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Sample records for genetically determined defects

  1. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  2. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  3. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  4. Ultrasonic determination of the size of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterwall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents results from a study of ultrasonic testing of materials. The main topic has been the determination of the size, length and deep, of cracks or defects in stainless steel plates. (K.A.E)

  5. Dimensions of defects determined by radiographical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, J.

    Normally industrial radiography using x-rays or radionuclides gives information on the existence of defects in welds. These defects may in some instances be harmless, the size of the flaw is important. Radiography may be used for determining the thickness of the defect in many cases, by measuring the blackening of the photographic film used. The report gives a theoretical treatment of the problems and goes on to practical examples of the application. For flaws that have a width of at least 0.3 mm, a thickness of the order 0.1 mm can be determined with sufficient accuracy in materials 40 mm thick.(P.Aa.)

  6. Basement Membrane Defects in Genetic Kidney Diseases

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    Christine Chew

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular basement membrane (GBM is a specialized structure with a significant role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier. This GBM is formed from the fusion of two basement membranes during development and its function in the filtration barrier is achieved by key extracellular matrix components including type IV collagen, laminins, nidogens, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The characteristics of specific matrix isoforms such as laminin-521 (α5β2γ1 and the α3α4α5 chain of type IV collagen are essential for the formation of a mature GBM and the restricted tissue distribution of these isoforms makes the GBM a unique structure. Detailed investigation of the GBM has been driven by the identification of inherited abnormalities in matrix proteins and the need to understand pathogenic mechanisms causing severe glomerular disease. A well-described hereditary GBM disease is Alport syndrome, associated with a progressive glomerular disease, hearing loss, and lens defects due to mutations in the genes COL4A3, COL4A4, or COL4A5. Other proteins associated with inherited diseases of the GBM include laminin β2 in Pierson syndrome and LMX1B in nail patella syndrome. The knowledge of these genetic mutations associated with GBM defects has enhanced our understanding of cell–matrix signaling pathways affected in glomerular disease. This review will address current knowledge of GBM-associated abnormalities and related signaling pathways, as well as discussing the advances toward disease-targeted therapies for patients with glomerular disease.

  7. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are two main types of abdominal wall defects: omphalocele and gastroschisis . Omphalocele is an opening in the center of the ... covering the exposed organs in gastroschisis. Fetuses with omphalocele may grow slowly before birth (intrauterine growth retardation) ...

  9. Genetic Engineering and the Amelioration of Genetic Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Joshua

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the claims for a brave new world of genetic manipulation" and concludes that if we could agree upon applying genetic (or any other effective) remedies to global problems we probably would need no rescourse to them. Suggests that effective methods of preventing genetic disease are prevention of mutations and detection and…

  10. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A; Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F; Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  11. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A [Laboratory of Physics, HUT, PO Box 1100, 02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland); Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F [Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unbertsitatea, P. K. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V, E-mail: fernando.plazaola@ehu.es [Universitat de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-10

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  12. Determination of defects in depth (stereoradiography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Gilberto

    2000-01-01

    After the identification of an internal defect, by means of the single radiographic process, it can be necessary to determine it's position to evaluate the importance of the service and to specify which side of the weld the piece should be cut in order to reduce the amount of material to be removed and, in a lot, the cost of repair. The single radiography image does not have perspective and can not show the tri-dimensional vision, and so, do not clearly indicate the relative positions of the various parts of the object, in the direction of the vision. Stereoradiography was idealized to overcome that limitation of the standard radiography and it requests the accomplishment of two exposures, separated by the normal interpupillary distance. In the present work, we use this technique in a simulated pore defect, commonly found in the welding processes, and we present the efficiency of the technique. The material employed was SAE 1020 steel, in several thickness pieces, covering the range of thickness that the use Ir-192 source is recommended. (author)

  13. Nuclear genetic defects of mitochondrial ATP synthase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Mráček, Tomáš; Vrbacký, Marek; Kaplanová, Vilma; Karbanová, Vendula; Nůsková, Hana; Pecina, Petr; Houštěk, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S57-S71 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0970; GA ČR GAP303/12/1363; GA MZd(CZ) NT12370; GA MZd(CZ) NT14050 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 370411 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial diseases * TMEM70 * ATPAF1 * ATP5A1 * ATP5E Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  14. GENETIC DETERMINATIONS OF MENTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osadcha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to clarifying the role of physicality and psycho-physical characteristics of a person as a preconditions of the mentality forming. It is conducted a retrospective analysis of discourse on the mentality, the history of the concept, its temporal characteristics and collective conditioning. The concept of mentality has been widely studied in various fields of socio-humanities such as: history, psychology, and even marginal context of scientific discourses, including the esoteric. This study attempted to analyse the mentality phenomenon through the prism of the concept of experience. Methodology. The concept of experience was acquired by essential justification through the representatives of the phenomenological approach - the late Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Bernhard Valdenfels. On the other hand the concept of mentality as a form of collective unconscious experience was entered to the scientific vocabulary by the representatives of the French historical science - M. Bloch, L. Febvre, J. Le Goff and others. At the intersection of these two methods, historical and phenomenological, the genetic method has been established – as a history of coverage and experience of internalization. Thanks to the application of genetic method the transition of phenomenon into the concept was examined. Novelty. The problem of change dynamics of mental phenomenon, in particular psycho-physical nature of a person, which has been only mentioned in F. Braudel works but has not received the adequate theoretical coverage, is analysed. To explain the practices of physicality and causality of this factor the action component of the cultural the overview of developments of such authors as V. Rozin (2005, M. Epstein (2005, N. Brunov (2003, A. Soares, M. Farhangmehr, A. Shoham (2007, D. Vaskul, F. Vannini Hospital (2012 was committed. Conclusions. The transition to paradoxical behaviour that is oriented on sign, and not on signalling

  15. Separating genetic and hemodynamic defects in neuropilin 1 knockout embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A V; Yuan, Li; Breant, Christine; Watts, Ryan J; Eichmann, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Targeted inactivation of genes involved in murine cardiovascular development frequently leads to abnormalities in blood flow. As blood fluid dynamics play a crucial role in shaping vessel morphology, the presence of flow defects generally prohibits the precise assignment of the role of the mutated gene product in the vasculature. In this study, we show how to distinguish between genetic defects caused by targeted inactivation of the neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) receptor and hemodynamic defects occurring in homozygous knockout embryos. Our analysis of a Nrp1 null allele bred onto a C57BL/6 background shows that vessel remodeling defects occur concomitantly with the onset of blood flow and cause death of homozygous mutants at E10.5. Using mouse embryo culture, we establish that hemodynamic defects are already present at E8.5 and continuous circulation is never established in homozygous mutants. The geometry of yolk sac blood vessels is altered and remodeling into yolk sac arteries and veins does not occur. To separate flow-induced deficiencies from those caused by the Nrp1 mutation, we arrested blood flow in cultured wild-type and mutant embryos and followed their vascular development. We find that loss of Nrp1 function rather than flow induces the altered geometry of the capillary plexus. Endothelial cell migration, but not replication, is altered in Nrp1 mutants. Gene expression analysis of endothelial cells isolated from freshly dissected wild-type and mutants and after culture in no-flow conditions showed down-regulation of the arterial marker genes connexin 40 and ephrin B2 related to the loss of Nrp1 function. This method allows genetic defects caused by loss-of-function of a gene important for cardiovascular development to be isolated even in the presence of hemodynamic defects.

  16. Feasibility of identifying families for genetic studies of birth defects using the National Health Interview Survey

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    Nolan Vikki G

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether the National Health Interview Survey is a useful source to identify informative families for genetic studies of birth defects. Methods The 1994/1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS was used to identify households where individuals with two or more birth defects reside. Four groups of households were identified: 1 single non-familial (one individual with one birth defect; 2 single familial (more than one individual with one birth defect; 3 multiple non-familial (one individual with more than one birth defect, and 4 multiple familial (more than one individual with more than one birth defect. The March 2000 U.S. Census on households was used to estimate the total number of households in which there are individuals with birth defects. Results Of a total of 28,094 households and surveyed about birth defects and impairments, 1,083 single non-familial, 55 multiple non-familial, 54 single familial, and 8 multiple familial households were identified. Based on the 2000 U.S. census, it is estimated that there are 4,472,385 households where at least one person has one birth defect in the United States and in 234,846 of them there are at least two affected individuals. Western states had the highest prevalence rates. Conclusions Population-based methods, such as the NHIS, are modestly useful to identify the number and the regions where candidate families for genetic studies of birth defects reside. Clinic based studies and birth defects surveillance systems that collect family history offer better probability of ascertainment.

  17. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  18. Genetic sex determination and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Gadau, Jürgen; Page, Robert E

    2006-02-01

    Genetic factors can affect the probability of extinction either by increasing the effect of detrimental variants or by decreasing the potential for future adaptive responses. In a recent paper, Zayed and Packer demonstrate that low variation at a specific locus, the complementary sex determination (csd) locus in Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps), can result in a sharply increased probability of extinction. Their findings illustrate situations in which there is a feedback process between decreased genetic variation at the csd locus owing to genetic drift and decreased population growth, resulting in an extreme type of extinction vortex for these ecologically important organisms.

  19. What’s new in genetics of congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Digilio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies, clinical observations and advances in molecular genetics are contributing to the understanding of the etiology of congenital heart defects (CHDs. Several phenotype-genotype correlation studies have suggested that specific morphogenetic mechanisms put in motion by genes can result in a specific cardiac phenotype. The use of new technologies has increased the possibility of identification of new genes and chromosomal loci in syndromic and non-syndromic CHDs. There are a number of methods available for genetic research studies of CHDs, including cytogenetic analysis, linkage and association studies, copy number variation (CNV and DNA micro-array analysis, and whole exome sequencing. The altered dosage of contigous genes included inside CNVs can produce new syndromic CHDs, so that several different new genomic conditions have been identified. These include duplication 22q11.2 syndrome, distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, deletion and duplication 1q21.1, deletion 1p36 syndrome. Molecular techniques as whole exome sequancing has lead to the identification of new genes for monogenic syndromes with CHD, as for example in Adams-Oliver, Noonan and Kabuki syndrome. The variable expressivity and reduced penetrance of CHDs in genetic syndromes is likely influenced by genetic factors, and several studies have been performed showing the involvement of modifier genes. It is not easy to define precisely the genetic defects underlying non-syndromic CHDs, due to the genetic and clinical heterogeneity of these malformations. Recent experimental studies have identified multiple CNVs contributing to non-syndromic CHD. The number of identified genes for non-syndromic CHDs is at this time limited and each of the identified gene has been shown to be implicated only in a small proportion of CHD. The application of new technologies to specific cases of CHD and pedigrees with familial recurrence and filtering genes mapping in CNV regions can probably

  20. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  1. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Abdelbasit, Omer B; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M; Alhussein, Khalid A; Miqdad, Abeer M; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S; Khalil, Mohammed I; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A

    2014-12-01

    To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions.

  2. Genetic analysis of metabolic defects in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Musilová, Alena; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kostka, Vlastimil; Mlejnek, Petr; Křen, Vladimír; Křenová, D.; Bílá, V.; Míková, B.; Jáchymová, M.; Horký, K.; Kazdová, L.; St.Lezin, E.; Kurtz, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2002), s. 253-258 ISSN 0938-8990 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA ČR GA305/00/1646; GA MŠk NB5299 Grant - others:NIH(US) RO1 HL56028; NIH(US) PO1 HL35018; HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : metabolic defects * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2002

  3. Determination of weld defect characteristics using focused probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglio, Robert; Touffait, A.-M.; Prot, A.-C.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described which allows, by means of an experimentally discovered law, the determination of the geometrical characteristics of the detected defects. This determination is based on the properties of focused probes, and particularly on what is called their 'effective ultrasonic beam'. The main result is the ability to describe a defect with a given and known accuracy. Examples are given which show practical applications of the method [fr

  4. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Murdoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  5. Sex Determination, Sex Ratios, and Genetic Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in

  6. Classification of Atrial Septal Defect and Ventricular Septal Defect with Documented Hemodynamic Parameters via Cardiac Catheterization by Genetic Algorithms and Multi-Layered Artificial Neural Network

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    Mustafa Yıldız

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed to develop a classification method to discriminate ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect by using severalhemodynamic parameters.Patients and Methods: Forty three patients (30 atrial septal defect, 13 ventricular septal defect; 26 female, 17 male with documentedhemodynamic parameters via cardiac catheterization are included to study. Such parameters as blood pressure values of different areas,gender, age and Qp/Qs ratios are used for classification. Parameters, we used in classification are determined by divergence analysismethod. Those parameters are; i pulmonary artery diastolic pressure, ii Qp/Qs ratio, iii right atrium pressure, iv age, v pulmonary arterysystolic pressure, vi left ventricular sistolic pressure, vii aorta mean pressure, viii left ventricular diastolic pressure, ix aorta diastolicpressure, x aorta systolic pressure. Those parameters detected from our study population, are uploaded to multi-layered artificial neuralnetwork and the network was trained by genetic algorithm.Results: Trained cluster consists of 14 factors (7 atrial septal defect and 7 ventricular septal defect. Overall success ratio is 79.2%, andwith a proper instruction of artificial neural network this ratio increases up to 89%.Conclusion: Parameters, belonging to artificial neural network, which are needed to be detected by the investigator in classical methods,can easily be detected with the help of genetic algorithms. During the instruction of artificial neural network by genetic algorithms, boththe topology of network and factors of network can be determined. During the test stage, elements, not included in instruction cluster, areassumed as in test cluster, and as a result of this study, we observed that multi-layered artificial neural network can be instructed properly,and neural network is a successful method for aimed classification.

  7. Iridoschisis: high frequency ultrasound imaging. Evidence for a genetic defect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danias, J; Aslanides, I M; Eichenbaum, J W; Silverman, R H; Reinstein, D Z; Coleman, D J

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To elucidate changes in the anatomy of the anterior chamber associated with iridoschisis, a rare form of iris atrophy, and their potential contribution to angle closure glaucoma. METHODS: Both eyes of a 71-year-old woman with bilateral iridoschisis and fibrous dysplasia and her asymptomatic 50-year-old daughter were scanned with a very high frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound system. RESULTS: The symptomatic patient exhibited diffuse changes in the iris stoma with an intact posterior iris pigmented layer in both eyes. These changes were clinically compatible with the lack of iris transillumination defects. Additionally, iris bowing with a resultant narrowing of the angle occurred. The asymptomatic daughter showed discrete, but less severe iris stromal changes. CONCLUSION: This is the first detailed study of high frequency ultrasonic imaging of the iris in iridoschisis. The observed structural changes suggest angle narrowing by forward bowing of the anterior iris stroma may be a mechanism of IOP elevation in this condition. The ultrasonic detection of iris changes in the asymptomatic daughter of the symptomatic patient and the association of iridoschisis with fibrous dysplasia suggest a possible genetic component in the pathogenesis of this condition. Images PMID:9059271

  8. Determination of linear defect depths from eddy currents disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Helena Geirinhas; Rocha, Tiago; Pasadas, Dário; Ribeiro, Artur Lopes

    2014-02-01

    One of the still open problems in the inspection research concerns the determination of the maximum depth to which a surface defect goes. Eddy current testing being one of the most sensitive well established inspection methods, able to detect and characterize different type of defects in conductive materials, is an adequate technique to solve this problem. This paper reports a study concerning the disturbances in the magnetic field and in the lines of current due to a machined linear defect having different depths in order to extract relevant information that allows the determination of the defect characteristics. The image of the eddy currents (EC) is paramount to understand the physical phenomena involved. The EC images for this study are generated using a commercial finite element model (FLUX). The excitation used produces a uniform magnetic field on the plate under test in the absence of defects and the disturbances due to the defects are compared with those obtained from experimental measurements. In order to increase the limited penetration depth of the method giant magnetoresistors (GMR) are used to lower the working frequency. The geometry of the excitation planar coil produces a uniform magnetic field on an area of around the GMR sensor, inducing a uniform eddy current distribution on the plate. In the presence of defects in the material surface, the lines of currents inside the material are deviated from their uniform direction and the magnetic field produced by these currents is sensed by the GMR sensor. Besides the theoretical study of the electromagnetic system, the paper describes the experiments that have been carried out to support the theory and conclusions are drawn for cracks having different depths.

  9. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the ultimate aim of assisting in disease classification and prognosis. The data suggest that specific loci can act pleiotropically raising risk for epilepsy broadly, or can have effects...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...

  10. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands

  11. How Darwinian reductionism refutes genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosoff, Philip M; Rosenberg, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Genetic determinism labels the morally problematical claim that some socially significant traits, traits we care about, such as sexual orientation, gender roles, violence, alcoholism, mental illness, intelligence, are largely the results of the operation of genes and not much alterable by environment, learning or other human intervention. Genetic determinism does not require that genes literally fix these socially significant traits, but rather that they constrain them within narrow channels beyond human intervention. In this essay we analyze genetic determinism in light of what is now known about the inborn error of metabolism phenylketonuria (PKU), which has for so long been the poster child 'simple' argument in favor of some form of genetic determinism. We demonstrate that this case proves the exact opposite of what it has been proposed to support and provides a strong refutation of genetic determinism in all its guises.

  12. Genetic determinants of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollex Rebecca L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statin-related skeletal muscle disorders range from benign myalgias – such as non-specific muscle aches or joint pains without elevated serum creatinine kinase (CK concentration – to true myositis with >10-fold elevation of serum CK, to rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The genetic basis of statin-related muscle disorders is largely unknown. Because mutations in the COQ2 gene are associated with severe inherited myopathy, we hypothesized that common, mild genetic variation in COQ2 would be associated with inter-individual variation in statin intolerance. We studied 133 subjects who developed myopathy on statin monotherapy and 158 matched controls who tolerated statins without incident or complaint. Results COQ2 genotypes, based on two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP1 and SNP2 and a 2-SNP haplotype, all showed significant associations with statin intolerance. Specifically, the odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals for increased risk of statin intolerance among homozygotes for the rare alleles were 2.42 (0.99 to 5.89, 2.33 (1.13 to 4.81 and 2.58 (1.26 to 5.28 for SNP1 and SNP2 genotypes, and the 2-SNP haplotype, respectively. Conclusion These preliminary pharmacogenetic results, if confirmed, are consistent with the idea that statin intolerance which is manifested primarily through muscle symptoms is associated with genomic variation in COQ2 and thus perhaps with the CoQ10 pathway.

  13. Genetic determinants of HDL metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossoli, A; Gomaraschi, M; Franceschini, G; Calabresi, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) comprise a highly heterogeneous family of lipoprotein particles, with subclasses that can be separated and identified according to density, size, surface charge as well as shape and protein composition. There is evidence that these subclasses may differ in their functional properties. The individual plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) level is generally taken as a snapshot of the steady-state concentration of all circulating HDL subclasses together, but this is insufficient to capture the structural and functional variation in HDL particles. HDL are continuously remodeled and metabolized in plasma and interstitial fluids, through the interaction with a large number of factors, including structural proteins, membrane transporters, enzymes, transfer proteins and receptors. Genetic variation in these factors can lead to essential changes in plasma HDL levels, and to remarkable changes in HDL particle density, size, surface charge, shape, and composition in lipids and apolipoproteins. This review discusses the impact of rare mutations and common variants in genes encoding factors involved in HDL remodeling and metabolism on plasma HDL-C levels and particle distribution. The study of the effects of human genetic variation in major players in HDL metabolism provides important clues on how individual factors modulate the formation, maturation, remodeling and catabolism of HDL.

  14. Birth defects and genetic disorders among Arab Americans--Michigan, 1992-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanni, Emad A; Copeland, Glenn; Olney, Richard S

    2010-06-01

    Birth defects and genetic disorders are leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in many countries. Population-based data on birth defects among Arab-American children have not been documented previously. Michigan has the second largest Arab-American community in the United States after California. Using data from the Michigan Birth Defects Registry (MBDR), which includes information on parents' country of birth and ancestry, birth prevalences were estimated in offspring of Michigan women of Arab ancestry for 21 major categories of birth defects and 12 congenital endocrine, metabolic, and hereditary disorders. Compared with other non-Hispanic white children in Michigan, Arab-American children had similar or lower birth prevalences of the selected types of structural birth defects, with higher rates of certain hereditary blood disorders and three categories of metabolic disorders. These estimates are important for planning preconception and antenatal health care, genetic counseling, and clinical care for Arab Americans.

  15. Genetic and environmental effects on a meat spotting defect in seasoned dry-cured ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Pagnacco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of a visible spotting defect on the slice of dry-cured ham and assess environmental and genetic causes of this frequent problem. A group of 233 pigs from commercial cross-breeding lines, progeny of ten boars and forty seven sows, was raised in a single herd to obtain the “Italian Heavy Pig”, typically slaughtered at 160 ± 10 kg live weight and older than 9 months of age. A quality evaluation of their right dry-cured hams, seasoned according to the Parma P.D.O. protocol, was undertaken. Each ham was cross-sectioned to obtain a slice of Semimembranosus, Semitendinosus and Biceps Femoris muscles. The focused phenotype was the presence/absence of brownish spots in these muscles, which represent a remarkable meat defect with strong impact on the final sale price. Environmental and management factors were considered in order to evaluate variability related to the phenotype. Animals were raised on two different flooring types (concrete and slatted floor and a Vitamin C diet was also supplemented in the last 45 days before slaughtering to half of the animals. While the pre-planned environmental effects did not show any significant contribution to the total variability of the phenotype, the genetic analysis showed a near to zero value for heritability with a consistent 0.32 repeatability. The proportion of the total phenotypic variance was explained by an important dominance genetic component (0.26 indicating that the technological seasoning process may play a secondary role on the expression of this phenotype.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in softening and weakening of the bones ( rickets ) in some individuals. If left untreated, congenital bile ... Encyclopedia: Cholestasis Health Topic: Liver Diseases Health Topic: Rickets Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  17. An Aggregated Method for Determining Railway Defects and Obstacle Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktev, Daniil; Loktev, Alexey; Stepanov, Roman; Pevzner, Viktor; Alenov, Kanat

    2018-03-01

    The method of combining algorithms of image blur analysis and stereo vision to determine the distance to objects (including external defects of railway tracks) and the speed of moving objects-obstacles is proposed. To estimate the deviation of the distance depending on the blur a statistical approach, logarithmic, exponential and linear standard functions are used. The statistical approach includes a method of estimating least squares and the method of least modules. The accuracy of determining the distance to the object, its speed and direction of movement is obtained. The paper develops a method of determining distances to objects by analyzing a series of images and assessment of depth using defocusing using its aggregation with stereoscopic vision. This method is based on a physical effect of dependence on the determined distance to the object on the obtained image from the focal length or aperture of the lens. In the calculation of the blur spot diameter it is assumed that blur occurs at the point equally in all directions. According to the proposed approach, it is possible to determine the distance to the studied object and its blur by analyzing a series of images obtained using the video detector with different settings. The article proposes and scientifically substantiates new and improved existing methods for detecting the parameters of static and moving objects of control, and also compares the results of the use of various methods and the results of experiments. It is shown that the aggregate method gives the best approximation to the real distances.

  18. Overview of Epidemiology, Genetics, Birth Defects, and Chromosome Abnormalities Associated With CDH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pober, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations. PMID:17436298

  19. Genetic determinants of hepatic steatosis in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Amanda J.; Adams, Leon A.; Burnett, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is one of the most common liver disorders in the general population. The main cause of hepatic steatosis is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), representing the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Insulin resistance and excess adiposity are considered to play key roles in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Although the risk factors for NAFLD are well established, the genetic basis of hepatic steatosis is largely unknown. Here we review recent progress on genomic variants and their association with hepatic steatosis and discuss the potential impact of these genetic studies on clinical practice. Identifying the genetic determinants of hepatic steatosis will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of NAFLD. PMID:21245030

  20. An Automated Defect Prediction Framework using Genetic Algorithms: A Validation of Empirical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Murillo-Morera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today, it is common for software projects to collect measurement data through development processes. With these data, defect prediction software can try to estimate the defect proneness of a software module, with the objective of assisting and guiding software practitioners. With timely and accurate defect predictions, practitioners can focus their limited testing resources on higher risk areas. This paper reports the results of three empirical studies that uses an automated genetic defect prediction framework. This framework generates and compares different learning schemes (preprocessing + attribute selection + learning algorithms and selects the best one using a genetic algorithm, with the objective to estimate the defect proneness of a software module. The first empirical study is a performance comparison of our framework with the most important framework of the literature. The second empirical study is a performance and runtime comparison between our framework and an exhaustive framework. The third empirical study is a sensitivity analysis. The last empirical study, is our main contribution in this paper. Performance of the software development defect prediction models (using AUC, Area Under the Curve was validated using NASA-MDP and PROMISE data sets. Seventeen data sets from NASA-MDP (13 and PROMISE (4 projects were analyzed running a NxM-fold cross-validation. A genetic algorithm was used to select the components of the learning schemes automatically, and to assess and report the results. Our results reported similar performance between frameworks. Our framework reported better runtime than exhaustive framework. Finally, we reported the best configuration according to sensitivity analysis.

  1. Genetic determinants of financial risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnen, Camelia M; Chiao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01

    Individuals vary in their willingness to take financial risks. Here we show that variants of two genes that regulate dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission and have been previously linked to emotional behavior, anxiety and addiction (5-HTTLPR and DRD4) are significant determinants of risk taking in investment decisions. We find that the 5-HTTLPR s/s allele carriers take 28% less risk than those carrying the s/l or l/l alleles of the gene. DRD4 7-repeat allele carriers take 25% more risk than individuals without the 7-repeat allele. These findings contribute to the emerging literature on the genetic determinants of economic behavior.

  2. Genetically determined patozoospermia. Literature review and research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Bragina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors (chromosomal aberrations and point mutations are the cause of infertility in 10–15 % of men with impaired fertility. Homogeneous structural and functional defects in the sperm or the total terato-, asthenozoospermia – rare cases of genetically determined male infertility, are autosomal recessive diseases. Currently, described 4 types of «syndromic» spermopatology. 1. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD in men with total asthenozoospermia. Affects axoneme structures (microtubules, dynein arms, radial spokes. It identified more than 20 chromosomal loci responsible for the development of the PCD. 2. Dysplasia of the fibrous sheath of sperm tail in men with asthenozoospermia. The shortened and thickened sperm tail observed with disorganization of vertical columns and cross ribs of the fibrous sheath. Candidate genes – genes family ACAP. 3. Globozoospermia in men with teratozoospermia characterized by the presence of sperm with round heads, primary lack of acrosome and disorganization middle part of the flagellum. Found mutations or deletions of genes SPATA16, PICK1 and DPY19L2. 4. Syndrome decapitated spermatozoa in men with teratozoospermia (microcephaly. Abnormalities in the spermiogenesis development of connecting part jf the tail and proximal (morphologically normal centrioles.In 2012–2014 years we have studied the ultrastructure of 2267 semen samples of men with impaired fertility. Globozoospermia revealed in 7 patients, dysplasia of the fibrous sheath – 13, decapitated sperm – in one. PCD was revealed in 4 patients (lack of axoneme dynein arms was found in 1 patient, absence of axoneme radial spokes – in 3 patients.The problem of genetically determined patozoospermya must be taken into account when the assisted reproductive technologies practises. There are few cases of successful assisted reproductive technologies with sperm of these patients. We don»t know the etiological factors of syndromic spermopatologe, so

  3. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Schizophrenia with the 22q11.2 deletion and additional genetic defects: case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyosima, M; Maekawa, M; Toyota, T; Iwayama, Y; Arai, M; Ichikawa, T; Miyashita, M; Arinami, T; Itokawa, M; Yoshikawa, T

    2011-09-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion is the most prominent known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia, but its penetrance is at most approximately 50% suggesting that additional risk factors are required for disease progression. We examined a woman with schizophrenia with this deletion for such risk factors. She had high plasma pentosidine levels ('carbonyl stress') and a frameshift mutation in the responsible gene, GLO1. She also had a constant exotropia, so we examined the PHOX2B gene associated with both schizophrenia and strabismus, and detected a 5-alanine deletion. We propose that the combination of these genetic defects may have exceeded the threshold for the manifestation of schizophrenia.

  5. Weight Stigma Reduction and Genetic Determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja

    2016-01-01

    One major approach to weight stigma reduction consists of decreasing beliefs about the personal controllability of-and responsibility for-obesity by educating about its biogenetic causes. Evidence on the efficacy of this approach is mixed, and it remains unclear whether this would create a deterministic view, potentially leading to detrimental side-effects. Two independent studies from Germany using randomized designs with delayed-intervention control groups served to (1) develop and pilot a brief, interactive stigma reduction intervention to educate N = 128 university students on gene × environment interactions in the etiology of obesity; and to (2) evaluate this intervention in the general population (N = 128) and determine mechanisms of change. The results showed (1) decreased weight stigma and controllability beliefs two weeks post-intervention in a student sample; and (2) decreased internal attributions and increased genetic attributions, knowledge, and deterministic beliefs four weeks post-intervention in a population sample. Lower weight stigma was longitudinally predicted by a decrease in controllability beliefs and an increase in the belief in genetic determinism, especially in women. The results underline the usefulness of a brief, interactive intervention promoting an interactionist view of obesity to reduce weight stigma, at least in the short term, lending support to the mechanisms of change derived from attribution theory. The increase in genetic determinism that occurred despite the intervention's gene × environment focus had no detrimental side-effect on weight stigma, but instead contributed to its reduction. Further research is warranted on the effects of how biogenetic causal information influences weight management behavior of individuals with obesity.

  6. Weight Stigma Reduction and Genetic Determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Hilbert

    Full Text Available One major approach to weight stigma reduction consists of decreasing beliefs about the personal controllability of-and responsibility for-obesity by educating about its biogenetic causes. Evidence on the efficacy of this approach is mixed, and it remains unclear whether this would create a deterministic view, potentially leading to detrimental side-effects. Two independent studies from Germany using randomized designs with delayed-intervention control groups served to (1 develop and pilot a brief, interactive stigma reduction intervention to educate N = 128 university students on gene × environment interactions in the etiology of obesity; and to (2 evaluate this intervention in the general population (N = 128 and determine mechanisms of change. The results showed (1 decreased weight stigma and controllability beliefs two weeks post-intervention in a student sample; and (2 decreased internal attributions and increased genetic attributions, knowledge, and deterministic beliefs four weeks post-intervention in a population sample. Lower weight stigma was longitudinally predicted by a decrease in controllability beliefs and an increase in the belief in genetic determinism, especially in women. The results underline the usefulness of a brief, interactive intervention promoting an interactionist view of obesity to reduce weight stigma, at least in the short term, lending support to the mechanisms of change derived from attribution theory. The increase in genetic determinism that occurred despite the intervention's gene × environment focus had no detrimental side-effect on weight stigma, but instead contributed to its reduction. Further research is warranted on the effects of how biogenetic causal information influences weight management behavior of individuals with obesity.

  7. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes: Determined by Single Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate, there was no significant difference between groups. These results show that the primary reduced TCA cycle flux in diabetic myotubes is not explained by defects in specific part of the TCA cycle but rather results from a general downregulation of the TCA cycle.

  8. Effect of Concomitant Birth Defects and Genetic Anomalies on Infant Mortality in Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Eric G; Strassle, Paula D; Stebbins, Rebecca C; Meyer, Robert E; Nelson, Jennifer S

    2017-08-15

    A substantial proportion of infants born with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) die in infancy. A better understanding of the heterogeneity associated with TOF, including extracardiac malformations and chromosomal anomalies is vital to stratifying risk and optimizing outcomes during infancy. Using the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program, infants diagnosed with TOF and born between 2003 and 2012 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate cumulative 1-year mortality, stratified by the presence of concomitant birth defects (BDs) and chromosomal anomalies. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the direct effect of each concomitant BD, after adjusting for all others. A total of 496 infants with TOF were included, and 15% (n = 76) died. The number of concomitant BD systems was significantly associated with the risk of death at 1-year, p < 0.0001. Specifically, the risk of mortality was 8% among infants with TOF with or without additional cardiac defects, 16% among infants with TOF and 1 extracardiac BD system, 19% among infants with 2 extracardiac BD systems, and 39% among infants with ≥ 3 extracardiac BD systems. After adjustment, concomitant eye and gastrointestinal defects were significantly associated increased with 1-year mortality, odds ratio 2.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-7.32) and odds ratio 4.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.57, 12.45), respectively. Infants with trisomy 13 or trisomy 18 were also significantly more likely to die, p < 0.0001. Both concomitant BDs and genetic anomalies increase the risk of mortality among infants with TOF. Future studies are needed to identify the underlying genetic and socioeconomic risk factors for high-risk TOF infants. Birth Defects Research 109:1154-1165, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Atrioventricular canal defect and associated genetic disorders: new insights into polydactyly syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Digilio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD is a common congenital heart defect (CHD, representing 7.4% of all cardiac malformations, considered secondary to an extracellular matrix anomaly. The AVCD is associated with extracardiac defects in about 75% of the cases. In this review we analyzed different syndromic AVCDs, in particular those associated with polydactyly disorders, which show remarkable genotype-phenotype correlations. Chromo - some imbalances more frequently associated with AVCD include Down syndrome, deletion 8p23 and deletion 3p25, while mendelian disorders include Noonan syndrome and related RASopathies, several polydactyly syndromes, CHARGE and 3C (cranio-cerebello-cardiac syndrome. The complete form of AVCD is prevalent in patients with chromosomal imbalances. Additional cardiac defects are found in patients affected by chromosomal imbalances different from Down syndrome. Left-sided obstructive lesions are prevalently found in patients with RASopathies. Patients with deletion 8p23 often display AVCD with tetralogy of Fallot or with pulmonary valve stenosis. Tetralogy of Fallot is the only additional cardiac defect found in patients with Down syndrome and AVCD. On the other hand, the association of AVCD and tetralogy of Fallot is also quite characteristic of CHARGE and 3C syndromes. Heterotaxia defects, including common atrium and anomalous pulmonary venous return, occur in patients with AVCD associated with polydactyly syndromes (Ellis-van Creveld, short rib polydactyly, oral-facial-digital, Bardet-Biedl, and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. The initial clinical evidence of anatomic similarities between AVCD and heterotaxia in polydactyly syndromes was corroborated and explained by experimental studies in transgenic mice. These investigations have suggested the involvement of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in syndromes with postaxial polydactyly and heterotaxia, and ciliary dysfunction was detected as pathomechanism for these disorders

  10. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  11. Application of Volta potential mapping to determine metal surface defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, A.; Thierry, D.

    2007-01-01

    As a rule, stress or fatigue cracks originate from various surface imperfections, such as pits, inclusions or locations showing a residual stress. It would be very helpful for material selection to be able to predict the likelihood of environment-assisted cracking or pitting corrosion. By using Scanning Kelvin Probe (the vibrating capacitor with a spatial resolution of 80 μm) the profiling of metal electron work function (Volta potential) in air is applied to the metal surfaces showing residual stress, MnS inclusions and wearing. The Volta potential is influenced by the energy of electrons at the Fermi level and drops generally across the metal/oxide/air interfaces. Inclusions (e.g. MnS) impair continuity of the passive film that locally decreases Volta potential. The stress applied gives rise to dislocations, microcracks and vacancies in the metal and the surface oxide. The defects decrease Volta and corrosion potentials; reduce the overvoltage for processes of passivity breakdown and anodic metal dissolution. These 'anodic' defects can be visualized in potential mapping that can help us to predict locations with higher risk of pitting corrosion or cracking

  12. Genetic Defects Underlie the Non-syndromic Autosomal Recessive Intellectual Disability (NS-ARID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Shamim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID is a neurodevelopmental disorder which appears frequently as the result of genetic mutations and may be syndromic (S-ID or non-syndromic (NS-ID. ID causes an important economic burden, for patient's family, health systems, and society. Identifying genes that cause S-ID can easily be evaluated due to the clinical symptoms or physical anomalies. However, in the case of NS-ID due to the absence of co-morbid features, the latest molecular genetic techniques can be used to understand the genetic defects that underlie it. Recent studies have shown that non-syndromic autosomal recessive (NS-ARID is extremely heterogeneous and contributes much more than X-linked ID. However, very little is known about the genes and loci involved in NS-ARID relative to X-linked ID, and whose complete genetic etiology remains obscure. In this review article, the known genetic etiology of NS-ARID and possible relationships between genes and the associated molecular pathways of their encoded proteins has been reviewed which will enhance our understanding about the underlying genes and mechanisms in NS-ARID.

  13. Cancers and genetic defects resulting from the use of various energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1978-06-01

    A review of recent literature on carcinogenic effects of chemical products derived from the combustion of organic fuels suggests that the numbers of fatal cancers and genetic defects induced by utilization of fossil fuels may be much greater than the numbers induced by utilization of nuclear power to produce the same amount of energy. Despite the uncertainties involved in these estimates, the maximum risk of fatal cancers due to carcinogenic by-products associated with the production of electricity by any of these methods appears to be remarkably low compared with the risk of other fatal hazards in Canada and the U.S.A. (author)

  14. Weak Defect Identification for Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Based on Pressure Sensors and Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkun; He, Changbo; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong

    2018-04-19

    pulsation signal. Genetic algorithm (GA) is used to obtain optimal parameters for this SR system to improve its feature enhancement performance. The analysis result of experimental signal shows the validity of the proposed method for the enhancement and identification of weak defect characteristic. In the end, strain test is carried out to further verify the accuracy and reliability of the analysis result obtained by pressure pulsation signal.

  15. Detection and depth determination of corrosion defects in embedded bolts using ultrasonic testing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shan; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki; Yuya, Hideki; Ito, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    A great number of anchor bolts are used to fix various components to concrete foundation in thermal and nuclear power plants. As aging power plants degrade, it is feared that defects resulted from corrosion may occur underground. In this paper, a measurement method utilizing the phased array technique is developed to detect such defects. Measurement results show that this method can detect local and circumferential corrosion defects introduced artificially, but defect echo position appears to be farther away from the bolt head than is actually the case. A finite element simulation of wave propagation shows that longitudinal waves excited by a phased array probe are mode converted and reflected at the defect and at bolt wall, which results in the position of the defect echo appearing to be farther away than the defect actually is. Moreover, an approach for determining the depth of defects using measurement results is also proposed based on numerical results. The depths determined by the proposed approach agree with the actual depths with a maximum error of 1.8 mm and a RMSE of 1.06 mm. (author)

  16. Exploring Relationships Among Belief in Genetic Determinism, Genetics Knowledge, and Social Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Niklas; Carver, Rebecca; Castéra, Jérémy; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes; Marre, Claire Coiffard; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-12-01

    Genetic determinism can be described as the attribution of the formation of traits to genes, where genes are ascribed more causal power than what scientific consensus suggests. Belief in genetic determinism is an educational problem because it contradicts scientific knowledge, and is a societal problem because it has the potential to foster intolerant attitudes such as racism and prejudice against sexual orientation. In this article, we begin by investigating the very nature of belief in genetic determinism. Then, we investigate whether knowledge of genetics and genomics is associated with beliefs in genetic determinism. Finally, we explore the extent to which social factors such as gender, education, and religiosity are associated with genetic determinism. Methodologically, we gathered and analyzed data on beliefs in genetic determinism, knowledge of genetics and genomics, and social variables using the "Public Understanding and Attitudes towards Genetics and Genomics" (PUGGS) instrument. Our analyses of PUGGS responses from a sample of Brazilian university freshmen undergraduates indicated that (1) belief in genetic determinism was best characterized as a construct built up by two dimensions or belief systems: beliefs concerning social traits and beliefs concerning biological traits; (2) levels of belief in genetic determination of social traits were low, which contradicts prior work; (3) associations between knowledge of genetics and genomics and levels of belief in genetic determinism were low; and (4) social factors such as age and religiosity had stronger associations with beliefs in genetic determinism than knowledge. Although our study design precludes causal inferences, our results raise questions about whether enhancing genetic literacy will decrease or prevent beliefs in genetic determinism.

  17. Molecular marker studies in riverine buffaloes, for characterization and diagnosis of genetic defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    The buffalo is probably the last livestock species to have been domesticated, with many genetic, physiological and behavioural traits not yet well understood. Molecular markers have been used for characterizing animals and breeds, diagnosing diseases and identifying anatomical and physiological anomalies. RFLP studies showed low heterozygosity, but genomic and oligonucleotide probes showed species-specific bands useful for identification of carcass or other unknown samples. Use of RAPD revealed band frequencies, band sharing frequencies, genetic distances, and genetic and identity indexes in different breeds. Bovine microsatellite primers indicate that 70.9% of bovine loci were conserved in buffalo. Allele numbers, sizes, frequencies, heterozygosity and polymorphism information content showed breed-specific patterns. Different marker types - genomic and oligonucleotide probes, RAPD and microsatellites - are useful in parent identification. Individual specific DNA fingerprinting techniques were applied with twin-born animal (XX/XY) chimerism, sex identification, anatomically defective and XO individuals. Molecular markers are a potential tool for geneticists and breeders to evaluate existing germplasm and to manipulate it to develop character-specific strains and to provide the basis for effective genetic conservation. (author)

  18. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Christopher P.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Saleheen, Danish; Hopewell, Jenna C.; Zeng, Lingyao; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Burgess, Stephen; Amouyel, Phillipe; Anand, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Clarke, Robert J.; Collins, Rory; Dedoussis, George; Farrall, Martin; Franks, Paul W.; Groop, Leif; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, Erik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; König, Inke R.; Kooner, Jaspal; Lehtimäki, Terho; März, Winifred; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Peters, Annette; Perola, Markus; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ripatti, Samuli; Roberts, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; Shah, Svati H.; Schreiber, Stefan; Siegbahn, Agneta; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Veronesi, Giovani; Wareham, Nicholas; Willer, Cristen J.; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested

  19. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  20. Utilization of shear stress for determination of activation energy of the defects created by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique used for the determination thermodynamical parameters such as activation energy using the thermal annealing of increments of Critical resolved Shear Stress of the defects created by neutron irradiation at 77 K. The doses chosen for this work was 3.1 x 10 16 n/cm 2 since the defects are stable to plastic deformation and the cascades of atomic displacements do not overlap. Specimens without any prior deformation were used allowing then the single addition of the initial stress to that due to the created defects. (author)

  1. Determining the internal quantum efficiency of shallow-implanted nitrogen-vacancy defects in bulk diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Boll, Mads; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2016-01-01

    -implanted NV defects in a single-crystal bulk diamond. Using a spherical metallic mirror with a large radius of curvature compared to the optical spot size, we perform calibrated modifications of the local density of states around NV defects and observe the change of their total decay rate, which is further...... used for IQE quantification. We also show that at the excitation wavelength of 532 nm, photo-induced relaxation cannot be neglected even at moderate excitation powers well below the saturation level. For NV defects shallow implanted 4.5 ± 1 and 8 ± 2 nm below the diamond surface, we determine...

  2. Genetic compatibility determines endophyte-grass combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Saikkonen

    Full Text Available Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F(1 and F(2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1 genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2 these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

  3. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S; de Voer, Richarda M; Kets, C Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88. Immunological assays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed an impaired immune response upon stimulation with Candida albicans, characterized by a defective production of the cytokine interleukin-17. Our data suggest that a genetic defect in MYD88 results in an impaired immune response and may increase gastric cancer risk.

  4. Detection of Defective Sensors in Phased Array Using Compressed Sensing and Hybrid Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Ullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compressed sensing based array diagnosis technique has been presented. This technique starts from collecting the measurements of the far-field pattern. The system linking the difference between the field measured using the healthy reference array and the field radiated by the array under test is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA, parallel coordinate descent (PCD algorithm, and then a hybridized GA with PCD algorithm. These algorithms are applied for fully and partially defective antenna arrays. The simulation results indicate that the proposed hybrid algorithm outperforms in terms of localization of element failure with a small number of measurements. In the proposed algorithm, the slow and early convergence of GA has been avoided by combining it with PCD algorithm. It has been shown that the hybrid GA-PCD algorithm provides an accurate diagnosis of fully and partially defective sensors as compared to GA or PCD alone. Different simulations have been provided to validate the performance of the designed algorithms in diversified scenarios.

  5. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  6. Non-destructive test method of determination of surface defects in objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, C.B.; Sewell, M.H.; Taber, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    In the radiographic method, adsorbed radioactive gas, e.g. krypton 85, is used to determine surface defects such as failures, cracks, and breaks on, e.g. nozzle turbine blades. The surface defects preferably retain the radioactive gas. The defects can be identified by means of a radiographic silver halide emulsion or dispersion made intensive to high energy radiation which is put on the surface or held at a distance to it. Piazine, thiuram disulphide, nitro-1,2,3-benzothiazole or a combination of thiuram disulphide and piazine are amongst others suitable as desensitizing agents. To prevent the adsorbed gases from diffusing out of the defects, the surface can be coated with an insulating mass of e.g. a polymer. The silver halide emulsions are in the form of single, double, or ammoniac emulsions. (DG/LH) [de

  7. Genetic determinants of hepatic steatosis in man

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, Amanda J.; Adams, Leon A.; Burnett, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is one of the most common liver disorders in the general population. The main cause of hepatic steatosis is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), representing the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Insulin resistance and excess adiposity are considered to play key roles in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Although the risk factors for NAFLD are well established, the genetic basis of hepatic steatos...

  8. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Derichs

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  9. [Elucidation of key genes in sex determination in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; He, Zhumei

    2014-06-01

    Sex is an important and complex feature of organisms, which is controlled by the genetic and environmental factors. The genetic factors, i.e., genes, are vital in sex determination. However, not all the related genes play the same roles, and some key genes play a vital role in the sex determination and differentiation. With the development of the modern genetics, a great progress on the key genes has been made in sex determination. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of sex determination and the strategy of how to study the key genes in sex determination. It will help us to understand the mechanism of sex determination better in the teaching of genetics.

  10. Exploring Relationships among Belief in Genetic Determinism, Genetics Knowledge, and Social Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, Niklas; Carver, Rebecca; Castéra, Jérémy; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes; Marre, Claire Coiffard; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic determinism can be described as the attribution of the formation of traits to genes, where genes are ascribed more causal power than what scientific consensus suggests. Belief in genetic determinism is an educational problem because it contradicts scientific knowledge, and is a societal problem because it has the potential to foster…

  11. Genetic variability of indigenous cowpea genotypes as determined ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bayesian statistics coupled with the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique was applied to determine population structure, while the genetic variability was established by analysis of molecular variance. UPGMA analysis allowed the separation of the genotypes into three groups, but no relationship between the genetic and ...

  12. Reproduction, Smell and Neurodevelopmental disorders: Genetic defects in different hypogonadotropic hypogonadal syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan G VALDES-SOCIN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine control of reproduction in mammals is governed by a neural hypothalamic network of nearly 1500 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH secreting neurons that modulate the activity of the reproductive axis across life. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by partial or complete pubertal failure. HH may result from inadequate hypothalamic GnRH axis activation, or a failure of pituitary gonadotropin secretion/effects. In man, several genes that participate in olfactory and GnRH neuronal migration are thought to interact during the embryonic life. A growing number of mutations in different genes are responsible for congenital HH. Based on the presence or absence of olfaction dysfunction, HH is divided in two syndromes: HH with olfactory alterations (Kallmann syndrome and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH with normal smell (normosmic IHH. Kallmann syndrome (KS is a heterogeneous disorder affecting 1 in 5000 males, with a 3-5 fold of males over females. KS is associated with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8, FGF17, IL17RD, PROK2/PROKR2, NELF, CHD7, HS6ST1, FLRT3, SPRY4, DUSP6, SEMA3A, NELF and WDR11 genes that are related to defects in neuronal migration. These reproductive and olfactory deficits include a variable non reproductive phenotype, including sensorineural deafness, coloboma, bimanual synkinesis, craniofacial abnormalities and/or renal agenesis. Interestingly, defects in PROKR2, FGFR1, FGF8, CHD7, DUSP6, and WDR11 genes are also associated with normosmic IHH, whereas mutations in KISS1/KISSR, TAC3/TACR3, GNRH1/GNRHR, LEP/LEPR, HESX1, FSHB and LHB are only present in patients with normosmic IHH. In this paper, we summarize the reproductive, neurodevelopmental and genetic aspects of HH in human pathology.

  13. An approach to determine a critical size for rolling contact fatigue initiating from rail surface defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.; Zhao, X.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A methodology for the determination of a critical size of surface defects, above which RCF can initiate, has been developed and demonstrated with its application to the passive type of squats under typical Dutch railway loading conditions. Such a methodology is based on stress evaluation of

  14. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  15. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  16. Genetic determinism of oil acidity among some DELI oil palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic determinism of oil acidity among some DELI oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) progenies. Benoit Constant Likeng-Li-Ngue, Joseph Martin Bell, Georges Franck Ngando-Ebongue, Godswill Ntsefong Ntsomboh, Hermine Bille Ngalle ...

  17. Ultrasonic delay measurements for the determination of the size of quasi-natural defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proegler, H.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria in the form of delay measurements and phase assessments on ultrasonic pulses were worked out for a series of the most different reflection positions of the artificial, quasi-natural and natural kind which in many cases enable an differentiation of defects and the determination of the defect size. Even though it was not possible to completely clarify all effects occuring, such as reflection positions with undefined pulse orientations, the results sofar are still a contribution to the improvement of the stating ability of ultrasonic testing. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Positron annihilation spectroscopy for the determination of thickness and defect profile in thin semiconductor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaga, A.; García, J. A.; Plazaola, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2007-05-01

    We present a method, based on positron annihilation spectroscopy, to obtain information on the defect depth profile of layers grown over high-quality substrates. We have applied the method to the case of ZnO layers grown on sapphire, but the method can be very easily generalized to other heterostructures (homostructures) where the positron mean diffusion length is small enough. Applying the method to the ratio of W and S parameters obtained from Doppler broadening measurements, W/S plots, it is possible to determine the thickness of the layer and the defect profile in the layer, when mainly one defect trapping positron is contributing to positron trapping at the measurement temperature. Indeed, the quality of such characterization is very important for potential technological applications of the layer.

  19. Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Heine, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts regarding those conditions: they are more likely to be perceived as a) immutable and determined, b) having a specific etiology, c) homogeneous and discrete,...

  20. Determining the dimension of subsurface defects by active infrared thermography – experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Grys

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research into a method of processing thermal images aimed at detecting and characterizing material defects, or non-uniformities, of the internal structure of materials. Active thermography was chosen as the NDT method. Hidden defects were revealed by analysing the temperature field of the tested material's front surface which was externally excited with heating lamps. Background removal and image segmentation were applied to the last thermogram in the sequence recorded at the end of the heating phase. The paper focuses on the quality of determining lateral dimensions of subsurface flaws in a polymethylmethacrylate slab with bottom holes drilled to imitate flaws. The following accuracy-affecting factors were taken into account: defect depth, emissivity of the inspected surface as an input, user-set parameter for the IR camera, type of filtering used to eliminate the effect of non-uniformity when heating the object surface with an external source, and global and local thresholding as a segmentation method used for defect detection and sizing.

  1. Determinism and mass-media portrayals of genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, C M; Ofulue, N; Sheedy, K M

    1998-01-01

    Scholars have expressed concern that the introduction of substantial coverage of "medical genetics" in the mass media during the past 2 decades represents an increase in biological determinism in public discourse. To test this contention, we analyzed the contents of a randomly selected, structured sample of American public newspapers (n=250) and magazines (n=722) published during 1919-95. Three coders, using three measures, all with intercoder reliability >85%, were employed. Results indicate that the introduction of the discourse of medical genetics is correlated with both a statistically significant decrease in the degree to which articles attribute human characteristics to genetic causes (P<.001) and a statistically significant increase in the differentiation of attributions to genetic and other causes among various conditions or outcomes (P<. 016). There has been no statistically significant change in the relative proportions of physical phenomena attributed to genetic causes, but there has been a statistically significant decrease in the number of articles assigning genetic causes to mental (P<.002) and behavioral (P<.000) characteristics. These results suggest that the current discourse of medical genetics is not accurately described as more biologically deterministic than its antecedents. PMID:9529342

  2. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  3. Genetic determinants of heart failure: facts and numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Wollnik, Bernd; Hasenfuß, Gerd

    2018-06-01

    The relevance of gene mutations leading to heart diseases and hence heart failure has become evident. The risk for and the course of heart failure depends on genomic variants and mutations underlying the so-called genetic predisposition. Genetic contribution to heart failure is highly heterogenous and complex. For any patient with a likely inherited heart failure syndrome, genetic counselling is recommended and important. In the last few years, novel sequencing technologies (named next-generation sequencing - NGS) have dramatically improved the availability of molecular testing, the efficiency of genetic analyses, and moreover reduced the cost for genetic testing. Due to this development, genetic testing has become increasingly accessible and NGS-based sequencing is now applied in clinical routine diagnostics. One of the most common reasons of heart failure are cardiomyopathies such as the dilated or the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Nearly 100 disease-associated genes have been identified for cardiomyopathies. The knowledge of a pathogenic mutation can be used for genetic counselling, risk and prognosis determination, therapy guidance and hence for a more effective treatment. Besides, family cascade screening for a known familial, pathogenic mutation can lead to an early diagnosis in affected individuals. At that timepoint, a preventative intervention could be used to avoid or delay disease onset or delay disease progression. Understanding the cellular basis of genetic heart failure syndromes in more detail may provide new insights into the molecular biology of physiological and impaired cardiac (cell) function. As our understanding of the molecular and genetic pathophysiology of heart failure will increase, this might help to identify novel therapeutic targets and may lead to the development of new and specific treatment options in patients with heart failure. © 2018 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European

  4. New method for the determination of the defect profile in thin layers grown over a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A.; Garcia, J.A.; Plazaola, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Zuniga, J.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new method to obtain information about the defect profile of films grown over high quality substrates. The method is valid, at least, for films where the positron mean-diffusion length is small. We have used the method for the case of ZnO films grown over sapphire, but the method can be generalized very easily to other film/substrate systems. Applying the method to the ratio of W and S parameters obtained from Doppler broadening measurements, W/S plots, one can determine the thickness of the film and the defect profile trend in the film, when mainly one positron trap is contributing to positron trapping within the film. Indeed, the quality of such a characterization is very important for the potential technological applications of the film. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. New method for the determination of the defect profile in thin layers grown over a substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A.; Garcia, J.A.; Plazaola, F. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Bilbao (Spain); Tuomisto, F. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Zuniga, J.; Munoz-Sanjose, V. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    We present a new method to obtain information about the defect profile of films grown over high quality substrates. The method is valid, at least, for films where the positron mean-diffusion length is small. We have used the method for the case of ZnO films grown over sapphire, but the method can be generalized very easily to other film/substrate systems. Applying the method to the ratio of W and S parameters obtained from Doppler broadening measurements, W/S plots, one can determine the thickness of the film and the defect profile trend in the film, when mainly one positron trap is contributing to positron trapping within the film. Indeed, the quality of such a characterization is very important for the potential technological applications of the film. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. The genetic defect in Cockayne syndrome is associated with a defect in repair of UV-induced DNA damage in transcriptionally active DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, J.; Mullenders, L.H.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mayne, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to UV-irradiation but have an apparently normal ability to remove pyrimidine dimers from the genome overall. We have measured the repair of pyrimidine dimers in defined DNA sequences in three normal and two CS cell strains. When compared to a nontranscribed locus, transcriptionally active genes were preferentially repaired in all three normal cell strains. There was no significant variation in levels of repair between various normal individuals or between two constitutively expressed genes, indicating that preferential repair may be a consistent feature of constitutively expressed genes in human cells. Neither CS strain, from independent complementation groups, was able to repair transcriptionally active DNA with a similar rate and to the same extent as normal cells, indicating that the genetic defect in CS lies in the pathway for repair of transcriptionally active DNA. These results have implications for understanding the pleiotropic clinical effects associated with disorders having defects in the repair of DNA damage. In particular, neurodegeneration appears to be associated with the loss of preferential repair of active genes and is not simply correlated with reduced levels of overall repair

  7. Determination of quantum defects from the poles of the Schwinger T matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snitchler, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Quantum defects are determined for lithium, sodium, potassium, and beryllium by searching for the poles of the Schwinger T matrix along the negative real-energy axis. This method takes advantage of the fundamental ideas of QDT by using a Coulomb Green's function to factor out most of the energy dependence. For the alkali atoms, a single-channel calculation is performed using model potentials to include the effects of core polarization and correlation. Quantum defects accurate to 1% are easily obtained with small grids and small fixed-basis sets for an entire Rydberg series up to principal quantum number, n, as high as 60. A multichannel extension of this method is used to determined neutral-beryllium quantum defects for the 1 P 0 , 3 P 0 , and 3 S Rydberg series. The 1 P 0 and 3 P 0 calculations are performed in a two-channel approximation using 1s 2 2p static-exchange cores. The 3 S calculation includes a third channel with a 1s 2 3s core. Accurate quantum defects are obtained with 4 to 6 basis functions per channel. The energies are variational and the wave functions have the correct asymptotic form enforced by the Coulomb Green's function. Tentative results for Be I 1 P 0 and 3 P 0 resonances below the 1s 2 2p 2 P threshold are presented. This calculation which is performed in a three-channel approximation uses a complex multichannel Coulomb Green's function to search for poles in the fourth quadrant of the complex-energy plane

  8. Genetic determinants of P wave duration and PR segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Niek; Mateo Leach, Irene; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Hillege, Hans L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Barnett, Phil; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van der Harst, Pim

    2014-01-01

    The PR interval on the ECG reflects atrial depolarization and atrioventricular nodal delay which can be partially differentiated by P wave duration and PR segment, respectively. Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci for PR interval, but it remains to be determined

  9. Determination of genetic diversity among some almond accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More recently the use of different molecular markers in fruit species to determine particularly genetic diversity, genetic relationships and cultivar identification has been gained more importance. In the study, 13 randomly amplified polimorfic DNA (RAPD and 4 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers were used to evaluate genetic relationships among 95 almong accessions (26 foreign cultivars and 69 national cultivars and selections. The all plant material found in Almond Germplasm Repository in Gaziantep, Turkey. Both RAPD and ISSR markers distinguished the almond cultivars and selections in various levels. 17 RAPD and ISSR markers yielded a total of 73 scorable bands, which 51 are polymorphic. The two marker system exhibited variation with regard to average band sizes and polymorphism ratio. The average polymorphism was higher in ISSR (88% compared to RAPD (74%. RAPD and ISSR marker systems were found to be useful for determining genetic diversity among almong genotypes and cultivars. Combining of two dendrograms obtained through these markers show different clustering of 96 almond specimens without geographical isolation. These results supported that almonds in Turkey indicated considerable genetic diversity.

  10. Application of genetic algorithm in radio ecological models parameter determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelic, G. [Institute of Occupatioanl Health and Radiological Protection ' Dr Dragomir Karajovic' , Belgrade (Serbia)

    2006-07-01

    The method of genetic algorithms was used to determine the biological half-life of 137 Cs in cow milk after the accident in Chernobyl. Methodologically genetic algorithms are based on the fact that natural processes tend to optimize themselves and therefore this method should be more efficient in providing optimal solutions in the modeling of radio ecological and environmental events. The calculated biological half-life of 137 Cs in milk is (32 {+-} 3) days and transfer coefficient from grass to milk is (0.019 {+-} 0.005). (authors)

  11. Application of genetic algorithm in radio ecological models parameter determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, G.

    2006-01-01

    The method of genetic algorithms was used to determine the biological half-life of 137 Cs in cow milk after the accident in Chernobyl. Methodologically genetic algorithms are based on the fact that natural processes tend to optimize themselves and therefore this method should be more efficient in providing optimal solutions in the modeling of radio ecological and environmental events. The calculated biological half-life of 137 Cs in milk is (32 ± 3) days and transfer coefficient from grass to milk is (0.019 ± 0.005). (authors)

  12. A review of genome-wide approaches to study the genetic basis for spermatogenic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Kenneth I; Conrad, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly advancing tools for genetic analysis on a genome-wide scale have been instrumental in identifying the genetic bases for many complex diseases. About half of male infertility cases are of unknown etiology in spite of tremendous efforts to characterize the genetic basis for the disorder. Advancing our understanding of the genetic basis for male infertility will require the application of established and emerging genomic tools. This chapter introduces many of the tools available for genetic studies on a genome-wide scale along with principles of study design and data analysis.

  13. Integrating genetic and toxicogenomic information for determining underlying susceptibility to developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua F; Port, Jesse A; Yu, Xiaozhong; Faustman, Elaine M

    2010-10-01

    To understand the complex etiology of developmental disorders, an understanding of both genetic and environmental risk factors is needed. Human and rodent genetic studies have identified a multitude of gene candidates for specific developmental disorders such as neural tube defects (NTDs). With the emergence of toxicogenomic-based assessments, scientists now also have the ability to compare and understand the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously across strain, time, and exposure in developmental models. Using a systems-based approach in which we are able to evaluate information from various parts and levels of the developing organism, we propose a framework for integrating genetic information with toxicogenomic-based studies to better understand gene-environmental interactions critical for developmental disorders. This approach has allowed us to characterize candidate genes in the context of variables critical for determining susceptibility such as strain, time, and exposure. Using a combination of toxicogenomic studies and complementary bioinformatic tools, we characterize NTD candidate genes during normal development by function (gene ontology), linked phenotype (disease outcome), location, and expression (temporally and strain-dependent). In addition, we show how environmental exposures (cadmium, methylmercury) can influence expression of these genes in a strain-dependent manner. Using NTDs as an example of developmental disorder, we show how simple integration of genetic information from previous studies into the standard microarray design can enhance analysis of gene-environment interactions to better define environmental exposure-disease pathways in sensitive and resistant mouse strains. © Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Maternal obesity and tobacco use modify the impact of genetic variants on the occurrence of conotruncal heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyu; Nick, Todd G; Cleves, Mario A; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Ming; Li, Jingyun; MacLeod, Stewart L; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2014-01-01

    Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) are among the most severe birth defects worldwide. Studies of CTDs indicate both lifestyle behaviors and genetic variation contribute to the risk of CTDs. Based on a hybrid design using data from 616 case-parental and 1645 control-parental triads recruited for the National Birth Defects Prevention Study between 1997 and 2008, we investigated whether the occurrence of CTDs is associated with interactions between 921 maternal and/or fetal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and maternal obesity and tobacco use. The maternal genotypes of the variants in the glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) gene and the fetal genotypes of the variants in the glutathione S-transferase alpha 3 (GSTA3) gene were associated with an elevated risk of CTDs among obese mothers. The risk of delivering infants with CTDs among obese mothers carrying AC genotype for a variant in the GCLC gene (rs6458939) was 2.00 times the risk among those carrying CC genotype (95% confidence interval: 1.41, 2.38). The maternal genotypes of several variants in the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) family of genes and the fetal genotypes of the variants in the GCLC gene interacted with tobacco exposures to increase the risk of CTDs. Our study suggests that the genetic basis underlying susceptibility of the developing heart to the adverse effects of maternal obesity and tobacco use involve both maternal and embryonic genetic variants. These results may provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology of CTDs, and ultimately lead to novel prevention strategies.

  15. Rapid and reliable healing of critical size bone defects with genetically modified sheep muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Ferreira, E; Porter, R M; Glatt, V; Schinhan, M; Shen, Z; Randolph, M A; Kirker-Head, C A; Wehling, C; Vrahas, M S; Evans, C H; Wells, J W

    2015-09-21

    Large segmental defects in bone fail to heal and remain a clinical problem. Muscle is highly osteogenic, and preliminary data suggest that autologous muscle tissue expressing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) efficiently heals critical size defects in rats. Translation into possible human clinical trials requires, inter alia, demonstration of efficacy in a large animal, such as the sheep. Scale-up is fraught with numerous biological, anatomical, mechanical and structural variables, which cannot be addressed systematically because of cost and other practical issues. For this reason, we developed a translational model enabling us to isolate the biological question of whether sheep muscle, transduced with adenovirus expressing BMP-2, could heal critical size defects in vivo. Initial experiments in athymic rats noted strong healing in only about one-third of animals because of unexpected immune responses to sheep antigens. For this reason, subsequent experiments were performed with Fischer rats under transient immunosuppression. Such experiments confirmed remarkably rapid and reliable healing of the defects in all rats, with bridging by 2 weeks and remodelling as early as 3-4 weeks, despite BMP-2 production only in nanogram quantities and persisting for only 1-3 weeks. By 8 weeks the healed defects contained well-organised new bone with advanced neo-cortication and abundant marrow. Bone mineral content and mechanical strength were close to normal values. These data demonstrate the utility of this model when adapting this technology for bone healing in sheep, as a prelude to human clinical trials.

  16. Genetic defects in DNA repair system and enhancement of intergenote transformation efficiency in Bacillus subtilis Marburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Takahashi, H.; Saito, H.; Ikeda, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Mechanisms of inefficiency in heterospecies transformation were studied with a transformation system consisting of Bacillus subtilis 168TI (trpC2thy) as recipient and of DNA prepared from partially hybrid strains of B. subtilis which had incorporated trp + DNA of B. amyloliquefaciens 203 (formerly, B. megaterium 203) in the chromosome (termed intergenote). The intergenote transformation was not so efficient as the corresponding homospecies transformation and the efficiency appeared to relate inversely with the length of heterologous portion in the intergenote. When a variety of ultraviolet light (UV) sensitive mutants, deficient in host-cell reactivation capacity, were used as recipients for the intergenote transformation, 2 out of 16 mutants exhibited significantly enhanced transformation efficiency of the trpC marker. Genetic studies by transformation showed that the trait relating to the enhancement of intergenote-transformation efficiency was always associated with the UV sensitivity, suggesting that these two traits are determined by a single gene. The efficiency of intergenote transformation was highly affected also by DNA concentration; the lower the concentration, the less the efficiency. When, however, the UV sensitive mutant was used as recipient, the effect of DNA concentration was largely diminished, suggesting the reduction of DNA-inactivating activity in the UV sensitive recipient. These results were discussed in relation to a possible excision-repair system selectively correcting the mismatched DNA in the course of intergenote transformation. (orig.) [de

  17. Determination of bone and tissue concentrations of teicoplanin mixed with hydroxyapatite cement to repair cortical defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenreich, K; Zeipper, U; Schwendenwein, E; Hadju, S; Kaltenecker, G; Laslo, I; Lang, S; Roschger, P; Vecsei, V; Wintersteiger, R

    2002-01-01

    A highly specific and sensitive isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the determination of the major component of teicoplanin in tissue is reported. Comparing fluorescamine and o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) as derivatizing agents, the derivative formed with the latter exhibits superior fluorescence intensity allowing detection of femtomole quantities. Pretreatment for tissue samples is by solid-phase extraction which uses Bakerbond PolarP C(18) cartridges and gives effective clean up from endogenous by-products. Linearity was given from 0.6 to 100 ng per injection. The coefficient of variation did not exceed 5.8% for both interday and intraday assays. It was found that when bone defects are repaired with a hydroxyapatite-teicoplanin mixture, the antibiotic does not degrade, even when it is in the cement for several months. The stability of teicoplanin in bone cement was determined fluorodensitometrically.

  18. Expectation and futurity: The remarkable success of genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    Genetic determinism is nowadays largely questioned and widely criticized. However, if we look at the history of biology in the last one hundred years, we realize that genetic determinism has always been controversial. Why, then, did it acquire such relevance in the past despite facing longstanding criticism? Through the analysis of some of the ambitious expectations of future scientific applications, this article explores the possibility that part of the historical success of genetic determinism lies in the powerful rhetorical strategies that have connected the germinal matter with alluring bio-technological visions. Indeed, in drawing on the recent perspectives of "expectation studies" in science and technology, it will be shown that there has been an interesting historical relationship between reductionist notions of the gene as a hereditary unit, coded information or functional DNA segment, and startling prophecies of what controlling such an entity might achieve. It will also be suggested that the well-known promissory nature of genomics is far older than the emergence of biotechnology in the 1970s. At least from the time of the bio-utopias predicted by J.B.S. Haldane and J. S. Huxley, the gene has often been surrounded by what I call the "rhetoric of futurity": a promissory rhetoric that, despite momentous changes in the life sciences throughout the 20th century, has remained relatively consistent over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complex genetics of glaucoma: defects in CYP1B1, and not MYOC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wide, affecting almost 60 million people (Quigley and Bro- man 2006). Defects ... Analysis of the family mem- ... both parents of the proband do not show any symptom of. POAG ... †These authors contributed equally to the work. .... stage of life.

  20. An ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study of a rare genetic sperm tail defect that causes infertility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Baccio; Bruni, Emanuele; Gambera, Laura; Moretti, Elena; Piomboni, Paola

    2004-08-01

    To characterize and describe the ontogenesis of a rare flagellar defect affecting the whole sperm population of a sterile man. Case report. Regional referral center for male infertility in Siena, Italy. A 28-year-old man with severe asthenozoospermia. Physical and hormonal assays, semen analysis, and testicular biopsy. Semen samples and testicular biopsies were analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy; immunocytochemical study with anti-beta-tubulin and anti-AKAP 82 antibodies was performed to detect the presence and distribution of proteins. Ultrastructural analysis of ejaculated spermatozoa and testicular biopsy revealed absence of the fibrous sheath in the principal-piece region of the tail. Fibrous sheath-like structures were observed in cytoplasmic residues and residual bodies released by spermatids in the seminiferous epithelium. Other anomalies observed were supplementary axonemes and mitochondrial helix elongation. These features were confirmed by immunocytochemical staining. This rare sperm tail defect, characterized by absence of the fibrous sheath, presence of supplementary axonemes, and an abnormally elongated midpiece, originates in the seminiferous tubules during spermiogenesis, as detected in testicular biopsy sections. These defects occur in the whole sperm population, and therefore a genetic origin could be suggested.

  1. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of the TYMS gene are not associated with congenital cardiac septal defects in a Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yuan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical research indicates that periconceptional administration of folic acid can reduce the occurrence of congenital cardiac septal defects (CCSDs. The vital roles of folate exhibits in three ways: the unique methyl donor for DNA expression regulation, the de novo biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine for DNA construction, and the serum homocysteine removal. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS is the solo catalysis enzyme for the de novo synthesis of dTMP, which is the essential precursor of DNA biosynthesis and repair process. To examine the role of TYMS in Congenital Cardiac Septal Defects (CCSDs risk, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS gene associated with the CCSDs in a Han Chinese population. METHOD: Polymorphisms in the noncoding region of TYMS were identified via direct sequencing in 32 unrelated individuals composed of half CCSDs and half control subjects. Nine SNPs and two insertion/deletion polymorphisms were genotyped from two independent case-control studies involving a total of 529 CCSDs patients and 876 healthy control participants. The associations were examined by both single polymorphism and haplotype tests using logistic regression. RESULT: We found that TYMS polymorphisms were not related to the altered CCSDs risk, and even to the changed risk of VSDs subgroup, when tested in both studied groups separately or in combination. In the haplotype analysis, there were no haplotypes significantly associated with risks for CCSDs either. CONCLUSION: Our results show no association between common genetic polymorphisms of the regulatory region of the TYMS gene and CCSDs in the Han Chinese population.

  3. The acceptability among young Hindus and Muslims of actively ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Shanmukh; Ahmed, Ramadan; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    To explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of damaged newborns. 254 university students from India and 150 from Kuwait rated the acceptability of ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects in 54 vignettes consisting of all combinations of four factors: gestational age (term or 7 months); severity of genetic defect (trisomy 21 alone, trisomy 21 with serious morphological abnormalities or trisomy 13 with impending death); the parents' attitude about prolonging care (unknown, in favour or opposed); and the procedure used (withholding treatment, withdrawing it or injecting a lethal substance). Four clusters were identified by cluster analysis and subjected to analysis of variance. Cluster I, labelled 'Never Acceptable', included 4% of the Indians and 59% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster II, 'No Firm Opinion', had little variation in rating from one scenario to the next; it included 38% of the Indians and 18% of the Kuwaitis. In Cluster III, 'Parents' Attitude+Severity+Procedure', all three factors affected the ratings; it was composed of 18% of the Indians and 16% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster IV was called 'Severity+Parents' Attitude' because these had the strongest impact; it was composed of 40% of the Indians and 7% of the Kuwaitis. In accordance with the teachings of Islam versus Hinduism, Kuwaiti students were more likely to oppose ending a newborn's life under all conditions, Indian students more likely to favour it and to judge its acceptability in light of the different circumstances.

  4. Growth Defects in the Dorsal Pallium after Genetically Targeted Ablation of Principal Preplate Neurons and Neuroblasts: A Morphometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Fisher

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study delineates the large-scale, organic responses of growth in the dorsal pallium to targeted genetic ablations of the principal PP (preplate neurons of the neocortex. Ganciclovir treatment during prenatal development [from E11 (embryonic age 11 to E13] of mice selectively killed cells with shared S-phase vulnerability and targeted expression of a GPT [golli promoter transgene; GPT linked to HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase, τ-eGFP and lacZ reporters] localized in PP neurons and their intermediate progenitor neuroblasts. The volume, area and thickness of the pallium were measured in an E12-P4 (postnatal age 4 longitudinal study with comparisons between ablated (HSV-TK+/0 and control (HSV-TK0/0 littermates. The extent of ablations was also systematically varied, and the effect on physical growth was assessed in an E18 cross-sectional study. The morphological evidence obtained in the present study supports the conclusion that genetically targeted ablations delay the settlement of the principal PP neurons of the dorsal pallium. This leads to progressive and substantial reductions of growth, despite compensatory responses that rapidly replace the ablated cells. These growth defects originate from inductive cellular interactions in the proliferative matrix of the ventricular zone of the pallium, but are amplified by subsequent morphogenic and trophic cellular interactions. The defects persist during the course of prenatal and postnatal development to demonstrate a constrained dose-response relationship with the extent of specific killing of GPT neurons. The defects propagate simultaneously in both the horizontal and vertical cytoarchitectural dimensions of the developing pallium, an outcome that produces a localized shortfall of volume in the telencephalic vesicles.

  5. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... genetically modified organisms but did not provide any specific disagreement with APHIS' analysis. Commenters... certain genetically engineered organisms. Our determination is based on our evaluation of data submitted... pests. Such genetically engineered organisms and products are considered ``regulated articles.'' The...

  6. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A better coefficient of determination for genetic profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hong; Goddard, Michael E; Wray, Naomi R; Visscher, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the construction of risk predictors for disease from multiple Single Nucleotide Polymorphism markers. The ability of such "genetic profiles" to predict outcome is usually quantified in an independent data set. Coefficients of determination (R(2) ) have been a useful measure to quantify the goodness-of-fit of the genetic profile. Various pseudo-R(2) measures for binary responses have been proposed. However, there is no standard or consensus measure because the concept of residual variance is not easily defined on the observed probability scale. Unlike other nongenetic predictors such as environmental exposure, there is prior information on genetic predictors because for most traits there are estimates of the proportion of variation in risk in the population due to all genetic factors, the heritability. It is this useful ability to benchmark that makes the choice of a measure of goodness-of-fit in genetic profiling different from that of nongenetic predictors. In this study, we use a liability threshold model to establish the relationship between the observed probability scale and underlying liability scale in measuring R(2) for binary responses. We show that currently used R(2) measures are difficult to interpret, biased by ascertainment, and not comparable to heritability. We suggest a novel and globally standard measure of R(2) that is interpretable on the liability scale. Furthermore, even when using ascertained case-control studies that are typical in human disease studies, we can obtain an R(2) measure on the liability scale that can be compared directly to heritability. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surface concentration of defects at grain boundaries in sintered alumina determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansy, J.; Ahmad, A.Si.; Moya, G.; Liebault, J.

    2001-01-01

    Sintered alumina samples of grain diameters spanning from 1.2 to 4.5 μm have been investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. One series of samples was produced from material containing about 150 ppm impurities (mainly SiO 2 ). The second one was made from material having about 2700 ppm of various elements (SiO 2 , MgO, CaO). Two models of positron trapping at grain boundaries are compared: The first one relates to the diffusion-limited regime; and the other one - to the transmission-limited regime of trapping. As a results of relative change of surface concentration of defects at grain boundaries is determined. Additionally, positron diffusion constant in bulk alumina at room temperature, D + = 0.36 ± 10 cm 2 /s, is estimated. (author)

  9. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Priscila H A; Souza, Beatriz S; Pacheco, Eimi N; Menegazzo, Michele S; Corrêa, Ivan S; Zen, Paulo R G; Rosa, Rafael F M; Cesa, Claudia C; Pellanda, Lucia C; Vilela, Manuel A P

    2018-01-01

    Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs) of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%), interventricular communication (51.6%), patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%), pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8%) and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%). Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  10. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila H. A. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. Method: A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. Results: The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%, interventricular communication (51.6%, patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%, pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8% and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%. Conclusion: Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  11. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate–acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate–acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate–acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature–nurture debates. PMID:20234831

  12. Pelvic incidence variation among individuals: functional influence versus genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Fang; Zhao, Chang-Qing

    2018-03-20

    Pelvic incidence has become one of the most important sagittal parameters in spinal surgery. Despite its great importance, pelvic incidence can vary from 33° to 85° in the normal population. The reasons for this great variability in pelvic incidence remain unexplored. The objective of this article is to present some possible interpretations for the great variability in pelvic incidence under both normal and pathological conditions and to further understand the determinants of pelvic incidence from the perspective of the functional requirements for bipedalism and genetic backgrounds via a literature review. We postulate that both pelvic incidence and pelvic morphology may be genetically predetermined, and a great variability in pelvic incidence may already exist even before birth. This great variability may also serve as a further reminder that the sagittal profile, bipedal locomotion mode, and genetic background of every individual are unique and specific, and clinicians should avoid making universally applying broad generalizations of pelvic incidence. Although PI is an important parameter and there are many theories behind its variability, we still do not have clear mechanistic answers.

  13. Determination of nonlinear genetic architecture using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chiu Man; Hsu, Stephen D H

    2015-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems of modern genomics is to extract the genetic architecture of a complex trait from a data set of individual genotypes and trait values. Establishing this important connection between genotype and phenotype is complicated by the large number of candidate genes, the potentially large number of causal loci, and the likely presence of some nonlinear interactions between different genes. Compressed Sensing methods obtain solutions to under-constrained systems of linear equations. These methods can be applied to the problem of determining the best model relating genotype to phenotype, and generally deliver better performance than simply regressing the phenotype against each genetic variant, one at a time. We introduce a Compressed Sensing method that can reconstruct nonlinear genetic models (i.e., including epistasis, or gene-gene interactions) from phenotype-genotype (GWAS) data. Our method uses L1-penalized regression applied to nonlinear functions of the sensing matrix. The computational and data resource requirements for our method are similar to those necessary for reconstruction of linear genetic models (or identification of gene-trait associations), assuming a condition of generalized sparsity, which limits the total number of gene-gene interactions. An example of a sparse nonlinear model is one in which a typical locus interacts with several or even many others, but only a small subset of all possible interactions exist. It seems plausible that most genetic architectures fall in this category. We give theoretical arguments suggesting that the method is nearly optimal in performance, and demonstrate its effectiveness on broad classes of nonlinear genetic models using simulated human genomes and the small amount of currently available real data. A phase transition (i.e., dramatic and qualitative change) in the behavior of the algorithm indicates when sufficient data is available for its successful application. Our results indicate

  14. Genetic Mutations, Birth Lengths, Weights and Head Circumferences of Children with IGF-I Receptor Defects. Comparison with other Congenital Defects in the GH/IGF-I axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essakow, Jenna Lee; Lauterpacht, Aharon; Lilos, Pearl; Kauli, Rivka; Laron, Zvi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years more and more genetic defects along the GHRH-GH-IGF-I axis have been reported. Mutations of the IGF-I receptor (R) are a rare abnormality of whom only the heterozygote progenies survive. To summarize, from the literature, data on birth length, weight and head circumference of neonates with IGF-I-R mutations, and to correlate the data with that of other types of mutations in the GH/IGF-I axis. Sixty seven neonates from 24 published articles were included and forty seven different mutations of the IGF-I (R) located on chromosome 15 have been identified. Mean (±SD) birth length (BL), available for 26, (10 M, 16F) neonates with a gestational age of 34-41weeks, was 44.2±4cm; one was premature (30cm at 31 weeks). There was a significant correlation between birth length and gestational age (GA) r=0.71 (p>.001). Mean birth weight (BW) of 41 neonates (18M, 23F) was 2388±743gr. Two premature neonates weighed 650gr and 950gr respectively. The BW correlated significantly with gestational age, (males: r=0.68; p=0.007, females: r=0.49; p=0.024). The BMI of 25 neonates ranged from 6 to 13. In 22 records marked microcephaly was ascertained or stated. Nine of 16 mothers were short (133 -148cm), m±SD = 150.5±7.3cm. Copyright© of YS Medical Media ltd.

  15. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  16. Ecological and genetic determinants of plasmid distribution in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaney, Frances; Ellis, Richard J; Raymond, Ben

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial plasmids are important carriers of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Nevertheless, little is known of the determinants of plasmid distribution in bacterial populations. Here the factors affecting the diversity and distribution of the large plasmids of Escherichia coli were explored in cattle grazing on semi-natural grassland, a set of populations with low frequencies of antibiotic resistance genes. Critically, the population genetic structure of bacterial hosts was chararacterized. This revealed structured E. coli populations with high diversity between sites and individuals but low diversity within cattle hosts. Plasmid profiles, however, varied considerably within the same E. coli genotype. Both ecological and genetic factors affected plasmid distribution: plasmid profiles were affected by site, E. coli diversity, E. coli genotype and the presence of other large plasmids. Notably 3/26 E. coli serotypes accounted for half the observed plasmid-free isolates indicating that within species variation can substantially affect carriage of the major conjugative plasmids. The observed population structure suggest that most of the opportunities for within species plasmid transfer occur between different individuals of the same genotype and support recent experimental work indicating that plasmid-host coevolution, and epistatic interactions on fitness costs are likely to be important in determining occupancy. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Identification of genetic defects in primary immunodeficiencies by whole exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Jensen, Jens Magnus Bernth; Veirum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    to hypogammaglobulinaemia, and increased risk of both infections as well as cancer. We employed whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify mutations associated with primary immunodeficiency in severely affected children. We present WES data on 2 patients with severe immunodeficiency. WES was performed using TruSeq exome kit...... and severe infections including sepsis. Second, we identified compound heterozygote stopgain mutations in RAD52 and a heterozygote mutation in LRRC8A in a 7 year-old girl with T-cell deficiency, reduced T-cell mediated B-cell activity, hypogammaglobulinaemia, prolonged splenomegali and benign adenopathy. RAD......52 has not previously been linked to immunodeficiency and we are currently investigating the functional consequences. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying immunodeficiencies is a prerequisite for understanding disease pathogenesis. WES allows the demonstration of immune defects that may result from...

  18. Peeling skin syndrome: genetic defects in late terminal differentiation of the epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Paul E

    2011-03-01

    In this issue, Israeli and colleagues confirm that homozygous mutations in corneodesmosin (CDSN) cause type B peeling skin syndrome (PSS), an autosomal recessive skin disorder. The deletion mutation described resulted in a frameshift, producing a downstream premature stop codon and early truncation of the protein. The recently described CDSN nonsense mutation in another PSS family also resulted in protein truncation and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Type B generalized PSS can now be clearly distinguished from acral PSS, caused by mutations in transglutaminase 5. This directly affects cornified envelope cross-linking rather than corneodesmosome adherence. These observations provide new insight into the molecular defects underlying two closely related forms of PSS.

  19. The social and economic origins of genetic determinism: a case history of the American Eugenics Movement, 1900-1940 and its lessons for today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G E

    1997-01-01

    Eugenics, the attempt to improve the genetic quality of the human species by 'better breeding', developed as a worldwide movement between 1900 and 1940. It was particularly prominent in the United States, Britain and Germany, and in those countries was based on the then-new science of Mendelian genetics. Eugenicists developed research programs to determine the degree in which traits such as Huntington's chorea, blindness, deafness, mental retardation (feeblemindedness), intelligence, alcoholism, schizophrenia, manic depression, rebelliousness, nomadism, prostitution and feeble inhibition were genetically determined. Eugenicists were also active in the political arena, lobbying in the United States for immigration restriction and compulsory sterilization laws for those deemed genetically unfit; in Britain they lobbied for incarceration of genetically unfit and in Germany for sterilization and eventually euthanasia. In all these countries one of the major arguments was that of efficiency: that it was inefficient to allow genetic defects to be multiplied and then have to try and deal with the consequences of state care for the offspring. National socialists called genetically defective individuals 'useless eaters' and argued for sterilization or euthanasia on economic grounds. Similar arguments appeared in the United States and Britain as well. At the present time (1997) much research and publicity is being given to claims about a genetic basis for all the same behaviors (alcoholism, manic depression, etc.), again in an economic context--care for people with such diseases is costing too much. There is an important lesson to learn from the past: genetic arguments are put forward to mask the true--social and economic--causes of human behavioral defects.

  20. A Reverse Genetics Approach for the Design of Methyltransferase-Defective Live Attenuated Avian Metapneumovirus Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Jing; Wei, Yongwei; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), also known as avian pneumovirus or turkey rhinotracheitis virus, is the causative agent of turkey rhinotracheitis and is associated with swollen head syndrome in chickens. aMPV belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae which includes many important human pathogens such as human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3). The family also includes highly lethal emerging pathogens such as Nipah virus and Hendra virus, as well as agriculturally important viruses such as Newcastle disease virus (NDV). For many of these viruses, there is no effective vaccine. Here, we describe a reverse genetics approach to develop live attenuated aMPV vaccines by inhibiting the viral mRNA cap methyltransferase. The viral mRNA cap methyltransferase is an excellent target for the attenuation of paramyxoviruses because it plays essential roles in mRNA stability, efficient viral protein translation and innate immunity. We have described in detail the materials and methods used to generate recombinant aMPVs that lack viral mRNA cap methyltransferase activity. We have also provided methods to evaluate the genetic stability, pathogenesis, and immunogenicity of live aMPV vaccine candidates in turkeys.

  1. The PMCA pumps in genetically determined neuronal pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Tito; Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2018-01-10

    Ca 2+ signals regulate most aspects of animal cell life. They are of particular importance to the nervous system, in which they regulate specific functions, from neuronal development to synaptic plasticity. The homeostasis of cell Ca 2+ must thus be very precisely regulated: in all cells Ca 2+ pumps transport it from the cytosol to the extracellular medium (the Plasma Membrane Ca 2+ ATPases, hereafter referred to as PMCA pumps) or to the lumen of intracellular organelles (the Sarco/Endoplasmatic Reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase and the Secretory Pathway Ca 2+ ATPase, hereafter referred to as SERCA and SPCA pumps, respectively). In neurons and other excitable cells a powerful plasma membrane Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger (NCX) also exports Ca 2+ from cells. Quantitatively, the PMCA pumps are of minor importance to the bulk regulation of neuronal Ca 2+ . However, they are important in the regulation of Ca 2+ in specific sub-plasma membrane microdomains which contain a number of enzymes that are relevant to neuronal function. The PMCA pumps (of which 4 basic isoforms are expressed in animal cells) are P-type ATPases that are characterized by a long C-terminal cytosolic tail which is the site of interaction with most of the regulatory factors of the pump, the most important being calmodulin. In resting neurons, at low intracellular Ca 2+ the C-terminal tail of the PMCA interacts with the main body of the protein keeping it in an autoinhibited state. Local Ca 2+ increase activates calmodulin that removes the C-terminal tail from the inhibitory sites. Dysregulation of the Ca 2+ signals are incompatible with healthy neuronal life. A number of genetic mutations of PMCA pumps are associated with pathological phenotypes, those of the neuron-specific PMCA 2 and PMCA 3 being the best characterized. PMCA 2 mutations are associated with deafness and PMCA 3 mutations are linked to cerebellar ataxias. Biochemical analysis of the mutated pumps overexpressed in model cells have revealed their

  2. Genetic Determinism vs. Phenotypic Plasticity in Protist Morphology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mulot, M.; Marcisz, K.; Grandgirard, L.; Lara, E.; Kosakyan, Anush; Robroek, B. J. M.; Lamentowicz, M.; Payne, R. J.; Mitchell, E.A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2017), s. 729-739 ISSN 1066-5234 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Body size * protozoa * soil moisture * testate amoebae * water table depth Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.692, year: 2016

  3. Fibrous metaphyseal defects - determination of their origin and natural history using a radiomorphological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Karnel, F.; Hajek, P.

    1988-01-01

    The radiomorphological appearance of fibrous metaphyseal defects (FMDs) is demonstrated by long-term follow-up studies. A characteristic radiomorphological course rather than a typical single appearance can be established. These findings correlate well with the duration of these tumor-like lesions; therefore, the radiological findings allow conclusions to be made about the age of a fibrous metaphyseal defect. In addition, the characteristic locations of FMDs will be explained in respect of theier origins at insertions of tendons and ligaments. (orig.)

  4. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ...] Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the Herbicide Glyphosate... decision and determination on the petition regarding the regulated status of alfalfa genetically engineered... regulated status of alfalfa genetically engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate based on an...

  5. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ...] Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically... making a determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa... status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101...

  6. Genetic determination of mortality rate in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Rafael Pimentel; Ask, Birgitte; Madsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    : a sire random component with pedigree representing the sire genetic effects and a herd-year-season component. Moreover, the level of heterozygosity and the sire breed proportions were included in the models as covariates in order to account for potential non-additive genetic effects due to the massive...... introduction of genetic material from other populations. The correlations between the sire components for death rate and slaughter rate were negative and small for the 3 populations, suggesting the existence of specific genetic mechanisms for each culling reason and common concurrent genetic mechanisms...

  7. Nonhomologous Recombination between Defective Poliovirus and Coxsackievirus Genomes Suggests a New Model of Genetic Plasticity for Picornaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3′ end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. PMID:25096874

  8. Global search in photoelectron diffraction structure determination using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, M L [Departamento de Fisica, Icex, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Muino, R Diez [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Soares, E A [Departamento de Fisica, Icex, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Hove, M A Van [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Carvalho, V E de [Departamento de Fisica, Icex, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2007-11-07

    Photoelectron diffraction (PED) is an experimental technique widely used to perform structural determinations of solid surfaces. Similarly to low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), structural determination by PED requires a fitting procedure between the experimental intensities and theoretical results obtained through simulations. Multiple scattering has been shown to be an effective approach for making such simulations. The quality of the fit can be quantified through the so-called R-factor. Therefore, the fitting procedure is, indeed, an R-factor minimization problem. However, the topography of the R-factor as a function of the structural and non-structural surface parameters to be determined is complex, and the task of finding the global minimum becomes tough, particularly for complex structures in which many parameters have to be adjusted. In this work we investigate the applicability of the genetic algorithm (GA) global optimization method to this problem. The GA is based on the evolution of species, and makes use of concepts such as crossover, elitism and mutation to perform the search. We show results of its application in the structural determination of three different systems: the Cu(111) surface through the use of energy-scanned experimental curves; the Ag(110)-c(2 x 2)-Sb system, in which a theory-theory fit was performed; and the Ag(111) surface for which angle-scanned experimental curves were used. We conclude that the GA is a highly efficient method to search for global minima in the optimization of the parameters that best fit the experimental photoelectron diffraction intensities to the theoretical ones.

  9. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. Methods: Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal, haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA, using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS® version 14.0. Results: Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p = 0.001 and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p = 0.044. The presence of α-thal (p = 0.196, the CAR haplotype (p = 0.543, and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  10. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela O W; Ribeiro, Luiz C; Sudário, Lysla C; Teixeira, Maria T B; Martins, Marina L; Pittella, Anuska M O L; Junior, Irtis de O Fernandes

    To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal), haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS ® version 14.0. Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR) was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p=0.001) and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p=0.044). The presence of α-thal (p=0.196), the CAR haplotype (p=0.543), and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic Determinism in the Genetics Curriculum: An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Mendelian and Weldonian Emphases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Annie; Radick, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-first-century biology rejects genetic determinism, yet an exaggerated view of the power of genes in the making of bodies and minds remains a problem. What accounts for such tenacity? This article reports an exploratory study suggesting that the common reliance on Mendelian examples and concepts at the start of teaching in basic genetics is…

  12. Determination and microscopic study of incipient defects in irradiated power reactor fuel rods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathi, V.; Perrin, J.S.; Roberts, E.

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results of nondestructive and destructive examinations carried out on the Point Beach-1 (PWR) and Dresden-3 (BWR) candidate fuel rods selected for the study of pellet-clad interaction (PCI) induced incipient defects. In addition, the report includes results of examination of sections from Oskarshamn-1 (BWR) fuel rods. Eddy current examination of Point Beach-1 rods showed indications of possible incipient defects in the fuel rods. The profilometry and the gamma scan data also indicated that the source of the eddy current indications may be incipient defects. No failed rods or rods with incipient failure were found in the sample from Point Beach-1. Despite the lack of success in finding incipient defects and filed rods, the mechanism for fuel rod failures in Point Beach-1 is postulated to be PCI-related, with high startup rates and fuel handling being the key elements. Nine out of the 10 candidate fuel rods from Dresden-3 (BWR) were failed, and all the failed rods had leaked water so that the initial mechanism was observed. Examination of clad inner surfaces of the specimens from failed and unfailed rods showed fuel deposits of widely varying appearance. The deposits were found to contain uranium, cesium, and tellurium. Transmission electron microscopy of clad specimens showed evidence of microscopic strain. Metallographic examination of fuel pellets from the peak transient power location showed extensive grain boundary separation and axial movement of the fuel indicative of rapid release of fission products. Examination of Oskarshamn clad specimens did not show any stress corrosion crack (SCC) type defects. The defects found in the examinations appear to be related to secondary hydriding. The clad inner surface of the Oskarshamn specimens also showed uranium-rich deposits of varying features

  13. Young Adults' Belief in Genetic Determinism, and Knowledge and Attitudes towards Modern Genetics and Genomics: The PUGGS Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Rebecca Bruu; Castéra, Jérémy; Gericke, Niklas; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes; El-Hani, Charbel N

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the development and validation a comprehensive questionnaire to assess college students' knowledge about modern genetics and genomics, their belief in genetic determinism, and their attitudes towards applications of modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. Written in everyday language with minimal jargon, the Public Understanding and Attitudes towards Genetics and Genomics (PUGGS) questionnaire is intended for use in research on science education and public understanding of science, as a means to investigate relationships between knowledge, determinism and attitudes about modern genetics, which are to date little understood. We developed a set of core ideas and initial items from reviewing the scientific literature on genetics and previous studies on public and student knowledge and attitudes about genetics. Seventeen international experts from different fields (e.g., genetics, education, philosophy of science) reviewed the initial items and their feedback was used to revise the questionnaire. We validated the questionnaire in two pilot tests with samples of university freshmen students. The final questionnaire contains 45 items, including both multiple choice and Likert scale response formats. Cronbach alpha showed good reliability for each section of the questionnaire. In conclusion, the PUGGS questionnaire is a reliable tool for investigating public understanding and attitudes towards modern genetics and genomic-based technologies.

  14. Young Adults’ Belief in Genetic Determinism, and Knowledge and Attitudes towards Modern Genetics and Genomics: The PUGGS Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Rebecca Bruu; Castéra, Jérémy; Gericke, Niklas; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the development and validation a comprehensive questionnaire to assess college students’ knowledge about modern genetics and genomics, their belief in genetic determinism, and their attitudes towards applications of modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. Written in everyday language with minimal jargon, the Public Understanding and Attitudes towards Genetics and Genomics (PUGGS) questionnaire is intended for use in research on science education and public understanding of science, as a means to investigate relationships between knowledge, determinism and attitudes about modern genetics, which are to date little understood. We developed a set of core ideas and initial items from reviewing the scientific literature on genetics and previous studies on public and student knowledge and attitudes about genetics. Seventeen international experts from different fields (e.g., genetics, education, philosophy of science) reviewed the initial items and their feedback was used to revise the questionnaire. We validated the questionnaire in two pilot tests with samples of university freshmen students. The final questionnaire contains 45 items, including both multiple choice and Likert scale response formats. Cronbach alpha showed good reliability for each section of the questionnaire. In conclusion, the PUGGS questionnaire is a reliable tool for investigating public understanding and attitudes towards modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. PMID:28114357

  15. Variation in human recombination rates and its genetic determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Fledel-Alon

    Full Text Available Despite the fundamental role of crossing-over in the pairing and segregation of chromosomes during human meiosis, the rates and placements of events vary markedly among individuals. Characterizing this variation and identifying its determinants are essential steps in our understanding of the human recombination process and its evolution.Using three large sets of European-American pedigrees, we examined variation in five recombination phenotypes that capture distinct aspects of crossing-over patterns. We found that the mean recombination rate in males and females and the historical hotspot usage are significantly heritable and are uncorrelated with one another. We then conducted a genome-wide association study in order to identify loci that influence them. We replicated associations of RNF212 with the mean rate in males and in females as well as the association of Inversion 17q21.31 with the female mean rate. We also replicated the association of PRDM9 with historical hotspot usage, finding that it explains most of the genetic variance in this phenotype. In addition, we identified a set of new candidate regions for further validation.These findings suggest that variation at broad and fine scales is largely separable and that, beyond three known loci, there is no evidence for common variation with large effects on recombination phenotypes.

  16. Early Determinants of Obesity: Genetic, Epigenetic, and In Utero Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung E. Rhee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging body of work indicating that genes, epigenetics, and the in utero environment can impact whether or not a child is obese. While certain genes have been identified that increase one’s risk for becoming obese, other factors such as excess gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes mellitus, and smoking can also influence this risk. Understanding these influences can help to inform which behaviors and exposures should be targeted if we are to decrease the prevalence of obesity. By helping parents and young children change certain behaviors and exposures during critical time periods, we may be able to alter or modify one’s genetic predisposition. However, further research is needed to determine which efforts are effective at decreasing the incidence of obesity and to develop new methods of prevention. In this paper, we will discuss how genes, epigenetics, and in utero influences affect the development of obesity. We will then discuss current efforts to alter these influences and suggest future directions for this work.

  17. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  18. Genetic and modifying factors that determine the risk of brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelli, Terezinha de Cresci Braga; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-01-01

    of tumor escape, CNS tumor immunology, immune defects that impair anti-tumor systemic immunity in brain tumor patients and local immuno-suppressive factors within CNS are also reviewed. New hope to treatment perspectives, as dendritic-cell-based vaccines is summarized too. Concluding, it seems well...... responses can alert immune system. However, it is necessary to clarify if individuals with both constitutional defects in immune functions and genetic instability have higher risk of developing brain tumors. Cytogenetic prospective studies and gene copy number variations analysis also must be performed...

  19. Determination of dimension and orientation of almost plane inclined defects with focussed probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadder, D. de; Azou, P.; Saglio, R.; Birac, A.M.

    The study of the diffraction of an ultrasonic beam by the edge of a defect is still uncomplete. Nevertheless we show how it can be used to calculate size and orientation of a flaw along its line of steepest gradient [fr

  20. Frenkel defect absorption on dislocations and dislocation discharge rate. Modeling determination of the absorption zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhlin, Eh.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    A situation connected with the fact that evaluations of dislocation discharge strength which somehow or other are based on the elasticity theory in the dislocation nucleus or near it, do not lead to results complying with experimental data, is discussed. Bases of the alternative approach to this problem consisting in direct investigation into the process of Frenkel defect absorption on dislocation by its computerized simulation at the microscopic level are also presented. Methods of investigation and results are described using α dislocation in iron-alpha as an example. The concept of zones of vacancy and interstitial atom absorption on dislocation is discussed. It is shown that a spontaneous transition, performed by any of these defects near a dislocation is not always identical to absorption and usually appears to be only a part of a multistage process leading to the defect disappearance. Potential relief characteristics for vacancy movement near the dislocation are found. An area wide enough in a transverse direction is found around the dislocation. Vacncies reaching this area can be easily transported to places of their disappearance. Therefore the vacancy entry to this area is equivalent to the absorption. the procedure of simulating the atomic structure of a crystallite containing a dislocation with a step is described. Positions from which these defects perform spontaneous transitions, reaching the disappearance places are found on the dislocation near the step

  1. Quantitative determination of charge transfer parameters of photorefractive BaTiO3:Rh from EPR-based defect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veber, C; Meyer, M; Schirmer, O F; Kaczmarek, M

    2003-01-01

    Optical absorption bands can be used as fingerprints of defects and their charge states in insulators and semiconductors. On the basis of the photochromicity usually shown by such materials, a method is introduced by which the optical bands are assigned to the defects and their charge states. It is based on simultaneous measurements of the light-induced changes of the optical absorption and of the corresponding EPR signals. Moreover, indirectly optical bands of EPR-silent defects can also be labelled in this way, strongly widening the scope of EPR based defect studies. We apply this method to the infrared-sensitive photorefractive system BaTiO 3 :Rh, where illumination leads to recharging among the valence states Rh 5+ , Rh 4+ and Rh 3+ . The values of all parameters governing the charge transfers responsible are inferred from the magnitude of the absorption bands, the absolute determination of their absorption cross-sections and the kinetics of the absorption changes under illumination. In contrast to previous investigations, these parameters are deduced independently of photorefractive measurements

  2. 76 FR 78232 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered To Have a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... peer review of safety tests, and health effects of genetically modified organisms and glyphosate. APHIS...] Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered To Have a Modified... that there is reason to believe are plant pests. Such genetically engineered organisms and products are...

  3. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. [Application of Multiple Genetic Markers in a Case of Determination of Half Sibling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Shi, Mei-sen; Yuan, Li; Lu, Di

    2016-02-01

    A case of half sibling was determined with multiple genetic markers, which could be potentially applied for determination of half sibling relationship from same father. Half sibling relationship was detected by 39 autosomal STR genetic markers, 23 Y-chromosomal STR genetic markers and 12 X -chromosomal STR genetic markers among ZHAO -1, ZHAO -2, ZHAO -3, ZHAO -4, and ZHAO-5. According to autosomal STR, Y-STR and X-STR genotyping results, it was determined that ZHAO-4 (alleged half sibling) was unrelated with ZHAO-1 and ZHAO-2; however, ZHAO-3 (alleged half sibling), ZHAO-5 (alleged half sibling) shared same genetic profile with ZHAO-1, and ZHAO-2 from same father. It is reliable to use multiple genetic markers and family gene reconstruction to determine half sibling relationship from same father, but it is difficult to determination by calculating half sibling index with ITO and discriminant functions.

  5. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eMercer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR. This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli.

  6. Genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Lohans, Christopher T; Duar, Rebbeca; Zheng, Jinshui; Vederas, John C; Walter, Jens; Gänzle, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Reutericyclin is a unique antimicrobial tetramic acid produced by some strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. This study aimed to identify the genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis. Comparisons of the genomes of reutericyclin-producing L. reuteri strains with those of non-reutericyclin-producing strains identified a genomic island of 14 open reading frames (ORFs) including genes coding for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), homologues of PhlA, PhlB, and PhlC, and putative transport and regulatory proteins. The protein encoded by rtcN is composed of a condensation domain, an adenylation domain likely specific for d-leucine, and a thiolation domain. rtcK codes for a PKS that is composed of a ketosynthase domain, an acyl-carrier protein domain, and a thioesterase domain. The products of rtcA, rtcB, and rtcC are homologous to the diacetylphloroglucinol-biosynthetic proteins PhlABC and may acetylate the tetramic acid moiety produced by RtcN and RtcK, forming reutericyclin. Deletion of rtcN or rtcABC in L. reuteri TMW1.656 abrogated reutericyclin production but did not affect resistance to reutericyclin. Genes coding for transport and regulatory proteins could be deleted only in the reutericyclin-negative L. reuteri strain TMW1.656ΔrtcN, and these deletions eliminated reutericyclin resistance. The genomic analyses suggest that the reutericyclin genomic island was horizontally acquired from an unknown source during a unique event. The combination of PhlABC homologues with both an NRPS and a PKS has also been identified in the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum, suggesting that the genes in these organisms and those in L. reuteri share an evolutionary origin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Determination of genetic variability of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... diversity and relationship among thirty-five Asian cultivars of rice including 19 aromatic, 13 non- ... are promising and effective tools for measuring genetic .... efficients were employed by using Simqual sub-program in similarity.

  8. Non-Genetic Determinants of Mosquito Competence for Malaria Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Lef?vre, Thierry; Vantaux, Am?lie; Dabir?, Kounbobr R.; Mouline, Karine; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies reve...

  9. Threshold defect production in silicon determined by density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, E.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2008-01-01

    We studied threshold displacement energies for creating stable Frenkel pairs in silicon using density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. The average threshold energy over all lattice directions was found to be 36±2 STAT ±2 SYST eV, and thresholds in the directions and were found to be 20±2 SYST eV and 12.5±1.5 SYST eV, respectively. Moreover, we found that in most studied lattice directions, a bond defect complex is formed with a lower threshold than a Frenkel pair. The average threshold energy for producing either a bond defect or a Frenkel pair was found to be 24±1 STAT ±2 SYST eV

  10. Antisite Defects of the L12 Structure Determined by the Phase Field Microelasticity Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Zhang; Zheng, Chen; Yan-Li, Lu; Yong-Xin, Wang; Yan, Zhao

    2009-01-01

    A phase field microelasticity simulation is performed to examine the antisite defect of L1 2 -Ni 3 Al in Ni 75 Al 5.3 V 19.7 ternary alloy. Combinimg strain energy with the phase field model leads to an atom configuration change as time proceeds. For the Ni sublattice, the antisite defect Al Ni , the equilibrium occupancy probability (OP) of which declines, precedes Ni Ni and V Ni in reaching equilibrium; subsequently, Ni Ni and V Ni present a phenomenon of symmetrical rise and decline individually. Similarly, for the Al sublattice, the antisite defect Ni Al , the OP of which eventually rises, takes fewer time steps than Al Ai and V Al to attain equilibrium. Thereafter, Al Al rises while V Al declines symmetrically at the axes of the Ni Al MAI curve. Furthermore, the OP for the Al sublattice is much more sensitive to strain energy than that for the Ni sublattice. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  11. Genetics of human body size and shape: pleiotropic and independent genetic determinants of adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, G; Yakovenko, K; Ginsburg, E; Kobyliansky, E

    1998-01-01

    The present study utilized pedigree data from three ethnically different populations of Kirghizstan, Turkmenia and Chuvasha. Principal component analysis was performed on a matrix of genetic correlations between 22 measures of adiposity, including skinfolds, circumferences and indices. Findings are summarized as follows: (1) All three genetic matrices were not positive definite and the first four factors retained even after exclusion RG > or = 1.0, explained from 88% to 97% of the total additive genetic variation in the 22 trials studied. This clearly emphasizes the massive involvement of pleiotropic gene effects in the variability of adiposity traits. (2) Despite the quite natural differences in pairwise correlations between the adiposity traits in the three ethnically different samples under study, factor analysis revealed a common basic pattern of covariability for the adiposity traits. In each of the three samples, four genetic factors were retained, namely, the amount of subcutaneous fat, the total body obesity, the pattern of distribution of subcutaneous fat and the central adiposity distribution. (3) Genetic correlations between the retained four factors were virtually non-existent, suggesting that several independent genetic sources may be governing the variation of adiposity traits. (4) Variance decomposition analysis on the obtained genetic factors leaves no doubt regarding the substantial familial and (most probably genetic) effects on variation of each factor in each studied population. The similarity of results in the three different samples indicates that the findings may be deemed valid and reliable descriptions of the genetic variation and covariation pattern of adiposity traits in the human species.

  12. Genetic algorithm approach to thin film optical parameters determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurecka, S.; Jureckova, M.; Muellerova, J.

    2003-01-01

    Optical parameters of thin film are important for several optical and optoelectronic applications. In this work the genetic algorithm proposed to solve optical parameters of thin film values. The experimental reflectance is modelled by the Forouhi - Bloomer dispersion relations. The refractive index, the extinction coefficient and the film thickness are the unknown parameters in this model. Genetic algorithm use probabilistic examination of promissing areas of the parameter space. It creates a population of solutions based on the reflectance model and then operates on the population to evolve the best solution by using selection, crossover and mutation operators on the population individuals. The implementation of genetic algorithm method and the experimental results are described too (Authors)

  13. Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Terry W; Shearer, Tonya L; Smith, Hilary A; Kubanek, Julia; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David B Mark

    2009-09-09

    Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s). We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units, even at synonymous positions, suggests that the

  14. Molecular mechanism and genetic determinants of buprofezin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueting; Ji, Junbin; Zhao, Leizhen; Qiu, Jiguo; Dai, Chen; Wang, Weiwu; He, Jian; Jiang, Jiandong; Hong, Qing; Yan, Xin

    2017-07-14

    . However, the molecular mechanism and genetic determinants of microbial degradation of buprofezin has not been well identified. This work revealed that gene cluster bfzBA3A4A1A2C is responsible for the upstream catabolic pathway of buprofezin in R. qingshengii YL-1. The products of bfzBA3A4A1A2C could also degrade bifenthrin, a widely used pyrethroid insecticide. These findings enhance our understanding of the microbial degradation mechanism of buprofezin and benefit the application of strain YL-1 and bfzBA3A4A1A2C in the bioremediation of buprofezin contamination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Parameter determination for quantitative PIXE analysis using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspiazu, J.; Belmont-Moreno, E.

    1996-01-01

    For biological and environmental samples, PIXE technique is in particular advantage for elemental analysis, but the quantitative analysis implies accomplishing complex calculations that require the knowledge of more than a dozen parameters. Using a genetic algorithm, the authors give here an account of the procedure to obtain the best values for the parameters necessary to fit the efficiency for a X-ray detector. The values for some variables involved in quantitative PIXE analysis, were manipulated in a similar way as the genetic information is treated in a biological process. The authors carried out the algorithm until they reproduce, within the confidence interval, the elemental concentrations corresponding to a reference material

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions XMEN X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close ... boxes. Description X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia (typically known by the acronym ...

  17. Non-Genetic Determinants of Mosquito Competence for Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Vantaux, Amélie; Dabiré, Kounbobr R.; Mouline, Karine; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies revealing a great diversity of ways in which non-genetic factors can interfere with mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. Here, we review the current evidence for such environmentally mediated effects, including ambient temperature, mosquito diet, microbial gut flora, and infection history, and we identify additional factors previously overlooked in mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. We also discuss epidemiological implications, and the evolutionary consequences for vector immunity and parasite transmission strategies. Finally, we propose directions for further research and argue that an improved knowledge of non-genetic influences on mosquito-Plasmodium interactions could aid in implementing conventional malaria control measures and contribute to the design of novel strategies. PMID:23818841

  18. Non-genetic determinants of mosquito competence for malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies revealing a great diversity of ways in which non-genetic factors can interfere with mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. Here, we review the current evidence for such environmentally mediated effects, including ambient temperature, mosquito diet, microbial gut flora, and infection history, and we identify additional factors previously overlooked in mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. We also discuss epidemiological implications, and the evolutionary consequences for vector immunity and parasite transmission strategies. Finally, we propose directions for further research and argue that an improved knowledge of non-genetic influences on mosquito-Plasmodium interactions could aid in implementing conventional malaria control measures and contribute to the design of novel strategies.

  19. Resistance to hepatitis C virus: potential genetic and immunological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael M; Luciani, Fabio; Cameron, Barbara; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R; Booth, David; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    Studies of individuals who were highly exposed but seronegative (HESN) for HIV infection led to the discovery that homozygosity for the Δ32 deletion mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents viral entry into target cells, and is associated with resistance to infection. Additionally, evidence for protective immunity has been noted in some HESN groups, such as sex workers in The Gambia. Population studies of individuals at high risk for hepatitis C virus infection suggest that an HESN phenotype exists. The body of evidence, which suggests that protective immunity allows clearance of hepatitis C virus without seroconversion is growing. Furthermore, proof-of-principle evidence from in-vitro studies shows that genetic polymorphisms can confer resistance to establishment of infection. This Review discusses the possibility that genetic mutations confer resistance against hepatitis C virus, and also explores evidence for protective immunity, including via genetically programmed variations in host responses. The data generally strengthens the notion that investigations of naturally arising polymorphisms within the hepatitis C virus interactome, and genetic association studies of well characterised HESN individuals, could identify potential targets for vaccine design and inform novel therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic Determinants of P Wave Duration and PR Segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Niek; Mateo Leach, Irene; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Hillege, Hans L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Barnett, Phil; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van der Harst, Pim

    Background-The PR interval on the ECG reflects atrial depolarization and atrioventricular nodal delay which can be partially differentiated by P wave duration and PR segment, respectively. Genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci for PR interval, but it remains to be

  1. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tabakoff, B.; Saba, L.; Printz, M.; Flodman, P.; Hodgkinson, C.; Goldman, D.; Koob, G.; Richardson, H.N.; Kechris, K.; Bell, R.L.; Hübner, N.; Heinig, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, J.; Legault, L.; Dongier, M.; Conigrave, K.M.; Whitfield, J.B.; Saunders, J.; Grant, B.; Hoffman, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2009), s. 70-70 ISSN 1741-7007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) 55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : alcohol consumption * rat * gene expression profiles Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2009

  2. Genetics of sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... How gender is determined under haplodiploidy in the ab- sence of heteromorphic sex ... determination (see below). Sex-determination mutants ... not others (Nöthiger and Steinmann-Zwicky 1985; Wilkins. 1995; Saccone et al.

  3. Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubanek Julia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s. We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. Results A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units

  4. Developmental and genetic determinants of leadership role occupancy among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Richard D; Zhang, Zhen; Avolio, Bruce J; Krueger, Robert F

    2007-05-01

    The genetic and developmental influences on leadership role occupancy were investigated using a sample of 178 fraternal and 214 identical female twins. Two general developmental factors were identified, one involving formal work experiences and the other a family experiences factor hypothesized to influence whether women move into positions of leadership in organizations. Results indicated that 32% of the variance in leadership role occupancy was associated with heritability. The 2 developmental factors also showed significant correlations with leadership role occupancy. However, after genetic factors were partialed out, only the work experience factor was significantly related to leadership role occupancy. Results are discussed in terms of prior life events and experiences that may trigger leadership development and the limitations of this study. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  5. A haploid genetic screen identifies the G1/S regulatory machinery as a determinant of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Blomen, Vincent A; Bisteau, Xavier; Degener, Fabian; Matsushita, Felipe Yu; Kaldis, Philipp; Foijer, Floris; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2015-12-08

    The Wee1 cell cycle checkpoint kinase prevents premature mitotic entry by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases. Chemical inhibitors of Wee1 are currently being tested clinically as targeted anticancer drugs. Wee1 inhibition is thought to be preferentially cytotoxic in p53-defective cancer cells. However, TP53 mutant cancers do not respond consistently to Wee1 inhibitor treatment, indicating the existence of genetic determinants of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity other than TP53 status. To optimally facilitate patient selection for Wee1 inhibition and uncover potential resistance mechanisms, identification of these currently unknown genes is necessary. The aim of this study was therefore to identify gene mutations that determine Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity. We performed a genome-wide unbiased functional genetic screen in TP53 mutant near-haploid KBM-7 cells using gene-trap insertional mutagenesis. Insertion site mapping of cells that survived long-term Wee1 inhibition revealed enrichment of G1/S regulatory genes, including SKP2, CUL1, and CDK2. Stable depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 or chemical Cdk2 inhibition rescued the γ-H2AX induction and abrogation of G2 phase as induced by Wee1 inhibition in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Remarkably, live cell imaging showed that depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 did not rescue the Wee1 inhibition-induced karyokinesis and cytokinesis defects. These data indicate that the activity of the DNA replication machinery, beyond TP53 mutation status, determines Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity, and could serve as a selection criterion for Wee1-inhibitor eligible patients. Conversely, loss of the identified S-phase genes could serve as a mechanism of acquired resistance, which goes along with development of severe genomic instability.

  6. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangion Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume

  7. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α‐thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non‐reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  8. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  9. Correlation of damage threshold and surface geometry of nodular defects in HR coatings as determined by in-situ atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staggs, M.C.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Balooch, M.

    1992-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine in-situ the correlation between the surface dimensions of defects in dielectric multilayer optical coatings and their susceptibility to damage by pulsed laser illumination. The primary surface defects studied were μm-scale domes associated with the classic nodule defect. The optical film studied was a highly reflective dielectric multilayer consisting of pairs of alternating HfO 2 and SiO 2 layers of quarter wave thickness at 1.06 μm. Nodule defect height and width dimensions were measured prior to laser illumination on two different samples. Correlation between these dimensions supported a simple model for the defect geometry. Defects with high nodule heights (> 0.6 μm) were found to be most susceptible to laser damage over a range of fluences between 0-35 J/cm 2 (1.06 μm, 10 ns, and 1/e 2 diam. of 1.3 mm). Crater defects, formed by nodules ejected from the coating prior to illumination, were also studied. None of the crater defects damaged when illuminated over the same range of fluences that the nodule defects were subjected to

  10. Genetic Determinism in the Genetics Curriculum. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Mendelian and Weldonian Emphases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Annie; Radick, Gregory

    2017-12-01

    Twenty-first-century biology rejects genetic determinism, yet an exaggerated view of the power of genes in the making of bodies and minds remains a problem. What accounts for such tenacity? This article reports an exploratory study suggesting that the common reliance on Mendelian examples and concepts at the start of teaching in basic genetics is an eliminable source of support for determinism. Undergraduate students who attended a standard `Mendelian approach' university course in introductory genetics on average showed no change in their determinist views about genes. By contrast, students who attended an alternative course which, inspired by the work of a critic of early Mendelism, W. F. R. Weldon (1860-1906), replaced an emphasis on Mendel's peas with an emphasis on developmental contexts and their role in bringing about phenotypic variability, were less determinist about genes by the end of teaching. Improvements in both the new Weldonian curriculum and the study design are in view for the future.

  11. Genetic determinants of circulating sphingolipid concentrations in European populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Hicks

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids have essential roles as structural components of cell membranes and in cell signalling, and disruption of their metabolism causes several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. Increasingly, variants within a few of the genes that encode enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are being associated with complex disease phenotypes. Direct experimental evidence supports a role of specific sphingolipid species in several common complex chronic disease processes including atherosclerotic plaque formation, myocardial infarction (MI, cardiomyopathy, pancreatic beta-cell failure, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, sphingolipids represent novel and important intermediate phenotypes for genetic analysis, yet little is known about the major genetic variants that influence their circulating levels in the general population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS between 318,237 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and levels of circulating sphingomyelin (SM, dihydrosphingomyelin (Dih-SM, ceramide (Cer, and glucosylceramide (GluCer single lipid species (33 traits; and 43 matched metabolite ratios measured in 4,400 subjects from five diverse European populations. Associated variants (32 in five genomic regions were identified with genome-wide significant corrected p-values ranging down to 9.08x10(-66. The strongest associations were observed in or near 7 genes functionally involved in ceramide biosynthesis and trafficking: SPTLC3, LASS4, SGPP1, ATP10D, and FADS1-3. Variants in 3 loci (ATP10D, FADS3, and SPTLC3 associate with MI in a series of three German MI studies. An additional 70 variants across 23 candidate genes involved in sphingolipid-metabolizing pathways also demonstrate association (p = 10(-4 or less. Circulating concentrations of several key components in sphingolipid metabolism are thus under strong genetic control, and variants in these loci can be

  12. Determination of Selection Method in Genetic Algorithm for Land Suitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfianti Asti Dwi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic Algoirthm is one alternative solution in the field of modeling optimization, automatic programming and machine learning. The purpose of the study was to compare some type of selection methods in Genetic Algorithm for land suitability. Contribution of this research applies the best method to develop region based horticultural commodities. This testing is done by comparing the three methods on the method of selection, the Roulette Wheel, Tournament Selection and Stochastic Universal Sampling. Parameters of the locations used in the test scenarios include Temperature = 27°C, Rainfall = 1200 mm, hummidity = 30%, Cluster fruit = 4, Crossover Probabiitiy (Pc = 0.6, Mutation Probabilty (Pm = 0.2 and Epoch = 10. The second test epoch incluides location parameters consist of Temperature = 30°C, Rainfall = 2000 mm, Humidity = 35%, Cluster fruit = 5, Crossover Probability (Pc = 0.7, Mutation Probability (Pm = 0.3 and Epoch 10. The conclusion of this study shows that the Roulette Wheel is the best method because it produces more stable and fitness value than the other two methods.

  13. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyde David R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO, subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease.

  14. Genetic determinants of glycated hemoglobin levels in the Greenlandic Inuit population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Emil V R; Moltke, Ida; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2018-01-01

    We previously showed that a common genetic variant leads to a remarkably increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the small and historically isolated Greenlandic population. Motivated by this, we aimed at discovering novel genetic determinants for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and at estimating...

  15. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ...] Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically... and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 as regulated... International (FGI) alfalfa events J101 and J163 were no longer considered regulated articles under the...

  16. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome . But the cause of most congenital heart defects isn't known. While they can't be prevented, many treatments are available for the defects and related health ...

  17. Genetic Determinism of Primary Early-Onset Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aury-Landas, Juliette; Marcelli, Christian; Leclercq, Sylvain; Boumédiene, Karim; Baugé, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. A minority of cases correspond to familial presentation characterized by early-onset forms which are genetically heterogeneous. This review brings a new point of view on the molecular basis of OA by focusing on gene mutations causing early-onset OA (EO-OA). Recently, thanks to whole-exome sequencing, a gain-of-function mutation in the TNFRSF11B gene was identified in two distant family members with EO-OA, opening new therapeutic perspectives for OA. Indeed, unraveling the molecular basis of rare Mendelian OA forms will improve our understanding of molecular processes involved in OA pathogenesis and will contribute to better patient diagnosis, management, and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New Analysis of Solute Drag in AA5754 by Precise Determination of Point Defect Generation and the Orowan Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, Brad J.; Penlington, Alex; Saimoto, Shig

    Serrated deformation in Al-Mg alloys creates problems that affect consumer product acceptability. This effect is usually attributed to the Portevin-LeChâtelier effect. In this study the inverse PLC effect due to solute drag on moving dislocations is examined in AA5754. The drag mechanism is dependent on the diffusivity of the solute which is in-turn dependent on the point defect evolution during deformation. Experimental determination of the parabolic James-Barnett drag profile by strain rate change experiments indicates the peak stress is centered at 1.5×10-9m/s, which requires a mechanical formation energy for vacancies of 0.4eV/at. A new slip-based constitutive relation was used to determine the evolution of vacancy volume fraction with deformation with strain, which is greater than the volume fraction of vacancies predicted by the solute drag profile.

  19. Genetic determinants of serum testosterone concentrations in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n = 871 and two de novo replication cohorts (n = 4,620 to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG locus (17p13-p12 were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p = 1.2×10(-41 and rs6258, p = 2.3×10(-22. Subjects with ≥ 3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p = 5.6×10(-16. The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01. Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation.

  20. Method of determining external defects of a structure by analyzing a series of its images in the monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Aleksey Alekseevich

    2015-03-01

    geometrical parameters by analyzing a series of images. This is the issue and the subject of this work, which developed the computational algorithms to detect external defects. At the stage of preliminary image processing there is the delineation of characteristic points in the image and the calculation of the optical flow in the area of these points. When determining the defect position, the characteristic points of the image are determined using the detector of Harris-Laplace, which are located in the central part of the image. The characteristic points outside the frame are considered to be background. There is an identification of the changes in characteristic points in the frame in relation to the background by using a pyramidal iterative scheme. In the second stage servo frame focuses on a specific point with the greatest change in relation to the background in the current time. The algorithm for object detection and determination of its parameters includes three procedures: detection procedure start; the procedure of the next image processing; stop procedure for determining the parameters of the object. The method described here can be used to create information-measuring system of monitoring based on the use of photodetectors with high-definition and recognition of defects (color differences and differences in the form compared to the background. Since almost each examination of a building or structure begins with a visual examination and determination of the most probable places of occurrence and presence of the defects, the proposed method can be combined with this stage and it will simplify the process of diagnosing, screening for the development of projects on reconstruction and placement of additional equipment on the existing infrastructure.

  1. CTLA-4 as a genetic determinant in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A S B; Mitchell, A L; Cordell, H J; Short, A; Skinningsrud, B; Ollier, W; Badenhoop, K; Meyer, G; Falorni, A; Kampe, O; Undlien, D; Pearce, S H S; Husebye, E S

    2015-09-01

    In common with several other autoimmune diseases, autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is thought to be caused by a combination of deleterious susceptibility polymorphisms in several genes, together with undefined environmental factors and stochastic events. To date, the strongest genomic association with AAD has been with alleles at the HLA locus, DR3-DQ2 and DR4. The contribution of other genetic variants has been inconsistent. We have studied the association of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the CD28-CTLA-4-ICOS genomic locus, in a cohort comprising 691 AAD patients of Norwegian and UK origin with matched controls. We have also performed a meta-analysis including 1002 patients from European countries. The G-allele of SNP rs231775 in CTLA-4 is associated with AAD in Norwegian patients (odds ratio (OR)=1.35 (confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.66), P=0.004), but not in UK patients. The same allele is associated with AAD in the total European population (OR=1.37 (CI 1.13-1.66), P=0.002). A three-marker haplotype, comprising PROMOTER_1661, rs231726 and rs1896286 was found to be associated with AAD in the Norwegian cohort only (OR 2.43 (CI 1.68-3.51), P=0.00013). This study points to the CTLA-4 gene as a susceptibility locus for the development of AAD, and refines its mapping within the wider genomic locus.

  2. Determinants of public attitudes to genetically modified salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Amin

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country.

  3. Genetic Determinism vs. Phenotypic Plasticity in Protist Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulot, Matthieu; Marcisz, Katarzyna; Grandgirard, Lara; Lara, Enrique; Kosakyan, Anush; Robroek, Bjorn J M; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Payne, Richard J; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2017-11-01

    Untangling the relationships between morphology and phylogeny is key to building a reliable taxonomy, but is especially challenging for protists, where the existence of cryptic or pseudocryptic species makes finding relevant discriminant traits difficult. Here we use Hyalosphenia papilio (a testate amoeba) as a model species to investigate the contribution of phylogeny and phenotypic plasticity in its morphology. We study the response of H. papilio morphology (shape and pores number) to environmental variables in (i) a manipulative experiment with controlled conditions (water level), (ii) an observational study of a within-site natural ecological gradient (water level), and (iii) an observational study across 37 European peatlands (climate). We showed that H. papilio morphology is correlated to environmental conditions (climate and water depth) as well as geography, while no relationship between morphology and phylogeny was brought to light. The relative contribution of genetic inheritance and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology varies depending on the taxonomic group and the trait under consideration. Thus, our data call for a reassessment of taxonomy based on morphology alone. This clearly calls for a substantial increase in taxonomic research on these globally still under-studied organisms leading to a reassessment of estimates of global microbial eukaryotic diversity. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ...] Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically Engineered High... advising the public of our determination that a soybean line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International... engineered organisms. Our determination is based on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred...

  5. 75 FR 20560 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ...] Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically Engineered for... are advising the public of our determination that a corn line developed by Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc... Biotechnology, Inc., in its petition for a determination of nonregulated status, our analysis of other...

  6. 78 FR 13302 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ...] Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered for... are advising the public of our determination that a corn line developed by the Syngenta Biotechnology... evaluation of data submitted by Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc., in its petition for a determination of...

  7. Determination of the genetic marker of the mutagenized strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the effluent of the Kaduna refining and petrochemical company, using standard methods. These were UV-irradiated for 30mins and thereafter subjected to nitrous acid treatment. Determination of essential amino acids required by both parents and mutants ...

  8. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan; Singh, Mohinder

    2015-01-01

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from 137 Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method

  9. Visualizing Angiogenesis by Multiphoton Microscopy In Vivo in Genetically Modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp Scaffold for Calvarial Critical Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jahr, Holger; Zheng, Wei; Ren, Pei-Gen

    2017-09-07

    The reconstruction of critically sized bone defects remains a serious clinical problem because of poor angiogenesis within tissue-engineered scaffolds during repair, which gives rise to a lack of sufficient blood supply and causes necrosis of the new tissues. Rapid vascularization is a vital prerequisite for new tissue survival and integration with existing host tissue. The de novo generation of vasculature in scaffolds is one of the most important steps in making bone regeneration more efficient, allowing repairing tissue to grow into a scaffold. To tackle this problem, the genetic modification of a biomaterial scaffold is used to accelerate angiogenesis and osteogenesis. However, visualizing and tracking in vivo blood vessel formation in real-time and in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds or new bone tissue is still an obstacle for bone tissue engineering. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a novel bio-imaging modality that can acquire volumetric data from biological structures in a high-resolution and minimally-invasive manner. The objective of this study was to visualize angiogenesis with multiphoton microscopy in vivo in a genetically modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp scaffold for calvarial critical bone defect repair. PLGA/nHAp scaffolds were functionalized for the sustained delivery of a growth factor pdgf-b gene carrying lentiviral vectors (LV-pdgfb) in order to facilitate angiogenesis and to enhance bone regeneration. In a scaffold-implanted calvarial critical bone defect mouse model, the blood vessel areas (BVAs) in PHp scaffolds were significantly higher than in PH scaffolds. Additionally, the expression of pdgf-b and angiogenesis-related genes, vWF and VEGFR2, increased correspondingly. MicroCT analysis indicated that the new bone formation in the PHp group dramatically improved compared to the other groups. To our knowledge, this is the first time multiphoton microscopy was used in bone tissue-engineering to investigate angiogenesis in a 3D bio-degradable scaffold in

  10. Determinism and Underdetermination in Genetics: Implications for Students' Engagement in Argumentation and Epistemic Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Aleixandre, María Pilar

    2014-02-01

    In the last two decades science studies and science education research have shifted from an interest in products (of science or of learning), to an interest in processes and practices. The focus of this paper is on students' engagement in epistemic practices (Kelly in Teaching scientific inquiry: Recommendations for research and implementation. Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, pp 99-117, 2008), or on their practical epistemologies (Wickman in Sci Educ 88(3):325-344, 2004). In order to support these practices in genetics classrooms we need to take into account domain-specific features of the epistemology of genetics, in particular issues about determinism and underdetermination. I suggest that certain difficulties may be related to the specific nature of causality in genetics, and in particular to the correspondence between a given set of factors and a range of potential effects, rather than a single one. The paper seeks to bring together recent developments in the epistemology of biology and of genetics, on the one hand, with science education approaches about epistemic practices, on the other. The implications of these perspectives for current challenges in learning genetics are examined, focusing on students' engagement in epistemic practices, as argumentation, understood as using evidence to evaluate knowledge claims. Engaging in argumentation in genetics classrooms is intertwined with practices such as using genetics models to build explanations, or framing genetics issues in their social context. These challenges are illustrated with studies making part of our research program in the USC.

  11. Examination of fibre composites by ultrasound for defect inspection and determination of material properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundtoft, H.E.

    1988-07-01

    Fibre composites may be produced by stacking prepregs impregnated with epoxy and hardening those in an autoclave. Results from different non destructive ultrasonic methods used on this product are presented. Two techiques (double through transmission and reflector) are developed from C-scan. They are useful for finding delaminations and porosities. An attempt was made to determine the porosity content in the plates non destructively with the reflector techique. A third technique (called ''in plane transmission'') is a contact method with separated transmitter and receiver on the same side of the plate (50 mm apart). The wave form of the received signal is digitized, and several so-called ''stress wave factors'' are calculated from the digitized values. The sound velocity is also calculated. Measurement has been made on materials in different thicknesses and with variation in fibre orientation and fibre material. Results from scanning with the reflector technique and in plane transmission measurement on the same samples are compared. 15 ills.

  12. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  13. Copy number determination of genetically-modified hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuesler, Todd; Reeves, Lilith; Kalle, Christof von; Grassman, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Human gene transfer with gammaretroviral, murine leukemia virus (MLV) based vectors has been shown to effectively insert and express transgene sequences at a level of therapeutic benefit. However, there are numerous reports of disruption of the normal cellular processes caused by the viral insertion, even of replication deficient gammaretroviral vectors. Current gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors do not control the site of insertion into the genome, hence, the possibility of disruption of the target cell genome. Risk related to viral insertions is linked to the number of insertions of the transgene into the cellular DNA, as has been demonstrated for replication competent and replication deficient retroviruses in experiments. At high number of insertions per cell, cell transformation due to vector induced activation of proto-oncogenes is more likely to occur, in particular since more than one transforming event is needed for oncogenesis. Thus, determination of the vector copy number in bulk transduced populations, individual colony forming units, and tissue from the recipient of the transduced cells is an increasingly important safety assay and has become a standard, though not straightforward assay, since the inception of quantitative PCR.

  14. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ...] Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically Engineered... Hi-Bred International Inc., designated as maize event DP-[Oslash][Oslash]4114-3, which has been... by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for a determination of nonregulated status...

  15. Comparison of French and Estonian Students' Conceptions in Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Sarapuu, Tago; Clement, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Innatism is the belief that most of the human personality can be determined by genes. This ideology is dangerous, especially when it claims to be scientific. The present study investigates conceptions of 1060 students from Estonia and France related to genetic determinism of some human behaviours. Factors taken into account included students'…

  16. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    With the appropriate radiolabeled tracers, positron emission tomography (PET) enables in vivo human brain imaging of markers for neurotransmission, including neurotransmitter synthesis, receptors, and transporters. Whereas structural imaging studies have provided compelling evidence that the human...... brain anatomy is largely genetically determined, it is currently unknown to what degree neuromodulatory markers are subjected to genetic and environmental influence. Changes in serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors have been reported to occur in various neuropsychiatric disorders and an association between...

  17. Genetically determined angiotensin converting enzyme level and myocardial tolerance to ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Messadi, Erij; Vincent, Marie-Pascale; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Mandet, Chantal; Colucci, Juliana; Krege, John H.; Bruneval, Patrick; Bouby, Nadine; Smithies, Oliver; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Richer, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; kininase II) levels in humans are genetically determined. ACE levels have been linked to risk of myocardial infarction, but the association has been inconsistent, and the causality underlying it remains undocumented. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in ACE levels influences myocardial tolerance to ischemia. We studied ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice bearing 1 (ACE1c), 2 (ACE2c, wild type), or 3 (ACE3c) functional copies of the ACE gene ...

  18. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  19. Determination of Optimal Double Sampling Plan using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath Sundaram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Designing double sampling plan requires identification of sample sizes and acceptance numbers. In this paper a genetic algorithm has been designed for the selection of optimal acceptance numbers and sample sizes for the specified producer’s risk and consumer’s risk. Implementation of the algorithm has been illustrated numerically for different choices of quantities involved in a double sampling plan   

  1. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S.; de Voer, Richarda M.; Kets, C. Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Teodorczyk, Urszula; Schackert, Hans K.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Ranzani, Guglielmina N.; Molinaro, Valeria; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Hes, Frederik J.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Genuardi, Maurizio; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Wagner, Anja; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Høberg Vetti, Hildegunn; Van Krieken, J. Han J M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88.

  2. On the application of the weak-beam technique to the determination of the sizes of small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have made an analysis of the conditions necessary for the successful use of the weak-beam technique for identifying and characterizing small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper. The visibility of small defects was found to depend only weakly on the magnitude of the beam-convergence. In general, the image sizes of small clusters were found to be most sensitive to the magnitude of Sa with the image sizes of some individual defects changing by large amounts with changes as small as 0.025 nm -1 . The most reliable information on the true defect size is likely to be obtained by taking a series of 5-9 micrographs with a systematic variation of deviation parameter from 0.2-0.3 nm -1 . This procedure allows size information to be obtained down to a resolution limit of about 0.5 nm for defects situated throughout a foil thickness of 60 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of changes in the sizes of small defects produced by a low-temperature in-situ irradiation and annealing experiment

  3. Genetic variants determining survival and fertility in an adverse African environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Pijpe, Jeroen; Böhringer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Human survival probability and fertility decline strongly with age. These life history traits have been shaped by evolution. However, research has failed to uncover a consistent genetic determination of variation in survival and fertility. As an explanation, such genetic determinants have been...... selected in adverse environments, in which humans have lived during most of their history, but are almost exclusively studied in populations in modern affluent environments. Here, we present a large-scale candidate gene association study in a rural African population living in an adverse environment...

  4. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modifed foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    2001-01-01

    of the technology. Purchase decisions with regard to the two product examples were almost exclusively determined by attitudes towards purchasing the products. These were, in turn, significantly influenced by the overall attitude towards genetic modification in food production through their effects on beliefs held...... which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to investigate the formation of consumer attitudes towards genetic modification in food production and of purchase decisions with regard to genetically modified yoghurt and beer. Altogether, 2031 consumers were interviewed...... consumers. Across countries, the attitude towards genetic modification in food production was deeply embedded in more general attitudes held by the consumers, in particular attitude towards nature and attitude towards technology. These general attitudes were found to influence perceived risks and benefits...

  5. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Priscila H. A.; Souza, Beatriz S.; Pacheco, Eimi N.; Menegazzo, Michele S.; Corrêa, Ivan S.; Zen, Paulo R. G.; Rosa, Rafael F. M.; Cesa, Claudia C.; Pellanda, Lucia C.; Vilela, Manuel A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional ...

  6. Use of the piezoelectric film for the determination of cracks and defects - the passive and active electric potential CT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S; Sakagami, T; Suzuki, T; Maeda, T; Nakatani, K

    2008-01-01

    The passive and active electric potential CT method was proposed by using piezoelectric film for identification of cracks and defects. This method is based on the principle of mutual conversion between mechanical strains and electric potential of piezoelectric material. A smart-layer was constructed using the piezoelectric film, and attached on a structure with a defect. When the structure was subjected to a mechanical load, the electric potential distribution appeared passively on the piezoelectric film due to the direct piezoelectric effect. The defect can be identified from the distribution with the help of inverse analysis. It was found that the crack could be identified reasonably, although the defect depth was not well estimated for the defects located far from the layer. When the electric signal was input to the smart-layer, acoustic wave was actively emitted from the layer due to the inverse piezoelectric effect, and a reflected wave was received on the layer. It was found that the depth of the defect could be estimated well. The simultaneous use of the passive method and the active method is promising for the identification of the defect.

  7. Novel Genetic Variants of Sporadic Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) in a Chinese Population Identified by Whole-Exome Sequencing (WES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Yu; Li, Yaxiong; Lei, Dongyun; Li, Lin; Hou, Zong Liu; Han, Shen; Meng, Mingyao; Shi, Jianlin; Zhang, Yayong; Wang, Yi; Niu, Zhaoyi; Xie, Yanhua; Xiao, Benshan; Wang, Yuanfei; Li, Xiao; Yang, Lirong; Wang, Wenju; Jiang, Lihong

    2018-03-05

    BACKGROUND Recently, mutations in several genes have been described to be associated with sporadic ASD, but some genetic variants remain to be identified. The aim of this study was to use whole-exome sequencing (WES) combined with bioinformatics analysis to identify novel genetic variants in cases of sporadic congenital ASD, followed by validation by Sanger sequencing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Five Han patients with secundum ASD were recruited, and their tissue samples were analyzed by WES, followed by verification by Sanger sequencing of tissue and blood samples. Further evaluation using blood samples included 452 additional patients with sporadic secundum ASD (212 male and 240 female patients) and 519 healthy subjects (252 male and 267 female subjects) for further verification by a multiplexed MassARRAY system. Bioinformatic analyses were performed to identify novel genetic variants associated with sporadic ASD. RESULTS From five patients with sporadic ASD, a total of 181,762 genomic variants in 33 exon loci, validated by Sanger sequencing, were selected and underwent MassARRAY analysis in 452 patients with ASD and 519 healthy subjects. Three loci with high mutation frequencies, the 138665410 FOXL2 gene variant, the 23862952 MYH6 gene variant, and the 71098693 HYDIN gene variant were found to be significantly associated with sporadic ASD (PASD (PASD, and supported the use of WES and bioinformatics analysis to identify disease-associated mutations.

  8. Determination of the stress-strain curve in specimens of Scots pine for numerical simulation of defect free beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baño, V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop a twodimensional numerical model to simulate the response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. defect free timber members in order to predict the behaviour of these members when subjected to external forces. For this purpose, data of the mechanical properties of Scots pine were obtained by performing experimental tests on specimens. We determined the stresses and deformations of timber beams in the elastic-plastic and plastic phases. In addition, we developed a finite element software that considered the orthotropic nature of timber, the non-linearity of the compression-reduction branch and the differing moduli of elasticity in tension and compression for Scots pine beams free from defects. The software developed simulates an experimental four point bending test according to UNE-EN 408 Standard.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es el desarrollo de un modelo numérico bidimensional de piezas de madera de Pinus sylvestris L. libre de defectos que prediga su comportamiento frente a solicitaciones externas. Para su desarrollo, fue necesario realizar ensayos experimentales sobre probetas de pequeño tamaño con el fin de obtener los datos de las propiedades mecánicas para el Pinus sylvestris L. de procedencia española. A partir de los datos experimentales obtenidos, se desarrolla un programa de elementos finitos que considera la ortotropía de la madera, la no linealidad de la rama compresión-acortamiento y los distintos módulos de elasticidad a tracción y a compresión para vigas libres de defectos. El programa simula el ensayo experimental de flexión en cuatro puntos según la Norma UNE-EN 408 y aborda la determinación de las tensiones y deformaciones de las vigas de madera en las tres fases de comportamiento: elástica, elastoplástica y plástica.

  9. DETERMINATION OF POSSIBLE REASONS OF DEFECT FORMATION «MICROPITTING» IN HARD-ALLOY WIRE DRAWING INSTRUMENT IN WIRE DRAWING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Kurenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that during operation a hard wear along with uniform attrition occurs in working canal of die because of welding of metal particles to the material of die, what results in formation of separate microholes, their enlargement and further defect creation of type “micropitting of hard alloy”.

  10. Teachers' Conceptions About the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed teachers' conceptions. This illustrates that innatism is present in two distinct ways: in relation to individuals (e.g. genetic determinism to justify intellectual likeness between individuals such as twins) or in relation to groups of humans (e.g. genetic determinism to justify gender differences or the superiority of some human ethnic groups). A between-factor analysis discriminates between countries, showing very significant differences. There is more innatism among teachers' conceptions in African countries and Lebanon than in European countries, Brazil and Australia. Among the other controlled parameters, only two are significantly independent of the country: the level of training and the level of knowledge of biology. A co-inertia analysis shows a strong correlation between non-citizen attitudes towards and innatist conceptions of genetic determinism regarding human groups. We discuss these findings and their implications for education.

  11. Teachers' Conceptions about the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed…

  12. Common Genetic Determinants of Intraocular Pressure and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Ikram, M. Kamran; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Pasutto, Francesca; Hysi, Pirro G.; Macgregor, Stuart; Janssen, Sarah F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Amin, Najaf; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J. M.; Kramer, Rogier; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Struchalin, Maksim; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Weisschuh, Nicole; Zenkel, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y.; Gramer, Eugen; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich; Montgomery, Grant W.; Carbonaro, Francis; Young, Terri L.; Bellenguez, Celine; McGuffin, Peter; Foster, Paul J.; Topouzis, Fotis; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y.; Czudowska, Monika A.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Mackey, David A.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Reis, Andre; Hammond, Christopher J.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Lemij, Hans G.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4

  13. The Use of Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs to Identify Osteoclast Defects in Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ping Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 500 rare genetic bone disorders have been described, but for many of them only limited treatment options are available. Challenges for studying these bone diseases come from a lack of suitable animal models and unavailability of skeletal tissues for studies. Effectors for skeletal abnormalities of bone disorders may be abnormal bone formation directed by osteoblasts or anomalous bone resorption by osteoclasts, or both. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be generated from somatic cells of various tissue sources and in theory can be differentiated into any desired cell type. However, successful differentiation of hiPSCs into functional bone cells is still a challenge. Our group focuses on the use of human iPSCs (hiPSCs to identify osteoclast defects in craniometaphyseal dysplasia. In this review, we describe the impact of stem cell technology on research for better treatment of such disorders, the generation of hiPSCs from patients with rare genetic bone disorders and current protocols for differentiating hiPSCs into osteoclasts.

  14. Beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research: psychometric scale properties, construct associations, demographic correlates, and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Swami, Viren; Loibl, Lisa Mariella; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Using two new scales, this study examined beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research in student samples from Austria, Malaysia, Romania, and the United Kingdom. For both constructs, effects of culture were detectable, whereas those related to key demographics were either small and inconsistent across samples (political orientation and religiosity) or zero (sex and age). Judged from factorial dimensionality and internal consistency, the psychometric properties of both scales were satisfactory. Belief in genetic determinism had lower prevalence and corresponded only modestly to positive attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research which had higher prevalence. The correlations of both constructs with a preference of inequality among social groups (social dominance orientation) were modest and inconsistent across samples. Both scales appear appropriate for cross-cultural applications, in particular for research into lay theories and public perceptions regarding genetic vs environmental effects on human behavior, mental disorders, and behavioral and psychiatric genetic research related to these.

  15. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... One of these is hypophosphatemic rickets , also called vitamin D -resistant rickets. CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS In chromosomal disorders, the defect is due to either an excess or lack of the genes contained in a ...

  16. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables

  17. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  18. Application of genetic algorithms for determination biological half-life of 137 Cs in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, G.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic algorithm an optimization method involving natural selection mechanisms, was used to determine biological half-life of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in the milk, after the Chernobyl accident, based on a two compartment linear system model. Genetic algorithms operate on populations of strings. Reproduction, crossover and mutation are applied to successive string population to create new string population. A model parameter estimation is performed by minimizing square differences between fitting function and experimental data. The calculated biological half-life of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in milk is (32(+(-) days (author)

  19. Genetic determinants of leucocyte telomere length in children: a neglected and challenging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, Maria G; Petrelis, Alexandros M; Buxton, Jessica L; Froguel, Philippe; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    Telomere length is associated with a large range of human diseases. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants that are associated with leucocyte telomere length (LTL). However, these studies are limited to adult populations. Nevertheless, childhood is a crucial period for the determination of LTL, and the assessment of age-specific genetic determinants, although neglected, could be of great importance. Our aim was to provide insights and preliminary results on genetic determinants of LTL in children. Healthy children (n = 322, age range = 6.75-17 years) with available GWAS data (Illumina Human CNV370-Duo array) were included. The LTL was measured using multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Linear regression models adjusted for age, gender, parental age at child's birth, and body mass index were used to test the associations of LTL with polymorphisms identified in adult GWAS and to perform a discovery-only GWAS. The previously GWAS-identified variants in adults were not associated with LTL in our paediatric sample. This lack of association was not due to possible interactions with age or gene × gene interactions. Furthermore, a discovery-only GWAS approach demonstrated six novel variants that reached the level of suggestive association (P ≤ 5 × 10(-5)) and explain a high percentage of children's LTL. The study of genetic determinants of LTL in children may identify novel variants not previously identified in adults. Studies in large-scale children populations are needed for the confirmation of these results, possibly through a childhood consortium that could better handle the methodological challenges of LTL genetic epidemiology field. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Non-aflatoxigenicity of commercial Aspergillus oryzae strains due to genetic defects compared to aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Chung, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is generally recognized as safe, but it is closely related to A. flavus in morphology and genetic characteristics. In this study, we tested the aflatoxigenicity and genetic analysis of nine commercial A. oryzae strains that were used in Korean soybean fermented products. Cultural and HPLC analyses showed that none of the commercial strains produced detectable amount of aflatoxins. According to the molecular analysis of 17 genes in the aflatoxin (AF) biosynthetic pathway, the commercial strains could be classified into three groups. The group I strains contained all the 17 AF biosynthetic genes tested in this study; the group II strains deleted nine AF biosynthetic genes and possessed eight genes, including aflG, aflI, aflK, aflL, aflM, aflO, aflP, and aflQ; the group III strains only had six AF biosynthetic genes, including aflG, aflI, aflK, aflO, aflP, and aflQ. With the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the group I A. oryzae strains showed no expression of aflG, aflQ and/or aflM genes, which resulted in the lack of AF-producing ability. Group II and group III strains could not produce AF owing to the deletion of more than half of the AF biosynthetic genes. In addition, the sequence data of polyketide synthase A (pksA) of group I strains of A. oryzae showed that there were three point mutations (two silent mutations and one missense mutation) compared with aflatoxigenic A. flavus used as the positive control in this study.

  1. A putative causal relationship between genetically determined female body shape and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimanti, Renato; Amstadter, Ananda B; Stein, Murray B; Almli, Lynn M; Baker, Dewleen G; Bierut, Laura J; Bradley, Bekh; Farrer, Lindsay A; Johnson, Eric O; King, Anthony; Kranzler, Henry R; Maihofer, Adam X; Rice, John P; Roberts, Andrea L; Saccone, Nancy L; Zhao, Hongyu; Liberzon, Israel; Ressler, Kerry J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Koenen, Karestan C; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-11-27

    The nature and underlying mechanisms of the observed increased vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women are unclear. We investigated the genetic overlap of PTSD with anthropometric traits and reproductive behaviors and functions in women. The analysis was conducted using female-specific summary statistics from large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a cohort of 3577 European American women (966 PTSD cases and 2611 trauma-exposed controls). We applied a high-resolution polygenic score approach and Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate genetic correlations and causal relationships. We observed an inverse association of PTSD with genetically determined anthropometric traits related to body shape, independent of body mass index (BMI). The top association was related to BMI-adjusted waist circumference (WC adj ; R = -0.079, P body shape and PTSD, which could be mediated by evolutionary mechanisms involved in human sexual behaviors.

  2. Genetic determinants of serum vitamin B12 and their relation to body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H.; Friedrich, Nele; Pietzner, Maik

    2017-01-01

    for associations between (1) serum vitamin B12 levels and body mass index (BMI), (2) genetic variants and serum vitamin B12 levels, and (3) genetic variants and BMI. The effect of a genetically determined decrease in serum vitamin B12 on BMI was estimated by instrumental variable regression. Decreased serum......Lower serum vitamin B12 levels have been related to adverse metabolic health profiles, including adiposity. We used a Mendelian randomization design to test whether this relation might be causal. We included two Danish population-based studies (ntotal = 9311). Linear regression was used to test...... vitamin B12 associated with increased BMI (P vitamin B12 associated variants associated strongly with serum vitamin B12 (P vitamin B12...

  3. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  4. Mapping determinants of gene expression plasticity by genetical genomics in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent genetical genomics studies have provided intimate views on gene regulatory networks. Gene expression variations between genetically different individuals have been mapped to the causal regulatory regions, termed expression quantitative trait loci. Whether the environment-induced plastic response of gene expression also shows heritable difference has not yet been studied. Here we show that differential expression induced by temperatures of 16 degrees C and 24 degrees C has a strong genetic component in Caenorhabditis elegans recombinant inbred strains derived from a cross between strains CB4856 (Hawaii and N2 (Bristol. No less than 59% of 308 trans-acting genes showed a significant eQTL-by-environment interaction, here termed plasticity quantitative trait loci. In contrast, only 8% of an estimated 188 cis-acting genes showed such interaction. This indicates that heritable differences in plastic responses of gene expression are largely regulated in trans. This regulation is spread over many different regulators. However, for one group of trans-genes we found prominent evidence for a common master regulator: a transband of 66 coregulated genes appeared at 24 degrees C. Our results suggest widespread genetic variation of differential expression responses to environmental impacts and demonstrate the potential of genetical genomics for mapping the molecular determinants of phenotypic plasticity.

  5. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  6. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-09

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34,819 patients (19,713 with Crohn's disease, 14,683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype-phenotype associations across 156,154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. After quality control, the primary analysis included 29,838 patients (16,902 with Crohn's disease, 12,597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for inflammatory bowel disease showed strong association with

  7. Genetic and Nongenetic Determinants of Cell Growth Variation Assessed by High-Throughput Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Siegal, Mark L.; Gresham, David

    2013-01-01

    In microbial populations, growth initiation and proliferation rates are major components of fitness and therefore likely targets of selection. We used a high-throughput microscopy assay, which enables simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of microcolonies, to determine the sources and extent of growth rate variation in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in different glucose environments. We find that cell growth rates are regulated by the extracellular concentration of glucose as proposed by Monod (1949), but that significant heterogeneity in growth rates is observed among genetically identical individuals within an environment. Yeast strains isolated from different geographic locations and habitats differ in their growth rate responses to different glucose concentrations. Inheritance patterns suggest that the genetic determinants of growth rates in different glucose concentrations are distinct. In addition, we identified genotypes that differ in the extent of variation in growth rate within an environment despite nearly identical mean growth rates, providing evidence that alleles controlling phenotypic variability segregate in yeast populations. We find that the time to reinitiation of growth (lag) is negatively correlated with growth rate, yet this relationship is strain-dependent. Between environments, the respirative activity of individual cells negatively correlates with glucose abundance and growth rate, but within an environment respirative activity and growth rate show a positive correlation, which we propose reflects differences in protein expression capacity. Our study quantifies the sources of genetic and nongenetic variation in cell growth rates in different glucose environments with unprecedented precision, facilitating their molecular genetic dissection. PMID:23938868

  8. Exploration of genetically determined resistance against hepatitis C infection in high-risk injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, P B; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Lloyd, A R

    2014-08-01

    Genetic resistance to specific infections is well recognized. In hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, genetic polymorphisms in IL-28B and the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their HLA class I ligands have been shown to affect clearance of the virus following infection. There are limited data regarding resistance to established HCV infection. Reliable quantification of repeated exposure in high-risk populations, such as injecting drug users (IDU), is a key limitation of previous studies of resistance. Behavioural data and DNA from IDU (n = 210) in the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study in prisons (HITS-p) cohort were genotyped for polymorphisms in: IL-28B, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase A (PPIA), HLA-C and KIR2. To quantify risk, a composite risk index based on factors predictive of incident HCV infection was derived. Logistic regression analysis revealed the risk index was strongly associated with incident HCV infection (P C1, or their combination. A framework for the investigation of genetic determinants of resistance to HCV infection has been developed. Several candidate gene associations were investigated and excluded. Further investigation of genetic determinants of resistance to HCV infection is warranted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Cost Effective Method for Determining the Position of Mine Haul Road Defects from the Road Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Sokolic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a simple method for estimating haul road defect positions from alongside roads. It is a method that is cheap and easy to implement, needing only a minimal amount of field equipment and training. Observers are required to estimate the bearing and distance to a defect, and to record their location using a GPS receiver. All further processing is automated and can be done entirely within a spatially-enabled database management system such as Microsoft SQL Server or PostgreSQL.

  10. Fyn kinase genetic ablation causes structural abnormalities in mature retina and defective Müller cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Solano, Marbella; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Treviño, Mario; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Lamas, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Fyn kinase is widely expressed in neuronal and glial cells of the brain, where it exerts multiple functional roles that affect fundamental physiological processes. The aim of our study was to investigate the, so far unknown, functional role of Fyn in the retina. We report that Fyn is expressed, in vivo, in a subpopulation of Müller glia. We used a mouse model of Fyn genetic ablation and Müller-enriched primary cultures to demonstrate that Fyn deficiency induces morphological alterations in the mature retina, a reduction in the thickness of the outer and inner nuclear layers and alterations in postnatal Müller cell physiology. These include shortening of Müller cell processes, a decrease in cell proliferation, inactivation of the Akt signal transduction pathway, a reduced number of focal adhesions points and decreased adhesion of these cells to the ECM. As abnormalities in Müller cell physiology have been previously associated to a compromised retinal function we evaluated behavioral responses to visual stimulation. Our results associate Fyn deficiency with impaired visual optokinetic responses under scotopic and photopic light conditions. Our study reveals novel roles for Fyn kinase in retinal morphology and Müller cell physiology and suggests that Fyn is required for optimal visual processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic parameters of methane emissions determined using portable accumulation chambers in lambs and ewes grazing pasture and genetic correlations with emissions determined in respiration chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, A; Hickey, S M; Rowe, S J; Janssen, P H; Shackell, G; Elmes, S; Bain, W E; Wing, J; Greer, G J; Bryson, B; MacLean, S; Dodds, K G; Pinares-Patiño, C S; Young, E A; Knowler, K; Pickering, N K; McEwan, J C

    2018-05-07

    Methane (CH4) emission traits were previously found to be heritable and repeatable in sheep fed alfalfa pellets in respiration chambers (RC). More rapid screening methods are, however, required to increase genetic progress and to provide a cost effective method to the farming industry for maintaining the generation of breeding values in the future. The objective of the current study was to determine CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using several one-hour portable accumulation chamber (PAC) measurements from lambs and again as ewes, while grazing ryegrass based pasture. Many animals with PAC measurements were also measured in RC while fed alfalfa pellets at 2.0 × maintenance metabolizable energy requirements (MEm). Heritability estimates from mixed models for CH4 and CO2 production (g/d) were 0.19 and 0.16, respectively, when measured using PAC with lambs; 0.20 and 0.27, respectively, when measured using PAC with ewes; and 0.23 and 0.34, respectively, when measured using RC with lambs. For measured gas traits, repeatabilities of measurements collected 14 days apart ranged from 0.33 to 0.55 for PAC (combined lambs and ewes) and were greater at 0.65 to 0.76 for the same traits measured using RC. Genetic correlations (rg) between PAC in lambs and ewes were 0.99 for CH4, 0.93 for CH4+CO2 and 0.85 for CH4/(CH4+CO2), suggesting CH4 emissions in lambs and ewes are the same trait. Genetic correlations between PAC and RC measurements were lower, at 0.62 to 0.67 for CH4 and 0.41 to 0.42 for CH4+CO2, likely reflecting different environmental conditions associated with the protocols used with the two measurement methods. The CH4/(CH4+CO2) ratio was the most similar genetic trait measured using PAC (both lambs and ewes, 63 and 66% selection efficiency, respectively) compared with CH4 yield (g/kg DMI) measured using RC. These results suggest that PAC measurements have considerable value as a rapid low cost method to estimate breeding values for CH4 emissions in sheep.

  12. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...... of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease....

  13. Maxillary canine displacement and genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Franka; Grabowski, Rosemarie

    2003-05-01

    The relationship between maxillary canine displacement and the simultaneous occurrence of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" as defined by Hoffmeister was investigated in 675 patients. Panoramic radiographs taken of each patient during the first and the second mixed dentition periods were evaluated. Canine inclination and the distance between the tip of the canine and a line connecting the cusps of the molars were computed in five different age groups according to Dausch-Neumann. Statistical analysis revealed 34 patients with "potential canine displacement", who exhibited further symptoms of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" significantly more frequently than the total group. The symptoms concerned were agenesia, displaced tooth buds, rotated or tilted incisors, aplasia and microdontia of lateral incisors. Careful follow-ups in patients with a predisposition to disturbed dental development enables risks to be anticipated and canine displacement to be detected at an early stage.

  14. Aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors: a classical twin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celeng, Csilla; Kolossvary, Marton; Kovacs, Attila; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Szilveszter, Balint; Karolyi, Mihaly; Jermendy, Adam L.; Karady, Julia; Merkely, Bela; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, Tamas [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Hydrodynamic Systems, Budapest (Hungary); Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L. [Semmelweis University, Department of Radiology and Oncotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Voros, Szilard [Global Genomics Group, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jermendy, Gyoergy [Bajcsy-Zsilinszky Hospital, Medical Department, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-06-15

    Previous studies using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) observed moderate heritability of aortic root dimensions. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) might provide more accurate heritability estimates. Our primary aim was to assess the heritability of the aortic root with CTA. Our secondary aim was to derive TTE-based heritability and compare this with the CTA-based results. In the BUDAPEST-GLOBAL study 198 twin subjects (118 monozygotic, 80 dizygotic; age 56.1 ± 9.4 years; 126 female) underwent CTA and TTE. We assessed the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Heritability was assessed using ACDE model (A additive genetic, C common environmental, D dominant genetic, E unique environmental factors). Based on CTA, additive genetic effects were dominant (LVOT: A = 0.67, E = 0.33; annulus: A = 0.76, E = 0.24; sinus of Valsalva: A = 0.83, E = 0.17; sinotubular junction: A = 0.82, E = 0.18; ascending aorta: A = 0.75, E = 0.25). TTE-derived measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence (LVOT: A = 0.38, E = 0.62; annulus: C = 0.47, E = 0.53; sinus of Valsalva: C = 0.63, E = 0.37; sinotubular junction: C = 0.45, E = 0.55; ascending aorta: A = 0.67, E = 0.33). CTA-based assessment suggests that aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors. TTE-based measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence. The choice of measurement method has substantial impact on heritability estimates. (orig.)

  15. Aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors: a classical twin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celeng, Csilla; Kolossvary, Marton; Kovacs, Attila; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Szilveszter, Balint; Karolyi, Mihaly; Jermendy, Adam L.; Karady, Julia; Merkely, Bela; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Horvath, Tamas; Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L.; Voros, Szilard; Jermendy, Gyoergy

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) observed moderate heritability of aortic root dimensions. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) might provide more accurate heritability estimates. Our primary aim was to assess the heritability of the aortic root with CTA. Our secondary aim was to derive TTE-based heritability and compare this with the CTA-based results. In the BUDAPEST-GLOBAL study 198 twin subjects (118 monozygotic, 80 dizygotic; age 56.1 ± 9.4 years; 126 female) underwent CTA and TTE. We assessed the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Heritability was assessed using ACDE model (A additive genetic, C common environmental, D dominant genetic, E unique environmental factors). Based on CTA, additive genetic effects were dominant (LVOT: A = 0.67, E = 0.33; annulus: A = 0.76, E = 0.24; sinus of Valsalva: A = 0.83, E = 0.17; sinotubular junction: A = 0.82, E = 0.18; ascending aorta: A = 0.75, E = 0.25). TTE-derived measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence (LVOT: A = 0.38, E = 0.62; annulus: C = 0.47, E = 0.53; sinus of Valsalva: C = 0.63, E = 0.37; sinotubular junction: C = 0.45, E = 0.55; ascending aorta: A = 0.67, E = 0.33). CTA-based assessment suggests that aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors. TTE-based measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence. The choice of measurement method has substantial impact on heritability estimates. (orig.)

  16. Genetic polymorphism of vitamin D receptor determines its metabolism and efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    O.A. Yakovleva; O.M. Nikolova; I.A. Doroshkevych; N.V. Shcherbeniuk

    2017-01-01

    The review represents the results of researches of vitamin D receptor characteristics and its genetic polymorphism, which is variable in different populations, and also depends on age and gender. This polymorphism determines the association of vitamin D different concentration with the probability of bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease development, and therefore the different efficacy of drug correction of vitamin D deficiency. However, the scientific data are contradict...

  17. Determining Optimal Replacement Policy with an Availability Constraint via Genetic Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Shengliang; Chai, Guorong; Su, Yana

    2017-01-01

    We develop a model and a genetic algorithm for determining an optimal replacement policy for power equipment subject to Poisson shocks. If the time interval of two consecutive shocks is less than a threshold value, the failed equipment can be repaired. We assume that the operating time after repair is stochastically nonincreasing and the repair time is exponentially distributed with a geometric increasing mean. Our objective is to minimize the expected average cost under an availability requi...

  18. A Simulation Study of Mutations in the Genetic Regulatory Hierarchy for Butterfly Eyespot Focus Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Evans, Travis M.

    2008-01-01

    The color patterns on the wings of butterflies have been an important model system in evolutionary developmental biology. A recent computational model tested genetic regulatory hierarchies hypothesized to underlie the formation of butterfly eyespot foci (Evans and Marcus, 2006). The computational model demonstrated that one proposed hierarchy was incapable of reproducing the known patterns of gene expression associated with eyespot focus determination in wild-type butterflies, but that two sl...

  19. Value of transmission electron microscopy for primary ciliary dyskinesia diagnosis in the era of molecular medicine: Genetic defects with normal and non-diagnostic ciliary ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Leigh, Margaret W

    2017-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder causing chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. No single diagnostic test will detect all PCD cases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of respiratory cilia was previously considered the gold standard diagnostic test for PCD, but 30% of all PCD cases have either normal ciliary ultrastructure or subtle changes which are non-diagnostic. These cases are identified through alternate diagnostic tests, including nasal nitric oxide measurement, high-speed videomicroscopy analysis, immunofluorescent staining of axonemal proteins, and/or mutation analysis of various PCD causing genes. Autosomal recessive mutations in DNAH11 and HYDIN produce normal TEM ciliary ultrastructure, while mutations in genes encoding for radial spoke head proteins result in some cross-sections with non-diagnostic alterations in the central apparatus interspersed with normal ciliary cross-sections. Mutations in nexin link and dynein regulatory complex genes lead to a collection of different ciliary ultrastructures; mutations in CCDC65, CCDC164, and GAS8 produce normal ciliary ultrastructure, while mutations in CCDC39 and CCDC40 cause absent inner dynein arms and microtubule disorganization in some ciliary cross-sections. Mutations in CCNO and MCIDAS cause near complete absence of respiratory cilia due to defects in generation of multiple cellular basal bodies; however, the scant cilia generated may have normal ultrastructure. Lastly, a syndromic form of PCD with retinal degeneration results in normal ciliary ultrastructure through mutations in the RPGR gene. Clinicians must be aware of these genetic causes of PCD resulting in non-diagnostic TEM ciliary ultrastructure and refrain from using TEM of respiratory cilia as a test to rule out PCD.

  20. Determination of genetic relatedness from low-coverage human genome sequences using pedigree simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael D; Jay, Flora; Castellano, Sergi; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2017-08-01

    We develop and evaluate methods for inferring relatedness among individuals from low-coverage DNA sequences of their genomes, with particular emphasis on sequences obtained from fossil remains. We suggest the major factors complicating the determination of relatedness among ancient individuals are sequencing depth, the number of overlapping sites, the sequencing error rate and the presence of contamination from present-day genetic sources. We develop a theoretical model that facilitates the exploration of these factors and their relative effects, via measurement of pairwise genetic distances, without calling genotypes, and determine the power to infer relatedness under various scenarios of varying sequencing depth, present-day contamination and sequencing error. The model is validated by a simulation study as well as the analysis of aligned sequences from present-day human genomes. We then apply the method to the recently published genome sequences of ancient Europeans, developing a statistical treatment to determine confidence in assigned relatedness that is, in some cases, more precise than previously reported. As the majority of ancient specimens are from animals, this method would be applicable to investigate kinship in nonhuman remains. The developed software grups (Genetic Relatedness Using Pedigree Simulations) is implemented in Python and freely available. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic sex determination in Astatotilapia calliptera, a prototype species for the Lake Malawi cichlid radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin N.; Cline, Maggie E.; Moore, Emily C.; Roberts, Natalie B.; Roberts, Reade B.

    2017-06-01

    East African cichlids display extensive variation in sex determination systems. The species Astatotilapia calliptera is one of the few cichlids that reside both in Lake Malawi and in surrounding waterways. A. calliptera is of interest in evolutionary studies as a putative immediate outgroup species for the Lake Malawi species flock and possibly as a prototype ancestor-like species for the radiation. Here, we use linkage mapping to test association of sex in A. calliptera with loci that have been previously associated with genetic sex determination in East African cichlid species. We identify a male heterogametic XY system segregating at linkage group (LG) 7 in an A. calliptera line that originated from Lake Malawi, at a locus previously shown to act as an XY sex determination system in multiple species of Lake Malawi cichlids. Significant association of genetic markers and sex produce a broad genetic interval of approximately 26 megabases (Mb) using the Nile tilapia genome to orient markers; however, we note that the marker with the strongest association with sex is near a gene that acts as a master sex determiner in other fish species. We demonstrate that alleles of the marker are perfectly associated with sex in Metriaclima mbenjii, a species from the rock-dwelling clade of Lake Malawi. While we do not rule out the possibility of other sex determination loci in A. calliptera, this study provides a foundation for fine mapping of the cichlid sex determination gene on LG7 and evolutionary context regarding the origin and persistence of the LG7 XY across diverse, rapidly evolving lineages.

  2. Fully Ab-Initio Determination of the Thermoelectric Properties of Half-Heusler NiTiSn: Crucial Role of Interstitial Ni Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berche, Alexandre; Jund, Philippe

    2018-05-23

    For thermoelectric applications, ab initio methods generally fail to predict the transport properties of the materials because of their inability to predict properly the carrier concentrations that control the electronic properties. In this work, a methodology to fill in this gap is applied on the NiTiSn half Heusler phase. For that, we show that the main defects act as donor of electrons and are responsible of the electronic properties of the material. Indeed, the presence of Ni i interstitial defects explains the experimental valence band spectrum and its associated band gap reported in the literature. Moreover, combining the DOS of the solid solutions with the determination of the energy of formation of charged defects, we show that Ni i defects are also responsible of the measured carrier concentration in experimentally supposed "pure" NiTiSn compounds. Subsequently the thermoelectric properties of NiTiSn can be calculated using a fully ab initio description and an overall correct agreement with experiments is obtained. This methodology can be extended to predict the result of extrinsic doping and thus to select the most efficient dopant for specific thermoelectric applications.

  3. Genetic Determinants of Cardio-Metabolic Risk: A Proposed Model for Phenotype Association and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Piers R; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a translational and unifying summary of metabolic syndrome genetics and highlights evidence that genetic studies are starting to unravel and untangle origins of the complex and challenging cluster of disease phenotypes. The associated genes effectively express in the brain, liver, kidney, arterial endothelium, adipocytes, myocytes and β cells. Progression of syndrome traits has been associated with ectopic lipid accumulation in the arterial wall, visceral adipocytes, myocytes, and liver. Thus it follows that the genetics of dyslipidemia, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) disease are central in triggering progression of the syndrome to overt expression of disease traits, and have become a key focus of interest for early detection and for designing prevention and treatments. To support the “birds’ eye view” approach we provide a road-map depicting commonality and interrelationships between the traits and their genetic and environmental determinants based on known risk factors, metabolic pathways, pharmacological targets, treatment responses, gene networks, pleiotropy, and association with circadian rhythm. Although only a small portion of the known heritability is accounted for and there is insufficient support for clinical application of gene-based prediction models, there is direction and encouraging progress in a rapidly moving field that is beginning to show clinical relevance. PMID:23351585

  4. Genetic determinants of cardiometabolic risk: a proposed model for phenotype association and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Piers R; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a translational and unifying summary of metabolic syndrome genetics and highlights evidence that genetic studies are starting to unravel and untangle origins of the complex and challenging cluster of disease phenotypes. The associated genes effectively express in the brain, liver, kidney, arterial endothelium, adipocytes, myocytes, and β cells. Progression of syndrome traits has been associated with ectopic lipid accumulation in the arterial wall, visceral adipocytes, myocytes, and liver. Thus, it follows that the genetics of dyslipidemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are central in triggering progression of the syndrome to overt expression of disease traits and have become a key focus of interest for early detection and for designing prevention and treatments. To support the "birds' eye view" approach, we provide a road-map depicting commonality and interrelationships between the traits and their genetic and environmental determinants based on known risk factors, metabolic pathways, pharmacologic targets, treatment responses, gene networks, pleiotropy, and association with circadian rhythm. Although only a small portion of the known heritability is accounted for and there is insufficient support for clinical application of gene-based prediction models, there is direction and encouraging progress in a rapidly moving field that is beginning to show clinical relevance. Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measured dose to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields and determination of genetically significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Cumberlin, R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the genetically significant dose from therapeutic radiation exposure with Hodgkin's fields by estimating the doses to ovaries and testes. Phantom measurements were performed to verify estimated doses to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields. Thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters (TLD-100) of 1 x 3 x 3 mm 3 dimensions were embedded in phantoms and exposed to standard mantle and paraaortic fields using Co-60, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. The results show that measured doses to ovaries and testes are about two to five times higher than the corresponding graphically estimated doses for Co-60 and 4 MVX photon beams as depicted in ICRP publication 44. In addition, the measured doses to ovaries and testes are about 30% to 65% lower for 10 MV photon beams than for their corresponding Co-60 photon beams. The genetically significant dose from Hodgkin's treatment (less than 0.01 mSv) adds about 4% to the genetically significant dose contribution to medical procedures and adds less than 1% to the genetically significant dose from all sources. Therefore, the consequence to society is considered to be very small. The consequences for the individual patient are, likewise, small. 28 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Genetic diversity in natural populations of Jacaranda decurrens Cham. determined using RAPD and AFLP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca W. Bertoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacaranda decurrens (Bignoniaceae is an endemic species of the Cerrado with validated antitumoral activity. The genetic diversity of six populations of J. decurrens located in the State of São Paulo was determined in this study by using molecular markers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP. Following optimization of the amplification reaction, 10 selected primers generated 78 reproducible RAPD fragments that were mostly (69.2% polymorphic. Two hundred and five reproducible AFLP fragments were generated by using four selected primer combinations; 46.3% of these fragments were polymorphic, indicating a considerable level of genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA using these two groups of markers indicated that variability was strongly structured amongst populations. The unweighted pair group method with arithmatic mean (UPGMA and Pearson's correlation coefficient (RAPD -0.16, p = 0.2082; AFLP 0.37, p = 0.1006 between genetic matrices and geographic distances suggested that the population structure followed an island model in which a single population of infinite size gave rise to the current populations of J. decurrens, independently of their spatial position. The results of this study indicate that RAPD and AFLP markers were similarly efficient in measuring the genetic variability amongst natural populations of J. decurrens. These data may be useful for developing strategies for the preservation of this medicinal species in the Cerrado.

  7. Targeted Next-generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics Pipeline to Evaluate Genetic Determinants of Constitutional Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilliott, Allison A; Farhan, Sali M K; Ghani, Mahdi; Sato, Christine; Liang, Eric; Zhang, Ming; McIntyre, Adam D; Cao, Henian; Racacho, Lemuel; Robinson, John F; Strong, Michael J; Masellis, Mario; Bulman, Dennis E; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony; Tartaglia, Carmela; Finger, Elizabeth; Zinman, Lorne; Turnbull, John; Freedman, Morris; Swartz, Rick; Black, Sandra E; Hegele, Robert A

    2018-04-04

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is quickly revolutionizing how research into the genetic determinants of constitutional disease is performed. The technique is highly efficient with millions of sequencing reads being produced in a short time span and at relatively low cost. Specifically, targeted NGS is able to focus investigations to genomic regions of particular interest based on the disease of study. Not only does this further reduce costs and increase the speed of the process, but it lessens the computational burden that often accompanies NGS. Although targeted NGS is restricted to certain regions of the genome, preventing identification of potential novel loci of interest, it can be an excellent technique when faced with a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous disease, for which there are previously known genetic associations. Because of the complex nature of the sequencing technique, it is important to closely adhere to protocols and methodologies in order to achieve sequencing reads of high coverage and quality. Further, once sequencing reads are obtained, a sophisticated bioinformatics workflow is utilized to accurately map reads to a reference genome, to call variants, and to ensure the variants pass quality metrics. Variants must also be annotated and curated based on their clinical significance, which can be standardized by applying the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics Pathogenicity Guidelines. The methods presented herein will display the steps involved in generating and analyzing NGS data from a targeted sequencing panel, using the ONDRISeq neurodegenerative disease panel as a model, to identify variants that may be of clinical significance.

  8. Genetic determination of high productivity in experimental hybrid combinations of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. О. Корнєєва

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Creation of experimental sugar beet hybrid combinations of high sugar yield values and defining gene­tic determination of their heterotic effect. Methods. Diallel crossing and topcrossing, genetic analysis of quantitative traits. Results. The authors have studied the frequency of occurrence of sugar beet heterotic hybrid combinations for «sugar yield» trait created on the basis of two pollinator lines to be genetically valuable for productivity elements, CMS lines and single-cross sterile hybrids with the use of diallel and topcrossing system of controlled hybridization. The share of parental components’ effect and their interaction in CMS hybrids variability for productivity was determined. Expediency of heterotic forecasting based on high combining ability lines was substabtiated. Promising high-yielding sugar beet combinations were selected that exceeded the group standard by 4.1–16.3%. Conclusions. The theory of genetic balance by M. V. Turbin was confirmed. Such hybrids as [CMS 5OT 4]MGP 1 (116.3%, [CMS 1OT 2]MGP 1 (112.5% and [CMS 3OT 5]MGP 1 (113.2% were recognized as the best for their productivity, MGP 1 and MGP 2 lines – as the best for their combining ability.

  9. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: Applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulino eMartínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD, a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study of the Genetic Determinants of Emphysema Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boueiz, Adel; Lutz, Sharon M; Cho, Michael H; Hersh, Craig P; Bowler, Russell P; Washko, George R; Halper-Stromberg, Eitan; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Laird, Nan M; Beaty, Terri H; Coxson, Harvey O; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K; Castaldi, Peter J; DeMeo, Dawn L

    2017-03-15

    Emphysema has considerable variability in the severity and distribution of parenchymal destruction throughout the lungs. Upper lobe-predominant emphysema has emerged as an important predictor of response to lung volume reduction surgery. Yet, aside from alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the genetic determinants of emphysema distribution remain largely unknown. To identify the genetic influences of emphysema distribution in non-alpha-1 antitrypsin-deficient smokers. A total of 11,532 subjects with complete genotype and computed tomography densitometry data in the COPDGene (Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease [COPD]; non-Hispanic white and African American), ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints), and GenKOLS (Genetics of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) studies were analyzed. Two computed tomography scan emphysema distribution measures (difference between upper-third and lower-third emphysema; ratio of upper-third to lower-third emphysema) were tested for genetic associations in all study subjects. Separate analyses in each study population were followed by a fixed effect metaanalysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-, gene-, and pathway-based approaches were used. In silico functional evaluation was also performed. We identified five loci associated with emphysema distribution at genome-wide significance. These loci included two previously reported associations with COPD susceptibility (4q31 near HHIP and 15q25 near CHRNA5) and three new associations near SOWAHB, TRAPPC9, and KIAA1462. Gene set analysis and in silico functional evaluation revealed pathways and cell types that may potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema distribution. This multicohort genome-wide association study identified new genomic loci associated with differential emphysematous destruction throughout the lungs. These findings may point to new biologic pathways on which to expand diagnostic and therapeutic

  11. Genetic determinism of bone and mineral metabolism in meat-type chickens: A QTL mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Sellier, Nadine; Chabault-Dhuit, Marie; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Narcy, Agnès

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal integrity in meat-type chickens is affected by many factors including rapid growth rate, nutrition and genetics. To investigate the genetic basis of bone and mineral metabolism, a QTL detection study was conducted in an intercross between two lines of meat-type chickens divergently selected for their high (D +) or low (D -) digestive efficiency. Tibia size (length, diameter, volume) and ash content were determined at 3 weeks of age as well as phosphorus (P) retention and plasma concentration. Heritability of these traits and their genetic correlations with digestive efficiency were estimated. A QTL mapping study was performed using 3379 SNP markers. Tibia size, weight, ash content and breaking strength were highly heritable (0.42 to 0.61). Relative tibia diameter and volume as well as P retention were strongly and positively genetically correlated with digestive efficiency (0.57 to 0.80). A total of 35 QTL were identified (9 for tibia weight, 13 for tibia size, 5 for bone strength, 5 for bone mineralization, 2 for plasma P concentration and 1 for P retention). Six QTL were genome-wide significant, and 3 QTL for tibia relative volume, weight and ash weight on chromosome 6 were fixed, the positive allele coming from the D-line. For two QTL for ash content on chromosome 18 and relative tibia length on chromosome 26, the confidence intervals were small enough to identify potential candidate genes. These findings support the evidence of multiple genetic loci controlling bone and mineral metabolism. The identification of candidate genes may provide new perspectives in the understanding of bone regulation, even beyond avian species.

  12. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  13. Determining Optimal Replacement Policy with an Availability Constraint via Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengliang Zong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a model and a genetic algorithm for determining an optimal replacement policy for power equipment subject to Poisson shocks. If the time interval of two consecutive shocks is less than a threshold value, the failed equipment can be repaired. We assume that the operating time after repair is stochastically nonincreasing and the repair time is exponentially distributed with a geometric increasing mean. Our objective is to minimize the expected average cost under an availability requirement. Based on this average cost function, we propose the genetic algorithm to locate the optimal replacement policy N to minimize the average cost rate. The results show that the GA is effective and efficient in finding the optimal solutions. The availability of equipment has significance effect on the optimal replacement policy. Many practical systems fit the model developed in this paper.

  14. Population stochasticity, random determination of handedness, and the genetic basis of antisymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Yoshitaka

    2011-12-07

    Conspicuous lateral asymmetries of organisms are classified into two major categories: antisymmetry (AS), characterized by almost equal frequencies of dextral and sinistral morphs, and directional asymmetry (DA), in which one morph dominates. I compared and characterized two types of genes, both with existing examples, in their roles in the evolutionary transitions between AS and DA for the first time. Handedness genes (HGs) determine the chirality in a strict sense, while randomization genes (RGs) randomize the chirality. A theory predicts that, in an AS population maintained by HGs under negative frequency-dependent selection, RGs harness fluctuation of the morph frequencies as their driving force and thus increase their frequency until half of the population flips the phenotype. These predictions were confirmed by simulations. Consequently, RGs mask the genetic effects of HGs, which provides a possible explanation for the apparent lack of a genetic basis for AS in empirical AS studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic determinants of hair and eye colours in the Scottish and Danish populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Wong, Terence H; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eye and hair colour is highly variable in the European population, and is largely genetically determined. Both linkage and association studies have previously been used to identify candidate genes underlying this variation. Many of the genes found were previously known as underlying...... mutant mouse phenotypes or human genetic disease, but others, previously unsuspected as pigmentation genes, have also been discovered. RESULTS: We assayed the hair of a population of individuals of Scottish origin using tristimulus colorimetry, in order to produce a quantitative measure of hair colour....... Cluster analysis of this data defined two groups, with overlapping borders, which corresponded to visually assessed dark versus red/light hair colour. The Danish population was assigned into categorical hair colour groups. Both cohorts were also assessed for eye colour. DNA from the Scottish group...

  16. Relation between chloroguanide bioactivation to cycloguanil and the genetically determined metabolism of mephenytoin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck-Brentano, C; Bosco, O; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Keundjian, A; Jaillon, P

    1992-05-01

    It has been suggested recently that the bioactivation of chloroguanide hydrochloride (proguanil) to its active antimalarial metabolite cycloguanil cosegregates with the genetically determined polymorphism of mephenytoin hydroxylation. We determined the chloroguanide to cycloguanil ratio in urine after oral administration of a single dose of 200 mg proguanil either alone or together with 100 mg racemic mephenytoin or 40 mg dextromethorphan in a randomized crossover study performed in 24 healthy subjects. The mephenytoin hydroxylation index was also determined after administration of 100 mg racemic mephenytoin either alone or together with 200 mg proguanil. Two subjects were poor metabolizers and one subject was an intermediate metabolizer of mephenytoin. These three subjects had chloroguanide to cycloguanil ratios of more than 50. The 21 subjects with the extensive metabolizer phenotype for mephenytoin hydroxylation had chloroguanide to cycloguanil ratios of less than 10. The chloroguanide to cycloguanil ratio was not significantly altered by mephenytoin or dextromethorphan coadministration. The trend toward a correlation between chloroguanide/cycloguanil ratio and log mephenytoin hydroxylation index did not reach statistical significance. Inclusion of the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio into the model did not improve the relationship. These findings confirm that the bioactivation of chloroguanide to cycloguanil cosegregates with the genetically determined activity of the CYP2C family. However, the chloroguanide to cycloguanil ratio and the mephenytoin hydroxylation index do not similarly reflect the variable activity of CYP2C.

  17. Environmental enrichment imparts disease-modifying and transgenerational effects on genetically-determined epilepsy and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Gabi; Ozturk, Ezgi; Salzberg, Michael R; Morris, Margaret; O'Brien, Terence J; Jones, Nigel C

    2016-09-01

    The absence epilepsies are presumed to be caused by genetic factors, but the influence of environmental exposures on epilepsy development and severity, and whether this influence is transmitted to subsequent generations, is not well known. We assessed the effects of environmental enrichment on epilepsy and anxiety outcomes in multiple generations of GAERS - a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy that manifests comorbid elevated anxiety-like behaviour. GAERS were exposed to environmental enrichment or standard housing beginning either prior to, or after epilepsy onset, and underwent EEG recordings and anxiety testing. Then, we exposed male GAERS to early enrichment or standard housing and generated F1 progeny, which also underwent EEG recordings. Hippocampal CRH mRNA expression and DNA methylation were assessed using RT-PCR and pyrosequencing, respectively. Early environmental enrichment delayed the onset of epilepsy in GAERS, and resulted in fewer seizures in adulthood, compared with standard housed GAERS. Enrichment also reduced the frequency of seizures when initiated in adulthood. Anxiety levels were reduced by enrichment, and these anti-epileptogenic and anxiolytic effects were heritable into the next generation. We also found reduced expression of CRH mRNA in GAERS exposed to enrichment, but this was not due to changes in DNA methylation. Environmental enrichment produces disease-modifying effects on genetically determined absence epilepsy and anxiety, and these beneficial effects are transferable to the subsequent generation. Reduced CRH expression was associated with these phenotypic improvements. Environmental stimulation holds promise as a naturalistic therapy for genetically determined epilepsy which may benefit subsequent generations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic and environmental determinants of the susceptibility of Amerindian derived populations for having hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2014-01-01

    Here, we discuss potential explanations for the higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in populations with an Amerindian background. Although environmental factors are the triggers, the search for the ethnic related factors that explains the increased susceptibility of the Amerindians is a promising area for research. The study of the genetics of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanic populations faces several challenges. Ethnicity could be a major confounding variable to prove genetic associations. Despite that, the study of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanics has resulted in significant contributions. Two GWAS reports have exclusively included Mexican mestizos. Fifty percent of the associations reported in Caucasians could be generalized to the Mexicans, but in many cases the Mexican lead SNP was different than that reported in Europeans. Both reports included new associations with apo B or triglycerides concentrations. The frequency of susceptibility alleles in Mexicans is higher than that found in Europeans for several of the genes with the greatest effect on triglycerides levels. An example is the SNP rs964184 in APOA5. The same trend was observed for ANGPTL3 and TIMD4 variants. In summary, we postulate that the study of the genetic determinants of hypertriglyceridemia in Amerindian populations which have major changes in their lifestyle, may prove to be a great resource to identify new genes and pathways associated with hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24768220

  19. Al-Aqeel Sewairi Syndrome, a new autosomal recessive disorder with multicentric osteolysis, nodulosis and arthropathy. The first genetic defect of matrix metalloproteinase 2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Aqeel, Aida I.

    2005-01-01

    We report a distinctive autosomal recessive multicentric osteolysis in Saudi Arabian families with distal arthropathy of the metacarpal, metatarsal and interphalangeal joints, with ultimate progression to the proximal joints with decreased range of movements and deformities with ankylosis and generalized osteopenia. In addition, they had large, painful to touch palmar and plantar pads. Hirsutism and mild dysmorphic facial features including proptosis, a narrow nasal bridge, bulbous nose and micrognathia. Using a genome-wide search for microsatellite markers from 11 members of the family from the Armed Forces Hospital and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, localized the disease gene to chromosome 16q12-21. Haplotype analysis with additional markers narrowed the critical region to 1.2cM and identified the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), (gelatinase A, collagenase type IV, EC 3.4, 24,24) gene as a disease candidate at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, United States of America in April 2000. Some affected individuals were homoallelic for a nonsense mutation (TCA>TAA) in codon 244 of exon 5, predicting the replacement of a tyrosine residue by a stop codon in the first fibronectin type II domain (Y244X). Other affected members had a missense mutation in exon 2 arginine 101-histidine (R101H) leading to no MMP-2 enzyme activity in serum or fibroblast or both of affected individuals. In other affected members, a non-pathogenic homoallelic GT transversion resulted in the substitution of an aspartate with a tyrosine residue in codon 210 of exon 4 (D210Y). The MMP-2-null mouse has no developmental defects, but are small, which may reflect genetic redundancy. The discovery that deficiency of this well-characterized gelatinase/collagenase results in an inherited form of an osteolytic and arthritic disorder provides an invaluable insights for the understanding of osteolysis and arthritis and is the first genetic

  20. Genetic polymorphism of vitamin D receptor determines its metabolism and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Yakovleva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The review represents the results of researches of vitamin D receptor characteristics and its genetic polymorphism, which is variable in different populations, and also depends on age and gender. This polymorphism determines the association of vitamin D different concentration with the probability of bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease development, and therefore the different efficacy of drug correction of vitamin D deficiency. However, the scientific data are contradictory, the molecular mechanisms of connection between vitamin D and bronchial tonus or allergic reactions remain unclear, which emphasizes the importance of studies to clarify the role of vitamin D in inflammatory, immune disorders in bronchial obstructive syndrome.

  1. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of patients with suspected Silver-Russell syndrome: genome-wide copy number analysis in 82 patients without imprinting defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takanobu; Nakamura, Akie; Fuke, Tomoko; Yamazawa, Kazuki; Sano, Shinichiro; Matsubara, Keiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Matsukura, Yoshika; Harashima, Chie; Hasegawa, Tatsuji; Nakajima, Hisakazu; Tsumura, Kumi; Kizaki, Zenro; Oka, Akira; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki; Kagami, Masayo

    2017-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by pre- and postnatal growth failure and dysmorphic features. Recently, pathogenic copy number variations (PCNVs) and imprinting defects other than hypomethylation of the H19 -differentially methylated region (DMR) and maternal uniparental disomy chromosome 7 have been reported in patients with the SRS phenotype. This study aimed to clarify the frequency and clinical features of patients with SRS phenotype caused by PCNVs. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization analysis using a catalog array for 54 patients satisfying the Netchine-Harbison clinical scoring system (NH-CSS) (SRS-compatible) and for 28 patients presenting with three NH-CSS items together with triangular face and/or fifth finger clinodactyly and/or brachydactyly (SRS-like) without abnormal methylation levels of 9 DMRs related to known imprinting disorders. We then investigated the clinical features of patients with PCNVs. Three of the 54 SRS-compatible patients (5.6%) and 2 of the 28 SRS-like patients (7.1%) had PCNVs. We detected 3.5 Mb deletion in 4p16.3, mosaic trisomy 18, and 3.77-4.00 Mb deletion in 19q13.11-12 in SRS-compatible patients, and 1.41-1.97 Mb deletion in 7q11.23 in both SRS-like patients. Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) were identified in two patients and moderate to severe global developmental delay was observed in four patients. Of the patients in our study, 5.6% of SRS-compatible and 7.1% of SRS-like patients had PCNVs. All PCNVs have been previously reported for genetic causes of contiguous deletion syndromes or mosaic trisomy 18. Our study suggests patients with PCNVs, who have a phenotype resembling SRS, show a high tendency towards CHDs and/or apparent developmental delay.

  3. Determination of interrill soil erodibility coefficient based on Fuzzy and Fuzzy-Genetic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Palizvan Zand

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the fuzzy logic science has been used successfully in various sudies of hydrology and soil erosion, but in literature review no article was found about its performance for estimating of interrill erodibility. On the other hand, studies indicate that genetic algorithm techniques can be used in fuzzy models and finding the appropriate membership functions for linguistic variables and fuzzy rules. So this study was conducted to develop the fuzzy and fuzzy–genetics models and investigation of their performance in the estimation of soil interrill erodibility factor (Ki. Materials and Methods: For this reason 36 soil samples with different physical and chemical properties were collected from west of Azerbaijan province . soilsamples were also taken from the Ap or A horizon of each soil profile. The samples were air-dried , sieved and Some soil characteristics such as soil texture, organic matter (OM, cation exchange capacity (CEC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, EC and pH were determined by the standard laboratory methods. Aggregates size distributions (ASD were determined by the wet-sieving method and fractal dimension of soil aggregates (Dn was also calculated. In order to determination of soil interrill erodibility, the flume experiment performed by packing soil a depth of 0.09-m in 0.5 × 1.0 m. soil was saturated from the base and adjusted to 9% slope and was subjected to at least 90 min rainfall . Rainfall intensity treatments were 20, 37 and 47 mm h-1. During each rainfall event, runoff was collected manually in different time intervals, being less than 60 s at the beginning, up to 15 min near the end of the test. At the end of the experiment, the volumes of runoff samples and the mass of sediment load at each time interval were measured. Finally interrill erodibility values were calculated using Kinnell (11 Equation. Then by statistical analyses Dn and sand percent of the soils were selected as input variables and Ki as

  4. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  5. Sex-specific genetic determinants for arterial stiffness in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decano, Julius L; Pasion, Khristine A; Black, Nicole; Giordano, Nicholas J; Herrera, Victoria L; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2016-01-11

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients including myocardial infarction, fatal stroke, cerebral micro-bleeds which predicts cerebral hemorrhage in hypertensive patients, as well as progression to hypertension in non-hypertensive subjects. The association between arterial stiffness and various cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke) remains after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, body mass index and other known predictors of cardiovascular disease, suggesting that arterial stiffness, measured via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, has a better predictive value than each of these factors. Recent evidence shows that arterial stiffening precedes the onset of high blood pressure; however their molecular genetic relationship (s) and sex-specific determinants remain uncertain. We investigated whether distinct or shared genetic determinants might underlie susceptibility to arterial stiffening in male and female Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Thus, we performed a genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting arterial stiffness in six-week old F2 (Dahl S x R)-intercross male and female rats characterized for abdominal aortic pulse wave velocity and aortic strain by high-resolution ultrasonography. We detected five highly significant QTLs affecting aortic stiffness: two interacting QTLs (AS-m1 on chromosome 4 and AS-m2 on chromosome16, LOD 8.8) in males and two distinct interacting QTLs (AS-f1 on chromosome 9 and AS-f2 on chromosome11, LOD 8.9) in females affecting pulse wave velocity. One QTL (AS-1 on chromosome 3, LOD 4.3) was found to influence aortic strain in a sex-independent manner. None of these arterial stiffness QTLs co-localized with previously reported blood pressure QTLs detected in equivalent genetic intercrosses. These data reveal sex-specific genetic determinants for aortic pulse wave velocity and suggest distinct polygenic susceptibility for arterial stiffness and

  6. Variation in Recombination Rate and Its Genetic Determinism in Sheep Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Morgane; Astruc, Jean-Michel; Sarry, Julien; Drouilhet, Laurence; Fabre, Stéphane; Moreno, Carole R; Servin, Bertrand

    2017-10-01

    Recombination is a complex biological process that results from a cascade of multiple events during meiosis. Understanding the genetic determinism of recombination can help to understand if and how these events are interacting. To tackle this question, we studied the patterns of recombination in sheep, using multiple approaches and data sets. We constructed male recombination maps in a dairy breed from the south of France (the Lacaune breed) at a fine scale by combining meiotic recombination rates from a large pedigree genotyped with a 50K SNP array and historical recombination rates from a sample of unrelated individuals genotyped with a 600K SNP array. This analysis revealed recombination patterns in sheep similar to other mammals but also genome regions that have likely been affected by directional and diversifying selection. We estimated the average recombination rate of Lacaune sheep at 1.5 cM/Mb, identified ∼50,000 crossover hotspots on the genome, and found a high correlation between historical and meiotic recombination rate estimates. A genome-wide association study revealed two major loci affecting interindividual variation in recombination rate in Lacaune, including the RNF212 and HEI10 genes and possibly two other loci of smaller effects including the KCNJ15 and FSHR genes. The comparison of these new results to those obtained previously in a distantly related population of domestic sheep (the Soay) revealed that Soay and Lacaune males have a very similar distribution of recombination along the genome. The two data sets were thus combined to create more precise male meiotic recombination maps in Sheep. However, despite their similar recombination maps, Soay and Lacaune males were found to exhibit different heritabilities and QTL effects for interindividual variation in genome-wide recombination rates. This highlights the robustness of recombination patterns to underlying variation in their genetic determinism. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society

  7. A simulation study of mutations in the genetic regulatory hierarchy for butterfly eyespot focus determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey M; Evans, Travis M

    2008-09-01

    The color patterns on the wings of butterflies have been an important model system in evolutionary developmental biology. A recent computational model tested genetic regulatory hierarchies hypothesized to underlie the formation of butterfly eyespot foci [Evans, T.M., Marcus, J.M., 2006. A simulation study of the genetic regulatory hierarchy for butterfly eyespot focus determination. Evol. Dev. 8, 273-283]. The computational model demonstrated that one proposed hierarchy was incapable of reproducing the known patterns of gene expression associated with eyespot focus determination in wild-type butterflies, but that two slightly modified alternative hierarchies were capable of reproducing all of the known gene expressions patterns. Here we extend the computational models previously implemented in Delphi 2.0 to two mutants derived from the squinting bush brown butterfly (Bicyclus anynana). These two mutants, comet and Cyclops, have aberrantly shaped eyespot foci that are produced by different mechanisms. The comet mutation appears to produce a modified interaction between the wing margin and the eyespot focus that results in a series of comet-shaped eyespot foci. The Cyclops mutation causes the failure of wing vein formation between two adjacent wing-cells and the fusion of two adjacent eyespot foci to form a single large elongated focus in their place. The computational approach to modeling pattern formation in these mutants allows us to make predictions about patterns of gene expression, which are largely unstudied in butterfly mutants. It also suggests a critical experiment that will allow us to distinguish between two hypothesized genetic regulatory hierarchies that may underlie all butterfly eyespot foci.

  8. Genetic Determinants of High-Level Oxacillin Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Borges, Vitor; Chung, Marilyn; Milheiriço, Catarina; Gomes, João Paulo; de Lencastre, Herminia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2018-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains carry either a mecA - or a mecC -mediated mechanism of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, and the phenotypic expression of resistance shows extensive strain-to-strain variation. In recent communications, we identified the genetic determinants associated with the stringent stress response that play a major role in the antibiotic resistant phenotype of the historically earliest "archaic" clone of MRSA and in the mecC -carrying MRSA strain LGA251. Here, we sought to test whether or not the same genetic determinants also contribute to the resistant phenotype of highly and homogeneously resistant (H*R) derivatives of a major contemporary MRSA clone, USA300. We found that the resistance phenotype was linked to six genes ( fruB , gmk , hpt , purB , prsA , and relA ), which were most frequently targeted among the analyzed 20 H*R strains (one mutation per clone in 19 of the 20 H*R strains). Besides the strong parallels with our previous findings (five of the six genes matched), all but one of the repeatedly targeted genes were found to be linked to guanine metabolism, pointing to the key role that this pathway plays in defining the level of antibiotic resistance independent of the clonal type of MRSA. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. First Attempt of Orbit Determination of SLR Satellites and Space Debris Using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleflie, F.; Coulot, D.; Descosta, R.; Fernier, A.; Richard, P.

    2013-08-01

    We present an orbit determination method based on genetic algorithms. Contrary to usual estimation methods mainly based on least-squares methods, these algorithms do not require any a priori knowledge of the initial state vector to be estimated. These algorithms can be applied when a new satellite is launched or for uncatalogued objects that appear in images obtained from robotic telescopes such as the TAROT ones. We show in this paper preliminary results obtained from an SLR satellite, for which tracking data acquired by the ILRS network enable to build accurate orbital arcs at a few centimeter level, which can be used as a reference orbit ; in this case, the basic observations are made up of time series of ranges, obtained from various tracking stations. We show as well the results obtained from the observations acquired by the two TAROT telescopes on the Telecom-2D satellite operated by CNES ; in that case, the observations are made up of time series of azimuths and elevations, seen from the two TAROT telescopes. The method is carried out in several steps: (i) an analytical propagation of the equations of motion, (ii) an estimation kernel based on genetic algorithms, which follows the usual steps of such approaches: initialization and evolution of a selected population, so as to determine the best parameters. Each parameter to be estimated, namely each initial keplerian element, has to be searched among an interval that is preliminary chosen. The algorithm is supposed to converge towards an optimum over a reasonable computational time.

  10. Prevalence of genetic determinants and phenotypic resistance to ciprofloxacin in Campylobacter jejuni from lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksomaitiene, Jurgita; Ramonaite, Sigita; Olsen, John E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the number of reports on isolation of ciprofloxacin resistant Campylobacter jejuni has increased worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin and its genetic determinants among C. jejuni isolated from humans (n = 100), poultry products (n...... = 96) and wild birds (n = 96) in Lithuania. 91.4% of the C. jejuni isolates were phenotypically resistant to ciprofloxacin. DNA sequence analyses of the gyrA gene from 292 isolates revealed that a change in amino acid sequence, Thr86Ile, was the main substition conferring resistance to ciprofloxacin...... forty-five C. jejuni isolates showed one or more silent mutations, and 32.4% of examined isolates possessed six silent mutations. In addition to the ciprofloxacin resistant isolates harboring only Thr86Ile point mutation (110 isolates), the current study identified resistant isolates (n = 101) harboring...

  11. Blood flow patterns underlie developmental heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Madeline; Thornburg, Kent; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Although cardiac malformations at birth are typically associated with genetic anomalies, blood flow dynamics also play a crucial role in heart formation. However, the relationship between blood flow patterns in the early embryo and later cardiovascular malformation has not been determined. We used the chicken embryo model to quantify the extent to which anomalous blood flow patterns predict cardiac defects that resemble those in humans and found that restricting either the inflow to the heart or the outflow led to reproducible abnormalities with a dose-response type relationship between blood flow stimuli and the expression of cardiac phenotypes. Constricting the outflow tract by 10-35% led predominantly to ventricular septal defects, whereas constricting by 35-60% most often led to double outlet right ventricle. Ligation of the vitelline vein caused mostly pharyngeal arch artery malformations. We show that both cardiac inflow reduction and graded outflow constriction strongly influence the development of specific and persistent abnormal cardiac structure and function. Moreover, the hemodynamic-associated cardiac defects recapitulate those caused by genetic disorders. Thus our data demonstrate the importance of investigating embryonic blood flow conditions to understand the root causes of congenital heart disease as a prerequisite to future prevention and treatment. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Congenital heart defects result from genetic anomalies, teratogen exposure, and altered blood flow during embryonic development. We show here a novel "dose-response" type relationship between the level of blood flow alteration and manifestation of specific cardiac phenotypes. We speculate that abnormal blood flow may frequently underlie congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Genetic Determinants of Thrombin Generation and Their Relation to Venous Thrombosis: Results from the GAIT-2 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, Laura; Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Carrasco, Marina; Millon, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Vilalta, Noelia; Brunel, Helena; Font, Montserrat; Hamsten, Anders; Souto, Juan Carlos; Soria, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease where known genetic risk factors explain only a small portion of the genetic variance. Then, the analysis of intermediate phenotypes, such as thrombin generation assay, can be used to identify novel genetic risk factors that contribute to VTE. Objectives To investigate the genetic basis of distinct quantitative phenotypes of thrombin generation and its relationship to the risk of VTE. Patients/Methods Lag time, thrombin peak and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were measured in the families of the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia 2 (GAIT-2) Project. This sample consisted of 935 individuals in 35 extended families selected through a proband with idiopathic thrombophilia. We performed also genome wide association studies (GWAS) with thrombin generation phenotypes. Results The results showed that 67% of the variation in the risk of VTE is attributable to genetic factors. The heritabilities of lag time, thrombin peak and ETP were 49%, 54% and 52%, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated also the existence of positive genetic correlations between thrombin peak or ETP and the risk of VTE. Moreover, the major genetic determinant of thrombin generation was the F2 gene. However, other suggestive signals were observed. Conclusions The thrombin generation phenotypes are strongly genetically determined. The thrombin peak and ETP are significantly genetically correlated with the risk of VTE. In addition, F2 was identified as a major determinant of thrombin generation. We reported suggestive signals that might increase our knowledge to explain the variability of this important phenotype. Validation and functional studies are required to confirm GWAS results. PMID:26784699

  13. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a baby with a congenital heart defect. Family history and genetics Congenital heart disease is not usually passed along ... you or your child to a specialist in genetic testing. Cardiac MRI to diagnose a ... Factors to review family history, smoking, and medicines that increase your risk of ...

  14. Determination of genetic variability of traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Brondani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The rice (Oryza sativa breeding program of the Rice and Bean research center of the Brazilian agricultural company Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa is well established and provides new cultivars every year to attend the demand for improved high yielding varieties with tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the elite genitors used to compose new populations for selection are closely related, contributing to the yield plateau reached in the last 20 years. To overcome this limit, it is necessary to broaden the genetic basis of the cultivars using diverse germplasm such as wild relatives or traditional varieties, with the latter being more practical because they are more easily crossed with elite germplasm to accelerate the recovery of modern plant types in the breeding lines. The objective of our study was to characterize the allelic diversity of 192 traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR or microsatellite markers. The germplasm was divided into 39 groups by common name similarity. A total of 176 alleles were detected, 30 of which (from 23 accessions were exclusive. The number of alleles per marker ranged from 6 to 22, with an average of 14.6 alleles per locus. We identified 16 accessions as a mixture of pure lines or heterozygous plants. Dendrogram analysis identified six clusters of identical accessions with different common names and just one cluster with identical accessions with the same common name, indicating that SSR markers are fundamental to determining the genetic relationship between landraces. A subset of 24 landraces, representatives of the 13 similarity groups plus the 11 accessions not grouped, was the most variable set of genotypes analyzed. These accessions can be used as genitors to increase the genetic variability available to rice breeding programs.

  15. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and die...

  16. Developmental defects and genomic instability after x-irradiation of wild-type and genetically modified mouse pre-implantation and early post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained from the end of the 1950s suggested that ionizing radiation could induce foetal malformations in some mouse strains when administered during early pre-implantation stages. Starting in 1989, data obtained in Germany also showed that radiation exposure during that period could lead to a genomic instability in the surviving foetuses. Furthermore, the same group reported that both malformations and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation foetuses after exposure of zygotes to relatively high doses of radiation. As such results were of concern for radiation protection, we investigated this in more detail during recent years, using mice with varying genetic backgrounds including mice heterozygous for mutations involved in important cellular processes like DNA repair, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The main parameters which were investigated included morphological development, genomic instability and gene expression in the irradiated embryos or their own progeny. The aim of this review is to critically reassess the results obtained in that field in the different laboratories and to try to draw general conclusions on the risks of developmental defects and genomic instability from an exposure of early embryos to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. Altogether and in the range of doses normally used in diagnostic radiology, the risk of induction of embryonic death and of congenital malformation following the irradiation of a newly fertilised egg is certainly very low when compared to the ‘spontaneous’ risks for such effects. Similarly, the risk of radiation induction of a genomic instability under such circumstances seems to be very small. However, this is not a reason to not apply some precaution principles when possible. One way of doing this is to restrict the use of higher dose examinations on all potentially pregnant women to the first ten days of their menstrual cycle when conception is very unlikely to have occurred

  17. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  18. Erythrocyte phosphofructokinase in rat strains with genetically determined differences in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, N A; Tanaka, K R

    1981-02-01

    We have studied the erythrocyte enzyme phosphofructokinase (PFK) from two strains of Long-Evans rats with genetically determined differences in erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) levels. The DPG difference is due to two alleles at one locus. With one probable exception, the genotype at this locus is always associated with the hemoglobin (Hb) electrophoretic phenotype, due to a polymorphism at the III beta-globin locus. The enzyme PFK has been implicated in the DPG difference because glycolytic intermediate levels suggest that this enzyme has a higher in vivo activity in High-DPG strain rats, although the total PFK activity does not differ. We report here that partially purified erythrocyte PFK from Low-DPG strain cells is inhibited significantly more at physiological levels of DPG (P less than 0.01) than PFK from High-DPG strain erythrocytes. Citrate and adenosine triphosphate also inhibit the Low-DPG enzyme more than the High-DPG enzyme. Therefore, a structurally different PFK, with a greater sensitivity to inhibitors, may explain the lower DPG and ATP levels observed in Low-DPG strain animals. These data support a two-locus (Hb and PFK) hypothesis and provide a gene marker to study the underlying genetic and physiologic relationships of these loci.

  19. Determination of the stacking fault density in highly defective single GaAs nanowires by means of coherent diffraction imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Arman; Biermanns, Andreas; Loffeld, Otmar; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2016-06-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to measure diffraction patterns from individual highly defective nanowires, showing a complex speckle pattern instead of well-defined Bragg peaks. The approach is tested for nanowires of 500 nm diameter and 500 nm height predominately composed by zinc-blende (ZB) and twinned zinc-blende (TZB) phase domains. Phase retrieval is used to reconstruct the measured 2-dimensional intensity patterns recorded from single nanowires with 3.48 nm and 0.98 nm spatial resolution. Whereas the speckle amplitudes and distribution are perfectly reconstructed, no unique solution could be obtained for the phase structure. The number of phase switches is found to be proportional to the number of measured speckles and follows a narrow number distribution. Using data with 0.98 nm spatial resolution the mean number of phase switches is in reasonable agreement with estimates taken from TEM. However, since the resolved phase domain still is 3-4 times larger than a single GaAs bilayer we explain the non-ambiguous phase reconstruction by the fact that depending on starting phase and sequence of subroutines used during the phase retrieval the retrieved phase domain host a different sequence of randomly stacked bilayers. Modelling possible arrangements of bilayer sequences within a phase domain demonstrate that the complex speckle patterns measured can indeed be explained by the random arrangement of the ZB and TZB phase domains.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Breathable Hemostatic Hydrogel Dressings and Determination of Their Effects on Full-Thickness Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Pan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel-based wound dressings provide a cooling sensation, a moist environment, and act as a barrier to microbes for wounds. In this study, a series of soft, flexible, porous non-stick hydrogel dressings were prepared through the simple repeated freeze-thawing of a poly(vinyl alcohol, human-like collagen (or and carboxymethyl chitosan mixed solution rather than chemical cross-linking and Tween80 was added as pore-forming agent for cutaneous wound healing. Some of their physical and chemical properties were characterized. Interestingly, hydrogel PVA-HLC-T80 and PVA-HLC-CS-T80 presented excellent swelling ratios, bacterial barrier activity, moisture vapor permeability, hemostasis activity and biocompatibility. Furthermore, in vivo evaluation of the healing capacity of these two hydrogels was checked by creating a full-thickness wound defect (1.3 cm × 1.3 cm in rabbit. Macroscopic observation and subsequent hematoxylin eosin staining (H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis at regular time intervals for 18 days revealed that the hydrogels significantly enhanced wound healing by reducing inflammation, promoting granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition and accelerating re-epithelialization. Taken together, the obtained data strongly encourage the use of these multifunctional hydrogels for skin wound dressings.

  1. Genetic determinism and evolutionary reconstruction of a host jump in a plant virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilakos, Nikon; Simon, Vincent; Tzima, Aliki

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their widespread occurrence, only few host jumps by plant viruses have been evidenced and the molecular bases of even fewer have been determined. A combination of three independent approaches, 1) experimental evolution followed by reverse genetics analysis, 2) positive selection...... analysis, and 3) locus-by-locus analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) allowed reconstructing the Potato virus Y (PVY; genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae) jump to pepper (Capsicum annuum), probably from other solanaceous plants. Synthetic chimeras between infectious cDNA clones of two PVY isolates...... independently and conferred adaptation to C. annuum. In addition to increasing our knowledge of host jumps in plant viruses, this study illustrates also the efficiency of locus-by-locus AMOVA and combined approaches to identify adaptive mutations in the genome of RNA viruses....

  2. Genetic determination of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine on γ-irradiated Bacillus subtilis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, V.L.; Oskolkova, O.B.; Stepanova, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of a lethal effect of 60 Co-γ-rays on Bacillus subtilis cells: a wild type strain and recombination-deficient mutants rec A, rec B, rec D, rec F, rec K, rec L and rec O exposed in the absence and in the presence of cysteamine (H -2 M). It was established that the protective efficiency of cysteamine for repair- and recombination-deficient mutants is significantly lower than that for the wild type (DMF 2.2-3.0). The most deficient in sensitivity to the protective action of cysteamine are rec B mutants (DMF 0.8-1.2). These data suggest that in B. subtilis, like in E. coli, the radioprotective effect of cysteamine is genetically determined and depends on the activity of repair systems

  3. Analyzing the determinants of the voting behavior using a genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vizcaíno-González

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Using data about votes emitted by funds in meetings held by United States banks from 2003 to 2013, we apply a genetic algorithm to a set of financial variables in order to detect the determinants of the vote direction. Our findings indicate that there are three main explanatory factors: the market value of the firm, the shareholder activism measured as the total number of funds voting, and the temporal context, which reflects the influence of recent critical events affecting the banking industry, including bankruptcies, reputational failures, and mergers and acquisitions. As a result, considering that voting behavior has been empirically linked to reputational harms, these findings can be considered as a useful insight about the keys that should be taken into account in order to achieve an effective reputational risk management strategy.

  4. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Georges

    Full Text Available A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  5. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Anouk; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naïma; Karim, Latifa; Georges, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  6. Relevance of genetically determined host factors to the prognosis of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, P; Muñiz-Diaz, E; Baraldès, M A; Arilla, M; Barquet, N; Pericas, R; Juárez, C; Madoz, P; Vázquez, G

    2004-08-01

    To assess the relevance of genetically determined host factors for the prognosis of meningococcal disease, Fc gamma receptor IIA (FcgammaRIIA), the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter region, and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms were studied in 145 patients with meningococcal disease and in 290 healthy controls matched by sex. Distribution of FcgammaRIIA, TNF-alpha, and PAI-1 alleles was not significantly different between patients and controls. Patients with the FcgammaRIIA-R/R 131 allotype scored > or =1 point in the Barcelona prognostic system more frequently than patients with other allotypes (odds ratio, 18.6; 95% confidence interval, 7.1-49.0, PFc gamma receptor IIA polymorphism was associated with markers of disease severity, but TNF-alpha and PAI-1 polymorphisms were not.

  7. Determination of Critical Conditions for Puncturing Almonds Using Coupled Response Surface Methodology and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mahmoodi-Eshkaftaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of seed moisture content, probe diameter and loading velocity (puncture conditions on some mechanical properties of almond kernel and peeled almond kernel is considered to model a relationship between the puncture conditions and rupture energy. Furthermore, distribution of the mechanical properties is determined. The main objective is to determine the critical values of mechanical properties significant for peeling machines. The response surface methodology was used to find the relationship between the input parameters and the output responses, and the fitness function was applied to measure the optimal values using the genetic algorithm. Two-parameter Weibull function was used to describe the distribution of mechanical properties. Based on the Weibull parameter values, i.e. shape parameter (β and scale parameter (η calculated for each property, the mechanical distribution variations were completely described and it was confirmed that the mechanical properties are rule governed, which makes the Weibull function suitable for estimating their distributions. The energy model estimated using response surface methodology shows that the mechanical properties relate exponentially to the moisture, and polynomially to the loading velocity and probe diameter, which enabled successful estimation of the rupture energy (R²=0.94. The genetic algorithm calculated the critical values of seed moisture, probe diameter, and loading velocity to be 18.11 % on dry mass basis, 0.79 mm, and 0.15 mm/min, respectively, and optimum rupture energy of 1.97·10-³ J. These conditions were used for comparison with new samples, where the rupture energy was experimentally measured to be 2.68 and 2.21·10-³ J for kernel and peeled kernel, respectively, which was nearly in agreement with our model results.

  8. Mapping Determinants of Gene Expression Plasticity by Genetical Genomics in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Alda Alvarez, O.; Gutteling, E.W.; Tijsterman, M.; Fu, J.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Hazendonk, E.; Prins, J.C.P.; Plasterk, R.H.A.; Jansen, R.C.; Breitling, R.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent genetical genomics studies have provided intimate views on gene regulatory networks. Gene expression variations between genetically different individuals have been mapped to the causal regulatory regions, termed expression quantitative trait loci. Whether the environment-induced plastic

  9. Mapping determinants of gene expression plasticity by genetical genomics in C. elegans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Alvarez, O.A.; Gutteling, E.W.; Tijsterman, M.; Fu, J.; Riksen, J.A.; Hazendonk, M.G.A.; Prins, P.; Plasterk, R.H.A.; Jansen, R.C.; Breitling, R.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent genetical genomics studies have provided intimate views on gene regulatory networks. Gene expression variations between genetically different individuals have been mapped to the causal regulatory regions, termed expression quantitative trait loci. Whether the environment-induced plastic

  10. 76 FR 8707 - Syngenta Seeds, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically Engineered To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There... genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason to believe are plant pests. Such...

  11. Sex determination of Pohnpei Micronesian kingfishers using morphological and molecular genetic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Dylan C.; Lopes, I.F.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation-oriented studies of Micronesian Kingfishers (Todiramphus cinnamominus) have been hindered by a lack of basic natural history information, despite the status of the Guam subspecies (T. c. cinnamominus) as one of the most endangered species in the world. We used tissue samples and morphometric measures from museum specimens and wild-captured Pohnpei Micronesian Kingfishers (T. c. reichenbachii) to develop methods for sex determination. We present a modified molecular protocol and a discriminant function that yields the probability that a particular individual is male or female. Our results revealed that females were significantly larger than males, and the discriminant function correctly predicted sex in 73% (30/41) of the individuals. The sex of 86% (18/21) of individuals was correctly assigned when a moderate reliability threshold was set. Sex determination using molecular genetic techniques was more reliable than methods based on morphology. Our results will facilitate recovery efforts for the critically endangered Guam Micronesian Kingfisher and provide a basis for sex determination in the 11 other endangered congeners in the Pacific Basin.

  12. The evolution of environmental and genetic sex determination in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dooren, Tom J M; Leimar, Olof

    2003-12-01

    Twenty years ago, Bulmer and Bull suggested that disruptive selection, produced by environmental fluctuations, can result in an evolutionary transition from environmental sex determination (ESD) to genetic sex determination (GSD). We investigated the feasibility of such a process, using mutation-limited adaptive dynamics and individual-based computer simulations. Our model describes the evolution of a reaction norm for sex determination in a metapopulation setting with partial migration and variation in an environmental variable both within and between local patches. The reaction norm represents the probability of becoming a female as a function of environmental state and was modeled as a sigmoid function with two parameters, one giving the location (i.e., the value of the environmental variable for which an individual has equal chance of becoming either sex) and the other giving the slope of the reaction norm for that environment. The slope can be interpreted as being set by the level of developmental noise in morph determination, with less noise giving a steeper slope and a more switchlike reaction norm. We found convergence stable reaction norms with intermediate to large amounts of developmental noise for conditions characterized by low migration rates, small differential competitive advantages between the sexes over environments, and little variation between individual environments within patches compared to variation between patches. We also considered reaction norms with the slope parameter constrained to a high value, corresponding to little developmental noise. For these we found evolutionary branching in the location parameter and a transition from ESD toward GSD, analogous to the original analysis by Bulmer and Bull. Further evolutionary change, including dominance evolution, produced a polymorphism acting as a GSD system with heterogamety. Our results point to the role of developmental noise in the evolution of sex determination.

  13. Using recurrence plot for determinism analysis of EEG recordings in genetic absence epilepsy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Li, Xiaoli; Dang, Chuangyin; Richards, Douglas A

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the transition of brain activity towards an absence seizure is a challenging task. In this paper, we use recurrence quantification analysis to indicate the deterministic dynamics of EEG series at the seizure-free, pre-seizure and seizure states in genetic absence epilepsy rats. The determinism measure, DET, based on recurrence plot, was applied to analyse these three EEG datasets, each dataset containing 300 single-channel EEG epochs of 5-s duration. Then, statistical analysis of the DET values in each dataset was carried out to determine whether their distributions over the three groups were significantly different. Furthermore, a surrogate technique was applied to calculate the significance level of determinism measures in EEG recordings. The mean (+/-SD) DET of EEG was 0.177+/-0.045 in pre-seizure intervals. The DET values of pre-seizure EEG data are significantly higher than those of seizure-free intervals, 0.123+/-0.023, (Pdeterminism in EEG epochs was present in 25 of 300 (8.3%), 181 of 300 (60.3%) and 289 of 300 (96.3%) in seizure-free, pre-seizure and seizure intervals, respectively. Results provide some first indications that EEG epochs during pre-seizure intervals exhibit a higher degree of determinism than seizure-free EEG epochs, but lower than those in seizure EEG epochs in absence epilepsy. The proposed methods have the potential of detecting the transition between normal brain activity and the absence seizure state, thus opening up the possibility of intervention, whether electrical or pharmacological, to prevent the oncoming seizure.

  14. In-situ determination of electronic surface and volume defect density of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebke, F.

    1992-07-01

    The density of localized gap states in the bulk and in the near-surface region of amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) was measured for non oxidized undoped, B-doped and P-doped samples as well as for films with low carbon (C) and germanium (Ge) content. Also the influence of light soaking on the bulk and surface density of states was investigated. The samples were prepared by rf glow discharge in an UHV-system at substrate temperatures between 100degC and 400degC and transferred to the analysis chamber by a vacuum lock. We combined the constant photocurrent method (CPM) and the total-yield photoelectron spectroscopy (TY) to obtain in-situ information about the defect densities. While the first method yields information about the density of states in the bulk, the other method obtains the density of occupied states in the near-surface region. The mean information depth of the TY-measurements is limited by the escape lenght of photoelectrons and can be estimated to 5 nm. In addition to the defect density the position of the Fermi energy was determined for the bulk by dark conductivity measurements and at the surface using a calibrated Kelvin probe. (orig.)

  15. Determining causes of genetic isolation in a large carnivore (Ursus americanus population to direct contemporary conservation measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Pelletier

    Full Text Available The processes leading to genetic isolation influence a population's local extinction risk, and should thus be identified before conservation actions are implemented. Natural or human-induced circumstances can result in historical or contemporary barriers to gene flow and/or demographic bottlenecks. Distinguishing between these hypotheses can be achieved by comparing genetic diversity and differentiation in isolated vs. continuous neighboring populations. In Ontario, American black bears (Ursus americanus are continuously distributed, genetically diverse, and exhibit an isolation-by-distance structuring pattern, except on the Bruce Peninsula (BP. To identify the processes that led to the genetic isolation of BP black bears, we modelled various levels of historical and contemporary migration and population size reductions using forward simulations. We compared simulation results with empirical genetic indices from Ontario black bear populations under different levels of geographic isolation, and conducted additional simulations to determine if translocations could help achieve genetic restoration. From a genetic standpoint, conservation concerns for BP black bears are warranted because our results show that: i a recent demographic bottleneck associated with recently reduced migration best explains the low genetic diversity on the BP; and ii under sustained isolation, BP black bears could lose between 70% and 80% of their rare alleles within 100 years. Although restoring migration corridors would be the most effective method to enhance long-term genetic diversity and prevent inbreeding, it is unrealistic to expect connectivity to be re-established. Current levels of genetic diversity could be maintained by successfully translocating 10 bears onto the peninsula every 5 years. Such regular translocations may be more practical than landscape restoration, because areas connecting the peninsula to nearby mainland black bear populations have been

  16. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F

    2015-03-01

    as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W.; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D.; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H.; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F.

    2015-01-01

    as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants. PMID:25616667

  18. Epigenetics and genetic determinism Epigenética e determinismo genético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán A. Burbano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper posits that the gene-centered viewpoint of the organism (gene-centrism is not enough to explain biological complexity. Organisms are not completely determined by their genomes; rather, living beings can be seen as interpreters or intentional systems. Epigenetics is the framework that allows the avoidance of gene-centrism and permits the emergence of a more holistic standpoint where determination and novelty can coexist, as shown with examples taken from developmental biology and macromolecules folding. In summary, as P. Medawar and J. Medawar wrote: "Genetics proposes; epigenetics disposes."O presente trabalho afirma que a visão geneticista do organismo (genecentrismo não é suficiente para explicar a complexidade biológica. Os organismos não são completamente determinados por seus genomas; ou melhor, os seres vivos podem ser vistos como intérpretes ou sistemas intencionais. A epigenética é o arcabouço que ajuda a evitar o genecentrismo e permite a emergência de uma posição mais holística, em que determinismo e inovação podem coexistir, conforme demonstrado a partir de exemplos retirados da biologia do desenvolvimento e da estrutura das macromoléculas. Em resumo, como P. Medawar e J. Medawar escreveram: "A genética propõe e a epigenética dispõe".

  19. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis isolates as determined by comparative genome hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Hoa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that causes infections in young piglets. S. suis is a heterogeneous species. Thirty-three different capsular serotypes have been described, that differ in virulence between as well as within serotypes. Results In this study, the correlation between gene content, serotype, phenotype and virulence among 55 S. suis strains was studied using Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH. Clustering of CGH data divided S. suis isolates into two clusters, A and B. Cluster A isolates could be discriminated from cluster B isolates based on the protein expression of extracellular factor (EF. Cluster A contained serotype 1 and 2 isolates that were correlated with virulence. Cluster B mainly contained serotype 7 and 9 isolates. Genetic similarity was observed between serotype 7 and serotype 2 isolates that do not express muramidase released protein (MRP and EF (MRP-EF-, suggesting these isolates originated from a common founder. Profiles of 25 putative virulence-associated genes of S. suis were determined among the 55 isolates. Presence of all 25 genes was shown for cluster A isolates, whereas cluster B isolates lacked one or more putative virulence genes. Divergence of S. suis isolates was further studied based on the presence of 39 regions of difference. Conservation of genes was evaluated by the definition of a core genome that contained 78% of all ORFs in P1/7. Conclusions In conclusion, we show that CGH is a valuable method to study distribution of genes or gene clusters among isolates in detail, yielding information on genetic similarity, and virulence traits of S. suis isolates.

  20. Genetic Determinism of Sensitivity to Corynespora cassiicola Exudates in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Minh; Clément-Demange, André; Déon, Marine; Garcia, Dominique; Le Guen, Vincent; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Soumahoro, Mouman; Masson, Aurélien; Label, Philippe; Le, Mau Tuy; Pujade-Renaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    An indirect phenotyping method was developed in order to estimate the susceptibility of rubber tree clonal varieties to Corynespora Leaf Fall (CLF) disease caused by the ascomycete Corynespora cassiicola. This method consists in quantifying the impact of fungal exudates on detached leaves by measuring the induced electrolyte leakage (EL%). The tested exudates were either crude culture filtrates from diverse C. cassiicola isolates or the purified cassiicolin (Cas1), a small secreted effector protein produced by the aggressive isolate CCP. The test was found to be quantitative, with the EL% response proportional to toxin concentration. For eight clones tested with two aggressive isolates, the EL% response to the filtrates positively correlated to the response induced by conidial inoculation. The toxicity test applied to 18 clones using 13 toxinic treatments evidenced an important variability among clones and treatments, with a significant additional clone x treatment interaction effect. A genetic linkage map was built using 306 microsatellite markers, from the F1 population of the PB260 x RRIM600 family. Phenotyping of the population for sensitivity to the purified Cas1 effector and to culture filtrates from seven C. cassiicola isolates revealed a polygenic determinism, with six QTL detected on five chromosomes and percentages of explained phenotypic variance varying from 11 to 17%. Two common QTL were identified for the CCP filtrate and the purified cassiicolin, suggesting that Cas1 may be the main effector of CCP filtrate toxicity. The CCP filtrate clearly contrasted with all other filtrates. The toxicity test based on Electrolyte Leakage Measurement offers the opportunity to assess the sensitivity of rubber genotypes to C. cassiicola exudates or purified effectors for genetic investigations and early selection, without risk of spreading the fungus in plantations. However, the power of this test for predicting field susceptibility of rubber clones to CLF will have

  1. Utilization of shear stress for determination of activation energy of the defects created by neutron irradiation; Utilizacion de la tension de fluencia en la determinacion de la energia de activacion de defectos producidos por irradiacion neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique used for the determination thermodynamical parameters such as activation energy using the thermal annealing of increments of Critical resolved Shear Stress of the defects created by neutron irradiation at 77 K. The doses chosen for this work was 3.1 x 10 {sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} since the defects are stable to plastic deformation and the cascades of atomic displacements do not overlap. Specimens without any prior deformation were used allowing then the single addition of the initial stress to that due to the created defects. (author)

  2. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  3. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Supervised chaos genetic algorithm based state of charge determination for LiFePO4 batteries in electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanqing

    2018-04-01

    LiFePO4 battery is developed rapidly in electric vehicle, whose safety and functional capabilities are influenced greatly by the evaluation of available cell capacity. Added with adaptive switch mechanism, this paper advances a supervised chaos genetic algorithm based state of charge determination method, where a combined state space model is employed to simulate battery dynamics. The method is validated by the experiment data collected from battery test system. Results indicate that the supervised chaos genetic algorithm based state of charge determination method shows great performance with less computation complexity and is little influenced by the unknown initial cell state.

  5. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such gene......To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...

  6. Identification of the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant using a combination of mouse and human genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu

    2009-01-01

    complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest......Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 27...... recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897...

  7. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  8. Determination of edge plasma parameters by a genetic algorithm analysis of spectral line shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Guirlet, R.

    2003-01-01

    Comparing an experimental and a theoretical line shape can be achieved by a genetic algorithm (GA) based on an analogy to the mechanisms of natural selection. Such an algorithm is able to deal with complex non-linear models, and can avoid local minima. We have used this optimization tool in the context of edge plasma spectroscopy, for a determination of the temperatures and fractions of the various populations of neutral deuterium emitting the D α line in 2 configurations of Tore-Supra: ergodic divertor and toroidal pumped limiter. Using the GA fit, the neutral emitters are separated into up to 4 populations which can be identified as resulting from molecular dissociation reactions, charge exchange, or reflection. In all the edge plasmas studied, a significant fraction of neutrals emit in the line wings, leading to neutrals with a temperature up to a few hundreds eV if a Gaussian line shape is assumed. This conclusion could be modified if the line wing exhibits a non Gaussian behavior

  9. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rosa Luz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL, a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32. Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003. Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23, compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07. Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031. These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  10. Determination of optimum allocation and pricing of distributed generation using genetic algorithm methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakabuta, Ndaga Stanslaus

    Electric power distribution systems play a significant role in providing continuous and "quality" electrical energy to different classes of customers. In the context of the present restrictions on transmission system expansions and the new paradigm of "open and shared" infrastructure, new approaches to distribution system analyses, economic and operational decision-making need investigation. This dissertation includes three layers of distribution system investigations. In the basic level, improved linear models are shown to offer significant advantages over previous models for advanced analysis. In the intermediate level, the improved model is applied to solve the traditional problem of operating cost minimization using capacitors and voltage regulators. In the advanced level, an artificial intelligence technique is applied to minimize cost under Distributed Generation injection from private vendors. Soft computing techniques are finding increasing applications in solving optimization problems in large and complex practical systems. The dissertation focuses on Genetic Algorithm for investigating the economic aspects of distributed generation penetration without compromising the operational security of the distribution system. The work presents a methodology for determining the optimal pricing of distributed generation that would help utilities make a decision on how to operate their system economically. This would enable modular and flexible investments that have real benefits to the electric distribution system. Improved reliability for both customers and the distribution system in general, reduced environmental impacts, increased efficiency of energy use, and reduced costs of energy services are some advantages.

  11. Mutation in the 3'untranslated region of APP as a genetic determinant of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Goupil, Claudia; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pottier, Cyril; Dorval, Véronique; Sarov-Rivière, Mariana; Riant, Florence; Hervé, Dominique; Amouyel, Philippe; Guerchet, Maelenn; Ndamba-Bandzouzi, Bebene; Mbelesso, Pascal; Dartigues, Jean-François; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Hébert, Sébastien S; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Aβ-related cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a major cause of primary non-traumatic brain hemorrhage. In families with an early onset of the disease, CAA can be due to amyloid precursor protein (APP) pathogenic variants or duplications. APP duplications lead to a ~1.5-fold increased APP expression, resulting in Aβ overproduction and deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal vessels. We hypothesized that rare variants in the 3'untranslated region (UTR) of APP might lead to APP overexpression in patients with CAA and no APP pathogenic variant or duplication. We performed direct sequencing of the whole APP 3'UTR in 90 patients with CAA and explored the functional consequences of one previously unreported variant. We identified three sequence variants in four patients, of which a two-base pair deletion (c.*331_*332del) was previously unannotated and absent from 175 controls of same ethnicity. This latter variant was associated with increased APP expression in vivo and in vitro. Bioinformatics and functional assays showed that the APP c.*331_*332del variant affected APP messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and binding of two microRNAs (miR-582-3p and miR-892b), providing a mechanism for the observed effects on APP expression. These results identify APP 3'UTR sequence variants as genetic determinants of Aβ-CAA.

  12. Genetic Determinism and Evolutionary Reconstruction of a Host Jump in a Plant Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Nikon; Simon, Vincent; Tzima, Aliki; Johansen, Elisabeth; Moury, Benoît

    2016-02-01

    In spite of their widespread occurrence, only few host jumps by plant viruses have been evidenced and the molecular bases of even fewer have been determined. A combination of three independent approaches, 1) experimental evolution followed by reverse genetics analysis, 2) positive selection analysis, and 3) locus-by-locus analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) allowed reconstructing the Potato virus Y (PVY; genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae) jump to pepper (Capsicum annuum), probably from other solanaceous plants. Synthetic chimeras between infectious cDNA clones of two PVY isolates with contrasted levels of adaptation to C. annuum showed that the P3 and, to a lower extent, the CI cistron played important roles in infectivity toward C. annuum. The three analytical approaches pinpointed a single nonsynonymous substitution in the P3 and P3N-PIPO cistrons that evolved several times independently and conferred adaptation to C. annuum. In addition to increasing our knowledge of host jumps in plant viruses, this study illustrates also the efficiency of locus-by-locus AMOVA and combined approaches to identify adaptive mutations in the genome of RNA viruses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Determination of edge plasma parameters by a genetic algorithm analysis of spectral line shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R. [Universite de Provence (PIIM), Centre de Saint-Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France); Capes, H.; Guirlet, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    Comparing an experimental and a theoretical line shape can be achieved by a genetic algorithm (GA) based on an analogy to the mechanisms of natural selection. Such an algorithm is able to deal with complex non-linear models, and can avoid local minima. We have used this optimization tool in the context of edge plasma spectroscopy, for a determination of the temperatures and fractions of the various populations of neutral deuterium emitting the D{sub {alpha}} line in 2 configurations of Tore-Supra: ergodic divertor and toroidal pumped limiter. Using the GA fit, the neutral emitters are separated into up to 4 populations which can be identified as resulting from molecular dissociation reactions, charge exchange, or reflection. In all the edge plasmas studied, a significant fraction of neutrals emit in the line wings, leading to neutrals with a temperature up to a few hundreds eV if a Gaussian line shape is assumed. This conclusion could be modified if the line wing exhibits a non Gaussian behavior.

  14. Common genetic determinants of intraocular pressure and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonieke M E van Koolwijk

    Full Text Available Intraocular pressure (IOP is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p=1.4×10(-8, and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p=1.6×10(-8. In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N = 1,432 glaucoma cases, both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p=2.4×10(-2 for rs11656696 and p=9.1×10(-4 for rs7555523. GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.

  15. An Image Segmentation Based on a Genetic Algorithm for Determining Soil Coverage by Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Angela; Ranz, Juan; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P.; Pajares, Gonzalo; Sanchez del Arco, Maria J.; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the soil coverage by crop residues after ploughing is a fundamental element of Conservation Agriculture. This paper presents the application of genetic algorithms employed during the fine tuning of the segmentation process of a digital image with the aim of automatically quantifying the residue coverage. In other words, the objective is to achieve a segmentation that would permit the discrimination of the texture of the residue so that the output of the segmentation process is a binary image in which residue zones are isolated from the rest. The RGB images used come from a sample of images in which sections of terrain were photographed with a conventional camera positioned in zenith orientation atop a tripod. The images were taken outdoors under uncontrolled lighting conditions. Up to 92% similarity was achieved between the images obtained by the segmentation process proposed in this paper and the templates made by an elaborate manual tracing process. In addition to the proposed segmentation procedure and the fine tuning procedure that was developed, a global quantification of the soil coverage by residues for the sampled area was achieved that differed by only 0.85% from the quantification obtained using template images. Moreover, the proposed method does not depend on the type of residue present in the image. The study was conducted at the experimental farm “El Encín” in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, Spain). PMID:22163966

  16. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Determination of point of maximum likelihood in failure domain using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obadage, A.S.; Harnpornchai, N.

    2006-01-01

    The point of maximum likelihood in a failure domain yields the highest value of the probability density function in the failure domain. The maximum-likelihood point thus represents the worst combination of random variables that contribute in the failure event. In this work Genetic Algorithms (GAs) with an adaptive penalty scheme have been proposed as a tool for the determination of the maximum likelihood point. The utilization of only numerical values in the GAs operation makes the algorithms applicable to cases of non-linear and implicit single and multiple limit state function(s). The algorithmic simplicity readily extends its application to higher dimensional problems. When combined with Monte Carlo Simulation, the proposed methodology will reduce the computational complexity and at the same time will enhance the possibility in rare-event analysis under limited computational resources. Since, there is no approximation done in the procedure, the solution obtained is considered accurate. Consequently, GAs can be used as a tool for increasing the computational efficiency in the element and system reliability analyses

  18. Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Otitis Media in an Indigenous Filipino Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Abbe, Izoduwa; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Ajami, Nadim J; Hutchinson, Diane S; Petrosino, Joseph F; Padilla, Carmencita D; Villarta, Romeo L; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa; Chan, Abner L; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Chiong, Charlotte M; Leal, Suzanne M; Abes, Generoso T

    2016-11-01

    To identify genetic and environmental risk factors for otitis media in an indigenous Filipino population. Cross-sectional study. Indigenous Filipino community. Clinical history and information on breastfeeding, tobacco smoke exposure, and swimming were obtained from community members. Heads of households were interviewed for family history and personal beliefs on ear health. Height and weight were measured. Otoscopic findings were described for the presence and character of perforation or discharge. An A2ML1 duplication variant that confers otitis media susceptibility was Sanger sequenced in all DNA samples. Co-occurrence of middle ear bacteria detected by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was determined according to A2ML1 genotype and social cluster. The indigenous Filipino population has a ~50% prevalence of otitis media. Young age was associated with otitis media (4 age strata; P = .004); however, age was nonsignificant as a bistratal or continuous variable. There was no association between otitis media and sex, body mass index, breastfeeding, tobacco exposure, or deep swimming. In multivariate analyses, A2ML1 genotype is the strongest predictor of otitis media, with an odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-10.8; P = .005). When otitis media diagnoses were plotted across ages, otitis media was observed within the first year of life, and chronic otitis media persisted up to adulthood, particularly in A2ML1-variant carriers. Among indigenous Filipinos, A2ML1 genotype is the primary risk factor for otitis media and main determinant of disease progression, although age, the middle ear microbiome, and social clusters might modulate the effect of the A2ML1 genotype. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  19. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J. W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M. L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T. Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O'Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide

  20. 76 FR 80869 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered for Drought...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is... in 7 CFR part 340, ``Introduction of Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to Believe Are Plant Pests,'' regulate, among other...

  1. 76 FR 63279 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered for Insect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is... regulations in 7 CFR part 340, ``Introduction of Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to Believe Are Plant Pests,'' regulate, among other...

  2. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely

  3. Performance Analysis of Combined Methods of Genetic Algorithm and K-Means Clustering in Determining the Value of Centroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adya Zizwan, Putra; Zarlis, Muhammad; Budhiarti Nababan, Erna

    2017-12-01

    The determination of Centroid on K-Means Algorithm directly affects the quality of the clustering results. Determination of centroid by using random numbers has many weaknesses. The GenClust algorithm that combines the use of Genetic Algorithms and K-Means uses a genetic algorithm to determine the centroid of each cluster. The use of the GenClust algorithm uses 50% chromosomes obtained through deterministic calculations and 50% is obtained from the generation of random numbers. This study will modify the use of the GenClust algorithm in which the chromosomes used are 100% obtained through deterministic calculations. The results of this study resulted in performance comparisons expressed in Mean Square Error influenced by centroid determination on K-Means method by using GenClust method, modified GenClust method and also classic K-Means.

  4. Defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent mucosal host response to Candida albicans determines susceptibility to oral candidiasis in mice expressing the HIV-1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Mathieu; Cousineau-Côté, Vincent; Aumont, Francine; Sénéchal, Serge; Gaboury, Louis; Hanna, Zaher; Jolicoeur, Paul; de Repentigny, Louis

    2014-10-26

    The tissue-signaling cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 are critical to host defense against oral Candida albicans infection, by their induction of oral antimicrobial peptide expression and recruitment of neutrophils. Mucosal Th17 cells which produce these cytokines are preferentially depleted in HIV-infected patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent host responses to C. albicans determine the phenotype of susceptibility to oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in transgenic (Tg) mice expressing HIV-1. Naïve CD4+ T-cells and the differentiated Th1, Th2, Th17, Th1Th17 and Treg lineages were all profoundly depleted in cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) of these Tg mice. However, naive CD4+ cells from Tg mice maintained the capacity to differentiate into these lineages in response to polarizing cytokines in vitro. Expression of Il17, Il22, S100a8 and Ccl20 was enhanced in oral mucosal tissue of non-Tg, but not of Tg mice, after oral infection with C. albicans. Treatment of infected Tg mice with the combination of IL-17 and IL-22, but not IL-17 or Il-22 alone, significantly reduced oral burdens of C. albicans and abundance of Candida hyphae in the epithelium of tongues of infected Tg mice, and restored the ability of the Tg mice to up-regulate expression of S100a8 and Ccl20 in response to C. albicans infection. These findings demonstrate that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent induction of innate mucosal immunity to C. albicans is central to the phenotype of susceptibility to OPC in these HIV transgenic mice.

  5. Neural circuit architecture defects in a Drosophila model of Fragile X syndrome are alleviated by minocycline treatment and genetic removal of matrix metalloproteinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul S. Siller

    2011-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS, caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 product (FMRP, is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. FXS patients suffer multiple behavioral symptoms, including hyperactivity, disrupted circadian cycles, and learning and memory deficits. Recently, a study in the mouse FXS model showed that the tetracycline derivative minocycline effectively remediates the disease state via a proposed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibition mechanism. Here, we use the well-characterized Drosophila FXS model to assess the effects of minocycline treatment on multiple neural circuit morphological defects and to investigate the MMP hypothesis. We first treat Drosophila Fmr1 (dfmr1 null animals with minocycline to assay the effects on mutant synaptic architecture in three disparate locations: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, clock neurons in the circadian activity circuit and Kenyon cells in the mushroom body learning and memory center. We find that minocycline effectively restores normal synaptic structure in all three circuits, promising therapeutic potential for FXS treatment. We next tested the MMP hypothesis by assaying the effects of overexpressing the sole Drosophila tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP in dfmr1 null mutants. We find that TIMP overexpression effectively prevents defects in the NMJ synaptic architecture in dfmr1 mutants. Moreover, co-removal of dfmr1 similarly rescues TIMP overexpression phenotypes, including cellular tracheal defects and lethality. To further test the MMP hypothesis, we generated dfmr1;mmp1 double null mutants. Null mmp1 mutants are 100% lethal and display cellular tracheal defects, but co-removal of dfmr1 allows adult viability and prevents tracheal defects. Conversely, co-removal of mmp1 ameliorates the NMJ synaptic architecture defects in dfmr1 null mutants, despite the lack of detectable difference in MMP1 expression or gelatinase activity between the single

  6. Determinants of Virulence and In Vitro Development Colocalize on a Genetic Map of Setosphaeria turcica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideros, Santiago X; Chung, Chia-Lin; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Poland, Jesse A; Wu, Dongliang; Fialko, Ariel A; Turgeon, B Gillian; Nelson, Rebecca J

    2018-02-01

    Generating effective and stable strategies for resistance breeding requires an understanding of the genetics of host-pathogen interactions and the implications for pathogen dynamics and evolution. Setosphaeria turcica causes northern leaf blight (NLB), an important disease of maize for which major resistance genes have been deployed. Little is known about the evolutionary dynamics of avirulence (AVR) genes in S. turcica. To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic association between avirulence and in vitro development traits, we (i) created a genetic map of S. turcica, (ii) located candidate AVRHt1 and AVRHt2 regions, and (iii) identified genetic regions associated with several in vitro development traits. A cross was generated between a race 1 and a race 23N strain, and 221 progeny were isolated. Genotyping by sequencing was used to score 2,078 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. A genetic map spanning 1,981 centimorgans was constructed, consisting of 21 linkage groups. Genetic mapping extended prior evidence for the location and identity of the AVRHt1 gene and identified a region of interest for AVRHt2. The genetic location of AVRHt2 colocalized with loci influencing radial growth and mycelial abundance. Our data suggest a trade-off between virulence on Ht1 and Ht2 and the pathogen's vegetative growth rate. In addition, in-depth analysis of the genotypic data suggests the presence of significant duplication in the genome of S. turcica.

  7. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs

  8. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings

  9. Genetic determinants of inherited susceptibility to hypercholesterolemia - a comprehensive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paththinige, C S; Sirisena, N D; Dissanayake, Vhw

    2017-06-02

    Hypercholesterolemia is a strong determinant of mortality and morbidity associated with cardiovascular diseases and a major contributor to the global disease burden. Mutations in four genes (LDLR, APOB, PCSK9 and LDLRAP1) account for the majority of cases with familial hypercholesterolemia. However, a substantial proportion of adults with hypercholesterolemia do not have a mutation in any of these four genes. This indicates the probability of having other genes with a causative or contributory role in the pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia and suggests a polygenic inheritance of this condition. Here in, we review the recent evidence of association of the genetic variants with hypercholesterolemia and the three lipid traits; total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), their biological pathways and the associated pathogenetic mechanisms. Nearly 80 genes involved in lipid metabolism (encoding structural components of lipoproteins, lipoprotein receptors and related proteins, enzymes, lipid transporters, lipid transfer proteins, and activators or inhibitors of protein function and gene transcription) with single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that are recognized to be associated with hypercholesterolemia and serum lipid traits in genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies were identified. In addition, genome-wide association studies in different populations have identified SNVs associated with TC, HDL-C and LDL-C in nearly 120 genes within or in the vicinity of the genes that are not known to be involved in lipid metabolism. Over 90% of the SNVs in both these groups are located outside the coding regions of the genes. These findings indicates that there might be a considerable number of unrecognized processes and mechanisms of lipid homeostasis, which when disrupted, would lead to hypercholesterolemia. Knowledge of these molecular pathways will enable the discovery of novel treatment and preventive methods as well as

  10. Genome-wide identification of genetic determinants for the cytotoxicity of perifosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perifosine belongs to the class of alkylphospholipid analogues, which act primarily at the cell membrane, thereby targeting signal transduction pathways. In phase I/II clinical trials, perifosine has induced tumour regression and caused disease stabilisation in a variety of tumour types. The genetic determinants responsible for its cytotoxicity have not been comprehensively studied, however. We performed a genome-wide analysis to identify genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were correlated with the cytotoxicity of perifosine, using public databases on the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-60 human cancer cell lines. For demonstrating drug specificity, the NCI Standard Agent Database (including 171 drugs acting through a variety of mechanisms was used as a control. We identified agents with similar cytotoxicity profiles to that of perifosine in compounds used in the NCI drug screen. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were carried out on genes more likely to be perifosine specific. The results suggested that genes correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity are connected by certain known pathways that lead to the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and apoptosis. Biological processes such as 'response to stress', 'inflammatory response' and 'ubiquitin cycle' were enriched among these genes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in CACNA2DI and EXOC4 were found to be correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity. Our results provided a manageable list of genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were strongly correlated with the cytotoxcity of perifosine. These genes could be targets for further studies using candidate-gene approaches. The results also provided insights into the pharmacodynamics of perifosine.

  11. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  12. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  13. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Coia

    Full Text Available Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet

  14. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. W...

  15. The fractal character of radiation defects aggregation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylbekov, A.; Akimbekov, E.; Baktybekov, K.; Vasil'eva, I.

    2002-01-01

    In processes of self-organization, which characterize open systems, the source of ordering is a non-equilibrium. One of the samples of ordering system is radiation-stimulated aggregation of defects in solids. In real work the analysis of criterions of ordering defects structures in solid, which is continuously irradiate at low temperature is presented. The method of cellular automata used in simulation of irradiation. It allowed us to imitate processes of defects formation and recombination. The simulation realized on the surfaces up to 1000x1000 units with initial concentration of defects C n (the power of dose) 0.1-1 %. The number of iterations N (duration of irradiation) mounted to 10 6 cycles. The single centers, which are the sources of formation aggregates, survive in the result of probabilistic nature of formation and recombination genetic pairs of defects and with strictly fixed radius of recombination (the minimum inter anionic distance). For determination the character of same type defects distribution the potential of their interaction depending of defects type and reciprocal distance is calculated. For more detailed study of processes, proceeding in cells with certain sizes of aggregates, the time dependence of potential interaction is constructed. It is shown, that on primary stage the potential is negative, then it increase and approach the saturation in positive area. The minimum of interaction potential corresponds to state of physical chaos in system. Its increasing occurs with formation of same type defects aggregates. Further transition to saturation and 'undulating' character of curves explains by formation and destruction aggregates. The data indicated that - these processes occur simultaneously in cells with different sizes. It allows us to assume that the radiation defects aggregation have a fractal nature

  16. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  17. Genetic Counseling: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis as a clinical and diagnostic problem: molecular pathology and... Article: GENETICS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Genetic counseling for congenital ... March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation Also in Spanish ...

  18. Identification of genetic determinants of the sexual dimorphism in CNS autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Bearoff

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a debilitating chronic inflammatory disease of the nervous system that affects approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide, with higher prevalence in females, and a strong genetic component. While over 200 MS susceptibility loci have been identified in GWAS, the underlying mechanisms whereby they contribute to disease susceptibility remains ill-defined. Forward genetics approaches using conventional laboratory mouse strains are useful in identifying and functionally dissecting genes controlling disease-relevant phenotypes, but are hindered by the limited genetic diversity represented in such strains. To address this, we have combined the powerful chromosome substitution (consomic strain approach with the genetic diversity of a wild-derived inbred mouse strain. Using experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS, we evaluated genetic control of disease course among a panel of 26 consomic strains of mice inheriting chromosomes from the wild-derived PWD strain on the C57BL/6J background, which models the genetic diversity seen in human populations. Nineteen linkages on 18 chromosomes were found to harbor loci controlling EAE. Of these 19 linkages, six were male-specific, four were female-specific, and nine were non-sex-specific, consistent with a differential genetic control of disease course between males and females. An MS-GWAS candidate-driven bioinformatic analysis using orthologous genes linked to EAE course identified sex-specific and non-sex-specific gene networks underlying disease pathogenesis. An analysis of sex hormone regulation of genes within these networks identified several key molecules, prominently including the MAP kinase family, known hormone-dependent regulators of sex differences in EAE course. Importantly, our results provide the framework by which consomic mouse strains with overall genome-wide genetic diversity, approximating that seen in humans, can be used as a rapid and

  19. Patterns of DNA methylation in development, division of labor and hybridization in an ant with genetic caste determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is a common regulator of gene expression, including acting as a regulator of developmental events and behavioral changes in adults. Using the unique system of genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex barbatus, we were able to document changes in DNA methylation during development, and also across both ancient and contemporary hybridization events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sodium bisulfite sequencing demonstrated in vivo methylation of symmetric CG dinucleotides in P. barbatus. We also found methylation of non-CpG sequences. This validated two bioinformatics methods for predicting gene methylation, the bias in observed to expected ratio of CpG dinucleotides and the density of CpG/TpG single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. Frequencies of genomic DNA methylation were determined for different developmental stages and castes using ms-AFLP assays. The genetic caste determination system (GCD is probably the product of an ancestral hybridization event between P. barbatus and P. rugosus. Two lineages obligately co-occur within a GCD population, and queens are derived from intra-lineage matings whereas workers are produced from inter-lineage matings. Relative DNA methylation levels of queens and workers from GCD lineages (contemporary hybrids were not significantly different until adulthood. Virgin queens had significantly higher relative levels of DNA methylation compared to workers. Worker DNA methylation did not vary among developmental stages within each lineage, but was significantly different between the currently hybridizing lineages. Finally, workers of the two genetic caste determination lineages had half as many methylated cytosines as workers from the putative parental species, which have environmental caste determination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that DNA methylation may be a conserved regulatory mechanism moderating division of labor in both bees and ants. Current and historic

  20. The use of ISSR markers for species determination and a genetic study of the invasive lionfish in Guanahacabibes, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Labastida

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The red lionfish (Pterois volitans and devil fire-fish (Pterois miles are invasive species that pose a threat to the biodiversity and stability of coral reefs in the Western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Species identification of lionfish is uncertain in some parts of Cuba, and research has mainly been focused on their biology and ecology. The principal aim of this study was to determine highly polymorphic markers (Inter Simple Sequence Repeat, ISSR that could be used in research on lionfish population genetics in addition to confirming the presence of Pterois species in the Guanahacabibes National Park. The genetic profile or "fingerprint" of individuals collected in Mexico, formally identified as P. volitans, was compared with the genetic profile of specimens from Cuba. There were very few "diagnostic bands" and a high number of "common bands", demonstrating that the same species exists in both countries. Furthermore, Nei's genetic distance and the unrooted tree do not show significant differences between both localities. In light of these results, we can confirm the presence of P. volitans in the Guanahacabibes National Park, Cuba. This study demonstrates the functionality of ISSR as a molecular tool for species identification and their application for genetic population studies of this invasive fish species.

  1. Vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome in co-occurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Herlin, Morten; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background: The vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome are rare conditions. We aimed to present two cases with the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac...... defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser co-occurrence from our local surgical center and through a systematic literature search detect published cases. Furthermore, we aimed to collect existing knowledge...... in the embryopathogenesis and genetics in order to discuss a possible link between the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. Case presentation: Our first case was a white girl...

  2. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  3. Genetic determination of human facial morphology: links between cleft-lips and normal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; van der Lijn, Fedde; Liu, Fan; Günther, Manuel; Sinigerova, Stella; Nowak, Stefanie; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Herberz, Ruth; Klein, Stefan; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Niessen, Wiro J; Breteler, Monique M B; van der Lugt, Aad; Würtz, Rolf P; Nöthen, Markus M; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Mangold, Elisabeth; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-11-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and other previous studies showed distinctly differing facial distance measurements when comparing unaffected relatives of NSCL/P patients with normal controls. Here, we test the hypothesis that genetic loci involved in NSCL/P also influence normal variation in facial morphology. We tested 11 SNPs from 10 genomic regions previously showing replicated evidence of association with NSCL/P for association with normal variation of nose width and bizygomatic distance in two cohorts from Germany (N=529) and the Netherlands (N=2497). The two most significant associations found were between nose width and SNP rs1258763 near the GREM1 gene in the German cohort (P=6 × 10(-4)), and between bizygomatic distance and SNP rs987525 at 8q24.21 near the CCDC26 gene (P=0.017) in the Dutch sample. A genetic prediction model explained 2% of phenotype variation in nose width in the German and 0.5% of bizygomatic distance variation in the Dutch cohort. Although preliminary, our data provide a first link between genetic loci involved in a pathological facial trait such as NSCL/P and variation of normal facial morphology. Moreover, we present a first approach for understanding the genetic basis of human facial appearance, a highly intriguing trait with implications on clinical practice, clinical genetics, forensic intelligence, social interactions and personal identity.

  4. Quantitative determination of casein genetic variants in goat milk: Application in Girgentana dairy goat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Maria; Segreto, Roberta; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Sardina, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to quantify casein genetic variants (αs2-, β-, and κ-casein) in milk of homozygous individuals of Girgentana goat breed. For calibration experiments, pure genetic variants were extracted from individual milk samples of animals with known genotypes. The described HPLC approach was precise, accurate and highly suitable for quantification of goat casein genetic variants of homozygous individuals. The amount of each casein per allele was: αs2-casein A = 2.9 ± 0.8 g/L and F = 1.8 ± 0.4 g/L; β-casein C = 3.0 ± 0.8 g/L and C1 = 2.0 ± 0.7 g/L and κ-casein A = 1.6 ± 0.3 g/L and B = 1.1 ± 0.2 g/L. A good correlation was found between the quantities of αs2-casein genetic variants A and F, and β-casein C and C1 with other previously described method. The main important result was obtained for κ-casein because, till now, no data were available on quantification of single genetic variants for this protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic determination of the biological radiation response in inbred mice lines; Genetische Determination der biologischen Strahlenantwort in Mausinzuchtstaemmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomolka, M.; Hornhardt, S.; Jung, T. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz Oberschleissheim (Germany). Institut fuer Strahlenhygiene

    2000-07-01

    Variation in radiation sensitivity and radiation resistance is influenced by the genetic constitution of an individual. Loss of function of genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle or controlled cell death can have serious consequences on individual radiation sensitivity. For example, individuals suffering on the clinical syndrome of Ataxia telangiectasia exhibit radiation sensitivity in the order of 2-3 magnitudes higher than other cancer patients. For radiation protection it is important to clarify the role of genetic predisposition for radiation sensitivity in clinical healthy people. Therefore, data were collected from the literature describing the genetic variation (heritability) of radiation sensitivity in the mouse model. A heritability of 30-50% was calculated for 27 inbred mice lines by Roderick (1963) based on days of survival after a daily dose of 1 Gy {gamma}-irradiation. The following inbred lines were described in the literature as radiation sensitive (phenotypical markers were e.g., time of survival, mortality, reduction in fertility post exposure): SWR, RIII, NC, K, HLG, DBA, CBA, BALB/c, A, AKR. Radiation resistance was demonstrated in SJL, SEC, RF, MA, C58, C57BR, BDP and 129. Parameter of longevity, some physiological, biochemical and immunological parameters as given in the data bank of the Jackson Laboratory, U.S.A., were compared between radiation sensitive and radiation resistant inbred strains. No correlation was seen for the most of the parameters except for the development of breast cancer. In 6 out of 10 radiosensitive inbred strains breast cancer is described while only 1 of 8 strains exhibits breast cancer. The higher heritability of 30-50% in spite of a very complex phenotype like survival and the correlation between radiosensitivity and tumour incidence show that individual genetic susceptibility is important on the biological radiation reaction. (orig.) [German] Die phaenotypische Variation der Strahlensensitivitaet und

  6. Genetic, nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants in developmental programming of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, Allan; Brøns, Charlotte; Gillberg, Linn

    2014-01-01

    Low birthweight (LBW) individuals and offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) exhibit increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and associated cardiometabolic traits in adulthood, which for both groups may be mediated by adverse events and developmental changes in fetal...... factors. Indeed, it has been shown that genetic changes influencing risk of diabetes may also be associated with reduced fetal growth as a result of reduced insulin secretion and/or action. Similarly, increased risk of T2D among offspring could be explained by T2D susceptibility genes shared between...... life. T2D is a multifactorial disease occurring as a result of complicated interplay between genetic and both prenatal and postnatal nongenetic factors, and it remains unknown to what extent the increased risk of T2D associated with LBW or GDM in the mother may be due to, or confounded by, genetic...

  7. Microsatellite markers to determine population genetic structure in the golden anchovy, Coilia dussumieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvelpandian, A; Gopalakrishnan, A; Lakra, W S; Krishna, Gopal; Sharma, Rupam; Musammilu, K K; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2014-06-01

    Coilia dussumieri (Valenciennes, 1848) commonly called as golden anchovy, constitutes a considerable fishery in the northern part of both the west and east coasts of India. Despite its clear-cut geographic isolation, the species is treated as a unit stock for fishery management purposes. We evaluated 32 microsatellite primer pairs from three closely related species (resource species) belonging to the family Engraulidae through cross-species amplification in C. dussumieri. Successful cross-priming was obtained with 10 loci, which were sequenced for confirmation of repeats. Loci were tested for delineating the genetic stock structure of four populations of C. dussumieri from both the coasts of India. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 to 18, with a mean of 12.3. Results of pairwise F ST indicated genetic stock structuring between the east and west coast populations of India and also validated the utilization of identified microsatellite markers in population genetic structure analysis.

  8. The long-term behavior of lightweight and heavyweight meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects is determined by the host tissue repair process provoked by the mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Gemma; Hernández-Gascón, Belén; Rodríguez, Marta; Sotomayor, Sandra; Peña, Estefania; Calvo, Begoña; Bellón, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    Although heavyweight (HW) or lightweight (LW) polypropylene (PP) meshes are widely used for hernia repair, other alternatives have recently appeared. They have the same large-pore structure yet are composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study compares the long-term (3 and 6 months) behavior of meshes of different pore size (HW compared with LW) and composition (PP compared with PTFE). Partial defects were created in the lateral wall of the abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits and then repaired by the use of a HW or LW PP mesh or a new monofilament, large-pore PTFE mesh (Infinit). At 90 and 180 days after implantation, tissue incorporation, gene and protein expression of neocollagens (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction/immunofluorescence), macrophage response (immunohistochemistry), and biomechanical strength were determined. Shrinkage was measured at 90 days. All three meshes induced good host tissue ingrowth, yet the macrophage response was significantly greater in the PTFE implants (P .05). Host collagen deposition is mesh pore size dependent whereas the macrophage response induced is composition dependent with a greater response shown by PTFE. In the long term, macroporous meshes show comparable biomechanical behavior regardless of their pore size or composition. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Defect chemistry of ''BaCuO2''. Pt. 1. Oxygen non-stoichiometry, cation molecularity and X-ray diffraction determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinolo, G.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia; Anselmi-Tamburini, U.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia; Arimondi, M.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia; Ghigna, P.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia; Flor, G.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia

    1995-01-01

    ''BaCuO 2 '' is the key intermediate in the synthesis of the Ba 2 YCu 3 O 7-δ superconductor. Its very complex crystal structure is able to accommodate a large change in oxygen content. Oxygen non-stoichiometry of ''BaCuO 2 '' materials with 1:1 and 88:90 (Ba:Cu) molecularity has been investigated by polythermal X-ray powder diffraction coupled with isobaric-isothermal gravimetry determinations under different temperature and oxygen partial pressure conditions [300 ≤ T ≤ 820 C, 1 ≥ P(O 2 ) ≥3 . 10 -3 atm]. The 1:1 composition does not give well reproducible results, thus suggesting its polyphasic nature, at least in part of the investigated range. The results for the 88:90 ≅ 0.98 (Ba:Cu) composition are well reproducible and show that the material is single phase. Ba 0.98 CuO 1.98 + δ is oxygen over-stoichiometric in the whole investigated [T, P(O 2 )] range, with a maximum value δ ∼ 0.21. A Rietveld X-ray profile fitting is in agreement with previous single-crystal data. The trend of δ vs. P(O 2 ) is consistent with the presence of oxygen interstitial defects on (possibly different) crystallographic sites. (orig.)

  10. Dispersal ability and habitat requirements determine landscape-level genetic patterns in desert aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipsen, Ivan C; Kirk, Emily H; Bogan, Michael T; Mims, Meryl C; Olden, Julian D; Lytle, David A

    2015-01-01

    Species occupying the same geographic range can exhibit remarkably different population structures across the landscape, ranging from highly diversified to panmictic. Given limitations on collecting population-level data for large numbers of species, ecologists seek to identify proximate organismal traits-such as dispersal ability, habitat preference and life history-that are strong predictors of realized population structure. We examined how dispersal ability and habitat structure affect the regional balance of gene flow and genetic drift within three aquatic insects that represent the range of dispersal abilities and habitat requirements observed in desert stream insect communities. For each species, we tested for linear relationships between genetic distances and geographic distances using Euclidean and landscape-based metrics of resistance. We found that the moderate-disperser Mesocapnia arizonensis (Plecoptera: Capniidae) has a strong isolation-by-distance pattern, suggesting migration-drift equilibrium. By contrast, population structure in the flightless Abedus herberti (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) is influenced by genetic drift, while gene flow is the dominant force in the strong-flying Boreonectes aequinoctialis (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). The best-fitting landscape model for M. arizonensis was based on Euclidean distance. Analyses also identified a strong spatial scale-dependence, where landscape genetic methods only performed well for species that were intermediate in dispersal ability. Our results highlight the fact that when either gene flow or genetic drift dominates in shaping population structure, no detectable relationship between genetic and geographic distances is expected at certain spatial scales. This study provides insight into how gene flow and drift interact at the regional scale for these insects as well as the organisms that share similar habitats and dispersal abilities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington's genetic assimilation

  12. Determinants of genetic structure in a nonequilibrium metapopulation of the plant Silene latifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Fields

    Full Text Available Population genetic differentiation will be influenced by the demographic history of populations, opportunities for migration among neighboring demes and founder effects associated with repeated extinction and recolonization. In natural populations, these factors are expected to interact with each other and their magnitudes will vary depending on the spatial distribution and age structure of local demes. Although each of these effects has been individually identified as important in structuring genetic variance, their relative magnitude is seldom estimated in nature. We conducted a population genetic analysis in a metapopulation of the angiosperm, Silene latifolia, from which we had more than 20 years of data on the spatial distribution, demographic history, and extinction and colonization of demes. We used hierarchical Bayesian methods to disentangle which features of the populations contributed to among population variation in allele frequencies, including the magnitude and direction of their effects. We show that population age, long-term size and degree of connectivity all combine to affect the distribution of genetic variance; small, recently-founded, isolated populations contributed most to increase FST in the metapopulation. However, the effects of population size and population age are best understood as being modulated through the effects of connectivity to other extant populations, i.e. FST diminishes as populations age, but at a rate that depends how isolated the population is. These spatial and temporal correlates of population structure give insight into how migration, founder effect and within-deme genetic drift have combined to enhance and restrict genetic divergence in a natural metapopulation.

  13. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington

  14. Genetically Determined Insulin Resistance is Characterized by Down-Regulation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas M; Skov, Vibe; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and high-risk individuals have demonstrated a co-ordinated down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) genes, suggesting a link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, whether...... mitochondrial dysfunction is a cause or consequence of insulin resistance remains to be clarified. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative metabolism was down-regulated in skeletal muscle of patients with genetically determined insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle biopsies.......02), and complex V (ATP5B; p=0.005). Our data demonstrate that genetically determined insulin resistance is associated with a co-ordinated down-regulation of OxPhos components both at the transcriptional and translational level. These findings suggest that an impaired biological response to insulin in skeletal...

  15. Patterns of DNA Methylation in Development, Division of Labor and Hybridization in an Ant with Genetic Caste Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Chris R.; Mutti, Navdeep S.; Jasper, W. Cameron; Naidu, Agni; Smith, Christopher D.; Gadau, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is a common regulator of gene expression, including acting as a regulator of developmental events and behavioral changes in adults. Using the unique system of genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex barbatus, we were able to document changes in DNA methylation during development, and also across both ancient and contemporary hybridization events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sodium bisulfite sequencing demonstrated in vivo methylation of symmetric CG dinucle...

  16. Markerless Escherichia coli rrn Deletion Strains for Genetic Determination of Ribosomal Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Selwyn; Skovgaard, Ole; McLaughlin, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Single-copy rrn strains facilitate genetic ribosomal studies in Escherichia coli. Consecutive markerless deletion of rrn operons resulted in slower growth upon inactivation of the fourth copy, which was reversed by supplying transfer RNA genes encoded in rrn operons in trans. Removal of the sixth...

  17. Annual cycles of metabolic rate are genetically determined but can be shifted by phenotypic flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, M. A.; Helm, B.; Gwinner, E.; Tieleman, B. I.

    2012-01-01

    Birds have adjusted their life history and physiological traits to the characteristics of the seasonally changing environments they inhabit. Annual cycles in physiology can result from phenotypic flexibility or from variation in its genetic basis. A key physiological trait that shows seasonal

  18. Proteomic studies related to genetic determinants of variability in protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvatovich, Peter; Franke, Lude; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation has multiple effects on the proteome. It may influence the expression level of proteins, modify their sequences through single nucleotide polymorphisms, the occurrence of allelic variants, or alternative splicing (ASP) events. This perspective paper summarizes the major effects of

  19. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA. ME......-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia....

  20. Host Genetic Variation Does Not Determine Spatio-Temporal Patterns of European Bat 1 Lyssavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, Cécile; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Dellicour, Simon; Casademont, Isabelle; Kergoat, Lauriane; Lepelletier, Anthony; Dacheux, Laurent; Baele, Guy; Monchâtre-Leroy, Elodie; Cliquet, Florence; Lemey, Philippe; Bourhy, Hervé

    2017-11-01

    The majority of bat rabies cases in Europe are attributed to European bat 1 lyssavirus (EBLV-1), circulating mainly in serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus). Two subtypes have been defined (EBLV-1a and EBLV-1b), each associated with a different geographical distribution. In this study, we undertake a comprehensive sequence analysis based on 80 newly obtained EBLV-1 nearly complete genome sequences from nine European countries over a 45-year period to infer selection pressures, rates of nucleotide substitution, and evolutionary time scale of these two subtypes in Europe. Our results suggest that the current lineage of EBLV-1 arose in Europe ∼600 years ago and the virus has evolved at an estimated average substitution rate of ∼4.19×10-5 subs/site/year, which is among the lowest recorded for RNA viruses. In parallel, we investigate the genetic structure of French serotine bats at both the nuclear and mitochondrial level and find that they constitute a single genetic cluster. Furthermore, Mantel tests based on interindividual distances reveal the absence of correlation between genetic distances estimated between viruses and between host individuals. Taken together, this indicates that the genetic diversity observed in our E. serotinus samples does not account for EBLV-1a and -1b segregation and dispersal in Europe. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Comparing Parental Well-Being and Its Determinants across Three Different Genetic Disorders Causing Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yuka; Downs, Jenny; Wong, Kingsley; Heyworth, Jane; Leonard, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Using the Short Form 12 Health Survey this cross-sectional study examined parental well-being in caregivers of children with one of three genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability; Down syndrome, Rett syndrome and the CDKL5 disorder. Data were sourced from the Western Australian Down Syndrome (n = 291), Australian Rett Syndrome (n…

  2. Vector choice determines immunogenicity and potency of genetic vaccines against Angola Marburg virus in nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Bailey, Michael; Geisbert, Joan B.; Asiedu, Clement; Roederer, Mario; Grazia-Pau, Maria; Custers, Jerome; Jahrling, Peter; Goudsmit, Jaap; Koup, Richard; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    The immunogenicity and durability of genetic vaccines are influenced by the composition of gene inserts and choice of delivery vector. DNA vectors are a promising vaccine approach showing efficacy when combined in prime-boost regimens with recombinant protein or viral vectors, but they have shown

  3. Independent genetic control of maize (Zea mays L.) kernel weight determination and its phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Prado, Santiago; Sadras, Víctor O; Borrás, Lucas

    2014-08-01

    Maize kernel weight (KW) is associated with the duration of the grain-filling period (GFD) and the rate of kernel biomass accumulation (KGR). It is also related to the dynamics of water and hence is physiologically linked to the maximum kernel water content (MWC), kernel desiccation rate (KDR), and moisture concentration at physiological maturity (MCPM). This work proposed that principles of phenotypic plasticity can help to consolidated the understanding of the environmental modulation and genetic control of these traits. For that purpose, a maize population of 245 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was grown under different environmental conditions. Trait plasticity was calculated as the ratio of the variance of each RIL to the overall phenotypic variance of the population of RILs. This work found a hierarchy of plasticities: KDR ≈ GFD > MCPM > KGR > KW > MWC. There was no phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits per se and trait plasticities. MWC, the trait with the lowest plasticity, was the exception because common quantitative trait loci were found for the trait and its plasticity. Independent genetic control of a trait per se and genetic control of its plasticity is a condition for the independent evolution of traits and their plasticities. This allows breeders potentially to select for high or low plasticity in combination with high or low values of economically relevant traits. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Population Structure of Bovine Neospora caninum Determined by Microsatellite Genotyping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P.; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N . caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N . caninum , which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N . caninum -derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N . caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N . caninum . Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N . caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise F ST. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal

  5. Embryonic aneuploidy does not differ among genetic ancestry according to continental origin as determined by ancestry informative markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franasiak, Jason M; Olcha, Meir; Shastri, Shefali; Molinaro, Thomas A; Congdon, Haley; Treff, Nathan R; Scott, Richard T

    2016-10-01

    Is embryonic aneuploidy, as determined by comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS), related to genetic ancestry, as determined by ancestry informative markers (AIMs)? In this study, when determining continental ancestry utilizing AIMs, genetic ancestry does not have an impact on embryonic aneuploidy. Aneuploidy is one of the best-characterized barriers to ART success and little information exists regarding ethnicity and whole chromosome aneuploidy in IVF. Classifying continental ancestry utilizing genetic profiles from a selected group of single nucleotide polymorphisms, termed AIMs, can determine ancestral origin with more accuracy than self-reported data. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing their first cycle of IVF with CCS at a single center from 2008 to 2014. There were 2328 patients identified whom had undergone IVF/CCS and AIM genotyping. All patients underwent IVF/ICSI and CCS after trophectoderm biopsy. Patients' serum was genotyped using 32 custom AIMs to identify continental origin. Admixture proportions were determined using Bayesian clustering algorithms. Patients were assigned to the population (European, African, East Asian or Central/South Asian) corresponding to their greatest admixture proportion. The mean number of embryos tested was 5.3 (range = 1-40) and the mode was 1. Patients' ethnic classifications revealed European (n = 1698), African (n = 103), East Asian (n = 206) or Central/South Asian (n = 321). When controlling for age and BMI, aneuploidy rate did not differ by genetic ancestry (P = 0.28). The study type (retrospective) and the ability to classify patients by continental rather than sub-continental origin as well as the predominantly European patient mix may impact generalizability. Post hoc power calculation revealed power to detect a 16.8% difference in embryonic aneuploidy between the two smallest sample size groups. These data do not support differences in embryonic aneuploidy among various genetic

  6. Genetic determinants of facial clefting: analysis of 357 candidate genes using two national cleft studies from Scandinavia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanand Jugessur

    Full Text Available Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark: 235 case-parent triads.We used two complementary statistical methods, TRIMM and HAPLIN, to look for associations across these two national samples. TRIMM tests for association in each gene by using multi-SNP genotypes from case-parent triads directly without the need to infer haplotypes. HAPLIN on the other hand estimates the full haplotype distribution over a set of SNPs and estimates relative risks associated with each haplotype. For isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (I-CL/P, TRIMM and HAPLIN both identified significant associations with IRF6 and ADH1C in both populations, but only HAPLIN found an association with FGF12. For isolated cleft palate (I-CP, TRIMM found associations with ALX3, MKX, and PDGFC in both populations, but only the association with PDGFC was identified by HAPLIN. In addition, HAPLIN identified an association with ETV5 that was not detected by TRIMM.Strong associations with seven genes were replicated in the Scandinavian samples and our approach effectively replicated the strongest previously known association in clefting--with IRF6. Based on two national cleft cohorts of similar ancestry, two robust statistical methods and a large panel of SNPs in the most promising cleft candidate genes to date, this study identified a previously unknown association with clefting for ADH1C and provides additional candidates and analytic approaches to advance the field.

  7. Age-Based Differences in the Genetic Determinants of Glycemic Control: A Case of FOXO3 Variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Sun

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is a trait of healthy ageing and is crucial to the elderly, but less consideration has been given to the age composition in most studies involving genetics and hyperglycemia.Seven variants in FOXO3 were genotyped in three cohorts (n = 2037; LLI, MI_S and MI_N; mean age: 92.5 ± 3.6, 45.9 ± 8.2 and 46.8 ± 10.3, respectively to compare the contribution of FOXO3 to fasting hyperglycemia (FH between long-lived individuals (LLI, aged over 90 years and middle-aged subjects (aged from 35-65 years.A different genetic predisposition of FOXO3 alleles to FH was observed between LLI and both of two middle-aged cohorts. In the LLI cohort, the longevity beneficial alleles of three variants with the haplotype "AGGC" in block 1 were significantly protective to FH, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C and HOMA-IR. Notably, combining multifactor dimensionality reduction and logistic regression, we identified a significant 3-factor interaction model (rs2802288, rs2802292 and moderate physical activity associated with lower FH risk. However, not all of the findings were replicated in the two middle-aged cohorts.Our data provides a novel insight into the inconsistent genetic determinants between middle-aged and LLI subjects. FOXO3 might act as a shared genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia and lifespan.

  8. Age-Based Differences in the Genetic Determinants of Glycemic Control: A Case of FOXO3 Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Hu, Caiyou; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Chenguang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Zeping; Huang, Zezhi; Qi, Keyan; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Qin; Yang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a trait of healthy ageing and is crucial to the elderly, but less consideration has been given to the age composition in most studies involving genetics and hyperglycemia. Seven variants in FOXO3 were genotyped in three cohorts (n = 2037; LLI, MI_S and MI_N; mean age: 92.5 ± 3.6, 45.9 ± 8.2 and 46.8 ± 10.3, respectively) to compare the contribution of FOXO3 to fasting hyperglycemia (FH) between long-lived individuals (LLI, aged over 90 years) and middle-aged subjects (aged from 35-65 years). A different genetic predisposition of FOXO3 alleles to FH was observed between LLI and both of two middle-aged cohorts. In the LLI cohort, the longevity beneficial alleles of three variants with the haplotype "AGGC" in block 1 were significantly protective to FH, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C and HOMA-IR. Notably, combining multifactor dimensionality reduction and logistic regression, we identified a significant 3-factor interaction model (rs2802288, rs2802292 and moderate physical activity) associated with lower FH risk. However, not all of the findings were replicated in the two middle-aged cohorts. Our data provides a novel insight into the inconsistent genetic determinants between middle-aged and LLI subjects. FOXO3 might act as a shared genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia and lifespan.

  9. Defining defect specifications to optimize photomask production and requalification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekowsky, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Reducing defect repairs and accelerating defect analysis is becoming more important as the total cost of defect repairs on advanced masks increases. Photomask defect specs based on printability, as measured on AIMS microscopes has been used for years, but the fundamental defect spec is still the defect size, as measured on the photomask, requiring the repair of many unprintable defects. ADAS, the Automated Defect Analysis System from AVI is now available in most advanced mask shops. It makes the use of pure printability specs, or "Optimal Defect Specs" practical. This software uses advanced algorithms to eliminate false defects caused by approximations in the inspection algorithm, classify each defect, simulate each defect and disposition each defect based on its printability and location. This paper defines "optimal defect specs", explains why they are now practical and economic, gives a method of determining them and provides accuracy data.

  10. Populational genetic structure of free-living maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus determined by proteic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. R. De Mattos

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic analysis of presumptive twenty gene loci products was conducted in hemolisates and plasma samples of twenty-eight maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus from an area in northeastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The area sampled was divided into three sub-areas, with the Mogi-Guaçu and Pardo rivers regarded as barriers to the gene flow. The polymorphism degree and heterozygosity level (intralocus and average estimated in this study were similar to those detected by other authors for maned wolves and other species of wild free-living canids. The samples of each sub-area and the total sample exhibited genotype frequencies consistent with the genetic equilibrium model. The values of the F-statistics evidenced absence of inbreeding and population subdivision and, consequently, low genetic distances were found among the samples of each area.

  11. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  12. Genetic and pharmacokinetic determinants of response to transdermal nicotine in white, black, and Asian nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, D A; St Helen, G; Jacob, P; Tyndale, R F; Benowitz, N L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine genetic, pharmacokinetic, and demographic factors that influence sensitivity to nicotine in never-smokers. Sixty never-smokers, balanced for gender and race (white, black, and Asian), wore 7-mg nicotine skin patches for up to 8 h. Serial plasma nicotine concentrations and subjective and cardiovascular effects were measured, and genetic variation in the CYP2A6 gene, encoding the primary enzyme responsible for nicotine metabolism, was assessed. Nicotine toxicity requiring patch removal developed in nine subjects and was strongly associated with rate of increase and peak concentrations of plasma nicotine. Toxicity and subjective and cardiovascular effects of nicotine were associated with the presence of reduced-function CYP2A6 alleles, presumably reflecting slow nicotine metabolic inactivation. This study has implications for understanding individual differences in responses to nicotine medications, particularly when they are used for treating medical conditions in nonsmokers, and possibly in vulnerability to developing nicotine dependence.

  13. Genetic mapping of the regulator gene determining enterotoxin synthesis in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, N.I.; Livanova, L.F.; Shaginyan, I.A.; Motin, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Data on the genetic mapping of mutation tox-7 (the mutation affecting the synthesis of the cholera toxin) were obtained by conjugation crosses between the atoxigenic donor strain Vibrio cholerae Eltor and the toxigenic recipient strain V. cholera classica. The molecular and genetic analysis of the Tox - recombinants indicated that, when the synthesis of the cholera toxin is disrupted in these strains, the tox-7 mutation (which impairs the regulator gene tox) is gained. Close linkage between the tox-7 and pur-63 mutations was established (during the selection procedure there was 81.1% combined transfer with respect to marker pur-63 situated in the donor strain chromosome more proximal than mutation tox-7). The markers were localized in the following order in the region under investigation: asp-cys-nal-pur-61-trp-his-pur-63-tox-7-ile

  14. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; Wout, Angelique van’t; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  15. Genetic Determinants for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Related Metabolic Traits in Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16x10-06; OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98x10-05; OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60’ OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  16. Mapping genetic determinants of coronary microvascular remodeling in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mancini, M.; Petretto, E.; Kleinert, C.; Scavone, A.; De, T.; Cook, S.; Šilhavý, Jan; Zídek, Václav; Pravenec, Michal; d´Amati, G.; Camici, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2013), s. 316 ISSN 0300-8428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11049; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : arterial hypertension * coronary circulation * myocardial ischemia * spontaneously hypertensive rat * recombinant inbred strains Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.955, year: 2013

  17. Genetic determinants for gestational diabetes mellitus and related metabolic traits in Mexican women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Huerta-Chagoya

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI, as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs, in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16 x 10(-06; OR=2.95 and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98 x 10(-05; OR=0.55. In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60' OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727 and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358. Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM.

  18. Determinants of Excess Genetic Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction - A Matched Case-Control Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valenta, Zdeněk; Mazura, Ivan; Kolář, M.; Feglarová, Petra; Peleška, Jan; Tomečková, Marie; Kalina, Jan; Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2012), s. 34-43 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : genome-wide association study * gene expression * myocardial infarction * genetic predisposition * predictive modeling Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2012/1/Valenta_en.pdf

  19. Biochemical traits useful for the determination of genetic variation in a natural population of Myracrodruon urundeuva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdala Ludmila

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were to analyze seeds from 20 trees of aroeira (Myracrodruon urundeuva Fr. All. of a natural population located in the region of Selvíria, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in order to evaluate their protein, lipid and carbohydrate contents, and to estimate their genetic variation. A completely randomized experimental design consisting of 20 treatments (families was set up, with two replications. Four types of proteins were detected: albumin (35.0 to 107.3 mg/g seed, globulin (3.4 to 9.3 mg/g, prolamin (60.0 to 135.2 mg/g and glutelin (118.0 to 286.0 mg/g. The lipid content varied between 200 and 334 mg/g seed. The total sugars also varied (26.5 to 46.3 mg/g seed, with a predominance of polyols (arabinitol, mannitol, glucitol and xylitol. The main monosaccharides detected were glucose and arabinose. Total hydrolysis of the sugars indicated the presence of neutral arabinan and xylan oligosaccharides. The starch content varied from 0.35 to 1.58 mg/g seed. These biochemical traits showed considerable genetic variability, indicating that only the collection of seeds from many different trees can provide a representative sample of the population for conservation and genetic improvement.

  20. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Idewaki

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671 was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2. The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2. Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2. In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  1. Depth profiles of defects in Ar-iondashirradiated steels determined by a least-squares fit of S parameters from variable-energy positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, Takeo; Takamura, Saburo; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Ito, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Using a new method for reconstructing the depth profile of defects in an iondashirradiated sample by using slow positrons, the depth profiles of vacancy-type defects in 316 stainless steel samples, irradiated with 250 keV Ar ions to a dose of 7.5 × 10 19 m -2 at room temperature, have been calculated from Doppler-broadening S parameters measured as a function of positron energies up to 16 keV. Without assuming any type of shape for the defect profiles, such as Gaussian, the defect profiling is done using a least-squares fitting method. The resulting profile suggests that in as-irradiated 316 stainless steel samples with lower carbon content, the defect distribution peaks at a depth four times larger than that of the ion range. After annealing at a high temperature of 1253 K for 0.5 h, the fitted profile shows that the peak around the average ion range is highly enhanced. While in the steel added with 0.3 wt% titanium, the profile exhibits almost no peak after annealing at 1073 K. The results indicate that the radiationdashproduced vacancy clusters are stabilized by the implanted Ar atoms more effectively in the Ti-free steel than in the Ti-added steel.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of intrinsic defects and Mg transmutants in 3C–SiC determined by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jiang, Weilin; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of transmutant Mg in 3C–SiC due to high-energy neutron irradiation associated with the fusion nuclear environment. The formation and binding energies of intrinsic defects, Mg-related defects, and clusters in 3C–SiC are systematically calculated. The minimum energy paths and activation energies during point defect migration and small cluster evolution are studied using a generalized solid-state nudged elastic band (G-SSNEB) method with DFT energy calculations. Stable defect structures and possible defect migration mechanisms are identified. The evolution of binding energies during Mg 2 Si formation demonstrates that the formation of Mg 2 Si needs to overcome a critical nucleus size and nucleation barrier. It is found that C vacancies promote the formation of the Mg 2 Si nucleus, and formation of which results in a compressive stress field around the nucleus. These data are important inputs in meso- and macro-scale modeling and experiments to understand and predict the impact of Mg on phase stability, microstructure evolution, and performance of SiC and SiC-based materials during long-term neutron exposures

  3. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants, and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.

    OpenAIRE

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Veldhuizen, M.E. van; Riel, E. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients’ participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare professionals and patients. Questionnaire-based telephone interviews about awareness, perceptions, and reasons for (non-) participation in cancer genetic counseling were conducted with 78 ...

  4. Genetic determinants of UV-susceptibility in non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen M Welsh

    Full Text Available A milieu of cytokines and signaling molecules are involved in the induction of UV-induced immune suppression and thus the etiology of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Targeting the UV-induced immunosuppression pathway, and using a large population based study of NMSC, we have investigated the risk associated with functional variants in 10 genes (IL10, IL4, IL4R, TNF, TNFR2, HTR2A, HRH2, IL12B, PTGS2, and HAL. The most prominent single genetic effect was observed for IL10. There was increasing risk for both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC with increasing number of variant IL10 haplotypes (BCC: p(trend = 0.0048; SCC: p(trend = 0.031. Having two IL10 GC haplotypes was associated with increased odds ratios of BCC and SCC (OR(BCC = 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; OR(SCC = 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9, and these associations were largely confined to women (OR(BCC = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.4; SCC: OR(SCC = 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0. To examine how combinations of these variants contribute to risk of BCC and SCC, we used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR and classification and regression trees (CART. Results from both of these methods found that in men, a combination of skin type, burns, IL10, IL4R, and possibly TNFR2 were important in both BCC and SCC. In women, skin type, burns, and IL10 were the most critical risk factors in SCC, with risk of BCC involving these same factors plus genetic variants in HTR2A, IL12B and IL4R. These data suggest differential genetic susceptibility to UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer risk by gender.

  5. Population genetics of traditionally managed maize : farming practice as a determinant of genetic structure and identity of maize landraces in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of crop genetic diversity is being maintained in farmers' fields worldwide. The population genetics of traditionally managed landraces is therefore of interest to the conservation of genetic resources. The growing trend towards agricultural modernization and the prospect of

  6. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  7. Selection and determination of beam weights based on genetic algorithms for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Zunliang Wang

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the selection of beam weights for external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. A fitness function is defined, which includes a difference function to achieve a least-square fit to doses at preselected points in a planning target volume, and a penalty item to constrain the maximum allowable doses delivered to critical organs. Adjustment between the dose uniformity within the target volume and the dose constraint to the critical structures can be achieved by varying the beam weight variables in the fitness function. A floating-point encoding schema and several operators, like uniform crossover, arithmetical crossover, geometrical crossover, Gaussian mutation and uniform mutation, have been used to evolve the population. Three different cases were used to verify the correctness of the algorithm and quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and three-dimensional dose distributions were given. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm presented here has considerable potential. (author)

  8. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fonseca Benevenuto

    Full Text Available Some genetically modified (GM plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses.

  9. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Male and female meiotic behaviour of an intrachromosomal insertion determined by preimplantation genetic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doshi Alpesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two related family members, a female and a male balanced carrier of an intrachromosomal insertion on chromosome 7 were referred to our centre for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. This presented a rare opportunity to investigate the behaviour of the insertion chromosome during meiosis in two related carriers. The aim of this study was to carry out a detailed genetic analysis of the preimplantation embryos that were generated from the three treatment cycles for the male and two for the female carrier. Patients underwent in vitro fertilization and on day 3, 22 embryos from the female carrier and 19 embryos from the male carrier were biopsied and cells analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Follow up analysis of 29 untransferred embryos was also performed for confirmation of the diagnosis and to obtain information on meiotic and mitotic outcome. Results In this study, the female carrier produced more than twice as many chromosomally balanced embryos as the male (76.5% vs. 36%, and two pregnancies were achieved for her. Follow up analysis showed that the male carrier had produced more highly abnormal embryos than the female (25% and 15% respectively and no pregnancies occurred for the male carrier and his partner. Conclusion This study compares how an intrachromosomal insertion has behaved in the meiotic and preimplantation stages of development in sibling male and female carriers. It confirms that PGD is an appropriate treatment in such cases. Reasons for the differing outcome for the two carriers are discussed.

  11. Genetic analysis of the pedigrees and molecular defects of the GH-receptor gene in the Israeli cohort of patients with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, Orit; Laron, Zvi

    2006-08-01

    Out of the 63 patients with Laron Syndrome ( LS) followed in our clinic we were able to perform a genetic analysis on 43 patients belonging to 28 families. Twenty-seven patients were Jews, eight were Arabs, one was Druze, and six were Caucasians from countries other then Israel. Consanguinity was found in 11 families. Molecular analysis of the growth hormone receptor gene was performed in 32 patients and 32 family members. From the study of the pedigrees, as well as the GH receptor gene analysis, we confirmed an earlier report from our group that LS is a recessively inherited disease. One patient with a classical phenotype of LS had a non-classical pattern of inheritance: R43X heterozygosity together with a heterozygous polymorphism G168G; a condition which needs further exploration.

  12. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent : participation determinants and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J E; van Dulmen, A M; Velthuizen, M E; van Riel, E; Ausems, M G E M

    2017-01-01

    Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients' participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare

  13. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants, and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Veldhuizen, M.E. van; Riel, E. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients’ participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of

  14. The European Prader-Willi Syndrome Clinical Research Database: An Aid in the Investigation of a Rare Genetically Determined Neurodevelopmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A.; Whittington, J.; Cohen, O.; Curfs, L.; Delahaye, F.; Dudley, O.; Horsthemke, B.; Lindgren, A. -C.; Nourissier, C.; Sharma, N.; Vogels, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex phenotype that changes with age. The rarity of the syndrome and the need to control for different variables such as genetic sub-type, age and gender limits clinical studies of sufficient size in any one country. A clinical research…

  15. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  16. Sex impact on the quality of fatty liver and its genetic determinism in mule ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Etancelin, C; Retailleau, B; Alinier, A; Vitezica, Z G

    2015-09-01

    Recent changes to French regulations now allow farmers to produce "foie gras" from both male and female mule ducks. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of female fatty liver and to compare, from a phenotypic and genetic point of view, liver quality in males and females. A total of 914 mule ducks (591 males and 323 females), hatched in a single pedigree batch, were reared until 86 d of age and then force-fed for 12 d, before being slaughtered. Carcasses and livers were weighed and liver quality was assessed by grading the extent of liver veining and measuring the liver melting rate, either after sterilization of 60 g of liver or pasteurization of 180 g of liver. Sexual dimorphism was observed in favor of males, with a difference of approximately 10% in carcass and liver weights and up to 54% for the liver melting rate. Moreover, one-third of female livers showed moderate to high veining, whereas this was not the case for male livers. The fatty livers of female mule ducks are, therefore, of poorer quality and could not be transformed into a product with the appellation "100% fatty liver." According to sex and parental line, heritability values ranged from 0.12 ± 0.05 to 0.18 ± 0.07 for fatty liver weight and from 0.09 ± 0.05 to 0.18 ± 0.05 for the 2 melting rate traits. The genetic correlations between the fatty liver weight and both melting rates were high (greater than +0.80) in the Muscovy population, whereas in the Pekin population, the liver weight and melting rates were less strongly correlated (estimates ranging from +0.36 ± 0.30 to +0.45 ± 0.28). Selection for lower liver melting rates without reducing the liver weight would, therefore, be easier to achieve in the Pekin population. Finally, as the 2 melting rate measurements are highly correlated (0.91 and over 0.95 for phenotypic and genetic correlations, respectively), we suggest using the easiest method, that is, sterilization of 60 g of liver.

  17. Genetic, metabolite and developmental determinism of fruit friction discolouration in pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Munazza; Brewer, Lester; Johnston, Jason; McGhie, Tony K; Gardiner, Susan E; Heyes, Julian A; Chagné, David

    2014-09-16

    The unattractive appearance of the surface of pear fruit caused by the postharvest disorder friction discolouration (FD) is responsible for significant consumer dissatisfaction in markets, leading to lower returns to growers. Developing an understanding of the genetic control of FD is essential to enable the full application of genomics-informed breeding for the development of new pear cultivars. Biochemical constituents [phenolic compounds and ascorbic acid (AsA)], polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, as well as skin anatomy, have been proposed to play important roles in FD susceptibility in studies on a limited number of cultivars. However, to date there has been no investigation on the biochemical and genetic control of FD, employing segregating populations. In this study, we used 250 seedlings from two segregating populations (POP369 and POP356) derived from interspecific crosses between Asian (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European (P. communis) pears to identify genetic factors associated with susceptibility to FD. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage maps suitable for QTL analysis were developed for the parents of both populations. The maps for population POP369 comprised 174 and 265 SNP markers for the male and female parent, respectively, while POP356 maps comprised 353 and 398 SNP markers for the male and female parent, respectively. Phenotypic data for 22 variables were measured over two successive years (2011 and 2012) for POP369 and one year (2011) only for POP356. A total of 221 QTLs were identified that were linked to 22 phenotyped variables, including QTLs associated with FD for both populations that were stable over the successive years. In addition, clear evidence of the influence of developmental factors (fruit maturity) on FD and other variables was also recorded. The QTLs associated with fruit firmness, PPO activity, AsA concentration and concentration of polyphenol compounds as well as FD are the first

  18. Common genetic variations in the CYP2R1 and GC genes are determinants of vitamin D status in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Ioanna

    Vitamin D is considered a key fat-soluble vitamin critically important for good bone- and overall health throughout life. Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of developing rickets, osteomalacia and osteoporosis, and moreover increases the risk of various non-skeletal adverse health outcomes......), after 6 months intake of vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk (paper II) and in 92 participants in the VitDgen study after artificial UVB irradiation during winter (paper III). Common genetic variations in the CYP2R1 and GC genes were found to be important determinants of vitamin D status in three out...

  19. Neonatal Screening: Some Ethical Issues of Expanding Spectrum for Genetically Determined Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Deryabina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers philosophical questions of neonatal screening technology. The main focus is on ethical and methodological issues that inevitably arise when expanding the number of scanned nosologies and applying genetic research methods. Questions concerning the existing discrepancy between technical capacity and the practical level of healthcare delivery and the probabilistic nature of results obtained by molecular testing are analyzed in terms of methodology. Access to information about the DNA-testing of newborns and the linkage between neonatal screening and prenatal diagnostics are among the most topical ethical problems raised within this article. One of the purposes of this article is to draw the attention of the public — especially it concerns current and prospective parents and volunteer organizations — to these contemporary problems.

  20. Highly impulsive rats: modelling an endophenotype to determine the neurobiological, genetic and environmental mechanisms of addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Jupp

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity describes the tendency of an individual to act prematurely without foresight and is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric co-morbidities, including drug addiction. As such, there is increasing interest in the neurobiological mechanisms of impulsivity, as well as the genetic and environmental influences that govern the expression of this behaviour. Tests used on rodent models of impulsivity share strong parallels with tasks used to assess this trait in humans, and studies in both suggest a crucial role of monoaminergic corticostriatal systems in the expression of this behavioural trait. Furthermore, rodent models have enabled investigation of the causal relationship between drug abuse and impulsivity. Here, we review the use of rodent models of impulsivity for investigating the mechanisms involved in this trait, and how these mechanisms could contribute to the pathogenesis of addiction.

  1. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying...... differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed...... a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals...

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of Campylobacter concisus determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis-based macrorestriction profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsheka, M.I.; Elisha, B.G.; Lastovica, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    1 for pulsed field gel electrophoresis-based genotyping. Subsequently, 53 strains of C concisus, principally from cases of diarrhoea in children, were examined. Fifty-one distinct patterns were obtained, indicating the high discriminatory potential of the method. Patterns comprised between one...... comprised of several genomospecies. The pulsed field gel electrophoresis typing method described here has considerable potential for molecular epidemiological studies of C concisus and may be a useful adjunctive method for helping to resolve key taxonomic issues for this species....... and 14 restriction fragments, with type and reference strains of two well-defined genomospecies of oral and faecal origin containing six and 12 fragments respectively. Our results show that C concisus is genetically diverse and suggest the species as currently defined to be a taxonomic continuum...

  3. Genetic Determinants of RNA Editing Levels of ADAR Targets in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerbol Z. Kurmangaliyev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing usually affects only a fraction of expressed transcripts and there is a vast amount of variation in editing levels of ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific targets. Here we explore natural genetic variation affecting editing levels of particular sites in 81 natural strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The analysis of associations between editing levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms allows us to map putative cis-regulatory regions affecting editing of 16 A-to-I editing sites (cis-RNA editing quantitative trait loci or cis-edQTLs, P < 10−8. The observed changes in editing levels are validated by independent molecular technique. All identified regulatory variants are located in close proximity of modulated editing sites. Moreover, colocalized editing sites are often regulated by same loci. Similar to expression and splicing QTL studies, the characterization of edQTLs will greatly expand our understanding of cis-regulatory evolution of gene expression.

  4. Genetic Determinants of Metabolism and Benign Prostate Enlargement: Associations with Prostate Volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Giri

    Full Text Available Prostate enlargement leading to clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is associated with metabolic dysregulation and obesity. The genetic basis of this association is unclear. Our objective was to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs previously associated with metabolic disorders are also associated with prostate volume (PV. Participants included 876 men referred for prostate biopsy and found to be prostate cancer free. PV was measured by transrectal ultrasound. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. Multivariable adjusted linear regression models were used to evaluate SNPs (additive coding in relation to natural-log transformed (log PV. We compared SNP-PV results from biopsy-negative men to 442 men with low-grade prostate cancer with similar levels of obesity and PV. Beta-coefficients from the discovery and replication samples were then aggregated with fixed effects inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. SNP rs11736129 (near the pseudo-gene LOC100131429 was significantly associated with log-PV (beta: 0.16, p-value 1.16x10(-8 after adjusting for multiple testing. Other noteworthy SNPs that were nominally associated (p-value < 1x10(-4 with log-PV included rs9583484 (intronic SNP in COL4A2, rs10146527 (intronic SNP in NRXN3, rs9909466 (SNP near RPL32P31, and rs2241606 (synonymous SNP in SLC12A7. We found several SNPs in metabolic loci associated with PV. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and elucidate the mechanism between these genetic loci, PV, and clinical BPH.

  5. Dynamical patterning modules: physico-genetic determinants of morphological development and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Stuart A; Bhat, Ramray

    2008-01-01

    The shapes and forms of multicellular organisms arise by the generation of new cell states and types and changes in the numbers and rearrangements of the various kinds of cells. While morphogenesis and pattern formation in all animal species are widely recognized to be mediated by the gene products of an evolutionarily conserved 'developmental-genetic toolkit', the link between these molecular players and the physics underlying these processes has been generally ignored. This paper introduces the concept of 'dynamical patterning modules' (DPMs), units consisting of one or more products of the 'toolkit' genes that mobilize physical processes characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable meso- to macroscopic systems such as cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on lateral inhibition and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We suggest that ancient toolkit gene products, most predating the emergence of multicellularity, assumed novel morphogenetic functions due to change in the scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We show that DPMs, acting individually and in concert with each other, constitute a 'pattern language' capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. The physical dimension of developmental causation implies that multicellular forms during the explosive radiation of animal body plans in the middle Cambrian, approximately 530 million years ago, could have explored an extensive morphospace without concomitant genotypic change or selection for adaptation. The morphologically plastic body plans and organ forms generated by DPMs, and their ontogenetic trajectories, would subsequently have been stabilized and consolidated by natural selection and genetic drift. This perspective also solves the apparent 'molecular homology-analogy paradox', whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development by proposing, in contrast to the Neo

  6. Genetic Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Family's Health (National Institutes of Health) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Genetic Testing updates ... testing and your cancer risk Karyotyping Related Health Topics Birth Defects Genetic Counseling Genetic Disorders Newborn Screening ...

  7. Genetic and pharmacological modifications of thrombin formation in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice determine atherosclerosis severity and atherothrombosis onset in a neutrophil-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borissoff, Julian I.; Otten, Jeroen J. T.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Leenders, Peter; van Oerle, René; Soehnlein, Oliver; Loubele, Sarah T. B. G.; Hamulyák, Karly; Hackeng, Tilman M.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Degen, Jay L.; Weiler, Hartmut; Esmon, Charles T.; van Ryn, Joanne; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; ten Cate, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the blood coagulation activity, determined genetically or by medication, may alter atherosclerotic plaque progression, by influencing pleiotropic effects of coagulation proteases. Published experimental studies have yielded contradictory findings on the role of hypercoagulability in

  8. 78 FR 66891 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... determination of nonregulated status, our analysis of available scientific data, and comments received from the... status and its associated environmental assessment and plant pest risk assessment. This notice also... Stankiewicz Gabel, Chief, Biotechnology Environmental Analysis Branch, Environmental Risk Analysis Programs...

  9. Determination of complex reaction mechanisms: analysis of chemical, biological, and genetic networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross, John; Schreiber, Igor; Vlad, Marcel O

    2006-01-01

    ... Systems, 40 5 Response of Systems to Pulse Perturbations, 46 5.1 5.2 Theory, 46 An Example: The Glycolytic Pathway, 53 6 Experimental Test of the Pulse Perturbation Method for Determining Causa...

  10. Health communication, genetic determinism, and perceived control: the roles of beliefs about susceptibility and severity versus disease essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Kahl, Mary L; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Traeder, Tara

    2012-08-01

    This research examined the lay public's beliefs about genes and health that might be labeled deterministic. The goals of this research were to sort through the divergent and contested meanings of genetic determinism in an effort to suggest directions for public health genomic communication. A survey conducted in community-based settings of 717 participants included 267 who self-reported race as African American and 450 who self-reported race as Caucasian American. The survey results revealed that the structure of genetic determinism included 2 belief sets. One set aligned with perceived threat, encompassing susceptibility and severity beliefs linked to genes and health. The other set represents beliefs about biological essentialism linked to the role of genes for health. These concepts were found to be modestly positively related. Threat beliefs predicted perceived control over genes. Public health efforts to communicate about genes and health should consider effects of these messages for (a) perceived threat relating to susceptibility and severity and (b) perceptions of disease essentialism. Perceived threat may enhance motivation to act in health protective ways, whereas disease essentialist beliefs may contribute to a loss of motivation associated with control over health.

  11. Properties of point defects either native or induced by irradiation in the 3C and 6H polytypes of silicon carbide determined by positron annihilation and EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbiriou, X.

    2006-02-01

    Potential applications of silicon carbide (SiC) in micro-electronics have justified many studies on point defects, which play an important role in the electrical compensation. Moreover, this material has many assets to take part in the fissile materials confining in the gas cooled reactors of the future (4. generation). In this thesis, we have used Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy to study the properties of point defects (nature, size, charge state, migration and agglomeration during annealing), either native or induced by irradiation with various particles (H + , e - , carbon ions), in the 3C and 6H polytypes of SiC. The positron annihilation study of native defects in 6H-SiC has shown the presence of a strong concentration of non-vacancy traps of acceptor type, which are not present in the 3C-SiC crystals. The nature of the defects detected after irradiation with low energy electrons (190 keV) depends on the polytype. Indeed, while silicon Frenkel pairs and carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 6H crystals, only carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 3C crystals. We propose that these differences concerning the populations of detected point defects result from different values of the silicon displacement threshold energy for the two polytypes (approximately 20 eV for 6H and 25 V for 3C). In addition, the irradiations with 12 MeV protons and 132 MeV carbon ions have created silicon mono-vacancies as well as VSi-VC di-vacancies. Neither the particle (protons or ions carbon), nor the polytype (3C or 6H) influence the nature of the generated defects. Finally the study of the annealing of 6H-SiC monocrystals irradiated with 12 MeV protons have revealed several successive processes. The most original result is the agglomeration of the silicon mono-vacancies with the VSi-VC di-vacancies which leads to the formation of VSi-VC-VSi tri-vacancies. (author)

  12. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of Echinococcus tapeworms in China as determined by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences ✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Minoru; Li, Tiaoying; Han, Xiumin; Ma, Xiumin; Xiao, Ning; Qiu, Jiamin; Wang, Hu; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Mamuti, Wulamu; Wen, Hao; Moro, Pedro L.; Giraudoux, Patrick; Craig, Philip S.; Ito, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of Echinococcus spp. in the eastern Tibetan Plateau and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region were evaluated by DNA sequencing analyses of genes for mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear elongation factor-1 alpha (ef1a). We collected 68 isolates of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) from Xinjiang and 113 isolates of E. granulosus s. s., 49 isolates of Echinococcus multilocularis and 34 isolates of Echinococcus shiquicus from the Tibetan Plateau. The results of molecular identification by mitochondrial and nuclear markers were identical, suggesting the infrequency of introgressive hybridization. A considerable intraspecific variation was detected in mitochondrial cox1 sequences. The parsimonious network of cox1 haplotypes showed star-like features in E. granulosus s. s. and E. multilocularis, but a divergent feature in E. shiquicus. The cox1 neutrality indexes computed by Tajima's D and Fu's Fs tests showed high negative values in E. granulosus s. s. and E. multilocularis, indicating significant deviations from neutrality. In contrast, the low positive values of both tests were obtained in E. shiquicus. These results suggest the following hypotheses: (i) recent founder effects arose in E. granulosus and E. multilocularis after introducing particular individuals into the endemic areas by anthropogenic movement or natural migration of host mammals, and (ii) the ancestor of E. shiquicus was segregated into the Tibetan Plateau by colonizing alpine mammals and its mitochondrial locus has evolved without bottleneck effects. PMID:19800346

  15. ITS1 locus: a major determinant of genetic diversity of Plantago spp. (plantaginaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altantestseg, K.; Baatartsogt, O.; Enkhchimeg, V.

    2018-01-01

    By this study, ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) regions in the nuclear DNA of 10 Plantago samples collected from Mongolia (5 samples) and Vietnam (5 samples) were sequenced and constructed Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Neighbor-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees for establishing the genetic relationship. The results showed that 10 samples belonged to 2 species (7 Plantago major and 3 Plantago depressa). The length of sequences ranged from 632 to 644 bp (ITS1 ranged from 210-222 bp, 5.8S was 162 bp, and ITS2 259 - 261 bp). The ITS1 region was highly variable among the sequences whereas ITS2 and 5.8S regions were more conservative. The MP and NJ trees apparently separated P. major and P. depressa into 2 different groups, supported with high bootstrap values. P. depressa was first time reported in Mongolia. The results highlighted that ITS sequences could distinguish P. major and P. depressa, which is certainly important for pharmacist to use crude drugs derived from Plantago. (author)

  16. DNA cards: determinants of DNA yield and quality in collecting genetic samples for pharmacogenetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Sergi; Crescenti, Anna; Gassó, Patricia; Vidal-Taboada, Jose M; Lafuente, Amalia

    2007-08-01

    As pharmacogenetic studies frequently require establishment of DNA banks containing large cohorts with multi-centric designs, inexpensive methods for collecting and storing high-quality DNA are needed. The aims of this study were two-fold: to compare the amount and quality of DNA obtained from two different DNA cards (IsoCode Cards or FTA Classic Cards, Whatman plc, Brentford, Middlesex, UK); and to evaluate the effects of time and storage temperature, as well as the influence of anticoagulant ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on the DNA elution procedure. The samples were genotyped by several methods typically used in pharmacogenetic studies: multiplex PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, single nucleotide primer extension, and allelic discrimination assay. In addition, they were amplified by whole genome amplification to increase genomic DNA mass. Time, storage temperature and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no significant effects on either DNA card. This study reveals the importance of drying blood spots prior to isolation to avoid haemoglobin interference. Moreover, our results demonstrate that re-isolation protocols could be applied to increase the amount of DNA recovered. The samples analysed were accurately genotyped with all the methods examined herein. In conclusion, our study shows that both DNA cards, IsoCode Cards and FTA Classic Cards, facilitate genetic and pharmacogenetic testing for routine clinical practice.

  17. Determination of the Cascade Reservoir Operation for Optimal Firm-Energy Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmeri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia today face a new paradigm in water management where aim to apply integrated water resources management has become unavoidable task in purpose of achieving greater level of effectiveness and efficiency. On of most interesting case study is the case of Citarum river, one of the most potential river for water supply in West Java, Indonesia. Alongside the river, Saguling, Cirata and Djuanda Reservoirs had been constructed in series/cascade. Saguling and Cirata reservoirs are particularly operated for hydroelectric power and Djuanda is multipurpose reservoir mainly operated for irrigation and contribute domestic water supply for Jakarta (capital city of Indonesia. Basically all reservoirs are relying on same resources, therefore this condition has considered addressing management and operational problem. Therefore, an approach toward new management and operation system are urgently required in order to achieve the effective and efficient output and to avoid conflicts of water used. This study aims to obtain energy production from Citarum Cascade Reservoir System using Genetic Algorithms optimization with the objective function to maximize firm-energy. Firm-energy is the minimum energy requirements must be available in a certain time period. Then, the result obtained by using the energy produced by GA is compared to the conventional searching technique of Non-Linier Programming (NLP. The GA derived operating curves reveal the higher energy and firm-energy than NLP model

  18. Genetic Determinants of RNA Editing Levels of ADAR Targets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmangaliyev, Yerbol Z; Ali, Sammi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2015-12-12

    RNA editing usually affects only a fraction of expressed transcripts and there is a vast amount of variation in editing levels of ADAR (adenosine deaminase, RNA-specific) targets. Here we explore natural genetic variation affecting editing levels of particular sites in 81 natural strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The analysis of associations between editing levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms allows us to map putative cis-regulatory regions affecting editing of 16 A-to-I editing sites (cis-RNA editing quantitative trait loci or cis-edQTLs, P < 10(-8)). The observed changes in editing levels are validated by independent molecular technique. All identified regulatory variants are located in close proximity of modulated editing sites. Moreover, colocalized editing sites are often regulated by same loci. Similar to expression and splicing QTL studies, the characterization of edQTLs will greatly expand our understanding of cis-regulatory evolution of gene expression. Copyright © 2016 Kurmangaliyev et al.

  19. Mycobacterium leprae–host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Souza Salles, Jorgenilce; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae in which susceptibility to the mycobacteria and its clinical manifestations are attributed to the host immune response. Even though leprosy prevalence has decreased dramatically, the high number of new cases indicates active transmission. Owing to its singular features, M. leprae infection is an attractive model for investigating the regulation of human immune responses to pathogen-induced disease. Leprosy is one of the most common causes of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy worldwide. The proportion of patients with disabilities is affected by the type of leprosy and delay in diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the clinical features as well as the immunopathological mechanisms related to the establishment of the different polar forms of leprosy, the mechanisms related to M. leprae–host cell interactions and prophylaxis and diagnosis of this complex disease. Host genetic factors are summarized and the impact of the development of interventions that prevent, reverse or limit leprosy-related nerve impairments are discussed. PMID:21366421

  20. Sex Determination in Bees. IV. Genetic Control of Juvenile Hormone Production in MELIPONA QUADRIFASCIATA (Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Warwick Estevam; Akahira, Yukio; Camargo, Conceição A.

    1975-01-01

    Cell number and volume of corpora allata was determined for 8 phases of development, the first prepupal stage to adults 30 days old, in the social Apidae Melipona quadrifasciata. In the second prepupal stage a strong correlation was found between cell number and body weight ( r=0.651**), and cell number and corpora allata volume in prepupal stage (r=0.535*), which indicates that juvenile hormone has a definite role in caste determination in Melipona. The distribution of the volume of corpus allatum suggest a 3:1 segregation between bees with high volume of corpora allata against low and medium volume. This implies that genes xa and xb code for an enzyme that directly participates in juvenile hormone production. It was also concluded that the number of cells in the second prepupal stage is more important than the weight of the prepupa for caste determination. A scheme summarizing the genic control of sex and caste determination in Melipona bees in the prepupal phase is given. PMID:1213273

  1. Fine-scale variation and genetic determinants of alternative splicing across individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Coulombe-Huntington

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, thanks to the increasing throughput of new technologies, we have begun to explore the full extent of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in the human transcriptome. This is unveiling a vast layer of complexity in isoform-level expression differences between individuals. We used previously published splicing sensitive microarray data from lymphoblastoid cell lines to conduct an in-depth analysis on splicing efficiency of known and predicted exons. By combining publicly available AS annotation with a novel algorithm designed to search for AS, we show that many real AS events can be detected within the usually unexploited, speculative majority of the array and at significance levels much below standard multiple-testing thresholds, demonstrating that the extent of cis-regulated differential splicing between individuals is potentially far greater than previously reported. Specifically, many genes show subtle but significant genetically controlled differences in splice-site usage. PCR validation shows that 42 out of 58 (72% candidate gene regions undergo detectable AS, amounting to the largest scale validation of isoform eQTLs to date. Targeted sequencing revealed a likely causative SNP in most validated cases. In all 17 incidences where a SNP affected a splice-site region, in silico splice-site strength modeling correctly predicted the direction of the micro-array and PCR results. In 13 other cases, we identified likely causative SNPs disrupting predicted splicing enhancers. Using Fst and REHH analysis, we uncovered significant evidence that 2 putative causative SNPs have undergone recent positive selection. We verified the effect of five SNPs using in vivo minigene assays. This study shows that splicing differences between individuals, including quantitative differences in isoform ratios, are frequent in human populations and that causative SNPs can be identified using in silico predictions. Several cases affected disease-relevant genes and

  2. Genetically determined measures of striatal D2 signaling predict prefrontal activity during working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Taurisano, Paolo; Pisciotta, Nicola Marco; Blasi, Giuseppe; Fazio, Leonardo; Romano, Raffaella; Gelao, Barbara; Lo Bianco, Luciana; Lozupone, Madia; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Caforio, Grazia; Sambataro, Fabio; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Papp, Audrey; Ursini, Gianluca; Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Popolizio, Teresa; Sadee, Wolfgang; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2010-02-22

    Variation of the gene coding for D2 receptors (DRD2) has been associated with risk for schizophrenia and with working memory deficits. A functional intronic SNP (rs1076560) predicts relative expression of the two D2 receptors isoforms, D2S (mainly pre-synaptic) and D2L (mainly post-synaptic). However, the effect of functional genetic variation of DRD2 on striatal dopamine D2 signaling and on its correlation with prefrontal activity during working memory in humans is not known. Thirty-seven healthy subjects were genotyped for rs1076560 (G>T) and underwent SPECT with [123I]IBZM (which binds primarily to post-synaptic D2 receptors) and with [123I]FP-CIT (which binds to pre-synaptic dopamine transporters, whose activity and density is also regulated by pre-synaptic D2 receptors), as well as BOLD fMRI during N-Back working memory. Subjects carrying the T allele (previously associated with reduced D2S expression) had striatal reductions of [123I]IBZM and of [123I]FP-CIT binding. DRD2 genotype also differentially predicted the correlation between striatal dopamine D2 signaling (as identified with factor analysis of the two radiotracers) and activity of the prefrontal cortex during working memory as measured with BOLD fMRI, which was positive in GG subjects and negative in GT. Our results demonstrate that this functional SNP within DRD2 predicts striatal binding of the two radiotracers to dopamine transporters and D2 receptors as well as the correlation between striatal D2 signaling with prefrontal cortex activity during performance of a working memory task. These data are consistent with the possibility that the balance of excitatory/inhibitory modulation of striatal neurons may also affect striatal outputs in relationship with prefrontal activity during working memory performance within the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical pathway.

  3. Genetically determined measures of striatal D2 signaling predict prefrontal activity during working memory performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bertolino

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Variation of the gene coding for D2 receptors (DRD2 has been associated with risk for schizophrenia and with working memory deficits. A functional intronic SNP (rs1076560 predicts relative expression of the two D2 receptors isoforms, D2S (mainly pre-synaptic and D2L (mainly post-synaptic. However, the effect of functional genetic variation of DRD2 on striatal dopamine D2 signaling and on its correlation with prefrontal activity during working memory in humans is not known.Thirty-seven healthy subjects were genotyped for rs1076560 (G>T and underwent SPECT with [123I]IBZM (which binds primarily to post-synaptic D2 receptors and with [123I]FP-CIT (which binds to pre-synaptic dopamine transporters, whose activity and density is also regulated by pre-synaptic D2 receptors, as well as BOLD fMRI during N-Back working memory.Subjects carrying the T allele (previously associated with reduced D2S expression had striatal reductions of [123I]IBZM and of [123I]FP-CIT binding. DRD2 genotype also differentially predicted the correlation between striatal dopamine D2 signaling (as identified with factor analysis of the two radiotracers and activity of the prefrontal cortex during working memory as measured with BOLD fMRI, which was positive in GG subjects and negative in GT.Our results demonstrate that this functional SNP within DRD2 predicts striatal binding of the two radiotracers to dopamine transporters and D2 receptors as well as the correlation between striatal D2 signaling with prefrontal cortex activity during performance of a working memory task. These data are consistent with the possibility that the balance of excitatory/inhibitory modulation of striatal neurons may also affect striatal outputs in relationship with prefrontal activity during working memory performance within the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical pathway.

  4. Genetic Determinants of Cisplatin Resistance in Patients With Advanced Germ Cell Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrodia, Aditya; Lee, Byron H; Lee, William; Cha, Eugene K; Sfakianos, John P; Iyer, Gopa; Pietzak, Eugene J; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Zabor, Emily C; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Syed, Aijazuddin; Arcila, Maria E; Chaganti, Raju S; Kundra, Ritika; Eng, Jana; Hreiki, Joseph; Vacic, Vladimir; Arora, Kanika; Oschwald, Dayna M; Berger, Michael F; Bajorin, Dean F; Bains, Manjit S; Schultz, Nikolaus; Reuter, Victor E; Sheinfeld, Joel; Bosl, George J; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Solit, David B; Feldman, Darren R

    2016-11-20

    Purpose Owing to its exquisite chemotherapy sensitivity, most patients with metastatic germ cell tumors (GCTs) are cured with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, up to 30% of patients with advanced GCT exhibit cisplatin resistance, which requires intensive salvage treatment, and have a 50% risk of cancer-related death. To identify a genetic basis for cisplatin resistance, we performed whole-exome and targeted sequencing of cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCTs. Methods Men with GCT who received a cisplatin-containing chemotherapy regimen and had available tumor tissue were eligible to participate in this study. Whole-exome sequencing or targeted exon-capture-based sequencing was performed on 180 tumors. Patients were categorized as cisplatin sensitive or cisplatin resistant by using a combination of postchemotherapy parameters, including serum tumor marker levels, radiology, and pathology at surgical resection of residual disease. Results TP53 alterations were present exclusively in cisplatin-resistant tumors and were particularly prevalent among primary mediastinal nonseminomas (72%). TP53 pathway alterations including MDM2 amplifications were more common among patients with adverse clinical features, categorized as poor risk according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) model. Despite this association, TP53 and MDM2 alterations predicted adverse prognosis independent of the IGCCCG model. Actionable alterations, including novel RAC1 mutations, were detected in 55% of cisplatin-resistant GCTs. Conclusion In GCT, TP53 and MDM2 alterations were associated with cisplatin resistance and inferior outcomes, independent of the IGCCCG model. The finding of frequent TP53 alterations among mediastinal primary nonseminomas may explain the more frequent chemoresistance observed with this tumor subtype. A substantial portion of cisplatin-resistant GCTs harbor actionable alterations, which might respond to targeted therapies. Genomic

  5. A common variation in EDAR is a genetic determinant of shovel-shaped incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Takeda, Mayako; Kondo, Osamu; Toma, Takashi; Haneji, Kuniaki; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Matsukusa, Hirotaka; Kawamura, Shoji; Maki, Koutaro; Osawa, Motoki; Ishida, Hajime; Oota, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Shovel shape of upper incisors is a common characteristic in Asian and Native American populations but is rare or absent in African and European populations. Like other common dental traits, genetic polymorphisms involved in the tooth shoveling have not yet been clarified. In ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR), where dysfunctional mutations cause hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, there is a nonsynonymous-derived variant, 1540C (rs3827760), that has a geographic distribution similar to that of the tooth shoveling. This allele has been recently reported to be associated with Asian-specific hair thickness. We aimed to clarify whether EDAR 1540C is also associated with dental morphology. For this purpose, we measured crown diameters and tooth-shoveling grades and analyzed the correlations between the dental traits and EDAR genotypes in two Japanese populations, inhabitants around Tokyo and in Sakishima Islands. The number of EDAR 1540C alleles in an individual was strongly correlated with the tooth-shoveling grade (p = 7.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of the allele was additive and explained 18.9% of the total variance in the shoveling grade, which corresponds to about one-fourth of the heritability of the trait reported previously. For data reduction of individual-level metric data, we applied a principal-component analysis, which yielded PC1-4, corresponding to four patterns of tooth size; this result implies that multiple factors are involved in dental morphology. The 1540C allele also significantly affected PC1 (p = 4.9 x 10(-3)), which denotes overall tooth size, and PC2 (p = 2.6 x 10(-3)), which denotes the ratio of mesiodistal diameter to buccolingual diameter.

  6. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  7. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, Iain F H

    2005-09-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tones. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalization (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

  8. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purchase, Iain F.H.

    2005-01-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies

  9. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purchase, Iain F.H. [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

  10. Genetic and anatomic determinants of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection of Culex (Melanoconion taeniopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan L Kenney

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE is a re-emerging, mosquito-borne viral disease with the potential to cause fatal encephalitis in both humans and equids. Recently, detection of endemic VEE caused by enzootic strains has escalated in Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador, emphasizing the importance of understanding the enzootic transmission cycle of the etiologic agent, VEE virus (VEEV. The majority of work examining the viral determinants of vector infection has been performed in the epizootic mosquito vector, Aedes (Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus. Based on the fundamental differences between the epizootic and enzootic cycles, we hypothesized that the virus-vector interaction of the enzootic cycle is fundamentally different from that of the epizootic model. We therefore examined the determinants for VEEV IE infection in the enzootic vector, Culex (Melanoconion taeniopus, and determined the number and susceptibility of midgut epithelial cells initially infected and their distribution compared to the epizootic virus-vector interaction. Using chimeric viruses, we demonstrated that the determinants of infection for the enzootic vector are different than those observed for the epizootic vector. Similarly, we showed that, unlike A. taeniorhynchus infection with subtype IC VEEV, C. taeniopus does not have a limited subpopulation of midgut cells susceptible to subtype IE VEEV. These findings support the hypothesis that the enzootic VEEV relationship with C. taeniopus differs from the epizootic virus-vector interaction in that the determinants appear to be found in both the nonstructural and structural regions, and initial midgut infection is not limited to a small population of susceptible cells.

  11. The Decision Support System (DSS) Application to Determination of Diabetes Mellitus Patient Menu Using a Genetic Algorithm Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliyana, Nia; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro; Adi, Kusworo

    2018-02-01

    Composition of foods containing sugar in people with Diabetes Mellitus should be balanced, so an app is required for facilitate the public and nutritionists in determining the appropriate food menu with calorie requirement of diabetes patient. This research will be recommended to determination of food variation for using Genetic Algorithm. The data used is nutrient content of food obtained from Tabel Komposisi Pangan Indonesia (TKPI). The requirement of caloric value the patient can be used the PERKENI 2015 method. Then the data is processed to determine the best food menu consisting of energy (E), carbohydrate (K), fat (L) and protein (P) requirements. The system is comparised with variation of Genetic Algorithm parameters is the total of chromosomes, Probability of Crossover (Pc) and Probability of Mutation (Pm). Maximum value of the probability generation of crossover and probability of mutation will be the more variations of food that will come out. For example, patient with gender is women aged 61 years old, height 160 cm, weight 55 kg, will be resulted number of calories: (E=1621.4, K=243.21, P=60.80, L=45.04), with the gene=4, chromosomes=3, generation=3, Pc=0.2, and Pm=0.2. The result obtained is the three varians: E=1607.25, K=198.877, P=95.385, L=47.508), (E=1633.25, K=196.677, P=85.885, L=55.758), (E=1630.90, K=177.455, P=85.245, L=64.335).

  12. Genetic interactions between the chromosome axis-associated protein Hop1 and homologous recombination determinants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon David; Jarosinska, Olga Dorota; Lorenz, Alexander

    2018-03-17

    Hop1 is a component of the meiosis-specific chromosome axis and belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of HORMA domain proteins. Hop1 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes are a major factor in promoting double-strand DNA break formation and inter-homolog recombination. In budding yeast and mammals, they are also involved in a meiotic checkpoint kinase cascade monitoring the completion of double-strand DNA break repair. We used the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks a canonical synaptonemal complex to test whether Hop1 has a role beyond supporting the generation of double-strand DNA breaks and facilitating inter-homolog recombination events. We determined how mutants of homologous recombination factors genetically interact with hop1, studied the role(s) of the HORMA domain of Hop1, and characterized a bio-informatically predicted interactor of Hop1, Aho1 (SPAC688.03c). Our observations indicate that in fission yeast, Hop1 does require its HORMA domain to support wild-type levels of meiotic recombination and localization to meiotic chromatin. Furthermore, we show that hop1∆ only weakly interacts genetically with mutants of homologous recombination factors, and in fission yeast likely has no major role beyond break formation and promoting inter-homolog events. We speculate that after the evolutionary loss of the synaptonemal complex, Hop1 likely has become less important for modulating recombination outcome during meiosis in fission yeast, and that this led to a concurrent rewiring of genetic pathways controlling meiotic recombination.

  13. Genetically determined ancestry is more informative than self-reported race in HIV-infected and -exposed children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Stephen A.; Brummel, Sean S.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Maihofer, Adam X.; Singh, Kumud K.; Purswani, Murli U.; Williams, Paige L.; Hazra, Rohan; Van Dyke, Russell; Seage, George R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), the largest ongoing longitudinal study of perinatal HIV-infected (PHIV) and HIV-exposed, uninfected (PHEU) children in the United States, comprises the Surveillance Monitoring of Antiretroviral Therapy [ART] Toxicities (SMARTT) Study in PHEU children and the Adolescent Master Protocol (AMP) that includes PHIV and PHEU children ≥7 years. Although race/ethnicity is often used to assess health outcomes, this approach remains controversial and may fail to accurately reflect the backgrounds of ancestry-diverse populations as represented in the PHACS participants. In this study, we compared genetically determined ancestry (GDA) and self-reported race/ethnicity (SRR) in the PHACS cohort. GDA was estimated using a highly discriminative panel of 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms and compared to SRR. Because SRR was similar between the PHIV and PHEU, and between the AMP and SMARTT cohorts, data for all unique 1958 participants were combined. According to SRR, 63% of study participants identified as Black/African-American, 27% White, and 34% Hispanic. Using the highest percentage of ancestry/ethnicity to identify GDA, 9.5% of subjects were placed in the incorrect superpopulation based on SRR. When ≥50% or ≥75% GDA of a given superpopulation was required, 12% and 25%, respectively, of subjects were placed in the incorrect superpopulation based on SRR, and the percent of subjects classified as multiracial increased. Of 126 participants with unidentified SRR, 71% were genetically identified as Eurasian. GDA provides a more robust assessment of race/ethnicity when compared to self-report, and study participants with unidentified SRR could be assigned GDA using genetic markers. In addition, identification of continental ancestry removes the taxonomic identification of race as a variable when identifying risk for clinical outcomes. PMID:27603370

  14. Genetically determined differences in the resistance to myocardial infarction in Wistar and August rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, L M; Saltykova, V A; Pshennikova, M G

    2001-06-01

    In intact August rats, the cardiac contractile function at rest was by 76% higher than in Wistar rats, while their hearts, both intact and after acute myocardial infarction, were more resistant to isometric load than the hearts of Wistar rats. Postinfarction mortality in August rats was 18% vs. 70% in Wistar rats. Adrenoreactivity of the myocardium in August rats was decreased compared to that in Wistar rats. These peculiarities can determine high resistance of August rats to myocardial infarction.

  15. [Application of multiple polymorphism genetic markers in determination of half sibling sharing a same mother].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Ting-zhi; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2010-08-01

    Determination strategies for half sibling sharing a same mother were investigated through the detection of autosomal and X-chromosomal STR (X-STR) loci and polymorphisms on hypervariable (HV) region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Genomic DNA were extracted from blood stain samples of the 3 full siblings and one dubious half sibling sharing the same mother with them. Fifteen autosomal STR loci were genotyped by Sinofiler kit, and 19 X-STR loci were genotyped by Mentype Argus X-8 kit and 16 plex in-house system. Polymorphisms of mtDNA HV-I and HV-II were also detected with sequencing technology. Full sibling relationship between the dubious half sibling and each of the 3 full siblings were excluded based on the results of autosomal STR genotyping and calculation of full sibling index (FSI) and half sibling index (HIS). Results of sequencing for mtDNA HV-I and HV-II showed that all of the 4 samples came from a same maternal line. X-STR genotyping results determined that the dubious half sibling shared a same mother with the 3 full siblings. It is reliable to combine three different genotyping technologies including autosomal STR, X-STR and sequencing of mtDNA HV-I and HV-II for determination of half sibling sharing a same mother.

  16. Clinical and Genetic Determinants of Warfarin Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics during Treatment Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Inna Y.; Schwarz, Ute I.; Crown, Natalie; Dresser, George K.; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Zou, GuangYong; Roden, Dan M.; Stein, C. Michael; Rodger, Marc; Wells, Philip S.; Kim, Richard B.; Tirona, Rommel G.

    2011-01-01

    Variable warfarin response during treatment initiation poses a significant challenge to providing optimal anticoagulation therapy. We investigated the determinants of initial warfarin response in a cohort of 167 patients. During the first nine days of treatment with pharmacogenetics-guided dosing, S-warfarin plasma levels and international normalized ratio were obtained to serve as inputs to a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model. Individual PK (S-warfarin clearance) and PD (Imax) parameter values were estimated. Regression analysis demonstrated that CYP2C9 genotype, kidney function, and gender were independent determinants of S-warfarin clearance. The values for Imax were dependent on VKORC1 and CYP4F2 genotypes, vitamin K status (as measured by plasma concentrations of proteins induced by vitamin K absence, PIVKA-II) and weight. Importantly, indication for warfarin was a major independent determinant of Imax during initiation, where PD sensitivity was greater in atrial fibrillation than venous thromboembolism. To demonstrate the utility of the global PK-PD model, we compared the predicted initial anticoagulation responses with previously established warfarin dosing algorithms. These insights and modeling approaches have application to personalized warfarin therapy. PMID:22114699

  17. Genetic determinants of cardiovascular events among women with migraine: a genome-wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schürks

    Full Text Available Migraine is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Both migraine and CVD are highly heritable. However, the genetic liability for CVD among migraineurs is unclear.We performed a genome-wide association study for incident CVD events during 12 years of follow-up among 5,122 migraineurs participating in the population-based Women's Genome Health Study. Migraine was self-reported and CVD events were confirmed after medical records review. We calculated odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI and considered a genome-wide p-value <5×10(-8 as significant.Among the 5,122 women with migraine 164 incident CVD events occurred during follow-up. No SNP was associated with major CVD, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or CVD death at the genome-wide level; however, five SNPs showed association with p<5×10(-6. Among migraineurs with aura rs7698623 in MEPE (OR = 6.37; 95% CI 3.15-12.90; p = 2.7×10(-7 and rs4975709 in IRX4 (OR = 5.06; 95% CI 2.66-9.62; p = 7.7×10(-7 appeared to be associated with ischemic stroke, rs2143678 located close to MDF1 with major CVD (OR = 3.05; 95% CI 1.98-4.69; p = 4.3×10(-7, and the intergenic rs1406961 with CVD death (OR = 12.33; 95% CI 4.62-32.87; p = 5.2×10(-7. Further, rs1047964 in BACE1 appeared to be associated with CVD death among women with any migraine (OR = 4.67; 95% CI 2.53-8.62; p = 8.0×10(-7.Our results provide some suggestion for an association of five SNPs with CVD events among women with migraine; none of the results was genome-wide significant. Four associations appeared among migraineurs with aura, two of those with ischemic stroke. Although our population is among the largest with migraine and incident CVD information, these results must be treated with caution, given the limited number of CVD events among women with migraine and the low minor allele frequencies for three of the SNPs. Our results await independent replication

  18. Multiplicative interaction of functional inflammasome genetic variants in determining the risk of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K; Day, Richard O; Kannangara, Diluk Rw; Williams, Kenneth M; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Timothy L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R

    2015-10-13

    The acute gout flare results from a localised self-limiting innate immune response to monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposited in joints in hyperuricaemic individuals. Activation of the caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 8 (CARD8) NOD-like receptor pyrin-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome by MSU crystals and production of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is central to acute gouty arthritis. However very little is known about genetic control of the innate immune response involved in acute gouty arthritis. Therefore our aim was to test functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants in the toll-like receptor (TLR)-inflammasome-IL-1β axis for association with gout. 1,494 gout cases of European and 863 gout cases of New Zealand (NZ) Polynesian (Māori and Pacific Island) ancestry were included. Gout was diagnosed by the 1977 ARA gout classification criteria. There were 1,030 Polynesian controls and 10,942 European controls including from the publicly-available Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Framingham Heart (FHS) studies. The ten SNPs were either genotyped by Sequenom MassArray or by Affymetrix SNP array or imputed in the ARIC and FHS datasets. Allelic association was done by logistic regression adjusting by age and sex with European and Polynesian data combined by meta-analysis. Sample sets were pooled for multiplicative interaction analysis, which was also adjusted by sample set. Eleven SNPs were tested in the TLR2, CD14, IL1B, CARD8, NLRP3, MYD88, P2RX7, DAPK1 and TNXIP genes. Nominally significant (P gout were detected at CARD8 rs2043211 (OR = 1.12, P = 0.007), IL1B rs1143623 (OR = 1.10, P = 0.020) and CD14 rs2569190 (OR = 1.08; P = 0.036). There was significant multiplicative interaction between CARD8 and IL1B (P = 0.005), with the IL1B risk genotype amplifying the risk effect of CARD8. There is evidence for association of gout with functional variants in CARD8, IL1B and CD14. The gout-associated allele of IL1B increases

  19. An optimization method for defects reduction in fiber laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Li, Peigen; Mi, Gaoyang; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Laser welding has been widely used in automotive, power, chemical, nuclear and aerospace industries. The quality of welded joints is closely related to the existing defects which are primarily determined by the welding process parameters. This paper proposes a defects optimization method that takes the formation mechanism of welding defects and weld geometric features into consideration. The analysis of welding defects formation mechanism aims to investigate the relationship between welding defects and process parameters, and weld features are considered to identify the optimal process parameters for the desired welded joints with minimum defects. The improved back-propagation neural network possessing good modeling for nonlinear problems is adopted to establish the mathematical model and the obtained model is solved by genetic algorithm. The proposed method is validated by macroweld profile, microstructure and microhardness in the confirmation tests. The results show that the proposed method is effective at reducing welding defects and obtaining high-quality joints for fiber laser keyhole welding in practical production.

  20. The haptoglobin promoter polymorphism rs5471 is the most definitive genetic determinant of serum haptoglobin level in a Ghanaian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Teye, Kwesi; Koda, Yoshiro

    2018-08-01

    The serum haptoglobin (HP) level varies in various clinical conditions and among individuals. Recently, the common HP alleles, rs5472, and rs2000999 have been reported to associate with serum HP level, but no studies have been done on Africans. Here, we explored the relationship of not only these polymorphisms but also rs5470 and rs5471 to the serum HP level in 121 Ghanaians. Genotyping of rs2000999 was performed by PCR using hydrolysis probes, while the other polymorphisms have been already genotyped. Serum HP level was measured by a sandwich ELISA. We observed a significant association between rs5471 and the serum HP level (p = 0.026). It was also observed within the subgroups of HP 2 /HP 2 and HP 2 /HP 1 . In addition, we detected a trend toward lower HP levels for individuals with the A allele of rs2000999 than those without A, but it was not statistically significant (p = 0.156). However, we did not observe the clear associations between other polymorphisms and serum HP level that were observed for Europeans and Asians because of the small sample size and the complexity of SNPs affecting the HP level. We suggest that rs5471 is a strong genetic determinant of HP levels in Ghanaians, and this seems to be characteristic of Africans. Further investigation using large scale samples will help in understanding the genetic background of individual variability of the serum HP level. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward automatic phenotyping of retinal images from genetically determined mono- and dizygotic twins using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, P.; Davis, B.; Murray, V.; Pattichis, M.; Barriga, S.; Russell, S.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents an image processing technique for automatically categorize age-related macular degeneration (AMD) phenotypes from retinal images. Ultimately, an automated approach will be much more precise and consistent in phenotyping of retinal diseases, such as AMD. We have applied the automated phenotyping to retina images from a cohort of mono- and dizygotic twins. The application of this technology will allow one to perform more quantitative studies that will lead to a better understanding of the genetic and environmental factors associated with diseases such as AMD. A method for classifying retinal images based on features derived from the application of amplitude-modulation frequency-modulation (AM-FM) methods is presented. Retinal images from identical and fraternal twins who presented with AMD were processed to determine whether AM-FM could be used to differentiate between the two types of twins. Results of the automatic classifier agreed with the findings of other researchers in explaining the variation of the disease between the related twins. AM-FM features classified 72% of the twins correctly. Visual grading found that genetics could explain between 46% and 71% of the variance.

  2. Improved Monkey-King Genetic Algorithm for Solving Large Winner Determination in Combinatorial Auction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhong

    Using GA solve the winner determination problem (WDP) with large bids and items, run under different distribution, because the search space is large, constraint complex and it may easy to produce infeasible solution, would affect the efficiency and quality of algorithm. This paper present improved MKGA, including three operator: preprocessing, insert bid and exchange recombination, and use Monkey-king elite preservation strategy. Experimental results show that improved MKGA is better than SGA in population size and computation. The problem that traditional branch and bound algorithm hard to solve, improved MKGA can solve and achieve better effect.

  3. [Genetic diagnostics of cancer diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobilanschi, Joana

    2013-11-27

    Cancer is caused by genetic alterations, but only 10% of the cancer diseases are inherited. The probability for an individual or a family of having inherited cancer, individual consequences of the respective results of genetic testing, as well as its costs and reimbursement by the health insurance must be addressed by expert genetic counseling which at-risk requires special expertise. Identification of a germline mutation which may predispose to a variety of different cancer types allows determination of an individual's specific life time risk in symptomatic as well as in a-symptomatic family members. Identification of the underlying defective gene in heritable cancer disorders also enables optimized preventive and novel therapeutic approaches specifically targeting the underlying molecular pathomechanisms.

  4. The relationship between reaction kinetics and mutagenic action of monofunctional alkylating agents in higher eukaryotic systems. IV. The effects of the excision-defective mei-9L1 and mus(2)201D1 mutants on alkylation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, E W; Dusenbery, R L; Smith, P D

    1985-04-01

    Repair-defective mutants of Drosophila melanogaster which identify two major DNA excision repair loci have been examined for their effects on alkylation-induced mutagenesis using the sex-linked recessive lethal assay as a measure of genotoxic endpoint. The alkylating agents (AAs) chosen for comparative analysis were selected on the basis of their reaction kinetics with DNA and included MMS, EMS, MNU, DMN, ENU, DEN and ENNG. Repair-proficient males were treated with the AAs and mated with either excision-defective mei-9L1 or mus(2)201D1 females or appropriate excision-proficient control females. The results of the present work suggest that a qualitative and quantitative relationship exists between the nature and the extent of chemical modification of DNA and the induction of of genetic alterations. The presence of either excision-defective mutant can enhance the frequency of mutation (hypermutability) and this hypermutability can be correlated with the Swain-Scott constant S of specific AAs such that as the SN1 character of the DNA alkylation reaction increases, the difference in response between repair-deficient and repair-proficient females decreases. The order of hypermutability of AAs with mei-9L1 relative to mei-9+ is MMS greater than MNU greater than DMN = EMS greater than iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG. When the percentage of lethal mutations induced in mei-9L1 females are plotted against those determined for control females, straight lines of different slopes are obtained. These mei-9L1/mei-9+ indices are: MMS = 7.6, MNU = 5.4, DMN = 2.4, EMS = 2.4 and iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG = 1. An identical order of hypermutability with similar indices is obtained for the mus(2)201 mutants: MMS(7.3) greater than MNU (5.4) greater than EMS(2.0) greater than ENU(1.1). Thus, absence of excision repair function has a significant effect on mutation production by AAs efficient in alkylating N-atoms in DNA but no measurable influence on mutation production by AAs most efficient in

  5. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application.

  6. Genetic diversity of Taenia hydatigena in the northern part of the West Bank, Palestine as determined by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwan, Kamel; Jayousi, Alaa; Abuseir, Sameh; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Adwan, Ghaleb; Jarrar, Naser

    2018-06-26

    Cysticercus tenuicollis is the metacestode of canine tapeworm Taenia hydatigena, which has been reported in domestic and wild ruminants and is causing veterinary and economic losses in the meat industry. This study was conducted to determine the sequence variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (coxl) gene in 20 isolates of T. hydatigena metacestodes (cysticercus tenuicollis) collected from northern West Bank in Palestine. Nine haplotypes were detected, with one prevailing (55%). The total haplotype diversity (0.705) and the total nucleotide diversity (0.0045) displayed low genetic diversity among our isolates. Haplotype analysis showed a star-shaped network with a centrally positioned common haplotype. The Tajima's D, and Fu and Li's statistics in cysticercus tenuicollis population of this region showed a negative value, indicating deviations from neutrality and both suggested recent population expansion for the population. The findings of this study would greatly help to implement control and preventive measures for T. hydatigena larvae infection in Palestine.

  7. Genetics and Epigenetics of Mating Type Determination in Paramecium and Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orias, Eduardo; Singh, Deepankar Pratap; Meyer, Eric

    2017-09-08

    While sex is an ancient and highly conserved eukaryotic invention, self-incompatibility systems such as mating types or sexes appear to be derived limitations that show considerable evolutionary plasticity. Within a single class of ciliates, Paramecium and Tetrahymena species have long been known to present a wide variety of mating type numbers and modes of inheritance, but only recently have the genes involved been identified. Although similar transmembrane proteins mediate self/nonself recognition in both ciliates, the mechanisms of mating type determination differ widely, ranging from Mendelian systems to developmental nuclear differentiation, either stochastic or maternally inherited. The non-Mendelian systems rely on programmed editing of the germline genome that occurs during differentiation of the somatic nucleus, and they have co-opted different DNA recombination mechanisms-some previously unknown. Here we review the recent molecular advances and some remaining unsolved questions and discuss the possible implications of these diverse mechanisms for inbreeding/outbreeding balance regulation.

  8. Genetic studies on sex determination and colouration in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karayuecel, I.

    1999-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate colour and sex determination mechanisms through the application of androgenesis, gynogenesis and controlled breeding programme with the objective of producing all red males in O. niloticus. The highest yield of androgenetic haploid to pigmentation stage was 24.6±3.5% (relative to controls) with optimal UV irradiation dose of 450JM -2 for 5 minutes. The highest survival rate of diploid androgens was 0.07±0.07% (relative to controls) to yolk sac stage using a heat shock of 42.5 deg. C for 3 minutes 30 seconds applied at 25 minutes after fertilisation. All paternal inheritance of diploid androgenetic tilapia was verified using DNA fingerprinting. The mean recombination frequency of the red skin colour gene in meiotic gynogens was 0.12±0.04. All maternal inheritance of meiotic gynogens was verified using the isozyme locus ADA*. Analyses of sex ratios of meiotic gynogens suggested that male progenies were produced by an epistatic sex determining locus (SDL-2 with two alleles SR and sr) causing female to male sex reversal in the homozygous phase (srsr) but with limited penetrance. A close linkage was found between a sex determining locus (SDL-2) and the red gene. No significant difference was found between colour genotypes (namely homozygous red, heterozygous red and wild type) in terms of total fecundity, ISI (inter spawning interval), egg size and survival rate. Overall mean ISI was 26.3±1.0 days. Mean total fecundity was 1096 eggs. Fecundity varied over successive spawns but this variation did not appear to be related to spawning periodicity. Hormonal and thermal feminization were compared on all YY male progeny of O. niloticus. While similar female percentages of 32.0±5.2 and 33.8±1.5% were produced, significantly higher intersex percentages of 18.5±2.5 and 1.6±0.8 were observed in heat and DES treated groups, respectively. Heat treatment groups showed the lowest survival rate of 62.6±9.8% compared to the

  9. Postgenomics Characterization of an Essential Genetic Determinant of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli are major bacterial pathogens causing bovine mastitis, a disease of great economic impact on dairy production worldwide. This work aimed to study the virulence determinants of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC). By whole-genome sequencing analysis of 40 MPEC and 22 environmental (“dairy-farm” E. coli [DFEC]) strains, we found that only the fec locus (fecIRABCDE) for ferric dicitrate uptake was present in the core genome of MPEC and that it was absent in DFEC genomes (P mastitis, whereas the fec+ DFEC K71 mutant was able to trigger intramammary inflammation. For the first time, a single molecular locus was shown to be crucial in MPEC pathogenicity. PMID:29615502

  10. Genetic studies on sex determination and colouration in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayuecel, I

    1999-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate colour and sex determination mechanisms through the application of androgenesis, gynogenesis and controlled breeding programme with the objective of producing all red males in O. niloticus. The highest yield of androgenetic haploid to pigmentation stage was 24.6{+-}3.5% (relative to controls) with optimal UV irradiation dose of 450JM{sup -2} for 5 minutes. The highest survival rate of diploid androgens was 0.07{+-}0.07% (relative to controls) to yolk sac stage using a heat shock of 42.5 deg. C for 3 minutes 30 seconds applied at 25 minutes after fertilisation. All paternal inheritance of diploid androgenetic tilapia was verified using DNA fingerprinting. The mean recombination frequency of the red skin colour gene in meiotic gynogens was 0.12{+-}0.04. All maternal inheritance of meiotic gynogens was verified using the isozyme locus ADA*. Analyses of sex ratios of meiotic gynogens suggested that male progenies were produced by an epistatic sex determining locus (SDL-2 with two alleles SR and sr) causing female to male sex reversal in the homozygous phase (srsr) but with limited penetrance. A close linkage was found between a sex determining locus (SDL-2) and the red gene. No significant difference was found between colour genotypes (namely homozygous red, heterozygous red and wild type) in terms of total fecundity, ISI (inter spawning interval), egg size and survival rate. Overall mean ISI was 26.3{+-}1.0 days. Mean total fecundity was 1096 eggs. Fecundity varied over successive spawns but this variation did not appear to be related to spawning periodicity. Hormonal and thermal feminization were compared on all YY male progeny of O. niloticus. While similar female percentages of 32.0{+-}5.2 and 33.8{+-}1.5% were produced, significantly higher intersex percentages of 18.5{+-}2.5 and 1.6{+-}0.8 were observed in heat and DES treated groups, respectively. Heat treatment groups showed the lowest survival rate of 62

  11. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by bento(a)pyrene ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schults, Marten A.; Chiu, Roland K.; Nagle, Peter; Kleinjans, J C; van Schooten, Frederik Jan; Godschalk, Roger W.

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification

  12. Method for accurate determination of dissociation constants of optical ratiometric systems: chemical probes, genetically encoded sensors, and interacting molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, Adam; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Miłoch, Anna; Krężel, Artur

    2013-12-03

    Ratiometric chemical probes and genetically encoded sensors are of high interest for both analytical chemists and molecular biologists. Their high sensitivity toward the target ligand and ability to obtain quantitative results without a known sensor concentration have made them a very useful tool in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Although ratiometric sensors are widely used in many applications, their successful and accurate usage depends on how they are characterized in terms of sensing target molecules. The most important feature of probes and sensors besides their optical parameters is an affinity constant toward analyzed molecules. The literature shows that different analytical approaches are used to determine the stability constants, with the ratio approach being most popular. However, oversimplification and lack of attention to detail results in inaccurate determination of stability constants, which in turn affects the results obtained using these sensors. Here, we present a new method where ratio signal is calibrated for borderline values of intensities of both wavelengths, instead of borderline ratio values that generate errors in many studies. At the same time, the equation takes into account the cooperativity factor or fluorescence artifacts and therefore can be used to characterize systems with various stoichiometries and experimental conditions. Accurate determination of stability constants is demonstrated utilizing four known optical ratiometric probes and sensors, together with a discussion regarding other, currently used methods.

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoxetine by molecularly imprinted polypyrrole and optimization by experimental design, artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadali, Azizollah; Motlagh, Maryam Omidvar; Sadeghzadeh, Samira

    2018-02-01

    A selective method based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) solid-phase extraction (SPE) using UV-Vis spectrophotometry as a detection technique was developed for the determination of fluoxetine (FLU) in pharmaceutical and human serum samples. The MIPs were synthesized using pyrrole as a functional monomer in the presence of FLU as a template molecule. The factors that affecting the preparation and extraction ability of MIP such as amount of sorbent, initiator concentration, the amount of monomer to template ratio, uptake shaking rate, uptake time, washing buffer pH, take shaking rate, Taking time and polymerization time were considered for optimization. First a Plackett-Burman design (PBD) consists of 12 randomized runs were applied to determine the influence of each factor. The other optimization processes were performed using central composite design (CCD), artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA). At optimal condition the calibration curve showed linearity over a concentration range of 10- 7-10- 8 M with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9970. The limit of detection (LOD) for FLU was obtained 6.56 × 10- 9 M. The repeatability of the method was obtained 1.61%. The synthesized MIP sorbent showed a good selectivity and sensitivity toward FLU. The MIP/SPE method was used for the determination of FLU in pharmaceutical, serum and plasma samples, successfully.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoxetine by molecularly imprinted polypyrrole and optimization by experimental design, artificial neural network and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadali, Azizollah; Motlagh, Maryam Omidvar; Sadeghzadeh, Samira

    2018-02-05

    A selective method based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) solid-phase extraction (SPE) using UV-Vis spectrophotometry as a detection technique was developed for the determination of fluoxetine (FLU) in pharmaceutical and human serum samples. The MIPs were synthesized using pyrrole as a functional monomer in the presence of FLU as a template molecule. The factors that affecting the preparation and extraction ability of MIP such as amount of sorbent, initiator concentration, the amount of monomer to template ratio, uptake shaking rate, uptake time, washing buffer pH, take shaking rate, Taking time and polymerization time were considered for optimization. First a Plackett-Burman design (PBD) consists of 12 randomized runs were applied to determine the influence of each factor. The other optimization processes were performed using central composite design (CCD), artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA). At optimal condition the calibration curve showed linearity over a concentration range of 10 -7 -10 -8 M with a correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.9970. The limit of detection (LOD) for FLU was obtained 6.56×10 -9 M. The repeatability of the method was obtained 1.61%. The synthesized MIP sorbent showed a good selectivity and sensitivity toward FLU. The MIP/SPE method was used for the determination of FLU in pharmaceutical, serum and plasma samples, successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic determination of the meso-diaminopimelate biosynthetic pathway of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, J D; Weisbrod, T R; Banerjee, A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1994-07-01

    The increasing incidence of multiple-drug-resistant mycobacterial infections indicates that the development of new methods for treatment of mycobacterial diseases should be a high priority. meso-Diaminopimelic acid (DAP), a key component of a highly immunogenic subunit of the mycobacterial peptidoglycan layer, has been implicated as a potential virulence factor. The mycobacterial DAP biosynthetic pathway could serve as a target for design of new antimycobacterial agents as well as the construction of in vivo selection systems. We have isolated the asd, dapA, dapB, dapD, and dapE genes involved in the DAP biosynthetic pathway of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These genes were isolated by complementation of Escherichia coli mutations with an expression library of BCG DNA. Our analysis of these genes suggests that BCG may use more than one pathway for biosynthesis of DAP. The nucleotide sequence of the BCG dapB gene was determined. The activity of the product of this gene in Escherichia coli provided evidence that the gene may encode a novel bifunctional dihydrodipicolinate reductase and DAP dehydrogenase.

  16. Antibiotic resistance determinants and genetic analysis of Salmonella enterica isolated from food in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Manuela; Bouchrif, Brahim; Timinouni, Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Cappuccinelli, Pietro; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-12-23

    Antimicrobial-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are an important cause of infection in Africa, but there is a lack of information on their molecular mechanisms of resistance and epidemiology. This study contributes to fill this gap through the characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), plasmid profiling and analysis of antibiotic-resistance determinants of 94 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from food in Morocco. PFGE revealed considerable heterogeneity among the strains, showing 32 pulsotypes. MLST of strains representative of the different serovars evidenced 13 sequence types (STs), three of which were newly identified (ST1694, ST1768 and ST1818) and nine not previously reported in Morocco. Thirty-four strains harbored from one to four plasmids, of IncI1 group in S. Mbandaka, IncFIIA in S. Typhimurium, IncL/M in S. Hadar and S. Blockley. For the first time in Morocco an intact Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) carrying the resistance genes aadA2, floR, tetG, blaPSE-1 and sul1 was detected in S. Typhimurium DT104. In serovar Hadar resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and streptomycin was associated to blaTEM-1, tetA and strA genes respectively, whereas one mutation in gyrA (Asp87Asn) and one in parC (Thr54Ser) genes conferred resistance to nalidixic acid. These findings improve the information on foodborne Salmonella in Morocco, evidencing the presence of MDR strains potentially dangerous to humans, and provide useful data for future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Postgenomics Characterization of an Essential Genetic Determinant of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Shlomo E; Goldstone, Robert J; Connolly, James P R; Répérant-Ferter, Maryline; Germon, Pierre; Inglis, Neil F; Krifucks, Oleg; Mathur, Shubham; Manson, Erin; Mclean, Kevin; Rainard, Pascal; Roe, Andrew J; Leitner, Gabriel; Smith, David G E

    2018-04-03

    Escherichia coli are major bacterial pathogens causing bovine mastitis, a disease of great economic impact on dairy production worldwide. This work aimed to study the virulence determinants of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC). By whole-genome sequencing analysis of 40 MPEC and 22 environmental ("dairy-farm" E. coli [DFEC]) strains, we found that only the fec locus ( fecIRABCDE ) for ferric dicitrate uptake was present in the core genome of MPEC and that it was absent in DFEC genomes ( P price of dairy products on supermarket shelves and the financial hardships suffered by dairy farmers. Mastitis is also the leading reason for the use of antibiotics in dairy farms. Good farm management practices in many countries have dramatically reduced the incidence of contagious mastitis; however, the problems associated with the incidence of environmental mastitis caused by bacteria such as Escherichia coli have proven intractable. E. coli bacteria cause acute mastitis, which affects the health and welfare of cows and in extreme cases may be fatal. Here we show for the first time that the pathogenicity of E. coli causing mastitis in cows is highly dependent on the fecIRABCDE ferric citrate uptake system that allows the bacterium to capture iron from citrate. The Fec system is highly expressed during infection in the bovine udder and is ubiquitous in and necessary for the E. coli bacteria that cause mammary infections in cattle. These results have far-reaching implications, raising the possibility that mastitis may be controllable by targeting this system. Copyright © 2018 Blum et al.

  18. Vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome in co-occurrence: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Herlin, Morten; Qvist, Niels; Petersen, Michael B

    2016-12-21

    The vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome are rare conditions. We aimed to present two cases with the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser co-occurrence from our local surgical center and through a systematic literature search detect published cases. Furthermore, we aimed to collect existing knowledge in the embryopathogenesis and genetics in order to discuss a possible link between the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. Our first case was a white girl delivered by caesarean section at 37 weeks of gestation; our second case was a white girl born at a gestational age of 40 weeks. A co-occurrence of vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome was diagnosed in both cases. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed ((VACTERL) OR (VATER)) AND ((MRKH) OR (Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser) OR (mullerian agenesis) OR (mullerian aplasia) OR (MURCS)) without limitations. A similar search was performed in Embase and the Cochrane library. We added two cases from our local center. All cases (n = 9) presented with anal atresia and renal defect. Vertebral defects were present in eight patients. Rectovestibular fistula was confirmed in seven patients. Along with the uterovaginal agenesis, fallopian tube aplasia appeared in five of nine cases and in two cases ovarian involvement also existed. The co-occurrence of the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal

  19. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, J E; van Dulmen, A M; Velthuizen, M E; van Riel, E; Ausems, M G E M

    2017-04-01

    Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients' participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare professionals and patients. Questionnaire-based telephone interviews about awareness, perceptions, and reasons for (non-) participation in cancer genetic counseling were conducted with 78 Dutch breast cancer patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent. The interviews were held in Arabic, Berber, Turkish, or Dutch by bilingual research assistants. Additionally, 14 breast cancer patients participated in one of two focus group meetings, and two focus groups were held with 11 healthcare professionals. SPSS and QSR Nvivo were used to examine the quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. Half of the total group of patients (N = 78) and 79% of patients eligible for genetic counseling and testing (N = 33) were aware of the possibility of genetic counseling. The most important determinants for nonparticipation in genetic counseling were experienced difficulties in patient-doctor communication, cultural factors (e.g., social norms), limited health literacy, limited knowledge of the family cancer history, and anxiety about cancer. Religious beliefs and knowing personal and family members' breast cancer risks were motives to obtain genetic counseling. Despite the fact that our study showed that Moroccan and Turkish women reported several personal motives to obtain genetic counseling and testing (GCT), patients and healthcare professionals experience significant language and health literacy difficulties, which make it harder to fully access health care such as genetic counseling and testing.

  20. Defective fatty acid uptake in the spontaneously hypertensive rat is a primary determinant of altered glucose metabolism, hyperinsulinemia, and myocardial hypertrophy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajri, T.; Ibrahimi, A.; Coburn, C. T.; Knapp jr., F. F.; Kurtz, T.; Pravenec, Michal; Abumrad, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 26 (2001), s. 23661-23666 ISSN 0021-9258 Grant - others:NIH-OER(US) RO1-DK33301; AHA(US) AHA0020639T; AHA(US) AHA0030345T Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : fatty acid transperter * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.258, year: 2001

  1. Detection and Assessment Using Positron Emission Tomography of Genetically Determined Defects in Myocardial Fatty Acid Utilization. Final report, 8/1/93-6/30/97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Steven R.

    2000-04-09

    An approach using positron emission tomography (PET) was developed, validated and used to measure myocardial fatty acid metabolism in patients with inherited forms of heart failure. Abnormalities were correlated with the severity of the clinical illness. The approach developed was also shown to identify abnormalities in myocardial fatty acid metabolism in some patients with acquired forms of heart failure. The PET technique thus permits identification of abnormal fatty acid metabolism and provides an approach to evaluate the efficacy of interventional strategies.

  2. Detection and Assessment Using Positron Emission Tomography of Genetically Determined Defects in Myocardial Fatty Acid Utilization. Final report, 8/1/93-6/30/97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Steven R.

    2000-01-01

    An approach using positron emission tomography (PET) was developed, validated and used to measure myocardial fatty acid metabolism in patients with inherited forms of heart failure. Abnormalities were correlated with the severity of the clinical illness. The approach developed was also shown to identify abnormalities in myocardial fatty acid metabolism in some patients with acquired forms of heart failure. The PET technique thus permits identification of abnormal fatty acid metabolism and provides an approach to evaluate the efficacy of interventional strategies

  3. Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Andarzian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wheat production in the south of Khuzestan, Iran is constrained by heat stress for late sowing dates. For optimization of yield, sowing at the appropriate time to fit the cultivar maturity length and growing season is critical. Crop models could be used to determine optimum sowing window for a locality. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the Cropping System Model (CSM-CERES-Wheat for its ability to simulate growth, development, grain yield of wheat in the tropical regions of Iran, and to study the impact of different sowing dates on wheat performance. The genetic coefficients of cultivar Chamran were calibrated for the CSM-CERES-Wheat model and crop model performance was evaluated with experimental data. Wheat cultivar Chamran was sown on different dates, ranging from 5 November to 9 January during 5 years of field experiments that were conducted in the Khuzestan province, Iran, under full and deficit irrigation conditions. The model was run for 8 sowing dates starting on 25 October and repeated every 10 days until 5 January using long-term historical weather data from the Ahvaz, Behbehan, Dezful and Izeh locations. The seasonal analysis program of DSSAT was used to determine the optimum sowing window for different locations as well. Evaluation with the experimental data showed that performance of the model was reasonable as indicated by fairly accurate simulation of crop phenology, biomass accumulation and grain yield against measured data. The normalized RMSE were 3%, 2%, 11.8%, and 3.4% for anthesis date, maturity date, grain yield and biomass, respectively. Optimum sowing window was different among locations. It was opened and closed on 5 November and 5 December for Ahvaz; 5 November and 15 December for Behbehan and Dezful;and 1 November and 15 December for Izeh, respectively. CERES-Wheat model could be used as a tool to evaluate the effect of sowing date on wheat performance in Khuzestan conditions. Further model evaluations

  4. Search for genetic markers determining the efficiency of therapy with bisphosphonates in Russian women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Krylov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical observations show that patient’s genetic background is of great importance in determining the efficiency of treatment.Subjects and methods. The instigation included 50 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (OP, who were followed up at the Laboratory of osteoporosis, V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology. Body mineral density (BMD in the lumbar spine (LI-IV, femoral neck (FN, and total hip was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 12 months after treatment with bisphosphonates (BP. To estimate BMD changes, the investigators used ΔBMD in percent (Δ, %.Results and discussion. The whole group showed a positive effect of BP therapy during a year, which was most pronounced in the lumbar spine (mean ΔBMD, about 4%, and a small increment in the proximal hip BMD (mean ΔBMD, about 2%. An analysis indicated a statistically significant correlation of MCP1 -2518A>G polymorphism with changes in LI-IV BMD after 12-month BP therapy. Thus, the female patients who were A allele carriers had a twice lower increase in LI-IV BMD due to BP therapy than those without this allele. The genetic variants of the CCR5 gene, which were related to Δ32 deletion, and IL1β -511C/T polymorphism were also associated with changes in FN BMD following 12-month BP therapy. The BMD increase due to BP therapy in the carriers of the CCR5 Δ32 mutation (wt/Δ32 genotype was 3.5-fold than that in the carriers of the wild type gene (wt/wt genotype. Examination of IL1 -511C/T polymorphism demonstrated that the FN BMD increment in the carriers of the CC genotype was significantly higher than in those of the CT genotype (4.2±4.8 and 1.0±3.7%, respectively; р = 0.023. Our investigation revealed no significant relationship between VDR, LEPR, IL10, MHTFR, PPARG, SPP1, and CCR5(G/A gene polymorphisms and 12-month BP therapy-induced BMD changes in the three study skeletal regions. The findings may suggest that genetic testing may be used to

  5. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression: impact of diet, sex, metabolic status, and cis genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Viguerie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently controlled AT gene expression. These analyses help understanding the relative importance of environmental and individual factors that control the expression of human AT genes and therefore may foster strategies aimed at improving AT function in metabolic diseases.

  6. Determining resistance to mastitis in a bovine subject comprises detecting the presence or absence of a genetic marker that is linked to a trait indicative of mastitis resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining mastitis resistance in bovine subjects, wherein mastitis resistance comprise resistance to both sub-clinical and clinical mastitis. In particular, the method of the invention involves identification of genetic markers and/or Quantitative Trait Locus...... (QTL) for the determination of mastitis resistance in a bovine subject. The determination of mastitis resistance involves resolution of the specific microsatellite status. Furthermore, the invention relates to a diagnostic kit for detection of genetic marker(s) associated with mastitis resistance....... The method and kit of the present invention can be applied for selection of bovine subjects for breeding purposes. Thus, the invention provides a method of genetically selecting bovine subjects with mastitis resistance, thereby yielding cows less prone to mastitis...

  7. Genetic defects of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecina, Petr; Houšťková, H.; Hansíková, H.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. S213-S223 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0749 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial disorders Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  8. Genetic defects in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.F.M. de Coo (René)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDit proefschrift is een bijdrage aan het snel groeiende kennisgebied gewijd aan de verbetering van de diagnostiek op DNA-niveau bij patiënten met mitochondriële encephalomyopathieën en is onder andere geïnspireerd door de hypothese van de communicatie over en weer tussen het kerngenoom

  9. Methods to determine the relative value of genetic traits in dairy cows to reduce greenhouse gas emissions along the chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Middelaar, C E; Berentsen, P B M; Dijkstra, J; van Arendonk, J A M; de Boer, I J M

    2014-01-01

    Current decisions on breeding in dairy farming are mainly based on economic values of heritable traits, as earning an income is a primary objective of farmers. Recent literature, however, shows that breeding also has potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The objective of this paper was to compare 2 methods to determine GHG values of genetic traits. Method 1 calculates GHG values using the current strategy (i.e., maximizing labor income), whereas method 2 is based on minimizing GHG per kilogram of milk and shows what can be achieved if the breeding results are fully directed at minimizing GHG emissions. A whole-farm optimization model was used to determine results before and after 1 genetic standard deviation improvement (i.e., unit change) of milk yield and longevity. The objective function of the model differed between method 1 and 2. Method 1 maximizes labor income; method 2 minimizes GHG emissions per kilogram of milk while maintaining labor income and total milk production at least at the level before the change in trait. Results show that the full potential of the traits to reduce GHG emissions given the boundaries that were set for income and milk production (453 and 441kg of CO2 equivalents/unit change per cow per year for milk yield and longevity, respectively) is about twice as high as the reduction based on maximizing labor income (247 and 210kg of CO2 equivalents/unit change per cow per year for milk yield and longevity, respectively). The GHG value of milk yield is higher than that of longevity, especially when the focus is on maximizing labor income. Based on a sensitivity analysis, it was shown that including emissions from land use change and using different methods for handling the interaction between milk and meat production can change results, generally in favor of milk yield. Results can be used by breeding organizations that want to include GHG values in their breeding goal. To verify GHG values, the effect of prices and emissions

  10. Evolving attractive faces using morphing technology and a genetic algorithm: a new approach to determining ideal facial aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian J F; Karimi, Koohyar; Devcic, Zlatko; McLaren, Christine E; Chen, Wen-Pin

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine if a genetic algorithm in combination with morphing software can be used to evolve more attractive faces; and 2) evaluate whether this approach can be used as a tool to define or identify the attributes of the ideal attractive face. Basic research study incorporating focus group evaluations. Digital images were acquired of 250 female volunteers (18-25 y). Randomly selected images were used to produce a parent generation (P) of 30 synthetic faces using morphing software. Then, a focus group of 17 trained volunteers (18-25 y) scored each face on an attractiveness scale ranging from 1 (unattractive) to 10 (attractive). A genetic algorithm was used to select 30 new pairs from the parent generation, and these were morphed using software to produce a new first generation (F1) of faces. The F1 faces were scored by the focus group, and the process was repeated for a total of four iterations of the algorithm. The algorithm mimics natural selection by using the attractiveness score as the selection pressure; the more attractive faces are more likely to morph. All five generations (P-F4) were then scored by three focus groups: a) surgeons (n = 12), b) cos-metology students (n = 44), and c) undergraduate students (n = 44). Morphometric measurements were made of 33 specific features on each of the 150 synthetic faces, and correlated with attractiveness scores using univariate and multivariate analysis. The average facial attractiveness scores increased with each generation and were 3.66 (+0.60), 4.59 (+/-0.73), 5.50 (+/-0.62), 6.23 (+/-0.31), and 6.39 (+/-0.24) for P and F1-F4 generations, respectively. Histograms of attractiveness score distributions show a significant shift in the skew of each curve toward more attractive faces with each generation. Univariate analysis identified nasal width, eyebrow arch height, and lip thickness as being significantly correlated with attractiveness scores. Multivariate analysis identified a

  11. Genetic and environmental determinants of violence risk in psychotic disorders: a multivariate quantitative genetic study of 1.8 million Swedish twins and siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariaslan, A; Larsson, H; Fazel, S

    2016-09-01

    Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders (for example, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) have elevated risks of committing violent acts, particularly if they are comorbid with substance misuse. Despite recent insights from quantitative and molecular genetic studies demonstrating considerable pleiotropy in the genetic architecture of these phenotypes, there is currently a lack of large-scale studies that have specifically examined the aetiological links between psychotic disorders and violence. Using a sample of all Swedish individuals born between 1958 and 1989 (n=3 332 101), we identified a total of 923 259 twin-sibling pairs. Patients were identified using the National Patient Register using validated algorithms based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8-10. Univariate quantitative genetic models revealed that all phenotypes (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, substance misuse, and violent crime) were highly heritable (h(2)=53-71%). Multivariate models further revealed that schizophrenia was a stronger predictor of violence (r=0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.30-0.33) than bipolar disorder (r=0.23; 0.21-0.25), and large proportions (51-67%) of these phenotypic correlations were explained by genetic factors shared between each disorder, substance misuse, and violence. Importantly, we found that genetic influences that were unrelated to substance misuse explained approximately a fifth (21%; 20-22%) of the correlation with violent criminality in bipolar disorder but none of the same correlation in schizophrenia (Pbipolar disordergenetically similar phenotypes as the latter sources may include aetiologically important clues. Clinically, these findings underline the importance of assessing risk of different phenotypes together and integrating interventions for psychiatric disorders, substance misuse, and violence.

  12. Genetically determined optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions.......The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions....

  13. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Defect reconstruction and fixation of the graft: The defect of ... where all loose fragments of fractured frontal bone was removed via the ... Mandible. • Ilium. • Allograft ... pediatric patients owing to skull growth. Thus, autologous ...

  14. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  15. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Combined Genetic Determinants of Liver Stiffness within the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Lammert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The common PNPLA3 (adiponutrin variant, p.I148M, was identified as a genetic determinant of liver fibrosis. Since the expression of PNPLA3 is induced by sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c, we investigate two common SREBP1c variants (rs2297508 and rs11868035 for their association with liver stiffness. In 899 individuals (aged 17–83 years, 547 males with chronic liver diseases, hepatic fibrosis was non-invasively phenotyped by transient elastography (TE. The SREBP1c single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped using PCR-based assays with 5'-nuclease and fluorescence detection. The SREBP1c rs11868035 variant affected liver fibrosis significantly (p = 0.029: median TE levels were 7.2, 6.6 and 6.0 kPa in carriers of (TT (n = 421, (CT (n = 384 and (CC (n = 87 genotypes, respectively. Overall, the SREBP1c SNP was associated with low TE levels (5.0–8.0 kPa. Carriers of both PNPLA3 and SREBP1c risk genotypes displayed significantly (p = 0.005 higher median liver stiffness, as compared to patients carrying none of these variants. The common SREBP1c variant may affect early stages of liver fibrosis. Our study supports a role of the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 pathway as a “disease module” that promotes hepatic fibrogenesis.

  17. Determination of genetic toxicity and potential carcinogenicity in vitro--challenges post the Seventh Amendment to the European Cosmetics Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweats, D J; Scott, A D; Westmoreland, C; Carmichael, P L

    2007-01-01

    Genetic toxicology and its role in the detection of carcinogens is currently undergoing a period of reappraisal. There is an increasing interest in developing alternatives to animal testing and the three R's of reduction, refinement and replacement are the basis for EU and national animal protection laws the Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive will ban the marketing of cosmetic/personal care products that contain ingredients that have been tested in animal models. Thus in vivo tests such as the bone marrow micronucleus test, which has a key role in current testing strategies for genotoxicity, will not be available for this class of products. The attrition rate for new, valuable and safe chemicals tested in an in vitro-only testing battery, using the in vitro tests currently established for genotoxicity screening, will greatly increase once this legislation is in place. In addition there has been an explosion of knowledge concerning the cellular and molecular events leading to carcinogenesis. This knowledge has not yet been fully factored into screening chemicals for properties that are not directly linked to mutation induction. Thus there is a pressing need for new, more accurate approaches to determine genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. However, a considerable challenge is presented for these new approaches to be universally accepted and new tests sufficiently validated by March 2009 when the animal testing and marketing bans associated with the Seventh Amendment are due to come into force. This commentary brings together ideas and approaches from several international workshops and meetings to consider these issues.

  18. Transcriptomics insights into the genetic regulation of root apical meristem exhaustion and determinate primary root growth in Pachycereus pringlei (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Alonso, Gustavo; Matvienko, Marta; López-Valle, Mayra L; Lázaro-Mixteco, Pedro E; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Shishkova, Svetlana

    2018-06-04

    Many Cactaceae species exhibit determinate growth of the primary root as a consequence of root apical meristem (RAM) exhaustion. The genetic regulation of this growth pattern is unknown. Here, we de novo assembled and annotated the root apex transcriptome of the Pachycereus pringlei primary root at three developmental stages, with active or exhausted RAM. The assembled transcriptome is robust and comprehensive, and was used to infer a transcriptional regulatory network of the primary root apex. Putative orthologues of Arabidopsis regulators of RAM maintenance, as well as putative lineage-specific transcripts were identified. The transcriptome revealed putative orthologues of most proteins involved in housekeeping processes, hormone signalling, and metabolic pathways. Our results suggest that specific transcriptional programs operate in the root apex at specific developmental time points. Moreover, the transcriptional state of the P. pringlei root apex as the RAM becomes exhausted is comparable to the transcriptional state of cells from the meristematic, elongation, and differentiation zones of Arabidopsis roots along the root axis. We suggest that the transcriptional program underlying the drought stress response is induced during Cactaceae root development, and that lineage-specific transcripts could contribute to RAM exhaustion in Cactaceae.

  19. Diallel analysis of corn for special use as corn grits: determining the main genetic effects for corn gritting ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, T V; Scapim, C A; Bignotto, L S; Pinto, R J B; Freitas, I L J; Amaral, A T; Pinheiro, A C

    2014-08-26

    Corn grits are used for various purposes such as flakes, snacks, livestock feed, hominy, extruded products, beer, etc. The grit size proportion varies according to the hybrid, and thus, once the use of the grits is linked to the particle size, determining the genetic effects is essential to develop hybrids for any specific use. For this purpose a complete diallel series of crosses, involving eight parents, was performed near Maringá, PR, Brazil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the general (GCA) and specific (SCA) combining abilities of 28 progeny for selection of hybrids for breeding programs and extraction of inbred lines for hybrid development. The response variables, such as plant height, ear insertion height, crop stand, grain yield, and grits, small grits and bran production, were gauged and appraised for each of the 28 progeny. The trait effects and GCA were significant for all response variables, while for SCA, only grain yield and crop stand showed significance (P < 0.05), according to Griffing (1955) analysis. A significant weak negative partial correlation was found between grain yield and grits conversion. In relation to the hybrid selection for breeding programs, the parent IAC Nelore was highly recommended for recurrent selection and the hybrids IPR 119 x HT 392 and IAC Nelore x HD 332 for the extraction of pure lines for hybrid development.

  20. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  1. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Hajek, P.C.; Pechmann, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients with fibrous metaphyseal defects were examined with both plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Depending on the age of the fibrous metaphyseal defects, characteristic radiomorphologic changes were found which correlated well with MR images. Following intravenous Gadolinium-DTPA injection, fibrous metaphyseal defects invariably exhibited a hyperintense border and signal enhancement. (orig./GDG)

  2. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  3. Distribution, genetic and cardiovascular determinants of FVIII:c - Data from the population-based Gutenberg Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, M Iris; Grossmann, Vera; Spronk, Henri M H; Schulz, Andreas; Jünger, Claus; Laubert-Reh, Dagmar; Mazur, Johanna; Gori, Tommaso; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Beutel, Manfred; Blankenberg, Stefan; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J; Ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; Ten Cate, Hugo; Wild, Philipp S

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of c are associated with risk for both venous and arterial thromboembolism. However, no population-based study on the sex-specific distribution and reference ranges of plasma c and its cardiovascular determinants is available. c was analyzed in a randomly selected sample of 2533 males and 2440 females from the Gutenberg Health Study in Germany. Multivariable regression analyses for c were performed under adjustment for genetic determinants, cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease. Females (126.6% (95% CI: 125.2/128)) showed higher c levels than males (121.2% (119.8/122.7)). c levels increased with age in both sexes (ß per decade: 5.67% (4.22/7.13) male, 6.15% (4.72/7.57) female; p<0.001). Sex-specific reference limits and categories indicating the grade of deviation from the reference were calculated, and nomograms for c were created. c was approximately 25% higher in individuals with non-O blood type. Adjusted for sex and age, ABO-blood group accounted for 18.3% of c variation. In multivariable analysis, c was notably positively associated with diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia and negatively with current smoking. In a fully adjusted multivariable model, the strongest associations observed were of elevated c with diabetes and peripheral artery disease in both sexes and with obesity in males. Effects of SNPs in the vWF, STAB2 and SCARA5 gene were stronger in females than in males. The use of nomograms for valuation of c might be useful to identify high-risk cohorts for thromboembolism. Additionally, the prospective evaluation of c as a risk predictor becomes feasible. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  5. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  6. The puzzle of Italian rice origin and evolution: determining genetic divergence and affinity of rice germplasm from Italy and Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Cai

    Full Text Available The characterization of genetic divergence and relationships of a set of germplasm is essential for its efficient applications in crop breeding and understanding of the origin/evolution of crop varieties from a given geographical region. As the largest rice producing country in Europe, Italy holds rice germplasm with abundant genetic diversity. Although Italian rice varieties and the traditional ones in particular have played important roles in rice production and breeding, knowledge concerning the origin and evolution of Italian traditional varieties is still limited. To solve the puzzle of Italian rice origin, we characterized genetic divergence and relationships of 348 rice varieties from Italy and Asia based on the polymorphisms of microsatellite fingerprints. We also included common wild rice O. rufipogon as a reference in the characterization. Results indicated relatively rich genetic diversity (H(e = 0.63-0.65 in Italian rice varieties. Further analyses revealed a close genetic relationship of the Italian traditional varieties with those from northern China, which provides strong genetic evidence for tracing the possible origin of early established rice varieties in Italy. These findings have significant implications for the rice breeding programs, in which appropriate germplasm can be selected from a given region and utilized for transferring unique genetic traits based on its genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships.

  7. Genetic and physical maps around the sex-determining M-locus of the dioecious plant asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telgmann-Rauber, Alexa; Jamsari, Ari; Kinney, Michael S; Pires, J Chris; Jung, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is a dioecious plant. A region called the M-locus located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes controls the sexual dimorphism in asparagus. The aim of this work was to clone the region determining sex in asparagus from its position in the genome. The structure of the region encompassing M should be investigated and compared to the sex-determining regions in other dioecious model species. To establish an improved basis for physical mapping, a high-resolution genetic map was enriched with AFLP markers closely linked to the target locus by carrying out a bulked segregant analysis. By screening a BAC library with AFLP- and STS-markers followed by chromosome walking, a physical map with eight contigs could be established. However, the gaps between the contigs could not be closed due to a plethora of repetitive elements. Surprisingly, two of the contigs on one side of the M-locus did not overlap although they have been established with two markers, which mapped in a distance as low as 0.25 cM flanking the sex locus. Thus, the clustering of the markers indicates a reduced recombination frequency within the M-region. On the opposite side of the M-locus, a contig was mapped in a distance of 0.38 cM. Four closely linked BAC clones were partially sequenced and 64 putative ORFs were identified. Interestingly, only 25% of the ORFs showed sequence similarity to known proteins and ESTs. In addition, an accumulation of repetitive sequences and a low gene density was revealed in the sex-determining region of asparagus. Molecular cytogenetic and sequence analysis of BACs flanking the M-locus indicate that the BACs contain highly repetitive sequences that localize to centromeric and pericentromeric locations on all asparagus chromosomes, which hindered the localization of the M-locus to the single pair of sex chromosomes. We speculate that dioecious Silene, papaya and Asparagus species may represent three stages in the evolution of XX, XY sex

  8. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in defects of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Masanori

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of positron and defects, application to research of defects of semiconductor and defects on the surface of semiconductor are explained. Cz (Czochralski)-Si single crystal with 10 18 cm -3 impurity oxygen was introduced defects by electron irradiation and the positron lifetime was measured at 90K after annealing. The defect size and recovery temperature were determined by the lifetime measurement. The distribution of defects in the depth direction is shown by S-E curve. The chemical state analysis is possible by CBS (Coincidence Doppler Broadening) spectra. The application to silicon-implanted (100 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon and oxygen-implanted (180 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon are stated. On the oxygen-implanted silicon, the main product was V2 after implantation, V 6 O 2 at 600degC and V 10 O 6 at 800degC. (S.Y.)

  9. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a cross-national survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    2000-01-01

    purchasing the products, which were, in turn, significantly influenced by overall attitudes towards genetic modification in food production through their effects on beliefs that consumer hold about the quality and trustworthiness of the products. 6. The results clearly verify that consumer acceptance...... the results of a survey which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to investigate the formation of consumer attitudes towards genetic modification in food production and of purchase decisions with regard to genetically modified yoghurt and beer. Altogether, 2031 consumers were...... towards nature and attitude towards technology. These general attitudes were found to influence attitudes towards genetic modification through their impact on perceived risks and benefits of the technology. In Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom, perceived risks of applying genetic modification...

  10. Predicting internal red oak (Quercus rubra) log defect features using surface defect defect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Determining the defects located within a log is crucial to understanding the tree/log resource for efficient processing. However, existing means of doing this non-destructively requires the use of expensive x-ray/CT (computerized tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), or microwave technology. These methods do not lend themselves to fast, efficient, and cost-...

  11. A haploid genetic screen identifies the G1/S regulatory machinery as a determinant of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Blomen, Vincent A.; Bisteau, Xavier; Degener, Fabian; Matsushita, Felipe Yu; Kaldis, Philipp; Foijer, Floris; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Wee1 cell cycle checkpoint kinase prevents premature mitotic entry by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases. Chemical inhibitors of Wee1 are currently being tested clinically as targeted anticancer drugs. Wee1 inhibition is thought to be preferentially cytotoxic in p53-defective cancer cells.

  12. Defects in conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billò, Marco; Gonçalves, Vasco; Lauria, Edoardo; Meineri, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  13. Defects in conformal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billò, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1 I-10125 Torino (Italy); Gonçalves, Vasco [Centro de Física do Porto,Departamento de Física e Astronomia Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research Instituto de Física Teórica,UNESP - University Estadual Paulista,Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lauria, Edoardo [Institute for Theoretical Physics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Meineri, Marco [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Scuola Normale Superiore, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - sezione di Pisa,Piazza dei Cavalieri 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  14. Dirichlet topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.M.; Trodden, M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a class of field theories featuring solitonic solutions in which topological defects can end when they intersect other defects of equal or higher dimensionality. Such configurations may be termed open-quotes Dirichlet topological defects,close quotes in analogy with the D-branes of string theory. Our discussion focuses on defects in scalar field theories with either gauge or global symmetries, in 3+1 dimensions; the types of defects considered include walls ending on walls, strings on walls, and strings on strings. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  15. Synthetic Defects for Vibrothermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Jeremy; Holland, Stephen D.; Thompson, R. Bruce; Eisenmann, David J.

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic defects are an important tool used for characterizing the performance of nondestructive evaluation techniques. Viscous material-filled synthetic defects were developed for use in vibrothermography (also known as sonic IR) as a tool to improve inspection accuracy and reliability. This paper describes how the heat-generation response of these VMF synthetic defects is similar to the response of real defects. It also shows how VMF defects can be applied to improve inspection accuracy for complex industrial parts and presents a study of their application in an aircraft engine stator vane.

  16. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  17. Conservation of Sex-Linked Markers among Conspecific Populations of a Viviparous Skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, Exhibiting Genetic and Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Christopher P; Ezaz, Tariq; Wapstra, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Sex determination systems are exceptionally diverse and have undergone multiple and independent evolutionary transitions among species, particularly reptiles. However, the mechanisms underlying these transitions have not been established. Here, we tested for differences in sex-linked markers in the only known reptile that is polymorphic for sex determination system, the spotted snow skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, to quantify the genomic differences that have accompanied this transition. In a highland population, sex is determined genetically, whereas in a lowland population, offspring sex ratio is influenced by temperature. We found a similar number of sex-linked loci in each population, including shared loci, with genotypes consistent with male heterogamety (XY). However, population-specific linkage disequilibrium suggests greater differentiation of sex chromosomes in the highland population. Our results suggest that transitions between sex determination systems can be facilitated by subtle genetic differences. PMID:29659810

  18. Birth Defects in the Newborn Population: Race and Ethnicity