. Genomic diversity of cercarial clones of Himasthla elongata (Trematoda, Echinostomatidae) determined with AFLP technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaktionov, N K; Podgornaya, O I; Strelkov, P P; Galaktionov, K V

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal genomic diversity formed during parthenogenetic reproduction of rediae of the trematode Himasthla elongata in its molluskan host Littorina littorea. We applied amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to determine the genomic diversity of individual cercariae within the clone, that is, the infrapopulation of parthenogenetic progeny in a single molluskan host. The level of genomic diversity of particular cercariae isolates from a single clone, detected with EcoR1/Mse1 AFLP reaction, was significantly lower than the variability of cercariae from different clones. The presence of intraclonal genomic diversity indicates a nonsexual shuffle of alleles during parthenogenesis in the rediae of H. elongata. The obtained polymorphic AFLP fragments were long enough to detect the sequences that may be responsible for clonal genomic variability. Based on this, AFLP can be recommended as a tool for the study of genetic mechanisms of this variability.

  4. Differential differences in methylation status of putative imprinted genes among cloned swine genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jie Shen

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification in the mammalian genome that regulates crucial aspects of gene function. Mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT often results in gestational or neonatal failure with only a small proportion of manipulated embryos producing live births. Many of the embryos that survive to term later succumb to a variety of abnormalities that are likely due to inappropriate epigenetic reprogramming. Aberrant methylation patterns of imprinted genes in cloned cattle and mice have been elucidated, but few reports have analyzed the cloned pig genome. Four surviving cloned sows that were created by ear fibroblast nuclear transfer, each with a different life span and multiple organ defects, such as heart defects and bone growth delay, were used as epigenetic study materials. First, we identified four putative differential methylation regions (DMR of imprinted genes in the wild-type pig genome, including two maternally imprinted loci (INS and IGF2 and two paternally imprinted loci (H19 and IGF2R. Aberrant DNA methylation, either hypermethylation or hypomethylation, commonly appeared in H19 (45% of imprinted loci hypermethylated vs. 30% hypomethylated, IGF2 (40% vs. 0%, INS (50% vs. 5%, and IGF2R (15% vs. 45% in multiple tissues from these four cloned sows compared with wild-type pigs. Our data suggest that aberrant epigenetic modifications occur frequently in the genome of cloned swine. Even with successful production of cloned swine that avoid prenatal or postnatal death, the perturbation of methylation in imprinted genes still exists, which may be one of reason for their adult pathologies and short life. Understanding the aberrant pattern of gene imprinting would permit improvements in future cloning techniques.

  5. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-08-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene.

  6. [Construction of Frankia genomic libraries and isolation of clones homologous to nodulation genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y H; Qin, M; Wang, Y L; Ding, J; Ma, Q S

    1990-01-01

    High molecular genomic DNAs were isolated by using the lysozyme plus achromopeptidase system from Frankia strains At4, Ccol and Hr16, the root nodule endophytes of Alnus, Casuarina and Hippophae respectively, and used to construct genomic libraries in pLAFR1, a broad host range cosmid vector within many gram-negative hosts. The genomic libraries were screened by in situ colony hybridization to identify clones homologous to common nodulation genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum, based on the sequence homology of EcoRI-digested Frankia total DNA to nodABC from Rhizobium meliloti. Several clones showing relatively strong hybridization were found, the recombinant plasmid was isolated, and their homology with Rhizobium nodulation genes was confirmed by spot hybridization. Further work on these positive clones is now underway.

  7. Description of genomic islands associated to the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Melise Chaves; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Asensi, Marise Dutra; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277 is disseminated in Brazil where it is mainly associated with the presence of metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1. Furthermore, it carries the class I integron In163 and a 16S rRNA methylase rmtD that confers aminoglycoside resistance. To analyze the genetic characteristics that might be responsible for the success of this endemic clone, genomes of four P. aeruginosa strains that were isolated in distinct years and in different Brazilian states were sequenced. The strains differed regarding the presence of the genes blaSPM-1 and rmtD. Genomic comparisons that included genomes of other clones that have spread worldwide from this species were also performed. These analyses revealed a 763,863bp region in the P. aeruginosa chromosome that concentrates acquired genetic structures comprising two new genomic islands (PAGI-13 and PAGI-14), a mobile element that could be used for ST277 fingerprinting and a recently reported Integrative and Conjugative Element (ICE) associated to blaSPM-1. The genetic elements rmtD and In163 are inserted in PAGI-13 while PAGI-14 has genes encoding proteins related to type III restriction system and phages. The data reported in this study provide a basis for a clearer understanding of the genetic content of clone ST277 and illustrate the mechanisms that are responsible for the success of these endemic clones.

  8. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    -based sequencing process that dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem

  9. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    -based sequencing process that dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem

  10. Complete genomic sequence and an infectious BAC clone of feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, S H Sheldon; Niikura, Masahiro; Cheng, Hans H; Kruger, John M; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K

    2010-06-05

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) is a major cause of upper respiratory and ocular diseases in Felidae. We report the first complete genomic sequence of FHV-1, as well as the construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of FHV-1, which contains the entire FHV-1 genome and has the BAC vector inserted at the left end of U(L). Complete genomic sequences were derived from both the FHV-1 BAC clone and purified virion DNA. The FHV-1 genome is 135,797bp in size with an overall G+C content of 45%. A total of 78 open reading frames were predicted, encoding 74 distinct proteins. The gene arrangement is collinear with that of most sequenced varicelloviruses. The virus regenerated from the BAC was very similar to the parental C-27 strain in vitro in terms of plaque morphology and growth characteristics and highly virulent in cats in a preliminary in vivo study.

  11. Characterization of the DNA of the hamster papovavirus: I. Genom length and molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F; Zimmermann, W; Krause, H; Scherneck, S

    1984-01-01

    The complete genome of the hamster papovavirus (HaPV) which was isolated from virions found in multiple skin tumors of the Syrian hamsters was measured by electron microscopy and cloned in Escherichia coli using the certified plasmid vector pBR322. The cloned viral DNA were characterized by digestion of the recombinant DNA with various restriction enzymes followed by comparison of their electrophoretic mobilities in agarose gels with that of similarly digested uncloned DNA and by electron microscopy to determine the genome size of cloned HaPV DNA. The restriction enzyme analysis of the cloned HaPV DNA showed the same cleavage pattern as the corresponding fragments from the uncloned DNA. No major insertions or deletions could be detected by heteroduplex analysis between cloned HaPV DNA and the starting material. The estimated genome size of 5.52 kb for HaPV DNA is approx. 300 bases larger than those determined for other known papovaviruses as SV40 or polyoma.

  12. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymier, Martin J., E-mail: mdeymie@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Claiborne, Daniel T., E-mail: dclaibo@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ende, Zachary, E-mail: zende@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ratner, Hannah K., E-mail: hannah.ratner@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Kilembe, William, E-mail: wkilembe@rzhrg-mail.org [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Allen, Susan, E-mail: sallen5@emory.edu [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hunter, Eric, E-mail: eric.hunter2@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  13. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I.; Uttenthal, Åse;

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stabl...... single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infectious BAC DNAs from a single full-length PCR product....

  14. Construction and utility of 10-kb libraries for efficient clone-gap closure for rice genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Jin; Yu, Yeisoo; Nah, Gyoungju; Atkins, Michael; Lee, Seunghee; Frisch, David A; Wing, Rod A

    2003-08-01

    Rice is an important crop and a model system for monocot genomics, and is a target for whole genome sequencing by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP). The IRGSP is using a clone by clone approach to sequence rice based on minimum tiles of BAC or PAC clones. For chromosomes 10 and 3 we are using an integrated physical map based on two fingerprinted and end-sequenced BAC libraries to identifying a minimum tiling path of clones. In this study we constructed and tested two rice genomic libraries with an average insert size of 10 kb (10-kb library) to support the gap closure and finishing phases of the rice genome sequencing project. The HaeIII library contains 166,752 clones covering approximately 4.6x rice genome equivalents with an average insert size of 10.5 kb. The Sau3AI library contains 138,960 clones covering 4.2x genome equivalents with an average insert size of 11.6 kb. Both libraries were gridded in duplicate onto 11 high-density filters in a 5 x 5 pattern to facilitate screening by hybridization. The libraries contain an unbiased coverage of the rice genome with less than 5% contamination by clones containing organelle DNA or no insert. An efficient method was developed, consisting of pooled overgo hybridization, the selection of 10-kb gap spanning clones using end sequences, transposon sequencing and utilization of in silico draft sequence, to close relatively small gaps between sequenced BAC clones. Using this method we were able to close a majority of the gaps (up to approximately 50 kb) identified during the finishing phase of chromosome-10 sequencing. This method represents a useful way to close clone gaps and thus to complete the entire rice genome.

  15. Molecular cloning of the avian myelocytomatosis virus genome and recovery of infectious virus by transfection of chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennström, B; Moscovici, C; Goodman, H M; Bishop, J M

    1981-01-01

    The avian retrovirus myelocytomatosis virus 19 (MCV) possesses an interesting diversity of oncogenic potentials, but the virus has proven difficult to study because of its inability to replicate without the assistance of a helper virus. We have therefore isolated and amplified the genome of MCV by molecular cloning in a procaryotic vector. The topography of the cloned DNA was explored by the use of restriction endonucleases and radioactive complementary DNAs representing specific domains in avian retrovirus genomes. The cloned DNA appeared to be an authentic representation of the MCV genome: the size and genetic topography of the DNA were comparable to those of MCV, and transfection of the cloned DNA into chicken cells (in company with the DNA of a suitable helper virus) gave rise to virus with the genome and transforming potentials of MCV. The availability of cloned MCV DNA should facilitate a variety of genetic and biochemical manipulations directed at elucidating the mechanism of oncogenesis by MCV. Images PMID:6268847

  16. [Molecular cloning and structural characteristics of the R complex of maize]. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    Studies on the R complex in Maize continued Progress is discussed in the following areas: Establishing identity of R components and cloning of R components; CO allele origin; molecular organization of R-r complex; NCO allele origin; genetic analysis of R-r complex; studies of the Sn locus and reverse paramutation.

  17. Diversity of chloroplast genome among local clones of cocoa (Theobroma cacao, L.) from Central Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwastika, I. Nengah; Pakawaru, Nurul Aisyah; Rifka, Rahmansyah, Muslimin, Ishizaki, Yoko; Cruz, André Freire; Basri, Zainuddin; Shiina, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Chloroplast genomes typically range in size from 120 to 170 kilo base pairs (kb), which relatively conserved among plant species. Recent evaluation on several species, certain unique regions showed high variability which can be utilized in the phylogenetic analysis. Many fragments of coding regions, introns, and intergenic spacers, such as atpB-rbcL, ndhF, rbcL, rpl16, trnH-psbA, trnL-F, trnS-G, etc., have been used for phylogenetic reconstructions at various taxonomic levels. Based on that status, we would like to analysis the diversity of chloroplast genome within species of local cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) from Central Sulawesi. Our recent data showed, there were more than 20 clones from local farming in Central Sulawesi, and it can be detected based on phenotypic and nuclear-genome-based characterization (RAPD- Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and SSR- Simple Sequences Repeat) markers. In developing DNA marker for this local cacao, here we also included analysis based on the variation of chloroplast genome. At least several regions such as rpl32-TurnL, it can be considered as chloroplast markers on our local clone of cocoa. Furthermore, we could develop phylogenetic analysis in between clones of cocoa.

  18. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  19. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  20. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  1. Genome evolution during progression to breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Newburger, D. E.

    2013-04-08

    Cancer evolution involves cycles of genomic damage, epigenetic deregulation, and increased cellular proliferation that eventually culminate in the carcinoma phenotype. Early neoplasias, which are often found concurrently with carcinomas and are histologically distinguishable from normal breast tissue, are less advanced in phenotype than carcinomas and are thought to represent precursor stages. To elucidate their role in cancer evolution we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing of early neoplasias, matched normal tissue, and carcinomas from six patients, for a total of 31 samples. By using somatic mutations as lineage markers we built trees that relate the tissue samples within each patient. On the basis of these lineage trees we inferred the order, timing, and rates of genomic events. In four out of six cases, an early neoplasia and the carcinoma share a mutated common ancestor with recurring aneuploidies, and in all six cases evolution accelerated in the carcinoma lineage. Transition spectra of somatic mutations are stable and consistent across cases, suggesting that accumulation of somatic mutations is a result of increased ancestral cell division rather than specific mutational mechanisms. In contrast to highly advanced tumors that are the focus of much of the current cancer genome sequencing, neither the early neoplasia genomes nor the carcinomas are enriched with potentially functional somatic point mutations. Aneuploidies that occur in common ancestors of neoplastic and tumor cells are the earliest events that affect a large number of genes and may predispose breast tissue to eventual development of invasive carcinoma.

  2. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of a second probable allatostatin receptor from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    We (C. Lenz et al. (2000) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 269, 91-96) and others (N. Birgül et al. (1999) EMBO J. 18, 5892-5900) have recently cloned a Drosophila receptor that was structurally related to the mammalian galanin receptors, but turned out to be a receptor for a Drosophila peptide...... belonging to the insect allatostatin neuropeptide family. In the present paper, we screened the Berkeley "Drosophila Genome Project" database with "electronic probes" corresponding to the conserved regions of the four rat (delta, kappa, mu, nociceptin/orphanin FQ) opioid receptors. This yielded alignment...... with a Drosophila genomic database clone that contained a DNA sequence coding for a protein having, again, structural similarities with the rat galanin receptors. Using PCR with primers coding for the presumed exons of this second Drosophila receptor gene, 5'- and 3'-RACE, and Drosophila cDNA as template, we...

  3. Cloning and characterization of the Dictyostelium discoideum rasG genomic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S M; Williams, J G; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1992-02-28

    A Dictyostelium discoideum genomic DNA clone containing the ras-related gene, rasG was isolated using the rasG cDNA as a probe. The genomic clone encompasses the entire coding region of the gene and 1.5 kb of 5' flanking region. The rasG gene contains a single intron as determined by sequence comparison with the cDNA, whereas the highly related rasD gene contains three introns. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription of the rasG gene initiates at multiple sites. Sequence analysis of the 5' flanking region of the gene revealed a stretch of thymine residues upstream from the transcription start sites but there is no evidence for a TATA box sequence.

  4. Taenia hydatigena: isolation of mitochondrial DNA, molecular cloning, and physical mitochondrial genome mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, K W; Thompson, R C; Rood, J I; Pawlowski, I D

    1987-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA was isolated from Taenia hydatigena, T. crassiceps, and Echinococcus granulosus using a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide precipitation technique. The technique is simple, rapid, reproducible, and does not require extensive high speed ultracentrifugation. The advantage of using mitochondrial DNA from taeniid cestodes for comparative restriction analysis was demonstrated. Mitochondrial DNA of T. hydatigena was isolated as covalently closed circular molecules. These were linearized by single digestion with BamHI and the molecular weight was estimated from the linear form of 17.6 kb. The mitochondrial DNA of T. hydatigena is therefore similar in size and structure to that of many other animal species. The entire mitochondrial genome was cloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli and a restriction map of the recombinant molecule was constructed. The potential of using the cloned mitochondrial genome as a probe in speciation studies as well as for providing functional information on the role of the cestode mitochondrion is discussed.

  5. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development.

  6. The Cassava Genome: Current Progress, Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnik, Simon; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Desany, Brian; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Rodriguez, Fausto; Fauquet, Claude; Tohme, Joseph; Harkins, Timothy; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Rounsley, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The starchy swollen roots of cassava provide an essential food source for nearly a billion people, as well as possibilities for bioenergy, yet improvements to nutritional content and resistance to threatening diseases are currently impeded. A 454-based whole genome shotgun sequence has been assembled, which covers 69% of the predicted genome size and 96% of protein-coding gene space, with genome finishing underway. The predicted 30,666 genes and 3,485 alternate splice forms are supported by 1.4 M expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Maps based on simple sequence repeat (SSR)-, and EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already exist. Thanks to the genome sequence, a high-density linkage map is currently being developed from a cross between two diverse cassava cultivars: one susceptible to cassava brown streak disease; the other resistant. An efficient genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach is being developed to catalog SNPs both within the mapping population and among diverse African farmer-preferred varieties of cassava. These resources will accelerate marker-assisted breeding programs, allowing improvements in disease-resistance and nutrition, and will help us understand the genetic basis for disease resistance.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecalis Symbioflor 1 Clones DSM16430 and DSM16434

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Chakraborty, Anindita; Hain, Torsten; Zimmermann, Kurt; Domann, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Symbioflor 1 is a historical concoction of 10 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two groups: one comprising eight identical clones (DSM16430, DSM16432, DSM16433, DSM16435 to DSM16439) and a further two isolates (DSM16431, DSM16434) with marginally different profiles. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the draft genome sequences of representative isolates.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecalis Symbioflor 1 Clones DSM16430 and DSM16434

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Chakraborty, Anindita; Hain, Torsten; Zimmermann, Kurt; Domann, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Symbioflor 1 is a historical concoction of 10 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two groups: one comprising eight identical clones (DSM16430, DSM16432, DSM16433, DSM16435 to DSM16439) and a further two isolates (DSM16431, DSM16434) with marginally different profiles. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the draft genome sequences of representative isolates.

  9. Molecular cloning of the avian erythroblastosis virus genome and recovery of oncogenic virus by transfection of chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennström, B; Fanshier, L; Moscovici, C; Bishop, J M

    1980-01-01

    Avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) causes erythroblastosis and sarcomas in birds and transforms both erythroblasts and fibroblasts to neoplastic phenotypes in culture. The viral genetic locus required for oncogenesis by AEV is at present poorly defined; moreover, we know very little of the mechanism of tumorigenesis by the virus. To facilitate further analysis of these problems, we used molecular cloning to isolate the genome of AEV as recombinant DNA in a procaryotic vector. The identity of the isolated DNA was verified by mapping with restriction endonucleases and by tests for biological activity. The circular form of unintegrated AEV DNA was purified from synchronously infected quail cells and cloned into the EcoRI site of lambda gtWES x B. A restriction endonuclease cleavage map was established. By hybridization with complementary DNA probes representing specific parts of avian retrovirus genomes, the restriction map of the cloned AEV DNAs was correlated with a genetic map. These data show that nucleotide sequences unique to AEV comprise at least 50% of the genome and are located approximately in the middle of the AEV genome. Our data confirm and extend previous descriptions of the AEV genome obtained by other procedures. We studied in detail two recombinant clones containing AEV DNA: the topography of the viral DNA in the two clones was virtually identical, except that one clone apparently contained two copies of the terminal redundancy that occurs in linear viral DNA isolated from infected cells; the other clone probably contained only one copy of the redundant sequence. To recover infectious virus from the cloned DNA, we developed a procedure for transfection that compensated for the defectiveness of AEV in replication. We accomplished this by ligating cloned AEV DNA to the cloned DNA of a retrovirus (Rous-associated virus type 1) whose genome could complement the deficiencies of AEV. Ligation of the two viral DNAs was facilitated by using a neutral fragment

  10. Osteoponin Promoter Controlled by DNA Methylation: Aberrant Methylation in Cloned Porcine Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jie Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloned animals usually exhibited many defects in physical characteristics or aberrant epigenetic reprogramming, especially in some important organ development. Osteoponin (OPN is an extracellular-matrix protein involved in heart and bone development and diseases. In this study, we investigated the correlation between OPN mRNA and its promoter methylation changes by the 5-aza-dc treatment in fibroblast cell and promoter assay. Aberrant methylation of porcine OPN was frequently found in different tissues of somatic nuclear transferred cloning pigs, and bisulfite sequence data suggested that the OPN promoter region −2615 to −2239 nucleotides (nt may be a crucial regulation DNA element. In pig ear fibroblast cell culture study, the demethylation of OPN promoter was found in dose-dependent response of 5-aza-dc treatment and followed the OPN mRNA reexpression. In cloned pig study, discrepant expression pattern was identified in several cloned pig tissues, especially in brain, heart, and ear. Promoter assay data revealed that four methylated CpG sites presenting in the −2615 to −2239 nt region cause significant downregulation of OPN promoter activity. These data suggested that methylation in the OPN promoter plays a crucial role in the regulation of OPN expression that we found in cloned pigs genome.

  11. Integration of the cytogenetic, genetic, and physical maps of the human genome by FISH mapping of CEPH YAC clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray-Ward, P.; Menninger, J.; Lieman, J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of over 950 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones on human chromosomes. This integration of the cytogenetic, genetic and physical maps of the human genome was accomplished using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping and the CEPH library of YAC clones. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 1, dissecting and modeling of tumor clones and their networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    Recent tumor genome sequencing confirmed that one tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones) which bear different, but related, genetic profiles such as mutation and copy number variation profiles. Thus far, one tumor has been viewed as a whole entity in cancer functional studies. With the advances of genome sequencing and computational analysis, we are able to quantify and computationally dissect clones from tumors, and then conduct clone-based analysis. Emerging technologies such as single-cell genome sequencing and RNA-Seq could profile tumor clones. Thus, we should reconsider how to conduct cancer systems biology studies in the genome sequencing era. We will outline new directions for conducting cancer systems biology by considering that genome sequencing technology can be used for dissecting, quantifying and genetically characterizing clones from tumors. Topics discussed in Part 1 of this review include computationally quantifying of tumor subpopulations; clone-based network modeling, cancer hallmark-based networks and their high-order rewiring principles and the principles of cell survival networks of fast-growing clones. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cloning of open reading frames and promoters from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome: construction of genomic libraries of random small fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, G M; Tornow, J; Moldave, K

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a novel efficient method, carrier-facilitated insertion, to insert small (150-600 bp) DNA fragments into plasmid vectors. This method employs a carrier segment of vector DNA to circumvent the difficulties in ligating two fragments together to generate a recombinant circle efficiently. We have used carrier-facilitated insertion to construct three genomic libraries of random (DNase I-generated) fragments from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. One of these was an expression library, and the other two were promoter-cloning libraries. 87-90% of the Escherichia coli colonies in each library contained recombinant plasmids, and less than 3% of the recombinants contained more than one insert. Detection of open reading frames among the inserts in the expression library was accomplished by testing for beta-galactosidase activity. This methodology, unencumbered by the intrinsic disproportionality of cDNA libraries, can be used to identify and clone DNA that codes for a specific antigenic determinant. When used in combination with a method to detect and isolate random constitutive, repressible and inducible yeast promoters, these libraries should permit a comprehensive analysis of the yeast genome and its expression.

  14. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, pr...

  15. Recovery of a soybean urease genomic clone by sequential library screening with two synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, R W; Holland, M A; Chisholm, D; Polacco, J C

    1987-01-01

    We report the first isolation of a low-copy-number gene from a complex higher plant (soybean) genome by direct screening with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide (oligo) probes. A synthetic, mixed, 21-nucleotide (nt) oligo (21-1) based on a seven amino acid (aa) sequence from soybean seed urease, was used to screen genomic libraries of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in the lambda Charon 4 vector. Twenty homologous clones were recovered from a screen of 500,000 plaques. These were counterscreened with embryo-specific cDNA (15-2 cDNA) made by priming with a second, mixed 15-nt oligo (15-2), based on a Jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) urease peptide [Takishima et al., J. Natl. Def. Med. Coll. 5 (1980) 19-23]. Five out of 20 clones were homologous to 15-2 cDNA and proved to be identical. Nucleotide sequence analysis of representative clone E15 confirmed that it contained urease sequences. Subclones of E15 homologous to the oligo probes contain a deduced amino acid sequence which matches 108 of 130 aa residues of an amino acid run in a recently published [Mamiya et al., Proc. Jap. Acad. 61B (1985) 359-398] complete protein sequence for Jack-bean seed urease. Using clone E15 as a probe of soybean embryonic mRNA revealed a homologous 3.8-kb species that is the size of the urease messenger. This species is absent from mRNA of embryos of a soybean seed urease-null mutant. However, both urease-positive and urease-null genomes contain the 11-kb DNA fragment bearing urease sequences.

  16. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale generation of sequence data, complemented by orthogonal new capabilities to functionally annotate these large sequence data sets. Our Strategic Vision lays out a path to guide our decisions and ensure that the evolving set of experimental and computational capabilities available to DOE JGI users will continue to enable groundbreaking science.

  17. Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GETDB Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) Data detail Data name Ge...nome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) Description of data contents A t...able showing the insert position of the Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap element and...iption Clone Name Name of the clone of the genome sequence adjacent to the 5'-end of the Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap...date History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) - GETDB | LSDB Archive ...

  18. Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single cell resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirew, Peter; Steif, Adi; Khattra, Jaswinder; Ha, Gavin; Yap, Damian; Farahani, Hossein; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, Colin; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; McPherson, Andrew; Nielsen, Cydney; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Lefebvre, Calvin; Bashashati, Ali; de Souza, Camila; Siu, Celia; Aniba, Radhouane; Brimhall, Jazmine; Oloumi, Arusha; Osako, Tomo; Bruna, Alejandra; Sandoval, Jose; Algara, Teresa; Greenwood, Wendy; Leung, Kaston; Cheng, Hongwei; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, Dong; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Lorette, Julie; Nguyen, Long; Huntsman, David; Eaves, Connie J.; Hansen, Carl; Marra, Marco A.; Caldas, Carlos; Shah, Sohrab P.; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers, including breast cancers, are comprised of clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution1,2, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis3–7. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours8–10. However the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours has not been systematically examined at single cell resolution. Here we show by both deep genome and single cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (<5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies utilizing patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment. PMID:25470049

  19. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with /sup 32/P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus.

  20. Identification and cloning of a new category of DNA fragments which are poorly represented in human genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, P; Myal, Y; Shui, R; Tenniswood, M

    1993-01-29

    We have developed an alternative strategy for the preparation of genomic libraries that ensures better representation of genomic sequences commonly underrepresented in genomic libraries constructed using standard protocols. To overcome the apparent bias against genomic sequences containing clusters of restriction sites we have used nonoptimized restriction digestions to generate a mixture of DNA fragments which have been cloned into the EMBL3 vector. To validate this protocol we have screened the EMBL3 library to identify a full length genomic clone of the prolactin-inducible gene (PIP). Screening 4 other, commercially available, genomic libraries prepared using standard protocols for restriction digestion of the genomic DNA failed to identify any full length clones. We show that this increase in the representation of the full length PIP gene in the EMBL3 genomic library is attributable to the method of insert preparation used and suggests that an additional subset of sequences that may be poorly represented in, or absent from, established libraries may be cloned using this modified protocol.

  1. Abnormal expression of DNA methyltransferases and genomic imprinting in cloned goat fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongjie; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Ren, Caifang; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful way to produce cloned animals. However, SCNT animals exhibit DNA methylation and genomic imprinting abnormalities. These abnormalities may be due to the faulty epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. To investigate the consequence of SCNT on the genomic imprinting and global methylation in the donor cells, growth patterns and apoptosis of cloned goat fibroblast cells (CGFCs) at passage 7 were determined. Growth patterns in CGFCs were similar to the controls; however, the growth rate in log phase was lower and apoptosis in CGFCs were significantly higher (P < 0.01). In addition, quantitative expression analysis of three DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) and two imprinted genes (H19, IGF2R) was conducted in CGFCs: Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b expression was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and H19 expression was decreased sixfold (P < 0.01); however, the expression of Dnmt3a was unaltered and IGF2R expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Finally, we used bisulfite sequencing PCR to compare the DNA methylation patterns in differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of H19 and IGF2R. The DMRs of H19 (P < 0.01) and IGF2R (P < 0.01) were both highly methylated in CGFCs. These results indicate that the global genome might be hypomethylated. Moreover, there is an aberrant expression of imprinted genes and DMR methylation in CGFCs.

  2. Conditionally amplifiable BACs: switching from single-copy to high-copy vectors and genomic clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jadwiga; Hradecna, Zdenka; Szybalski, Waclaw

    2002-09-01

    The widely used, very-low-copy BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors are the mainstay of present genomic research. The principal advantage of BACs is the high stability of inserted clones, but an important disadvantage is the low yield of DNA, both for vectors alone and when carrying genomic inserts. We describe here a novel class of single-copy/high-copy (SC/HC) pBAC/oriV vectors that retain all the advantages of low-copy BAC vectors, but are endowed with a conditional and tightly controlled oriV/TrfA amplification system that allows: (1) a yield of ~100 copies of the vector per host cell when conditionally induced with L-arabinose, and (2) analogous DNA amplification (only upon induction and with copy number depending on the insert size) of pBAC/oriV clones carrying >100-kb inserts. Amplifiable clones and libraries facilitate high-throughput DNA sequencing and other applications requiring HC plasmid DNA. To turn on DNA amplification, which is driven by the oriV origin of replication, we used copy-up mutations in the gene trfA whose expression was very tightly controlled by the araC-P(araBAD) promoter/regulator system. This system is inducible by L-arabinose, and could be further regulated by glucose and fucose. Amplification of DNA upon induction with L-arabinose and its modulation by glucose are robust and reliable. Furthermore, we discovered that addition of 0.2% D-glucose to the growth medium helped toward the objective of obtaining a real SC state for all BAC systems, thus enhancing the stability of their maintenance, which became equivalent to cloning into the host chromosome

  3. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  4. Research progress on isolation and cloning of functional genes in tea plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chunlei; CHEN Liang

    2007-01-01

    Tea,which has many sanitarian functions,is one of the most popular non-alcoholic soft and healthy beverages in the world.In many countries,as well as in China,tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important cash crop.It has great value as a source of secondary metabolic products.Molecular biology of tea plants has been one of the most active and kinetic research fields of tea science for the last decade.Isolation and cloning of important functional genes of tea plants have a critical significance on elucidating the molecular mechanism of high quality,yield and resistance,as well as genetic manipulating via biotechnological approaches for tea plants.In this paper,we introduced the research progress on the isolation and cloning of functional genes in tea plants.In addition,the brief prospect on the research of functional genes of tea plants in the near future is also given out.

  5. Comparison of gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and conventionally bred controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Gao

    Full Text Available Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF. Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver, using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls, though a small set of genes showed altered expression. Cloned pigs presented a more different pattern of DNA methylation in unique sequences in both tissues. Especially a small set of genomic sites had different DNA methylation status with a trend towards slightly increased methylation levels in cloned pigs. Molecular network analysis of the genes that contained such differential methylation loci revealed a significant network related to tissue development. In conclusion, our study showed that phenotypically normal cloned pigs were highly similar with normal breeding pigs in their gene expression, but moderate alteration in DNA methylation aspects still exists, especially in certain unique genomic regions.

  6. NotI linking clones as a tool for joining physical and genetic maps of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allikmets, R L; Kashuba, V I; Pettersson, B; Gizatullin, R; Lebedeva, T; Kholodnyuk, I D; Bannikov, V M; Petrov, N; Zakharyev, V M; Winberg, G

    1994-01-15

    To study the connection among NotI linking clones, CpG islands, and genes, the sequence surrounding 143 NotI sites was determined. These NotI linking clones were isolated from human chromosome 3-specific libraries and contain an average C + G content of 65%. These clones represent sequence-tagged sites that can be positioned onto chromosome maps and used for generating a long-range NotI map of the human genome. A majority (about 90%) of these clones contain transcribed sequences, as detected by Northern blot hybridization, providing an efficient link between physical and functional (genetic) maps. The GenBank nucleotide database was searched with sequences from these NotI linking clones. For many clones, homology was found to human and other vertebrate genes. About 20 clones contained various repeats in their sequences and may represent microsatellite loci. Most of these NotI linking clones therefore represent evolutionarily conserved DNA fragments and also can be used for comparative genome mapping of other mammalian species. In addition, approximately 20% of all sequenced human CpG island-containing genes and more than 12% of all well-characterized human genes were found to possess NotI restriction sites. This is at least 2-5 times more than has been previously estimated and suggests that NotI sites have a much stronger association with genes.

  7. NotL linking clones as a tool for joining physical and genetic maps of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allikmets, R.L.; Dean, M.; Modi, W. (DynCorp National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States)); Kholodnyuk, I.D.; Winberg, G.; Klein, G. (Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)); Pettersson, B.; Uhlen, M. (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Gizatullin, R.; Bannikov, V.M. (and others)

    1994-01-15

    To study the connection among NotI linking clones, CpG islands, and genes, the sequence surrounding 143 NotI sites was determined. These NotI linking clones were isolated from human chromosome 3-specific libraries and contain an average C + G content of 65%. These clones represent sequence-tagged sites that can be positioned onto chromosome maps and used for generating a long-range NotI map of the human genome. A majority (about 90%) of these clones contain transcribed sequences, as detected by Northern blot hybridization, providing an efficient link between physical and functional (genetic) maps. The GenBank nucleotide database was searched with sequences from these NotI linking clones. For many clones, homology was found to human and other vertebrate genes. About 20 clones contained various repeats in their sequences and may represent microsatellite loci. Most of these NotI linking clones therefore represent evolutionarily conserved DNA fragments and also can be used for comparative genome mapping of other mammalian species. In addition, approximately 20% of all sequenced human CpG island-containing genes and more than 12% of all well-characterized human genes were found to possess NotI restriction sites. This is at least 2-5 times more than has been previously estimated and suggests that NotI sites have a much stronger association with genes. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapid Evolution of an Extreme-Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    , comparative genomics has been employed to analyze the rapid evolution of an EDR Acinetobacter baumannii clone from the intensive care unit (ICU) of Rigshospitalet at Copenhagen. Two resistant A. baumannii strains, 48055 and 53264, were sequentially isolated from two individuals who had been admitted to ICU...... within a 1-month interval. Multilocus sequence typing indicates that these two isolates belonged to ST208. The A. baumannii 53264 strain gained colistin resistance compared with the 48055 strain and became an EDR strain. Genome sequencing indicates that A. baumannii 53264 and 48055 have almost identical...... genomes—61 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found between them. The A. baumannii 53264 strain was assembled into 130 contigs, with a total length of 3,976,592 bp with 38.93% GC content. The A. baumannii 48055 strain was assembled into 135 contigs, with a total length of 4,049,562 bp with 39...

  9. Recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus constructed by high-throughput cloning: a useful tool for functional and structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eYuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C and is an important resource of many industrial and molecular biological enzymes. To study the structure and function of Pyrococcus furiosus proteins at whole genome level, we constructed expression plasmids of each Pyrococcus furiosus gene using a ligase-independent cloning method, which was based on amplifying target gene and vector by PCR using phosphorothioate-modified primers and digesting PCR products by λ exonuclease. Our cloning method had a positive clone percentage of ≥ 80% in 96-well plate cloning format. Small-scale expression experiment showed that 55 out of 80 genes were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Strain Rosetta 2(DE3pLysS. In summary, this recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus provides a platform for functional and structural studies, as well as developing novel industrial enzymes. Our cloning scheme is adaptable to constructing recombinant expression library of other sequenced organisms.

  10. Development of new transformation-competent artificial chromosome vectors and rice genomic libraries for efficient gene cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Guang; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Letian; Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Qunyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Chunyi; Su, Jing; Wang, Zhonghua; Tian, Dongsheng; Mei, Mantong

    2002-01-09

    The transformation-competent artificial chromosome vector (TAC) system has been shown to be very useful for efficient gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1998) 6535). To adapt the vector system for gene isolation in crops, two new TAC vectors and rice genomic libraries were developed. The new vectors pYLTAC17 and pYLTAC27 use the Bar gene and Hpt gene driven by the rice Act1 promoter as the plant selectable markers, respectively, and are suitable for transformation of rice and other grasses. Two representative genomic libraries (I and II) of an Indica rice variety Minghui63, a fertility restorer line for hybrid rice, were constructed with pYLTAC17 using different size classes of partially digested DNA fragments. Library I and library II consisted of 34,560 and 1.2 x 10(5) clones, with average insert sizes of approximately 77 and 39 kb, respectively. The genome coverage of the libraries I and II was estimated to be about 5 and 11 haploid genome equivalents, respectively. Clones of the library I were stored individually in ninety 384-well plates, and those of the library II were collected as bulked pools each containing 30-50 clones and stored in eight 384-well plates. A number of probes were used to hybridize high-density colony filters of the library I prepared by an improved replicating method and each detected 2-9 positive clones. A method for rapid screening of the library II by pooled colony hybridization was developed. A TAC clone having an 80 kb rice DNA insert was successfully transferred into rice genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The new vectors and the genomic libraries should be useful for gene cloning and genetic engineering in rice and other crops.

  11. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  12. The cloning, genomic organization and tissue expression profile of the human DLG5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbs Richard A

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial atrial fibrillation, an autosomal dominant disease, was previously mapped to chromosome 10q22. One of the genes mapped to the 10q22 region is DLG5, a member of the MAGUKs (Membrane Associated Gyanylate Kinase family which mediates intracellular signaling. Only a partial cDNA was available for DLG5. To exclude potential disease inducing mutations, it was necessary to obtain a complete cDNA and genomic sequence of the gene. Methods The Northern Blot analysis performed using 3' UTR of this gene indicated the transcript size to be about 7.2 KB. Using race technique and library screening the entire cDNA was cloned. This gene was evaluated by sequencing the coding region and splice functions in normal and affected family members with familial atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, haploid cell lines from affected patients were generated and analyzed for deletions that may have been missed by PCR. Results We identified two distinct alternately spliced transcripts of this gene. The genomic sequence of the DLG5 gene spanned 79 KB with 32 exons and was shown to have ubiquitous human tissue expression including placenta, heart, skeletal muscle, liver and pancreas. Conclusions The entire cDNA of DLG5 was identified, sequenced and its genomic organization determined.

  13. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of an allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    The insect allatostatins are neurohormones, acting on the corpora allata (where they block the release of juvenile hormone) and on the insect gut (where they block smooth muscle contraction). We screened the "Drosophila Genome Project" database with electronic sequences corresponding to various...... insect allatostatins. This resulted in alignment with a DNA sequence coding for some Drosophila allatostatins (drostatins). Using PCR with oligonucleotide primers directed against the presumed exons of this Drosophila allatostatin gene and subsequent 3'- and 5'-RACE, we were able to clone its c......DNA. The Drosophila allatostatin preprohormone contains four amino acid sequences that after processing would give rise to four Drosophila allatostatins: Val-Glu-Arg-Tyr-Ala-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-1), Leu-Pro-Val-Tyr-Asn-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-2), Ser-Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ser-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2) (drostatin-3...

  14. Gene Cloning of Penicillin V Acylase from Bacillus sp BAC4 by Genomic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELFI SUSANTI VH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to clone and identify penicillin V acylase (PVA gene of Bacillus sp. BAC4 by genomic library. Chromosome DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was isolated by Wang method. pHB201 of E. coli was isolated by alkali lyses method. Recombinant DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 chromosome fragment and pHB201 was made by ligase process using T4 DNA ligase. Transformation of E. coli using this recombinant plasmid was carried out according to Mandel-Higa method. The results indicated that chromosome DNA fragment of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was bigger 23 kb with purity 1,3. Plasmid DNA fragment of E coli was 6,5 kb. Transformants laboring pHB201 recombinant plasmid was screen as blue-white colonies in a medium containing IPTG/X-gal and chloramphenicol.

  15. DNA microarrays for comparative genomic hybridization based on DOP-PCR amplification of BAC and PAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegler, Heike; Carr, Philippa; Douglas, Eleanor J; Burford, Deborah C; Hunt, Sarah; Scott, Carol E; Smith, James; Vetrie, David; Gorman, Patricia; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Carter, Nigel P

    2003-04-01

    We have designed DOP-PCR primers specifically for the amplification of large insert clones for use in the construction of DNA microarrays. A bioinformatic approach was used to construct primers that were efficient in the general amplification of human DNA but were poor at amplifying E. coli DNA, a common contaminant of DNA preparations from large insert clones. We chose the three most selective primers for use in printing DNA microarrays. DNA combined from the amplification of large insert clones by use of these three primers and spotted onto glass slides showed more than a sixfold increase in the human to E. coli hybridization ratio when compared to the standard DOP-PCR primer, 6MW. The microarrays reproducibly delineated previously characterized gains and deletions in a cancer cell line and identified a small gain not detected by use of conventional CGH. We also describe a method for the bulk testing of the hybridization characteristics of chromosome-specific clones spotted on microarrays by use of DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes. Finally, we describe a set of clones selected from the publicly available Golden Path of the human genome at 1-Mb intervals and a view in the Ensembl genome browser from which data required for the use of these clones in array CGH and other experiments can be downloaded across the Internet.

  16. Selection of Unique Escherichia coli Clones by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD): Evaluation by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Godfrey, Paul A.; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Feldgarden, Michael; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing clonal diversity is important when analysing fecal flora. We evaluated random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, applied for selection of Escherichia coli isolates, by whole genome sequencing. RAPD was fast, and reproducible as screening method for selection of distinct E. coli clones in fecal swabs. PMID:24912108

  17. Comparison of gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and conventionally bred controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fei, Gao; Luo, Yonglun; Li, Shengting

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural...... breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation......-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls...

  18. Cloning and sequence characteristics of the genomic gene of a rice metallothionein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Northern blot analysis showed that a metallothionein gene, ricMT, is expressed strongly in the stem of rice with an expression level that could be more than 100-fold stronger than in leaf blades. The results suggest that the 5'upstream region flanking the coding sequence of the ricMT may contain a fairly strong promoter. To elucidate its regulation and promoter structure, the genomic clones of ricMT were screened out from a rice genomic library and a fragment of about 4 084 bp was sequenced. The fragment included a 5'upstream region of ca. 2 970 bp, a transcription region of ca. 690 bp and a 3'downstream region of ca. 420 bp. Computer analysis of the sequence homology showed that the 5'upstream region included a putative TATA box, a putative CAAT box, and a typical metal-responsive element TGCGCGCG. The results will promote further understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation and metal response of plant metallothionein proteins.

  19. Genomic-Glycosylation Aberrations in Tumor Initiation, Progression and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carman K.M. Ip

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-translation modifications of proteins alter their functional activity and thus are key contributors of tumor initiation and progression. Glycosylation, one of the most common post-translational modifications of proteins, has been associated with tumorigenesis for decades. However, due to complexity in analysis of the functional effects of glycosylation, definitive information on the role of altered glycosylation in cancer is lacking. Importantly, imputing changes in glycosylation in proteins from analysis of DNA mutations has not been attempted globally. It is thus critical to elucidate the role of glycosylation in tumor pathophysiology as well as potential roles of altered glycosylation as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarize the evidence that glycosylation regulates functions of a set of frequently mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Moreover, we explore the potential that protein sequence changes engendered by genomic mutations broadly alter glycosylation and thus promote tumor initiation and progression.

  20. Two unisexual artificial polyploid clones constructed by genome addition of common carp (Cyprinus carp) and crucian carp (Carassius auratus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Qingjiang; (吴清江); YE; Yuzhen; (叶玉珍); DONG; Xinhong; (董新红)

    2003-01-01

    A polyploid hybrid fish with natural gynogenesis can prevent segregation and maintain their hybrid vigor in their progenies. Supposing the reproduction mode of induced polyploid fish being natural gynogenesis, allopolyploid hybrid between common carp and crucian carp into allopolyploid was performed. The purpose of this paper is to describe a lineage from sexual diploid carp transforming into allotriploid and allotetraploid unisexual clones by genome addition. The diploid hybrid between common carp and crucian carp reproduces an unreduced nucleus consisting of two parental genomes. This unreduced female pronucleus will fuse with male pronucleus and form allotriploid zygote after penetration of related species sperms. Allotriploid embryos grow normally, and part of female allotriploid can produce unreduced mature ova with three genomes. Mature ova of most allotriploid females are provided with natural gynogenetic trait and their nuclei do not fuse with any entrance sperm. All female offspring are produced by gynogenesis of allotriploid egg under activation of penetrating sperms. These offspring maintain morphological traits of their allotriploid maternal and form an allotetraploid unisexual clone by gynogenetic reproduction mode. However, female nuclei of rare allotriploid female can fuse with penetrating male pronuclei and result in the appearance of allotetraploid individuals by means of genome addition. All allotetraploid females can reproduce unreduced mature eggs containing four genomes. Therefore, mature eggs of allotetraploid maintain gynogenetic trait and allotetraploid unisexual clone is produced under activation of related species sperms.

  1. A versatile shuttle cosmid vector for the efficient construction of genomic libraries and for the cloning of fungal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiewacz, H D

    1994-07-01

    A shuttle cosmid vector, pANsCos1, has been constructed for Escherichia coli and filamentous fungi. This vector contains two cos sequences separated by a single XbaI restriction site. pANsCos1 allows the efficient construction of representative genomic libraries from as little as 15-20 micrograms of genomic DNA. Due to the presence of a functional hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene (hph) transformation of fungal protoplasts with pAN-sCos1, or derivatives of it, results in the formation of hygromycin B-resistant transformants. The T7 and T3 RNA polymerase promoter sequences flanking the cloning site, in combination with two adjacent NotI sites facilitate genomic walking and the rapid construction of restriction maps of cloned inserts.

  2. NotI jumping and linking clones as a tool for genome mapping and analysis of chromosome rearrangements in different tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarovsky, E R; Kashuba, V I; Gizatullin, R Z; Winberg, G; Zabarovska, V I; Erlandsson, R; Domninsky, D A; Bannikov, V M; Pokrovskaya, E; Kholodnyuk, I; Petrov, N; Zakharyev, V M; Kisselev, L L; Klein, G

    1996-01-01

    Long-range restriction site maps are of central importance for mapping the human genome. The use of clones from linking and jumping libraries for genome mapping offers a promising alternative to the laborious procedures used up until now. In the present review, this research field is analyzed with particular emphasis on the implementation of a shot-gun sequencing strategy for genome mapping and the use of NotI linking clones for analysis of rearrangements in tumors and tumor cell lines.

  3. EasyCloneMulti: A Set of Vectors for Simultaneous and Multiple Genomic Integrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Maury

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used in the biotechnology industry for production of ethanol, recombinant proteins, food ingredients and other chemicals. In order to generate highly producing and stable strains, genome integration of genes encoding metabolic pathway enzymes is the preferred option. However, integration of pathway genes in single or few copies, especially those encoding rate-controlling steps, is often not sufficient to sustain high metabolic fluxes. By exploiting the sequence diversity in the long terminal repeats (LTR of Ty retrotransposons, we developed a new set of integrative vectors, EasyCloneMulti, that enables multiple and simultaneous integration of genes in S. cerevisiae. By creating vector backbones that combine consensus sequences that aim at targeting subsets of Ty sequences and a quickly degrading selective marker, integrations at multiple genomic loci and a range of expression levels were obtained, as assessed with the green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter system. The EasyCloneMulti vector set was applied to balance the expression of the rate-controlling step in the β-alanine pathway for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP. The best 3HP producing clone, with 5.45 g.L(-1 of 3HP, produced 11 times more 3HP than the lowest producing clone, which demonstrates the capability of EasyCloneMulti vectors to impact metabolic pathway enzyme activity.

  4. EasyCloneMulti: A Set of Vectors for Simultaneous and Multiple Genomic Integrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Jérôme; Germann, Susanne M; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad; Jensen, Niels B; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Herrgård, Markus J; Schneider, Konstantin; Koza, Anna; Forster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens; Borodina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used in the biotechnology industry for production of ethanol, recombinant proteins, food ingredients and other chemicals. In order to generate highly producing and stable strains, genome integration of genes encoding metabolic pathway enzymes is the preferred option. However, integration of pathway genes in single or few copies, especially those encoding rate-controlling steps, is often not sufficient to sustain high metabolic fluxes. By exploiting the sequence diversity in the long terminal repeats (LTR) of Ty retrotransposons, we developed a new set of integrative vectors, EasyCloneMulti, that enables multiple and simultaneous integration of genes in S. cerevisiae. By creating vector backbones that combine consensus sequences that aim at targeting subsets of Ty sequences and a quickly degrading selective marker, integrations at multiple genomic loci and a range of expression levels were obtained, as assessed with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system. The EasyCloneMulti vector set was applied to balance the expression of the rate-controlling step in the β-alanine pathway for biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP). The best 3HP producing clone, with 5.45 g.L(-1) of 3HP, produced 11 times more 3HP than the lowest producing clone, which demonstrates the capability of EasyCloneMulti vectors to impact metabolic pathway enzyme activity.

  5. Comparative Genome Analyses of Streptococcus suis Isolates from Endocarditis Demonstrate Persistence of Dual Phenotypic Clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Tohya

    Full Text Available Many bacterial species coexist in the same niche as heterogeneous clones with different phenotypes; however, understanding of infectious diseases by polyphenotypic bacteria is still limited. In the present study, encapsulation in isolates of the porcine pathogen Streptococcus suis from persistent endocarditis lesions was examined. Coexistence of both encapsulated and unencapsulated S. suis isolates was found in 26 out of 59 endocarditis samples. The isolates were serotype 2, and belonged to two different sequence types (STs, ST1 and ST28. The genomes of each of the 26 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the 26 samples were sequenced. The data showed that each pair of isolates had one or more unique nonsynonymous mutations in the cps gene, and the encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates from the same samples were closest to each other. Pairwise comparisons of the sequences of cps genes in 7 pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated isolates identified insertion/deletions (indels ranging from one to 104 bp in different cps genes of unencapsulated isolates. Capsule expression was restored in a subset of unencapsulated isolates by complementation in trans with cps expression vectors. Examination of gene content common to isolates indicated that mutation frequency was higher in ST28 pairs than in ST1 pairs. Genes within mobile genetic elements were mutation hot spots among ST28 isolates. Taken all together, our results demonstrate the coexistence of dual phenotype (encapsulated and unencapsulated bacterial clones and suggest that the dual phenotypes arose independently in each farm by means of spontaneous mutations in cps genes.

  6. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-01-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-bindin...

  7. The genomic dynamics during progression of lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Luo, Longhai; Luo, Wen; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chao; Xiong, Teng; Li, Xiangchun; Meng, Xuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Xiaopin; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zhixin

    2017-08-01

    Intra-tumor heterogeneity is a big barrier to precision medicine. To explore the underlying clonal diversity in lung adenocarcinomas, we selected nine individuals with whole-genome sequencing data from primary and matched metastatic tumors as a cohort for study. Similar global pattern of arm-level copy number changes and large variations of somatic single-nucleotide variant between the primary and metastasis are observed in the majority of cases. Importantly, we found breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycles acting as an important mechanism for underlying cancer gene amplification, such as amplification of CDK4, CDKN3 and FGFR1 in early stage. We also identified recurrent focal amplification of gene CCNY derived from BFB in two metastatic tumors, but not in primary tumor. Clonal analysis of case 236T demonstrated that mutational processes are varying with tumor progression. Collectively, our data provide new insights into genetic diversity and potential therapeutic target in lung adenocarcinoma.

  8. Genome-wide association studies in asthma: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March ME

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael E March,1 Patrick MA Sleiman,1,2 Hakon Hakonarson1,2 1Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Genetic studies of asthma have revealed that there is considerable heritability to the phenotype. An extensive history of candidate-gene studies has identified a long list of genes associated with immune function that are potentially involved in asthma pathogenesis. However, many of the results of candidate-gene studies have failed to be replicated, leaving in question the true impact of the implicated biological pathways on asthma. With the advent of genome-wide association studies, geneticists are able to examine the association of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers with a phenotype, allowing the hypothesis-free identification of variants associated with disease. Many such studies examining asthma or related phenotypes have been published, and several themes have begun to emerge regarding the biological pathways underpinning asthma. The results of many genome-wide association studies have currently not been replicated, and the large sample sizes required for this experimental strategy invoke difficulties with sample stratification and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, large collaborative groups of researchers have formed consortia focused on asthma, with the goals of sharing material and data and standardizing diagnosis and experimental methods. Additionally, research has begun to focus on genetic variants that affect the response to asthma medications and on the biology that generates the heterogeneity in the asthma phenotype. As this work progresses, it will move asthma patients closer to more specific, personalized medicine. Keywords: asthma, genetics, GWAS, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers

  9. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented. PMID:28261237

  10. Progress in Genome Editing Technology and Its Application in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Zhu, Bin; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing technology (GET) is a versatile approach that has progressed rapidly as a mechanism to alter the genotype and phenotype of organisms. However, conventional genome modification using GET cannot satisfy current demand for high-efficiency and site-directed mutagenesis, retrofitting of artificial nucleases has developed into a new avenue within this field. Based on mechanisms to recognize target genes, newly-developed GETs can generally be subdivided into three cleavage systems, protein-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., zinc-finger nucleases, ZFN, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, TALEN), RNA-dependent DNA cleavage systems (i.e., clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated proteins, CRISPR-Cas9, CRISPR-Cpf1, and CRISPR-C2c1), and RNA-dependent RNA cleavage systems (i.e., RNA interference, RNAi, and CRISPR-C2c2). All these techniques can lead to double-stranded (DSB) or single-stranded breaks (SSB), and result in either random mutations via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or targeted mutation via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, site-directed mutagenesis can be induced via targeted gene knock-out, knock-in, or replacement to modify specific characteristics including morphology-modification, resistance-enhancement, and physiological mechanism-improvement along with plant growth and development. In this paper, an non-comprehensive review on the development of different GETs as applied to plants is presented.

  11. An alternative method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells transfected with the corresponding genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Yong; Cui, Chen-Chen; Song, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiang-Guo; Jin, Ya-Ping; Wang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2012-07-01

    cDNA is widely used in gene function elucidation and/or transgenics research but often suitable tissues or cells from which to isolate mRNA for reverse transcription are unavailable. Here, an alternative method for cDNA cloning is described and tested by cloning the cDNA of human LALBA (human alpha-lactalbumin) from genomic DNA. First, genomic DNA containing all of the coding exons was cloned from human peripheral blood and inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector. Next, by delivering the plasmids into either 293T or fibroblast cells, surrogate cells were constructed. Finally, the total RNA was extracted from the surrogate cells and cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR. The human LALBA cDNA that was obtained was compared with the corresponding mRNA published in GenBank. The comparison showed that the two sequences were identical. The novel method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells described here uses well-established techniques that are feasible and simple to use. We anticipate that this alternative method will have widespread applications.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of a genomic island found in the Brazilian purpuric fever clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Tomaras, Andrew P; Rhodes, Eric R; Actis, Luis A

    2005-04-01

    A genomic island was identified in the Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) strain F3031. This island, which was also found in other BPF isolates, could not be detected in non-BPF biogroup aegyptius strains or in nontypeable or typeable H. influenzae strains, with the exception of a region present in the type b Eagan strain. This 34,378-bp island is inserted, in reference to H. influenzae Rd KW20, within a choline transport gene and contains a mosaic structure of Mu-like prophage genes, several hypothetical genes, and genes potentially encoding an Erwinia carotovora carotovoricin Er-like bacteriocin. The product of the tail fiber ORF in the bacteriocin-like region shows a hybrid structure where the C terminus is similar to an H. influenzae phage HP1 tail protein implicating this open reading frame in altering host specificity for a putative bacteriocin. Significant synteny is seen in the entire genomic island with genomic regions from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi CT18, Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TT01, Chromobacterium violaceum, and to a lesser extent Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP. In a previous work, we isolated several BPF-specific DNA fragments through a genome subtraction procedure, and we have found that a majority of these fragments map to this locus. In addition, several subtracted fragments generated from an independent laboratory by using different but related strains also map to this island. These findings underscore the importance of this BPF-specific chromosomal region in explaining some of the genomic differences between highly invasive BPF strains and non-BPF isolates of biogroup aegyptius.

  13. Identification, cloning and sequence analysis of a dwarf genome-specific RAPD marker in rubber tree [Hevea brasiliensis (Muell.) Arg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, P; Priya, P; Amma, C K Saraswathy; Thulaseedharan, A

    2004-11-01

    High-yielding dwarf clones of Hevea brasiliensis are tolerant to wind damage and therefore useful for high-density planting. The identification of molecular markers for the dwarf character is very important for isolating true-to-type high-yielding dwarf hybrid lines in the early stage of plant breeding programs. We have identified a dwarf genome-specific random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker in rubber tree. A total of 115 random oligonucleotide 10-mer primers were used to amplify genomic DNA by PCR, of which 19 primers produced clear and detectable bands. The primer OPB-12 generated a 1.4-kb DNA marker from both natural and controlled F(1) hybrid progenies (dwarf stature) derived from a cross between a dwarf parent and a normal cultivated clone as well as from the dwarf parent; it was absent in other parent (RRII 118). To validate this DNA marker, we analyzed 22 F(1) hybrids (13 with a dwarf stature and nine with a normal stature); the dwarf genome-specific 1.4-kb RAPD marker was present in all dwarf-stature hybrids and absent in all normal-stature hybrids. This DNA marker was cloned and characterized. DNA marker locus specificity was further confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. Our results indicate that Southern blot hybridization of RAPD using probes made from cloned DNA fragments allows a more accurate analysis of the RAPD pattern based on the presence/absence of specific DNA markers than dye-stained gels or Southern blot analysis of RAPD blots using probes made from purified PCR products. Detection of RAPD markers in the hybrid progenies indicates that RAPD is a powerful tool for identifying inherited genome segments following different hybridization methods in perennial tree crops.

  14. An efficient and high fidelity method for amplification, cloning and sequencing of complete tospovirus genomic RNA segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Spencer H; Adegbola, Raphael O; Adkins, Scott; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2017-04-01

    Tospoviruses (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) are responsible for major losses in an extensive range of crops worldwide. New species of these single-stranded, ambisense RNA viruses regularly emerge and have been shown to maintain heterogeneous populations with individual isolates having quite variable biological and virulence characteristics. Most tospovirus phylogenetic studies have focused on analysis of a single gene, most often the nucleocapsid protein gene. Complete genomic RNA segment amplification as a single fragment would facilitate more detailed analyses of genome-wide sequence variability, but obtaining such sequences for a large number of tospovirus isolates using traditional methods of amplification and cloning of small overlapping fragments is tedious, time consuming and expensive. In this study, protocols were optimized to amplify, clone and sequence full-length M- and S-RNA genome segments of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Impatiens necrotic spot virus. The strategy presented here is straightforward, scalable and offers several advantages over the previously commonplace and overlapping amplicon-based approach. Use of whole genome segments, instead of individual gene sequences or defined portions of genome segments, will facilitate a better understanding of the underlying molecular diversity of tospoviruses in mixed infections.

  15. Convergence of advances in genomics, team science, and repositories as drivers of progress in psychiatric genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Thomas; Senthil, Geetha; Addington, Anjené M

    2015-01-01

    After many years of unfilled promise, psychiatric genetics has seen an unprecedented number of successes in recent years. We hypothesize that the field has reached an inflection point through a confluence of four key developments: advances in genomics; the orientation of the scientific community around large collaborative team science projects; the development of sample and data repositories; and a policy framework for sharing and accessing these resources. We discuss these domains and their effect on scientific progress and provide a perspective on why we think this is only the beginning of a new era in scientific discovery.

  16. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Sheets

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The domestic pig is an ideal “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9, it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100% generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications.

  17. Cloning of genomic DNA of rice 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase gene and chromosomal localization of the gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军望; 冯德江; 李旭刚; 常团结; 朱祯

    2002-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSPs) is the target of nonselective herbicide glyphosate. A partial rice epsps cDNA was generated by RT-PCR with primers designed according to EST sequence in GenBank and used as probe for rice genomic library screening. In a screen of approximately 8.0×104 clones from the rice genomic library, sixteen positive clones were obtained, which strongly hybridized to the probe. One clone, E11, was selected for further analysis and the full-length 3661 bp rice epsps genomic sequence was obtained. Sequence analysis and homologous comparison revealed that epsps gene is composed of 8 exons and 7 introns. Analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism with the probe of rice epsps cDNA fragment confirmed that rice epsps is located on chromosome 6 with an indica-japonica (ZYQ8-JX17) double-haploid (DH) population. This is the first report on the EPSP synthase from monocotyledons.

  18. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Timothy P; Park, Chi-Hun; Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-12-03

    The domestic pig is an ideal "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9), it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100%) generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications.

  19. Malignant progressive tumor cell clone exhibits significant up-regulation of cofilin-2 and 27-kDa modified form of cofilin-1 compared to regressive clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Wang, Yufeng; Okada, Futoshi; Baron, Byron; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Takao; Akada, Junko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    QR-32 is a regressive murine fibrosarcoma cell clone which cannot grow when they are transplanted in mice; QRsP-11 is a progressive malignant tumor cell clone derived from QR-32 which shows strong tumorigenicity. A recent study showed there to be differentially expressed up-regulated and down-regulated proteins in these cells, which were identified by proteomic differential display analyses by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Cofilins are small proteins of less than 20 kDa. Their function is the regulation of actin assembly. Cofilin-1 is a small ubiquitous protein, and regulates actin dynamics by means of binding to actin filaments. Cofilin-1 plays roles in cell migration, proliferation and phagocytosis. Cofilin-2 is also a small protein, but it is mainly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. There are many reports showing the positive correlation between the level of cofilin-1 and cancer progression. We have also reported an increased expression of cofilin-1 in pancreatic cancer tissues compared to adjacent paired normal tissues. On the other hand, cofilin-2 was significantly less expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues. Therefore, the present study investigated the comparison of the levels of cofilin-1 and cofilin-2 in regressive QR-32 and progressive QRsP-11cells by western blotting. Cofilin-2 was significantly up-regulated in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 cells (p<0.001). On the other hand, the difference of the intensities of the bands of cofilin-1 (18 kDa) in QR-32 and QRsP-11 was not significant. However, bands of 27 kDa showed a quite different intensity between QR-32 and QRsP-11, with much higher intensities in QRsP-11 compared to QR-32 (p<0.001). These results suggested that the 27-kDa protein recognized by the antibody against cofilin-1 is a possible biomarker for progressive tumor cells.

  20. Virulence potential and genomic mapping of the worldwide clone Escherichia coli ST131.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Lavigne

    Full Text Available Recently, the worldwide propagation of clonal CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli isolates, namely ST131 and O25b:H4, has been reported. Like the majority of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates, the pandemic clone ST131 belongs to phylogenetic group B2, and has recently been shown to be highly virulent in a mouse model, even though it lacks several genes encoding key virulence factors (Pap, Cnf1 and HlyA. Using two animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans and zebrafish embryos, we assessed the virulence of three E. coli ST131 strains (2 CTX-M-15- producing urine and 1 non-ESBL-producing faecal isolate, comparing them with five non-ST131 B2 and a group A uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. In C. elegans, the three ST131 strains showed intermediate virulence between the non virulent group A isolate and the virulent non-ST131 B2 strains. In zebrafish, the CTX-M-15-producing ST131 UPEC isolates were also less virulent than the non-ST131 B2 strains, suggesting that the production of CTX-M-15 is not correlated with enhanced virulence. Amongst the non-ST131 B2 group isolates, variation in pathogenic potential in zebrafish embryos was observed ranging from intermediate to highly virulent. Interestingly, the ST131 strains were equally persistent in surviving embryos as the non-ST131-group B2 strains, suggesting similar mechanisms may account for development of persistent infection. Optical maps of the genome of the ST131 strains were compared with those of 24 reference E. coli strains. Although small differences were seen within the ST131 strains, the tree built on the optical maps showed that these strains belonged to a specific cluster (86% similarity with only 45% similarity with the other group B2 strains and 25% with strains of group A and D. Thus, the ST131 clone has a genetic composition that differs from other group B2 strains, and appears to be less virulent than previously suspected.

  1. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  2. Structure and organization of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast genome. I. Cloning and gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Fukuzawa, H; Kohchi, T; Sano, T; Sano, S; Shirai, H; Umesono, K; Shiki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Chang, Z

    1988-09-20

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, using a clone bank of chloroplast DNA fragments. The circular genome consists of 121,024 base-pairs and includes two large inverted repeats (IRA and IRB, each 10,058 base-pairs), a large single-copy region (LSC, 81,095 base-pairs), and a small single-copy region (SSC, 19,813 base-pairs). The nucleotide sequence was analysed with a computer to deduce the entire gene organization, assuming the universal genetic code and the presence of introns in the coding sequences. We detected 136 possible genes. 103 gene products of which are related to known stable RNA or protein molecules. Stable RNA genes for four species of ribosomal RNA and 32 species of tRNA were located, although one of the tRNA genes may be defective. Twenty genes encoding polypeptides involved in photosynthesis and electron transport were identified by comparison with known chloroplast genes. Twenty-five open reading frames (ORFs) show structural similarities to Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunits, 19 ribosomal proteins and two related proteins. Seven ORFs are comparable with human mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes. A computer-aided homology search predicted possible chloroplast homologues of bacterial proteins; two ORFs for bacterial 4Fe-4S-type ferredoxin, two for distinct subunits of a protein-dependent transport system, one ORF for a component of nitrogenase, and one for an antenna protein of a light-harvesting complex. The other 33 ORFs, consisting of 29 to 2136 codons, remain to be identified, but some of them seem to be conserved in evolution. Detailed information on gene identification is presented in the accompanying papers. We postulated that there were 22 introns in 20 genes (8 tRNA genes and 12 ORFs), which may be classified into the groups I and II found in fungal mitochondrial genes. The structural gene for ribosomal protein S12 is trans-split on the opposite DNA strand

  3. Development of a full-genome cDNA clone of Citrus leaf blotch virus and infection of citrus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, María Carmen; Martín, Susana; Ambrós, Silvia; Renovell, Agueda; Navarro, Luis; Pina, Jose Antonio; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2008-11-01

    Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), a member of the family Flexiviridae, has a ~9-kb single-stranded, positive-sense genomic RNA encapsidated by a 41-kDa coat protein. CLBV isolates are associated with symptom production in citrus including leaf blotching of Dweet tangor and stem pitting in Etrog citron (Dweet mottle disease), and some isolates are associated with bud union crease on trifoliate rootstocks, but Koch's postulates for this virus were not fulfilled. A full-genome cDNA of CLBV isolate SRA-153, which induces bud union crease, was placed under the T7 promoter (clone T7-CLBV), or between the 35S promoter and the Nos-t terminator, with or without a ribozyme sequence downstream of the CLBV sequence (clones 35SRbz-CLBV and 35S-CLBV). RNA transcripts from T7-CLBV failed to infect Etrog citron and Nicotiana occidentalis and N. benthamiana plants, whereas agro-inoculation with binary vectors carrying 35SRbz-CLBV or 35S-CLBV, and the p19 silencing suppressor, caused systemic infection and production of normal CLBV virions. Virus accumulation was similar in citron plants directly agro-infiltrated, or mechanically inoculated with wild-type or 35SRbz-CLBV-derived virions from Nicotiana, and the three sources incited the symptoms characteristic of Dweet mottle disease, but not bud union crease. Our results show that (1) virions derived from an infectious clone show the same replication, movement and pathogenicity characteristics as the wild-type CLBV; (2) CLBV is the causal agent of Dweet mottle disease but not of the bud union crease syndrome; and (3) for the first time an RNA virus could be successfully agro-inoculated on citrus plants. This infectious clone may become a useful viral vector for citrus genomic studies.

  4. Massive depletion of bovine leukemia virus proviral clones located in genomic transcriptionally active sites during primary infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas A Gillet

    Full Text Available Deltaretroviruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and bovine leukemia virus (BLV induce a persistent infection that remains generally asymptomatic but can also lead to leukemia or lymphoma. These viruses replicate by infecting new lymphocytes (i.e. the infectious cycle or via clonal expansion of the infected cells (mitotic cycle. The relative importance of these two cycles in viral replication varies during infection. The majority of infected clones are created early before the onset of an efficient immune response. Later on, the main replication route is mitotic expansion of pre-existing infected clones. Due to the paucity of available samples and for ethical reasons, only scarce data is available on early infection by HTLV-1. Therefore, we addressed this question in a comparative BLV model. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the BLV-infected cells population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone. We found that BLV propagation shifts from cell neoinfection to clonal proliferation in about 2 months from inoculation. Initially, BLV proviral integration significantly favors transcribed regions of the genome. Negative selection then eliminates 97% of the clones detected at seroconversion and disfavors BLV-infected cells carrying a provirus located close to a promoter or a gene. Nevertheless, among the surviving proviruses, clone abundance positively correlates with proximity of the provirus to a transcribed region. Two opposite forces thus operate during primary infection and dictate the fate of long term clonal composition: (1 initial integration inside genes or promoters and (2 host negative selection disfavoring proviruses located next to transcribed regions. The result of this initial response will contribute to the proviral load set point value as clonal abundance will benefit from carrying a provirus in

  5. Isolation of BAC Clones Containing Conserved Genes from Libraries of Three Distantly Related Moths: A Useful Resource for Comparative Genomics of Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yasukochi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera, butterflies and moths, is the second largest animal order and includes numerous agricultural pests. To facilitate comparative genomics in Lepidoptera, we isolated BAC clones containing conserved and putative single-copy genes from libraries of three pests, Heliothis virescens, Ostrinia nubilalis, and Plutella xylostella, harboring the haploid chromosome number, =31, which are not closely related with each other or with the silkworm, Bombyx mori, (=28, the sequenced model lepidopteran. A total of 108–184 clones representing 101–182 conserved genes were isolated for each species. For 79 genes, clones were isolated from more than two species, which will be useful as common markers for analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, as well as for comparison of genome sequence among multiple species. The PCR-based clone isolation method presented here is applicable to species which lack a sequenced genome but have a significant collection of cDNA or EST sequences.

  6. The potential for modification in cloning and vitrification technology to enhance genetic progress in beef cattle in Northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Robinson, Andrew W; Walton, Simon; Swain, David L; Walsh, Kerry B; Vajta, Gábor

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in embryology and related research offer considerable possibilities to accelerate genetic improvement in cattle breeding. Such progress includes optimization and standardization of laboratory embryo production (in vitro fertilization - IVF), introduction of a highly efficient method for cryopreservation (vitrification), and dramatic improvement in the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning) in terms of required effort, cost, and overall outcome. Handmade cloning (HMC), a simplified version of somatic cell nuclear transfer, offers the potential for relatively easy and low-cost production of clones. A potentially modified method of vitrification used at a centrally located laboratory facility could result in cloned offspring that are economically competitive with elite animals produced by more traditional means. Apart from routine legal and intellectual property issues, the main obstacle that hampers rapid uptake of these technologies by the beef cattle industry is a lack of confidence from scientific and commercial sources. Once stakeholder support is increased, the combined application of these methods makes a rapid advance toward desirable traits (rapid growth, high-quality beef, optimized reproductive performance) a realistic goal. The potential impact of these technologies on genetic advancement in beef cattle herds in which improvement of stock is sought, such as in northern Australia, is hard to overestimate.

  7. Genomic cloning, characterization and statistical analysis of an antitumor-analgesic peptide from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Yanfeng; Chen, Qiqing; Zhang, Rong; Song, Yongbo; Jiang, Zhuopu; Wu, Chunfu; Zhang, Jinghai

    2010-09-01

    The genomic DNA sequence encoding an antitumor-analgesic peptide was amplified from the genome of Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAGAP), then cloned and sequenced. An intron, with a high A + T content (61.6%), splits a glycine codon near the end of the precursor signal peptide and the consensus GT/AG splice junction was identified in the BmKAGAP gene. Using PCR amplification, we confirmed the identity of our cloned cDNA, and found that the BmKAGAP gene contained an intron of 506 bp in length, which was almost identical to that of the characterized scorpion sodium channel ligands in size, consensus junctions, putative branch point and A + T content. This is the first report of using a statistical method for Chinese scorpion B. martensii Karsch genomic sequence analysis, involving the extraction of some putative transcription regulatory factors. Moreover, it establishes a theoretical foundation for studying the relationship between scorpion evolution, gene expression and protein function.

  8. Algorithms and software tools for ordering clone libraries: application to the mapping of the genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, R; Grigoriev, A; Maier, E; Hoheisel, J; Lehrach, H

    1993-04-25

    A complete set of software tools to aid the physical mapping of a genome has been developed and successfully applied to the genomic mapping of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Two approaches were used for ordering single-copy hybridisation probes: one was based on the simulated annealing algorithm to order all probes, and another on inferring the minimum-spanning subset of the probes using a heuristic filtering procedure. Both algorithms produced almost identical maps, with minor differences in the order of repetitive probes and those having identical hybridisation patterns. A separate algorithm fitted the clones to the established probe order. Approaches for handling experimental noise and repetitive elements are discussed. In addition to these programs and the database management software, tools for visualizing and editing the data are described. The issues of combining the information from different libraries are addressed. Also, ways of handling multiple-copy probes and non-hybridisation data are discussed.

  9. Discovery of Genomic Breakpoints Affecting Breast Cancer Progression and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    the codon is induced. This translates into the introduction of a stop-codon early in the ATXN7 sequence. This most likely results in the loss of a...www.genboree.org. All MCF-7 BAC clones are available from Amplicon Express under name HTA and plate/row/ column names as indicated. The sequence data from this

  10. Cloning of fatty acid elongase1 gene and molecular identification of A and C genome in Brassica species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) genes of Brassic napus were cloned from two cultivars, i.e. Zhong- shuan No. 9 with low erucic acid content, and Zhongyou 821 with high erucic acid content, using the degenerate PCR primers. The sequence analysis showed that there was no intron within the FAE1 genes. The FAE1 genes from Zhongyou 821 contained a coding sequence of 1521 nucleotides, and those cloned from Zhongshuan No. 9 contained a 1517 bp coding sequence. Alignment of the FAE1 sequences from Brassica rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus detected 31 single nucleotide polymorphic sites (2.03%), which resulted in 7 amino-acid substitutions. Further analysis indicated that 19 SNPs were genome-specific, of which, 95% were synonymous mutations. The nucleotide substitution at po- sition 1217 in the FAE1 genes led to a specific site of restricted cleavage. An AvrII cleavage site was present only in the C genome genes and absent in the A genome FAE1 genes. Digestion profile of the FAE1 sequences from B. rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus produced with AvrII confirmed that the FAE1 genes of B. oleracea origin was recognized and digested, while that of B. rapa origin could not. The results indicated that by AvrII cleavage it was possible to distinguish B. rapa from B. oleracea and be- tween the A and C genome of B. napus. In addition, the FAE1 genes could be used as marker genes to detect the pollen flow of B. napus, thus providing an alternative method for risk assessment of gene flow.

  11. Functional genomics of maize submergence tolerance and cloning of the related gene Sicyp51

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wanhu; ZHANG Zuxin; ZOU Xiling; ZHENG Yonglian

    2005-01-01

    In this study, SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and cDNA microarray were used to identify genes associated with waterlogging response of maize roots. Mo17 and Hz32 are two maize inbred lines with differential tolerance to hypoxia. Seedlings of the inbred lines with two leaves were submerged in hypoxia buffer. SSH libraries were constructed with cDNA samples from roots. Both forward and reverse subtractions were performed for each inbred line, and 105 positive clones induced by hypoxia were selected by differential screening. The treated and control message RNA were hybridized with the cDNA microarray of Mo17, sequentially, 57 of 3-fold differentially expressed clones were obtained. A total of 162 positive clones were all sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis showed these positive clones represent 85 TUGs, including genes involved in several biochemistry pathways, such as glycolysis, protection, signal transduction, cell construction and energy metabolism and 41 EST with unknown function. Comparison between Mo17 and Hz32 indicates that genes related to hypoxia tolerance have different expression patterns in submerged roots. Several positive clones' expression patterns were revealed by Northern or RT-PCR, and a new gene (Sicyp51), which may contribute to hypoxia tolerance, was identified.

  12. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  13. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  14. Expression cloning of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes by histochemical screening of genomic libraries onto an indicator medium containing phenolphthalein diphosphate and methyl green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Rossolini, G M; Lombardi, G; Chiesurin, A; Satta, G

    1997-02-01

    A system for expression cloning of bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes has been developed, and its potential has been investigated. The system is based on histochemical screening of bacterial genomic libraries, constructed in an Escherichia coli multicopy plasmid vector, for phosphatase-producing clones using an indicator medium (named TPMG) made of Tryptose-Phosphate agar supplemented with the phosphatase substrate phenolphthalein diphosphate and the stain methyl green. To test the performance of this system, three genomic libraries were constructed from bacterial strains of different species which showed different patterns of phosphatase activity, and were screened using the TPMG medium. Following a partial screening, three different phosphatase-encoding genes (respectively encoding a class A non-specific acid phosphatase, an acid-hexose phosphatase and a non-specific alkaline phosphatase) were shotgun-cloned from the above libraries, indicating that the TPMG-based expression cloning system can be useful for rapid isolation of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes.

  15. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway that pro......Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway...

  16. Cloning-free genome engineering in Sinorhizobium meliloti advances applications of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhlemann, Johannes; Brennecke, Meike; Becker, Anke

    2016-09-10

    The soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti serves as model for studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a highly important process in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report advancements of the genetic toolbox accelerating genome editing in S. meliloti. The hsdMSR operon encodes a type-I restriction-modification (R-M) system. Transformation of S. meliloti is counteracted by the restriction endonuclease HsdR degrading DNA which lacks the appropriate methylation pattern. We provide a stable S. meliloti hsdR deletion mutant showing enhanced transformation with Escherichia coli-derived plasmid DNA and demonstrate that using an E. coli plasmid donor, expressing S. meliloti methyl transferase genes, is an alternative strategy of increasing the transformation efficiency of S. meliloti. Furthermore, we devise a novel cloning-free genome editing (CFGE) method for S. meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthomonas campestris, and demonstrate the applicability of this method for intricate applications of the Cre/lox recombination system in S. meliloti. An enhanced Cre/lox system, allowing for serial deletions of large genomic regions, was established. An assay of lox spacer mutants identified a set of lox sites mediating specific recombination. The availability of several non-promiscuous Cre recognition sites enables simultaneous specific Cre/lox recombination events. CFGE combined with Cre/lox recombination is put forward as powerful approach for targeted genome editing, involving serial steps of manipulation to expedite the genetic accessibility of S. meliloti as chassis.

  17. A simple, flexible and high-throughput cloning system for plant genome editing via CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Sang-Tae; Ryu, Jahee; Choi, Min Kyung; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kang, Beum-Chang; Ahn, Hyo-Min; Bae, Suji; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 system is now widely used to edit a target genome in animals and plants. Cas9 protein derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) cleaves double-stranded DNA targeted by a chimeric single-guide RNA (sgRNA). For plant genome editing, Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transformation has been broadly used to express Cas9 proteins and sgRNAs under the control of CaMV 35S and U6/U3 promoter, respectively. We here developed a simple and high-throughput binary vector system to clone a 19-20 bp of sgRNA, which binds to the reverse complement of a target locus, in a large T-DNA binary vector containing an SpCas9 expressing cassette. Two-step cloning procedures: (1) annealing two target-specific oligonucleotides with overhangs specific to the AarI restriction enzyme site of the binary vector; and (2) ligating the annealed oligonucleotides into the two AarI sites of the vector, facilitate the high-throughput production of the positive clones. In addition, Cas9-coding sequence and U6/U3 promoter can be easily exchanged via the Gateway(TM) system and unique EcoRI/XhoI sites on the vector, respectively. We examined the mutation ratio and patterns when we transformed these constructs into Arabidopsis thaliana and a wild tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata. Our vector system will be useful to generate targeted large-scale knock-out lines of model as well as non-model plant.

  18. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Repetitive Element from the Mouse Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Adriana; Cossio, Gabriela; Wettstein, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 3-week laboratory activity for an undergraduate molecular biology course. This activity introduces students to the practice of basic molecular techniques such as restriction enzyme digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, cloning, plasmid DNA purification, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Students learn how to carry…

  19. Genomic Evolution Of The Mdr Serotype O12 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L.; Freschi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the 1980’s the serotype O12 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as the predominant serotype in clinical settings and in epidemic outbreaks. These serotype O12 isolates exhibit high levels of resistance to various classes of antibiotics.Methods: In this study, we explore how ......, and dangerous clones like O12 can be identified quickly....

  20. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on genomic expression profiling of porcine parthenogenetic activated and cloned embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Yonglun; Sørensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Handmade cloning (HMC) has been used to generate transgenic pigs for biomedical research. Recently, we found that parthenogenetic activation (PA) of porcine oocytes and improved HMC efficiency could be achieved by treatment with sublethal high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). However, the molecular...

  1. Molecular Cloning, Expression and Genome Organization of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the course of studying pathogenesis of enteric septicemia of catfish, we noted that channel catfish matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene was up-regulated after Edwardsiella ictaluri infection. In this study, we cloned, sequenced using the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method and cha...

  2. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiwei, Shan; Caixia, Gao

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants.

  3. Genomic and cDNA cloning of a novel mouse lipoxygenase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems van Dijk, K.; Steketee, K.; Havekes, L.; Frants, R.; Hofker, M.

    1995-01-01

    A novel 12- and 15-lipoxygenase related gene was isolated from a mouse strain 129 genomic phage library in a screen with a human 15-lipoxygenase cDNA probe. The complete genomic sequence revealed 14 exons and 13 introns covering 7.3 kb of DNA. The splice junctions were verified from the cDNA

  4. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Genome from the Inner Mongolia Strain of the Endogenous Betaretroviruses (enJSRV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu WANG; Shu-ying LIU; Jian-yun LI; Min HAN; Zhen-ling WANG

    2008-01-01

    In order to amplify the complete genome of enJSRV from the strain of Inner Mongolia (enJSRV-NM), we used enJSRV-specific and JSRV-specific DNA probes in dot blot hybridization. Seven pairs of primers were designed based on Genbank sequences. Seven fragments were obtained by PCR and were cloned into the PMD19- T vectors. The recombinant plasmids were sequenced and analyzed. The results showed that the genome was 7 942 bp in length and contained four overlapping open reading frames corresponding to the gag, pro, pol and env genes as well as an additional open reading frame (orf-x) that overlaps the 3' end of the pol gene. The nucleotide acid sequences of the enJSRV-NM loci were compared with the sequences of South Africa enJS56A1 strain (Accession No. AF153615) and USA JSRV21 strain (Accession No. AF105220). The nucleotide acid identities were 99.2% and 92.3% respectively. Two zinc fingers were found in the NC region in the predicted amino acid sequence. However, the YXXM motif, which is a reliable molecular marker for the infectious exogenous virus, was not found in the TM region. It was found that the enJSRV-NM region was 90%-98% identical at the amino acid level to its exogenous infectious counterparts in most of the retroviral genome. This is the first nucleotide sequence of enJSRV reported in P.R China. The resource work has provided a wide range of information useful not only for expression genomics and annotation of genomic DNA sequence, but also for further research on the clinical diagnosis of OPA.

  5. The complexity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus genome characterised through detailed analysis of two BAC clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Rmi a major cattle ectoparasite and tick borne disease vector, impacts on animal welfare and industry productivity. In arthropod research there is an absence of a complete Chelicerate genome, which includes ticks, mites, spiders, scorpions and crustaceans. Model arthropod genomes such as Drosophila and Anopheles are too taxonomically distant for a reference in tick genomic sequence analysis. This study focuses on the de-novo assembly of two R. microplus BAC sequences from the understudied R microplus genome. Based on available R. microplus sequenced resources and comparative analysis, tick genomic structure and functional predictions identify complex gene structures and genomic targets expressed during tick-cattle interaction. Results In our BAC analyses we have assembled, using the correct positioning of BAC end sequences and transcript sequences, two challenging genomic regions. Cot DNA fractions compared to the BAC sequences confirmed a highly repetitive BAC sequence BM-012-E08 and a low repetitive BAC sequence BM-005-G14 which was gene rich and contained short interspersed elements (SINEs. Based directly on the BAC and Cot data comparisons, the genome wide frequency of the SINE Ruka element was estimated. Using a conservative approach to the assembly of the highly repetitive BM-012-E08, the sequence was de-convoluted into three repeat units, each unit containing an 18S, 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA encoding gene sequence (rDNA, related internal transcribed spacer and complex intergenic region. In the low repetitive BM-005-G14, a novel gene complex was found between to 2 genes on the same strand. Nested in the second intron of a large 9 Kb papilin gene was a helicase gene. This helicase overlapped in two exonic regions with the papilin. Both these genes were shown expressed in different tick life stage important in ectoparasite interaction with the host. Tick specific sequence

  6. From genome to proteome: great progress in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Zhou; Huijuan Yang; Boxiong Zhong

    2008-01-01

    As the only truly domesticated insect,the silkworm not only has great economic value,but it also has value as a model for genetics and molecular biology research.Genomics and proteomics have recently shown vast potential to be essential tools in domesticated silkworm research,especially after the completion of the Bombyx mori genome sequence.This paper reviews the progress of the domesticated silkworm genome,particularly focusing on its genetic map,physical map and functional genome.This review also presents proteomics,the proteomic technique and its application in silkworm research.

  7. DNA sequencing leads to genomics progress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JiaYan; XIAO JingFa; ZHANG RuoSi; YU Jun

    2011-01-01

    1 Science in the large-scale sequencing era Ten years ago,the first draft sequence assembly of the human genome was completed [1],bringing biomedical research one-step closer toward the goal of revolutionizing diagnosis,prevention,and treatment of human diseases.Recently,journalists from the journal Nature surveyed more than 1000 life scientists regarding this laudable aim [2],obtaining substantially negative responses [3].However,almost all of those surveyed had been influenced,in one way or another,by the availability of the human genome sequence,and they also agreed with the notion that the "sequence is the start." The complexity of genome biology and almost every aspect of human biology is far greater than previously thought [4].

  8. cDNA Clones with Rare and Recurrent Mutations Found in Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at UT- MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed High-Throughput Mutagenesis and Molecular Barcoding (HiTMMoB)1,2 pipeline to construct mutant alleles open reading frame expression clones that are either recurrent or rare in cancers. These barcoded genes can be used for context-specific functional validation, detection of novel biomarkers (pathway activation) and targets (drug sensitivity).

  9. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies.

  10. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  11. Research progress in genomics of environmental and industrial microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Microbes contribute to geochemical cycles in the ecosystem.They also play important roles in biodegradation and bioremediation of contaminated environments,and have great potential in energy conversion and regeneration.Up to date,at least 150 genomes of non-pathogenic microbes have been sequenced,of which,the majority are bacteria from various environments or of industrial uses.The emerging field ’metagenomics’ in combination with the high-throughput sequencing technology offers opportunities to discover new functions of microbes in the environment on a large scale,and has become the ’hot spot’ in the field of environmental microbiology.Seven genomes of bacteria from various extreme environments,including high temperature,high and low pressure,and extreme acidic regions,have been sequenced by researchers in China,leading to the discovery of metabolic pathways,genetic functions and new enzymes,which are related to the niches those bacteria occupy.These results were published in Nature,PNAS,Genome Research and other top international journals.In the meantime,several groups in China have started ’metagenomics’ programs.The outcomes of these researches are expected to generate a considerable number of novel findings,taking Chinese researchers to the frontier of genomics for environmental and industrial microorganisms.

  12. Research progress in genomics of environmental and industrial microorganisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; LIU Bin; ZHOU ZheMin

    2009-01-01

    Microbes contribute to geochemical cycles in the ecosystem. They also play important roles in bio-degradation and bioremediation of contaminated environments, and have great potential in energy conversion and regeneration. Up to date, at least 150 genomes of non-pathogenic microbes have been sequenced, of which, the majority are bacteria from various environments or of industrial uses. The emerging field 'metagenomics' in combination with the high-throughput sequencing technology offers opportunities to discover new functions of microbes in the environment on a large scale, and has be-come the 'hot spot' in the field of environmental microbiology. Seven genomes of bacteria from various extreme environments, including high temperature, high and low pressure, and extreme acidic regions, have been sequenced by researchers in China, leading to the discovery of metabolic pathways, genetic functions and new enzymes, which are related to the niches those bacteria occupy. These results were published in Nature, PNAS, Genome Research and other top international journals. In the meantime, several groups in China have started 'metagenomics' programs. The outcomes of these researches are expected to generate a considerable number of novel findings, taking Chinese researchers to the fron-tier of genomics for environmental and industrial microorganisms.

  13. The draft genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CCBH4851, a nosocomial isolate belonging to clone SP (ST277) that is prevalent in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Melise; Albano, Rodolpho; Asensi, Marise; Assef, Ana Paula Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    The high occurrence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms is considered a global health problem. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in Brazil that belongs to the endemic clone ST277. The genome encodes important resistance determinant genes and consists of 6.7 Mb with a G+C content of 66.86% and 6,347 predicted coding regions including 60 RNAs. PMID:25466623

  14. Accurate Dna Assembly And Direct Genome Integration With Optimized Uracil Excision Cloning To Facilitate Engineering Of Escherichia Coli As A Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce a vast diversity of valuable compounds with medical properties, but these are often difficult to purify from the natural source or produce by organic synthesis. An alternative is to transfer the biosynthetic pathways to an efficient production host like the bacterium Escherichia co......-excision-based cloning and combining it with a genome-engineering approach to allow direct integration of whole metabolic pathways into the genome of E. coli, to facilitate the advanced engineering of cell factories....

  15. The draft genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CCBH4851, a nosocomial isolate belonging to clone SP (ST277 that is prevalent in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melise Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The high occurrence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant (MDR microorganisms is considered a global health problem. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in Brazil that belongs to the endemic clone ST277. The genome encodes important resistance determinant genes and consists of 6.7 Mb with a G+C content of 66.86% and 6,347 predicted coding regions including 60 RNAs.

  16. LINE-1 repetitive DNA probes for species-specific cloning from Mus spretus and Mus domesticus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikke, B A; Hardies, S C

    1991-12-01

    Mus domesticus and Mus spretus mice are closely related subspecies. For genetic investigations involving hybrid mice, we have developed a set of species-specific oligonucleotide probes based on the detection of LINE-1 sequence differences. LINE-1 is a repetitive DNA family whose many members are interspersed among the genes. In this study, library screening experiments were used to fully characterize the species specificity of four M. domesticus LINE-1 probes and three M. spretus LINE-1 probes. It was found that the nucleotide differences detected by the probes define large, species-specific subfamilies. We show that collaborative use of such probes can be employed to selectively detect thousands of species-specific library clones. Consequently, these probes could be exploited to monitor and access almost any given species-specific region of interest within hybrid genomes.

  17. Biological Parameters and Molecular Markers of Clone CL Brener - The Reference Organism of the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zingales

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Clone CL Brener is the reference organism used in the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project. Some biological parameters of CL Brener were determined: (a the doubling time of epimastigote forms cultured in liver infusion-tryptose (LIT medium at 28oC is 58±13 hr; (b differentiation of epimastigotes to metacyclic trypomastigotes is obtained by incubation in LIT-20% Grace´s medium; (c trypomastigotes infect mammalian cultured cells and perform the complete intracellular cycle at 33 and 37oC; (d blood forms are highly infective to mice; (e blood forms are susceptible to nifurtimox and benznidazole. The molecular typing of CL Brener has been determined: (a isoenzymatic profiles are characteristic of zymodeme ZB; (b PCR amplification of a 24Sa ribosomal RNA sequence indicates it belongs to T. cruzi lineage 1; (c schizodeme, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and DNA fingerprinting analyses were performed

  18. A new approach for cloning hLIF cDNA from genomic DNA isolated from the oral mucous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y H; Zhu, G Q; Chen, Q J; Wang, Y F; Yang, M M; Song, Y X; Wang, J G; Cao, B Y

    2011-11-25

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) is valuable for investigating protein structure and function in the study of life science, but it is difficult to obtain by traditional reverse transcription. We employed a novel strategy to clone human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) gene cDNA from genomic DNA, which was directly isolated from the mucous membrane of mouth. The hLIF sequence, which is 609 bp long and is composed of three exons, can be acquired within a few hours by amplifying each exon and splicing all of them using overlap-PCR. This new approach developed is simple, time- and cost-effective, without RNA preparation or cDNA synthesis, and is not limited to the specific tissues for a particular gene and the expression level of the gene.

  19. Molecular progress on the mapping and cloning of functional genes for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.): current status and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Ghasemzadeh, A; Ravanfar, S A; Latif, M A

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease, which is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is a recurring problem in all rice-growing regions of the world. The use of resistance (R) genes in rice improvement breeding programmes has been considered to be one of the best options for crop protection and blast management. Alternatively, quantitative resistance conferred by quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is also a valuable resource for the improvement of rice disease resistance. In the past, intensive efforts have been made to identify major R-genes as well as QTLs for blast disease using molecular techniques. A review of bibliographic references shows over 100 blast resistance genes and a larger number of QTLs (∼500) that were mapped to the rice genome. Of the blast resistance genes, identified in different genotypes of rice, ∼22 have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this review, we have summarized the reported rice blast resistance genes and QTLs for utilization in future molecular breeding programmes to introgress high-degree resistance or to pyramid R-genes in commercial cultivars that are susceptible to M. oryzae. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the significant studies in order to update our understanding of the molecular progress on rice and M. oryzae. This information will assist rice breeders to improve the resistance to rice blast using marker-assisted selection which continues to be a priority for rice-breeding programmes.

  20. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  1. Cloning and characterization of genomic DNA sequences of four self-incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, A; Hormaza, J I

    2004-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) in sweet cherry is determined by a locus S with multiple alleles. In the style, the S-locus codifies for an allele-specific ribonuclease ( S-RNase) that is involved in the rejection of pollen that carries the same S allele. In this work we report the cloning and genomic DNA sequence analysis including the 5' flanking regions of four S-RNases of sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L., Rosaceae). DNA from the cultivars Ferrovia, Pico Colorado, Taleguera Brillante and Vittoria was amplified through PCR using primers designed in the conserved sequences of sweet cherry S-RNases. Two alleles were amplified for each cultivar and three of them correspond to three new S-alleles named S23, S24 and S25 present in 'Pico Colorado', 'Vittoria' and 'Taleguera Brillante' respectively. To confirm the identity of the amplified fragments, the genomic DNA of these three putative S-RNases and the allele S12 amplified in the cultivar Ferrovia were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences obtained contained the structural features of rosaceous S-RNases. The isolation of the 5'-flanking sequences of these four S-RNases revealed a conserved putative TATA box and high similarity among them downstream from that sequence. However, similarity was low compared with the 5'-flanking regions of S-RNases from the Maloideae. S6- and S24-RNase sequences are highly similar, and most amino-acid substitutions among these two RNases occur outside the rosaceous hypervariable region (RHV), but within another highly variable region. The confirmation of the different specificity of these two S-RNases would help elucidate which regions of the S-RNase sequences play a role in S-pollen specific recognition.

  2. Molecular cloning and organization of two leghaemoglobin genomic sequences of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D.; Brisson, N.; Goodchild, B.; Verma, D. P. S.

    1981-02-01

    The leghaemoglobins (Lb) are myoglobin-like proteins found in all nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes1-3. They are encoded by plant nuclear genes4 which are specifically induced and form the predominant protein in nodules developed in symbiosis with the appropriate species of Rhizobium. The Lb is located in the host-cell cytoplasm of the infected cell5 and is thought to facilitate oxygen diffusion6,7. Amino acid sequencing of the soybean Lbs has revealed at least four primary structures differing only in a few amino acids8-10. We have previously estimated about 40 copies of Lb sequences in the soybean (Glycine max L.) genome by cDNA hybridization4. To investigate Lb gene organization and function, we prepared and characterized a Lb cDNA recombinant molecule, pLb1, and used it to isolate two genomic Lb sequences from a library constructed in Charon 4. We report here that the organization of the two genomic Lb sequences is quite distinct and one of them seems to have an intervening sequence(s). Hybridization of pLb1 with genomic DNA from various tissues showed that Lb sequences are dispersed through more than 30 kilobases of genomic DNA and that there is no apparent sequence rearrangement or methylation changes following induction of Lb genes.

  3. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-03-04

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces.

  4. CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE GENOMIC DNA SEQUENCE OF AUGMENTER OF LIVER REGENERATION FROM RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董菁; 成军; 王勤环; 施双双; 王刚; 斯崇文

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To search for genomic DNA sequence of the augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) of rat.Methods.Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers was used to amplify the sequence from the rat genome.Results.A piece of genomic DNA sequence and a piece of pseudogene of rat ALR were identified.The lengths of the gene and pseudogene are 1508 bp and 442 bp,respectively.The ALR gene of rat includes 3 exons and 2 introns.The 442 bp DNA sequence may represent a pseudogene or a ALR related peptide.Predicted amino acid sequence analysis showed that there were 14 different amino acid residues between the gene and pseudogene.ALR related peptide is 84 amino acid residues in length and relates closely to ALR protein.Conclusion.There might be a multigene family of ALR in rat.

  5. Electric fish genomics: Progress, prospects, and new tools for neuroethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchers, William R; Constantinou, Savvas J; Losilla, Mauricio; Gallant, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    Electric fish have served as a model system in biology since the 18th century, providing deep insight into the nature of bioelectrogenesis, the molecular structure of the synapse, and brain circuitry underlying complex behavior. Neuroethologists have collected extensive phenotypic data that span biological levels of analysis from molecules to ecosystems. This phenotypic data, together with genomic resources obtained over the past decades, have motivated new and exciting hypotheses that position the weakly electric fish model to address fundamental 21(st) century biological questions. This review article considers the molecular data collected for weakly electric fish over the past three decades, and the insights that data of this nature has motivated. For readers relatively new to molecular genetics techniques, we also provide a table of terminology aimed at clarifying the numerous acronyms and techniques that accompany this field. Next, we pose a research agenda for expanding genomic resources for electric fish research over the next 10years. We conclude by considering some of the exciting research prospects for neuroethology that electric fish genomics may offer over the coming decades, if the electric fish community is successful in these endeavors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a steroid sulfatase cDNA clone: genomic deletions in patients with X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, A.; Parenti, G.; Carrozzo, R.; Sebastio, G.; Andria, G.; Buckle, V.; Fraser, N.; Craig, I.; Rocchi, M.; Romeo, G.; Jobsis, A.C.; Persico, M.G.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have isolated several cDNA clones from a lambdagt11 expression library by screening with antibodies prepared against the microsomal enzyme steroid sulfatase, which is deficient in classical X-chromosome-linked ichthyosis patients. One of these clones (p422) has been assigned by mapping with a somatic cell hybrid panel and by in situ hybridization to Xp22.3. Clone p422 therefore has a coincident localization with the previously identified locus for steroid sulfatase expression in the region of the X chromosome escaping from inactivation. Twelve steroid sulfatase-deficient patients, including eight cases of classical ichthyosis, were found to be deleted for genomic sequences detected by the clone.

  7. Genomic clones of Aspergillus nidulans containing alcA, the structural gene for alcohol dehydrogenase and alcR, a regulatory gene for ethanol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doy, C H; Pateman, J A; Olsen, J E; Kane, H J; Creaser, E H

    1985-04-01

    Our aim was to obtain from Aspergillus nidulans a genomic bank and then clone a region we expected from earlier genetic mapping to contain two closely linked genes, alcA, the structural gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and alcR, a positive trans-acting regulatory gene for ethanol metabolism. The expression of alcA is repressed by carbon catabolites. A genomic restriction fragment characteristic of the alcA-alcR region was identified, cloned in pBR322, and used to select from a genomic bank in lambda EMBL3A three overlapping clones covering 24 kb of DNA. Southern genomic analysis of wild-type, alcA and alcR mutants showed that the mutants contained extra DNA at sites near the center of the cloned DNA and are close together, as expected for alcA and alcR. Transcription from the cloned DNA and hybridization with a clone carrying the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for ADHI (ADC1) are both confined to the alcA-alcR region. At least one of several species of mature mRNA is about 1 kb, the size required to code for ADH. For all species, carbon catabolite repression overrides control by induction. The overall characteristics of transcription, hybridization to ADC1 and earlier work suggest that alcA consists of a number of exons and/or that the alcA-alcR region represents a cluster of alcA-related genes or sequences.

  8. ETS-Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0385 TITLE: ETS -Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect Prostate Cancer Progression...29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0385 ETS -Associated Genomic Alterations including ETS2 Loss Markedly Affect...upregulation of ERG, a transcription factor with oncogenic roles in other cancers such as leukemias and sarcomas (Tomlins, Rhodes et al. 2005; Turner

  9. The transcriptome of the reference potato genome Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja clone DM1-3 516R44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Alicia N; Childs, Kevin L; Lin, Haining; Bryan, Glenn J; Giuliano, Giovanni; Buell, C Robin

    2011-01-01

    Advances in molecular breeding in potato have been limited by its complex biological system, which includes vegetative propagation, autotetraploidy, and extreme heterozygosity. The availability of the potato genome and accompanying gene complement with corresponding gene structure, location, and functional annotation are powerful resources for understanding this complex plant and advancing molecular breeding efforts. Here, we report a reference for the potato transcriptome using 32 tissues and growth conditions from the doubled monoploid Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja clone DM1-3 516R44 for which a genome sequence is available. Analysis of greater than 550 million RNA-Seq reads permitted the detection and quantification of expression levels of over 22,000 genes. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses captured the biological variability that accounts for gene expression differences among tissues suggesting tissue-specific gene expression, and genes with tissue or condition restricted expression. Using gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 18 gene modules that represent tissue-specific transcriptional networks of major potato organs and developmental stages. This information provides a powerful resource for potato research as well as studies on other members of the Solanaceae family.

  10. The Transcriptome of the Reference Potato Genome Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja Clone DM1-3 516R44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Alicia N.; Childs, Kevin L.; Lin, Haining; Bryan, Glenn J.; Giuliano, Giovanni; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    Advances in molecular breeding in potato have been limited by its complex biological system, which includes vegetative propagation, autotetraploidy, and extreme heterozygosity. The availability of the potato genome and accompanying gene complement with corresponding gene structure, location, and functional annotation are powerful resources for understanding this complex plant and advancing molecular breeding efforts. Here, we report a reference for the potato transcriptome using 32 tissues and growth conditions from the doubled monoploid Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja clone DM1-3 516R44 for which a genome sequence is available. Analysis of greater than 550 million RNA-Seq reads permitted the detection and quantification of expression levels of over 22,000 genes. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses captured the biological variability that accounts for gene expression differences among tissues suggesting tissue-specific gene expression, and genes with tissue or condition restricted expression. Using gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 18 gene modules that represent tissue-specific transcriptional networks of major potato organs and developmental stages. This information provides a powerful resource for potato research as well as studies on other members of the Solanaceae family. PMID:22046362

  11. Cloning of full genome sequence of hepatitis E virus of Shanghai swine isolate using RACE method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Jing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genotype 4 hepatitis E virus (HEV was reportedly transmitted freely between humans and swine in eastern China. The full-length genomic sequence of Shanghai swine isolate (SH-SW-zs1 recovered from feces sample of a pig which was infected with HEV RNA positive swine serum was determined using RT-PCR and RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends methods. The full genome of the SH-SW-zs1 isolate was 7265 nucleotides in length and phylogenetic analysis indicated that this isolate belonged to genotype 4. Comparison of the 3' UTR sequence with the corresponding regions of other 38 HEV strains from different region revealed that the Shanghai swine isolate is 21–49 bp longer than the other stains.

  12. Molecular genetics and genomics progress in urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, George J

    2013-11-01

    The clinical management of solid tumor patients has recently undergone a paradigm shift as the result of the accelerated advances in cancer genetics and genomics. Molecular diagnostics is now an integral part of routine clinical management in lung, colon, and breast cancer patients. In a disappointing contrast, molecular biomarkers remain largely excluded from current management algorithms of urologic malignancies. The need for new treatment alternatives and validated prognostic molecular biomarkers that can help clinicians identify patients in need of early aggressive management is pressing. Identifying robust predictive biomarkers that can stratify response to newly introduced targeted therapeutics is another crucially needed development. The following is a brief discussion of some promising candidate biomarkers that may soon become a part of clinical management of bladder cancers.

  13. Construction of male and female PAC genomic libraries suitable for identification of Y-chromosome-specific clones from the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Fujisawa, M; Sone, T; Nakayama, S; Nishiyama, R; Takenaka, M; Yamaoka, S; Sakaida, M; Kono, K; Takahama, M; Yamato, K T; Fukuzawa, H; Brennicke, A; Ohyama, K

    2000-11-01

    Unlike higher plants, the dioecious liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, has uniquely small sex chromosomes, with X chromosomes present only in female gametophytes and Y chromosomes only in male gametophytes. We have constructed respective genomic libraries for male and female plantlets using a P1-derived artificial chromosome (pCYPAC2). With an average insert size of approximately 90 kb, each PAC library is estimated to cover the entire genome with a probability of more than 99.9%. Male-specific PAC clones were screened for by differential hybridization using male and female genomic DNAs as separate probes. Seventy male-specific PAC clones were identified. The male specificity of one of the clones, pMM4G7, was verified by Southern hybridization and PCR analysis. This clone was indeed located on the Y chromosome as verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This result shows that the Y chromosome contains unique sequences that are not present either on the X chromosome or any of the autosomes. Thus, the respective male and female libraries for M. polymorpha offer an opportunity to identify key genes involved in the process of sex differentiation and this unique system of sex determination.

  14. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of testicular carcinoma in situ progression into overt tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, K; Hoei-Hansen, C E; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    into CIS occurs early during foetal life. Progression into an overt tumour, however, typically first happens after puberty, where CIS cells transform into either a seminoma (SEM) or a nonseminoma (N-SEM). Here, we have compared the genome-wide gene expression of CIS cells to that of testicular SEM...

  15. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal protein S25 gene (RPS25) from the Giant Panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yan-Zhe; Hou, Wan-Ru; Hou, Yi-Ling; Du, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Tian; Peng, Zheng-Song

    2009-11-01

    RPS25 is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS25 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. Studies in reference to RPS25 gene from animals were handful. The Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), known as a "living fossil", are increasingly concerned by the world community. Studies on RPS25 of the Giant Panda could provide scientific data for inquiring into the hereditary traits of the gene and formulating the protective strategy for the Giant Panda. The cDNA of the RPS25 cloned from Giant Panda is 436 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 378 bp encoding 125 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 1,992 bp, which was found to possess four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence shows a high homology to those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus as determined by Blast analysis, 92.6, 94.4, 89.2 and 91.5%, respectively. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS25 protein is 13.7421 kDa with a theoretical pI 10.12. Topology prediction showed there is one N-glycosylation site, one cAMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, two Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites and one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site in the RPS25 protein of the Giant Panda. The RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and Western Blotting of the RPS25 protein was also done. The results indicated that the RPS25 gene can be really expressed in E. coli and the RPS25 protein fusioned with the N-terminally his-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 17.4 kDa polypeptide. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS25 were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively, which were both sequenced and analyzed preliminarily; then the cDNA of the RPS25 gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 and immunoblotted, which is the first

  16. Genomic aberrations of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms in chronic phase and during disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, C; Huh, H J; Mun, Y C; Seong, C M; Chung, W S; Huh, J

    2015-04-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) may transform into secondary myelofibrosis (MF) or evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The genetic mechanisms underlying disease progression in MPN and MDS/MPN patients remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate sequential genomic aberrations identified by single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping that can detect cryptic aberrations or copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) in the chronic phase and during disease progression of MPN and MDS/MPN patients. The study group included 13 MPN and four MDS/MPN patients (seven polycythemia vera (PV); four essential thrombocythemia (ET); two MPN-unclassifiable (MPN-U); one chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML); one atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL1 negative (aCML); and two MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U)). Among them, five patients (two PV, two MPN-U, and one MDS/MPN-U) progressed to MF and three patients (one CMML, one aCML, and one MDS/MPN-U) transformed to AML. The median follow-up period was 70 months (range, 7-152). Whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0; Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA)-based karyotyping and JAK2 mutation analysis were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. SNP-A showed 19 kinds of genomic aberrations, including seven gains, eight deletions, and four CN-LOH. CN-LOH of 9p involving JAK2 was the most common aberration, followed by 5q deletion and 9p gain. The incidence of genomic changes identified by SNP was not different in patients with disease progression (75%), compared with those without disease progression (56%) (P = 0.4). However, when excluding 9p CN-LOH, the incidence of genomic changes was significantly higher in patients with disease progression than in patients without disease progression (63% and 0%, respectively, P = 0.01). Among eight patients with disease progression, two patients (two MPN-U) showed abnormal SNP-A results

  17. Genomic organization and promoter cloning of the human X11α gene APBA1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chai, Ka-Ho

    2012-05-01

    X11α is a brain specific multi-modular protein that interacts with the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). Aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), an APP cleavage product, is believed to be central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Recently, overexpression of X11α has been shown to reduce Aβ generation and to ameliorate memory deficit in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Therefore, manipulating the expression level of X11α may provide a novel route for the treatment of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Human X11α is encoded by the gene APBA1. As evidence suggests that X11α expression can be regulated at transcription level, we have determined the gene structure and cloned the promoter of APBA1. APBA1 spans over 244 kb on chromosome 9 and is composed of 13 exons and has multiple transcription start sites. A putative APBA1 promoter has been identified upstream of exon 1 and functional analysis revealed that this is highly active in neurons. By deletion analysis, the minimal promoter was found to be located between -224 and +14, a GC-rich region that contains a functional Sp3 binding site. In neurons, overexpression of Sp3 stimulates the APBA1 promoter while an Sp3 inhibitor suppresses the promoter activity. Moreover, inhibition of Sp3 reduces endogenous X11α expression and promotes the generation of Aβ. Our findings reveal that Sp3 play an essential role in APBA1 transcription.

  18. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  19. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  20. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  1. A xylanase gene directly cloned from the genomic DNA of alkaline wastewater sludge showing application potential in the paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyu; Luo, Huiying; Meng, Kun; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Guozeng; Yang, Peilong; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yao, Bin

    2011-09-01

    A xylanase gene, aws-2x, was directly cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge using degenerated PCR and modified TAIL-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence of AWS-2x shared the highest identity (60%) with the xylanase from Chryseobacterium gleum belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase GH family 10. Recombinant AWS-2x was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 55 °C, maintained more than 50% of maximal activity when assayed at pH 9.0, and was stable over a wide pH range from 4.0 to 11.0. The specific activity of AWS-2x towards hardwood xylan (beechwood and birchwood xylan) was significantly higher than that to cereal xylan (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). These properties make AWS-2x a potential candidate for application in the pulp and paper industry.

  2. A PCR-based method for manipulation of the vaccinia virus genome that eliminates the need for cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P C; Moyer, R W

    1992-11-01

    A general method is described for altering specific genes of vaccinia virus (VV). We demonstrate and evaluate the procedure by gene inactivation, using a dominant selectable marker in conjunction with recombinant polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Primers based on the sequence of the target gene enable amplification of flanking arms and their subsequent attachment to the gpt cassette that confers resistance to mycophenolic acid. Linear PCR constructs are transfected into cells infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. Mutant viruses with gpt inserted into the target gene by homologous recombination are then selected by growth in the presence of MPA. This technique was applied to the vaccinia virus thymidine kinase gene and compared to the traditional method of constructing gpt-containing plasmids by cloning. The PCR scheme was found to be highly efficient and could theoretically be used to insert any foreign DNA element into any nonessential target gene for which partial or complete sequence information is available. The procedure can potentially be used for a wide variety of genetic modifications, including the insertion of foreign genes, with poxviruses and other DNA viruses. Genomes of microorganisms, such as bacteria and yeast that can be transformed with linear DNA, are also candidates for manipulation by this methodology.

  3. Cloning, genomic organization, and expression analysis of zebrafish nuclear receptor coactivator, TIF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jee-Hian; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chan, Woon-Khiong

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are involved in numerous diverse biological processes such as growth and differentiation, thermogenesis, neurulation, homeostasis, and metamorphosis. In zebrafish, TRbeta1 has been implicated to be involved in the obligatory embryonic-to-larval transitory phase. In order to understand if nuclear receptor coactivators could modulate the transcriptional activities of TRs during this transitory phase, the transcriptionary intermediary factor 2 (TIF2), a member of the p160 coactivator, was isolated from zebrafish. The zebrafish tif2 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 1,505 amino acids. The tif2 gene is made up of 23 exons with the AUG and stop codon located in Exon IV and XXIII, respectively. The overall genomic organization of human and zebrafish tif2 genes are very similar. Four tif2 isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. The N-terminus mRNA variants are generated as a result of multiple initiation start sites located upstream of the noncoding Exon I and Exon II. The C-terminus isoforms, E20a and E20b, resulted from the alternative splicing of Exon XX. Although E20a and E20b isoforms were ubiquitously expressed, they were very highly expressed in reproductive tissues. The availability of TIF2 cDNA will allow the analysis of its functional roles in mediating the actions of TRs in various aspects of zebrafish developmental biology.

  4. Cloning, Expression and Identification of a New Trehalose Synthase Gene from Thermobifida fusca Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Tuo WEI; Ri-Bo HUANG; Qi-Xia ZHU; Zhao-Fei LUO; Fu-Shen LU; Fa-Zhong CHEN; Qing-Yan WANG; Kun HUANG; Jian-Zhong MENG; Rong WANG

    2004-01-01

    A new open reading frame in Thermobifida fusca sequenced genome was identified to encode a new trehalose synthase, annotated as "glycosidase" in the GenBank database, by bioinformatics searching and experimental validation. The gene had a length of 1830 bp with about 65% GC content and encoded for a new trehalose synthase with 610 amino acids and deduced molecular weight of 66 kD. The high GC content seemed not to affect its good expression in E. coli BL21 in which the target protein could account for as high as 15% of the total cell proteins. The recombinant enzyme showed its optimal activities at 25 ℃ and pH 6.5 when it converted substrate maltose into trehalose. However it would divert a high proportion of its substrate into glucose when the temperature was increased to 37 ℃, or when the enzyme concentration was high Its activity was not inhibited by 5 mM heavy metals such as Cu2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ but affected by high concentration of glucose. Blasting against the database indicated that amino acid sequence of this protein had maximal 69% homology with the known trehalose synthases, and two highly conserved segments of the protein sequence were identified and their possible linkage with functions was discussed.

  5. Sequence determination of cDNA clones of transcripts from the tumor-associated region of the Marek's disease virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, A; Ueda, S; Ishihama, A; Hirai, K

    1992-04-01

    The number of 132-bp tandem direct repeats within the long inverted repeat region of the Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) genome increases concomitantly with the loss of oncogenicity during serial passages in cultured cells. Twelve clones carrying the 132-bp sequence were isolated from a cDNA library constructed from chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the MDV1 Md5 strain. Through sequence analysis of a cDNA clone and primer extension analysis, the corresponding mRNA was found to be a linear transcript which included the two 132-bp tandem direct repeats. Two open reading frames were found in this transcript. One had a week homology with v-fms. The other should increase its size concomitantly with expansion of the 132-bp tandem direct repeat. PCR analysis of both cDNA clones and RNA gave amplified products which were as large as that produced from the genomic clone, indicating that a majority of mRNA from this region is composed of unspliced transcripts.

  6. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS) were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome assembly [1]. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information about gene structure and

  7. Genomic sequence analysis and biological characteristics of a rescued clone of avian leukosis virus strain JS11C1, isolated from indigenous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Su, Shuai; Chen, Zimeng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-11-01

    The strain JS11C1, a member of a putative new subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV) that is different from all six known subgroups from chickens based on Gp85 amino acid sequence comparison, was isolated from Chinese native chicken breeds in 2012. In order to further study the genome structure, biological characteristics, and the evolutionary relationship of the virus with others of known subgroups from infected chickens, we determined the complete genome sequence, constructed an infectious clone of ALV strain JS11C1, and performed comparative analysis using the whole genome sequence or elements with that of other ALVs available in GenBank. The results showed that the full-length sequence of the JS11C1 DNA provirus genome was 7707 bp, which is consistent with a genetic organization typical of a replication-competent type C retrovirus lacking viral oncogenes. The rescued infectious clone of JS11C1 showed similar growth rate and biological characteristics to its original virus. All the comparison analyses based on whole genomes support the opinion that the new isolates are relatively distantly related to any known subgroups of ALVs and might be classified as a new subgroup.

  8. Peroxisomal Monodehydroascorbate Reductase. Genomic Clone Characterization and Functional Analysis under Environmental Stress Conditions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.; Sandalio, Luisa M.; del Río, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    In plant cells, ascorbate is a major antioxidant that is involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) is the enzymatic component of this cycle involved in the regeneration of reduced ascorbate. The identification of the intron-exon organization and the promoter region of the pea (Pisum sativum) MDAR 1 gene was achieved in pea leaves using the method of walking polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA. The nuclear gene of MDAR 1 comprises nine exons and eight introns, giving a total length of 3,770 bp. The sequence of 544 bp upstream of the initiation codon, which contains the promoter and 5′ untranslated region, and 190 bp downstream of the stop codon were also determined. The presence of different regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the gene might indicate distinct responses to various conditions. The expression analysis in different plant organs by northern blots showed that fruits had the highest level of MDAR. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of pea leaves transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens having the binary vectors pGD, which contain the autofluorescent proteins enhanced green fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein with the full-length cDNA for MDAR 1 and catalase, indicated that the MDAR 1 encoded the peroxisomal isoform. The functional analysis of MDAR by activity and protein expression was studied in pea plants grown under eight stress conditions, including continuous light, high light intensity, continuous dark, mechanical wounding, low and high temperature, cadmium, and the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. This functional analysis is representative of all the MDAR isoforms present in the different cell compartments. Results obtained showed a significant induction by high light intensity and cadmium. On the other hand, expression studies, performed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated differential expression patterns

  9. The murine decorin. Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, chromosomal assignment, and expression during organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholzen, T; Solursh, M; Suzuki, S; Reiter, R; Morgan, J L; Buchberg, A M; Siracusa, L D; Iozzo, R V

    1994-11-11

    Decorin, a proteoglycan known to interact with collagen and growth factors, may play key roles during ontogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cancer. We have deciphered the complete protein sequence of the murine decorin by cDNA cloning, elucidated its gene structure and chromosomal location, and investigated its expression in the developing embryo. The decorin protein and the gene were highly conserved vis à vis the human counterpart; however, the murine gene lacked a leader exon, exon Ib, which was found only in the human. Using interspecific backcrossing, we assigned the gene to chromosome 10 just proximally to the Steel gene locus. In situ hybridization studies of developing mouse embryos showed a distinct pattern of expression with a progressive increase of decorin mRNA during ontogenesis. At early stages (day 11 postconception), decorin was detectable only in the floor plate region. Subsequently (days 13-16 postconception), decorin expression was especially prominent in the meninges and mesothelial linings of pericardium, pleura, and coelomic cavity, as well as in the dermis and subepithelial layers of the intestine and urinary bladder. In contrast, the major parenchymal organs were only weakly positive for decorin mRNA. These findings suggest that decorin may play a role in epithelial/mesenchymal interactions during organ development and shaping.

  10. Multi-platform genome-wide analysis of melanoma progression to brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M. Marzese

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma has a high tendency to metastasize to brain tissue. The understanding about the molecular alterations of early-stage melanoma progression to brain metastasis (MBM is very limited. Identifying MBM-specific genomic and epigenomic alterations is a key initial step in understanding its aggressive nature and identifying specific novel druggable targets. Here, we describe a multi-platform dataset generated with different stages of melanoma progression to MBM. This data includes genome-wide DNA methylation (Illumina HM450K BeadChip, gene expression (Affymetrix HuEx 1.0 ST array, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy number variation (CNV; Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array analyses of melanocyte cells (MNCs, primary melanoma tumors (PRMs, lymph node metastases (LNMs and MBMs. The analysis of this data has been reported in our recently published study (Marzese et al., 2014.

  11. Multiple noggins in vertebrate genome: cloning and expression of noggin2 and noggin4 in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshkin, Fedor M; Ermakova, Galina V; Bayramov, Andrey V; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2006-01-01

    Noggin is a neural inducer secreted by cells of the Spemann organizer. A single noggin gene was identified until very recently in all tested vertebrates. The only exception was zebrafish, in which two close homologs of noggin, named noggin1 and noggin3, and one gene more diverged from them, noggin2, were cloned. Nevertheless, finding of three zebrafish noggins was attributed exclusively to specific genomic duplications in the fish evolutionary branch. However, very recently it was shown that Xenopus tropicalis have additional noggin homolog, called noggin2 [Fletcher, R.B., Watson, A.L., Harland, R.M. (2004). Expression of Xenopus tropicalis noggin1 and noggin2 in early development: two noggin genes in a tetrapod. Gene Expr. Patterns 5, 225-230], which indicates at least two independent noggin genes in vertebrate phylum. Now we report identification of two novel noggin homologs in each of so evolutionary distant species as Xenopus laevis, chicken and fugu. One of these noggins is ortholog of the X. tropicalis and zebrafish noggin2, whereas another, named noggin4, was not known previously. In the X. laevis embryos, the expression of noggin2 very resembles that of its counterpart in X. tropicalis: it begins with neurulation at the anterior margin of the neural plate and, afterward, continues mainly in the forebrain and dorsal hindbrain. At the same time, noggin4 is expressed starting from the beginning of gastrulation, throughout the ectoderm, with a local expression maximum in the prospective anterior neurectoderm. Later, it is widely expressed on the dorsal side of embryo, including neural tube, eyes, otic vesicles, cranial placodes, branchial arches, and somites. The data presented here demonstrate that the vertebrate phylum contains at least three distinct noggin genes.

  12. Low incidence of off-target mutations in individual CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN targeted human stem cell clones detected by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Adrian; Gosis, Bridget S; Ding, Qiurong; Collins, Ryan; Ragavendran, Ashok; Brand, Harrison; Erdin, Serkan; Cowan, Chad A; Talkowski, Michael E; Musunuru, Kiran

    2014-07-03

    Genome editing has attracted wide interest for the generation of cellular models of disease using human pluripotent stem cells and other cell types. CRISPR-Cas systems and TALENs can target desired genomic sites with high efficiency in human cells, but recent publications have led to concern about the extent to which these tools may cause off-target mutagenic effects that could potentially confound disease-modeling studies. Using CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN targeted human pluripotent stem cell clones, we performed whole-genome sequencing at high coverage in order to assess the degree of mutagenesis across the entire genome. In both types of clones, we found that off-target mutations attributable to the nucleases were very rare. From this analysis, we suggest that, although some cell types may be at risk for off-target mutations, the incidence of such effects in human pluripotent stem cells may be sufficiently low and thus not a significant concern for disease modeling and other applications.

  13. Research Progress in Genomic Imprinting in Mammals%哺乳动物基因组印记的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀莉; 马利兵

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a genetic phenomenon because of the different parents resulted from the allelic gene expression differences. The causes and the process of genomic imprinting is a hot issue of modern genetics. Mammals many genomic imprinting characteristic makes it become a focus biology problems in the post genome era. The evolution of genomic imprinting has played a special role in mammalian reproduction and development. This paper reviewed the characteristics of genomic imprinting、imprinting mechanism of gene imprinting, gene imprinting and the development of cloned animals, the research progress of the imprinting genes and the disease.%基因组印记是由亲本来源不同而导致等位基因表达差异的一种遗传现象。基因组印记产生的原因及过程是现代遗传学的一个热点问题。哺乳动物的许多基因组印记特征都使其成为后基因组时代的一个热点生物学问题。进化的基因组印记在哺乳动物生殖、发育中起到了特定的作用。综述了基因组印记的特点、印记基因的印记机理、基因印记与克隆动物的发育、印记基因与疾病的研究进展。

  14. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-31

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability.

  15. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  16. Molecular and Biological Characterization of an Isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus from Glycine soja by Generating its Infectious Full-genome cDNA Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sa Vo Phan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and biological characteristics of an isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV from Glycine soja (wild soybean, named as CMV-209, was examined in this study. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analyses of CMV-209 with the other CMV strains revealed that CMV-209 belonged to CMV subgroup I. However, CMV-209 showed some genetic distance from the CMV strains assigned to subgroup IA or subgroup IB. Infectious full-genome cDNA clones of CMV-209 were generated under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Infectivity of the CMV-209 clones was evaluated in Nicotiana benthamiana and various legume species. Our assays revealed that CMV-209 could systemically infect Glycine soja (wild soybean and Pisum sativum (pea as well as N. benthamiana, but not the other legume species.

  17. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each targ

  18. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each

  19. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194303403; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each targ

  20. Progress in TILLING as a tool for functional genomics and improvement of crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Chen; Liugen Hao; Martin A.J.Parry; Andrew L. Phillips; Yin-Gang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Food security is a global concern and substantial yield increases in crops are required to feed the growing world population. Mutagenesis is an important tool in crop improve-ment and is free of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetical y modified organisms. Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING), which combines traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutations in desired genes, offers a powerful way to create novel mutant al eles for both functional genomics and improvement of crops. TILLING is general y applicable to genomes whether smal or large, diploid or even al ohexaploid, and shows great potential to address the major chal enge of linking sequence information to the function of genes and to modulate key traits for plant breeding. TILLING has been successful y applied in many crop species and recent progress in TILLING is summarized below, especial y on the developments in mutation detection technology, application of TILLING in gene functional studies and crop breeding. The potential of TILLING/EcoTILLING for functional genetics and crop improvement is also discussed. Furthermore, a smal-scale forward strategy including backcross and selfing was con-ducted to release the potential mutant phenotypes masked in M2 (or M3) plants.

  1. Genome-wide association and linkage analyses localize a progressive retinal atrophy locus in Persian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Rah, Hyung-Chul; Peterson, Carlyn B; Maggs, David J; Good, Kathryn L; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary eye diseases of animals serve as excellent models of human ocular disorders and assist in the development of gene and drug therapies for inherited forms of blindness. Several primary hereditary eye conditions affecting various ocular tissues and having different rates of progression have been documented in domestic cats. Gene therapy for canine retinopathies has been successful, thus the cat could be a gene therapy candidate for other forms of retinal degenerations. The current study investigates a hereditary, autosomal recessive, retinal degeneration specific to Persian cats. A multi-generational pedigree segregating for this progressive retinal atrophy was genotyped using a 63 K SNP array and analyzed via genome-wide linkage and association methods. A multi-point parametric linkage analysis localized the blindness phenotype to a ~1.75 Mb region with significant LOD scores (Z ≈ 14, θ = 0.00) on cat chromosome E1. Genome-wide TDT, sib-TDT, and case-control analyses also consistently supported significant association within the same region on chromosome E1, which is homologous to human chromosome 17. Using haplotype analysis, a ~1.3 Mb region was identified as highly associated for progressive retinal atrophy in Persian cats. Several candidate genes within the region are reasonable candidates as a potential causative gene and should be considered for molecular analyses.

  2. Why Clone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn ... issue of the genetic reshuffling that happensduring sexual reproduction and simply clone our drug-producing cow. Cloning ...

  3. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke

    step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between......Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer...... necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer...

  4. In Vitro Synthesized RNA Generated from cDNA Clones of Both Genomic Components of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus Replicates in Cucumber Protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Carolyn A.; Moukarzel, Romy; Huang, Xiao; Kassem, Mona A.; Eliasco, Eleonora; Aranda, Miguel A.; Coutts, Robert H. A.; Livieratos, Ioannis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), a bipartite whitefly-transmitted virus, constitutes a major threat to commercial cucurbit production worldwide. Here, construction of full-length CYSDV RNA1 and RNA2 cDNA clones allowed the in vitro synthesis of RNA transcripts able to replicate in cucumber protoplasts. CYSDV RNA1 proved competent for replication; transcription of both polarities of the genomic RNA was detectable 24 h post inoculation. Hybridization of total RNA extracted from transfected protoplasts or from naturally CYSDV-infected cucurbits revealed high-level transcription of the p22 subgenomic RNA species. Replication of CYSDV RNA2 following co-transfection with RNA1 was also observed, with similar transcription kinetics. A CYSDV RNA2 cDNA clone (T3CM8Δ) comprising the 5′- and 3′-UTRs plus the 3′-terminal gene, generated a 2.8 kb RNA able to replicate to high levels in protoplasts in the presence of CYSDV RNA1. The clone T3CM8Δ will facilitate reverse genetics studies of CYSDV gene function and RNA replication determinants. PMID:27314380

  5. In Vitro Synthesized RNA Generated from cDNA Clones of Both Genomic Components of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus Replicates in Cucumber Protoplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. Owen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV, a bipartite whitefly-transmitted virus, constitutes a major threat to commercial cucurbit production worldwide. Here, construction of full-length CYSDV RNA1 and RNA2 cDNA clones allowed the in vitro synthesis of RNA transcripts able to replicate in cucumber protoplasts. CYSDV RNA1 proved competent for replication; transcription of both polarities of the genomic RNA was detectable 24 h post inoculation. Hybridization of total RNA extracted from transfected protoplasts or from naturally CYSDV-infected cucurbits revealed high-level transcription of the p22 subgenomic RNA species. Replication of CYSDV RNA2 following co-transfection with RNA1 was also observed, with similar transcription kinetics. A CYSDV RNA2 cDNA clone (T3CM8Δ comprising the 5′- and 3′-UTRs plus the 3′-terminal gene, generated a 2.8 kb RNA able to replicate to high levels in protoplasts in the presence of CYSDV RNA1. The clone T3CM8Δ will facilitate reverse genetics studies of CYSDV gene function and RNA replication determinants.

  6. In Vitro Synthesized RNA Generated from cDNA Clones of Both Genomic Components of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus Replicates in Cucumber Protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Carolyn A; Moukarzel, Romy; Huang, Xiao; Kassem, Mona A; Eliasco, Eleonora; Aranda, Miguel A; Coutts, Robert H A; Livieratos, Ioannis C

    2016-06-14

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), a bipartite whitefly-transmitted virus, constitutes a major threat to commercial cucurbit production worldwide. Here, construction of full-length CYSDV RNA1 and RNA2 cDNA clones allowed the in vitro synthesis of RNA transcripts able to replicate in cucumber protoplasts. CYSDV RNA1 proved competent for replication; transcription of both polarities of the genomic RNA was detectable 24 h post inoculation. Hybridization of total RNA extracted from transfected protoplasts or from naturally CYSDV-infected cucurbits revealed high-level transcription of the p22 subgenomic RNA species. Replication of CYSDV RNA2 following co-transfection with RNA1 was also observed, with similar transcription kinetics. A CYSDV RNA2 cDNA clone (T3CM8Δ) comprising the 5'- and 3'-UTRs plus the 3'-terminal gene, generated a 2.8 kb RNA able to replicate to high levels in protoplasts in the presence of CYSDV RNA1. The clone T3CM8Δ will facilitate reverse genetics studies of CYSDV gene function and RNA replication determinants.

  7. Recurrent genomic alterations in sequential progressive leukoplakia and oral cancer: drivers of oral tumorigenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigne, Nilva K; Machado, Jerry; Goswami, Rashmi S; Sadikovic, Bekim; Bradley, Grace; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Galloni, Natalie Naranjo; Gilbert, Ralph; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan C; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    A significant proportion (up to 62%) of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may arise from oral potential malignant lesions (OPMLs), such as leukoplakia. Patient outcomes may thus be improved through detection of lesions at a risk for malignant transformation, by identifying and categorizing genetic changes in sequential, progressive OPMLs. We conducted array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 25 sequential, progressive OPMLs and same-site OSCCs from five patients. Recurrent DNA copy number gains were identified on 1p in 20/25 cases (80%) with minimal, high-level amplification regions on 1p35 and 1p36. Other regions of gains were frequently observed: 11q13.4 (68%), 9q34.13 (64%), 21q22.3 (60%), 6p21 and 6q25 (56%) and 10q24, 19q13.2, 22q12, 5q31.2, 7p13, 10q24 and 14q22 (48%). DNA losses were observed in >20% of samples and mainly detected on 5q31.2 (35%), 16p13.2 (30%), 9q33.1 and 9q33.29 (25%) and 17q11.2, 3p26.2, 18q21.1, 4q34.1 and 8p23.2 (20%). Such copy number alterations (CNAs) were mapped in all grades of dysplasia that progressed, and their corresponding OSCCs, in 70% of patients, indicating that these CNAs may be associated with disease progression. Amplified genes mapping within recurrent CNAs (KHDRBS1, PARP1, RAB1A, HBEGF, PAIP2, BTBD7) were selected for validation, by quantitative real-time PCR, in an independent set of 32 progressive leukoplakia, 32 OSSCs and 21 non-progressive leukoplakia samples. Amplification of BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A was exclusively detected in progressive leukoplakia and corresponding OSCC. BTBD7, KHDRBS1, PARP1 and RAB1A may be associated with OSCC progression. Protein-protein interaction networks were created to identify possible pathways associated with OSCC progression.

  8. Comparative genomics of Bordetella pertussis reveals progressive gene loss in Finnish strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriikka Heikkinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bordetella pertussis is a gram-negative bacterium that infects the human respiratory tract and causes pertussis or whooping cough. The disease has resurged in many countries including Finland where the whole-cell pertussis vaccine has been used for more than 50 years. Antigenic divergence has been observed between vaccine strains and clinical isolates in Finland. To better understand genome evolution in B. pertussis circulating in the immunized population, we developed an oligonucleotide-based microarray for comparative genomic analysis of Finnish strains isolated during the period of 50 years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The microarray consisted of 3,582 oligonucleotides (70-mer and covered 94% of 3,816 ORFs of Tohama I, the strain of which the genome has been sequenced. Twenty isolates from 1953 to 2004 were studied together with two Finnish vaccine strains and two international reference strains. The isolates were selected according to their characteristics, e.g. the year and place of isolation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Genomic DNA of the tested strains, along with reference DNA of Tohama I strain, was labelled and hybridized. The absence of genes as established with microarrays, was confirmed by PCR. Compared with the Tohama I strain, Finnish isolates lost 7 (8.6 kb to 49 (55.3 kb genes, clustered in one to four distinct loci. The number of lost genes increased with time, and one third of lost genes had functions related to inorganic ion transport and metabolism, or energy production and conversion. All four loci of lost genes were flanked by the insertion sequence element IS481. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the progressive gene loss occurred in Finnish B. pertussis strains isolated during a period of 50 years and confirmed that B. pertussis is dynamic and is continuously evolving, suggesting that the bacterium may use gene loss as one strategy to adapt to highly immunized populations.

  9. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and expression of a B-type (cricket-type) allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Lenz, C; Winther, A M

    2001-01-01

    and nonamidated C terminus. We have previously reported the structure of an A-type allatostatin preprohormone from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Here we describe the molecular cloning of a B-type prepro-allatostatin from Drosophila (DAP-B). DAP-B is 211 amino acid residues long and contains one copy each...

  10. Cloning of rat thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (TSLPR) and characterization of genomic structure of murine Tslpr gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, Blagoy; Nielsen, Mogens M; Angrist, Misha

    2002-01-01

    , a cytokine involved in B- and T-cell function. We have cloned the TSLP receptor from rat and find that the WSXWX motif commonly found in extracellular domains of cytokine receptors is conserved as a W(T/S)XV(T/A) motif among TSLP receptors from mouse, rat and human. As in the mouse, TSLP receptor is widely...

  11. 1-Mb resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a BAC clone set optimized for cancer gene analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greshock, J; Naylor, TL; Margolin, A; Diskin, S; Cleaver, SH; Futreal, PA; deJong, PJ; Zhao, SY; Liebman, M; Weber, BL

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a recently developed tool for genome-wide determination of DNA copy number alterations. This technology has tremendous potential for disease-gene discovery in cancer and developmental disorders as well as numerous other applications. However, w

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Isolates of Enterococcus faecium Sequence Type 117, a Globally Disseminated Multidrug-Resistant Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedim, Ana P.; Lanza, Val F.; Manrique, Marina; Pareja, Eduardo; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Tobes, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of nosocomial infections by multidrug-resistant sequence type 117 (ST117) Enterococcus faecium has been reported in several European countries. ST117 has been detected in Spanish hospitals as one of the main causes of bloodstream infections. We analyzed genome variations of ST117 strains isolated in Madrid and describe the first ST117 closed genome sequences. PMID:28360174

  13. Adaptive change inferred from genomic population analysis of the ST93 epidemic clone of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Timothy P; Holt, Kathryn E; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change.

  14. Adaptive Change Inferred from Genomic Population Analysis of the ST93 Epidemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L.; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  15. [Research progress on the cloning of Mendel's gene in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its application in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Bi-Yan; Gao, Feng; Li, Shao-Shan; Li, Niang-Hui

    2013-07-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Gregor Mendel investigated the segregation of seven traits in pea (Pisum sativum) and established the law of segregation and the law of independent assortment in genetics. After the two laws of genetics were rediscovered in 1900, the seven traits have been extensively investigated in the fields of plant physiology and biochemistry as well as in the cell and molecular levels. Recently, with the development of molecular technology in genetics, four genes for seed shape (R), stem length (Le), cotyledon colour (I), and flower colour (A) have been cloned and sequenced; and another three genes for immature pod colour (Gp), fasciation (Fa) and pod form (V) have been located in the linkage groups, respectively. The identification and cloning of the four Mendel's genes will help deeply understand the basic concept of gene in many respects: like the diversity of gene function, the different origins for gene mutation in molecular level, and the molecular nature of a dominant gene or a recessive gene. In teaching of genetics, the introduction of most recent research advancements of cloning of Mendel's genes to the students and the interpretation of the Mendel's laws in molecular level will help students promote their learning interests in genetics and help students grasp the whole content from classical genetics to molecular genetics and the developmental direction of this subject.

  16. Genomic structure analysis of SNC6, a progesterone-receptor associated protein gene, and cloning and characterization of its 5'-flanking region . 

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the genomic structure of SNC6, a progesterone-receptor associated protein gene and its regulatory elements in its 5'-flanking region. Methods: Genomic sequence from GenBank database (accession number: Z98048) covering the whole SNC6 gene was used to analyze the genomic structure of SNC6 and design primers for PCR amplification of its 5'-flanking region. A 1894 bp fragment of the 5'-flanking region (-1814 to +75) was cloned by PCR using genomic DNA from a healthy donor peripheral blood lymphocyte as template. This fragment, as well as 3 shorter derivative fragments (1423 bp, 632 bp and 416 bp, which correspond to -1344 to +75, -552 to +75 and -337 to +75 respectively), were subcloned into pGL2 series luciferase reporter vectors. These constructs were introduced into colorectal cancer cell line SW620 for transient expression of reporter gene and luciferase activities were measured. Results: The genomic structure analysis showed there are 12 exons for SNC6 gene, which spans 32017 bp (nt71529 to nt39513 in Z98048 sequence). All transfected SW620 cells with the above 5-flanking region-containing constructs showed luciferase activities. The highest luciferase activities were measured in transfected cells with vectors containing 1894 bp fragments, and the lowest luciferase activities were measured in transfected cells with vectors containing 416 bp fragments. Luciferase activities were higher in transfected cells with vectors containing 632 bp fragments than that in transfected cells with vectors containing 1423 bp fragments. Conclusion: The basic transcription-promoting element (promoter) for SNC6 expression resides between 0 to -337, and two transcription-enhancing elements (enhancer) resides between -337 to -552 and -1344 to -1814, whereas one transcription-inhibiting element (silencer) exists between -552 to -1344.

  17. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci genome project: analysis of sequenced clones from egg, instar, and adult (viruliferous and non-viruliferous cDNA libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czosnek Henryk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past three decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in interest in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, owing to its nature as a taxonomically cryptic species, the damage it causes to a large number of herbaceous plants because of its specialized feeding in the phloem, and to its ability to serve as a vector of plant viruses. Among the most important plant viruses to be transmitted by B. tabaci are those in the genus Begomovirus (family, Geminiviridae. Surprisingly, little is known about the genome of this whitefly. The haploid genome size for male B. tabaci has been estimated to be approximately one billion bp by flow cytometry analysis, about five times the size of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. The genes involved in whitefly development, in host range plasticity, and in begomovirus vector specificity and competency, are unknown. Results To address this general shortage of genomic sequence information, we have constructed three cDNA libraries from non-viruliferous whiteflies (eggs, immature instars, and adults and two from adult insects that fed on tomato plants infected by two geminiviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV. In total, the sequence of 18,976 clones was determined. After quality control, and removal of 5,542 clones of mitochondrial origin 9,110 sequences remained which included 3,843 singletons and 1,017 contigs. Comparisons with public databases indicated that the libraries contained genes involved in cellular and developmental processes. In addition, approximately 1,000 bases aligned with the genome of the B. tabaci endosymbiotic bacterium Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum, originating primarily from the egg and instar libraries. Apart from the mitochondrial sequences, the longest and most abundant sequence encodes vitellogenin, which originated from whitefly adult libraries, indicating that much of the gene expression in this insect is directed toward the production

  18. Cloning of the genome of a goose parvovirus vaccine strain SYG61v and rescue of infectious virions from recombinant plasmid in embryonated goose eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianye; Duan, Jinkun; Meng, Xia; Gong, Jiansen; Jiang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2014-05-01

    The SYG61v is an attenuated goose parvovirus (GPV) that has been used as a vaccine strain in China. The genome of SYG61v was sequenced to attempt to identify the genetic basis for the attenuation of this strain. The entire genome consists of 5102 nucleotides (nts), with four nt deletions compared to that of virulent strain B. The inverted terminal repeats (ITR) are 442 nts in length, of which 360 nts form a stem region, and 43 nts constitute the bubble region. Although mutations were observed throughout the ITR, no mismatch was found in the stem. Alignment with other pathogenic GPV strains (B, 82-0321, 06-0329, and YZ99-5) indicated that there are 10 and 11 amino acid mutations in the Rep1 and VP1 proteins of SYG61v, respectively. The complete genome of SYG61v was cloned into the pBluescript II vector and an infectious plasmid pSYG61v was generated. Infectious progeny virus was successfully rescued through transfection of the plasmid pSYG61v in embryonated goose eggs and yielded viral titers similar to its parental virus, as evaluated by ELD50. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomics of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 512 clone highlights the role of RamR and ribosomal S10 protein mutations in conferring tigecycline resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Laura; Feudi, Claudia; Fortini, Daniela; García-Fernández, Aurora; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Full genome sequences were determined for five Klebsiella pneumoniae strains belonging to the sequence type 512 (ST512) clone, producing KPC-3. Three strains were resistant to tigecycline, one showed an intermediate phenotype, and one was susceptible. Comparative analysis performed using the genome of the susceptible strain as a reference sequence identified genetic differences possibly associated with resistance to tigecycline. Results demonstrated that mutations in the ramR gene occurred in two of the three sequenced strains. Mutations in RamR were previously demonstrated to cause overexpression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and were implicated in tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae. The third strain showed a mutation located at the vertex of a very well conserved loop in the S10 ribosomal protein, which is located in close proximity to the tigecycline target site in the 30S ribosomal subunit. This mutation was previously shown to be associated with tetracycline resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A PCR-based approach was devised to amplify the potential resistance mechanisms identified by genomics and applied to two additional ST512 strains showing resistance to tigecycline, allowing us to identify mutations in the ramR gene.

  20. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of genome segment 7 (S7) of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) that encodes a viral structural protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2007-10-01

    The Genome segment 7 (S7) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted to cDNA, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence showed that segment 7 consisted of 1789 nucleotides with an ORF of 530 amino acids and could encode a protein of approximately 61 kDa, termed P61. The 5' terminal sequence, AGTAAT and the 3' terminal sequence, AGAGC of the plus strand was found to be the same as genome segment 10 of AmCPV encoding polyhedrin. No sequence similarity was found by searching nucleic acid and protein sequence databases using BLAST. The secondary structure prediction showed the presence of 17 alpha-helices, 18 extended beta-sheets along the entire length of P61. The ORF of segment 7 was expressed in E. coli as His-tagged fusion protein, purified through Ni-NTA chromatography, and polyclonal antibody was raised in rabbit indicating that P61 is immunogenic. Immunoblot analysis using this antibody on viral infected cells as well as purified polyhedra showed that P61 is a viral structural protein. Motif scan search showed some similarity of P61 with Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain at the C-terminus and it was hypothesized that by binding to single stranded viral RNA through its CBS domain P61 may help in virus replication or transcription.

  1. Digging Up the Human Genome: Current Progress in Deciphering Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are a major clinical problem. In addition to their clinical impact on human health, there is an enormous cost associated with ADRs in health care and pharmaceutical industry. Increasing studies revealed that genetic variants can determine the susceptibility of individuals to ADRs. The development of modern genomic technologies has led to a tremendous advancement of improving the drug safety and efficacy and minimizing the ADRs. This review will discuss the pharmacogenomic techniques used to unveil the determinants of ADRs and summarize the current progresses concerning the identification of biomarkers for ADRs, with a focus on genetic variants for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug-transporter proteins, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA. The knowledge gained from these cutting-edge findings will form the basis for better prediction and management for ADRs, ultimately making the medicine personalized.

  2. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessita......Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer...... progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each...

  3. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittaranjan eKole

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to surge further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood and submergence, and pests along with increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives towards identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have been proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advancement in next-generation sequencing along with high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB. In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB in improving climate change resilience in crop plants towards circumventing global food insecurity.

  4. Genomics of Ovarian Cancer Progression Reveals Diverse Metastatic Trajectories Including Intraepithelial Metastasis to the Fallopian Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Mark A; Pan, Shawn; Hernandez, Kyle M; Loth, Rachel M; Andrade, Jorge; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Faber, Pieter; Montag, Anthony; Lastra, Ricardo; Peter, Marcus E; Yamada, S Diane; Lengyel, Ernst

    2016-12-01

    Accumulating evidence has supported the fallopian tube rather than the ovary as the origin for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). To understand the relationship between putative precursor lesions and metastatic tumors, we performed whole-exome sequencing on specimens from eight HGSOC patient progression series consisting of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), invasive fallopian tube lesions, invasive ovarian lesions, and omental metastases. Integration of copy number and somatic mutations revealed patient-specific patterns with similar mutational signatures and copy-number variation profiles across all anatomic sites, suggesting that genomic instability is an early event in HGSOC. Phylogenetic analyses supported STIC as precursor lesions in half of our patient cohort, but also identified STIC as metastases in 2 patients. Ex vivo assays revealed that HGSOC spheroids can implant in the fallopian tube epithelium and mimic STIC lesions. That STIC may represent metastases calls into question the assumption that STIC are always indicative of primary fallopian tube cancers. We find that the putative precursor lesions for HGSOC, STIC, possess most of the genomic aberrations present in advanced cancers. In addition, a proportion of STIC represent intraepithelial metastases to the fallopian tube rather than the origin of HGSOC. Cancer Discov; 6(12); 1342-51. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Swisher et al., p. 1309This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1293. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritland Carol

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length (FLcDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. Results We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4 from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca. Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR and 94 kbp (CYP720B4 long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs, high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. Conclusion We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene

  6. Genomic analysis of the F3031 Brazilian purpuric fever clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius by PCR-based subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Laura M; Franke, Deanna D; McGillivary, Glen; Actis, Luis A

    2002-05-01

    PCR-based subtractive genome hybridization produced clones harboring inserts present in Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) prototype strain F3031 but absent in noninvasive Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius isolate F1947. Some of these inserts have no matches in the GenBank database, while others are similar to genes encoding either known or hypothetical proteins. One insert represents a 2.3-kb locus with similarity to a Thermotoga maritima hypothetical protein, while another is part of a 7.6-kb locus that contains predicted genes encoding hypothetical, phage-related, and carotovoricin Er-like proteins. The presence of DNA related to these loci is variable among BPF isolates and nontypeable H. influenzae strains, while neither of them was detected in strains of types a to f. The data indicate that BPF-causing strain F3031 harbors unique chromosomal regions, most of which appear to be acquired from unrelated microbial sources.

  7. A versatile binary vector system with a T-DNA organisational structure conducive to efficient integration of cloned DNA into the plant genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleave, A P

    1992-12-01

    A versatile gene expression cartridge and binary vector system was constructed for use in Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. The expression cartridge of the primary cloning vector, pART7, comprises of cauliflower mosaic virus Cabb B-JI isolate 35S promoter, a multiple cloning site and the transcriptional termination region of the octopine synthase gene. The entire cartridge can be removed from pART7 as a Not I fragment and introduced directly into the binary vector, pART27, recombinants being selected by blue/white screening for beta-galactosidase. pART27 carries the RK2 minimal replicon for maintenance in Agrobacterium, the ColE1 origin of replication for high-copy maintenance in Escherichia coli and the Tn7 spectinomycin/streptomycin resistance gene as a bacterial selectable marker. The organisational structure of the T-DNA of pART27 has been constructed taking into account the right to left border, 5' to 3' model of T-DNA transfer. The T-DNA carries the chimaeric kanamycin resistance gene (nopaline synthase promoter-neomycin phosphotransferase-nopaline synthase terminator) distal to the right border relative to the lacZ' region. Utilisation of these vectors in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco demonstrated efficient T-DNA transfer to the plant genome.

  8. Genome-Wide Association of CKD Progression: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Afshin; Kanetsky, Peter A; Xiao, Rui; Gupta, Jayanta; Mitra, Nandita; Limou, Sophie; Xie, Dawei; Xu, Huichun; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Ojo, Akinlolu; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Sandholm, Niina; Jeff, Janina; Raj, Dominic E; Böger, Carsten A; Bottinger, Erwin; Salimi, Shabnam; Parekh, Rulan S; Adler, Sharon G; Langefeld, Carl D; Bowden, Donald W; Groop, Per-Henrik; Forsblom, Carol; Freedman, Barry I; Lipkowitz, Michael; Fox, Caroline S; Winkler, Cheryl A; Feldman, Harold I

    2017-03-01

    The rate of decline of renal function varies significantly among individuals with CKD. To understand better the contribution of genetics to CKD progression, we performed a genome-wide association study among participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Our outcome of interest was CKD progression measured as change in eGFR over time among 1331 blacks and 1476 whites with CKD. We stratified all analyses by race and subsequently, diabetes status. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a significance threshold of P<1×10(-6) for association with eGFR slope were selected as candidates for follow-up and secondarily tested for association with proteinuria and time to ESRD. We identified 12 such SNPs among black patients and six such SNPs among white patients. We were able to conduct follow-up analyses of three candidate SNPs in similar (replication) cohorts and eight candidate SNPs in phenotype-related (validation) cohorts. Among blacks without diabetes, rs653747 in LINC00923 replicated in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort (discovery P=5.42×10(-7); replication P=0.039; combined P=7.42×10(-9)). This SNP also associated with ESRD (hazard ratio, 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.7); P=4.90×10(-6)). Similarly, rs931891 in LINC00923 associated with eGFR decline (P=1.44×10(-4)) in white patients without diabetes. In summary, SNPs in LINC00923, an RNA gene expressed in the kidney, significantly associated with CKD progression in individuals with nondiabetic CKD. However, the lack of equivalent cohorts hampered replication for most discovery loci. Further replication of our findings in comparable study populations is warranted.

  9. Why clone flies? Using cloned Drosophila to monitor epigenetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Andrew J; Lloyd, Vett K

    2007-01-01

    Since the birth of the first cloned sheep in 1996, advances in nuclear transplantation have led to both the creation of genetically tailored stem cells and the generation of a number of cloned organisms. The list of cloned animals reared to adulthood currently includes the frog, sheep, mouse, cow, goat, pig, rabbit, cat, zebrafish, mule, horse, rat and dog. The addition of Drosophila to this elite bestiary of cloned animals has prompted the question - why clone flies? Organisms generated by nuclear transplantation suffer from a high rate of associated defects, and many of these defects appear to be related to aberrant genomic imprinting. Imprinted gene expression also appears to be compromised in Drosophila clones. Proper imprinted gene regulation relies on a suite of highly conserved chromatin-modifying genes first identified in Drosophila. Thus, Drosophila can potentially be used to study epigenetic dysfunction in cloned animals and to screen for genetic and epigenetic conditions that promote the production of healthy clones.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Propionibacterium acnes Strains Isolated from Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis Lesions of Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rolf; Lomholt, Hans B.; Scholz, Christian F. P.;

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is prevalent on human skin. It has been associated with skin disorders such as acne vulgaris and progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH). Here, we report draft genome sequences of two type III P. acnes strains, PMH5 and PMH7, isolated from...

  11. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessita...

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Propionibacterium acnes Strains Isolated from Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis Lesions of Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rolf; Lomholt, Hans B.; Scholz, Christian F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that is prevalent on human skin. It has been associated with skin disorders such as acne vulgaris and progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH). Here, we report draft genome sequences of two type III P. acnes strains, PMH5 and PMH7, isolated from...

  13. Cloning of Genomic DNA Flanking Transposon in the Nonpathogenic Mutant of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines M715

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA AKHDIYA RUSMANA

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to clone flanking DNA derived from Tn-5 mutagenesis of wild type strain Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines as first step to clone and to identify the gene involved in pathogenicity mechanism. We have localized the flanking DNA fragment from a nonpathogenic mutant of Xag M715. Southern hybridization analysis using 2.8 kb EcoRI from pYR103 as a probe showed that the fragment is located within 2.0 kb PstI fragment. A 0.7 kb flanking DNA was amplified using inverse PCR technique, and inserted into pGEM-T Easy vector generating a 3.7 kb recombinant plasmid (pAA01. Southern hybridization analysis of the wild type (YR32 with pAA01 as a probe indicated a hybridization signal located at approximately 3.0 kb PstI fragment. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the DNA fragment has a 64% identity to a vir gene of Bacillus anthracis.

  14. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of full-length DNA copies of the genomic RNAs of cowpea mosaic virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments described in this thesis were designed to unravel various aspects of the mechanism of gene expression of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). For this purpose full-length DNA copies of both genomic RNAs of CPMV were constructed. Using powerful invitro transcription systems RNA t

  16. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  17. What is Cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate Home Cloning What is Cloning What is Cloning Clones are organisms that are exact genetic copies. ... clones made through modern cloning technologies. How Is Cloning Done? Many people first heard of cloning when ...

  18. Use of genomics to identify bacterial undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase: cloning, expression, and characterization of the essential uppS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, C M; Takács, B; Fountoulakis, M; Stieger, M; Keck, W

    1999-01-01

    The prenyltransferase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase (di-trans,poly-cis-decaprenylcistransferase; EC 2.5.1.31) was purified from the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli by TSK-DEAE, ceramic hydroxyapatite, TSK-ether, Superdex 200, and heparin-Actigel chromatography. The protein was labeled with the photolabile analogue of the farnesyl pyrophosphate analogue (E, E)-[1-3H]-(2-diazo-3-trifluoropropionyloxy)geranyl diphosphate and was detected on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa. This protein band was cut out from the gel, trypsin digested, and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis. Comparison of the experimental data with computer-simulated trypsin digest data for all E. coli proteins yielded a single match with a protein of unassigned function (SWISS-PROT Q47675; YAES_ECOLI). Sequences with strong similarity indicative of homology to this protein were identified in 25 bacterial species, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in Caenorhabditis elegans. The homologous genes (uppS) were cloned from E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressed in E. coli as amino-terminal His-tagged fusion proteins, and purified over a Ni2+ affinity column. An untagged version of the E. coli uppS gene was also cloned and expressed, and the protein purified in two chromatographic steps. We were able to detect Upp synthetase activity for all purified enzymes. Further, biochemical characterization revealed no differences between the recombinant untagged E. coli Upp synthetase and the three His-tagged fusion proteins. All enzymes were absolutely Triton X-100 and MgCl2 dependent. With the use of a regulatable gene disruption system, we demonstrated that uppS is essential for growth in S. pneumoniae R6.

  19. Isolation and characterization of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 from a cow affected by post partum metritis and cloning of the genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavirani Sandro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a gammaherpesvirus with a Worldwide distribution in cattle and is often isolated from the uterus of animals with postpartum metritis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Virus strain adaptation to an organ, tissue or cell type is an important issue for the pathogenesis of disease. To explore the mechanistic role of viral strain variation for uterine disease, the present study aimed to develop a tool enabling precise genetic discrimination between strains of BoHV-4 and to easily manipulate the viral genome. Methods A strain of BoHV-4 was isolated from the uterus of a persistently infected cow and designated BoHV-4-U. The authenticity of the isolate was confirmed by RFLP-PCR and sequencing using the TK and IE2 loci as genetic marker regions for the BoHV-4 genome. The isolated genome was cloned as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC and manipulated through recombineering technology Results The BoHV-4-U genome was successfully cloned as a BAC, and the stability of the pBAC-BoHV-4-U clone was confirmed over twenty passages, with viral growth similar to the wild type virus. The feasibility of using BoHV-4-U for mutagenesis was demonstrated using the BAC recombineering system. Conclusion The analysis of genome strain variation is a key method for investigating genes associated with disease. A resource for dissection of the interactions between BoHV-4 and host endometrial cells was generated by cloning the genome of BoHV-4 as a BAC.

  20. Genome-wide association study of corticobasal degeneration identifies risk variants shared with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A.; Dombroski, Beth; Younkin, Curtis S.; Serie, Daniel J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Baker, Matthew; Finch, Ni Cole A.; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; McLean, Catriona A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Cantwell, Laura B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D.; Ryung Han, Mi; Beecher, Sherry; Geller, Evan T.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Roeber, Sigrun; Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.; Wenning, Gregor K.; White, Charles L.; Höglinger, Günter U.; Müller, Ulrich; Devlin, Bernie; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Crook, Julia; Parisi, Joseph E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Litvan, Irene; Younkin, Steven G.; Wang, Li-San; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Rademakers, Rosa; Hakonarsen, Hakon; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement and cognition, definitively diagnosed only at autopsy. Here, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in CBD cases (n=152) and 3,311 controls, and 67 CBD cases and 439 controls in a replication stage. Associations with meta-analysis were 17q21 at MAPT (P=1.42 × 10−12), 8p12 at lnc-KIF13B-1, a long non-coding RNA (rs643472; P=3.41 × 10−8), and 2p22 at SOS1 (rs963731; P=1.76 × 10−7). Testing for association of CBD with top progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified associations at MOBP (3p22; rs1768208; P=2.07 × 10−7) and MAPT H1c (17q21; rs242557; P=7.91 × 10−6). We previously reported SNP/transcript level associations with rs8070723/MAPT, rs242557/MAPT, and rs1768208/MOBP and herein identified association with rs963731/SOS1. We identify new CBD susceptibility loci and show that CBD and PSP share a genetic risk factor other than MAPT at 3p22 MOBP (myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein). PMID:26077951

  1. Genome-Wide Search for Host Association Factors during Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Thompson

    Full Text Available Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV is an important virus that causes serious diseases in sheep and goats with a prevalence of 36% in the USA. Although OPPV was discovered more than half of a century ago, little is known about the infection and pathogenesis of this virus. In this report, we used RNA-seq technology to conduct a genome-wide probe for cellular factors that are associated with OPPV infection. A total of approximately 22,000 goat host genes were detected of which 657 were found to have been significantly up-regulated and 889 down-regulated at 12 hours post-infection. In addition to previously known restriction factors from other viral infections, a number of factors which may be specific for OPPV infection were uncovered. The data from this RNA-seq study will be helpful in our understanding of OPPV infection, and also for further study in the prevention and intervention of this viral disease.

  2. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and expression of a C-type (Manduca sexta-type) allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Lenz, C; Winther, A M

    2001-01-01

    ; and a single allatostatin that we now call C-type allatostatin that was first discovered in the moth Manduca sexta, and which has a nonamidated C terminus, and a structure unrelated to the A- and B-type allatostatins. We have previously cloned the preprohormones for the A- and B-type allatostatins from......-C gene has three introns and four exons and is located at position 32D2-3 on the left arm of the second chromosome. Northern blots show that the gene is strongly expressed in larvae and adult flies, but less in pupae and embryos. In situ hybridizations of larvae show that the gene is expressed in various...... neurons of the brain and abdominal ganglia and in endocrine cells of the midgut. This is the first publication on the structure of a C-type allatostatin from insects other than moths and the first report on the presence of all three types of allatostatins in a representative of the insect order Diptera...

  3. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and alternative splice forms of the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    2000-10-14

    Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is the major collagen receptor underlying platelet activation. We cloned the full-length cDNA for GPVI (GPVI-1) and its two isoforms (GPVI-2 and -3) from phorbol-ester-stimulated CMK cells. The GPVI-1 cDNA was identical in the coding region with the cDNA that has recently been reported to belong to the immunoglobulin superfamily. The GPVI gene consisted of 8 exons spanning over 23 kbp and was mapped on the chromosome 19q13. 4. The promoter of GPVI gene lacked TATA and CAAT boxes and had multiple transcription start sites like other megakaryocytic genes. When COS-7 cells were cotransfected with the GPVI isoforms and Fc receptor gamma chain, Fc receptor gamma chain was associated with GPVI-1 and -2 but did not affect the GPVI expression levels. GPVI-1 and -2 could bind the collagen-related peptide, which exhibits triple-helical and polymeric structure of collagen to activate platelets via GPVI. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents.

  5. Identification of novel genomic markers related to progression to glioblastoma through genomic profiling of 25 primary glioma cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roversi, G.; Pfundt, R.; Moroni, R.F.; Magnani, I.; Reijmersdal, S.V. van; Pollo, B.; Straatman, H.M.P.M.; Larizza, L.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of genetic copy number changes in glial tumors is of importance in the context of improved/refined diagnostic, prognostic procedures and therapeutic decision-making. In order to detect recurrent genomic copy number changes that might play a role in glioma pathogenesis and/or progressi

  6. Appearance traits in fish farming: progress from classical genetics to genomics, providing insight into current and potential genetic improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Appearance traits in fish, those external body characteristics that influence consumer acceptance at point of sale, have come to the forefront of commercial fish farming, as culture profitability is closely linked to management of these traits. Appearance traits comprise mainly body shape and skin pigmentation. Analysis of the genetic basis of these traits in different fish reveals significant genetic variation within populations, indicating potential for their genetic improvement. Work into ascertaining the minor or major genes underlying appearance traits for commercial fish is emerging, with substantial progress in model fish in terms of identifying genes that control body shape and skin colors. In this review, we describe research progress to date, especially with regard to commercial fish, and discuss genomic findings in model fish in order to better address the genetic basis of the traits. Given that appearance traits are important in commercial fish, the genomic information related to this issue promises to accelerate the selection process in coming years. PMID:25140172

  7. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-06-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been idedntified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  8. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of genome segments S8 from rice black-streaked dwarf virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张恒木; 陈剑平; 薛庆中; 雷娟利

    2002-01-01

    Genome segments S8 of two Chinese isolates of rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), one from Zhejiang Province and another from Hebei Province, were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Both segments consisted of 1936 nts in full length (EMBL accession numbers were AJ297431 and AJ297432, respectively) and contained only one big open reading frame which encoded a polypeptide with molecular weight of 68kD. The two Chinese isolates shared 94.0% and 96.5% identity at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. They shared 94.5-94.9% and 92.5-92.9% homology with S8 of RBSDV Japanese isolate at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively; shared 85.1-87.6% and 91.7-91.9% homology with S7 of Italian MRDV (maize rough dwarf virus).

  9. Progress on Transferring Elite Genes from Non-AA Genome Wild Rice into Oryza sativa through Interspecific Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The progress of research on transferring elite genes from non-AA genome wild rice into Oryza sativa through interspecific hybridization are in three respects,that is,breeding monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs),constructing introgression lines (ILs) and analyzing the heredity of the characters and mapping the related genes.There are serious reproductive barriers,mainly incrossability and hybrid sterility,in the interspecific hybridization of O.sativa with non-AA genome wild rice.These are the 'bottleneck' for transferring elite genes from wild rice to O.sativa.Combining traditional crossing method with biotechnique is a reliable way to overcome the reproductive barriers and to improve the utilizing efficiency of non-AA genome wild rice.

  10. Quantum cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio; Iblisdir, Sofyan; Gisin, Nicolas; Acin, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The impossibility of perfectly copying (or cloning) an arbitrary quantum state is one of the basic rules governing the physics of quantum systems. The processes that perform the optimal approximate cloning have been found in many cases. These "quantum cloning machines" are important tools for studying a wide variety of tasks, e.g. state estimation and eavesdropping on quantum cryptography. This paper provides a comprehensive review of quantum cloning machines (both for discrete-dimensional an...

  11. Engineering infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus in vivo from a full-length genomic cDNA clone of the A/AKT/58 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two full-length genomic cDNA clones, pTA/FMDV and pCA/FMDV, were constructed that contained three point-mutants [A174G and A308G (not present in pTA/FMDV); T1029G] in the genome compared with the wild type A/AKT/58 strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus. These two viruses were rescued by co-transfection of pCA/FMDV with pCT7RNAP, which can express T7 RNA polymerase in BHK-21 cell-lines, or by transfection of the in vitro transcribed RNA. Their biological properties were analyzed for their antigenicity, virulence in suckling-mice (LD50) and growth kinetics in BHK-21 cells. The in vivo rescued viruses showed high pathogenicity for 3-day-old unweaned mice (LD50=10?7.5). However, the in vitro transcribed RNA derived from pTA/FMDV had lower pathogenicity for suckling-mice (LD50=10?6), and the in vivo transcribed RNA recovered from pCA/FMDV co-transfected with pCT7RNAP showed no significant differences from the wild type virus. These data showed that recovery of the infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus directly from the use of in vivo techniques was better than from in vitro methods. Furthermore, the reverse genetic procedure technique was simplified to a faster one-step procedure based on co-transfection with pCT7RNAP. These results suggest that in vivo RNA tran- scripts may be more valuable for engineering recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus than in vitro RNA transcripts, and may contribute to further understanding of the biological properties, such as replication, maturation and quasispecies, of the foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  12. Engineering infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus in vivo from a full-lensth genomic cDNA clone of the A/AKT/58 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI XingWen; LI PingHua; CAO YiMei; LI Dong; LU ZengJun; GUO JianHong; SUN DeHui; ZHENG HaiXue; SUN Pu; LIU XiangTao; LUO JianXun; LIU ZaiXin

    2009-01-01

    Two full-length genomic cDNA clones, pTA/FMDV and pCA/FMDV, were constructed that contained three point-mutants [A174G and A308G (not present in pTA/FMDV); T1029G] in the genome compared with the wild type A/AKT/58 strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus. These two viruses were rescued by co-transfection of pCA/FMDV with pCT7RNAP, which can express T7 RNA polymerase in BHK-21 cell-lines, or by transfection of the in vitro transcribed RNA. Their biological properties were analyzed for their antigenicity, virulence in suckling-mice (LD50) and growth kinetics in BHK-21 cells. The in vivo rescued viruses showed high pathogenicity for 3-day-old unweaned mice (LD50=10-7.5). However, the in vitro transcribed RNA derived from pTA/FMDV had lower pathogenicity for suckling-mice (LD50=10-6), and the in vivo transcribed RNA recovered from pCA/FMDV co-transfected with pCT7RNAP showed no significant differences from the wild type virus. These data showed that recovery of the infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus directly from the use of in vivo techniques was better than from in vitro methods. Furthermore, the reverse genetic procedure technique was simplified to a faster one-step procedure based on co-transfection with pCT7RNAP. These results suggest that in vivo RNA tran-scripts may be more valuable for engineering recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus than in vitro RNA transcripts, and may contribute to further understanding of the biological properties, such as replication, maturation and quasispecies, of the foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  13. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism-based assay for high-resolution epidemiological analysis of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus hospital clone EMRSA-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, A; McAllister, G; McAdam, P R; Hsien Choi, S; Girvan, K; Robb, A; Edwards, G; Templeton, K; Fitzgerald, J R

    2014-02-01

    The EMRSA-15 clone is a major cause of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in the UK and elsewhere but existing typing methodologies have limited capacity to discriminate closely related strains, and are often poorly reproducible between laboratories. Here, we report the design, development and validation of a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing method and compare it to established methods for typing of EMRSA-15. In order to identify discriminatory SNPs, the genomes of 17 EMRSA-15 strains, selected to represent the breadth of genotypic and phenotypic diversity of EMRSA-15 isolates in Scotland, were determined and phylogenetic reconstruction was carried out. In addition to 17 phylogenetically informative SNPs, five binary markers were included to form the basis of an EMRSA-15 genotyping assay. The SNP-based typing assay was as discriminatory as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and significantly more discriminatory than staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing for typing of a representative panel of diverse EMRSA-15 strains, isolates from two EMRSA-15 hospital outbreak investigations, and a panel of bacteraemia isolates obtained in healthcare facilities in the east of Scotland during a 12-month period. The assay is a rapid, and reproducible approach for epidemiological analysis of EMRSA-15 clinical isolates in Scotland. Unlike established methods the DNA sequence-based method is ideally suited for inter-laboratory comparison of identified genotypes, and its flexibility lends itself to supplementation with additional SNPs or markers for the identification of novel S. aureus strains in other regions of the world.

  14. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  15. [Research progress in developing reporter systems for the enrichment of positive cells with targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Xu, Kun; Wei, Zehui; Ma, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Targeted genome editing technology plays an important role in studies of gene function, gene therapy and transgenic breeding. Moreover, the efficiency of targeted genome editing is increased dramatically with the application of recently developed artificial nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9. However, obtaining positive cells with targeted genome modification is restricted to some extent by nucleases expression plasmid transfection efficiency, nucleases expression and activity, and repair efficiency after genome editing. Thus, the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification remains a problem that need to be solved. Surrogate reporter systems could be used to reflect the efficiency of nucleases indirectly and enrich genetically modified positive cells effectively, which may increase the efficiency of the enrichment and screening of positive cells with targeted genome modification. In this review, we mainly summarized principles and applications of reporter systems based on NHEJ and SSA repair mechanisms, which may provide references for related studies in future.

  16. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David [DOE JGI Public Affairs Manager

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  17. Tn7-mediated Introduction of DNA into Bacmid-cloned Pseudorabies Virus Genome for Rapid Construction of Recombinant Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    lacZα-mini-attTn7 was inserted into the intergenic region between the gG and gD genes in a PRV bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) by homologous recombination in E. coli. The resulting recombinant BAC (pBeckerZF1) was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was then transposed into pBeckerZF1 by transposon Tn7 to generate pBeckerZF2. Recombinant viruses vBeckerZF1 and vBeckerZF2 were generated by transfection with the corresponding BAC pBeckerZF1 or pBeckerZF2. The titers and cytopathic effect (CPE) observed for by vBeckerZF1 and vBeckerZF2 was comparable to that of the parental virus vBecker3. vBeckerZF2 was serial passaged for five rounds in cell culture, and the mini-Tn7 insertion was stably maintained in viral genome. These results show that recombinant viruses can be rapidly and reliably created by Tn7-mediated transposition. This technology should accelerate greatly the pace at which recombinant PRV can be generated and, thus, facilitate the use of recombinant viruses for detailed mutagenic studies.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, Representative of a Multidrug-Resistant Clone Spreading in Europe and Expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-Type β-Lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Ciacci, Nagaia; Gniadkowski, Marek; Miriagou, Vivi; Torricelli, Francesca; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-02-11

    Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, representative of a multidrug-resistant clone expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-type β-lactamase and circulating in Europe since 2003, was sequenced by a MiSeq platform using a paired-end approach. The genome was assembled in 100 scaffolds with a total length of 4,197,318 bp. Analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, phenicols, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides, of one plasmid replicon, and of a type I-E clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system.

  19. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  20. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A High Occurrence of Acquisition and/or Expansion of C-CBL Mutant Clones in the Progression of High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome to Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Kao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and its progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML remain to be explored. Somatic C-CBL mutations were recently described in MDS. Our study aimed to determine the role of C-CBL mutations in the progression of MDS to sAML and sought to correlate with clinicohematological features and outcome. Bone marrow samples from 51 patients with high-risk MDS (13 with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 19 with refractory anemia with excess blast 1, and 19 with refractory anemia with excess blast 2 were analyzed for C-CBL mutations at both diagnosis and sAML in the same individuals. Mutational analysis was performed for exons 7 to 9 of C-CBL gene. Of the 51 paired samples, C-CBL mutations were identified in 6 patients at the sAML phase. One patient retained the identical C-CBL mutation (G415S at sAML evolution and exhibited clonal expansion. The other five patients acquired C-CBL mutations (Y371S, F418S, L370_Y371 ins L, L399V, and C416W during sAML evolution. Three of the six patients harboring C-CBL mutations at sAML had additional gene mutations including JAK2V617F, PTPN11, or N-RAS. There was no significant difference in clinicohematological features and overall survival with respect to C-CBL mutation status. Our results show that C-CBL mutation is very rare (0.6% in MDS, but acquisition and/or expansion of C-CBL mutant clones occur in 11.8% of patients during sAML transformation. The findings suggest that C-CBL mutations play a role at least in part in a subset of MDS patients during sAML transformation.

  2. Genome mining in Streptomyces avermitilis: cloning and characterization of SAV_76, the synthase for a new sesquiterpene, avermitilol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wayne K W; Fanizza, Immacolata; Uchiyama, Takuma; Komatsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Haruo; Cane, David E

    2010-07-07

    The terpene synthase encoded by the sav76 gene of Streptomyces avermtilis was expressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminal-His(6)-tag protein, using a codon-optimized synthetic gene. Incubation of the recombinant protein, SAV_76, with farnesyl diphosphate (1, FPP) in the presence of Mg(2+) gave a new sesquiterpene alcohol avermitilol (2), whose structure and stereochemistry were determined by a combination of (1)H, (13)C, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY NMR, along with minor amounts of germacrene A (3), germacrene B (4), and viridiflorol (5). The absolute configuration of 2 was assigned by (1)H NMR analysis of the corresponding (R)- and (S)-Mosher esters. The steady state kinetic parameters were k(cat) 0.040 +/- 0.001 s(-1) and K(m) 1.06 +/- 0.11 microM. Individual incubations of recombinant avermitilol synthase with [1,1-(2)H(2)]FPP (1a), (1S)-[1-(2)H]-FPP (1b), and (1R)-[1-(2)H]-FPP (1c) and NMR analysis of the resulting avermitilols supported a cyclization mechanism involving the loss of H-1(re) to generate the intermediate bicyclogermacrene (7), which then undergoes proton-initiated anti-Markovnikov cyclization and capture of water to generate 2. A copy of the sav76 gene was reintroduced into S. avermitilis SUKA17, a large deletion mutant from which the genes for the major endogenous secondary metabolites had been removed, and expressed under control of the native S. avermitilis promoter rpsJp (sav4925). The resultant transformants generated avermitilol (2) as well as the derived ketone, avermitilone (8), along with small amounts of 3, 4, and 5. The biochemical function of all four terpene synthases found in the S. avermtilis genome have now been determined.

  3. Nucleologenesis and embryonic genome activation are defective in interspecies cloned embryos between bovine ooplasm and rhesus monkey somatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yong-Mahn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT has been proposed as a tool to address basic developmental questions and to improve the feasibility of cell therapy. However, the low efficiency of iSCNT embryonic development is a crucial problem when compared to in vitro fertilization (IVF and intraspecies SCNT. Thus, we examined the effect of donor cell species on the early development of SCNT embryos after reconstruction with bovine ooplasm. Results No apparent difference in cleavage rate was found among IVF, monkey-bovine (MB-iSCNT, and bovine-bovine (BB-SCNT embryos. However, MB-iSCNT embryos failed to develop beyond the 8- or 16-cell stages and lacked expression of the genes involved in embryonic genome activation (EGA at the 8-cell stage. From ultrastructural observations made during the peri-EGA period using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, we found that the nucleoli of MB-iSCNT embryos were morphologically abnormal or arrested at the primary stage of nucleologenesis. Consistent with the TEM analysis, nucleolar component proteins, such as upstream binding transcription factor, fibrillarin, nucleolin, and nucleophosmin, showed decreased expression and were structurally disorganized in MB-iSCNT embryos compared to IVF and BB-SCNT embryos, as revealed by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. Conclusion The down-regulation of housekeeping and imprinting genes, abnormal nucleolar morphology, and aberrant patterns of nucleolar proteins during EGA resulted in developmental failure in MB-iSCNT embryos. These results provide insight into the unresolved problems of early embryonic development in iSCNT embryos.

  4. EasyClone-MarkerFree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Mathew Malcolm Jessop; Jakociunas, Tadas; Stovicek, Vratislav

    2016-01-01

    Clone-MarkerFree. The integration of linearized expression cassettes into defined genomic loci is facilitated by CRISPR/Cas9. Cas9 is recruited to the chromosomal location by specific guide RNAs (gRNAs) expressed from a set of gRNA helper vectors. Using our genome engineering vector suite, single and triple insertions are obtained...

  5. Reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, and error-prone repair: a model for genomic instability with progression in myeloid leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassool, Feyruz V; Gaymes, Terry J; Omidvar, Nader; Brady, Nicola; Beurlet, Stephanie; Pla, Marika; Reboul, Murielle; Lea, Nicholas; Chomienne, Christine; Thomas, Nicholas S B; Mufti, Ghulam J; Padua, Rose Ann

    2007-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, with an increased propensity to develop acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The molecular basis for MDS progression is unknown, but a key element in MDS disease progression is loss of chromosomal material (genomic instability). Using our two-step mouse model for myeloid leukemic disease progression involving overexpression of human mutant NRAS and BCL2 genes, we show that there is a stepwise increase in the frequency of DNA damage leading to an increased frequency of error-prone repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) by nonhomologous end-joining. There is a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these transgenic mice with disease progression. Importantly, RAC1, an essential component of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase, is downstream of RAS, and we show that ROS production in NRAS/BCL2 mice is in part dependent on RAC1 activity. DNA damage and error-prone repair can be decreased or reversed in vivo by N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment. Our data link gene abnormalities to constitutive DNA damage and increased DSB repair errors in vivo and provide a mechanism for an increase in the error rate of DNA repair with MDS disease progression. These data suggest treatment strategies that target RAS/RAC pathways and ROS production in human MDS/AML.

  6. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z Q

    2016-09-09

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  7. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, YanHua, E-mail: liyanhua.1982@aliyun.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Translational Medical Research in Cognitive Development and Learning and Memory Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation base of Child development and Critical Disorders, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Li, AiHua [Chongqing Cancer Institute & Hospital & Cancer Center, Chongqing 404100 (China); Yang, Z.Q. [Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-09-09

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  8. Genetic environment of the KPC gene in Acinetobacter baumannii ST2 clone from Puerto Rico and genomic insights into its drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Teresa; Martinez, Idali; Vazquez, Guillermo J; Aquino, Edna E; Robledo, Iraida E

    2016-08-01

    Carbapenems are considered the last-resort antibiotics to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. The Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) enzyme hydrolyses β-lactam antibiotics including the carbapenems. KPC has been detected worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates associated with transposon Tn4401 commonly located in plasmids. Acinetobacter baumannii has become an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen. KPC-producing A. baumannii has been reported to date only in Puerto Rico. The objective of this study was to determine the whole genomic sequence of a KPC-producing A. baumannii in order to (i) define its allelic diversity, (ii) identify the location and genetic environment of the blaKPC and (iii) detect additional mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. Next-generation sequencing, Southern blot, PFGE, multilocus sequence typing and bioinformatics analysis were performed. The organism was assigned to the international ST2 clone. The blaKPC-2 was identified on a novel truncated version of Tn4401e (tentatively named Tn4401h), located in the chromosome within an IncA/C plasmid fragment derived from an Enterobacteriaceae, probably owing to insertion sequence IS26. A chromosomally located truncated Tn1 transposon harbouring a blaTEM-1 was found in a novel genetic environment within an antimicrobial resistance cluster. Additional resistance mechanisms included efflux pumps, non-β-lactam antibiotic inactivating enzymes within and outside a resistance island, two class 1 integrons, In439 and the novel In1252, as well as mutations in the topoisomerase and DNA gyrase genes which confer resistance to quinolones. The presence of the blaKPC in an already globally disseminated A. baumannii ST2 presents a serious threat of further dissemination.

  9. Cloning of genomic sequences of three crustacean hyperglycemic hormone superfamily genes and elucidation of their roles of regulating insulin-like androgenic gland hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fajun; Bai, Hongkun; Zhang, Wenyi; Fu, Hongtuo; Jiang, Fengwei; Liang, Guoxia; Jin, Shubo; Sun, Shengming; Qiao, Hui

    2015-04-25

    The insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) gene in crustaceans plays an important role in male sexual differentiation, metabolism, and growth. However, the upstream regulation of IAG signaling schemes remains poorly studied. In the present study, we cloned the 5' flanking sequence of IAG and full-length genomic sequences of gonad-inhibiting hormone (Mn-GIH), molt-inhibiting hormone (Mn-MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (Mn-CHH) in Macrobrachium nipponense. We identified the transcription factor-binding sites in the 5' flanking sequence of IAG and investigated the exon-intron patterns of the three CHH superfamily genes. Each CHH superfamily gene consisted of two introns separating three exons. Mn-GIH and Mn-MIH shared the same intron insertion sites, which differed from Mn-CHH. We provided DNA-level evidence for the type definition. We also identified two cAMP response elements in the 5' untranslated region. We further investigated the regulatory relationships between Mn-GIH, Mn-MIH, and Mn-CHH and IAG at the transcriptional level by injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). IAG transcription levels were significantly increased to 660.2%, 472.9%, and 112.4% of control levels in the Mn-GIH dsRNA, Mn-MIH dsRNA, and Mn-CHH dsRNA groups, respectively. The results clearly demonstrated that Mn-GIH and Mn-MIH, but not Mn-CHH, negatively regulate the expression of the IAG gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of whole genome amplification to study chromosomal changes in prostate cancer: insights into genome-wide signature of preneoplasia associated with cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Squire Jeremy A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer (CaP is a disease with multifactorial etiology that includes both genetic and environmental components. The knowledge of the genetic basis of CaP has increased over the past years, mainly in the pathways that underlie tumourigenesis, progression and drug resistance. The vast majority of cases of CaP are adenocarcinomas that likely develop through a pre-malignant lesion and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HPIN. Histologically, CaP is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple, discrete foci of invasive carcinoma and HPIN that are commonly interspersed with benign glands and stroma. This admixture with benign tissue can complicate genomic analyses in CaP. Specifically, when DNA is bulk-extracted the genetic information obtained represents an average for all of the cells within the sample. Results To minimize this problem, we obtained DNA from individual foci of HPIN and CaP by laser capture microdissection (LCM. The small quantities of DNA thus obtained were then amplified by means of multiple-displacement amplification (MDA, for use in genomic DNA array comparative genomic hybridisation (gaCGH. Recurrent chromosome copy number abnormalities (CNAs were observed in both HPIN and CaP. In HPIN, chromosomal imbalances involving chromosome 8 where common, whilst in CaP additional chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 6, 10, 13 and 16 where also frequently observed. Conclusion An overall increase in chromosomal changes was seen in CaP compared to HPIN, suggesting a universal breakdown in chromosomal stability. The accumulation of CNAs, which occurs during this process is non-random and may indicate chromosomal regions important in tumourigenesis. It is therefore likely that the alterations in copy number are part of a programmed cycle of events that promote tumour development, progression and survival. The combination of LCM, MDA and gaCGH is ideally suited for the identification of CNAs from

  11. Isolation of a human tissue-type plasminogen-activator genomic DNA clone and its expression in mouse L-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Brown (Morris); A.W.R. Tyrrell; C.G. Chapman; J.E. Carey (Janet); D.M. Glover; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); I. Dodd; J.H. Robinson

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have isolated a cDNA clone corresponding to a substantial portion of the human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) protein. It encodes almost all of the protein B chain and part of the 3' untranslated region. We have used this clone to screen bacteriophage lambda and cosmid libra

  12. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  13. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 for genome editing: progress, implications and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong

    2014-09-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein 9 system provides a robust and multiplexable genome editing tool, enabling researchers to precisely manipulate specific genomic elements, and facilitating the elucidation of target gene function in biology and diseases. CRISPR/Cas9 comprises of a nonspecific Cas9 nuclease and a set of programmable sequence-specific CRISPR RNA (crRNA), which can guide Cas9 to cleave DNA and generate double-strand breaks at target sites. Subsequent cellular DNA repair process leads to desired insertions, deletions or substitutions at target sites. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage requires target sequences matching crRNA and a protospacer adjacent motif locating at downstream of target sequences. Here, we review the molecular mechanism, applications and challenges of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and clinical therapeutic potential of CRISPR/Cas9 in future.

  15. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  16. Progress and knowledge gaps in Culicoides genetics, genomics and population modelling: 2003 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Simon

    2016-09-30

    In the 10 years, since the last international meeting on Bluetongue virus (BTV) and related Orbiviruses in Sicily, there have been huge advances in explorations of the genetics and genomics of Culicoides, culminating in the imminent release of the rst full genome de novo assembly for the genus. In parallel, mathematical models used to predict Culicoides adult distribution, seasonality, and dispersal have also increased in sophistication, re ecting advances in available computational power and expertise. While these advances have focused upon the outbreaks of BTV in Europe, there is an opportunity to extend these techniques to other regions as part of global studies of the genus. This review takes a selective approach to examining the past decade of research in these areas and provides a personal viewpoint of future directions of research that may prove productive.

  17. Progress in unraveling the genetic etiology of Parkinson disease in a genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Aline; Theuns, Jessie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) and Parkinson-plus syndromes are genetically heterogeneous neurological diseases. Initial studies into the genetic causes of PD relied on classical molecular genetic approaches in well-documented case families. More recently, these approaches have been combined with exome sequencing and together have identified 15 causal genes. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered over 25 genetic risk factors. Elucidation of the genetic architecture of sporadic and familial parkinsonism, however, has lagged behind that of simple Mendelian conditions, suggesting the existence of features confounding genetic data interpretation. Here we discuss the successes and potential pitfalls of gene discovery in PD and related disorders in the post-genomic era. With an estimated 30% of trait variance currently unexplained, tackling current limitations will further expedite gene discovery and lead to increased application of these genetic insights in molecular diagnostics using gene panel and exome sequencing strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Progress of genome engineering technology via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2013-10-04

    In survival competition with phage, bacteria and archaea gradually evolved the acquired immune system--Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), presenting the trait of transcribing the crRNA and the CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) to silence or cleaving the foreign double-stranded DNA specifically. In recent years, strong interest arises in prokaryotes primitive immune system and many in-depth researches are going on. Recently, researchers successfully repurposed CRISPR as an RNA-guided platform for sequence-specific gene expression, which provides a simple approach for selectively perturbing gene expression on a genome-wide scale. It will undoubtedly bring genome engineering into a more convenient and accurate new era.

  19. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    microenvironment, mammographic biomarkers 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals of the project? Aim 1. Determine whether genetic diversity...of genetic diversity, microenvironmental diversity, and/or mammographic biomarkers can be used to predict which DCIS tumors are most likely to...series of pilot experiments to determine the best resource (Washington University) that we will use to perform the genomic sequencing of our tumors. We

  20. The P1 vector system for the preparation and screening of genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, N S; Smoller, D

    1994-01-01

    In retrospect, it is remarkable how swiftly the P1 cloning system has progressed in only a few years from a novel cloning system to one now widely used for the production of recombinant libraries and the building of physical maps. As the libraries become larger, better characterized and more widely distributed, we certainly will see a blossoming of research articles and techniques based on the use of P1 recombinant clones. Specifically, we can look forward to scanning P1 clones for expressed sequences (N. Sternberg, personal communication), routine retrofitting of P1 clones with a combination of transposon and P1 transduction techniques (3), the random or loxP-directed (68,69) insertion of P1 clones into host genomes and the subsequent production of transgenic animals (63), a further use of P1 clones in the building of contigs and physical maps, an a higher in vitro cloning efficiency due to the purification of the P1 pacase proteins used during in vitro packaging (70). In summary, P1 bacteriophage cloning is favorably impacting research today and will continue to fill an important niche as a genomic cloning system.

  1. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  2. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, developmental regulation, and a knock-out mutant of a novel leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (DLGR-2) from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov; Hauser, Frank; Schiøtt, Morten

    2000-01-01

    After screening the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project database with sequences from a recently characterized Leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (LGR) fromDrosophila (DLGR-1), we identified a second gene for a different LGR (DLGR-2) and cloned its cDNA. DLGR-2 is 1360 amino acid...... LGRs (LGR-4 and LGR-5). This homology includes the seven transmembrane region (e.g., 49% amino acid identity with the human TSH receptor) and the very large extracellular amino terminus. This amino terminus contains 18 Leu-rich repeats-in contrast with the 3 mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptors...

  3. Successful pod infections by Moniliophthora roreri result in differential Theobroma cacao gene expression depending on the clone's level of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S; Melnick, Rachel L; Crozier, Jayne; Phillips-Mora, Wilberth; Strem, Mary D; Shao, Jonathan; Zhang, Dapeng; Sicher, Richard; Meinhardt, Lyndel; Bailey, Bryan A

    2014-09-01

    An understanding of the tolerance mechanisms of Theobroma cacao used against Moniliophthora roreri, the causal agent of frosty pod rot, is important for the generation of stable disease-tolerant clones. A comparative view was obtained of transcript populations of infected pods from two susceptible and two tolerant clones using RNA sequence (RNA-Seq) analysis. A total of 3009 transcripts showed differential expression among clones. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated shifts in 152 different metabolic pathways between the tolerant and susceptible clones. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR) analyses of 36 genes verified the differential expression. Regression analysis validated a uniform progression in gene expression in association with infection levels and fungal loads in the susceptible clones. Expression patterns observed in the susceptible clones diverged in tolerant clones, with many genes showing higher expression at a low level of infection and fungal load. Principal coordinate analyses of real-time qRT-PCR data separated the gene expression patterns between susceptible and tolerant clones for pods showing malformation. Although some genes were constitutively differentially expressed between clones, most results suggested that defence responses were induced at low fungal load in the tolerant clones. Several elicitor-responsive genes were highly expressed in tolerant clones, suggesting rapid recognition of the pathogen and induction of defence genes. Expression patterns suggested that the jasmonic acid-ethylene- and/or salicylic acid-mediated defence pathways were activated in the tolerant clones, being enhanced by reduced brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis and catabolic inactivation of both BR and abscisic acids. Finally, several genes associated with hypersensitive response-like cell death were also induced in tolerant clones. © 2014

  4. Dual Roles of RNF2 in Melanoma Progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epigenetic regulators have emerged as critical factors governing the biology of cancer. Here, in the context of melanoma, we show that RNF2 is prognostic, exhibiting progression-correlated expression in human melanocytic neoplasms. Through a series of complementary gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mouse and human systems, we establish that RNF2 is oncogenic and prometastatic.

  5. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    communication. This multi-disciplinary progress puts our group into an ideal position to fully implement the aims of the project and reach our year 3 and 4...were upstaged to invasive disease at definitive surgery. The other half of 99 testing subjects have been set aside for aim 3b work. For the first

  6. Genomically amplified Akt3 activates DNA repair pathway and promotes glioma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristen M; Sun, Youting; Ji, Ping; Granberg, Kirsi J; Bernard, Brady; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David E; Zhou, Xinhui; Yli-Harja, Olli; Nykter, Matti; Shmulevich, Ilya; Yung, W K Alfred; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei

    2015-03-17

    Akt is a robust oncogene that plays key roles in the development and progression of many cancers, including glioma. We evaluated the differential propensities of the Akt isoforms toward progression in the well-characterized RCAS/Ntv-a mouse model of PDGFB-driven low grade glioma. A constitutively active myristoylated form of Akt1 did not induce high-grade glioma (HGG). In stark contrast, Akt2 and Akt3 showed strong progression potential with 78% and 97% of tumors diagnosed as HGG, respectively. We further revealed that significant variations in polarity and hydropathy values among the Akt isoforms in both the pleckstrin homology domain (P domain) and regulatory domain (R domain) were critical in mediating glioma progression. Gene expression profiles from representative Akt-derived tumors indicated dominant and distinct roles for Akt3, consisting primarily of DNA repair pathways. TCGA data from human GBM closely reflected the DNA repair function, as Akt3 was significantly correlated with a 76-gene signature DNA repair panel. Consistently, compared with Akt1 and Akt2 overexpression models, Akt3-expressing human GBM cells had enhanced activation of DNA repair proteins, leading to increased DNA repair and subsequent resistance to radiation and temozolomide. Given the wide range of Akt3-amplified cancers, Akt3 may represent a key resistance factor.

  7. 大片段DNA克隆载体的研究进展%Research Progress of Large Fragment DNA Cloning Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 蒋世翠; 王康宇; 薛菲; 张美萍; 王义

    2015-01-01

    DNA克隆技术是分子生物学和基因工程研究中非常重要的一项技术。自第一个质粒载体pSC101作为第一个克隆载体以来,随着分子生物学技术的迅猛发展克隆载体的整体结构、容载能力和转化效率都有了很大的改善。通过综述克隆载体的发展概况,以及大片段DNA文库的构建和应用,对大片段DNA遗传转化的发展做了展望。%DNA cloning techniques is a very important technology in molecular biology and genetic engineering research .Since the first pSC101 plasmid cloning vector as the first cloning vector ,the rapid development of mo‐lecular biology techniques ,the overall structure of the cloning vector ,the capacity‐load capacity and conversion efficiency had been greatly improved .Through the reviews of the development situation of the cloning vector ,as well as construction and application of large fragments of DNA libraries ,and large pieces of DNA genetic trans‐formation of development were put forward .

  8. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  9. Current progress in the biology of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex following the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; de Souza Baptista, Andrea R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2015-09-01

    Sporotrichosis has been attributed for more than a century to one single etiological agent, Sporothrix schencki. Only eight years ago, it was described that, in fact, the disease is caused by several pathogenic cryptic species. The present review will focus on recent advances to understand the biology and virulence of epidemiologically relevant pathogenic species of the S. schenckii complex. The main subjects covered are the new clinical and epidemiological aspects including diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the development of molecular tools, the genome database and the perspectives for study of virulence of emerging Sporothrix species.

  10. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cheng, Sou-De (Children' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R McDonald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A. The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard

  12. Research Progress of Sugarcane Chloroplast Genome%甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杨; 周会

    2013-01-01

    Along with the development of modern molecular biology technologies, complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced in various plant species to date, and the structure, function and expression of these genes have been deter-mined. The chloroplast genome structure in most higher plants is stable, since the gene number, arrangement and composition are conservative. The determination of sugarcane chloroplast genome sequence laid a good foundation for sugarcane chloroplast related research. This article gives a review on the research progress of sugarcane chloroplast genome through the chloroplast genome map, gene structure, function, chloroplast RNA editing, and phylogenetic analysis in Saccharum and relat-ed genera. This study held great potential to clarify more directions in researches, including sugarcane chloroplast genetic transformation, complete chloroplast nu-cleotide sequence determination in Saccharum and closely related genera, cpSSRs development and application.%随着现代分子生物学技术的发展,目前已经完成了多种植物叶绿体基因组的全序列测定,并研究了这些基因的结构、功能与表达。大部分高等植物的叶绿体基因组结构稳定,基因数量、排列顺序及组成上具有保守性。甘蔗叶绿体基因组测序工作的完成为甘蔗叶绿体相关研究奠定了良好基础。文章从甘蔗叶绿体基因组图谱、结构和功能基因、叶绿体RNA编辑以及甘蔗属叶绿体系统进化等方面综合概述了甘蔗叶绿体基因组研究取得的成果,并从甘蔗叶绿体遗传转化、甘蔗及近缘属叶绿体基因组测序和叶绿体基因组 cpSSRs开发利用等方面指出甘蔗叶绿体基因组今后的研究方向。

  13. Genomic changes defining the progression of human colorectal and cervical tumors

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Defining changes during the carcinogenesis and progression of tumors is a major way to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of cancer development. We therefore investigated the cacinogenesis process in the colon-rectum and in the uterine cervix by different cellchemical, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic methods. Cell proliferation, assessed by immunohistochemical detection of the Ki-67 antigen (MIB 1 antibody), DNA ploify, determined by image cytometry, e...

  14. Cloning-free CRISPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Arbab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR, a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis.

  15. Improving livestock for agriculture - technological progress from random transgenesis to precision genome editing heralds a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Götz; Wei, Jingwei; Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history in shaping the genetic makeup of livestock to optimize production and meet growing human demands for food and other animal products. Until recently, this has only been possible through traditional breeding and selection, which is a painstakingly slow process of accumulating incremental gains over a long period. The development of transgenic livestock technology offers a more direct approach with the possibility for making genetic improvements with greater impact and within a single generation. However, initially the technology was hampered by technical difficulties and limitations, which have now largely been overcome by progressive improvements over the past 30 years. Particularly, the advent of genome editing in combination with homologous recombination has added a new level of efficiency and precision that holds much promise for the genetic improvement of livestock using the increasing knowledge of the phenotypic impact of genetic sequence variants. So far not a single line of transgenic livestock has gained approval for commercialization. The step change to genome-edited livestock with precise sequence changes may accelerate the path to market, provided applications of this new technology for agriculture can deliver, in addition to economic incentives for producers, also compelling benefits for animals, consumers, and the environment.

  16. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Molecular Cloning, Genomic Organization and Developmental Regulation of a Novel Receptor from Drosophila melanogaster Structurally Related to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors from Vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.

    1998-01-01

    RH) receptors from vertebrates. Using the polymerase chain reaction, withDrosophilacDNA as a template, and oligonucleotide probes coding for the presumed exons of this gene, we were able to clone the cDNA coding for this receptor. The transmembrane region of the receptor shows 36% amino acid residue identity...

  18. Positional cloning of deafness genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the majority of the known causative genes involved in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) started with linkage analysis as part of a positional cloning procedure. The human and mouse genome projects in combination with technical developments on genotyping, transcript

  19. Molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Juliane C

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the basic steps involved in conventional plasmid-based cloning. The goals are to insert a DNA fragment of interest into a receiving vector plasmid, transform the plasmid into E. coli, recover the plasmid DNA, and check for correct insertion events.

  20. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yue, Jie-Dong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-20

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  1. Genome-wide cloning and sequence analysis of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane receptor kinases play critical roles in both animal and plant signaling pathways regulating growth, development, differentiation, cell death, and pathogenic defense responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are at least 223 Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, representing one of the largest protein families. Although functional roles for a handful of LRR-RLKs have been revealed, the functions of the majority of members in this protein family have not been elucidated. Results As a resource for the in-depth analysis of this important protein family, the complementary DNA sequences (cDNAs of 194 LRR-RLKs were cloned into the GatewayR donor vector pDONR/ZeoR and analyzed by DNA sequencing. Among them, 157 clones showed sequences identical to the predictions in the Arabidopsis sequence resource, TAIR8. The other 37 cDNAs showed gene structures distinct from the predictions of TAIR8, which was mainly caused by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Most of the genes have been further cloned into GatewayR destination vectors with GFP or FLAG epitope tags and have been transformed into Arabidopsis for in planta functional analysis. All clones from this study have been submitted to the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC at Ohio State University for full accessibility by the Arabidopsis research community. Conclusions Most of the Arabidopsis LRR-RLK genes have been isolated and the sequence analysis showed a number of alternatively spliced variants. The generated resources, including cDNA entry clones, expression constructs and transgenic plants, will facilitate further functional analysis of the members of this important gene family.

  2. 材料基因组技术前沿进展%Progress on Materials Genome Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向勇; 闫宗楷; 朱焱麟; 张晓琨

    2016-01-01

    Materials genome is an emerging technology to accelerate materials discovery, development, and deployment. In the past two decades, high-throughput materials experimentation tools have been developed and applied successfully to the discovery of a number of materials, ranging from advanced catalysts, dielectrics, electrodes, to high-temperature alloys. Materials computation and database technologies have also made remarkable progresses, particularly represented by the integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) developed in the past decade. Materials genome research integrates high-throughput computation and simulation, high-throughput experimentation, and materials database, throughout the materials discovery-to-deployment process, targeting to cut the materials development time and cost significantly. This review, is trying to give a brief and comprehensive introduction to materials genome technologies, with emphasis on high-throughput materials experimentation, as well as applications of materials computation and database. University of Electronics Science and Technology of China is one of the most active institutes in China in the filed of materials genome research, and some progresses are also highlighted in this review.%材料基因组技术是近年来兴起的材料研究新理念和新方法,是当今世界材料科学与工程领域的最前沿。材料基因组技术的实质是通过融合高通量材料计算设计、高通量材料实验和材料数据库三大组成要素,构建材料设计研发的协同创新网络,加速新材料从发现到应用的全过程。其中,高通量材料实验经过20多年的发展,目前已面向多种形态材料和多种服役性能形成了一系列成功案例,高通量材料计算模拟和材料数据库近几年也取得了较大进展。该文简要回顾了材料基因组技术的主要内容和发展历程,总结了具有代表性的高通量实验技术,以及高通

  3. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  4. Pan-cancer analysis of the extent and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) drives neoplastic progression and therapeutic resistance. We used the bioinformatics tools 'expanding ploidy and allele frequency on nested subpopulations' (EXPANDS) and PyClone to detect clones that are present at a ≥10% frequency in 1,165 exome sequences from tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas. 86% of tumors across 12 cancer types had at least two clones. ITH in the morphology of nuclei was associated with genetic ITH (Spearman's correlation coefficient, ρ = 0.24-0.41; P < 0.001).

  5. Canine tumor cross-species genomics uncovers targets linked to osteosarcoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triche Timothy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary metastasis continues to be the most common cause of death in osteosarcoma. Indeed, the 5-year survival for newly diagnosed osteosarcoma patients has not significantly changed in over 20 years. Further understanding of the mechanisms of metastasis and resistance for this aggressive pediatric cancer is necessary. Pet dogs naturally develop osteosarcoma providing a novel opportunity to model metastasis development and progression. Given the accelerated biology of canine osteosarcoma, we hypothesized that a direct comparison of canine and pediatric osteosarcoma expression profiles may help identify novel metastasis-associated tumor targets that have been missed through the study of the human cancer alone. Results Using parallel oligonucleotide array platforms, shared orthologues between species were identified and normalized. The osteosarcoma expression signatures could not distinguish the canine and human diseases by hierarchical clustering. Cross-species target mining identified two genes, interleukin-8 (IL-8 and solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter, member 3 (SLC1A3, which were uniformly expressed in dog but not in all pediatric osteosarcoma patient samples. Expression of these genes in an independent population of pediatric osteosarcoma patients was associated with poor outcome (p = 0.020 and p = 0.026, respectively. Validation of IL-8 and SLC1A3 protein expression in pediatric osteosarcoma tissues further supported the potential value of these novel targets. Ongoing evaluation will validate the biological significance of these targets and their associated pathways. Conclusions Collectively, these data support the strong similarities between human and canine osteosarcoma and underline the opportunities provided by a comparative oncology approach as a means to improve our understanding of cancer biology and therapies.

  6. Cloning of the genomes of human cytomegalovirus strains Toledo, TownevarRIT3, and Towne long as BACs and site-directed mutagenesis using a PCR-based technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Gabriele; Rose, Dietlind; Wagner, Markus; Rhiel, Sylvia; McVoy, Michael A

    2003-03-01

    The 230-kb human cytomegalovirus genome is among the largest of the known viruses. Experiments to determine the genetic determinants of attenuation, pathogenesis, and tissue tropism are underway; however, a lack of complete sequence data for multiple strains and substantial problems with genetic instability during in vitro propagation create serious complications for such studies. For example, recent findings suggest that common laboratory strains Towne and AD169 passaged in cultured human fibroblasts are missing up to 15 kb of genetic information relative to clinical isolates. To establish standard, genetically stable genomes that can be sequenced, disseminated, and repeatedly reconstituted to produce virus stocks, we have undertaken to clone two variants of Towne, designated Towne(long) and Towne(short) (referred to as TownevarRIT3) (A., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 7829-7834), and the pathogenic strain Toledo into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). We further demonstrate the ease with which mutagenesis can be achieved by deleting 13.5 kb from the Toledo genome using a PCR-based technique.

  7. Nuclear transfer technology in mammalian cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, D P; Mitalipov, S; Norgren, R B

    2001-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells, our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT over 15 years ago from totipotent, embryonic blastomeres derived from early cleavage-stage embryos. However, once begun, the progression to somatic cell cloning or NT employing differentiated cells as the source of donor nuclei was meteoric, initially involving differentiated embryonic cell cultures in sheep in 1996 and quickly thereafter, fetal or adult somatic cells in sheep, cow, mouse, goat, and pig. Several recent reviews provide a background for and discussion of these successes. Here we will focus on the potential uses of reproductive cloning along with recent activities in the field and a discussion concerning current interests in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  8. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  9. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    genes , for example, has led to new treatments developed by the biotechnology industry for diseases such as diabetes and hemophilia . In the context of...stem cells should be permitted because of the potential for developing new therapies and advancing biomedical knowledge. On May 24, 2005, the House...to describe many different processes that involve making copies of biological material, such as a gene , a cell, a plant or an animal. The cloning of

  10. The genome of Coxiella burnetii Z3055, a clone linked to the Netherlands Q fever outbreaks, provides evidence for the role of drift in the emergence of epidemic clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Felicetta; Rouli, Laetitia; Edouard, Sophie; Tyczka, Judith; Million, Matthieu; Robert, Catherine; Nguyen, Thi Tien; Raoult, Didier

    2014-12-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a pathogen causing Q fever. The aim of our work was to study Z3055, a strain that is genotypically related to the strain causing the Netherlands outbreak. We compared Z3055 to 5 other completed genomes available in GenBank. We calculated the blast score ratio (BSR) to analyze genetic differences among the strains. The ratio core genome/pangenome was 98% likely other bacteria with closed pangenomes. Differences between Z3055 and the reference NMI consisted only of point mutations and insertion/deletion (INDELs). Non-synonymous mutations significantly increased in genes coding for membrane proteins (16/156 vs 103/1757, bilateral Chi(2) test, p<0.05), ankyrin repeat domains containing proteins (2/9 vs 117/1904, bilateral Chi(2) test, p<0.05), transcription factors (7/53 vs 112/1860, bilateral Chi(2) test, p<0.05) and translation proteins (15/144 vs 109/1655, bilateral Chi(2) test, p<0.05). The evolution of this strain may have been driven by mutations in critical genes.

  11. Towards the Physical Map of the Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Genome: Construction of YAC and BAC Libraries of the Reference Clone T. cruzi CL-Brener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ferrari

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to construct the physical map of the Trypanosoma cruzi nuclear genome have to capitalize on three main advantages of the parasite genome, namely (a its small size, (b the fact that all chromosomes can be defined, and many of them can be isolated by pulse field gel electrophoresis, and (c the fact that simple Southern blots of electrophoretic karyotypes can be used to map sequence tagged sites and expressed sequence tags to chromosomal bands. A major drawback to cope with is the complexity of T. cruzi genetics, that hinders the construction of a comprehensive genetic map. As a first step towards physical mapping, we report the construction and partial characterization of a T. cruzi CL-Brener genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs that consists of 2,770 individual YACs with a mean insert size of 365 kb encompassing around 10 genomic equivalents. Two libraries in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs have been constructed, BACI and BACII. Both libraries represent about three genome equivalents. A third BAC library (BAC III is being constructed. YACs and BACs are invaluable tools for physical mapping. More generally, they have to be considered as a common resource for research in Chagas disease

  12. A novel approach to propagate flavivirus infectious cDNA clones in bacteria by introducing tandem repeat sequences upstream of virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Despite tremendous efforts to improve the methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, the manipulation of flavivirus cDNAs remains a difficult task in bacteria. Here, we successfully propagated DNA-launched type 2 dengue virus (DENV2) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infectious cDNAs by introducing seven repeats of the tetracycline-response element (7×TRE) and a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMVmin) promoter upstream of the viral genome. Insertion of the 7×TRE-CMVmin sequence upstream of the DENV2 or JEV genome decreased the cryptic E. coli promoter (ECP) activity of the viral genome in bacteria, as measured using fusion constructs containing DENV2 or JEV segments and the reporter gene Renilla luciferase in an empty vector. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from DNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs were similar to those of parental viruses. Similarly, RNA-launched DENV2 infectious cDNAs were generated by inserting 7×TRE-CMVmin, five repeats of the GAL4 upstream activating sequence, or five repeats of BamHI linkers upstream of the DENV2 genome. All three tandem repeat sequences decreased the ECP activity of the DENV2 genome in bacteria. Notably, 7×TRE-CMVmin stabilized RNA-launched JEV infectious cDNAs and reduced the ECP activity of the JEV genome in bacteria. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from RNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs displayed patterns similar to those of the parental viruses. These results support a novel methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, which will facilitate research in virology, viral pathogenesis and vaccine development of flaviviruses and other RNA viruses. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Diversification of mitochondrial genome of Daphnia galeata (Cladocera, Crustacea): Comparison with phylogenetic consideration of the complete sequences of clones isolated from five lakes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokishita, Shin-Ichi; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Taku; Sakamoto, Masaki; Ha, Jin-Yong; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yamagata, Hideo; Hanazato, Takayuki

    2017-05-05

    To characterize genetic diversity and gene flow among Daphnia galeata populations, the complete nucleotide (nt) sequences of the mitochondrial (mt) DNAs of D. galeata clones isolated from five lakes in Japan (Lakes Shirakaba, Suwa, Kizaki, Kasumigaura, and Biwa) were determined. Comparison of non-synonymous (amino acid altering) substitution rates with synonymous substitution rates of D. galeata mt protein-coding genes demonstrated that ATPase8 and COI genes were the most and least susceptible, respectively, to the evolutional forces selecting the aa substitutions. Several non-synonymous substitutions were found in ATPase8 and ATPase6 even in the comparison that no synonymous substitution was found. Comparison of the total number of nt variations among the mt DNAs suggested the phylogenetic relationship ((((Shirakaba/Suwa, Kizaki), Kasumigaura), Biwa), D. pulex). Maximum-likelihood analysis using the total nt sequences of mt protein-coding genes confirmed this relationship with bootstrap values higher than 98%. All the mtDNAs of the analyzed Japanese D. galeata clones contained a control region of essentially the same structure that is distinct from those of the previously reported European Daphnia species of the D. longispina complex. The two control regions of different structures spread among mtDNAs of the Japanese and European Daphnia species, respectively, probably after the divergence of the Japanese D. galeata under different selection pressures associated with their habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rescue of the highly virulent classical swine fever virus strain “Koslov” from cloned cDNA and first insights into genome variations relevant for virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Risager, Peter Christian

    2014-01-01

    -by-step, thereby producing genomes encoding the consensus amino acid sequence. Viruses rescued from the construct corresponding to the inferred parental form were highly virulent, when tested in pigs, with infected animals displaying pronounced clinical symptoms leading to high mortality. The reconstruction...

  15. Current development and application of soybean genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli HE; Jing ZHAO; Man ZHAO; Chaoying HE

    2011-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max),an important domesticated species originated in China,constitutes a major source of edible oils and high-quality plant proteins worldwide.In spite of its complex genome as a consequence of an ancient tetraploidilization,platforms for map-based genomics,sequence-based genomics,comparative genomics and functional genomics have been well developed in the last decade,thus rich repertoires of genomic tools and resources are available,which have been influencing the soybean genetic improvement.Here we mainly review the progresses of soybean (including its wild relative Glycine soja) genomics and its impetus for soybean breeding,and raise the major biological questions needing to be addressed.Genetic maps,physical maps,QTL and EST mapping have been so well achieved that the marker assisted selection and positional cloning in soybean is feasible and even routine.Whole genome sequencing and transcriptomic analyses provide a large collection of molecular markers and predicted genes,which are instrumental to comparative genomics and functional genomics.Comparative genomics has started to reveal the evolution of soybean genome and the molecular basis of soybean domestication process.Microarrays resources,mutagenesis and efficient transformation systems become essential components of soybean functional genomics.Furthermore,phenotypic functional genomics via both forward and reverse genetic approaches has inferred functions of many genes involved in plant and seed development,in response to abiotic stresses,functioning in plant-pathogenic microbe interactions,and controlling the oil and protein content of seed.These achievements have paved the way for generation of transgenic or genetically modified (GM) soybean crops.

  16. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  17. Co-expression module analysis reveals biological processes, genomic gain, and regulatory mechanisms associated with breast cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derow Catherine K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures are typically identified by correlating gene expression patterns to a disease phenotype of interest. However, individual gene-based signatures usually suffer from low reproducibility and interpretability. Results We have developed a novel algorithm Iterative Clique Enumeration (ICE for identifying relatively independent maximal cliques as co-expression modules and a module-based approach to the analysis of gene expression data. Applying this approach on a public breast cancer dataset identified 19 modules whose expression levels were significantly correlated with tumor grade. The correlations were reproducible for 17 modules in an independent breast cancer dataset, and the reproducibility was considerably higher than that based on individual genes or modules identified by other algorithms. Sixteen out of the 17 modules showed significant enrichment in certain Gene Ontology (GO categories. Specifically, modules related to cell proliferation and immune response were up-regulated in high-grade tumors while those related to cell adhesion was down-regulated. Further analyses showed that transcription factors NYFB, E2F1/E2F3, NRF1, and ELK1 were responsible for the up-regulation of the cell proliferation modules. IRF family and ETS family proteins were responsible for the up-regulation of the immune response modules. Moreover, inhibition of the PPARA signaling pathway may also play an important role in tumor progression. The module without GO enrichment was found to be associated with a potential genomic gain in 8q21-23 in high-grade tumors. The 17-module signature of breast tumor progression clustered patients into subgroups with significantly different relapse-free survival times. Namely, patients with lower cell proliferation and higher cell adhesion levels had significantly lower risk of recurrence, both for all patients (p = 0.004 and for those with grade 2 tumors (p = 0.017. Conclusions The ICE

  18. Construction and characterization of a 10-genome equivalent yeast artificial chromosome library for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, L.; Zee, R.Y.L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Schalkwyk, L.C. [Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Increasing attention has been focused in recent years on the rat as a model organism for genetic studies, in particular for the investigation of complex traits, but progress has been limited by the lack of availability of large-insert genomic libraries. Here, we report the construction and characterization of an arrayed yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for the rat genome containing approximately 40,000 clones in the AB1380 host using the pCGS966 vector. An average size of 736 kb was estimated from 166 randomly chosen clones; thus the library provides 10-fold coverage of the genome, with a 99.99% probability of containing a unique sequence. Eight of 39 YACs analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization were found to be chimeric, indicating a proportion of about 20-30% of chimeric clones. The library was spotted on high-density filters to allow the identification of YAC clones by hybridization and was pooled using a 3-dimensional scheme for screening by PCR. Among 48 probes used to screen the library, an average of 9.3 positive clones were found, consistent with the calculated 10-fold genomic coverage of the library. This YAC library represents the first large-insert genomic library for the rat. It will be made available to the research community at large as an important new resource for complex genome analysis in this species. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22 using Pace electrophoresis and large fragment cloning]. Annual report, October 1, 1991--July 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.I.

    1994-12-31

    In the past two years, the authors have made a great deal of progress in establishing Fosmid and BAC libraries and in using large BAC libraries for gene mapping. In addition, they initiated work on the application of BAC clones to long range genome sequencing. They continue to increase the ability to rapidly generate large BAC libraries and to efficiently apply these libraries to genome mapping. The BACs provide a very effective means of developing physical maps. The current work suggests that BAC contigs will be extremely useful as source material for genome sequencing.

  20. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  1. Human papillomaviruses associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. II. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of human papillomavirus 3a, 8, 10, and 12 genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremsdorf, D; Jablonska, S.; Favre, M.; Orth, G

    1983-01-01

    The DNAs of four human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that were found in the benign lesions of three patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis have been characterized. The flat wart-like lesions and the macular lesions of patient 1 contained two viruses, HPV-3a and HPV-8, respectively, whose genomes had previously been only partially characterized. The flat wart-like lesions of patient 2 and the macular lesions of patient 3 each contained a virus previously considered as belonging to t...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Hospital-Associated Clone of Klebsiella pneumoniae ST340/CC258 Coproducing RmtG and KPC-2 Isolated from a Pediatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeira, Louise; Fernandes, Miriam R; Francisco, Gabriela R; Bueno, Maria Fernanda C; Ienne, Susan; Souza, Tiago A; de Oliveira Garcia, Doroti; Lincopan, Nilton

    2016-11-03

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 1194/11, belonging to the hospital-associated sequence type 340 (ST340; clonal complex CC258), isolated from a catheter tip culture from a pediatric patient. The multidrug-resistant strain coproduced the 16S rRNA methyltransferase rRNA RmtG and β-lactamases KPC-2 and CTX-M-15.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain M1, a unique t024-ST8-IVa Danish methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Worning, Peder; Bartels, Mette

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence, in five contigs, of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate designated M1. This clinical isolate was from the index patient of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in Copenhagen, Denmark, that started in 2003. This strain is se...... is sequence type 8 (ST8), spa type t024, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) type IVa....

  4. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; George, Reed A.; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Boldyreva, Lidiya V.; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A. Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. PMID:25589440

  5. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  6. Bacterial genome reengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jindan; Rudd, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    The web application PrimerPair at ecogene.org generates large sets of paired DNA sequences surrounding- all protein and RNA genes of Escherichia coli K-12. Many DNA fragments, which these primers amplify, can be used to implement a genome reengineering strategy using complementary in vitro cloning and in vivo recombineering. The integration of a primer design tool with a model organism database increases the level of quality control. Computer-assisted design of gene primer pairs relies upon having highly accurate genomic DNA sequence information that exactly matches the DNA of the cells being used in the laboratory to ensure predictable DNA hybridizations. It is equally crucial to have confidence that the predicted start codons define the locations of genes accurately. Annotations in the EcoGene database are queried by PrimerPair to eliminate pseudogenes, IS elements, and other problematic genes before the design process starts. These projects progressively familiarize users with the EcoGene content, scope, and application interfaces that are useful for genome reengineering projects. The first protocol leads to the design of a pair of primer sequences that were used to clone and express a single gene. The N-terminal protein sequence was experimentally verified and the protein was detected in the periplasm. This is followed by instructions to design PCR primer pairs for cloning gene fragments encoding 50 periplasmic proteins without their signal peptides. The design process begins with the user simply designating one pair of forward and reverse primer endpoint positions relative to all start and stop codon positions. The gene name, genomic coordinates, and primer DNA sequences are reported to the user. When making chromosomal deletions, the integrity of the provisional primer design is checked to see whether it will generate any unwanted double deletions with adjacent genes. The bad designs are recalculated and replacement primers are provided alongside the

  7. 猪链球菌的比较基因组学研究进展%Progress on research of comparative genomics of Streptococcus suis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑霄

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important zoonotic agent and could cause outbreaks of the infections among pigs and humans. Over the past five years, great progress had been achieved in the field of S. suis genomics. By now six S. suis genomes have been sequenced and publicly available. Furthermore, the application of new comparative genomics technologies on such genomes had led to the identification of new pathogenicity islands and pathogenesis-related genes,which greatly boosted the research on pathogenic mechanisms of S. suis.%猪链球菌是一种重要的人兽共患病病原菌,可以引起人猪链球菌病暴发流行.近几年来,猪链球菌的基因组学研究发展迅速:共有6株猪链球菌的基因组全序列公布;采用多种比较基因组技术发现了高致病性猪链球菌相关的毒力岛和特异基因,为研究猪链球菌的致病机制提供了重要线索.

  8. Progress on Functional Genomics of Some Important Zoonotic Parasites%重要人兽共患寄生虫功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾琳; 陈韶红; 陈家旭

    2011-01-01

    随着分子生物学技术的迅速发展,基因组学的研究已从结构基因组学转向功能基因组学,对于基因功能的研究也由单一基因转向大规模、批量分析.为促进我国寄生虫功能基因组学的研究,本文介绍几种重要的功能基因组学研究技术方法,并对近几年来一些重要寄生虫功能基因组学的最新研究进展作一综述.%With the development of molecular biology, genomics research has been expanded from structural genomics to functional genomics, and from single gene to massive batch. This paper summarizes the progress of structural genomics of some zoonotic parasites and major technical methods.

  9. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Differentially Expressed Phenylalanine Ammonialyase Gene (liPAL) After Genome Duplication from Tetraploid Isatis indigotica Fort.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei-Bei Lu; Zhen Du; Ru-Xian Ding; Lei Zhang; Xiao-Jing Yu; Cheng-Hong Liu; Wan-Sheng Chen

    2006-01-01

    Phenylpropanoid derivatives are a complex class of secondary metabolites that have many important roles in plants during normal growth and in responses to environmental stress. Phenylalanine ammonialyase(PAL) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. In the present study, we isolated a novel phenylalanine ammonialyase gene (designated as liPAL) from tetraploid Isatis indigotica Fort. by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), which was a cultivar from the diploid plant by genome duplication.The full-length cDNA of liPAL was 2 530-bp long with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2 178 bp encoding a polypeptide of 725 amino acid residues. Analysis of liPAL genomic DNA revealed that it was structurally similar to other plant PAL genes, with a single intron at a conserved position, and a long highly conserved second exon. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the liPAL expression in roots and leaves from a tetraploid sample was higher than that in diploid progenitor, whereas expression of liPAL in stems was almost the same as each other. Furthermore, the highest expression of liPAL in tetraploid plant was found in roots, which was found in stems in diploid plants. Further expression analysis revealed that gibberellin (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and cold treatments could up-regulate the liPAL transcription in tetraploid plants. All our findings suggest that liPAL participates not only in the defense/stress responsive pathways, but also probably in the polyploidy evolution of I. indigotica.

  11. Mathematical design of prokaryotic clone-based microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, B.; Quirijns, E.J.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Werf, van der M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background - Clone-based microarrays, on which each spot represents a random genomic fragment, are a good alternative to open reading frame-based microarrays, especially for microorganisms for which the complete genome sequence is not available. Since the generation of a genomic DNA library is a ran

  12. Mathematical design of prokaryotic clone-based microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, B.; Quirijns, E.J.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Werf, M.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clone-based microarrays, on which each spot represents a random genomic fragment, are a good alternative to open reading frame-based microarrays, especially for microorganisms for which the complete genome sequence is not available. Since the generation of a genomic DNA library is a rand

  13. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  14. The Clone Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  15. Progresses in research on the functional genomics on Tribolium castaneum%赤拟谷盗功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李承军; 王艳允; 刘幸; 桑明; 李斌

    2011-01-01

    赤拟谷盗Tribolium castaneum是一种重要的模式生物,在遗传、发育、生化与免疫等研究领域均取得了重要的研究进展.同时它也是一种危害极大的鞘翅目类储粮害虫,在世界各地都有分布,每年给储藏物造成了数十亿美元的经济损失.其全基因组测序的完成、遗传操作体系的构建及系统RNAi方法的应用都极大地促进了其功能基因组学的研究.本文综述了近年来赤拟谷盗基因组计划及功能基因组学的研究进展,拟为赤拟谷盗的生物学研究和防治奠定基础.%Tribolium castaneum is a powerful model organism for research in such fields as insect genetics, biology development, biochemistry and immunity, and rapid and useful progress has been made in these fields in recent years. T. Castaneum is also an important coleopteran pest of stored agricultural products. This globally distributed pest causes billions of dollars of damage to such stored products each year. Recently, the sequencing of the entire genome of T. Castaneum, the construction of their genetics operation systems, and the utilization of the systemic RNA interference, have greatly facilitated and accelerated research on their functional genomics and the related fields. In order to facilitate research on both the fundamental biology and control of T. Castaneum, we here review progresses and achievements in research on T. Castaneum genome projects and functional genomics over the past few years.

  16. 蛇毒类凝血酶基因工程的研究进展%Research Progress on Cloning of Snake Venom Thrombin-like Enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家祺; 李谦; 唐松山; 李红枝

    2013-01-01

    蛇毒类凝血酶(Thrombin-like enzyme,TLE)是蛇毒中与血浆凝血酶性质相似的一类丝氨酸蛋白酶,所不同的是在蛇毒类凝血酶结构中已经没有纤维蛋白稳定因子激活组分.由于蛇毒类凝血酶在新药研究中扮演重要角色,比如来自Bothrops jararaca和Bothrops atrox蛇毒的立芷雪、来自东北白眉蝮蛇毒的邦停和来自尖吻蝮蛇毒的苏灵,它们是具有止血作用的新药;来自Gloydius shedaoensis和Gloydius ussuriensis蛇毒的东菱克栓酶、来自白眉蝮蛇和尖吻蝮蛇毒的降纤酶、来自Calloselasma rhodostoma蛇毒的安克洛酶和来自Crotalus adamanteus蛇毒的Crotalase,它们是具有溶栓作用的新药.这些药用蛋白质的来源和产量因有限的蛇毒原料而有很大限制,通过基因克隆可解决资源问题.文章综述了蛇毒类凝血酶的基因结构、糖基化特点和各种重组表达体系,为大量制备供临床和基础研究使用奠定基础.%Snake venom thrombin-like enzymes (snTLE) are one kind of serine proteases similar to thrombin from blood, but the basic difference between them is that snTLE has no XIII-activated domain to lead thrombosis in vivo or in vitro. Because snake venoms play very important role in pharmaceutics,for example Reptilase from Bothrops jararaca or Bothrops atrox snake venom, Bangtin from Agkistrodon halys snake venom,or Siding from Agkistrodon acutus snake venom,are hemostatic drugs. Defibrase from Gloydius shedaoensis ,Cloydius ussuriensis,Agkistrodon halys,or Agkistrodon acutus snake venom,Ancrod from Calloselasma rhodostoma snake venom, or Crotalase from Crotalus adamanteus snake venom, is thrombolytic drug. So the shortage of snake venom source can be overcome by using gene recombination method. The gene structures, protein glycosylation, and all kinds of cloning expression systems for snTLE protein are summarized in the paper,which will provide a basis for large-scale production of some snTLE proteins.

  17. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: Chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausova, Z.; Bourdon, J.; Clayton, D.; Janicic, N.; Goltzman, D.; Hendy, G.N. (McGill Univ. and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal Quebec (Canada)); Mattei, M.G. (INSERM, Marseille (France)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Riviere, M.; Szpirer, J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-St-Genese (Belgium)) (and others)

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acelpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). These results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes. 34 refs., 7 figs. 1 tab.

  18. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausova, Z; Bourdon, J; Clayton, D; Mattei, M G; Seldin, M F; Janicic, N; Rivière, M; Szpirer, J; Levan, G; Szpirer, C

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acylpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). Our results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes.

  19. Crotoxin: Structural Studies, Mechanism of Action and Cloning of Its gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    basic subunit clones and the acidic subunit clones that were partially sequenced, had multiple sequence differences. New cONA and genomic libraries from...were partially sequenced, had multiple sequence differences. New cDNA and genomic libraries from C. s. scutulatus are in being prepared and screened...unsuccessful in identifying any clones that contained basic subunit cDNA. Work is continuing with new cDNA and genomic libraries from . t , in collaboration

  20. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  1. Progression from Sustained BK Viruria to Sustained BK Viremia with Immunosuppression Reduction Is Not Associated with Changes in the Noncoding Control Region of the BK Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran A. Memon

    2012-01-01

    We performed PCR amplification and sequencing of (1 stored urine and (2 plasma samples from the time of peak viremia from 11 patients with sustained viremia who participated in a 200-patient clinical trial. The antimetabolite was withdrawn for BK viremia and reduction of the calcineurin inhibitor for sustained BK viremia. DNA sequencing from the 11 patients with sustained viremia revealed 8 insertions, 16 transversions, 3 deletions, and 17 transitions. None were deemed significant. No patient developed clinically evident BKVAN. Our data support, at a genomic level, the effectiveness of reduction of immunosuppression for prevention of progression from viremia to BKVAN.

  2. Rice's Salt Tolerance Gene Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with US colleagues, CAS researchers have made significant progress in their studies into functional genes for key agronomic traits by cloning SKC1, a salt-tolerant functional gene of rice and making clear its biological functions and mechanisms. This pioneering work,which was reported in the Oct. issue of Nature Genetics (37:1141-1146), is believed to hold promise to increase the output of the crop plant in this country.

  3. Conotoxins Are Purified and Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A group of CAS scientists have succeeded in purifying many conotoxins and cloning more than 100 new genes from six species of cone snails living in waters off the coast of the South China Sea, paving the way for the development of new drugs to relieve neuropathic pains. The work has been honored with a first prize from the 2005 Awards for S&T Progress in Shanghai.

  4. De novo 454 sequencing of barcoded BAC pools for comprehensive gene survey and genome analysis in the complex genome of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De novo sequencing the entire genome of a large complex plant genome like the one of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is a major challenge both in terms of experimental feasibility and costs. The emergence and breathtaking progress of next generation sequencing technologies has put this goal into focus and a clone based strategy combined with the 454/Roche technology is conceivable. Results To test the feasibility, we sequenced 91 barcoded, pooled, gene containing barley BACs using the GS FLX platform and assembled the sequences under iterative change of parameters. The BAC assemblies were characterized by N50 of ~50 kb (N80 ~31 kb, N90 ~21 kb and a Q40 of 94%. For ~80% of the clones, the best assemblies consisted of less than 10 contigs at 24-fold mean sequence coverage. Moreover we show that gene containing regions seem to assemble completely and uninterrupted thus making the approach suitable for detecting complete and positionally anchored genes. By comparing the assemblies of four clones to their complete reference sequences generated by the Sanger method, we evaluated the distribution, quality and representativeness of the 454 sequences as well as the consistency and reliability of the assemblies. Conclusion The described multiplex 454 sequencing of barcoded BACs leads to sequence consensi highly representative for the clones. Assemblies are correct for the majority of contigs. Though the resolution of complex repetitive structures requires additional experimental efforts, our approach paves the way for a clone based strategy of sequencing the barley genome.

  5. The DNA-instability test as a specific marker of malignancy and its application to detect cancer clones in borderline malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fukuda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in cytogenetic and biochemical mutator assay technologies has enabled us to detect single gene alterations and gross chromosomal rearrangements, and it became clear that all cancer cells are genetically unstable. In order to detect the genome-wide instability of cancer cells, a new simple method, the DNA-instability test, was developed. The methods to detect genomic instability so far reported have only demonstrated the presence of qualitative and quantitative alterations in certain specific genomic loci. In contrast to these commonly used methods to reveal the genomic instability at certain specific DNA regions, the newly introduced DNA-instability test revealed the presence of physical DNA-instability in the entire DNA molecule of a cancer cell nucleus as revealed by increased liability to denature upon HCl hydrolysis or formamide exposure. When this test was applied to borderline malignancies, cancer clones were detected in all cases at an early-stage of cancer progression. We proposed a new concept of “procancer” clones to define those cancer clones with “functional atypia” showing positivities for various cancer markers, as well as DNA-instability testing, but showing no remarkable ordinary “morphological atypia” which is commonly used as the basis of histopathological diagnosis of malignancy.

  6. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower...

  7. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L.F. Ho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability.

  8. THE CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-3 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we have cloned the gene of human neurotrophin-3 (hNT-3) from the genomic DNA of white blood cells (WBC) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplification products were cloned into pUC19 and sequenced. Genomic sequence comparison of the cloned fragment and the reported hNT-3 (GenBank M61180) reveals 7 base differences: 1 in the signal peptide, 3 in the prepro peptide, and 3 in the mature hNT-3. Except the 2 varied bases (16th, T to G; 285th, A to C) in the signal peptide and pro-sequence resulted in the change of their encoded amino-acids (Tyr→Asp; Gln→His), the other varied bases have no influence on their respective encoded amino-acids, and all the changes have no influence on the open reading frame (ORF) of the hNT-3.

  9. 新型基因组编辑技术研究进展%Progress on Novel Genome Editing Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩勇; 杨杰; 李子彬; 董宋鹏; 高凤山

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is a new technology which can modifiy the targeted biological genome accurately so as to knock out some genes site-directly and integrate some exogenous genes site-directly.Recently,sev-eral effective tools were developed quickly,including engineered nuclease mediated zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN),transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN)and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats along with cas9 protein (CRISPRs/Cas9),and they all can site-directly edit genomes by recognizing the target sites according to the specific structure followed by nuclease cleavage.The three no-vel genome editing technologies have been applied broadly in life science because of their advantages of higher efficiency,making easily and timesaving.Here the characteristics,principles,construction methods of the three novel genome editing technologies and their application in conventional biology model,functional genome screening,and gene therapy for human inherited diseases were reviewed.%基因组编辑技术是一种能精确靶向修饰生物基因组,实现对基因定点敲除和外源基因定点整合的技术。新出现的锌指核酸酶(ZFN)、转录激活子样效应因子核酸酶(TALEN)和规律性重复短回文序列簇与 Cas9蛋白(CRISPRs/Cas9)系统3种新型的基因组编辑技术通过特异性结构识别靶位点,核酸酶发挥切割作用对靶位点进行定点编辑。3种新型基因编辑技术因具有高效准确、制作简单、耗时短等特点而在生命科学研究中得到广泛应用。论文对目前三种新型的基因组定点编辑技术的特点、结构原理、构建方法以及在传统生物模型、功能基因筛选、人类遗传病基因治疗等方面中的应用做一综述。

  10. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence ... stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also known as research or therapeutic cloning), ...

  11. Ethical issues in cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satris, S

    2000-01-01

    There is great public concern with the ethics of human cloning. This paper briefly examines some of what I identify as pseudo-problems or myths associated with cloning, and some of the more substantial ethical concerns.

  12. Progressive genomic convergence of two Helicobacter pylori strains during mixed infection of a patient with chronic gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qizhi; Didelot, Xavier; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Zongwei; He, Lihua; Li, Yunsheng; Ni, Ming; You, Yuanhai; Lin, Xi; Li, Zhen; Gong, Yanan; Zheng, Minqiao; Zhang, Minli; Liu, Jie; Wang, Weijun; Bo, Xiaochen; Falush, Daniel; Wang, Shengqi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the detailed nature of genomic microevolution during mixed infection with multiple Helicobacter pylori strains in an individual. Design We sampled 18 isolates from a single biopsy from a patient with chronic gastritis and nephritis. Whole-genome sequencing was applied to these isolates, and statistical genetic tools were used to investigate their evolutionary history. Results The genomes fall into two clades, reflecting colonisation of the stomach by two distinct strains, and these lineages have accumulated diversity during an estimated 2.8 and 4.2 years of evolution. We detected about 150 clear recombination events between the two clades. Recombination between the lineages is a continuous ongoing process and was detected on both clades, but the effect of recombination in one clade was nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the other. Imputed ancestral sequences also showed evidence of recombination between the two strains prior to their diversification, and we estimate that they have both been infecting the same host for at least 12 years. Recombination tracts between the lineages were, on average, 895 bp in length, and showed evidence for the interspersion of recipient sequences that has been observed in in vitro experiments. The complex evolutionary history of a phage-related protein provided evidence for frequent reinfection of both clades by a single phage lineage during the past 4 years. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing can be used to make detailed conclusions about the mechanisms of genetic change of H. pylori based on sampling bacteria from a single gastric biopsy. PMID:25007814

  13. Mammalian cloning: possibilities and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, S M; Wolf, D P

    2000-10-01

    The cloning of mammals originated with the production of limited numbers of genetically identical offspring by blastomere separation or embryo splitting. In the past few years, remarkable progress has been reported in cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) with donor nuclei recovered from embryonic, fetal or adult cells. Factors that contribute to the successful reprogramming of the transferred nucleus and the normal term development of the newly reconstructed embryo include the cell cycle stage of both the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplast, the timing of fusion and cytoplast activation, and the source of donor nuclei. The possibility of producing live offspring by somatic cell NT carries potential applications in animal husbandry, biotechnology, transgenic and pharmaceutical production, biomedical research, and the preservation of endangered species. However, the low efficiencies of cloning by NT coupled with high embryonic, fetal and neonatal losses may restrict immediate commercial applications in agriculture. These limitations notwithstanding, the greatest benefits and practical implications of this new technology could be in transplantation medicine and therapeutic cloning.

  14. [Application progress of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yinglun; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into human target cells in a certain way to correct or compensate diseases caused by defective or abnormal genes. Therefore, gene therapy has great practical significance in studying the treatment of persistent or latent HIV-1 infection. At present, the existing methods of gene therapy have some major defects such as limited target site recognition and high frequency of off-targets. The latest research showed that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) /CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea has been successfully reformed to a targeted genome editing tool. Thus, how to achieve the goal of treating HIV-1 infection by modifying targeted HIV-1 virus genome effectively using the CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a current research focus. Here we review the latest achievements worldwide and briefly introduce applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including CCR5 gene editing, removal of HIV-1 virus and activation of HIV-1 virus, in order to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  15. Strategies for cloning and manipulating natural and synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Bogumil J; Suzuki, Yo; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-02-01

    Advances in synthetic biology methods to assemble and edit DNA are enabling genome engineering at a previously impracticable scale and scope. The synthesis of the Mycoplasma mycoides genome followed by its transplantation to convert a related cell into M. mycoides has transformed strain engineering. This approach exemplifies the combination of newly emerging chromosome-scale genome editing strategies that can be defined in three main steps: (1) chromosome acquisition into a microbial engineering platform, (2) alteration and improvement of the acquired chromosome, and (3) installation of the modified chromosome into the original or alternative organism. In this review, we outline recent progress in methods for acquiring chromosomes and chromosome-scale DNA molecules in the workhorse organisms Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We present overviews of important genetic strategies and tools for each of the three organisms, point out their respective strengths and weaknesses, and highlight how the host systems can be used in combination to facilitate chromosome assembly or engineering. Finally, we highlight efforts for the installation of the cloned/altered chromosomes or fragments into the target organism and present remaining challenges in expanding this powerful experimental approach to a wider range of target organisms.

  16. Construction and Genome Sequence Analysis of Molecular Clone of Canine Parainfluenza Virus%犬副流感病毒分子克隆的构建及全基因组序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐宾宾; 宋彩玲; 陈小微; 曲连东; 刘明

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the molecular evolution of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV),the full-length molecular clone of HRB-V strain was constructed by ligation of overlapping RT-PCR fragments. The five fragments 5′UTR,3′UTR,f1,f2,f3,were digested with specific restriction enzymes and cloned into expression plasmid pHW2000.Then the complete genome was sequenced and compared with sequences of PIV5 reference strains in GenBank.The isolate genome was 15 246 nucleotides in length including 5′UTR,7 ORFS and 3′ UTR.Fusion (F)gene,haemagglutinin (HN)gene and complete genome analysis demonstrated that HRB-V is closely related with reference strains CPI-/CPI+.The nucleotide sequence homologies of F and HN genes with the reference strains were between 96.5%-98.8% and 98.1%-99.5%, and amino acid sequence homologies were between 94.2%-98% and 97%-99.3%,respectively.Above all suggested the virus strain of HRB-V had little differences and close genetic relationships with other PIV5 i-solates.The construction of molecular clone laid the base for further development CPIV reverse genetics system and mutation analysis.%为了解犬副流感病毒(CPIV)的基因组结构与遗传进化特征,应用 RT-PCR 分段扩增 HRB-V毒株的5个片段,f1、f2、f3以及5′-末端和3′-末端,克隆到 pHW2000载体中并进行测序。经序列拼接获得全基因组序列,与 GenBank 登录的副流感病毒代表毒株进行对比分析。基因序列分析表明,HRB-V 株基因组全长15246 nt,含5′-末端、3′-末端和7个 ORF 具有副流感病毒基因组结构的典型特征;将结构蛋白 F、HN 以及全基因序列与参考毒株进行比较分析并做遗传进化树,结果表明,HRB-V 与 CPI-和 CPI+属同一分支,亲缘性相近。核苷酸以及氨基酸序列同源性分析结果表明,HRB-V 与各病毒株的 F 基因的核苷酸同源性在96.5%~98.8%之间,氨基酸同源性为94.2%~98%;HN

  17. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  18. Most multifocal papillary thyroid carcinomas acquire genetic and morphotype diversity through subclonal evolution following the intra-glandular spread of the initial neoplastic clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, L; Delahunt, B; McIver, B; Eberhardt, N L; Grebe, S K G

    2008-06-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is frequently multifocal (mPTC), with synchronous tumour foci often showing varied morphology. The genetic mechanisms underlying the development of multiple and histologically diverse tumour foci remain uncertain. Different tumour foci might develop either through intrathyroidal dissemination of a single malignant clone, with morphotype differentiation occurring as a result of subclonal progression, or they may stem from independent transformational events involving multiple progenitor clones. To determine the clonal derivation of multiple tumour foci and to map their clonal relationships and genetic progression in mPTC, we evaluated genome-wide allelic imbalances (AI) and BRAF V600E mutation status in 55 synchronous tumour foci from 18 mPTC patients. For apparently monoclonal tumours, we calculated the probabilities of monoclonal derivation and used phylogenetic analysis to model clonal evolution. Genome-wide allelotyping and BRAF mutation analysis showed genetic alterations consistent with monoclonal origin in 83% of cases, mostly with evidence of subclonal evolution. BRAF V600E mutations were early events during clonal evolution of most, but not all cases. MPTC with morphologically diverse tumour foci also arose through monoclonal derivation in 75% of cases, demonstrating that morphotype-determining genetic changes can be acquired during clonal diversification, subsequent to the spread of the original malignant progenitor clone. In 17% of patients, discordant AI or BRAF V600E profiles implied that mPTCs can occasionally develop from distinct transformation events. This study suggests that mPTC originates usually from neoplastic transformation and subsequent intrathyroidal spread of a single malignant progenitor clone. Clonal progression and morphotype differentiation occur through progressive acquisition of genetic alterations subsequent to the initial intra-glandular spread. In monoclonal BRAF V600E-positive mPTCs, BRAF V600E

  19. Genome Engineering and Modification Toward Synthetic Biology for the Production of Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuan; Wang, Lianrong; Li, Zhiqiang; Luo, Jie; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Du, Shiming; Chen, Shi

    2017-03-15

    Antibiotic production is often governed by large gene clusters composed of genes related to antibiotic scaffold synthesis, tailoring, regulation, and resistance. With the expansion of genome sequencing, a considerable number of antibiotic gene clusters has been isolated and characterized. The emerging genome engineering techniques make it possible towards more efficient engineering of antibiotics. In addition to genomic editing, multiple synthetic biology approaches have been developed for the exploration and improvement of antibiotic natural products. Here, we review the progress in the development of these genome editing techniques used to engineer new antibiotics, focusing on three aspects of genome engineering: direct cloning of large genomic fragments, genome engineering of gene clusters, and regulation of gene cluster expression. This review will not only summarize the current uses of genomic engineering techniques for cloning and assembly of antibiotic gene clusters or for altering antibiotic synthetic pathways but will also provide perspectives on the future directions of rebuilding biological systems for the design of novel antibiotics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Genomic libraries: I. Construction and screening of fosmid genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Mike A; Matthews, Lucy; Sims, Sarah; Lloyd, Christine; Beasley, Helen; Baxter, Simon W

    2011-01-01

    Large insert genome libraries have been a core resource required to sequence genomes, analyze haplotypes, and aid gene discovery. While next generation sequencing technologies are revolutionizing the field of genomics, traditional genome libraries will still be required for accurate genome assembly. Their utility is also being extended to functional studies for understanding DNA regulatory elements. Here, we present a detailed method for constructing genomic fosmid libraries, testing for common contaminants, gridding the library to nylon membranes, then hybridizing the library membranes with a radiolabeled probe to identify corresponding genomic clones. While this chapter focuses on fosmid libraries, many of these steps can also be applied to bacterial artificial chromosome libraries.

  1. Quick and clean cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Frank; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of unknown sequences that flank known sequences of interest requires PCR amplification of DNA fragments that contain the junction between the known and unknown flanking sequences. Since amplified products often contain a mixture of specific and nonspecific products, the quick and clean (QC) cloning procedure was developed to clone specific products only. QC cloning is a ligation-independent cloning procedure that relies on the exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase to generate single-stranded extensions at the ends of the vector and insert. A specific feature of QC cloning is the use of vectors that contain a sequence called catching sequence that allows cloning specific products only. QC cloning is performed by a one-pot incubation of insert and vector in the presence of T4 DNA polymerase at room temperature for 10 min followed by direct transformation of the incubation mix in chemo-competent Escherichia coli cells.

  2. 吸虫线粒体基因研究进展%Research progress on trematode mitochodrial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王曼; 王光西; 张锡林

    2011-01-01

    Trematode belongs to Platyhelminthes' s trematoda,it' s an important class of parasitic zoonosis,not only seriously threatening human health,but also affecting the production of aquaculture and livestock industry.The study on mitochondrial genome is one of the most essential part in molecular biology.This article focused on the composition of trematode mitochondrial genome,structure and significance of mitochondrial DNA research and the applications of the trematode mitochondrial DNA research.%吸虫属于扁形动物门吸虫纲,是一类重要的人兽共患蠕虫病病原,对人体危害很大,也严重影响水产业和畜牧业的发展.分子生物学方法是研究吸虫的重要工具.该文对吸虫线粒体分子生物学的研究进行总结,重点介绍吸虫线粒体基因的组成和结构特点、吸虫线粒体基因的研究意义及吸虫线粒体基因组研究的应用前景.

  3. Positional cloning in maize (Zea mays subsp. mays, Poaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Andrea; Whipple, Clinton J.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Positional (or map-based) cloning is a common approach to identify the molecular lesions causing mutant phenotypes. Despite its large and complex genome, positional cloning has been recently shown to be feasible in maize, opening up a diverse collection of mutants to molecular characterization. • Methods and Results: Here we outline a general protocol for positional cloning in maize. While the general strategy is similar to that used in other plant species, we focus on the unique resources and approaches that should be considered when applied to maize mutants. • Conclusions: Positional cloning approaches are appropriate for maize mutants and quantitative traits, opening up to molecular characterization the large array of genetic diversity in this agronomically important species. The cloning approach described should be broadly applicable to other species as more plant genomes become available. PMID:25606355

  4. Progression from Sustained BK Viruria to Sustained BK Viremia with Immunosuppression Reduction Is Not Associated with Changes in the Noncoding Control Region of the BK Virus Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Imran A.; Parikh, Bijal A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Skelton, Rebecca; Storch, Gregory A.; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the BK virus archetypal noncoding control region (NCCR) have been associated with BK-virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN). Whether sustained viremia, a surrogate for BKVAN, is associated with significant changes in the BK-NCCR is unknown. We performed PCR amplification and sequencing of (1) stored urine and (2) plasma samples from the time of peak viremia from 11 patients with sustained viremia who participated in a 200-patient clinical trial. The antimetabolite was withdrawn for BK viremia and reduction of the calcineurin inhibitor for sustained BK viremia. DNA sequencing from the 11 patients with sustained viremia revealed 8 insertions, 16 transversions, 3 deletions, and 17 transitions. None were deemed significant. No patient developed clinically evident BKVAN. Our data support, at a genomic level, the effectiveness of reduction of immunosuppression for prevention of progression from viremia to BKVAN. PMID:22701777

  5. Positional cloning of disease genes on chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doggett, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bruening, M. [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands); Callen, D. [Adelaide Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gardiner, M. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom); Lerner, T. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The project seeks to elucidate the molecular basis of an important genetic disease (Batten`s disease) by molecular cloning of the affected gene by utilizing an overlapping clone map of chromosome 16. Batten disease (also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by progressive loss of vision, seizures, and psychomoter disturbances. The Batten disease gene was genetically mapped to the chromosome region 16p 12.1 in close linkage with the genetic markers D16S299 and D16S298. Exon amplification of a cosmid containing D16S298 yielded a candidate gene that was disrupted by a 1 kb genomic deletion in all patients containing the most common haplotype for the disease. Two separate deletions and a point mutation altering a splice site in three unrelated families have confirmed the gene as the Batten disease gene. The disease gene encodes a novel 438 amino acid membrane binding protein of unknown function.

  6. 草鱼腺苷酸基琥珀酸裂解酶克隆及序列分析%MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADENYLOSUCCINATE LYASE cDNA AND GENOMIC DNA IN GRASS CARP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈刚; 顾继锐; 辜文博; 朱文漓; 吴江; 刘汉元; 徐恒

    2009-01-01

    腺苷酸基琥珀酸裂解酶(Adenylosuccinate lyase,ADSL)是嘌呤核苷酸合成过程中的关键酶.研究以草鱼(Ctenopharyngodon idellus)肠道cDNA文库为基础,应用PCR、RT-PCR和RACE技术,成功获得了草鱼肠道组织腺苷酸基琥珀酸裂解酶基因的cDNA全长和基凶组DNA全长.该基因全长1584 bp,包含一个1449 bp的开放阅读框,编码482个氨基酸,与其他脊椎动物比对显示,其序列具有较高的保守性.草鱼腺苷酸基琥珀酸裂解酶基因组DNA由13个外显子和12个内含子组成,其外显子拼接位点非常保守.遵循GT-AG原则.%Ctenopharyngodon idellus, which is common known as grass carp, is a kind of large cyprinoid fish in China. It lives in both north and south water of China and is the most important fish in Chinese fresh water aquaculture. Grass carp can efficiently transform vegetable protein into high-quality animal protein. So people call the grass carp "cattle and sheep in water". The intestine of grass carp is the main part for nutrition digestion and the functional genes from the intestinal cell are tightly connected with the efficient transformation of vegetable protein and animal protein. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) gene encoding enzymes involved in two pathways of purine nucleotide metabolism are of considerable biological and medical importance. It catalyzes two similar but separate reactions in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway. Now, we are trying to build a connection between grass carp genome project and the industrialization of function feedstuff depended on the information that we have got from this research. In this research, we clone the full length cDNA and genomic DNA of ADSL from grass carp intestine, which is very important in the purine metabolism. The cDNA sequence of Grass Carp ADSL gene contains complete ORF starting at nucleotide 64 with a stop codon at nucleotide 1510-1512. The translated region is of 1446 nucleotides with full open reading frame (ORF

  7. Molecular Cloning, Escherichia coli Expression and Genomic Organization of Squalene Synthase Gene from Artemisia annua%青蒿鲨烯合酶基因的克隆、结构分析与大肠杆菌表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彦; 叶和春; 王红; 李国凤

    2003-01-01

    A 1 539 bp squalene synthase (AaSQS) cDNA was cloned from a high-yield Artemisia annua L. strain 001 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The amino acid sequence of AaSQS is 70%, 77%, 44% and 39% identical to that of squalene synthases from Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco, human and yeast, respectively. The AaSQS genomic DNA has a complex organization containing 14 exons and 13 introns. Full-length or C-terminal truncated cDNA was subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET30a and the constructed plasmid was introduced to Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) for induced overexpression. No squalene synthase protein with expected molecular mass was observed in E.coli containing the putative full-length squalene synthase cDNA, however, overexpression in E.coli was achieved by truncating 30 amino acids of hydrophobic region at the carboxy terminus.%用RT-PCR方法从青蒿(Artemisia annua L.)中克隆了一个1 539 bp全长鲨烯合酶cDNA.青蒿鲨烯合酶氨基酸序列与拟南芥、烟草、人类、酵母鲨烯合酶的一致性分别为70%、77%、44%和39%.青蒿鲨烯合酶基因组DNA结构很复杂,包括14个外显子和13个内含子.全长的或C末端截短的鲨烯合酶cDNA被克隆进原核表达载体pET30a并在大肠杆菌(Escherichia coli) BL21(DE3)中诱导表达.但在含有全长的鲨烯合酶cDNA的大肠杆菌中并没有观察到预期大小的鲨烯合酶表达,而C末端截短疏水区30个氨基酸的鲨烯合酶可在大肠杆菌中过量表达.

  8. 水稻白叶枯病菌GX1329基因组文库的构建及含编码TAL效应物基因的克隆的分离%Construction of a Genomic Library of Xanthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae Strain GX1329 and Isolation of Clones Containing the Genes Encoding TAL Effectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子宇; 赵帅; 莫伟兰; 罗雪梅; 玉延华; 段承杰; 冯家勋

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial leaf blight (BLB), caused by Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo),is a serious threat to yield losses in the main regions of rice growth including Asia, North America and Africa.BLB could lead to a crop loss of up to 50%. It is known that the virulence of Xoo mainly relies on type Ⅲ secretion system (T3SS) and its secreted effectors. To know the numbers of genes encoding avrBs3/pthA family members in Guangxi Xoo strain GX1329, a genomic DNA library containing 736 clones was successfully constructed by partially digesting the genomic DNA with A lu Ⅰ . Restriction enzyme BamH Ⅰ digestion analysis of plasmids from 15 randomly chosen library clones showed that the cloned DNA in the genomic library was highly random.The size of the smallest cloned DNA in one clone was 27.7kb, the size of the biggest cloned DNA in one clone was 58.5 kb, and the average size of cloned DNA in one clone was 39.9 kb. The cloning capacity of the library is about 2.8x103 Mb with high randomness, and the probability of any one gene contained in the library was about 99.4%.Thirty-seven positive clones were screened out from the GX1329 genomic library by colony in situ hybridization using the 252th to 486th bp sequence of avrXa10 from Xoo strain PXO86 as probe. Southern hybridization analysis of the 17 clones showed that they contain at least 13 different avrBs3/pthA genes. The results also showed that the avrB.s3/pthA family genes occurred in individual or clusters in the genome of strain GX1329. This work defined the number of avrBs3/pthA family genes in the genome of GX1329, which may provide a solid basis for further studying the function of the genes.%由革兰氏阴性细菌水稻白叶枯病菌引起的水稻白叶枯病是亚洲、北美以及非洲部分地区最严重的水稻病害之一,水稻白叶枯病可使水稻减产高达50%以上.研究表明水稻白叶枯病菌的毒力主要依靠三型分泌系统所分泌的效应物.为了解

  9. Construction of an infectious plasmid clone of Muscovy duck parvovirus by TA cloning and creation of a partially attenuated strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, T-Y; Li, K-P; Ou, S-C; Shien, J-H; Lu, H-M; Chang, P-C

    2015-01-01

    Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) infection is a highly contagious and fatal disease of Muscovy ducklings. The infectious clone methodology is a valuable tool to study the pathogenic mechanisms of viruses, but no infectious clone of MDPV is yet available. In this study, a plasmid clone containing the full-length genome of MDPV was constructed using the TA cloning methodology. This MDPV clone was found to be infectious after transfection of primary Muscovy duck embryo fibroblast cells and passage in embryonated Muscovy duck eggs. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the K75N mutation in the VP1 protein of MDPV resulted in the partial attenuation of the virus. The availability of an MDPV infectious clone can facilitate investigation of the pathogenic mechanisms of MDPV and development of vaccines against diseases caused by MDPV.

  10. Recent progress in the understanding of tissue culture-induced genome level changes in plants and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Wang, Kan

    2012-04-01

    In vitro cell and tissue-based systems have tremendous potential in fundamental research and for commercial applications such as clonal propagation, genetic engineering and production of valuable metabolites. Since the invention of plant cell and tissue culture techniques more than half a century ago, scientists have been trying to understand the morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular changes associated with tissue culture responses. Establishment of de novo developmental cell fate in vitro is governed by factors such as genetic make-up, stress and plant growth regulators. In vitro culture is believed to destabilize the genetic and epigenetic program of intact plant tissue and can lead to chromosomal and DNA sequence variations, methylation changes, transposon activation, and generation of somaclonal variants. In this review, we discuss the current status of understanding the genomic and epigenomic changes that take place under in vitro conditions. It is hoped that a precise and comprehensive knowledge of the molecular basis of these variations and acquisition of developmental cell fate would help to devise strategies to improve the totipotency and embryogenic capability in recalcitrant species and genotypes, and to address bottlenecks associated with clonal propagation.

  11. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as our understanding of this technology advances. Support Stem Cell Research (including Research Cloning) AAAS supports stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also ...

  12. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  13. Cloning and Analysis of a cDNA Encoding psbL and psbJ Gene in Rice Chloroplast Genome%水稻叶绿体基因组中一个编码psbL 和psbJ基因cDNA的克隆与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾克余; 罗林广; 苏昌潮; 翟虎渠

    2001-01-01

    A 505 bp cDNA was cloned from the leaves of rice (Oryza sativaL.) Shanyou 63 combination. DNA sequence analysis showed that it is a part of rice chloroplast genome. Its homology comparison with those known in GenBank found that it encodes 38 amino acid peptide deduced from psbL gene and 40 amino acid peptide deduced from psbJ gene in rice chloroplast PSⅡ. Northern hybridization showed that the cDNA was differentially displayed in hybrid F1 and its parental lines.

  14. 水稻白叶枯病菌GX1329基因组文库的构建及含编码TAL效应物基因的克隆的分离%Construction of a Genomic Library of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strain GX1329 and Isolation of Clones Containing the Genes Encoding TAL Ef- fectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子宇; 赵帅; 莫伟兰; 罗雪梅; 玉延华; 段承杰; 冯家勋

    2011-01-01

    由革兰氏阴性细菌水稻白叶枯病菌引起的水稻白叶枯病是亚洲、北美以及非洲部分地区最严重的水稻病害之一,水稻白叶枯病可使水稻减产高达50%以上。研究表明水稻白叶枯病菌的毒力主要依靠三型分泌系统所分泌的效应物。为了解水稻白叶枯病菌广西菌株GX1329中含有avrBs3/pthA家族基因的情况,本研究应用Alu I部分酶切其基因组DNA,构建了含有736个克隆的菌株GX1329的基因组文库。BamHI酶切分析随机挑取的15个文库克隆表明,克隆的外源DNA随机性良好,克隆的最小片段为27.7kb,最大为58.5kb,平均大小为39.9kb,文库克隆容量约为2.8×10^3Mb,该文库中包含基因组中任一个基因的概率为99.4%。利用来自水稻白叶枯病菌菲律宾菌株PX086的无毒基因avrXa10的第252位~第486位核苷酸序列作为探针,通过菌落原位杂交从GX1329基因组文库中筛选到37个含avrBs3/pthA家族基因的克隆。再通过Southern杂交分析,得到了17个独立克隆。这17个克隆中至少含有13个不同的avrBs3/pthA家族基因。这些基因在GX1329基因组中有的单独存在,有的两个或两个以上串联存在。本工作基本上明确了菌株GX1329基因组中avrBs3/pthA家族基因的数量,为进一步研究菌株GX1329中avrBs3/pthA家族基因的功能奠定了基础。%Bacterial leaf blight (BLB), caused by Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is a serious threat to yield losses in the main regions of rice growth including Asia, North America and Africa. BLB could lead to a crop loss of up to 50%. It is known that the virulence of Xoo mainly relies on type BI secre- tion system (T3SS) and its secreted effectors. To know the numbers of genes encoding avrBs3/pthA family mem- bers in Guangxi Xoo strain GX1329, a genomic DNA library containing 736 clones was successfully constructed by partially

  15. Dogs cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hossein, M Shamim; Shamim, M Hossein; Kim, Jung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Schatten, Gerald; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-04

    Several mammals--including sheep, mice, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, cats, a mule, a horse and a litter of three rats--have been cloned by transfer of a nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg cell (oocyte) that has had its nucleus removed. This technology has not so far been successful in dogs because of the difficulty of maturing canine oocytes in vitro. Here we describe the cloning of two Afghan hounds by nuclear transfer from adult skin cells into oocytes that had matured in vivo. Together with detailed sequence information generated by the canine-genome project, the ability to clone dogs by somatic-cell nuclear transfer should help to determine genetic and environmental contributions to the diverse biological and behavioural traits associated with the many different canine breeds.

  16. Molecular genetics of metal detoxification: Prospects for phytoremediation. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ow, D.W.

    1997-10-15

    'The authors proposed to characterize a number of fission yeast mutants that are hypersensitivity to cadmium and deficient in the production of metal-peptide complexes. For each of the mutants the authors sought to clone the gene responsible for the mutant phenotype and more importantly to define the gene function. They summarize the progress made thus far for each of the mutants. Mutants that hypoproduce phytochelatins are: (1) DS12--The gene has been cloned, but a full length cDNA remains to be isolated. They believe the longest clone is short at the 5 feet end by less than 100 bp. This gene encodes sulfite reductase and its function is needed for Pb-induced sulfide production, but not Cd-induced sulfide production. Since this enzyme acts upstream of cysteine biosynthesis, the likely reason that this mutant hypoproduces phytochelatins is that it fails to produce sufficient cysteine during Cd stress. (2) JS563--The gene has been cloned and found to encode a sulfide dehydrogenase. In vitro, the authors found that the protein binds FAD, converts S{sup 2-} to S{sup 0} while reducing quinone. The protein is membrane associated and has been localized to the mitochondria. Its likely function is to detoxify sulfide in the mitochondria resulting from cadmium-induced sulfide production. The sulfide electrons are likely used for the electron transport chain. Cells that have a defect in this enzyme cannot oxidize mitochondrial S{sup 2-} resulting in high toxic levels of S{sup 2-} during Cd stress. In addition, the high S{sup 2-} level precipitates Cd{sup 2-} to form CdS, and the lack of free Cd{sup 2+} fails to induce phytochelatin synthase activity to produce phytochelatin peptides. (3) JS282--The genomic clone that restores Cd tolerance to JS282 has been isolated. Surprisingly, this genomic clone when present in a multicopy vector in a wild type background causes hypersensitivity to Cd and selenium. The cDNA corresponding to the genomic clone has been isolated and its

  17. The full-ORF clone resource of the German cDNA Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Guenter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the human genome sequence the functional analysis and characterization of the encoded proteins has become the next urging challenge in the post-genome era. The lack of comprehensive ORFeome resources has thus far hampered systematic applications by protein gain-of-function analysis. Gene and ORF coverage with full-length ORF clones thus needs to be extended. In combination with a unique and versatile cloning system, these will provide the tools for genome-wide systematic functional analyses, to achieve a deeper insight into complex biological processes. Results Here we describe the generation of a full-ORF clone resource of human genes applying the Gateway cloning technology (Invitrogen. A pipeline for efficient cloning and sequencing was developed and a sample tracking database was implemented to streamline the clone production process targeting more than 2,200 different ORFs. In addition, a robust cloning strategy was established, permitting the simultaneous generation of two clone variants that contain a particular ORF with as well as without a stop codon by the implementation of only one additional working step into the cloning procedure. Up to 92 % of the targeted ORFs were successfully amplified by PCR and more than 93 % of the amplicons successfully cloned. Conclusion The German cDNA Consortium ORFeome resource currently consists of more than 3,800 sequence-verified entry clones representing ORFs, cloned with and without stop codon, for about 1,700 different gene loci. 177 splice variants were cloned representing 121 of these genes. The entry clones have been used to generate over 5,000 different expression constructs, providing the basis for functional profiling applications. As a member of the recently formed international ORFeome collaboration we substantially contribute to generating and providing a whole genome human ORFeome collection in a unique cloning system that is made freely available

  18. Progress and Prospect of Genomics Technologies in Horticultural Crops%园艺作物基因组技术研究及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓武

    2013-01-01

    China is the largest growing and consuming country of horticultural crops in the world. The second generation of sequencing technologies achieved significant breakthrough and greatly influenced improvement of horticultural crops. A number of important horticultural crops, including Chinese cabbage, cucumber, tomato, melon and water melon et al. have recently being sequenced. After analyzing the progress of the genomics technology and policies adopted by the major contrived in the world, the paper listed some major tasks for promoting genomics of horticultural crops in China and proposed some policy recommendations.%  我国是世界上园艺作物种植和消费大国。第二代基因组测序技术取得了重大突破,并对园艺作物改良产生了重大影响。近年来,完成了白菜、黄瓜、番茄、甜瓜和西瓜等一系列重要园艺作物的基因组测序。在分析了世界基因组前沿技术发展现状与方向和主要国家园艺作物基因组研究采取的主要政策的基础上,围绕园艺作物的发展,提出了我国发展园艺作物基因组技术重点任务和需要采取的政策措施。

  19. Stochasticity or the fatal `imperfection' of cloning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reiner A Veitia

    2005-02-01

    The concept of clone is analysed with the aim of exploring the limits to which a phenotype can be said to be determined geneticaly. First of all, mutations that result from the replication, topological manipulation or lesion of DNA introduce a source of heritable variation in an otherwise identical genetic background. But more important, stochastic effects in many biological processes may superimpose a phenotypic variation which is not encoded in the genome. The source of stochasticity ranges from the random selection of alleles or whole chromosomes to be expressed in small cell populations, to fluctuations in processes such as gene expression, due to limiting amounts of the players involved. The picture emerging is that the term clone is a statistical over-simplification representing a series of individuals having essentially the same genome but capable of exhibiting wide phenotypic variation. Finally, to what extent fluctuations in biological processes, usually thought of as noise, are in fact signal is also discussed.

  20. Chicken's Genome Decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ After completing the work on mapping chicken genome sequence and chicken genome variation in early March, 2004, two international research consortiums have made significant progress in reading the maps, shedding new light on the studies into the first bird as well as the first agricultural animal that has its genome sequenced and analyzed in the world.

  1. Research progress on the targeted genome modification%基因组靶向修饰技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周阳; 袁少飞; 蒋廷亚; 韩邦兴; 高力; 陈乃富

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome modification technology is one of the important methods to study genes′function, which also can be used for the treatment of human diseases at the same time.It is becoming a hot field of biology research in recent years.Because of its low efficiency and toxicity, traditional targeted modification technology will be replaced by a more efficient and safer technology.Thus three generations of targeted genome modification technologies have been developed.It includes ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9.These three techniques overcome the defects of traditional technology.Here, we discuss the research progress in the structure, mechanism and application of these three technologies, especially newly developed CRISPR/Cas9.Finally, the three generations of genome modifi-cation techniques are compared.%基因组靶向修饰技术是研究基因功能的重要方法之一,该技术也被用于人类疾病的治疗上,从而成为近来生物学研究的热点。传统的靶向修饰技术由于其效率低、有毒性等缺点注定其将要被更高效、安全的技术所取代,因此产生了后来的三代基因组靶向修饰技术:锌指核酸酶( Zinc finger nuclease, ZFN)、类转录激活因子效应物核酸酶( Transcription activator-like effector nuclease, TALEN)和常间回文重复序列丛集关联蛋白系统( Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins 9, CRISPR/Cas9)。这3种技术在克服传统技术缺陷的基础上,也针对其上一代技术的缺陷进行了自身的改善。对三代基因组靶向修饰技术,尤其最近发展起来的CRISPR/Cas9的结构组成、作用原理和基因定点修饰中的应用进行阐述,最后对三代基因组靶向修饰技术进行比较。

  2. Genomic amplification of the human telomerase gene (hTERC associated with human papillomavirus is related to the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hongqian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV infection plays an etiological role in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer. Amplification of human telomerase gene (hTERC and over expression of telomerase were found to be associated with cervical tumorigenesis. This study was performed to analyze genomic amplification of hTERC gene, telomerase activity in association with HPV infection in different stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cervical cancer. We were studying the role of hTERC in the progression of uterine cervical dysplasia to invasive cancer, and proposed an adjunct method for cervical cancer screening. Methods Exfoliated cervical cells were collected from 114 patients with non neoplastic lesion (NNL, n=27, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1, n=26, CIN2, n=16, CIN3, n=24 and cervical carcinoma (CA, n=21, and analyzed for amplification of hTERC with two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH probe and HPV-DNA with Hybrid Capture 2. From these patients, 53 were taken biopsy to analyze telomerase activity by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, with immunohistochemistry (IHC. All biopsies were clinically confirmed by phathologists. Results Amplification of hTERC was significantly associated with the histologic diagnoses (p Conclusions hTERC ampliffication can be detected with FISH technique on exfoliated cervical cells. Amplification of hTERC and HPV infection are associated with more progressive CIN3 and CA. The testing of hTERC amplification might be a supplementary to cytology screening and HPV test, especially high-risk patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1857134686755648.

  3. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo

  4. CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF MATURED FRAGMENT OF HUMAN NEVER GROWTH FACTOR GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马巍; 吴玲; 王德利; 刘淼; 任惠民; 杨广笑; 王全颖

    2003-01-01

    Objective Molecular cloning and sequencing of the human matured fragment of human nerve growth factor(NGF) gene. Methods Extracting the human genomic DNA from the white blood cells as templates, the gene of NGF was cloned by using PCR and T-vector cloning method. Screening the positive clones and identified by the restriction enzymes, and then the cloned amplified fragment was sequenced and analyzed. Results DNA sequence comparison the cloned gene of NGF with the GenBank (V01511) sequence demonstrated that both of sequences were identical, 354bp length. Conclusion Cloning the NGF gene from the human genomic DNA has paved the way for further study on gene therapy of nerve system injury.

  5. New miRNAs cloned from neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glatting Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a novel class of gene expression regulators implicated in cancer biology. Neuroblastoma (NB is an embryonal tumour consisting of neural crest-derived undifferentiated cells and is characterised by variable clinical courses ranging from spontaneous regression to therapy-resistant progression. Recent advances identified a subset of miRNAs with putative function in NB biology. However, the full repertoire of miRNAs expressed in NBs is not available. Results We describe miRNA profiles of 13 NB specimens and 2 NB cell lines as determined by miRNA cloning. A total of 3153 sequences were sequenced and analysed by a miRNA prediction tool (miRpredict. Our library covered 27% miRNAs known to date. 39 reads corresponding to 25 individual sequences were classified as novel miRNAs, including miRNA* species of 10 known miRNAs. Expression of 5 new miRNA* forms and 8 individual sequences was supported by Northern blotting. Most of the novel miRNA genes are not related to each other and do not share homology with the annotated sequences in the public miRNA database, but they are conserved within mammals or have close homologues in primates genomes. Conclusion We provide evidence for 29 new miRNA and miRNA-like sequences (24 novel sequences and 5 miRNAs discovered initially in other species. Some of these newly identified sequences reside within frequently altered chromosomal regions in NB tumours and may play a role in NB biology.

  6. Consensus maps of cloned plant cuticle genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eviatar; Nevo

    2010-01-01

    Plant cuticle,which covers the plant surface,consists of waxes and cutins,and is associated with plant drought,cold,and salt resistance.Hitherto,at least 47 genes participating in the formation of plant cuticle have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana,Oryza sativa,Zea mays,Ricinus communis,Brassica napus,and Medicago truncatula;and about 85% of them encode proteins sharing above 50% identities with their rice homologous sequences.These cloned cuticle genes were mapped in silico on different chromosomes of rice and Arabidopsis,respectively.The mapping results revealed that plant cuticle genes were not evenly distributed in both genomes.About 40% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 1 in Arabidopsis,while 20% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 2 but none on chromosome 12 in rice.Some cloned plant cuticle genes have several rice homologous sequences,which might be produced by chromosomal segment duplication.The consensus map of cloned plant cuticle genes will provide important clues for the selection of candidate genes in a positional cloning of an unknown cuticle gene in plants.

  7. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and developmental regulation of a novel receptor from Drosophila melanogaster structurally related to members of the thyroid-stimulating hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, F; Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide probes derived from consensus sequences for glycoprotein hormone receptors, we have cloned an 831-amino acid residue-long receptor from Drosophila melanogaster that shows a striking structural homology with members of the glycoprotein hormone (thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH...... until after pupation. Adult male flies express high levels of receptor mRNA, but female flies express about 6 times less. The expression pattern in embryos and larvae suggests that the receptor is involved in insect development. This is the first report on the molecular cloning of a glycoprotein hormone...

  8. From genome-wide arrays to tailor-made biomarker readout - Progress towards routine analysis of skin sensitizing chemicals with GARD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forreryd, Andy; Zeller, Kathrin S; Lindberg, Tim; Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) initiated by chemical sensitizers is an important public health concern. To prevent ACD, it is important to identify chemical allergens to limit the use of such compounds in various products. EU legislations, as well as increased mechanistic knowledge of skin sensitization have promoted development of non-animal based approaches for hazard classification of chemicals. GARD is an in vitro testing strategy based on measurements of a genomic biomarker signature. However, current GARD protocols are optimized for identification of predictive biomarker signatures, and not suitable for standardized screening. This study describes improvements to GARD to progress from biomarker discovery into a reliable and cost-effective assay for routine testing. Gene expression measurements were transferred to NanoString nCounter platform, normalization strategy was adjusted to fit serial arrival of testing substances, and a novel strategy to correct batch variations was presented. When challenging GARD with 29 compounds, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could be estimated to 94%, 83% and 90%, respectively. In conclusion, we present a GARD workflow with improved sample capacity, retained predictive performance, and in a format adapted to standardized screening. We propose that GARD is ready to be considered as part of an integrated testing strategy for skin sensitization.

  9. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  10. Genomics of Sorghum

    OpenAIRE

    PATERSON, ANDREW H

    2008-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the world's leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the world's most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relatin...

  11. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  12. Advances in maize genomics and their value for enhancing genetic gains from breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbi; Skinner, Debra J; Wu, Huixia; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Araus, Jose Luis; Yan, Jianbing; Gao, Shibin; Warburton, Marilyn L; Crouch, Jonathan H

    2009-01-01

    Maize is an important crop for food, feed, forage, and fuel across tropical and temperate areas of the world. Diversity studies at genetic, molecular, and functional levels have revealed that, tropical maize germplasm, landraces, and wild relatives harbor a significantly wider range of genetic variation. Among all types of markers, SNP markers are increasingly the marker-of-choice for all genomics applications in maize breeding. Genetic mapping has been developed through conventional linkage mapping and more recently through linkage disequilibrium-based association analyses. Maize genome sequencing, initially focused on gene-rich regions, now aims for the availability of complete genome sequence. Conventional insertion mutation-based cloning has been complemented recently by EST- and map-based cloning. Transgenics and nutritional genomics are rapidly advancing fields targeting important agronomic traits including pest resistance and grain quality. Substantial advances have been made in methodologies for genomics-assisted breeding, enhancing progress in yield as well as abiotic and biotic stress resistances. Various genomic databases and informatics tools have been developed, among which MaizeGDB is the most developed and widely used by the maize research community. In the future, more emphasis should be given to the development of tools and strategic germplasm resources for more effective molecular breeding of tropical maize products.

  13. Advances in Maize Genomics and Their Value for Enhancing Genetic Gains from Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbi; Skinner, Debra J.; Wu, Huixia; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Araus, Jose Luis; Yan, Jianbing; Gao, Shibin; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Crouch, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    Maize is an important crop for food, feed, forage, and fuel across tropical and temperate areas of the world. Diversity studies at genetic, molecular, and functional levels have revealed that, tropical maize germplasm, landraces, and wild relatives harbor a significantly wider range of genetic variation. Among all types of markers, SNP markers are increasingly the marker-of-choice for all genomics applications in maize breeding. Genetic mapping has been developed through conventional linkage mapping and more recently through linkage disequilibrium-based association analyses. Maize genome sequencing, initially focused on gene-rich regions, now aims for the availability of complete genome sequence. Conventional insertion mutation-based cloning has been complemented recently by EST- and map-based cloning. Transgenics and nutritional genomics are rapidly advancing fields targeting important agronomic traits including pest resistance and grain quality. Substantial advances have been made in methodologies for genomics-assisted breeding, enhancing progress in yield as well as abiotic and biotic stress resistances. Various genomic databases and informatics tools have been developed, among which MaizeGDB is the most developed and widely used by the maize research community. In the future, more emphasis should be given to the development of tools and strategic germplasm resources for more effective molecular breeding of tropical maize products. PMID:19688107

  14. Gibson assembly : an easy way to clone potyviral full-length infectious cDNA clones ex pressing an ectopic VPg

    OpenAIRE

    Bordat, Amandine; Houvenaghel, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Approaches to simplify and accelerate the construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones for plant potyviruses have been described, based on cloning strategies involving in vitro ligation or homologous recombination in yeast. In the present study, we developed a faster and more efficient in vitro recombination system using Gibson assembly (GA), to engineer a Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) infectious clone expressing an ectopic mcherry-tagged VPg (Viral protein genome-linked) for in...

  15. Unified Approach to Universal Cloning and Phase-Covariant Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jia-Zhong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the problem of approximate quantum cloning when the quantum state is between two latitudes on the Bloch's sphere. We present an analytical formula for the optimized 1-to-2 cloning. The formula unifies the universal quantum cloning (UQCM) and the phase covariant quantum cloning.

  16. Cloning the soil metagenome: a strategy for accessing the genetic and functional diversity of uncultured microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, M R; August, P R; Bettermann, A D; Brady, S F; Grossman, T H; Liles, M R; Loiacono, K A; Lynch, B A; MacNeil, I A; Minor, C; Tiong, C L; Gilman, M; Osburne, M S; Clardy, J; Handelsman, J; Goodman, R M

    2000-06-01

    Recent progress in molecular microbial ecology has revealed that traditional culturing methods fail to represent the scope of microbial diversity in nature, since only a small proportion of viable microorganisms in a sample are recovered by culturing techniques. To develop methods to investigate the full extent of microbial diversity, we used a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector to construct libraries of genomic DNA isolated directly from soil (termed metagenomic libraries). To date, we have constructed two such libraries, which contain more than 1 Gbp of DNA. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from one of the libraries indicates that the BAC libraries contain DNA from a wide diversity of microbial phyla, including sequences from diverse taxa such as the low-G+C, gram-positive Acidobacterium, Cytophagales, and Proteobacteria. Initial screening of the libraries in Escherichia coli identified several clones that express heterologous genes from the inserts, confirming that the BAC vector can be used to maintain, express, and analyze environmental DNA. The phenotypes expressed by these clones include antibacterial, lipase, amylase, nuclease, and hemolytic activities. Metagenomic libraries are a powerful tool for exploring soil microbial diversity, providing access to the genetic information of uncultured soil microorganisms. Such libraries will be the basis of new initiatives to conduct genomic studies that link phylogenetic and functional information about the microbiota of environments dominated by microorganisms that are refractory to cultivation.

  17. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the TIGR japonica Pseudomolecu...les kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  18. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  19. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  20. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the B

  1. Cloning and analysis of an HMG gene from the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharman, A C; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Holland, P W

    1997-01-01

    Evolution has shaped the organisation of vertebrate genomes, including the human genome. To shed further light on genome history, we have cloned and analysed an HMG gene from lamprey, representing one of the earliest vertebrate lineages. Genes of the HMG1/2 family encode chromosomal proteins...... that bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, and have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes dependent on chromatin structure. They are characterised by two copies of a conserved motif, the HMG box, followed by an acidic C-terminal region. We report here the cloning of a cDNA clone from...

  2. Rapid DNA Library Construction for Functional Genomic and Metagenomic Screening▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    A rapid protocol was developed for constructing plasmid libraries from small quantities of genomic/metagenomic DNA. The technique utilizes linker amplification with topoisomerase cloning and allows for inducible transcription in Escherichia coli. As proof of principle, several anti-Bacillus lysins were cloned from bacteriophage genomes and an aerolysin was cloned from a metagenomic sample.

  3. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  4. Towards an understanding of British public attitudes concerning human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Richard; Barnett, Julie; Cooper, Helen; Coyle, Adrian; Moran-Ellis, Jo; Senior, Victoria; Walton, Chris

    2007-07-01

    The ability of scientists to apply cloning technology to humans has provoked public discussion and media coverage. The present paper reports on a series of studies examining public attitudes to human cloning in the UK, bringing together a range of quantitative and qualitative methods to address this question. These included a nationally representative survey, an experimental vignette study, focus groups and analyses of media coverage. Overall the research presents a complex picture of attitude to and constructions of human cloning. In all of the analyses, therapeutic cloning was viewed more favourably than reproductive cloning. However, while participants in the focus groups were generally negative about both forms of cloning, and this was also reflected in the media analyses, quantitative results showed more positive responses. In the quantitative research, therapeutic cloning was generally accepted when the benefits of such procedures were clear, and although reproductive cloning was less accepted there was still substantial support. Participants in the focus groups only differentiated between therapeutic and reproductive cloning after the issue of therapeutic cloning was explicitly raised; initially they saw cloning as being reproductive cloning and saw no real benefits. Attitudes were shown to be associated with underlying values associated with scientific progress rather than with age, gender or education, and although there were a few differences in the quantitative data based on religious affiliation, these tended to be small effects. Likewise in the focus groups there was little direct appeal to religion, but the main themes were 'interfering with nature' and the 'status of the embryo', with the latter being used more effectively to try to close down further discussion. In general there was a close correspondence between the media analysis and focus group responses, possibly demonstrating the importance of media as a resource, or that the media reflect

  5. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids.

  6. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  7. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  8. High-Throughput Genomics Enhances Tomato Breeding Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, A; Di Matteo, A; Carputo, D; Frusciante, L

    2009-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is considered a model plant species for a group of economically important crops, such as potato, pepper, eggplant, since it exhibits a reduced genomic size (950 Mb), a short generation time, and routine transformation technologies. Moreover, it shares with the other Solanaceous plants the same haploid chromosome number and a high level of conserved genomic organization. Finally, many genomic and genetic resources are actually available for tomato, and the sequencing of its genome is in progress. These features make tomato an ideal species for theoretical studies and practical applications in the genomics field. The present review describes how structural genomics assist the selection of new varieties resistant to pathogens that cause damage to this crop. Many molecular markers highly linked to resistance genes and cloned resistance genes are available and could be used for a high-throughput screening of multiresistant varieties. Moreover, a new genomics-assisted breeding approach for improving fruit quality is presented and discussed. It relies on the identification of genetic mechanisms controlling the trait of interest through functional genomics tools. Following this approach, polymorphisms in major gene sequences responsible for variability in the expression of the trait under study are then exploited for tracking simultaneously favourable allele combinations in breeding programs using high-throughput genomic technologies. This aims at pyramiding in the genetic background of commercial cultivars alleles that increase their performances. In conclusion, tomato breeding strategies supported by advanced technologies are expected to target increased productivity and lower costs of improved genotypes even for complex traits. PMID:19721805

  9. Placentation in cloned cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miglino, M A; Pereira, F T V; Visintin, J A

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the morphological differences between placentas from normal and cloned cattle pregnancies reaching term, the umbilical cord, placentomes and interplacentomal region of the fetal membranes were examined macroscopically as well as by light and scanning electron microscopy. In pregnancies...... than one primary villus, as opposed to a single villus in non-cloned placentae. Scanning electron microscopy of blood vessel casts revealed that there was also more than one stem artery per villous tree and that the ramification of the vessels failed to form dense complexes of capillary loops...

  10. Advances in biotechnology and genomics of switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Soneji, Jaya R; Kwit, Charles; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-05-12

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 perennial warm season grass indigenous to the North American tallgrass prairie. A number of its natural and agronomic traits, including adaptation to a wide geographical distribution, low nutrient requirements and production costs, high water use efficiency, high biomass potential, ease of harvesting, and potential for carbon storage, make it an attractive dedicated biomass crop for biofuel production. We believe that genetic improvements using biotechnology will be important to realize the potential of the biomass and biofuel-related uses of switchgrass. Tissue culture techniques aimed at rapid propagation of switchgrass and genetic transformation protocols have been developed. Rapid progress in genome sequencing and bioinformatics has provided efficient strategies to identify, tag, clone and manipulate many economically-important genes, including those related to higher biomass, saccharification efficiency, and lignin biosynthesis. Application of the best genetic tools should render improved switchgrass that will be more economically and environmentally sustainable as a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock.

  11. Commercial aspects of cloning and genetic modification in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, I M; French, A J; Tecirlioglu, R T

    2004-01-01

    A range of potential commercial applications of cloning and genetic modification in cattle has been suggested over the last decade. It includes the rapid multiplication of elite genotypes, production of valuable human proteins, altered production characteristics, increased disease resistance...... and milk with improved nutritional value and processing capabilities. However, an economic return from the sale of product is far from reality in any of these areas. One impediment to achieving economic sustainability is the extremely low efficiency in producing healthy offspring from transferred cloned...... of products at economically sustainable levels, cryopreservation and the progress towards automation of cloning techniques...

  12. The DNA methylation events in normal and cloned rabbit embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaoChen; Yan-LingZhang; YanJiang; Shu-ZhenLiu; HeideSchatten; Da-YuanChen; Qing-YuanSun

    2005-01-01

    To study the DNA methylation events in normal and cloned rabbit embryos, we investigated the methylation status of a satellite seqnence and the promoter region of a single-copy gene using bisulfite-sequencing technology. During normal rabbit embryo development, both sequences maintained hypermethylation status until the 8- to 16-cell stage when progressive demethylation took place. In cloned embryos, the single-copy gene promoter sequence was rapidly demethylated and preco-ciously de novo methylated, while the satellite sequence mainrained the donor-type methylation status in all examined stages. Our results indicate that unique sequences as well as satellitesequences may have aberrant methylation patterns in cloned embryos.

  13. Cloning for therapeutic purposes: ethical and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M J

    2001-01-01

    This essay reviews how cloning techniques may be used for therapeutic purposes, analyzes ethical implications, and makes recommendations for public policy discourse. Although cloning may bring many potential benefits, they remain uncertain. Furthermore, human embryo research is morally problematic. Therefore, alternatives to human cloning for therapeutic aims should be sought at present. In addition to central ethical issues, public discourse should maintain an emphasis on the value of the human embryo over scientific expediency, the relativity of health, and the principle of justice. Society should support the laudable mission of medical research, while also attending to the moral concerns often threatened by the promises of scientific progress.

  14. How to improve the success rate of mouse cloning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Nguyen Van; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-02-01

    It has now been 13 years since the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep was generated from somatic cells using nuclear transfer (SCNT). Since then, this technique has been considered an important tool not only for animal reproduction but also for regenerative medicine. However, the success rate is still very low and the mechanisms involved in genomic reprogramming are not yet clear. Moreover, the NT technique requires donated fresh oocyte, which raises ethical problems for production of human cloned embryo. For this reason, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for genomic reprogramming and for regenerative medicine is currently a hot topic in this field. However, we believe that the NT approach remains the only valid way for the study of reproduction and basic biology. For example, only the NT approach can reveal dynamic and global modifications in the epigenome without using genetic modification, and it can generate offspring from a single cell or even a frozen dead body. Thanks to much hard work by many groups, cloning success rates are increasing slightly year by year, and NT cloning is now becoming a more applicable method. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  15. Chromosomal assignment of chicken clone contigs by extending the consensus linkage map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, J.; Veenendaal, T.; Poel, van der J.J.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial artificial clone-based physical map for chicken plays an important role in the integration of the consensus linkage map and the whole-genome shotgun sequence. It also provides a valuable resource for clone selection within applications such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and posi

  16. Cloning, structure, and chromosome localization of the mouse glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeller, D.M.; DiGiulio, A.; Frerman, F.E. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial matrix enzyme. In humans, deficiency of GCDH leads to glutaric acidemia type I, and inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative disease. In this report we describe the cloning and structure of the mouse GCDH (Gcdh) gene and cDNA and its chromosomal localization. The mouse Gcdh cDNA is 1.75 kb long and contains and open reading frame of 438 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of mouse, human, and pig GCDH are highly conserved. The mouse Gcdh gene contains 11 exons and spans 7 kb of genomic DNA. Gcdh was mapped by backcross analysis to mouse chromosome 8 within a region that is homologous to a region of human chromosome 19, where the human gene was previously mapped. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Medicolegal and ethical issues of cloning: do we need to think again and again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, B R

    2004-06-01

    Research on the cloning of human cells holds the promise of medical benefits, but cloning humans is a far more complex and ethically disturbing issue. Some have argued strenuously that human cloning should be banned permanently. They have called it immoral, repugnant, and abhorrent. Most European countries have already banned it, and others are considering a proscription. While allowing fundamental research in the field to progress, we need a wide debate on human cloning. We need to think about what, if any, circumstances might warrant cloning, as well as the circumstances under which it should never be allowed.

  18. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli EC958: a high quality reference sequence for the globally disseminated multidrug resistant E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 clone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Forde

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli ST131 is now recognised as a leading contributor to urinary tract and bloodstream infections in both community and clinical settings. Here we present the complete, annotated genome of E. coli EC958, which was isolated from the urine of a patient presenting with a urinary tract infection in the Northwest region of England and represents the most well characterised ST131 strain. Sequencing was carried out using the Pacific Biosciences platform, which provided sufficient depth and read-length to produce a complete genome without the need for other technologies. The discovery of spurious contigs within the assembly that correspond to site-specific inversions in the tail fibre regions of prophages demonstrates the potential for this technology to reveal dynamic evolutionary mechanisms. E. coli EC958 belongs to the major subgroup of ST131 strains that produce the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase, are fluoroquinolone resistant and encode the fimH30 type 1 fimbrial adhesin. This subgroup includes the Indian strain NA114 and the North American strain JJ1886. A comparison of the genomes of EC958, JJ1886 and NA114 revealed that differences in the arrangement of genomic islands, prophages and other repetitive elements in the NA114 genome are not biologically relevant and are due to misassembly. The availability of a high quality uropathogenic E. coli ST131 genome provides a reference for understanding this multidrug resistant pathogen and will facilitate novel functional, comparative and clinical studies of the E. coli ST131 clonal lineage.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of multidomain xylanase from manure library

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene (manf-x10) encoding xylanase from an environmental genomic DNA library was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The encoded enzyme was predicted to be 467 amino acids with a molecular mass of 50.3 kD. The recombinant ManF-X10 was purified by HisTrap affinity column and showed activit...

  20. Clip, connect, clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fujima, Jun; Lunzer, Aran; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    using three mechanisms: clipping of input and result elements from existing applications to form cells on a spreadsheet; connecting these cells using formulas, thus enabling result transfer between applications; and cloning cells so that multiple requests can be handled side by side. We demonstrate...

  1. The Cloning of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  2. Asian Yellow Goat Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ It was released on August 24,2005 by Prof. CHEN Dayuan (Da-Yuan Chen) from the CAS Institute of Zoology that the first success in cloning the Asian Yellow Goat by nuclear transfer had recently been achieved in east China's Shandong Province.

  3. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-12-30

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals.

  4. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  5. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  6. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  7. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Animal Cloning and Food Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM scientists studied ...

  8. Mathematical design of prokaryotic clone-based microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirijns Elisabeth J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clone-based microarrays, on which each spot represents a random genomic fragment, are a good alternative to open reading frame-based microarrays, especially for microorganisms for which the complete genome sequence is not available. Since the generation of a genomic DNA library is a random process, it is beforehand uncertain which genes are represented. Nevertheless, the genome coverage of such an array, which depends on different variables like the insert size and the number of clones in the library, can be predicted by mathematical approaches. When applying the classical formulas that determine the probability that a certain sequence is represented in a DNA library at the nucleotide level, massive amounts of clones would be necessary to obtain a proper coverage of the genome. Results This paper describes the development of two complementary equations for determining the genome coverage at the gene level. The first equation predicts the fraction of genes that is represented on the array in a detectable way and cover at least a set part (the minimal insert coverage of the genomic fragment by which these genes are represented. The higher this minimal insert coverage, the larger the chance that changes in expression of a specific gene can be detected and attributed to that gene. The second equation predicts the fraction of genes that is represented in spots on the array that only represent genes from a single transcription unit, which information can be interpreted in a quantitative way. Conclusion Validation of these equations shows that they form reliable tools supporting optimal design of prokaryotic clone-based microarrays.

  9. Current Status and Progresses in Chinese Cotton Genomic Research%中国棉花基因组研究的现状及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-xian ZHU; Sheng-jian JI; Ying-chun LU; Gang WEI; Jun LI

    2002-01-01

    @@ Cotton fiber, a single-celled trichome, 30-40mm in length and 15m in cell-wall-thickness, is a differentiated epidermal cell originated from the outer integument of the ovule. There are several groups in China that work on cotton gene cloning or fiber improvement using biotechnological approaches. Dr. Xiaoya Chen's group from the Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Academia Sinica, obtained transgenic cottons that express a rabbit keratin gene, a silkworm fibroin gene, IAAM and PAT gene.

  10. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  11. Genetics and Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  12. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ting; YAN Feng-Li; WANG Zhi-Xi

    2004-01-01

    @@ We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning.In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  13. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  14. Comparative Genomics of Listeria Sensu Lato: Genus-Wide Differences in Evolutionary Dynamics and the Progressive Gain of Complex, Potentially Pathogenicity-Related Traits through Lateral Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Matteo; Caruso, Marta; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Manzari, Caterina; Fraccalvieri, Rosa; Goffredo, Elisa; Latorre, Laura; Miccolupo, Angela; Padalino, Iolanda; Santagada, Gianfranco; Chiocco, Doriano; Pesole, Graziano; Horner, David S; Parisi, Antonio

    2015-07-15

    Historically, genome-wide and molecular characterization of the genus Listeria has concentrated on the important human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and a small number of closely related species, together termed Listeria sensu strictu. More recently, a number of genome sequences for more basal, and nonpathogenic, members of the Listeria genus have become available, facilitating a wider perspective on the evolution of pathogenicity and genome level evolutionary dynamics within the entire genus (termed Listeria sensu lato). Here, we have sequenced the genomes of additional Listeria fleischmannii and Listeria newyorkensis isolates and explored the dynamics of genome evolution in Listeria sensu lato. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of genetic material through gene duplication and divergence as well as through lateral gene transfer (mostly from outside Listeria) is widespread throughout the genus. Novel genetic material is apparently subject to rapid turnover. Multiple lines of evidence point to significant differences in evolutionary dynamics between the most basal Listeria subclade and all other congeners, including both sensu strictu and other sensu lato isolates. Strikingly, these differences are likely attributable to stochastic, population-level processes and contribute to observed variation in genome size across the genus. Notably, our analyses indicate that the common ancestor of Listeria sensu lato lacked flagella, which were acquired by lateral gene transfer by a common ancestor of Listeria grayi and Listeria sensu strictu, whereas a recently functionally characterized pathogenicity island, responsible for the capacity to produce cobalamin and utilize ethanolamine/propane-2-diol, was acquired in an ancestor of Listeria sensu strictu.

  15. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  16. Revised genomic consensus for the hypermethylated CpG island region of the human L1 transposon and integration sites of full length L1 elements from recombinant clones made using methylation-tolerant host strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowther, P J; Doherty, J P; Linsenmeyer, M E

    1991-01-01

    preferentially from L1 members which have accumulated mutations that have removed sites of methylation. We present a revised consensus from the 5' presumptive control region of these elements. This revised consensus contains a consensus RNA polymerase III promoter which would permit the synthesis of transcripts...... from the 5' end of full length L1 elements. Such potential transcripts are likely to exhibit a high degree of secondary structure. In addition, we have determined the flanking sequences for 6 full length L1 elements. The majority of full length L1 clones show no convincing evidence for target site...... duplication in the insertion site as commonly observed with truncated L1 elements. These data would be consistent with two mechanisms of integration of transposing L1 elements with different mechanisms predominating for full length and truncated elements. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-May-11...

  17. Research Progress of Genome Editing in Plants%基因组编辑技术在植物中的研究进展与应用前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢科; 饶力群; 李红伟; 安学丽; 方才臣; 万向元

    2013-01-01

    外源DNA导入细胞并与基因组靶基因发生同源重组可以精确修饰或替换靶基因,但在植物中产生自发同源重组的概率很低.近几年出现的人工改造核酸酶可以大幅提高同源重组的效率,实现基因组的精确、定向改造.其中,归巢核酸酶、锌指核酸酶和TALE核酸酶已在植物基因工程中得到成功应用,最近开发出来的基于CRISPR/Cas系统的基因组编辑技术则更具有高效方便等特点.这些人工核酸酶的应用为植物基因工程的发展呈现了更加美好的前景.首先介绍了基因组编辑技术及其发展历程,随后详细阐述了提高植物基因组定点编辑效率的策略,最后对基因组编辑技术在农业和植物基因工程上的应用进行了展望.%The precise insertion of a foreign DNA molecule at genome through homologous recombination remains low efficiency in plants.Genome editing is an important tool to precisely integrate DNA molecules at a defined genomic location.Extensive efforts have been made to understand the mechanisms governing gene targeting and to establish efficient systems to achieve precise and efficient targeting.A set of genome editing techniques,engineered meganucleases,zinc finger nucleases,and transcription activator-like effector nucleases,have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in plants.The recent development of genome editing technique based on the CRISPR/Cas system demonstrate that it is efficient and specific for wide application.The rapid progress in the field of genome editing was summarized,and then the potential perspective of the genome editing technology to be used in agriculture and plant engineering was discussed.

  18. Entering the Clone Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Suppose you make your parents so happy,they decide to have another baby just like you.It might be flattering,but how would you feel about having a little brother or sister who is also your twin? A laboratory experiment conducted last fall suggests it may someday be possible.For the first time ever,scientists made exact copies, or clones, of a human embryo.

  19. Employment of Near Full-Length Ribosome Gene TA-Cloning and Primer-Blast to Detect Multiple Species in a Natural Complex Microbial Community Using Species-Specific Primers Designed with Their Genome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; He, Hongkui; Yu, Xiujuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2016-11-01

    It remains an unsolved problem to quantify a natural microbial community by rapidly and conveniently measuring multiple species with functional significance. Most widely used high throughput next-generation sequencing methods can only generate information mainly for genus-level taxonomic identification and quantification, and detection of multiple species in a complex microbial community is still heavily dependent on approaches based on near full-length ribosome RNA gene or genome sequence information. In this study, we used near full-length rRNA gene library sequencing plus Primer-Blast to design species-specific primers based on whole microbial genome sequences. The primers were intended to be specific at the species level within relevant microbial communities, i.e., a defined genomics background. The primers were tested with samples collected from the Daqu (also called fermentation starters) and pit mud of a traditional Chinese liquor production plant. Sixteen pairs of primers were found to be suitable for identification of individual species. Among them, seven pairs were chosen to measure the abundance of microbial species through quantitative PCR. The combination of near full-length ribosome RNA gene library sequencing and Primer-Blast may represent a broadly useful protocol to quantify multiple species in complex microbial population samples with species-specific primers.

  20. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    million cases and up to 2.7 million A whole chromosome shotgun sequencing strategy was used to deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are...deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are greatest in determine the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. This sub-Saharan Africa...aminolevulinic acid dehydratase. Cura . Genet. 40, 391-398 (2002). 15. Lasonder, E. et al Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteome by high-accuracy mass

  1. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  2. Secure the Clones

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Thomas; Pichardie, David

    2012-01-01

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfil their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the ove...

  3. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity.

  4. Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection of a CD4+ proliferative/cytotoxic T cell clone progresses in at least two distinct phases based on changes in function and phenotype of the infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yssel, H; de Waal Malefyt, R; Duc Dodon, M D; Blanchard, D; Gazzolo, L; de Vries, J E; Spits, H

    1989-04-01

    The effect of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) infection on the function and the phenotype of a human proliferating/cytotoxic T cell clone, specific for tetanus toxin, was investigated. During the period after infection, two distinct phases were observed, based on growth properties, phenotype, and functional activity of the infected cells. Phase I HTLV-I infected cells (0 to about 150 days after infection) proliferated in an IL-2-dependent way, but without the requirement for repetitive antigenic stimulation. No differences in expression of the CD2, CD3, CD4, Tp103, and CD28 Ag between these cells and the parental cells could be demonstrated, with the exception of the expression of IL-R p55 and HLA-DR Ag, which were constitutively expressed on the phase I cells. The phase I HTLV-I-infected cells, as well as the parental 827 cells reacted with a mAb specific for an epitope on the variable part of the TCR beta-chain, indicating that the TCR was not altered after HTLV-I infection. Like the parental clone, the phase I cells proliferated in response to tetanus toxin, but the tetanus toxin-specific response of the phase I cells did not require the presence of APC. Results of experiments, in which the levels of intracellular Ca2+ were measured, indicated that HTLV-I cells can acquire the capability to process Ag and present that to themselves. Phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells had lost their cytotoxic activity which was likely to be due to an effect on the lytic machinery rather than on Ag recognition by the TCR, inasmuch as it was found that phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells did no longer contain N-alpha-benzyloxy-L-lysine thiobenzylester-serine esterase activity. Furthermore, it was found that phase I HTLV-I-infected T cells had a diminished capacity to form conjugates with target cells. From a period of about 200 days after HTLV-I infection, phase II cells emerged that proliferated strongly in the absence of IL-2 and that had lost all functional

  5. DNA Methylation in Peripheral Blood Cells of Pigs Cloned by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Fei; Li, Shengting; Lin, Lin

    2011-01-01

    To date, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of cloned pigs has not been investigated. Due to the relatively low success rate of pig cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer, a better understanding of the epigenetic reprogramming and the global methylation patterns associated with development...... in cloned pigs is required. In this study we applied methylation-specific digital karyotyping tag sequencing by Solexa technology and investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood cells in cloned pigs with normal phenotypes in comparison with their naturally bred controls....... In the result, we found that globally there was no significant difference of DNA methylation patterns between the two groups. Locus-specifically, some genes involved in embryonic development presented a generally increased level of methylation. Our findings suggest that in cloned pigs with normal phenotypes...

  6. Climbing Mount Efficiency--small steps, not giant leaps towards higher cloning success in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn

    2008-07-01

    Despite more than a decade of research efforts, farm animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still frustratingly inefficient. Inefficiency manifests itself at different levels, which are currently not well integrated. At the molecular level, it leads to widespread genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations in cloned embryos. At the organismal level, these genome-wide abnormalities compromise development of cloned foetuses and offspring. Specific molecular defects need to be causally linked to specific cloned phenotypes, in order to design specific treatments to correct them. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be fully reprogrammed into an embryonic state and the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions. It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is influenced by its differentiation status. However, direct comparisons between cells of divergent differentiation status within several somatic lineages have found no conclusive evidence for this. Choosing somatic stem cells as donors has not improved cloning efficiency, indicating that donor cell type may be less critical for cloning success. Different recipient cells, on the other hand, vary in their reprogramming ability. In bovine, using zygotes instead of oocytes has increased cloning success. Other improvements in livestock cloning efficiency include better coordinating donor cell type with cell cycle stage and aggregating cloned embryos. In the future, it will be important to demonstrate if these small increases at every step are cumulative, adding up to an integrated cloning protocol with greatly improved efficiency.

  7. Cloning of Leishmania Major P4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Shaddel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Leishmania major P4 gene is normally expressed during amastigote form ofthe parasite and can be good candidate for producing an effective vaccine. In this study wecloned this gene in suitable vector (pQE-30 for further vaccine preparation studies.Materials and Methods: Leishmania promastigotes were grown in N.N.N.medium and culturein RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Total genomic DNA was extracted by centrifugationof promastigotes. The pellet was suspended in lysis buffer and followed by boiling method.PCR was carried out using P4 gene specific primers. PCR product was detected by agarosgel electrophoresis and cloned into Bluescript plasmid via T/A cloning method. Reactionwas transformed into XL1- Blue competent cell and recombinant plasmid screened usingagar plate contained X-gal and IPTG. The product was extracted, digested by restrictionenzyme and electrophoresed on agarose gel.Results: Plasmid was extracted and cloned gene was released by restriction enzyme andsubcloned into pQE-30 expression vector.Conclusion: This construct is ready for protein expression in in-vitro.

  8. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits.

  9. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  10. Progress in functional genomics of drug-producing microorganisms%微生物药物产生菌功能基因组学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杭; 白林泉; 周秀芬; 邓子新

    2013-01-01

    Microbial drugs are secondary metabolites with diverse structures and bioactivities. In recent years, considerable genomes of the drug-producing microorganisms have been completely sequenced. Subsequently, functional genomic studies have been performed, which shed new lights on anibiotic biosynthesis, morphological differentiation, regulation, phylogeny and evolution, and genome mining of secondary metabolism. Herein, functional genomics for four important antibiotic producers is discussed, focusing on the genetic basis for penicillin overproduction, genomic and transcriptomic analysis of erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea, A-factor regulatory networks of streptomycin-producing Streptomyces griseus, construction of surrogate host for the heterologous expression of secondary metabolites and high-yielding strain of Streptomyces avermitilis, and genome mining for novel natural products. Moreover, current status on genomics of drug-producing microorganisms in China is summarized, and the perspective of genomic studies is predicted at both the basic research and the applied science aspects.%微生物药物是一类化学结构和生物活性多样的次级代谢产物,近年来其多个产生菌基因组序列已经被测定完成,在此基础上开展的功能基因组研究方兴未艾,并在抗生素生物合成、形态分化、调控、系统发育与进化以及次级代谢产物挖掘等方面有着新的发现,展现出广阔的研究前景.本文重点阐述了四种重要抗生素产生菌功能基因组学的研究现状,集中于青霉素高产的遗传机制、红霉素产生菌红色糖多孢菌基因组与转录组分析、链霉素产生菌灰色链霉菌中A因子调控网络、阿维菌素产生菌作为次级代谢物异源表达的通用宿主与超高产菌株构建以及新型天然产物的挖掘等研究内容,同时简要介绍了当前我国微生物药物产生菌基因组学的研究概况,并从基础与应用两个角度对

  11. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  12. A physical map of the mouse genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregory, SG; Sekhon, M; Schein, J; Zhao, SY; Osoegawa, K; Scott, CE; Evans, RS; Burridge, PW; Cox, TV; Fox, CA; Hutton, RD; Mullenger, IR; Phillips, KJ; Smith, J; Stalker, J; Threadgold, GJ; Birney, E; Wylie, K; Chinwalla, A; Wallis, J; Hillier, L; Carter, J; Gaige, T; Jaeger, S; Kremitzki, C; Layman, D; McGrane, R; Mead, K; Walker, R; Jones, S; Smith, M; Asano, J; Bosdet, I; Chan, S; Chittaranjan, S; Chiu, R; Fjell, C; Fuhrmann, D; Girn, N; Gray, C; Guin, R; Hsiao, L; Krzywinski, M; Kutsche, R; Lee, SS; Mathewson, C; McLeavy, C; Messervier, S; Ness, S; Pandoh, P; Prabhu, AL; Saeedi, P; Smailus, D; Spence, L; Stott, J; Taylor, S; Terpstra, W; Tsai, M; Vardy, J; Wye, N; Yang, G; Shatsman, S; Ayodeji, B; Geer, K; Tsegaye, G; Shvartsbeyn, A; Gebregeorgis, E; Krol, M; Russell, D; Overton, L; Malek, JA; Holmes, M; Heaney, M; Shetty, J; Feldblyum, T; Nierman, WC; Catanese, JJ; Hubbard, T; Waterston, RH; Rogers, J; de Jong, PJ; Fraser, CM; Marra, M; McPherson, JD; Bentley, DR

    2002-01-01

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs w

  13. A physical map of the mouse genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregory, SG; Sekhon, M; Schein, J; Zhao, SY; Osoegawa, K; Scott, CE; Evans, RS; Burridge, PW; Cox, TV; Fox, CA; Hutton, RD; Mullenger, IR; Phillips, KJ; Smith, J; Stalker, J; Threadgold, GJ; Birney, E; Wylie, K; Chinwalla, A; Wallis, J; Hillier, L; Carter, J; Gaige, T; Jaeger, S; Kremitzki, C; Layman, D; McGrane, R; Mead, K; Walker, R; Jones, S; Smith, M; Asano, J; Bosdet, I; Chan, S; Chittaranjan, S; Chiu, R; Fjell, C; Fuhrmann, D; Girn, N; Gray, C; Guin, R; Hsiao, L; Krzywinski, M; Kutsche, R; Lee, SS; Mathewson, C; McLeavy, C; Messervier, S; Ness, S; Pandoh, P; Prabhu, AL; Saeedi, P; Smailus, D; Spence, L; Stott, J; Taylor, S; Terpstra, W; Tsai, M; Vardy, J; Wye, N; Yang, G; Shatsman, S; Ayodeji, B; Geer, K; Tsegaye, G; Shvartsbeyn, A; Gebregeorgis, E; Krol, M; Russell, D; Overton, L; Malek, JA; Holmes, M; Heaney, M; Shetty, J; Feldblyum, T; Nierman, WC; Catanese, JJ; Hubbard, T; Waterston, RH; Rogers, J; de Jong, PJ; Fraser, CM; Marra, M; McPherson, JD; Bentley, DR

    2002-01-01

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs w

  14. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  15. Array patterns and clones - RMOS | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed by large scale cDNA analysis in RGP (rice genome research program). - Rice8987 f_array Our microarray wit...m about 40,000 cDNA clones isolated in the first research stage of the rice genome research project. Field 1

  16. Transfer of the cloned Salmonella SPI-1 type III secretion system and characterization of its expression mechanisms in Gram negative bacteria in comparison with cloned SPI-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, Chris; Hannagan, Susan; Santiago, Clayton P; Wilson, James W

    2015-11-01

    Cloned type III secretion systems have much potential to be used for bacterial engineering purposes involving protein secretion and substrate translocation directly into eukaryotic cells. We have previously cloned the SPI-1 and SPI-2 type III systems from the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genome using plasmid R995 which can conveniently capture large genomic segments for transfer between bacterial strains. However, though expressed and functional in Salmonella strains, cloned SPI-1 was previously observed to have a serious expression defect in other Gram negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. Here we show that cloned SPI-1 expression and secretion can be detected in the secretion preps from E. coli and Citrobacter indicating the first observation of non-Salmonella SPI-1 expression. We describe a compatible plasmid system to introduce engineered SPI-1 substrates into cloned SPI-1 strains. However, a SPI-1 translocation defect is still observed in E. coli, and we show that this is likely due to a defect in SipB expression/secretion in this species. In addition, we also examined the requirement for the hilA and ssrAB regulators in the expression of cloned SPI-1 and SPI-2, respectively. We found a strict requirement for hilA for full cloned SPI-1 expression and secretion. However, though we found that ssrAB is required for full cloned SPI-2 expression in a range of media across different bacteria, it is not required for cloned SPI-2 expression in MgM8 inducing media in S. Typhimurium. This suggests that under SPI-2 inducing conditions in S. Typhimurium, other factors can substitute for loss of ssrAB in cloned SPI-2 expression. The results provide key foundational information for the future use of these cloned systems in bacteria.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants that expressed Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) protein toxins can suffer feeding damage from a small number of lepidopteran insect species under field conditions, which has heightened concerns about the durability of pest control tactics. Genomics research has provid...

  18. Progress in research on functional genes in the Drosophila genome%果蝇基因组与功能基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素宁; 沈杰

    2011-01-01

    黑腹果蝇Drosophila melanogaster是生物科学研究中重要的模式动物之一.2000年,黑腹果蝇全基因组测序完成,随后基因组序列质量不断完善,对其功能基因进行深入研究,为其他高等动物基因组和功能基因的研究提供了巨大帮助.本文综述了近年来基因组功能元件、比较基因组学等方面的最新研究成果,着重介绍了功能基因在Hh信号通路、细胞凋亡方面的研究进展,并对最新的功能基因研究技术进行了简要概述.%Drosophila is one of the most important model organisms in the life sciences. The sequencing of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, completed in 2000, has provided a number of important contributions to research on the genome and functional genes. In this review, we summarize historical landmarks in the Drosophila genome with a focus on functional elements and comparative genomics. Recent findings regarding the Hh signaling pathway and apoptosis are highlighted and the most widely used advanced experimental techniques are briefly introduced.

  19. cDNA Cloning of c33-c Antigen Gene Derived From NS3 Region of Chinese HCV Genome, Expression in Escherichia coli and Development of HCV EIA Second-Generation Diagnostic Kit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永平; 刘崇柏; 金冬雁; 詹美云; 汤权; 夏宁邵; 曹经媛; 李景源< Author> YANG Yong-Ping LIU Chong-Bai JIN Dong-YanZHAN Mei-Yun TANG Quan; XIA Ning-ShaoCAO Jing-Yuan and LI Jing-Yuan(Institute of Virology; Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine; Beijing 100052; PRC)

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA fragment of about 860 bp corresponding to the c33-c gene in the non-structural region 3 (NS3) of HCV genome was obtained from one plasma derived from a Chinese HCV carrier who came from Tai’an of Shandong Province, China by the application of reverse transcription (RT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. After the sequence of the cDNA fragment was determined and compared with the equivalent region of. the HCV-I (HCV-US) and HCV-II (HCV-BK) genomes, the nucleotide/ amino acid sequence homologies were found to be 79. 2%/91. 3% and 91. 3%/93. 9%, respectively. The prokaryotic expression vector pBV220 was employed for the overproduction of c33-c native recombinant protein in E. coli cells. The expression products were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting with antisera of chronic hepatitis C patients, and a molecular weight 31 kD of c33-c viral protein was shown to account for 14% of the total cellular soluble proteins. This product was extracted from

  20. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of ``physical linking clones`` that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the ``rare-cutter`` endonucleases.

  1. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of physical linking clones'' that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the rare-cutter'' endonucleases.

  2. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  3. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper: targeted use of genome resources for comparative grass genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben; Mayer, Klaus F X; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Byrne, Stephen; Frei, Ursula; Studer, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper is an ordered, information-rich genome scaffold, facilitating map-based cloning and genome assembly in perennial ryegrass and closely related Poaceae species. It also represents a milestone in describing synteny between perennial ryegrass and fully sequenced model grass genomes, thereby increasing our understanding of genome organization and evolution in the most important temperate forage and turf grass species.

  4. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  5. Application of bioinformatics in cardiovascular genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tragante Do O, V.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research made a remarkable progress in the past 20 years, with the Human Genome Project, which sequenced an entire genome; the HapMap project, that identified common genetic variation in hundreds of genomes from different populations; and the 1000 Genomes project, which identified common and

  6. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  7. Human cloning and child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  8. Localization and Characterization of 170 BAC-derived clones and mapping of Ninety-Four Microsatellites in the Hessian Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninety-four microsatellites from enriched genomic libraries of Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor (Say)) were localized to 170 cognate clones in a Hessian fly bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. These microsatellite-positive BAC clones were physically mapped to polytene chromosomes by fl...

  9. Cytogenetically unrelated clones in hematological neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, S; Mitelman, F

    1989-01-01

    We have reviewed literature data on 6,306 cases of hematological neoplasia--acute and chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemias (CML excepted), myelodysplastic and chronic lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, and malignant lymphomas--with the goal of quantitatively ascertaining how often cytogenetically unrelated clones occur in these diseases. Unexpectedly wide variations were found: in ANLL, unrelated clones were present in 1.1% of the 2,506 known cases with chromosome abnormalities characterized with banding technique; in the various myelodysplastic (MDS) and chronic myeloproliferative (CMD) disorders (total number of cases 1,299) the frequency was 4.3% and in lymphatic malignancies 1.3% (total case number 2,501). In the latter group the proportions varied between 0.4% and 0.6% in ALL and malignant lymphoma (ML) to as much as 6.2% in CLD and 7.3% in CLL. Some karyotypic abnormalities were encountered more often than would be expected from their general frequency in the various diseases. This discrepancy was particularly evident in MDS and CMD, where 5q- was found in slightly less and +8 in somewhat more than half of the 56 cases. Furthermore, these two aberrations were found as the only changes in the two coexisting clones in one-fourth of the material. Although if viewed in isolation these data would undoubtedly be best explained by assuming a multicellular origin of the neoplasm, it is entirely possible that what are cytogenetically perceived as unrelated clones could be subclones with some invisible aberration in common. If so, this interpretation indicates that changes like +8 and 5q-, both of which are common rearrangements in bone marrow neoplasms, are actually secondary changes that develop during tumor progression.

  10. 一株H5N1亚型禽流感病毒全基因组克隆及HA基因分子进化分析%Cloning and sequencing full-length genome of H5N1 avian influenza A virus and molecular evolution analysis of HA gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军强; 吴叔文; 詹发先; 喻明霞; 江永忠; 霍细香

    2011-01-01

    Objective To clone and sequence full-length genome of the avian influenza A/Chicken/Hubei/489/ 2004(H5N1 ) virus,in order to analyze genetic mutation patterns of HA gene and polygenetic relationship between A/ Chicken/Hubei/489/2OO4(H5Nl) virus and other strains since 1996. Methods 8 genes of the avian influenza A/ Chicken/Hubei/489/2004 ( H5N1 ) virus were amplified and cloned, and then genetic mutation analysis and phylogenetic trees were made by bioinformatics software. Results Full-length genome of the avian influenza A/ Chicken/Hubei/489/2004(H5N1)virus were cloned into the vector of PMD18-T. Genetic evolution analysis showed that there is a specific cleavage site of "PQRERRRKKR" , which was proved be related with virulence. In addition, molecular phylogenetic trees of HA gene revealed that A/Chicken/Hubei/ 489/2004 virus were closely related to HSN1 viruses of 2000-2006 isolated in Hong Kong and in Southeast Asia. Conclusion the influenza A/Chicken/ Hubei/489/2004 ( H5N1) virus was closest genetic relatives to the influenza A/Chicken/HongKong/YU777/2002 (H5N1) virus, and it was most possible that the avian influenza outbreak was caused by the 2002 lineage of Hong Kong.%目的 对禽流感H5N1亚型病毒株A/Chicken/Hubei/489/2004的全基因组进行克隆和测序,并分析血凝素基因HA的遗传突变特点及其与1996年以来其他病毒株的亲缘关系.方法 通过RT-PCR扩增病毒株A/C hicken/Hubei/489/2004的8个基因,并将其克隆到测序载体;在对病毒株全基因组序列测定基础上,利用生物信息学软件对HA基因进行遗传进化分析.结果 病毒株A/Chicken/Hubei/489/2004的全基因组克隆到PMD18-T;遗传进化分析显示该毒株HA蛋白具有与致病性有关的切割位点“PQRERRRKKR”,并且与2000~2006年在香港从人和禽体内分离的H5N1亲缘关系相近,也与2003~2004年在东南亚从人和禽体内分离的H5N1极其相关.结论 A/Chicken/H ubei/489/2004病

  11. In silico analysis of the fucosylation-associated genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni: cloning and characterization of the enzymes involved in GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nathan A; Anderson, Tavis K; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2013-07-09

    Carbohydrate structures of surface-expressed and secreted/excreted glycoconjugates of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni are key determinants that mediate host-parasite interactions in both snail and mammalian hosts. Fucose is a major constituent of these immunologically important glycans, and recent studies have sought to characterize fucosylation-associated enzymes, including the Golgi-localized fucosyltransferases that catalyze the transfer of L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. Importantly, GDP-L-fucose is the only nucleotide-sugar donor used by fucosyltransferases and its availability represents a bottleneck in fucosyl-glycotope expression. A homology-based genome-wide bioinformatics approach was used to identify and molecularly characterize the enzymes that contribute to GDP-L-fucose synthesis and Golgi import in S. mansoni. Putative functions were further investigated through molecular phylogenetic and immunocytochemical analyses. We identified homologs of GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase-4-reductase (GMER), which constitute a de novo pathway for GDP-L-fucose synthesis, in addition to a GDP-L-fucose transporter (GFT) that putatively imports cytosolic GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi. In silico primary sequence analyses identified characteristic Rossman loop and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase motifs in GMD and GMER as well as 10 transmembrane domains in GFT. All genes are alternatively spliced, generating variants of unknown function. Observed quantitative differences in steady-state transcript levels between miracidia and primary sporocysts may contribute to differential glycotope expression in early larval development. Additionally, analyses of protein expression suggest the occurrence of cytosolic GMD and GMER in the ciliated epidermal plates and tegument of miracidia and primary sporocysts, respectively, which is consistent with previous localization of highly

  12. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, July 1992--August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1993-09-01

    Progress in identification of chromosomal transformations associated with leukemogenesis is described. In particular progress in DNA cloning of chromosomal break points in human cancer patients is described.

  13. Cloning of Xylose Reductase Gene and Site-Specific Integrating it into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome%木糖还原酶基因的克隆及其在酿酒酵母中的定向整合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岚; 夏黎明

    2013-01-01

      酿酒酵母(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)是重要的乙醇生产菌株,但因缺少戊糖代谢途径而不能利用木糖,为了改良工业酿酒酵母利用半纤维素发酵生产乙醇的性能,利用分子生物学技术构建能够利用木糖的基因工程酵母。选取酿酒酵母染色体的rDNA重复序列作为外源基因整合位点,依此构建多拷贝染色体整合型载体pUG-LR。采用融合表达策略扩增得到含有酿酒酵母乙醇脱氢酶启动子PADH和树干毕赤酵母木糖还原酶基因xyl1的融合序列,并将其插入pUG-LR载体中,构建成含遗传霉素G418抗性标记的同源重组质粒pUG-LR-XYL1。以工业酿酒酵母ZU-01为宿主,通过优化后的电穿孔法将重组质粒导入经缓冲液处理的酵母细胞,30℃培养。通过提高YEPX复筛培养基G418浓度,得到10株生长较快的优良性状转化子。在不含G418的YEPX培养基上传代8次以上,以转化子基因组DNA为模板,进行PCR检测,均可获得目的基因片段。研究结果表明:木糖还原酶基因xyl1已定向整合于ZU-01染色体DNA上并稳定遗传,为后续构建工业酿酒酵母的木糖代谢通路、利用木糖产酒精的重组菌株奠定了基础。%  Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important ethanol producing fungus, but it cannot be used in large-scale bioethanol production from hemicelluloses due to its lack of the metabolism pathway of pentose, and therefore the xylose can not be utilized. In order to improve its ability of utilizing hemicelluloses to produce ethand, molecular biology technology was adopted to obtain recombinant strain with ability of xylose-using in this study. The repeat region of rDNA in the S. cerevisiae chromosome was chosen as the insert site of foreign genes. Plasmid pUG6, with KanMX resistance marker, was connected with rDNA fragments to construct site-specific integration vector pUG-LR. Then a Pichia stipitis xylose reductase gene xyl1 was cloned

  14. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  15. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter V Henstock

    Full Text Available High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1 a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2 a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3 a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  16. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  17. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  18. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  19. Quantum probabilistically cloning and computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article we make a review on the usefulness of probabilistically cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which quantum cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to it.In these quantum computations,one needs to distribute quantum information contained in states about which we have some partial information.To perform quantum computations,one uses state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.And we discuss the achievable efficiencies and the efficient quantum logic network for probabilistic cloning the quantum states used in implementing quantum computation tasks for which cloning provides enhancement in performance.

  20. Cloning of Rabbit HPRT Gene Using the Recombineering System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun SHI; Donghui CAI; Xuejin CHEN; Huizheng SHENG

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) plays an important role in the metabolic salvage of purines, and been used as an alternative pathway for mutant selection in many studies. To facilitate its application in rabbits, we have cloned the cDNA and genomic DNA of the rabbit HPRT gene using an approach that combines bioinformatics and recombineering methods. The cDNA is comprised of 1449 bp containing a coding sequence for a protein of 218 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the rabbit HPRT gene shares 98%, 97%, 98% and 94% identity with human, mouse, pig and cattle HPRT genes, respectively. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that this gene is ubiquitously expressed in tissues of adult rabbit. The rabbit HPRT gene spans approximately 48 kb in length and consists of nine exons. The cloning of the rabbit HPRT gene shows the usefulness of the recombineering system in cloning genes of large size. This system may facilitate the subcloning of DNA from bacterial artificial chromosomes for cloning genes of large size or filling big gaps in genomic sequencing.

  1. Expression of lactate/H⁺ symporters MCT1 and MCT4 and their chaperone CD147 predicts tumor progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: immunohistochemical and The Cancer Genome Atlas data analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Choi, Jung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Young-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) have inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau protein, leading to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). HIF-1α induces aerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, whereas HIF-2α functions as an oncoprotein. Lactate transport through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and the chaperone CD147 is essential for high glycolytic cancer cell survival. To elucidate the clinical significance of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 expression, we investigated their expressions by immunohistochemistry in ccRCC specimens and validated the results by an open-access The Cancer Genome Atlas data analysis. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 was observed in 49.4% (89/180), 39.4% (71/180), and 79.4% (143/180) of ccRCC patients, respectively. High MCT1 expression was associated with older age (P = .017), larger tumor size (P = .015), and advanced TNM stage (P = .012). However, MCT4 overexpression was not related to any variables. CD147 overexpression correlated with high grade (P = .005), tumor necrosis (P = .016), and larger tumor size (P = .038). In univariate analysis, high expression of MCT1 (P CD147 (P = .02) was linked to short progression-free survival. In multivariate analysis, high MCT1 expression was associated with worse progression-free survival (P = .001). In conclusion, high expression of MCT1 and CD147 is associated with poor prognostic factors. Overexpression of MCT1, MCT4, and CD147 predicts tumor progression. Reversing the Warburg effect by targeting the lactate transporters may be a useful strategy to prevent ccRCC progression.

  2. Specific single-cell isolation and genomic amplification of uncultured microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Lasken, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    We in this study describe a new method for genomic studies of individual uncultured prokaryotic organisms, which was used for the isolation and partial genome sequencing of a soil archaeon. The diversity of Archaea in a soil sample was mapped by generating a clone library using group...... sequence analysis and shotgun-cloned for additional genomic analysis. Sequence analysis showed > 99% 16S rRNA gene homology to soil crenarchaeotal clone SCA1170 and shotgun fragments had the closest match to a crenarchaeotal BAC clone previously retrieved from a soil sample. The system was validated using...

  3. The global governance of human cloning: the case of UNESCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Adèle

    2017-01-01

    Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Feelings run strong on both sides. In 2005, the United Nations adopted its Declaration on Human Cloning to try to deal with the issue. The declaration is ambiguously worded, prohibiting “all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life”. It received only ambivalent support from UN member states. Given this unsatisfactory outcome, in 2008 UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) set up a Working Group to investigate the possibility of a legally binding convention to ban human reproductive cloning. The Working Group was made up of members of the International Bioethics Committee, established in 1993 as part of UNESCO’s Bioethics Programme. It found that the lack of clarity in international law is unhelpful for those states yet to formulate national regulations or policies on human cloning. Despite this, member states of UNESCO resisted the idea of a convention for several years. This changed in 2015, but there has been no practical progress on the issue. Drawing on official records and first-hand observations at bioethics meetings, this article examines the human cloning debate at UNESCO from 2008 onwards, thus building on and advancing current scholarship by applying recent ideas on global governance to an empirical case. It concludes that, although human reproductive cloning is a challenging subject, establishing a robust global governance framework in this area may be possible via an alternative deliberative format, based on knowledge sharing and feasibility testing rather than the interest-based bargaining that is common to intergovernmental organizations and involving a wide range of stakeholders. This article is published as part of a collection on global governance.

  4. The global governance of human cloning: the case of UNESCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Adèle

    2017-03-21

    Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Feelings run strong on both sides. In 2005, the United Nations adopted its Declaration on Human Cloning to try to deal with the issue. The declaration is ambiguously worded, prohibiting "all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life". It received only ambivalent support from UN member states. Given this unsatisfactory outcome, in 2008 UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) set up a Working Group to investigate the possibility of a legally binding convention to ban human reproductive cloning. The Working Group was made up of members of the International Bioethics Committee, established in 1993 as part of UNESCO's Bioethics Programme. It found that the lack of clarity in international law is unhelpful for those states yet to formulate national regulations or policies on human cloning. Despite this, member states of UNESCO resisted the idea of a convention for several years. This changed in 2015, but there has been no practical progress on the issue. Drawing on official records and first-hand observations at bioethics meetings, this article examines the human cloning debate at UNESCO from 2008 onwards, thus building on and advancing current scholarship by applying recent ideas on global governance to an empirical case. It concludes that, although human reproductive cloning is a challenging subject, establishing a robust global governance framework in this area may be possible via an alternative deliberative format, based on knowledge sharing and feasibility testing rather than the interest-based bargaining that is common to intergovernmental organizations and involving a wide range of stakeholders. This article is published as part of a collection on global governance.

  5. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor sequence from fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Kumaresan; T Venugopal; A Vikas; T J Pandian; S M Athavan

    2000-03-01

    A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding for a putative transmembrane domain of gonadotropin hormone receptor. The amplified DNA sequence shows a high degree of homology to the available turkey and human luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormone receptor coding sequences. This is the first report on cloning such sequences of piscine origin.

  6. 1株中度嗜盐菌质粒基因组文库的构建及2个膜蛋白基因的克隆和序列分析%Construction of Plasmid Genomic Library of One Moderately Halophilic Bacteria & Cloning, Sequence Analysis of Two Membrane Protein Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱文华; 董冠群; 滕长财; 侯娟; 吕彦; 孙业盈

    2012-01-01

    中度嗜盐菌是生活在高盐环境中的微生物,以1株从蜢子虾酱中分离的中度嗜盐菌盐脱氮枝芽胞杆菌(Virgibacillus halodenitrificans)为研究对象,通过酶切,筛选DNA片段然后连接pUC19载体并转化大肠埃希菌,构建了该菌株的质粒基因组文库,推测可获得5×103个阳性克隆,覆盖约15 Mb的遗传信息.随机选取部分克隆进行测序,在测序结果中筛选到了2个具有完整ORF的膜蛋白基因分别为编码Na+H+逆向转运蛋白的NhaC基因,编码一离子通道蛋白的MscS基因,GenBank登陆号分别为JX849200、JX849202.其中NhaC基因ORF全长为1 446 bp,编码481个氨基酸,包括10个跨膜结构域;MscS基因的全长ORF为822 bp,编码273个氨基酸的蛋白质,包括3个跨膜区,与其他菌种的序列比对表明第3个跨膜区保守性最强.%Moderately halophilic bacteria are microorganism living in high salt environment. A moderately halophilic bacteria Virgibacillus halodenitrijicans was separated from a shrimp paste as research object. Plasmid genomic library of the strain was constructed. DNA fragments were selected after genomic DNA digestion by restriction enzyme, and then were linked with pUC19 vector and transformed into E. coli to construct the plasmid genomic library of the strain. It was speculated that about 5 × 103 positive clones were obtained, covering about 15 Mb of genetic information. Part of the clones was selected to carry out sequencing. From the sequencing results two membrane protein genes possessing complete ORF respectively encoding NhaC gene of Na+ H + reverse transporter protein, MscS genes of encoding an ion channel protein were screened. The CenBank accession numbers of the two genes were JX849200, JX849202 respectively. Among them the NhaC gene was 1 446 bp length ORF, encoded 481 amino acids, including 10 transmem-brane domains. MscS gene had 822 bp length ORF, encoded a protein of 273 amino acids, including 3 transmembrane domains. The

  7. Cloning in cattle: from embryo splitting to somatic nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Y; Vignon, X; Chesné, P; Le Bourhis, D; Marchal, J; Renard, J P

    1998-01-01

    The ability to obtain genetically identical offspring in cattle (clones) is useful for research and for potential applications to breeding schemes. Experimental possibilities for generating such animals have evolved considerably in the last two decades. Embryo splitting has become a relatively simple technique but is limited to twinning. Embryonic nuclear transfer has improved and is associated with sexing to generate sets of clones despite a great variability of results between parent embryos. The factors of progress are reviewed here. Recently, somatic cells used as a source of nuclei in bovine nuclear transfer has been demonstrated. Here we present the results of the developmental potential of nuclei from skin and muscle cells.

  8. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Á; Sonesson, Anna K; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in the initial founders. Traditionally, base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and, therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during 10 generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program.

  9. Optimizing the creation of base populations for aquaculture breeding programs using phenotypic and genomic data and its consequences on genetic progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús eFernández

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of an aquaculture breeding program critically depends on the way in which the base population of breeders is constructed since all the genetic variability for the traits included originally in the breeding goal as well as those to be included in the future is contained in those initial founders. Traditionally base populations were created from a number of wild strains by sampling equal numbers from each strain. However, for some aquaculture species improved strains are already available and therefore, mean phenotypic values for economically important traits can be used as a criterion to optimize the sampling when creating base populations. Also, the increasing availability of genome-wide genotype information in aquaculture species could help to refine the estimation of relationships within and between candidate strains and, thus, to optimize the percentage of individuals to be sampled from each strain. This study explores the advantages of using phenotypic and genome-wide information when constructing base populations for aquaculture breeding programs in terms of initial and subsequent trait performance and genetic diversity level. Results show that a compromise solution between diversity and performance can be found when creating base populations. Up to 6% higher levels of phenotypic performance can be achieved at the same level of global diversity in the base population by optimizing the selection of breeders instead of sampling equal numbers from each strain. The higher performance observed in the base population persisted during ten generations of phenotypic selection applied in the subsequent breeding program.

  10. 鹦鹉热嗜衣原体基因组学的研究进展%Research progress on genomics of Chlamydophila psittaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎知青

    2012-01-01

    目前,7株鹦鹉热嗜衣原体全基因组己测序完整,揭示了不同株之间的相同性与差异性.主要外膜蛋白基因、多形态膜蛋白多基因家族、Ⅲ型分泌系统基因和包涵体膜蛋白基因是鹦鹉热嗜表原体(Chlamydophila psittaci,Cps)研究的重点.对多个种株Cps基因组完整核苷酸序列测定的研究,将有助于进一步了解Cps的致病机制,寻找更好的诊断方法和防治措施,预防和控制Cps的流行.%At present, the whole genomes of seven strains Chlamydophila psittaci (Cp) have been completely se-quenced and it reveals the similarities and differences among each other. Major outer membrane protein genes, the polymorphic membrane protein multiple genes family, the type Ⅲ secretion system genes, and the inclusion membrane protein genes are the focuses of study on Chlamydophila psittaci. The studies on genome integrity nucleotide sequencing among multiple strains of Cps will help for further understanding of the pathogenesis of Cps, searching for better diagnostic methods and prevention measures, and preventing and controlling the prevalence of Cps.

  11. Clone Networks, Clone Extensions and Biregularizations of Varieties of Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Plonka

    2001-01-01

    We consider algebras of type τ- without nullary operations. An identity ψ≈ψ of type τ is clone compatible if ψ and ψ are the same variable or the sets of fundamental operation symbols in ψ and ψ are non-empty and identical. For a variety V, we denote by Vc the variety defined by all clone compatible identities from Id(V). In this paper, we give a construction of algebras called a clone network. Under some assumptions, we describe algebras from Vc by means of this construction. We find some properties of Vc and applications.

  12. Genomic and epigenomic alterations in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria eAschelter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in man. The treatment of localized PC includes surgery or radiation therapy. In case of relapse after a definitive treatment or in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, the standard treatment includes the androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT. By reducing the levels of Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT under the castration threshold, the ADT acts on the androgen receptor (AR, even if indirectly. The effects of the ADT are usually temporary and nearly all patients, initially sensitive to the androgen ablation therapy, have a disease progression after a 18-24 months medium term. This is probably due to the selection of the cancer cell clones and to their acquisition of critical somatic genome and epigenomic changes. This review aims to provide an overview about the genetic and epigenetic alterations having a crucial role in the carcinogenesis and in the disease progression toward the castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We focused on the role of the androgen receptor, on its signaling cascade and on the clinical implications that the knowledge of these aspects would have on hormonal therapy, on its failure and its toxicity.

  13. 肠道病毒71型的功能基因组学研究进展%Progress in the functional genomics researches on human enterovirus 71

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高爽; 龙健儿

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infant, also has been associated with neurological diseases including asepic meningitis, brain stem encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like paralysis. Here we focus on the progress in the research on EV71 genomic structure and function. Knowledge on EV71 functional genomics would be great helpful to development of antiviral drugs and vaccines.%肠道病毒71型(enterovirus type 71,EV71)感染通常引起婴幼儿手足口病(hand,foot and mouth disease,HFMD),但少数可引起无菌性脑膜炎(asepic meningitis)、脑炎(encephalitis)和类脊髓灰质炎的麻痹性疾病(poliomyelitis-like paralysis)等严重的神经系统疾病.功能基因组学研究对于探讨EV71的感染及复制过程、药物及疫苗的研制具有重大意义.该文就EV71的基因组结构及其功能的研究进展作简要的概述.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9介导基因组编辑技术在植物基因中的研究进展%The Progress of Genomic Editing Technology Mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颂平; 吴云花; 邹国兴; 聂元元; 杜鹃; 毛伟伟; 余霞; 张琳

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic editing could generate double stranded breaks in special sites,which could be repaired by homologous recombination or non-homologous end joining,and it resulted in base deletion or insertion in genome.The advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 are simple operation and high effi-ciency of mutation.The article describes the basic structure and classification of the CRISPR/Cas9 and its de-velopment and progress in plants.%CRISPR/Cas9介导的基因组编辑技术是在DNA双链的特定位置形成双链断裂,然后通过同源重组或非同源末端连接方式进行修复,造成基因组碱基局部缺失或插入而引起基因突变,它具有操作简单、突变效率高等优势.笔者归纳了CRISPR/Cas9系统的基本结构、分类及其在植物基因中的研究进展和未来的发展方向.

  15. Database for exchangeable gene trap clones: pathway and gene ontology analysis of exchangeable gene trap clone mouse lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Masatake; Nakahara, Mai; Muta, Mayumi; Itou, Miharu; Yanai, Chika; Yamazoe, Fumika; Miyake, Mikiko; Morita, Ayaka; Araki, Miyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakagata, Naomi; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2014-02-01

    Gene trapping in embryonic stem (ES) cells is a proven method for large-scale random insertional mutagenesis in the mouse genome. We have established an exchangeable gene trap system, in which a reporter gene can be exchanged for any other DNA of interest through Cre/mutant lox-mediated recombination. We isolated trap clones, analyzed trapped genes, and constructed the database for Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) [http://egtc.jp]. The number of registered ES cell lines was 1162 on 31 August 2013. We also established 454 mouse lines from trap ES clones and deposited them in the mouse embryo bank at the Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan. The EGTC database is the most extensive academic resource for gene-trap mouse lines. Because we used a promoter-trap strategy, all trapped genes were expressed in ES cells. To understand the general characteristics of the trapped genes in the EGTC library, we used Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for pathway analysis and found that the EGTC ES clones covered a broad range of pathways. We also used Gene Ontology (GO) classification data provided by Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) to compare the functional distribution of genes in each GO term between trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and total genes annotated in MGI. We found the functional distributions for the trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and for the RefSeq genes for the whole mouse genome were similar, indicating that the EGTC mouse lines had trapped a wide range of mouse genes. © 2014 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2014 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  16. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  17. A Research Progress on Salmonella Multi-drug Resistance Genomic Island 1%沙门菌多重耐药基因岛研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2011-01-01

    多药耐药基因组岛是指细菌染色体上一段具有典型特征的基因簇,携带有多种耐药基因,决定细菌的多药耐药性;多药耐药基因组岛具有移动元件的特征,如 G+C百分比和密码子使用与宿主菌不同,常含移动基因,可以在同种甚至于不同种菌株间水平转移,加速了临床上多药耐药菌株的产生.目前已发现在沙门菌属和其他菌属的细菌中携带沙门菌多重耐药基因岛.由于沙门菌多重耐药基因岛1上的耐药基因具有可移动性,使其在细菌多重耐药获得与传播机制的研究中具有重要意义.%A multi-drug resistance genomic island of bacteria refers to the gene clusters section of hacterial chromosome with typical characteristics, on which there are many drug resistant genes determining the multi-drug resistance of bacteria. Multi-drug resistance genomic island has characteristics of mobile genetic elements such as different (G+ C contents and codon usage. It usually contains mobile genes and can be transferred between homologous and even heterologous hacteria,which promotes the production of clinical multi-drug resistant strains. At present , salmonella multidrug resistant genomic island 1 ( SGI1 )and the variants of it have been found in salmonella and other bacteria. The mohile characteristic of SGI1 made it very important in studying development and dissemination of the multi-drug resistance among bacteria.

  18. A unique circovirus-like genome detected in pig feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using a metagenomic approach and molecular cloning methods, we identified, cloned, and sequenced the complete genome of a novel circular DNA virus, porcine stool-associated virus (PoSCV4), from pig feces. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced replication initiator protein showed that PoSCV4 is most r...

  19. Molecular cloning, genomic organization and functional characterization of a new short-chain potassium channel toxin-like peptide BmTxKS4 from Buthus martensii Karsch(BmK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiqun, Sheng; Xiuling, Xu; Zhijian, Cao; Wanhong, Liu; Yingliang, Wu; Shunyi, Zhu; Xianchun, Zeng; Dahe, Jiang; Xin, Mao; Hui, Liu; Wenxin, Li; Teng, Wang

    2004-01-01

    Scorpion venom contains many small polypeptide toxins, which can modulate Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), and Ca(2+) ion-channel conductance in the cell membrane. A full-length cDNA sequence encoding a novel type of K(+)-channel toxin (named BmTxKS4) was first isolated and identified from a venom gland cDNA library of Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK). The encoded precursor contains 78 amino acid residues including a putative signal peptide of 21 residues, propeptide of 11 residues, and a mature peptide of 43 residues with three disulfide bridges. BmTxKS4 shares the identical organization of disulfide bridges with all the other short-chain K(+)-channel scorpion toxins. By PCR amplification of the genomic region encoding BmTxKS4, it was shown that BmTxKS4 composed of two exons is disrupted by an intron of 87 bp inserted between the first and the second codes of Phe (F) in the encoding signal peptide region, which is completely identical with that of the characterized scorpion K(+)-channel ligands in the size, position, consensus junctions, putative branch point, and A+T content. The GST-BmTxKS4 fusion protein was successfully expressed in BL21 (DE3) and purified with affinity chromatography. About 2.5 mg purified recombinant BmTxKS4 (rBmTxKS4) protein was obtained by treating GST-BmTxKS4 with enterokinase and sephadex chromatography from 1 L bacterial culture. The electrophysiological activity of 1.0 microM rBmTxKS4 was measured and compared by whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that rBmTxKS4 reversibly inhibited the transient outward K(+) current (I(to)), delayed inward rectifier K(+) current (I(k1)), and prolonged the action potential duration of ventricular myocyte, but it has no effect on the action potential amplitude. Taken together, BmTxKS4 is a novel subfamily member of short-strain K(+)-channel scorpion toxin.

  20. Between two fern genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Emily B; Banks, Jo Ann; Barker, Michael S; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Graham, Sean W; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Langdale, Jane; Li, Fay-Wei; Marchant, D Blaine; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J; Roux, Stanley J; Salmi, Mari L; Sigel, Erin M; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Wolf, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves.

  1. Genomics and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkin, Matthew E; Monticelli, Silvia

    2008-05-01

    While the hereditary information encoded in the Watson-Crick base pairing of genomes is largely static within a given individual, access to this information is controlled by dynamic mechanisms. The human genome is pervasively transcribed, but the roles played by the majority of the non-protein-coding genome sequences are still largely unknown. In this review we focus on insights to gene transcriptional regulation by placing special emphasis on genome-wide approaches, and on how non-coding RNAs, which derive from global transcription of the genome, in turn control gene expression. We review recent progress in the field with highlights on the immune system.

  2. Social implications of the Human Genome Project: Policy roundtable series and journals. Final progress report, March 15, 2001 - March 15, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiguer, Erica

    2002-12-30

    This report reflects the activities of the Harvard Health Caucus at Harvard Medical School that were supported, in part, by the Department of Energy. The following policy roundtables and panels were held: Spring 2001 Policy Roundtable Series: The social implications of the Human Genome Project; Spring 2002 Policy Roundtable Series: Managing globalization to improve health; 13 February 2002 Keynote Address: The globalization of health; 25 February 2002 Healthier or Wealthier: Which comes first in the new global era?; 28 February 2002 The crisis of neglected diseases: Creating R&D incentives for diseases of developing countries; 7 March 2002 Health care education in the developing world: Bridging global and local health care practices; 20 March 2002 Building a legal framework for global health: How can the US and UN work to reduce global disparities?; 25 April 2002 The role of mass media and tobacco control efforts. Caucus organizational information is also included.

  3. De novo copy number variations in cloned dogs from the same nuclear donor

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Yim, Seon-Hee; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mosaicism of copy number variants (CNVs) in human body organs and de novo CNV event in monozygotic twins suggest that de novo CNVs can occur during mitotic recombination. These de novo CNV events are important for understanding genetic background of evolution and diverse phenotypes. In this study, we explored de novo CNV event in cloned dogs with identical genetic background. Results We analyzed CNVs in seven cloned dogs using the nuclear donor genome as reference by array-...

  4. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  5. Definition of the zebrafish genome using flow cytometry and cytogenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jennifer L; Adeniyi, Adeola; Banerjee, Ruby; Dallaire, Stephanie; Maguire, Sean F; Chi, Jianxiang; Ng, Bee Ling; Zepeda, Cinthya; Scott, Carol E; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Carter, Nigel P; Yang, Fengtang; Lee, Charles

    2007-06-27

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism system for biomedical research. The syntenic conservation between the zebrafish and human genome allows one to investigate the function of human genes using the zebrafish model. To facilitate analysis of the zebrafish genome, genetic maps have been constructed and sequence annotation of a reference zebrafish genome is ongoing. However, the duplicative nature of teleost genomes, including the zebrafish, complicates accurate assembly and annotation of a representative genome sequence. Cytogenetic approaches provide "anchors" that can be integrated with accumulating genomic data. Here, we cytogenetically define the zebrafish genome by first estimating the size of each linkage group (LG) chromosome using flow cytometry, followed by the cytogenetic mapping of 575 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones onto metaphase chromosomes. Of the 575 BAC clones, 544 clones localized to apparently unique chromosomal locations. 93.8% of these clones were assigned to a specific LG chromosome location using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and compared to the LG chromosome assignment reported in the zebrafish genome databases. Thirty-one BAC clones localized to multiple chromosomal locations in several different hybridization patterns. From these data, a refined second generation probe panel for each LG chromosome was also constructed. The chromosomal mapping of the 575 large-insert DNA clones allows for these clones to be integrated into existing zebrafish mapping data. An accurately annotated zebrafish reference genome serves as a valuable resource for investigating the molecular basis of human diseases using zebrafish mutant models.

  6. Definition of the zebrafish genome using flow cytometry and cytogenetic mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish (Danio rerio is an important vertebrate model organism system for biomedical research. The syntenic conservation between the zebrafish and human genome allows one to investigate the function of human genes using the zebrafish model. To facilitate analysis of the zebrafish genome, genetic maps have been constructed and sequence annotation of a reference zebrafish genome is ongoing. However, the duplicative nature of teleost genomes, including the zebrafish, complicates accurate assembly and annotation of a representative genome sequence. Cytogenetic approaches provide "anchors" that can be integrated with accumulating genomic data. Results Here, we cytogenetically define the zebrafish genome by first estimating the size of each linkage group (LG chromosome using flow cytometry, followed by the cytogenetic mapping of 575 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones onto metaphase chromosomes. Of the 575 BAC clones, 544 clones localized to apparently unique chromosomal locations. 93.8% of these clones were assigned to a specific LG chromosome location using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and compared to the LG chromosome assignment reported in the zebrafish genome databases. Thirty-one BAC clones localized to multiple chromosomal locations in several different hybridization patterns. From these data, a refined second generation probe panel for each LG chromosome was also constructed. Conclusion The chromosomal mapping of the 575 large-insert DNA clones allows for these clones to be integrated into existing zebrafish mapping data. An accurately annotated zebrafish reference genome serves as a valuable resource for investigating the molecular basis of human diseases using zebrafish mutant models.

  7. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  8. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  9. Cloning: revisiting an old debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, Allen D

    1994-09-01

    The debate about cloning that took place 25 years ago, although directed toward a different sort of cloning, elucidates fundamental issues currently at stake in reproductive technologies and research. Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher were participants in this early debate. The differences between Ramsey and Fletcher about the meaning and sufficiency of freedom, the understanding and weighing of good and evil, the connection between embodiment and personhood, the relationship of humans with nature, and the meaning of parenthood suggest both a broader agenda for the debate about cloning and a cautious move forward in the development of embryo-splitting.

  10. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  11. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  12. A Clone of Your Own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  13. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  14. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Fan, Qing [Northwestern University, Evanston; Zhou, Ruanbao [Anhui Normal University, People' s Republic of China; Huang, Guocun [University of Texas Southwestern Medical; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Kuritz, Tanya [ORNL; Wojciuch, Elizabeth [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  15. Genome plasticity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: microevolution of the 'pandemic group'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiumei

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreak of V. parahaemolyticus infections occurred since 1996 was linked to a proposed clonal complex, the pandemic group. The whole genome sequence provides an unprecedented opportunity for dissecting genome plasticity and phylogeny of the populations of V. parahaemolyticus. In the present work, a whole-genome cDNA microarray was constructed to compare the genomic contents of a collection of 174 strains of V. parahaemolyticus. Results Genes that present variably in the genome accounted for about 22% of the whole gene pool on the genome. The phylogenetic analysis of microarray data generated a minimum spanning tree that depicted the phylogenetic structure of the 174 strains. Strains were assigned into five complexes (C1 to C5, and those in each complex were related genetically and phylogenetically. C3 and C4 represented highly virulent clinical clones. C2 and C3 constituted two different clonal complexes 'old-O3:K6 clone' and 'pandemic clone', respectively. C3 included all the 39 pandemic strains tested (trh-, tdh+ and GS-PCR+, while C2 contained 12 pre-1996 'old' O3:K6 strains (trh+, tdh- and GS-PCR- tested herein. The pandemic clone (post-1996 'new' O3:K6 and its derivates O4:K68, O1:K25, O1:KUT and O6:K18 might be emerged from the old-O3:K6 clone, which was promoted by acquisition of toxRS/new sequence and genomic islands. A phylogenetic intermediate O3:K6 clade (trh-, tdh- and GS-PCR+ was identified between the pandemic and old-O3:K6 clones. Conclusion A comprehensive overview of genomic contents in a large collection of global isolates from the microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization data enabled us to construct a phylogenetic structure of V. parahaemolyticus and an evolutionary history of the pandemic group (clone of this pathogen.

  16. Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Likun; You, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Yanliang; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Zixia; Chen, Baohua; Zhao, Yunfeng; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Ke, Caihuan; Xu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33%. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor.

  17. Genomic predictors for treatment of late stage prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Shevrin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the development of new treatments for late stage prostate cancer, significant challenges persist to match individuals with effective targeted therapies. Genomic classification using high-throughput sequencing technologies has the potential to achieve this goal and make precision medicine a reality in the management of men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. This chapter reviews some of the most recent studies that have resulted in significant progress in determining the landscape of somatic genomic alterations in this cohort and, more importantly, have provided clinically actionable information that could guide treatment decisions. This chapter reviews the current understanding of common alterations such as alterations of the androgen receptor and PTEN pathway, as well as ETS gene fusions and the growing importance of PARP inhibition. It also reviews recent studies that characterize the evolution to neuroendocrine tumors, which is becoming an increasingly important clinical problem. Finally, this chapter reviews recent innovative studies that characterize the compelling evolutionary history of lethal prostate cancer evidenced by polyclonal seeding and interclonal cooperation between metastasis and the importance of tumor clone dynamics measured serially in response to treatment. The genomic landscape of late stage prostate cancer is becoming better defined, and the prospect for assigning clinically actionable data to inform rationale treatment for individuals with this disease is becoming a reality.

  18. The nuclear matrix: a structural milieu for genomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezney, R; Mortillaro, M J; Ma, H; Wei, X; Samarabandu, J

    1995-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in elucidating molecular properties of specific genes and their regulation, our understanding of how the whole genome is coordinated has lagged behind. To understand how the genome functions as a coordinated whole, we must understand how the nucleus is put together and functions as a whole. An important step in that direction occurred with the isolation and characterization of the nuclear matrix. Aside from the plethora of functional properties associated with these isolated nuclear structures, they have enabled the first direct examination and molecular cloning of specific nuclear matrix proteins. The isolated nuclear matrix can be used for providing an in vitro model for understanding nuclear matrix organization in whole cells. Recent development of high-resolution and three-dimensional approaches for visualizing domains of genomic organization and function in situ has provided corroborative evidence for the nuclear matrix as the site of organization for replication, transcription, and post-transcriptional processing. As more is learned about these in situ functional sites, appropriate experiments could be designed to test molecular mechanisms with the in vitro nuclear matrix systems. This is illustrated in this chapter by the studies of nuclear matrix-associated DNA replication which have evolved from biochemical studies of in vitro nuclear matrix systems toward three-dimensional computer image analysis of replication sites for individual genes.

  19. Application of whole genome exon sequencing technology in identifying clone of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality family pathogenic gene%全基因组外显子测序技术在遗传性纤维蛋白原异常家系致病基因的克隆鉴定中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓娣; 张新友; 宋通微; 洪澄英

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究采用全基因组外显子测序技术在遗传性纤维蛋白原异常家系致病基因鉴定中的应用价值。方法采集12例遗传性纤维蛋白原异常患者及其核心家庭成员外周血检测凝血指标,并提取其基因组DNA进行全基因组外显子测序,分析测序结果,探讨遗传性纤维蛋白原异常的分子机制。结果全基因组外显子测序结果显示:先证者A1、A4以及B2均为FGA基因g.1233G>A突变,A1的妹妹、A4的父亲以及B2的母亲均携带有相同的突变;A2、A7、B4和B5均为FGG基因g.10819G>A突变,家系成员中A2的母亲和外婆、A7的姐姐和女儿、B4的母亲和B5的母亲均携带有相同的突变;A3、A5、A6、B1和B3及其相关亲属共10例携带有FGB基因g.9692A>G突变。先证者及家系主要成员中发生Fg基因突变的成员APTT、PT和TT均明显延长,但Fg活性显著降低。结论遗传性纤维蛋白原异常可由多种Fg基因外显子突变导致,FGB和FGG外显子突变较为常见。%Objective To research the applicative value of whole genome exon sequencing technology in identifying clone of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality family pathogenic gene. Methods Peripheral blood of 12 patients with hereditary fibrinogen abnormality and core family members was collected to detect coagulation index. And genomic DNA was received whole genome exon sequencing. Test results were analyzed to explore molecular mechanism of hereditary fibrinogen abnormality. Results Results of whole genome exon sequencing technology showed probandA1, A4, and B2 all had FGA gene g. 1233G>A mutation. A1’s sister, A4’s father, and B2’s mother carried the same mutation. A2, A7, B4 and B5 all had FGA gene, g.10819G>A mutation. A2’s mother and grandmother, A7’s sister and daughter, B4’s mother and B5’s mother carried the same mutation. A3, A5, A6, B1 and B3 and 10 people in their related family had FGA gene g.9692A>G mutation. In proband and

  20. Construction of a BAC library from cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and identification of linkage group specific clones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Guan; Qi Chen; Junsong Pan; Zheng Li; Huanle He; Aizhong Wu; Rentao Song; Run Cai

    2008-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library consisting of 19,200 clones with an average insert size of 105 kb has been constructed from a cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) inbred line S94, derived from a cultivar in North China. The entire library was equivalent to approximately 5 haploid cucumber genomes. To facilitate chromosome engineering and anchor the cucumber genetic linkage map to its chromosomes, 15 sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers from each link-age group of cucumber were used to screen an ordered array of pooled BAC DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fifteen mark-ers gave at least two positive clones. As a result, 22 BAC clones representing 7 linkage groups of cucumber were identified, which further validated the genome coverage and utility of the library. This BAC library and linkage group specific clones provide essential resources for future research of the cucumber genome.