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Sample records for genetically determined defects

  1. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  2. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candito, Mirande; Rivet, Romain; Herbeth, Bernard; Boisson, Catherine; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Luton, Dominique; Journel, Hubert; Oury, Jean-François; Roux, François; Saura, Robert; Vernhet, Isabelle; Gaucherand, Pascal; Muller, Françoise; Guidicelli, Béatrice; Heckenroth, Hélène; Poulain, Patrice; Blayau, Martine; Francannet, Christine; Roszyk, Laurence; Brustié, Cécile; Staccini, Pascal; Gérard, Philippe; Fillion-Emery, Nathalie; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations due to failure of neural tube formation in early pregnancy. The proof that folic acid prevents NTDs raises the question of whether other parts of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism may affect rates of NTDs. This French case-control study covered: 77 women aged 17-42 years sampled prior to elective abortion for a severe NTDs (cases) and 61 women aged 20-43 years with a normal pregnancy. Plasma and erythrocyte folate, plasma B6, B12 and Hcy were tested as five polymorphisms MTHFR 677 C --> T, MTHFR 1298 A --> C, MTR 2756 A --> G, MTTR 66 A --> G and TCN2 776 C --> G. Cases had significantly lower erythrocyte folate, plasma folate, B12 and B6 concentrations than the controls, and higher Hcy concentration. The odds ratio was 2.15 (95% CI: 1.00-4.59) for women with the MTRR 66 A --> G allele and it was decreased for mothers carrying the MTHFR 1298 A --> C allele. In multivariate analysis, only the erythrocyte folate concentration (P = 0.005) and plasma B6 concentration (P = 0.020) were predictors. Red cell folate is the main determinant of NTDs in France. Folic acid supplement or flour fortification would prevent most cases. Increased consumption of vitamins B12 and B6 could contribute to the prevention of NTDs. Genetic polymorphisms played only a small role. Until folic acid fortification becomes mandatory, all women of reproductive age should consume folic acid in a multivitamin that also contains B12 and B6.

  3. Genetic Determinants of Parkinson's Disease: Can They Help to Stratify the Patients Based on the Underlying Molecular Defect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redenšek, Sara; Trošt, Maja; Dolžan, Vita

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a sporadic progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder with a relatively strong genetic background. We have reviewed the current literature about the genetic factors that could be indicative of pathophysiological pathways of PD and their applications in everyday clinical practice. Information on novel risk genes is coming from several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses. GWASs that have been performed so far enabled the identification of 24 loci as PD risk factors. These loci take part in numerous cellular processes that may contribute to PD pathology: protein aggregation, protein, and membrane trafficking, lysosomal autophagy, immune response, synaptic function, endocytosis, inflammation, and metabolic pathways are among the most important ones. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms are usually located in the non-coding regions and their functionality remains to be determined, although they presumably influence gene expression. It is important to be aware of a very low contribution of a single genetic risk factor to PD development; therefore, novel prognostic indices need to account for the cumulative nature of genetic risk factors. A better understanding of PD pathophysiology and its genetic background will help to elucidate the underlying pathological processes. Such knowledge may help physicians to recognize subjects with the highest risk for the development of PD, and provide an opportunity for the identification of novel potential targets for neuroprotective treatment. Moreover, it may enable stratification of the PD patients according to their genetic fingerprint to properly personalize their treatment as well as supportive measures.

  4. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  5. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  6. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Vorhaus Daniel B; Resnik David B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound....

  7. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  8. Improved Genetic Algorithm Application in Textile Defect Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Zhao-feng; Li Bei-bei; ZHAO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    Based on an efficient improved genetic algorithm,a pattern recognition approach is represented for textile defects inspection. An image process is developed to automatically detect the drawbacks on textile caused by three circumstances: break, dual, and jump of yams. By statistic method, some texture feature values of the image with defects points can be achieved. Therefore, the textile defects are classified properly. The advanced process of the defect image is done. Image segmentation is realized by an improved genetic algorithm to detect the defects. This method can be used to automatically classify and detect textile defects. According to different users' requirements, ifferent types of textile material can be detected.

  9. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  10. Genetics of T Cell Defects in Lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifang Chen; Laurence More

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by anti-nuclear autoantibodies that cause damage to multiple organs and tissues. Intrinsic defects have been demonstrated in the lymphoid and myeloid cellular compartments, including T cells. Lupus susceptibility is mediated through the interplay of a large number of genes, most of which are still unidentified. Most of the genetic studies in both human patients and mouse models have addressed lupus susceptibility as a whole. More recently however, more attention has been paid to the inheritance of specific lupus-associated phenotypes. In this review, we summarized our results obtained with the Slel locus in the NZM2410 mouse model, which mediates the generation of anti-histone autoreactive T cells. Sle1,which is constituted of multiple genes, is the only known genomic region that is sufficient for the generation of autoreactive T cells. The identification of the corresponding genes will constitute a landmark for our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity. Our results are discussed in the context of candidate genes and the role of T cells in systemic autoimmunity.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  12. Genetic and epigenetic defects in mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, J.M.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2009-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a highly diverse group of cognitive disorders. The high incidence of MR, 2-3% in most populations, and the high burden for families and society makes this condition one of the major unsolved problems in modern medicine. Gene defects account for about half of all patients a

  13. Genetic Determinants of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. López León (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies in this genetic epidemiological thesis was to investigate candidate genes that play a role in the etiology of depression and to obtain new insights about biological pathways that may be involved in this disorder. The introduction of the thesis presents a review of

  14. GENETIC DETERMINATIONS OF MENTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osadcha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to clarifying the role of physicality and psycho-physical characteristics of a person as a preconditions of the mentality forming. It is conducted a retrospective analysis of discourse on the mentality, the history of the concept, its temporal characteristics and collective conditioning. The concept of mentality has been widely studied in various fields of socio-humanities such as: history, psychology, and even marginal context of scientific discourses, including the esoteric. This study attempted to analyse the mentality phenomenon through the prism of the concept of experience. Methodology. The concept of experience was acquired by essential justification through the representatives of the phenomenological approach - the late Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Bernhard Valdenfels. On the other hand the concept of mentality as a form of collective unconscious experience was entered to the scientific vocabulary by the representatives of the French historical science - M. Bloch, L. Febvre, J. Le Goff and others. At the intersection of these two methods, historical and phenomenological, the genetic method has been established – as a history of coverage and experience of internalization. Thanks to the application of genetic method the transition of phenomenon into the concept was examined. Novelty. The problem of change dynamics of mental phenomenon, in particular psycho-physical nature of a person, which has been only mentioned in F. Braudel works but has not received the adequate theoretical coverage, is analysed. To explain the practices of physicality and causality of this factor the action component of the cultural the overview of developments of such authors as V. Rozin (2005, M. Epstein (2005, N. Brunov (2003, A. Soares, M. Farhangmehr, A. Shoham (2007, D. Vaskul, F. Vannini Hospital (2012 was committed. Conclusions. The transition to paradoxical behaviour that is oriented on sign, and not on signalling

  15. Genetic basis of susceptibility to teratogen induced birth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Palacios, Ana M; Chapa, Claudia J; Zhu, Huiping; George, Timothy M; Finnell, Richard H

    2011-08-15

    Birth defects remain the leading cause of infant death in US. The field of teratology has been focused on the causes and underlying mechanisms of birth defects for decades, yet our understanding of these critical issues remain unacceptably vague. Conclusions from years of animal and human studies made it clear that the vast majority of birth defects have multifactorial origins, with contributions from environmental and genetic factors. The environment comprises not only of the physical, biological, and chemical external environment surrounding the pregnant woman, but it also includes the internal environment of the woman's body that interact with the developing embryo in a complex fashion. The importance of maternal and embryonic genetic factors consisting of countless genetic variants/mutations that exist within every individual contribute to birth defect susceptibility is only now being more fully appreciated. This great complexity of the genome and its diversity within individuals and populations seems to be the principal reason why the same teratogenic exposure can induce severe malformation in one embryo, while fail to do so to other exposed embryos. As the interaction between genetic and environmental factors has long been recognized as the first "Principle of Teratology" by Wilson and Warkany [1965. Teratology: Principles and techniques. Chicago: University of Chicago Press], it is only recently that the appropriate investigative tools have been developed with which to fully investigate this fundamental principle. The introduction of high throughput technologies like whole genome sequencing or genome-wide association studies are promising to deliver an enormous amount of new data that will shed light on the genomic factors that contribute susceptibility to environmental teratogens. In this review, we attempt to summarize the epidemiological and experimental literature concerning birth defects whose phenotypic expression can be clearly related to the

  16. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  17. Genetic determinants of plasma triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Christopher T.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hegele, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration is reemerging as an important cardiovascular disease risk factor. More complete understanding of the genes and variants that modulate plasma TG should enable development of markers for risk prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapies and might help specify new directions for therapeutic interventions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified both known and novel loci associated with plasma TG concentration. However, genetic variation at these loci explains only ∼10% of overall TG variation within the population. As the GWAS approach may be reaching its limit for discovering genetic determinants of TG, alternative genetic strategies, such as rare variant sequencing studies and evaluation of animal models, may provide complementary information to flesh out knowledge of clinically and biologically important pathways in TG metabolism. Herein, we review genes recently implicated in TG metabolism and describe how some of these genes likely modulate plasma TG concentration. We also discuss lessons regarding plasma TG metabolism learned from various genomic and genetic experimental approaches. Treatment of patients with moderate to severe hypertriglyceridemia with existing therapies is often challenging; thus, gene products and pathways found in recent genetic research studies provide hope for development of more effective clinical strategies. PMID:21041806

  18. Genetic knowledge and attitudes of parents of children with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Klima, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly; Chisolm, Deena; McBride, Kim L

    2014-12-01

    Clinical genetic testing for specific isolated congenital heart defects (CHD) is becoming standard of care in pediatric cardiology practice. Both genetic knowledge and attitudes toward genetic testing are associated with an increased utilization of genetic testing, but these factors have not been evaluated in parents of children with CHD. We mailed a survey to measure the demographics, genetic knowledge, and attitudes towards genetic testing of parents of children with CHD who previously consented to participate in a separate research study of the genetic etiology of left ventricular outflow tract malformations (LVOT). Of the 378 eligible families, 190 (50%) returned surveys with both parents completing surveys in 97 (51%) families, resulting in 287 participants. Genetic knowledge was assessed on an adapted measure on which the mean percent correct was 73.8%. Educational attainment and household income were directly and significantly associated with genetic knowledge (P Parents of younger children were less likely to endorse employment or racial/social discrimination. Genetic knowledge was not correlated with specific attitudes. Among parents of children with CHD, genetic knowledge was directly associated with household income and education, but additional research is necessary to determine what factors influence attitudes towards genetic testing.

  19. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  20. Defects in trafficking bridge Parkinson's disease pathology and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeliovich, Asa; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-11-10

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating, age-associated movement disorder. A central aspect of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is the progressive demise of midbrain dopamine neurons and their axonal projections, but the underlying causes of this loss are unclear. Advances in genetics and experimental model systems have illuminated an important role for defects in intracellular transport pathways to lysosomes. The accumulation of altered proteins and damaged mitochondria, particularly at axon terminals, ultimately might overwhelm the capacity of intracellular disposal mechanisms. Cell-extrinsic mechanisms, including inflammation and prion-like spreading, are proposed to have both protective and deleterious functions in Parkinson's disease.

  1. Genetic and pharmacogenetic determinants of cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jeffrey Johan Willem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis, titled ‘Genetic and pharmacogenetic determinants of cardiovascular disease’ is divided in three sections. In section one the genetic determinants of coronary restenosis are explored. In the first genome-wide association study on this condition, in the GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis

  2. Sex Determination, Sex Ratios, and Genetic Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in

  3. Sex Determination, Sex Ratios, and Genetic Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in oppo

  4. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Murdoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  5. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  6. Laser transillumination imaging for determining wood defects and grain angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Sari; Heikkinen, Jorma; Räty, Jukka

    2013-12-01

    Wood defects and grain angle correlate strongly with timber strength and grading. In this study a laser transillumination imaging method was developed to determine wood defects and grain angle. The method uses a near infrared laser light source which illuminates a wood sample with a round beam and the image generated by the light transmitted through the sample is captured for further analysis. In basic and flawless wood, the transmitted light pattern is an ellipse and wood defects and grain angle deviation will change the shape, size and location of the ellipse. The method could be used for determining the strength of wood, grading sawn timber, studying finger and glue joints, estimating moisture and differentiating between heartwood and sapwood.

  7. Classification of Atrial Septal Defect and Ventricular Septal Defect with Documented Hemodynamic Parameters via Cardiac Catheterization by Genetic Algorithms and Multi-Layered Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yıldız

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed to develop a classification method to discriminate ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect by using severalhemodynamic parameters.Patients and Methods: Forty three patients (30 atrial septal defect, 13 ventricular septal defect; 26 female, 17 male with documentedhemodynamic parameters via cardiac catheterization are included to study. Such parameters as blood pressure values of different areas,gender, age and Qp/Qs ratios are used for classification. Parameters, we used in classification are determined by divergence analysismethod. Those parameters are; i pulmonary artery diastolic pressure, ii Qp/Qs ratio, iii right atrium pressure, iv age, v pulmonary arterysystolic pressure, vi left ventricular sistolic pressure, vii aorta mean pressure, viii left ventricular diastolic pressure, ix aorta diastolicpressure, x aorta systolic pressure. Those parameters detected from our study population, are uploaded to multi-layered artificial neuralnetwork and the network was trained by genetic algorithm.Results: Trained cluster consists of 14 factors (7 atrial septal defect and 7 ventricular septal defect. Overall success ratio is 79.2%, andwith a proper instruction of artificial neural network this ratio increases up to 89%.Conclusion: Parameters, belonging to artificial neural network, which are needed to be detected by the investigator in classical methods,can easily be detected with the help of genetic algorithms. During the instruction of artificial neural network by genetic algorithms, boththe topology of network and factors of network can be determined. During the test stage, elements, not included in instruction cluster, areassumed as in test cluster, and as a result of this study, we observed that multi-layered artificial neural network can be instructed properly,and neural network is a successful method for aimed classification.

  8. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  9. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands Tw

  10. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands

  11. How Darwinian reductionism refutes genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosoff, Philip M; Rosenberg, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Genetic determinism labels the morally problematical claim that some socially significant traits, traits we care about, such as sexual orientation, gender roles, violence, alcoholism, mental illness, intelligence, are largely the results of the operation of genes and not much alterable by environment, learning or other human intervention. Genetic determinism does not require that genes literally fix these socially significant traits, but rather that they constrain them within narrow channels beyond human intervention. In this essay we analyze genetic determinism in light of what is now known about the inborn error of metabolism phenylketonuria (PKU), which has for so long been the poster child 'simple' argument in favor of some form of genetic determinism. We demonstrate that this case proves the exact opposite of what it has been proposed to support and provides a strong refutation of genetic determinism in all its guises.

  12. Human genetic determinants of dengue virus susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L; Mertens, Eva; Brehin, Anne-Claire; Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Amara, Ali; Després, Philippe; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj

    2009-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen that produces significant morbidity worldwide resulting in an estimated 50-100 million infections annually. DENV causes a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever and shock. The varied DENV disease outcome is determined by complex interactions between immunopathologic, viral, and human genetic factors. This review summarizes these interactions with a focus on human genetic determinants of DENV susceptibility, including human leukocyte antigens, blood type, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in immune response genes that have been associated with DENV disease. We also discuss other factors related to DENV outcome including viral genetic determinants, age, ethnicity, and nutritional status as they relate to DENV susceptibility. We emphasize the need for functional genetics studies to complement association-based data and we call for controlled study designs and standard clinical DENV disease definitions that will strengthen conclusions based on human genetic DENV studies.

  13. Mouse gestation length is genetically determined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Murray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is an enormous public health problem, affecting over 12% of live births and costing over $26 billion in the United States alone. The causes are complex, but twin studies support the role of genetics in determining gestation length. Despite widespread use of the mouse in studies of the genetics of preterm birth, there have been few studies that actually address the precise natural gestation length of the mouse, and to what degree the timing of labor and birth is genetically determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further develop the mouse as a genetic model of preterm birth, we developed a high-throughput monitoring system and measured the gestation length in 15 inbred strains. Our results show an unexpectedly wide variation in overall gestation length between strains that approaches two full days, while intra-strain variation is quite low. Although litter size shows a strong inverse correlation with gestation length, genetic difference alone accounts for a significant portion of the variation. In addition, ovarian transplant experiments support a primary role of maternal genetics in the determination of gestation length. Preliminary analysis of gestation length in the C57BL/6J-Chr#(A/J/NaJ chromosome substitution strain (B.A CSS panel suggests complex genetic control of gestation length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these data support the role of genetics in regulating gestation length and present the mouse as an important tool for the discovery of genes governing preterm birth.

  14. Birth defects and genetic disorders among Arab Americans--Michigan, 1992-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanni, Emad A; Copeland, Glenn; Olney, Richard S

    2010-06-01

    Birth defects and genetic disorders are leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in many countries. Population-based data on birth defects among Arab-American children have not been documented previously. Michigan has the second largest Arab-American community in the United States after California. Using data from the Michigan Birth Defects Registry (MBDR), which includes information on parents' country of birth and ancestry, birth prevalences were estimated in offspring of Michigan women of Arab ancestry for 21 major categories of birth defects and 12 congenital endocrine, metabolic, and hereditary disorders. Compared with other non-Hispanic white children in Michigan, Arab-American children had similar or lower birth prevalences of the selected types of structural birth defects, with higher rates of certain hereditary blood disorders and three categories of metabolic disorders. These estimates are important for planning preconception and antenatal health care, genetic counseling, and clinical care for Arab Americans.

  15. Genetic and environmental effects on a meat spotting defect in seasoned dry-cured ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Pagnacco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of a visible spotting defect on the slice of dry-cured ham and assess environmental and genetic causes of this frequent problem. A group of 233 pigs from commercial cross-breeding lines, progeny of ten boars and forty seven sows, was raised in a single herd to obtain the “Italian Heavy Pig”, typically slaughtered at 160 ± 10 kg live weight and older than 9 months of age. A quality evaluation of their right dry-cured hams, seasoned according to the Parma P.D.O. protocol, was undertaken. Each ham was cross-sectioned to obtain a slice of Semimembranosus, Semitendinosus and Biceps Femoris muscles. The focused phenotype was the presence/absence of brownish spots in these muscles, which represent a remarkable meat defect with strong impact on the final sale price. Environmental and management factors were considered in order to evaluate variability related to the phenotype. Animals were raised on two different flooring types (concrete and slatted floor and a Vitamin C diet was also supplemented in the last 45 days before slaughtering to half of the animals. While the pre-planned environmental effects did not show any significant contribution to the total variability of the phenotype, the genetic analysis showed a near to zero value for heritability with a consistent 0.32 repeatability. The proportion of the total phenotypic variance was explained by an important dominance genetic component (0.26 indicating that the technological seasoning process may play a secondary role on the expression of this phenotype.

  16. Genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research described in this thesis was to investigate the role of genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke. We therefore performed several retrospective studies and one prospective case-control study of patients with recent ischemic stroke (the COCOS

  17. Determination of volatile marker compounds of common coffee roast defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ni; Liu, Chujiao; Liu, Xingkun; Degn, Tina Kreuzfeldt; Munchow, Morten; Fisk, Ian

    2016-11-15

    Coffee beans from the same origin were roasted using six time-temperature profiles, in order to identify volatile aroma compounds associated with five common roast coffee defects (light, scorched, dark, baked and underdeveloped). Thirty-seven volatile aroma compounds were selected on the basis that they had previously been identified as potent odorants of coffee and were also identified in all coffee brew preparations; the relative abundance of these aroma compounds was then evaluated using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with headspace solid phase micro extraction. Some of the 37 key aroma compounds were significantly changed in each coffee roast defect and changes in one marker compound was chosen for each defect type, that is, indole for light defect, 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol for scorched defect, phenol for dark defect, maltol for baked defect and 2,5-dimethylfuran for underdeveloped defect. The association of specific changes in aroma profiles for different roast defects has not been shown previously and could be incorporated into screening tools to enable the coffee industry quickly identify if roast defects occur during production.

  18. Genetic determination of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Hotoleanu; Radu Popp; Adrian Pavel Trifa; Laurentiu Nedelcu; Dan L Dumitrascu

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder.According to the Rome Ⅲ criteria,IBS is defined as recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort for at least 3 d per month during the previous 3 mo associated with two or more of the following symptoms:improvement with defecation,onset associated with a change in the frequency of stool and/or onset associated with a change in form or appearance of stool.There is growing evidence regarding the genetic contribution in IBS,however the precise etiology of IBS is still unknown.The evaluation of the genetic influence is based on twin studies,familial aggregation and genetic epidemiological investigations.Most studies showed a concordance for IBS significantly greater in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins.The majority of the studies have shown that familial aggregation may represent exposures to a similar environment,as well as the influence of genetic factors.Whereas no specific gene has been identified in association with IBS,recent studies have noticed the importance of polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin reuptake transporter gene,G-protein beta 3 subunit gene (C825T),cholecystokinin receptor (CCKAR gene 779T>C),and high-producer tumornecrosis factor genotype.Further studies are necessary to determine how genetic factors influence the clinical manifestations and therapeutical response in IBS patients.

  19. Epidemiologic and Genetic Aspects of Spina Bifida and Other Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kit Sing; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Northrup, Hope

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 per 1,000 births with almost equal frequencies between two major categories: anencephaly and spina bifida (SB). Epidemiological studies have provided valuable insight for (a) researchers to identify nongenetic and genetic factors contributing to etiology, (b) public…

  20. Epidemiologic and Genetic Aspects of Spina Bifida and Other Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kit Sing; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Northrup, Hope

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 per 1,000 births with almost equal frequencies between two major categories: anencephaly and spina bifida (SB). Epidemiological studies have provided valuable insight for (a) researchers to identify nongenetic and genetic factors contributing to etiology, (b) public…

  1. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  2. Genetic variation in genes of folate metabolism and neural-tube defect risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, I.J. van der; Afman, L.A.; Heil, S.G.; Blom, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Neural-tube defects (NTD) are common congenital malformations that can lead to severe disability or even death. Periconceptional supplementation with the B-vitamin folic acid has been demonstrated to prevent 50-70% of NTD cases. Since the identification of the first genetic risk factor of NTD, the C

  3. Genetic variation in genes of folate metabolism and neural-tube defect risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der I.J.; Afman, L.A.; Heil, S.G.; Blom, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Neural-tube defects (NTD) are common congenital malformations that can lead to severe disability or even death. Periconceptional supplementation with the B-vitamin folic acid has been demonstrated to prevent 50–70% of NTD cases. Since the identification of the first genetic risk factor of NTD, the C

  4. Genetically determined patozoospermia. Literature review and research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Bragina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors (chromosomal aberrations and point mutations are the cause of infertility in 10–15 % of men with impaired fertility. Homogeneous structural and functional defects in the sperm or the total terato-, asthenozoospermia – rare cases of genetically determined male infertility, are autosomal recessive diseases. Currently, described 4 types of «syndromic» spermopatology. 1. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD in men with total asthenozoospermia. Affects axoneme structures (microtubules, dynein arms, radial spokes. It identified more than 20 chromosomal loci responsible for the development of the PCD. 2. Dysplasia of the fibrous sheath of sperm tail in men with asthenozoospermia. The shortened and thickened sperm tail observed with disorganization of vertical columns and cross ribs of the fibrous sheath. Candidate genes – genes family ACAP. 3. Globozoospermia in men with teratozoospermia characterized by the presence of sperm with round heads, primary lack of acrosome and disorganization middle part of the flagellum. Found mutations or deletions of genes SPATA16, PICK1 and DPY19L2. 4. Syndrome decapitated spermatozoa in men with teratozoospermia (microcephaly. Abnormalities in the spermiogenesis development of connecting part jf the tail and proximal (morphologically normal centrioles.In 2012–2014 years we have studied the ultrastructure of 2267 semen samples of men with impaired fertility. Globozoospermia revealed in 7 patients, dysplasia of the fibrous sheath – 13, decapitated sperm – in one. PCD was revealed in 4 patients (lack of axoneme dynein arms was found in 1 patient, absence of axoneme radial spokes – in 3 patients.The problem of genetically determined patozoospermya must be taken into account when the assisted reproductive technologies practises. There are few cases of successful assisted reproductive technologies with sperm of these patients. We don»t know the etiological factors of syndromic spermopatologe, so

  5. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants in Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Vento-Tormo, Roser; Ballestar, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    The concept of autoinflammation has evolved over the past 20 years, beginning with the discovery that mutations in the Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene were causative of Familial Mediterranean Fever. Currently, autoinflammatory diseases comprise a wide range of disorders with the common features of recurrent fever attacks, prevalence of hyperreactive innate immune cells, and signs of inflammation that can be systemic or organ specific in the absence of pathogenic infection of autoimmunity. Innate immune cells from the myeloid compartment are the main effectors of uncontrolled inflammation that is caused in great extent by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18. Defects in several signaling pathways that control innate immune defense, particularly the hyperreactivity of one or more inflammasomes, are at the core of pathologic autoinflammatory phenotypes. Although many of the autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be monogenic, some of them are genetically complex and are impacted by environmental factors. Recently, epigenetic dysregulation has surfaced as an additional contributor to pathogenesis. In the present review, we discuss data that are currently available to describe the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in autoinflammatory diseases.

  6. Genetic counseling for young adults who have a congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, R

    1986-01-01

    Early individual guidance is needed for all adolescents and young adults with congenital heart defects. This should include not only a personal interest in the individual but also an attempt to identify concerns about sex education, smoking, drugs and the risks of pregnancy and possible inheritance. In a prospective study of 252 women with various cardiac malformations, the incidence of congenital heart defects in their progeny was 15.7% (13% exclusive of genetic syndromes and those with a positive family history). In those with a positive family history or a genetic syndrome the incidence was 56% in the offspring. Genetic syndromes with cardiac components are increasingly apparent. The role of teratogens such as medications, illicit drugs, and environmental exposure play a not yet clearly defined role. Careful discussion with potential parents, giving facts but with a positive approach, is an obligation of every physician.

  7. Genetic and environmental determinants of menstrual characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Jahanfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of women′s menstrual cycle on her quality of life, health, work, and community is substantial. Menstrual disturbance is linked with general ill conditions such as migraine, asthma, and endocrinopathies. The clinical significance of medical interventions to prevent these conditions becomes clear if the role of genetic or environment is clarified. Aims: To identify the genetic and environmental contribution on menstrual characteristics. Setting and Design: This was a cross-sectional study in 2 Asian countries. Materials and Methods: 2 cohorts of monozygotic and dizygotic twins born between (1945-1988, n = 122 and (1951-1993, n = 71 were taken. A standard questionnaire was designed inclusive of socio- demographic characteristics of subjects as well as menstrual history (duration, interval, amount, irregularity. Subjects were interviewed by phone. Statistical Analysis: Quantitative variables were analyzed using Falconars′ formula as well as maximum likelihood analysis. Structural modeling was then applied to twin correlations to provide estimates of the relative genetic and/or environmental factors contribution in determining the measured trait. Results: Menstrual characteristics were found to be under environmental influence where the best fitting model for menstrual interval and duration was common environment. CDF plotting confirmed the results for both variables. Proband-wise concordance analysis for amount of menstruation, amenorrhea, and irregular menstruation revealed no genetic influence. The best fitting model for menstrual irregularity was CE (C73%, E27%. The same model was defined for amenorrhea (C48%, E52%. Conclusions: Environmental factors are most likely responsible to determine the menstrual flow, its integrity, and regularity. These factors need to be studied further.

  8. Weight Stigma Reduction and Genetic Determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja

    2016-01-01

    One major approach to weight stigma reduction consists of decreasing beliefs about the personal controllability of-and responsibility for-obesity by educating about its biogenetic causes. Evidence on the efficacy of this approach is mixed, and it remains unclear whether this would create a deterministic view, potentially leading to detrimental side-effects. Two independent studies from Germany using randomized designs with delayed-intervention control groups served to (1) develop and pilot a brief, interactive stigma reduction intervention to educate N = 128 university students on gene × environment interactions in the etiology of obesity; and to (2) evaluate this intervention in the general population (N = 128) and determine mechanisms of change. The results showed (1) decreased weight stigma and controllability beliefs two weeks post-intervention in a student sample; and (2) decreased internal attributions and increased genetic attributions, knowledge, and deterministic beliefs four weeks post-intervention in a population sample. Lower weight stigma was longitudinally predicted by a decrease in controllability beliefs and an increase in the belief in genetic determinism, especially in women. The results underline the usefulness of a brief, interactive intervention promoting an interactionist view of obesity to reduce weight stigma, at least in the short term, lending support to the mechanisms of change derived from attribution theory. The increase in genetic determinism that occurred despite the intervention's gene × environment focus had no detrimental side-effect on weight stigma, but instead contributed to its reduction. Further research is warranted on the effects of how biogenetic causal information influences weight management behavior of individuals with obesity.

  9. Weight Stigma Reduction and Genetic Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja

    2016-01-01

    One major approach to weight stigma reduction consists of decreasing beliefs about the personal controllability of—and responsibility for—obesity by educating about its biogenetic causes. Evidence on the efficacy of this approach is mixed, and it remains unclear whether this would create a deterministic view, potentially leading to detrimental side-effects. Two independent studies from Germany using randomized designs with delayed-intervention control groups served to (1) develop and pilot a brief, interactive stigma reduction intervention to educate N = 128 university students on gene × environment interactions in the etiology of obesity; and to (2) evaluate this intervention in the general population (N = 128) and determine mechanisms of change. The results showed (1) decreased weight stigma and controllability beliefs two weeks post-intervention in a student sample; and (2) decreased internal attributions and increased genetic attributions, knowledge, and deterministic beliefs four weeks post-intervention in a population sample. Lower weight stigma was longitudinally predicted by a decrease in controllability beliefs and an increase in the belief in genetic determinism, especially in women. The results underline the usefulness of a brief, interactive intervention promoting an interactionist view of obesity to reduce weight stigma, at least in the short term, lending support to the mechanisms of change derived from attribution theory. The increase in genetic determinism that occurred despite the intervention’s gene × environment focus had no detrimental side-effect on weight stigma, but instead contributed to its reduction. Further research is warranted on the effects of how biogenetic causal information influences weight management behavior of individuals with obesity. PMID:27631384

  10. Use of genetically modified muscle and fat grafts to repair defects in bone and cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel technology for the rapid healing of large osseous and chondral defects, based upon the genetic modification of autologous skeletal muscle and fat grafts. These tissues were selected because they not only possess mesenchymal progenitor cells and scaffolding properties, but also can be biopsied, genetically modified and returned to the patient in a single operative session. First generation adenovirus vector carrying cDNA encoding human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Ad.BMP-2 was used for gene transfer to biopsies of muscle and fat. To assess bone healing, the genetically modified (“gene activated” tissues were implanted into 5mm-long critical size, mid-diaphyseal, stabilized defects in the femora of Fischer rats. Unlike control defects, those receiving gene-activated muscle underwent rapid healing, with evidence of radiologic bridging as early as 10 days after implantation and restoration of full mechanical strength by 8 weeks. Histologic analysis suggests that the grafts rapidly differentiated into cartilage, followed by efficient endochondral ossification. Fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of Y-chromosomes following the transfer of male donor muscle into female rats demonstrated that at least some of the osteoblasts of the healed bone were derived from donor muscle. Gene activated fat also healed critical sized defects, but less quickly than muscle and with more variability. Anti-adenovirus antibodies were not detected. Pilot studies in a rabbit osteochondral defect model demonstrated the promise of this technology for healing cartilage defects. Further development of these methods should provide ways to heal bone and cartilage more expeditiously, and at lower cost, than is presently possible.

  11. Genetic analysis of Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Yu, Tao; Matsui, Sei-ichi; ZHANG Li; Fu, Dawei; Pao, Annie; Costa, Alberto C.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cowell, John K; Nowak, Norma J; Parmacek, Michael S.; Liang, Ping; Baldini, Antonio; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Human trisomy 21, the chromosomal basis of Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of heart defects. Regions on human chromosome 21 (Has21) are syntenically conserved with three regions located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of duplications of each syntenic region on cardiovascular development in mice and have found that only the duplication on Mmu16, i.e., Dp(16)1Yey, is associated with heart defects. Furthermore, we g...

  12. Determination of the Nonequilibrium Steady State Emerging from a Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Bruno; Fagotti, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    We consider the nonequilibrium time evolution of a translationally invariant state under a Hamiltonian with a localized defect. We discern the situations where a light cone spreads out from the defect and separates the system into regions with macroscopically different properties. We identify the light cone and propose a procedure to obtain a (quasi)stationary state describing the late time dynamics of local observables. As an explicit example, we study the time evolution generated by the Hamiltonian of the transverse-field Ising chain with a local defect that cuts the interaction between two sites (a quench of the boundary conditions alongside a global quench). We solve the dynamics exactly and show that the late time properties can be obtained with the general method proposed.

  13. Defective kernel mutants of maize. I. Genetic and lethality studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuffer, M G; Sheridan, W F

    1980-08-01

    A planting of 3,919 M(1) kernels from normal ears crossed by EMS-treated pollen produced 3,461 M(1) plants and 3,172 selfed ears. These plants yielded 2,477 (72%) total heritable changes; the selfed ears yielded 2,457 (78%) recessive mutants, including 855 (27%) recessive kernel mutants and 8 (0.23%) viable dominant mutants. The ratio of recessive to dominant mutants was 201:1. The average mutation frequency for four known loci was three per 3,172 genomes analyzed. The estimated total number of loci mutated was 535 and the estimated number of kernel mutant loci mutated was 285. Among the 855 kernel mutants, 432 had a nonviable embryo, and 59 germinated but had a lethal seedling. A sample of 194 of the latter two types was tested for heritability, lethality, chromosome arm location and endosperm-embryo interaction between mutant and nonmutant tissues in special hyper-hypoploid combinations produced by manipulation of B-A translocations. The selected 194 mutants were characterized and catalogued according to endosperm phenotype and investigated to determine their effects on the morphology and development of the associated embryo. The possibility of rescuing some of the lethal mutants by covering the mutant embryo with a normal endosperm was investigated. Ninety of these 194 mutants were located on 17 of the 18 chromosome arms tested. Nineteen of the located mutants were examined to determine the effect of having a normal embryo in the same kernel with a mutant endosperm, and vice versa, as compared to the expression observed in kernels with both embryo and endosperm in a mutant condition. In the first situation, for three of the 19 mutants, the mutant endosperm was less extreme (the embryo helped); for seven cases, the mutant endosperm was more extreme (the embryo hindered); and for nine cases, there was no change. In the reverse situation, for four cases the normal endosperm helped the mutant embryo; for 14 cases there was no change and one case was inconclusive.

  14. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes: Determined by Single Defects?

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    Michael Gaster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate, there was no significant difference between groups. These results show that the primary reduced TCA cycle flux in diabetic myotubes is not explained by defects in specific part of the TCA cycle but rather results from a general downregulation of the TCA cycle.

  15. Recent perspectives on the genetic background of neural tube defects with special regard to iniencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-04-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare and mostly lethal type of neural tube defect. The pattern of inheritance of this group of malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of human neurulation. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the CNS include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure, as well as the sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of neural tube defects. In this review we have attempted to summarize the knowledge on iniencephaly and neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  16. A Genetic Algorithm Based Approach for Segmentingand Identifying Defects in Glass Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mathew

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work mainly aims at designing and developing a suitable tool for identifying defects in glass bottles through visual inspection based on Segmentation algorithm. The defect identification is done in three stages. These are Image acquisition, Pre-processing and filtering and Segmentation. In the Image acquisition stage, samples of real time images are taken and are converted into 512x512 monochrome images. In the Preprocessing and filtering stage, the image acquired is passed through median filters. The Proposed filter is Modified Decision Based Unsymmetric Trimmed Median Filter (MDBUTMF because it produces a high value of Peak to Signal Ratio (PSNR of 60-75db.The de-noised images is further sent to the third stage which is Segmentation. In this work, Segmentation is done using Genetic Algorithm (GA. The defects in the images are segmented and highlighted. Thus the areas of defects are spotted out. The Genetic segmentation has produced high Sensitivity, high Specificity and high Accuracy of 92%, 93% and 93% respectively. Thus the Proposed work produced effective results and hence this tool shall be useful for food processing industries for the Quality Inspection of the glass bottles

  17. Genetic analysis of Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Yu, Tao; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Zhang, Li; Fu, Dawei; Pao, Annie; Costa, Alberto C; Gardiner, Katheleen J; Cowell, John K; Nowak, Norma J; Nowak, Normal J; Parmacek, Michael S; Liang, Ping; Baldini, Antonio; Yu, Y Eugene

    2011-11-01

    Human trisomy 21, the chromosomal basis of Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of heart defects. Regions on human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) are syntenically conserved with three regions located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of duplications of each syntenic region on cardiovascular development in mice and have found that only the duplication on Mmu16, i.e., Dp(16)1Yey, is associated with heart defects. Furthermore, we generated two novel mouse models carrying a 5.43-Mb duplication and a reciprocal deletion between Tiam1 and Kcnj6 using chromosome engineering, Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+ and Df(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+, respectively, within the 22.9-Mb syntenic region on Mmu16. We found that Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+, but not Dp(16)1Yey/Df(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey, resulted in heart defects, indicating that triplication of the Tiam1-Knj6 region is necessary and sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+ embryos confirmed elevated expression levels for the genes located in the Tiam-Kcnj6 region. Therefore, we established the smallest critical genomic region for DS-associated heart defects to lay the foundation for identifying the causative gene(s) for this phenotype.

  18. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  19. Genetic Drivers of Kidney Defects in the DiGeorge Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Liu, Yangfan P; Verbitsky, Miguel; Anderson, Blair R; Capone, Valentina P; Otto, Edgar A; Yan, Zhonghai; Mitrotti, Adele; Martino, Jeremiah; Steers, Nicholas J; Fasel, David A; Vukojevic, Katarina; Deng, Rong; Racedo, Silvia E; Liu, Qingxue; Werth, Max; Westland, Rik; Vivante, Asaf; Makar, Gabriel S; Bodria, Monica; Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Petrey, Donald S; Honig, Barry; Lozanovski, Vladimir J; Salomon, Rémi; Heidet, Laurence; Carpentier, Wassila; Gaillard, Dominique; Carrea, Alba; Gesualdo, Loreto; Cusi, Daniele; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco; van Wijk, Joanna A E; Arapovic, Adela; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Kunac, Nenad; Samii, Ali; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Crowley, Terrence B; Zackai, Elaine H; Drozdz, Dorota; Miklaszewska, Monika; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Sikora, Przemyslaw; Szczepanska, Maria; Mizerska-Wasiak, Malgorzata; Krzemien, Grazyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Zaniew, Marcin; Darlow, John M; Puri, Prem; Barton, David; Casolari, Emilio; Furth, Susan L; Warady, Bradley A; Gucev, Zoran; Hakonarson, Hakon; Flogelova, Hana; Tasic, Velibor; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Allegri, Landino; Wong, Craig S; Drummond, Iain A; D'Agati, Vivette; Imamoto, Akira; Barasch, Jonathan M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Lifton, Richard P; Morrow, Bernice E; Jeanpierre, Cecile; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2017-02-23

    Background The DiGeorge syndrome, the most common of the microdeletion syndromes, affects multiple organs, including the heart, the nervous system, and the kidney. It is caused by deletions on chromosome 22q11.2; the genetic driver of the kidney defects is unknown. Methods We conducted a genomewide search for structural variants in two cohorts: 2080 patients with congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies and 22,094 controls. We performed exome and targeted resequencing in samples obtained from 586 additional patients with congenital kidney anomalies. We also carried out functional studies using zebrafish and mice. Results We identified heterozygous deletions of 22q11.2 in 1.1% of the patients with congenital kidney anomalies and in 0.01% of population controls (odds ratio, 81.5; P=4.5×10(-14)). We localized the main drivers of renal disease in the DiGeorge syndrome to a 370-kb region containing nine genes. In zebrafish embryos, an induced loss of function in snap29, aifm3, and crkl resulted in renal defects; the loss of crkl alone was sufficient to induce defects. Five of 586 patients with congenital urinary anomalies had newly identified, heterozygous protein-altering variants, including a premature termination codon, in CRKL. The inactivation of Crkl in the mouse model induced developmental defects similar to those observed in patients with congenital urinary anomalies. Conclusions We identified a recurrent 370-kb deletion at the 22q11.2 locus as a driver of kidney defects in the DiGeorge syndrome and in sporadic congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Of the nine genes at this locus, SNAP29, AIFM3, and CRKL appear to be critical to the phenotype, with haploinsufficiency of CRKL emerging as the main genetic driver. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  20. Genetic backgrounds determine brown remodeling of white fat in rodents

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    Giulia Ferrannini

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Rodent genetic background determines the brown remodeling of different white fat depots. This study provides new insights into the role of genetic variation in fat remodeling in susceptibility to metabolic diseases.

  1. Atrioventricular canal defect and associated genetic disorders: new insights into polydactyly syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Digilio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD is a common congenital heart defect (CHD, representing 7.4% of all cardiac malformations, considered secondary to an extracellular matrix anomaly. The AVCD is associated with extracardiac defects in about 75% of the cases. In this review we analyzed different syndromic AVCDs, in particular those associated with polydactyly disorders, which show remarkable genotype-phenotype correlations. Chromo - some imbalances more frequently associated with AVCD include Down syndrome, deletion 8p23 and deletion 3p25, while mendelian disorders include Noonan syndrome and related RASopathies, several polydactyly syndromes, CHARGE and 3C (cranio-cerebello-cardiac syndrome. The complete form of AVCD is prevalent in patients with chromosomal imbalances. Additional cardiac defects are found in patients affected by chromosomal imbalances different from Down syndrome. Left-sided obstructive lesions are prevalently found in patients with RASopathies. Patients with deletion 8p23 often display AVCD with tetralogy of Fallot or with pulmonary valve stenosis. Tetralogy of Fallot is the only additional cardiac defect found in patients with Down syndrome and AVCD. On the other hand, the association of AVCD and tetralogy of Fallot is also quite characteristic of CHARGE and 3C syndromes. Heterotaxia defects, including common atrium and anomalous pulmonary venous return, occur in patients with AVCD associated with polydactyly syndromes (Ellis-van Creveld, short rib polydactyly, oral-facial-digital, Bardet-Biedl, and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. The initial clinical evidence of anatomic similarities between AVCD and heterotaxia in polydactyly syndromes was corroborated and explained by experimental studies in transgenic mice. These investigations have suggested the involvement of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in syndromes with postaxial polydactyly and heterotaxia, and ciliary dysfunction was detected as pathomechanism for these disorders

  2. Feasibility of Genetic Algorithm for Textile Defect Classification Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tarek Habib

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The global market for textile industry is highly competitive nowadays. Quality control in production process in textile industry has been a key factor for retaining existence in such competitive market. Automated textile inspection systems are very useful in this respect, because manual inspection is time consuming and not accurate enough. Hence, automated textile inspection systems have been drawing plenty of attention of the researchers of different countries in order to replace manual inspection. Defect detection and defect classification are the two major problems that are posed by the research of automated textile inspection systems. In this paper, we perform an extensive investigation on the applicability of genetic algorithm (GA in the context of textile defect classification using neural network (NN. We observe the effect of tuning different network parameters and explain the reasons. We empirically find a suitable NN model in the context of textile defect classification. We compare the performance of this model with that of the classification models implemented by others.

  3. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  4. Genetic background and phenotypic characterization over two farrowings of leg conformation defects in Landrace and Large White sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sevilla, X Fernàndez; Fàbrega, E; Tibau, J; Casellas, J

    2009-05-01

    A Bayesian threshold animal model was applied to evaluate the prevalence over 2 farrowings and genetic background of overall leg conformation score and the presence or absence of 6 specific leg defects (abnormal hoof growth, splay footed, plantigradism, straight pasterns, sickle-hocked legs, and the presence of swelling or injuries) in purebred Landrace and Large White sows. Data sets contained phenotypic records from 2,477 and 1,550 Landrace and Large White females, respectively, at the end of the growing period. Leg conformation data from first and second farrowings were available for 223 and 191 Landrace sows and 213 and 193 Large White sows, respectively. Overall leg conformation deteriorated with age, with statistically relevant differences between females at the end of the growing period, first farrowing (FF), and second farrowing (SF). In a similar way, the prevalence of the 6 specific leg defects increased between the end of the growing period and FF (with the exception of straight pasterns in the Landrace population). Differences between FF and second farrowing were statistically relevant for hoof growth (highest posterior density regions at 95% did not overlap), plantigradism, sickle-hocked legs, and overall leg conformation score in Landrace and for sickle-hocked leg and overall leg conformation score in Large White. The statistical relevance of the genetic background was tested through the Bayes factor (BF) between the model with the additive genetic component and the model with 0 heritability (nonheritable). Heritability (h(2)) was discarded (BF 100) of genetic background was obtained for overall leg conformation score in Landrace and Large White sows (h(2) = 0.27 and 0.38, respectively), hoof growth in both breeds (h(2) = 0.22 and 0.26, respectively), and plantigradism (h(2) = 0.34) and the presence of swelling or injuries in Landrace (h(2) = 0.27). Note that a BF > 100 implies that the model with infinitesimal genetic effects was more than 100 times

  5. A genetic approach for the identification of exosporium assembly determinants of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreng, Krista A.; Thompson, Brian M.; Stewart, George C.

    2013-01-01

    The exosporium is the outermost layer of spores of the zoonotic pathogen Bacillus anthracis. The composition of the exosporium and its functions are only partly understood. Because this outer spore layer is refractive to traditional biochemical analysis, a genetic approach is needed in order to define the proteins which comprise this important spore layer and its assembly pathway. We have created a novel genetic screening system for the identification and isolation of mutants with defects in exosporium assembly during B. anthracis spore maturation. The system is based on the targeting sequence of the BclA exosporium nap layer glycoprotein and a fluorescent reporter. By utilizing this screening system and gene inactivation with Tn916, several novel putative exosporium-associated determinants were identified. A sampling of the mutants obtained was further characterized, confirming their exosporium defect and validating the utility of this screen to identify novel spore determinants in the genome of this pathogen. PMID:23411372

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, a genetic cause for familial recurrent neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi V Yaliwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene mutations have been implicated as risk factors for neural tube defects (NTDs. The best-characterized MTHFR genetic mutation 677C→T is associated with a 2-4 fold increased risk of NTD if patient is homozygous for this mutation. This risk factor is modulated by folate levels in the body. A second mutation in the MTHFR gene is an A→C transition at position 1298. The 1298A→C mutation is also a risk factor for NTD, but with a smaller relative risk than 677C→T mutation. Under conditions of low folate intake or high folate requirements, such as pregnancy, this mutation could become of clinical importance. We present a case report with MTHFR genetic mutation, who presented with recurrent familial pregnancy losses due to anencephaly/NTDs.

  7. Surface Defect Target Identification on Copper Strip Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm and Feature Saliency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the stability and robustness of visual inspection system (VIS, a new surface defect target identification method for copper strip based on adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA and feature saliency is proposed. First, the study uses gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM and HU invariant moments for feature extraction. Then, adaptive genetic algorithm, which is used for feature selection, is evaluated and discussed. In AGA, total error rates and false alarm rates are integrated to calculate the fitness value, and the probability of crossover and mutation is adjusted dynamically according to the fitness value. At last, the selected features are optimized in accordance with feature saliency and are inputted into a support vector machine (SVM. Furthermore, for comparison, we conduct experiments using the selected optimal feature subsequence (OFS and the total feature sequence (TFS separately. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can guarantee the correct rates of classification and can lower the false alarm rates.

  8. Computational techniques for determining printability of real defects in EUV mask pilot line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Li, Ying; Peng, Daniel; Chen, Dongxue; Hu, Peter; Corcoran, Noel; Son, Donghwan; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    With EUV lithography on the ITRS roadmap for sub-2X half-pitch patterning, it has become increasingly essential to ramp up efforts in being able to manufacture defect-free reticles or at least ones with minimal defects initially. For this purpose, much of the focus in recent years has been in finding ways to adequately detect, characterize, and reduce defects on both EUV blanks and patterned masks. For detection purposes, the current high-resolution DUV or e-beam inspection platforms are being extended to inspect EUV blanks and patterned masks but being non-actinic, make it very challenging to assess the real impact of the detected defects on EUV plane. Even with the realization of the EUV beta AIMS™ aerial-image based metrology in 2014-2015, the exact nature of each critical defect needs to be determined in order to be able to come up with an appropriate repair strategy. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of computational techniques to non-actinic supplemental metrology data collected on EUV mask defects to effectively determine the nature and also predict printability of these defects. The fundamental EUV simulation engine used in this approach is the EUV Defect Printability Simulator (DPS), which uses simulation and modeling methods designed specifically for the individual EUV mask components, and achieves runtimes several orders of magnitude faster than rigorous FDTD and RCWA methods while maintaining adequate accuracy. The EUV DPS simulator is then coupled with supplemental inspection and metrology measurements of real defects to effectively predict wafer printability of these defects. Several sources of such supplementary data are explored here, and may sometimes be dependent on the actual nature of defect. These sources include AFM height-profile data, SEM top-down images, and 193nm high-NA inspection images of single or multiple focus plane capture. From each of these supplemental data sources, the mask pattern and defect information is first

  9. Genetic compatibility determines endophyte-grass combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Saikkonen

    Full Text Available Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F(1 and F(2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1 genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2 these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

  10. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A.; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula HB; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×109/L to 186×109/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. PMID:27479822

  11. Demographic and genetic consequences of disturbed sex determination.

    OpenAIRE

    Wedekind, C

    2017-01-01

    During sex determination, genetic and/or environmental factors determine the cascade of processes of gonad development. Many organisms, therefore, have a developmental window in which their sex determination can be sensitive to, for example, unusual temperatures or chemical pollutants. Disturbed environments can distort population sex ratios and may even cause sex reversal in species with genetic sex determination. The resulting genotype-phenotype mismatches can have long-lasting effects on p...

  12. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  13. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  14. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  15. [Elucidation of key genes in sex determination in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; He, Zhumei

    2014-06-01

    Sex is an important and complex feature of organisms, which is controlled by the genetic and environmental factors. The genetic factors, i.e., genes, are vital in sex determination. However, not all the related genes play the same roles, and some key genes play a vital role in the sex determination and differentiation. With the development of the modern genetics, a great progress on the key genes has been made in sex determination. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of sex determination and the strategy of how to study the key genes in sex determination. It will help us to understand the mechanism of sex determination better in the teaching of genetics.

  16. A genetic screen for replication initiation defective (rid mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locovei Alexandra M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In fission yeast the intra-S phase and DNA damage checkpoints are activated in response to inhibition of DNA replication or DNA damage, respectively. The intra-S phase checkpoint responds to stalled replication forks leading to the activation of the Cds1 kinase that both delays cell cycle progression and stabilizes DNA replication forks. The DNA damage checkpoint, that operates during the G2 phase of the cell cycle delays mitotic progression through activation of the checkpoint kinase, Chk1. Delay of the cell cycle is believed to be essential to allow time for either replication restart (in S phase or DNA damage repair (in G2. Previously, our laboratory showed that fission yeast cells deleted for the N-terminal half of DNA polymerase ε (Cdc20 are delayed in S phase, but surprisingly require Chk1 rather than Cds1 to maintain cell viability. Several additional DNA replication mutants were then tested for their dependency on Chk1 or Cds1 when grown under semi-permissive temperatures. We discovered that mutants defective in DNA replication initiation are sensitive only to loss of Chk1, whilst mutations that inhibit DNA replication elongation are sensitive to loss of both Cds1 and Chk1. To confirm that the Chk1-sensitive, Cds1-insensitive phenotype (rid phenotype is specific to mutants defective in DNA replication initiation, we completed a genetic screen for cell cycle mutants that require Chk1, but not Cds1 to maintain cell viability when grown at semi-permissive temperatures. Our screen identified two mutants, rid1-1 and rid2-1, that are defective in Orc1 and Mcm4, respectively. Both mutants show defects in DNA replication initiation consistent with our hypothesis that the rid phenotype is replication initiation specific. In the case of Mcm4, the mutation has been mapped to a highly conserved region of the protein that appears to be required for DNA replication initiation, but not elongation. Therefore, we conclude that the cellular

  17. [Role and function of voltage-gated chloride channels of the CIC family and their defects leading to genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dołowy, Krzysztof; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Hordejuk, Renata; Dworakowska, Beata; Nurowska, Ewa; Jarzabek, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    There are 9 channels of the ClC family in mammals and few others in fishes, plants, yeast and bacteria. The ClC channels are present in different tissues and play a role in transmembrane potential stabilization, transepithelial transport, cell volume regulation, acidification of intracellular organelles. The genetic defects of ClC-1 chloride channel lead to myotonias, the defect in ClC-5 channel to the formation of stones in kidney, while the defect in ClC-Kb channel leads to the Bartter's syndrome.

  18. Detection of Defective Sensors in Phased Array Using Compressed Sensing and Hybrid Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Ullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compressed sensing based array diagnosis technique has been presented. This technique starts from collecting the measurements of the far-field pattern. The system linking the difference between the field measured using the healthy reference array and the field radiated by the array under test is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA, parallel coordinate descent (PCD algorithm, and then a hybridized GA with PCD algorithm. These algorithms are applied for fully and partially defective antenna arrays. The simulation results indicate that the proposed hybrid algorithm outperforms in terms of localization of element failure with a small number of measurements. In the proposed algorithm, the slow and early convergence of GA has been avoided by combining it with PCD algorithm. It has been shown that the hybrid GA-PCD algorithm provides an accurate diagnosis of fully and partially defective sensors as compared to GA or PCD alone. Different simulations have been provided to validate the performance of the designed algorithms in diversified scenarios.

  19. The Resurgence of Genetic Determinism: Is It a Distraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacquelyne F.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there is a wealth of little known but rapidly growing evidence that contradicts the assumptions and claims of genetic determinism. Recent research showing the impacts of child maltreatment and environmental pollutants suggest interventions that might alleviate the problems sometimes attributed to genetic deficiencies. (SLD)

  20. Determining the critical size of a rabbit rib segmental bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengzhen; Chen, Kun; Hou, Lei; Li, Keyi; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiumei

    2016-10-01

    In order to establish and standardize the rabbit rib segmental bone defect model, it is of vital importance to determine rabbit rib critical size defect (CSD). According to the general time needed for spontaneous long-bone regeneration, three-month observation period was set to determine the CSD. The rabbit rib segmental bone defects with different sizes from 1 to 5 cm with or without periosteum were performed in the eighth rib of 4-month-old male New Zealand rabbits and underwent X-ray examinations at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks postoperatively. The gross and histological examinations at postoperative week 12 were evaluated, which showed that the critical sizes in the rabbit rib models with and without periosteum were 5 and 2 cm, respectively. This study provides prerequisite data for establishing rabbit rib CSD model and evaluating bone materials using this model.

  1. GENETICALLY DETERMINED WAY OF COGNITION IN THE RUSSIAN TRADITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana M. Klimenkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is reviles stages of cognition and comprehension according to natural genetic determinate pass of cognition, modern discovery in methodology and archetype code of cognition/comprehension, saving up in Slavonic culture.

  2. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Derichs

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  3. GENETIC DEFECTS IN THE GROWTH HORMONE-IGF-I AXIS CAUSING GROWTH HORMONE INSENSITIVITY AND IMPAIRED LINEAR GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Savage

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human genetic defects in the growth hormone (GH –IGF-I axis affecting the IGF system present with growth failure as their principal clinical feature. This is usually associated with GH insensitivity (GHI presenting in childhood as severe or mild short stature. Dysmorphic features and metabolic abnormalities may also be present. The field of GHI due to mutations affecting GH action has evolved radidly since the first description of the extreme phenotype related to homozygous GH receptor (GHR mutations in 1966. A continuum of genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical abnormalities can be defined associated with clinically relevant defects in linear growth. The mechanisms of the GH–IGF-I axis in the regulation of normal human growth is discussed followed by descriptions of mutations in GHR, STAT5B, IGF-I, IGFALS, IGF1R and GH1 defects causing bioinactive GH or anti-GH antibodies. These GH-IGF-I axis defects are associated with a range of clinical, and hormonal characteristics. An up-dated approach to the clinical assessment of the patient with GHI focussing on investigation of the GH–IGF-I axis and relevant molecular studies contributing to the identification of causative genetic defects is also discussed.

  4. Determination of Defect Densities in High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Current Transient DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, John; Mil'shtein, Samson

    2011-12-01

    Since its introduction, Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) has become the preferred tool for investigating semiconductor defects. The limitations of measuring the small changes in gate capacitance in transistors led to the advent of current transient DLTS where the defects manifest themselves as a small change in drain current. However, this method was introduced at a time when heterostructure devices, such as High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), were non-existent and fails in determining defect concentrations in these modern devices. This study establishes a method by which defect concentrations can be determined in HEMT structures using current transient DLTS. First, the relationship between the change in the trap charge and the transistor drain current is established. Then, a computer aided technique is described which determines the volume within the device where the Fermi level crosses the trap energy. The result is that trap densities and their locations can be determined. DLTS measurements revealed two traps with ET = 0.43 and Nt = 1.1×1017cm-3, and ET = 0.19 and Nt = 3.1×1017 cm-3 for a tested HEMT.

  5. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  6. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael eFalk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioural properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing assorted phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews by their socio-religious-cultural relationship maintained also considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify.

  7. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  8. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  9. Genetic architecture of open angle glaucoma and related determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdas, W.D.; Amin, N.; van Koolwijk, L.M.E.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Demirkan, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Wolfs, R.C.W.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Oostra, B.A.; Lemij, H.G.; Klaver, C.C.W.; Vingerling, J.R.; Jansonius, N.M.; van Duijn, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR) and intraocular pressure (IOP) are important determinants of open angle glaucoma (OAG), it is unclear to what extent the genetic origin of these traits overlap with those of OAG. We evaluated whether the same genes that determine VCDR and IOP al

  10. Fluorescence-tagged transgenic lines reveal genetic defects in pollen growth--application to the eIF3 complex.

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    Bijoyita Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in several subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 cause male transmission defects in Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the stage of pollen development at which eIF3 becomes essential it is desirable to examine viable pollen and distinguish mutant from wild type. To accomplish this we have developed a broadly applicable method to track mutant alleles that are not already tagged by a visible marker gene through the male lineage of Arabidopsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence tagged lines (FTLs harbor a transgenic fluorescent protein gene (XFP expressed by the pollen-specific LAT52 promoter at a defined chromosomal position. In the existing collection of FTLs there are enough XFP marker genes to track nearly every nuclear gene by virtue of its genetic linkage to a transgenic marker gene. Using FTLs in a quartet mutant, which yields mature pollen tetrads, we determined that the pollen transmission defect of the eif3h-1 allele is due to a combination of reduced pollen germination and reduced pollen tube elongation. We also detected reduced pollen germination for eif3e. However, neither eif3h nor eif3e, unlike other known gametophytic mutations, measurably disrupted the early stages of pollen maturation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: eIF3h and eIF3e both become essential during pollen germination, a stage of vigorous translation of newly transcribed mRNAs. These data delimit the end of the developmental window during which paternal rescue is still possible. Moreover, the FTL collection of mapped fluorescent protein transgenes represents an attractive resource for elucidating the pollen development phenotypes of any fine-mapped mutation in Arabidopsis.

  11. Genetic defects of GDF6 in the zebrafish out of sight mutant and in human eye developmental anomalies

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    den Hollander Anneke I

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size of the vertebrate eye and the retina is likely to be controlled at several stages of embryogenesis by mechanisms that affect cell cycle length as well as cell survival. A mutation in the zebrafish out of sight (out locus results in a particularly severe reduction of eye size. The goal of this study is to characterize the outm233 mutant, and to determine whether mutations in the out gene cause microphthalmia in humans. Results In this study, we show that the severe reduction of eye size in the outm233 mutant is caused by a mutation in the zebrafish gdf6a gene. Despite the small eye size, the overall retinal architecture appears largely intact, and immunohistochemical studies confirm that all major cell types are present in outm233 retinae. Subtle cell fate and patterning changes are present predominantly in amacrine interneurons. Acridine orange and TUNEL staining reveal that the levels of apoptosis are abnormally high in outm233 mutant eyes during early neurogenesis. Mutation analysis of the GDF6 gene in 200 patients with microphthalmia revealed amino acid substitutions in four of them. In two patients additional skeletal defects were observed. Conclusions This study confirms the essential role of GDF6 in the regulation of vertebrate eye size. The reduced eye size in the zebrafish outm233 mutant is likely to be caused by a transient wave of apoptosis at the onset of neurogenesis. Amino acid substitutions in GDF6 were detected in 4 (2% of 200 patients with microphthalmia. In two patients different skeletal defects were also observed, suggesting pleitrophic effects of GDF6 variants. Parents carrying these variants are asymptomatic, suggesting that GDF6 sequence alterations are likely to contribute to the phenotype, but are not the sole cause of the disease. Variable expressivity and penetrance suggest a complex non-Mendelian inheritance pattern where other genetic factors may influence the outcome of the phenotype.

  12. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  13. Genetic determinism in the Finnish upper secondary school biology textbooks

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    Tuomas Aivelo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics is a fast-developing field and it has been argued that genetics education is lagging behind. Genetics education has, for example, been suspected of indoctrinating strong genetic determinism. As the updating of the national upper secondary school curricula is about to start, we decided to study how the current curriculum manifests in Finnish biology textbooks. We studied the main four textbooks for historical gene models and definitions of genes using content analysis. Hybrid models were pervasive in textbooks. The textbooks expressed sometimes even strong genetic determinism, which might be linked to the dominance of older historical models in the textbooks. We also found instances of determinism which we call ‘weak determinism’: genes were depicted as more important factor than environment in relation to the expressed properties. Subsequently, there were no modern gene models found. We suggest gene models should be presented explicitly to reduce misconceptions about genes. We argue that genetics education needs to take more into account than environmental effects and there needs to be more emphasis on the temporal and developmental aspect of genotype-phenotype link. Specifically in Finland this could be done by a more explicit formulation of the national curriculum.

  14. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  16. Linking a genetic defect in migraine to spreading depression in a computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Dahlem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM is a rare subtype of migraine with aura. A mutation causing FHM type 3 (FHM3 has been identified in SCN1A encoding the Nav1.1 Na+ channel. This genetic defect affects the inactivation gate. While the Na+ tail currents following voltage steps are consistent with both hyperexcitability and hypoexcitability, in this computational study, we investigate functional consequences beyond these isolated events. Our extended Hodgkin–Huxley framework establishes a connection between genotype and cellular phenotype, i.e., the pathophysiological dynamics that spans over multiple time scales and is relevant to migraine with aura. In particular, we investigate the dynamical repertoire from normal spiking (milliseconds to spreading depression and anoxic depolarization (tens of seconds and show that FHM3 mutations render gray matter tissue more vulnerable to spreading depression despite opposing effects associated with action potential generation. We conclude that the classification in terms of hypoexcitability vs. hyperexcitability is too simple a scheme. Our mathematical analysis provides further basic insight into also previously discussed criticisms against this scheme based on psychophysical and clinical data.

  17. Error analysis on heading determination via genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Bing; Xu Jiangning; Ma Heng

    2006-01-01

    A new error analysis method is presented via genetic algorithms for high precise heading determination model based on two total positioning stations (TPSs). The method has the ability to search all possible solution space by the genetic operators of elitist model and restriction. The result of analyzing the error of this model shows that the accuracy of this model is precise enough to meet the need of calibration for navigation systems on ship, and the search space is only 0.03% of the total search space, and the precision of heading determination is 4" in a general dock.

  18. Characterization of T cell mutants with defects in capacitative calcium entry: genetic evidence for the physiological roles of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, C M; Hoth, M; Crabtree, G R; Lewis, R S

    1995-11-01

    Prolonged Ca2+ influx is an essential signal for the activation of T lymphocytes by antigen. This influx is thought to occur through highly selective Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels that are activated by the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. We have isolated mutants of the Jurkat human T cell line NZdipA to explore the molecular mechanisms that underlie capacitative Ca2+ entry and to allow a genetic test of the functions of CRAC channels in T cells. Five mutant cell lines (CJ-1 through CJ-5) were selected based on their failure to express a lethal diphtheria toxin A chain gene and a lacZ reporter gene driven by NF-AT, a Ca(2+)- and protein kinase C-dependent transcription factor. The rate of Ca2+ influx evoked by thapsigargin was reduced to varying degrees in the mutant cells whereas the dependence of NF-AT/lacZ gene transcription on [Ca2+]i was unaltered, suggesting that the transcriptional defect in these cells is caused by a reduced level of capacitative Ca2+ entry. We examined several factors that determine the rate of Ca2+ entry, including CRAC channel activity, K(+)-channel activity, and Ca2+ clearance mechanisms. The only parameter found to be dramatically altered in most of the mutant lines was the amplitude of the Ca2+ current (ICRAC), which ranged from 1 to 41% of that seen in parental control cells. In each case, the severity of the ICRAC defect was closely correlated with deficits in Ca2+ influx rate and Ca(2-)-dependent gene transcription. Behavior of the mutant cells provides genetic evidence for several roles of ICRAC in T cells. First, mitogenic doses of ionomycin appear to elevate [Ca2+]i primarily by activating CRAC channels. Second, ICRAC promotes the refilling of empty Ca2+ stores. Finally, CRAC channels are solely responsible for the Ca2+ influx that underlies antigen-mediated T cell activation. These mutant cell lines may provide a useful system for isolating, expressing, and exploring the functions of genes involved in

  19. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease.

  20. Intelligence and Race, Gender, Class: The Fallacy of Genetic Determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhir, Jean Ait; Duyme, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Biological determinism represents a pseudo-scientific inquiry that is ultimately used to foster a scientific rationale for the maintenance of classism, racism, and sexism in general. Genetic diversity is an inescapable fact, but it is cultures that human brains have created that most severely limit potential. (SLD)

  1. Possible genetic defects in regulation of glycosaminoglycans in patients with diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckert, T.; Horowitz, I.M.; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A.; Kjellen, L.; Deckert, M.; Lykkelund, C.; Burcharth, F. (Steno Memorial Hospital, Gentofte (Denmark))

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis of genetic defects in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) regulation among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nephropathy was assessed by studies in tissue cultures of fibroblasts obtained from 7 patients with normal urinary albumin excretion, 11 patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 6 nondiabetic control subjects. The incorporation of (2H) glucosamine and (35S) sulfate into hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate (CS + DS), and heparan sulfate (HS) was measured in cells, matrix, and medium and related to micrograms of tissue protein. Large interindividual variations were seen in all three groups, and the incorporation of (3H) glucosamine into HA, CS + DS, and HS and (35S) sulfate into CS + DS and HS were not significantly different between the three groups. However, the fractional incorporation of (3H)glucosamine into HS was significantly reduced in diabetic patients with nephropathy compared with control subjects. This was the case not only when related to the total amount of GAGs (P = 0.014) but also when related to HA (P = 0.014). No significant difference was seen between control subjects and normoalbuminuric diabetic patients. The degree of N-sulfation of HS was not significantly different between the experimental groups. The results suggest that patients with diabetic nephropathy may suffer from deficiencies of coordinate regulation in the biosynthesis of GAG in fibroblasts, which may lead to a reduced density of HS in the extracellular matrix. If these changes reflect alterations in the biosynthesis of GAG from endothelial, myomedial, and mesangial cells, this observation may be relevant for the pathogenesis of severe diabetic complications.

  2. Genetic Algorithm for Initial Orbit Determination with Too Short Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin-ran, Li; Xin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    A huge quantity of too-short-arc (TSA) observational data have been obtained in sky surveys of space objects. However, reasonable results for the TSAs can hardly be obtained with the classical methods of initial orbit determination (IOD). In this paper, the IOD is reduced to a two-stage hierarchical optimization problem containing three variables for each stage. Using the genetic algorithm, a new method of the IOD for TSAs is established, through the selections of the optimized variables and the corresponding genetic operators for specific problems. Numerical experiments based on the real measurements show that the method can provide valid initial values for the follow-up work.

  3. Novel PCR assay for determining the genetic sex of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, L; Truong, V; Palmer, J S; Wilhelm, D

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies require the determination of the genetic sex of mouse embryos before sexual differentiation and/or of mutant mice that display partial or complete sex reversal. The majority of current methods for sexing by PCR involve multiplexing of 2 primer pairs. We have developed a novel sexing PCR using a single primer pair that amplifies fragments from the X and the Y chromosome with a clear size difference between the respective amplicons. This assay provides a rapid and reliable method to identify the genetic sex of mice across different mouse strains.

  4. Genetic and perinatal determinants of structural brain deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, T D; Mednick, S A; Parnas, J

    1989-10-01

    Using a subsample from the Copenhagen schizophrenia high-risk project, we examined the contributions of schizophrenic genetic liability and perinatal complications to computed tomographic (CT) measurements of ventricular enlargement and cortical and cerebellar abnormalities. A factor analysis of six CT measurements yielded two significant factors. One factor reflected multisite neural deficits as evidenced by abnormality of the cerebellar vermis and widening of the sylvian and interhemispheric fissures and cortical sulci. The other factor reflected periventricular damage as evidenced by enlargement of the third and lateral ventricles. Because all of the subjects had schizophrenic mothers, the major source of genetic variation is contributed by the diagnostic status of their fathers. In a stepwise multiple-regression analysis, it was determined that the multisite neural deficits factor was significantly related to genetic risk for schizophrenia (as measured by schizophrenia spectrum illness in the subjects' fathers) but was unrelated to pregnancy or delivery complications or to weight at birth. Periventricular damage was highly and significantly correlated with the number of complications suffered at delivery, but only among subjects with an elevated genetic risk. Although limited by a small sample size, these results suggest that the two types of CT abnormalities in schizophrenia may reflect partially independent processes based on different combinations of genetic and perinatal influences.

  5. Genetic background influences embryonic lethality and the occurrence of neural tube defects in Men1 null mice: relevance to genetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Manuel C; Harding, Brian; Reed, Anita A C; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Walls, Gerard V; Bowl, Michael R; Sharpe, James; Wedden, Sarah; Moss, Julie E; Ross, Allyson; Davidson, Duncan; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2009-10-01

    Germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene cause parathyroid, pancreatic and pituitary tumours in man. MEN1 mutations also cause familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and the same MEN1 mutations, in different families, can cause either FIHP or MEN1. This suggests a role for genetic background and modifier genes in altering the expression of a mutation. We investigated the effects of genetic background on the phenotype of embryonic lethality that occurs in a mouse model for MEN1. Men1(+/-) mice were backcrossed to generate C57BL/6 and 129S6/SvEv incipient congenic strains, and used to obtain homozygous Men1(-/-) mice. No viable Men1(-/-) mice were obtained. The analysis of 411 live embryos obtained at 9.5-16.5 days post-coitum (dpc) revealed that significant deviations from the expected Mendelian 1:2:1 genotype ratio were first observed at 12.5 and 14.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively (P<0.05). Moreover, live Men1(-/-) embryos were absent by 13.5 and 15.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively thereby indicating an earlier lethality by 2 days in the 129S6/SvEv strain (P<0.01). Men1(-/-) embryos had macroscopic haemorrhages, and histology and optical projection tomography revealed them to have internal haemorrhages, myocardial hypotrophy, pericardial effusion, hepatic abnormalities and neural tube defects. The neural tube defects occurred exclusively in 129S6/SvEv embryos (21 vs 0%, P<0.01). Thus, our findings demonstrate the importance of genetic background in influencing the phenotypes of embryonic lethality and neural tube defects in Men1(-/-) mice, and implicate a role for genetic modifiers.

  6. Genetic determinants of obesity and related vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Yaroslav; Sankowski, Roman; Back, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors of vascular diseases, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In the past decade, progress has been made in the understanding of genetic determinants of obesity and obesity-associated diseases. Genome-wide association studies identified a number of genetic variants associated with obesity. In addition to common variants, FTO and MC4R, new loci, such as TMEM18, KCTD15, GNPDA2, SH2B1, MTCH2, and NEGR1 have been detected. In the past years, abdominal obesity has been shown to be a more important vascular risk factor than the body mass index. In the context of vascular risk assessment, identification of genetic polymorphisms associated with accumulation of visceral fat is of special importance. Some polymorphisms associated with abdominal obesity, such as variants of gene encoding microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, have been already discovered. In this chapter, we provide a review of genetic determinants of obesity and discuss their role in obesity-related vascular diseases.

  7. Genetic structure of avian myeloblastosis virus, released from transformed myeloblasts as a defective virus particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter H.; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo

    1980-01-01

    Chicken myeloblasts transformed by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) in the absence of nondefective helper virus (termed nonproducer cells) were found to release a defective virus particle (DVP) that contains avian tumor viral gag proteins but lacks envelope glycoprotein and a DNA polymerase. Nonproducer cells contain a Pr76 gag precursor protein and also a protein that is indistinguishable from the Pr180 gag-pol protein of nondefective viruses. The RNA of the DVP is 7.5 kilobases (kb) long and is 0.7 kb shorter than the 8.2-kb RNAs of the helper viruses of AMV, MAV-1 and MAV-2. Comparisons based on RNA·cDNA hybridization and mapping of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides indicated that DVP RNA shares with MAV RNAs nearly isogenic 5′-terminal gag and pol-related sequences of 5.3 kb and a 3′-terminal c-region of 0.7 kb that is different from that found in other avian tumor viruses. Adjacent to the c-region, DVP RNA contains a contiguous specific sequence of 1.5 kb defined by 14 specific oligonucleotides. Except for two of these oligonucleotides that map at its 5′ end, this sequence is unrelated to any sequences of nondefective avian tumor viruses of four different envelope subgroups as well as to the specific sequences of fibroblast-transforming avian acute leukemia and sarcoma viruses of four different RNA subgroups. The specific sequence of the DVP RNA is present in infectious stocks of AMV from this and other laboratories in an AMV-transformed myeloblast line from another laboratory, and it is about 70% related to nucleotide sequences of E26 virus, an independent isolate of an AMV-like virus. Preliminary experiments show DVP to be leukemogenic if fused into susceptible cells in the presence of helper virus. We conclude that DVP RNA is the leukemogenic component of infectious AMV and that its specific sequence, termed AMV, may carry genetic information for oncogenicity. Thus we have found here a transformation-specific RNA sequence, unrelated to helper virus

  8. Molecular genetics and pathogenic mechanisms for the severe ciliopathies: insights into neurodevelopment and pathogenesis of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clare V; Abdel-Hamed, Zakia; Johnson, Colin A

    2011-02-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a severe autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by developmental defects of the central nervous system that comprise neural tube defects that most commonly present as occipital encephalocele. MKS is considered to be the most common syndromic form of neural tube defect. MKS is genetically heterogeneous with six known disease genes: MKS1, MKS2/TMEM216, MKS3/TMEM67, RPGRIP1L, CEP290, and CC2D2A with the encoded proteins all implicated in the correct function of primary cilia. Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the apical surface of most epithelial cell types. Recent progress has implicated the involvement of cilia in the Wnt and Shh signaling pathways and has led to an understanding of their role in normal mammalian neurodevelopment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the molecular genetics of the human disorder, and to assess recent insights into the etiology and molecular cell biology of severe ciliopathies from mammalian animal models of MKS.

  9. [Recent perspectives on the development of the central nervous system and the genetic background of neural tube defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-05-10

    Neural tube defects are rare and mostly lethal malformations. The pattern of inheritance of these malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of the development of the central nervous system. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the central nervous system include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure as well as sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes and their mutations influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of NTDs. In this review the author has attempted to summarize the knowledge on neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  10. Feasibility of Genetic Algorithm for Textile Defect Classification Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tarek Habib

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The global market for textile industry is highly competitive nowadays. Quality control in productionprocess in textile industry has been a key factor for retaining existence in such competitive market.Automated textile inspection systems are very useful in this respect, because manual inspection is timeconsuming and not accurate enough. Hence, automated textile inspection systems have been drawing plentyof attention of the researchers of different countries in order to replace manual inspection. Defect detectionand defect classification are the two major problems that are posed by the research of automated textileinspection systems. In this paper, we perform an extensive investigation on the applicability of geneticalgorithm (GA in the context of textile defect classification using neural network (NN. We observe theeffect of tuning different network parameters and explain the reasons. We empirically find a suitable NNmodel in the context of textile defect classification. We compare the performance of this model with that ofthe classification models implemented by others.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions AEC syndrome ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... mouth (a cleft palate ), a split in the lip (a cleft lip ), or both. Cleft lip or cleft palate ...

  12. Genetic Algorithm Optimization for Determining Fuzzy Measures from Fuzzy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy measures and fuzzy integrals have been successfully used in many real applications. How to determine fuzzy measures is a very difficult problem in these applications. Though there have existed some methodologies for solving this problem, such as genetic algorithms, gradient descent algorithms, neural networks, and particle swarm algorithm, it is hard to say which one is more appropriate and more feasible. Each method has its advantages. Most of the existed works can only deal with the data consisting of classic numbers which may arise limitations in practical applications. It is not reasonable to assume that all data are real data before we elicit them from practical data. Sometimes, fuzzy data may exist, such as in pharmacological, financial and sociological applications. Thus, we make an attempt to determine a more generalized type of general fuzzy measures from fuzzy data by means of genetic algorithms and Choquet integrals. In this paper, we make the first effort to define the σ-λ rules. Furthermore we define and characterize the Choquet integrals of interval-valued functions and fuzzy-number-valued functions based on σ-λ rules. In addition, we design a special genetic algorithm to determine a type of general fuzzy measures from fuzzy data.

  13. Expectation and futurity: The remarkable success of genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    Genetic determinism is nowadays largely questioned and widely criticized. However, if we look at the history of biology in the last one hundred years, we realize that genetic determinism has always been controversial. Why, then, did it acquire such relevance in the past despite facing longstanding criticism? Through the analysis of some of the ambitious expectations of future scientific applications, this article explores the possibility that part of the historical success of genetic determinism lies in the powerful rhetorical strategies that have connected the germinal matter with alluring bio-technological visions. Indeed, in drawing on the recent perspectives of "expectation studies" in science and technology, it will be shown that there has been an interesting historical relationship between reductionist notions of the gene as a hereditary unit, coded information or functional DNA segment, and startling prophecies of what controlling such an entity might achieve. It will also be suggested that the well-known promissory nature of genomics is far older than the emergence of biotechnology in the 1970s. At least from the time of the bio-utopias predicted by J.B.S. Haldane and J. S. Huxley, the gene has often been surrounded by what I call the "rhetoric of futurity": a promissory rhetoric that, despite momentous changes in the life sciences throughout the 20th century, has remained relatively consistent over time.

  14. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  15. Both microsatellite length and sequence context determine frameshift mutation rates in defective DNA mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heekyung; Lopez, Claudia G; Holmstrom, Joy; Young, Dennis J; Lai, Jenny F; Ream-Robinson, Deena; Carethers, John M

    2010-07-01

    It is generally accepted that longer microsatellites mutate more frequently in defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) than shorter microsatellites. Indeed, we have previously observed that the A10 microsatellite of transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) frameshifts -1 bp at a faster rate than the A8 microsatellite of activin type II receptor (ACVR2), although both genes become frameshift-mutated in >80% of MMR-defective colorectal cancers. To experimentally determine the effect of microsatellite length upon frameshift mutation in gene-specific sequence contexts, we altered the microsatellite length within TGFBR2 exon 3 and ACVR2 exon 10, generating A7, A10 and A13 constructs. These constructs were cloned 1 bp out of frame of EGFP, allowing a -1 bp frameshift to drive EGFP expression, and stably transfected into MMR-deficient cells. Subsequent non-fluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days and harvested for EGFP analysis and DNA sequencing. Longer microsatellites within TGFBR2 and ACVR2 showed significantly higher mutation rates than shorter ones, with TGFBR2 A13, A10 and A7 frameshifts measured at 22.38x10(-4), 2.17x10(-4) and 0.13x10(-4), respectively. Surprisingly, shorter ACVR2 constructs showed three times higher mutation rates at A7 and A10 lengths than identical length TGFBR2 constructs but comparably lower at the A13 length, suggesting influences from both microsatellite length as well as the sequence context. Furthermore, the TGFBR2 A13 construct mutated into 33% A11 sequences (-2 bp) in addition to expected A12 (-1 bp), indicating that this construct undergoes continual subsequent frameshift mutation. These data demonstrate experimentally that both the length of a mononucleotide microsatellite and its sequence context influence mutation rate in defective DNA MMR.

  16. Syndromes of reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone: genetic defects in hormone receptors, cell transporters and deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refetoff, Samuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M

    2007-06-01

    At least six major steps are required for secreted thyroid hormone (TH) to exert its action on target tissues. Mutations interfering with three of these steps have been so far identified. The first recognized defect, which causes resistance to TH, involves the TH receptor beta gene and has been given the acronym RTH. Occurring in approximately 1 per 40,000 newborns, more than 1000 affected subjects, from 339 families, have been identified. The gene defect remains unknown in 15% of subjects with RTH. Two novel syndromes causing reduced sensitivity to TH were recently identified. One, producing severe psychomotor defects in > 100 males from 26 families, is caused by mutations in the cell-membrane transporter of TH, MCT8; the second, affecting the intracellular metabolism of TH in four individuals from two families, is caused by mutations in the SECISBP2 gene, which is required for the synthesis of selenoproteins, including TH deiodinases.

  17. Skew rays analysis to determine radial position of defects within optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George Y.; Monro, Tanya M.; Lancaster, David G.

    2017-04-01

    Defects in optical fibers can cause severe damage, and thus must be found and repaired/replaced early. Such defects in fibers and their coatings can be detected using an angle-resolved interrogator that exploits the contribution of different ray groups. This approach can also estimate the radial position of defects within the fiber. A demonstration is performed with a femtosecond-laser-induced internal defect inside the cladding.

  18. Identification of Genetic Alterations, as Causative Genetic Defects in Long QT Syndrome, Using Next Generation Sequencing Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    Full Text Available Long QT Syndrome is an inherited channelopathy leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite that several genes have been associated with the disease, nearly 20% of cases remain without an identified genetic cause. Other genetic alterations such as copy number variations have been recently related to Long QT Syndrome. Our aim was to take advantage of current genetic technologies in a family affected by Long QT Syndrome in order to identify the cause of the disease.Complete clinical evaluation was performed in all family members. In the index case, a Next Generation Sequencing custom-built panel, including 55 sudden cardiac death-related genes, was used both for detection of sequence and copy number variants. Next Generation Sequencing variants were confirmed by Sanger method. Copy number variations variants were confirmed by Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method and at the mRNA level. Confirmed variants and copy number variations identified in the index case were also analyzed in relatives.In the index case, Next Generation Sequencing revealed a novel variant in TTN and a large deletion in KCNQ1, involving exons 7 and 8. Both variants were confirmed by alternative techniques. The mother and the brother of the index case were also affected by Long QT Syndrome, and family cosegregation was observed for the KCNQ1 deletion, but not for the TTN variant.Next Generation Sequencing technology allows a comprehensive genetic analysis of arrhythmogenic diseases. We report a copy number variation identified using Next Generation Sequencing analysis in Long QT Syndrome. Clinical and familiar correlation is crucial to elucidate the role of genetic variants identified to distinguish the pathogenic ones from genetic noise.

  19. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronfeldner, Maria E

    2009-06-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate-acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate-acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate-acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature-nurture debates.

  20. A Statistical Investigation for Determining Fabric Defects That Occur During Weaving Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Mutlu Ala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabric defects that occur during weaving production causes wastage at garment production. If fabric defects can not be detected during garment production, causes separation of the finished product as second quality. In this study, in a weaving mill, raw fabrics were inspected during three weeks for defect detection after weaving operation and results were investigated using statistical methods. Detected fabric defects has been classified and noted on quality control charts. For statistical investigation of number of defects pareto analysis and p control charts were used from statistical process control methods.

  1. Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm Approach to Determine Pulse Sequences in NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoy, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new class of genetic algorithm that computationally determines efficient pulse sequences to implement a quantum gate U in a three-qubit system. The method is shown to be quite general, and the same algorithm can be used to derive efficient sequences for a variety of target matrices. We demonstrate this by implementing the inversion-on-equality gate efficiently when the spin-spin coupling constants $J_{12}=J_{23}=J$ and $J_{13}=0$. We also propose new pulse sequences to implement the Parity gate and Fanout gate, which are about 50% more efficient than the previous best efforts. Moreover, these sequences are shown to require significantly less RF power for their implementation. The proposed algorithm introduces several new features in the conventional genetic algorithm framework. We use matrices instead of linear chains, and the columns of these matrices have a well defined hierarchy. The algorithm is a genetic algorithm coupled to a fast local optimizer, and is hence a hybrid GA. It shows fast con...

  2. Determinants of Genetic Diversity of Spontaneous Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Any pathogen population sufficiently large is expected to harbor spontaneous drug-resistant mutants, often responsible for disease relapse after antibiotic therapy. It is seldom appreciated, however, that while larger populations harbor more mutants, the abundance distribution of these mutants is expected to be markedly uneven. This is because a larger population size allows early mutants to expand for longer, exacerbating their predominance in the final mutant subpopulation. Here, we investigate the extent to which this reduction in evenness can constrain the genetic diversity of spontaneous drug resistance in bacteria. Combining theory and experiments, we show that even small variations in growth rate between resistant mutants and the wild type result in orders-of-magnitude differences in genetic diversity. Indeed, only a slight fitness advantage for the mutant is enough to keep diversity low and independent of population size. These results have important clinical implications. Genetic diversity at antibiotic resistance loci can determine a population's capacity to cope with future challenges (i.e., second-line therapy). We thus revealed an unanticipated way in which the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance can affect the evolvability of pathogens surviving a drug-induced bottleneck. This insight will assist in the fight against multidrug-resistant microbes, as well as contribute to theories aimed at predicting cancer evolution.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of the TYMS gene are not associated with congenital cardiac septal defects in a Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yuan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical research indicates that periconceptional administration of folic acid can reduce the occurrence of congenital cardiac septal defects (CCSDs. The vital roles of folate exhibits in three ways: the unique methyl donor for DNA expression regulation, the de novo biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine for DNA construction, and the serum homocysteine removal. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS is the solo catalysis enzyme for the de novo synthesis of dTMP, which is the essential precursor of DNA biosynthesis and repair process. To examine the role of TYMS in Congenital Cardiac Septal Defects (CCSDs risk, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS gene associated with the CCSDs in a Han Chinese population. METHOD: Polymorphisms in the noncoding region of TYMS were identified via direct sequencing in 32 unrelated individuals composed of half CCSDs and half control subjects. Nine SNPs and two insertion/deletion polymorphisms were genotyped from two independent case-control studies involving a total of 529 CCSDs patients and 876 healthy control participants. The associations were examined by both single polymorphism and haplotype tests using logistic regression. RESULT: We found that TYMS polymorphisms were not related to the altered CCSDs risk, and even to the changed risk of VSDs subgroup, when tested in both studied groups separately or in combination. In the haplotype analysis, there were no haplotypes significantly associated with risks for CCSDs either. CONCLUSION: Our results show no association between common genetic polymorphisms of the regulatory region of the TYMS gene and CCSDs in the Han Chinese population.

  4. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  5. The acceptability among young Hindus and Muslims of actively ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Shanmukh; Ahmed, Ramadan; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    To explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of damaged newborns. 254 university students from India and 150 from Kuwait rated the acceptability of ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects in 54 vignettes consisting of all combinations of four factors: gestational age (term or 7 months); severity of genetic defect (trisomy 21 alone, trisomy 21 with serious morphological abnormalities or trisomy 13 with impending death); the parents' attitude about prolonging care (unknown, in favour or opposed); and the procedure used (withholding treatment, withdrawing it or injecting a lethal substance). Four clusters were identified by cluster analysis and subjected to analysis of variance. Cluster I, labelled 'Never Acceptable', included 4% of the Indians and 59% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster II, 'No Firm Opinion', had little variation in rating from one scenario to the next; it included 38% of the Indians and 18% of the Kuwaitis. In Cluster III, 'Parents' Attitude+Severity+Procedure', all three factors affected the ratings; it was composed of 18% of the Indians and 16% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster IV was called 'Severity+Parents' Attitude' because these had the strongest impact; it was composed of 40% of the Indians and 7% of the Kuwaitis. In accordance with the teachings of Islam versus Hinduism, Kuwaiti students were more likely to oppose ending a newborn's life under all conditions, Indian students more likely to favour it and to judge its acceptability in light of the different circumstances.

  6. Genetic effects on variation in red-blood-cell folate in adults: Implications for the familial aggregation of neural tube defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, L.E. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Duffy, P.; Bellingham, G. [Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated folic acid as an important determinant of normal human growth, development, and function. Insufficient folate levels appear to be a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD), as well as for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, relatively little is known about the factors that influence folate status in the general population. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and nongenetic factors to variation in folate, we have evaluated red blood cell (RBC) folate levels in 440 pairs of MZ twins and in 331 pairs of DZ twins. The data were best described by a model in which 46% of the variance in RBC folate was attributable to additive genetic effects, 16% of the variance was due to measured phenotypic covariates, and 38% of the variance was due to random environmental effects. Moreover, the correlations for RBC folate in MZ co-twins (r = .46) and in repeat measures from the same individual (r = .51) were very similar, indicating that virtually all repeatable variation in RBC folate is attributable to genetic factors. On the basis of these results, it would seem reasonable to initiate a search for the specific genes that influence RBC folate levels in the general population. Such genes ultimately may be used to identify individuals at increased risk for NTD and other folate-related diseases. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Genetic and environmental determinants of risk for cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanao; Miwa; Satoshi; Honjo; Gyokukou; You; Masakazu; Tanaka; Kazuhiko; Uchida; Petcharin; Srivatanakul; Thiravud; Khuhaprema; Watcharin; Loilome; Anchalee; Techasen; Chaisiri; Wongkham; Temduang; Limpaiboon; Puangrat; Yongvanit; Sopit; Wongkham

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma(CCA) is a difficult cancer to diagnose in the early stage and to treat by curative resec-tion. The incidence of CCA in the northeast of Thailand is the highest in the world. To make progress in detecting a high risk group and in the prevention and detection of CCA, we have been analyzing the risk factors for CCA. Although liver fluke infection is known to be a risk factor, there are patients who are not infected with the liver fluke and not all people infected with the liver fluke will suffer from the disease. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to analyze the risk factors and the mechanism to prevent the disease and also to detect the disease in its early stage to save patients’ lives. Through collaboration among Thai and Japanese researchers, we analyzed the genetic and environmental determinants of risks for CCA. Also, we have been trying to develop methods to detect the disease in a non-invasive way. Without repeating findings reported in various reviews on CCA, we will first discuss the environmental and genetic determinants of the risks for CCA. Second, we will discuss the properties of CCA, including the etiological agents and the mechanism of cholangiocarcinogenesis, and finally, we will discuss future approaches to prevent and cure CCA from the standpoint of evidence-based medicine. We will discuss these points by including the data from our laboratories. We would like to emphasize the importance of the genetic data, especially whole genome approaches, to understand the properties of CCA, to find a high risk population for CCA and to develop effective preventative methods to stop the carcinogenic steps toward CCA in the near future. In addition, it is of the upmost importance to develop a non-invasive, specific and sensitive method to detect CCA in its early stage for the application of modern medical approaches to help patients with CCA.

  8. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  9. Genetic determinants of swimming motility in the squid light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Mandel, Mark J; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Thomasgard, Krista A; Ruby, Edward G

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial flagellar motility is a complex cellular behavior required for the colonization of the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the beneficial bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. We characterized the basis of this behavior by performing (i) a forward genetic screen to identify mutants defective in soft-agar motility, as well as (ii) a transcriptional analysis to determine the genes that are expressed downstream of the flagellar master regulator FlrA. Mutants with severe defects in soft-agar motility were identified due to insertions in genes with putative roles in flagellar motility and in genes that were unexpected, including those predicted to encode hypothetical proteins and cell division-related proteins. Analysis of mutants for their ability to enter into a productive symbiosis indicated that flagellar motility mutants are deficient, while chemotaxis mutants are able to colonize a subset of juvenile squid to light-producing levels. Thirty-three genes required for normal motility in soft agar were also downregulated in the absence of FlrA, suggesting they belong to the flagellar regulon of V. fischeri. Mutagenesis of putative paralogs of the flagellar motility genes motA, motB, and fliL revealed that motA1, motB1, and both fliL1 and fliL2, but not motA2 and motB2, likely contribute to soft-agar motility. Using these complementary approaches, we have characterized the genetic basis of flagellar motility in V. fischeri and furthered our understanding of the roles of flagellar motility and chemotaxis in colonization of the juvenile squid, including identifying 11 novel mutants unable to enter into a productive light-organ symbiosis. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7-Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang,Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two ta...

  11. Determination of optimal excitation and emission wavebands for detection of defect cherry tomato by using fluorescence emission and excitation matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, In-Suck; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.; Kim, Young-Sik

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging technique has been widely used for quality and safety measurements of agro-food materials. Fluorescence emission intensities of target materials are influenced by wavelengths of excitation sources. Hence, selection of a proper excitation wavelength is an important factor in differentiating target materials effectively. In this study, optimal fluorescence excitation wavelength was determined on the basis of fluorescence emission intensity of defect and sound areas of cherry tomatoes. The result showed that fluorescence responses of defect and sound surfaces of cherry tomatoes were most significantly separated with the excitation light wavelength range between 400 and 410 nm. Fluorescence images of defect cherry tomatoes were acquired with the LEDs with the central wavelength of 410 nm as the excitation source to verify the detection efficiency of cherry tomato defects. The resultant fluorescence images showed that the defects were discriminated from sound areas on cherry tomatoes with above 98% accuracy. This study shows that high power LEDs as the excitation source for fluorescence imaging are suitable for defect detection of cherry tomatoes.

  12. Novel genetic algorithm search procedure for LEED surface structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, M L; dos Reis, D D; Soares, E A; Van Hove, M A; Moritz, W; de Carvalho, V E

    2014-06-04

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is one of the most powerful experimental techniques for surface structure analysis but until now only a trial-and-error approach has been successful. So far, fitting procedures developed to optimize structural and nonstructural parameters-by minimization of the R-factor-have had a fairly small convergence radius, suitable only for local optimization. However, the identification of the global minimum among the several local minima is essential for complex surface structures. Global optimization methods have been applied to LEED structure determination, but they still require starting from structures that are relatively close to the correct one, in order to find the final structure. For complex systems, the number of trial structures and the resulting computation time increase so rapidly that the task of finding the correct model becomes impractical using the present methodologies. In this work we propose a new search method, based on Genetic Algorithms, which is able to determine the correct structural model starting from completely random structures. This method-called here NGA-LEED for Novel Genetic Algorithm for LEED-utilizes bond lengths and symmetry criteria to select reasonable trial structures before performing LEED calculations. This allows a reduction of the parameter space and, consequently of the calculation time, by several orders of magnitude. A refinement of the parameters by least squares fit of simulated annealing is performed only at some intermediate stages and in the final step. The method was successfully tested for two systems, Ag(1 1 1)(4 × 4)-O and Au(1 1 0)-(1 × 2), both in theory versus theory and in theory versus experiment comparisons. Details of the implementation as well as the results for these two systems are presented.

  13. Genetic defects in fatty acid beta-oxidation and acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter; Andresen, Brage S

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation deficiencies are due to genetic defects in enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation and transport proteins. Genetic defects have been identified in most of the genes where nearly all types of sequence variations (mutation types) have been associated with disease......, stability and kinetic properties for this variant enzyme will be discussed in detail and used as a paradigm for the study of other mis-sense variant proteins. We conclude that the total effect of mis-sense sequence variations may comprise an invariable--sequence variation specific--effect on the catalytic...

  14. Signaling regulating inner ear development: cell fate determination, patterning, morphogenesis, and defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    The membranous labyrinth of the inner ear is a highly complex organ that detects sound and balance. Developmental defects in the inner ear cause congenital hearing loss and balance disorders. The membranous labyrinth consists of three semicircular ducts, the utricle, saccule, and endolymphatic ducts, and the cochlear duct. These complex structures develop from the simple otic placode, which is established in the cranial ectoderm adjacent to the neural crest at the level of the hindbrain at the early neurula stage. During development, the otic placode invaginates to form the otic vesicle, which subsequently gives rise to neurons for the vestibulocochlear ganglion, the non-sensory and sensory epithelia of the membranous labyrinth that includes three ampullary crests, two maculae, and the organ of Corti. Combined paracrine and autocrine signals including fibroblast growth factor, Wnt, retinoic acid, hedgehog, and bone morphogenetic protein regulate fate determination, axis formation, and morphogenesis in the developing inner ear. Juxtacrine signals mediated by Notch pathways play a role in establishing the sensory epithelium, which consists of mechanosensory hair cells and supporting cells. The highly differentiated organ of Corti, which consists of uniformly oriented inner/outer hair cells and specific supporting cells, develops during fetal development. Developmental alterations/arrest causes congenital malformations in the inner ear in a spatiotemporal-restricted manner. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying inner ear development is important not only for the management of patients with congenital inner ear malformations, but also for the development of regenerative therapy for impaired function.

  15. Identification of genetic defects in primary immunodeficiencies by whole exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Jensen, Jens Magnus Bernth; Veirum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    to hypogammaglobulinaemia, and increased risk of both infections as well as cancer. We employed whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify mutations associated with primary immunodeficiency in severely affected children. We present WES data on 2 patients with severe immunodeficiency. WES was performed using TruSeq exome kit...... and severe infections including sepsis. Second, we identified compound heterozygote stopgain mutations in RAD52 and a heterozygote mutation in LRRC8A in a 7 year-old girl with T-cell deficiency, reduced T-cell mediated B-cell activity, hypogammaglobulinaemia, prolonged splenomegali and benign adenopathy. RAD......52 has not previously been linked to immunodeficiency and we are currently investigating the functional consequences. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying immunodeficiencies is a prerequisite for understanding disease pathogenesis. WES allows the demonstration of immune defects that may result from...

  16. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically... regulated status of alfalfa genetically engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate based on APHIS... decision and determination on the petition regarding the regulated status of alfalfa genetically engineered...

  17. Genetic determination of mortality rate in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Rafael Pimentel; Ask, Birgitte; Madsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    introduction of genetic material from other populations. The correlations between the sire components for death rate and slaughter rate were negative and small for the 3 populations, suggesting the existence of specific genetic mechanisms for each culling reason and common concurrent genetic mechanisms....... In the Holstein population the effects of the changes in the level of heterozygosity, breed composition and the increasing genetic trend act in the same direction increasing the death rate in the recent years. In the Jersey population, the effects of the level of heterozygosity and the breed proportion were small......, and only the increasing genetic trend can be pointed as a genetic cause to the observed increase in the mortality rate. In the Red Danish population neither the time-development pattern of the genetic trend nor the changes in the level of heterozygosity and breed composition could be causing the observed...

  18. Determining the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine.

  19. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela O W; Ribeiro, Luiz C; Sudário, Lysla C; Teixeira, Maria T B; Martins, Marina L; Pittella, Anuska M O L; Junior, Irtis de O Fernandes

    To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal), haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS(®) version 14.0. Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR) was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p=0.001) and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p=0.044). The presence of α-thal (p=0.196), the CAR haplotype (p=0.543), and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. Methods: Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal, haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA, using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS® version 14.0. Results: Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p = 0.001 and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p = 0.044. The presence of α-thal (p = 0.196, the CAR haplotype (p = 0.543, and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  1. Structure determination of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase from a crystal with lattice-translocation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xueyong [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Xu, Xiaojin [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Glycobiology Institute, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Wilson, Ian A., E-mail: wilson@scripps.edu [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The structure of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase was determined to 1.65 Å from crystals with a lattice-translocation defect using uncorrected, as well as corrected, diffraction data. Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 Å resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 Å, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  2. Genetic background determines response to hemostasis and thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Annie E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombosis is the fatal and disabling consequence of cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J and A/J, have marked differences in susceptibility to obesity, atherosclerosis, and vessel remodeling. However, it is unclear how these diverse genetic backgrounds influence pathways known to regulate thrombosis and hemostasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate thrombosis and hemostasis in these two inbred strains and determine the phenotypic response of A/J chromosomes in the C57BL/6J background. Methods A/J and C57Bl/6J mice were evaluated for differences in thrombosis and hemostasis. A thrombus was induced in the carotid artery by application of the exposed carotid to ferric chloride and blood flow measured until the vessel occluded. Bleeding and rebleeding times, as surrogate markers for thrombosis and hemostasis, were determined after clipping the tail and placing in warm saline. Twenty-one chromosome substitution strains, A/J chromosomes in a C57BL/6J background, were screened for response to the tail bleeding assay. Results Thrombus occlusion time was markedly decreased in the A/J mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. Tail bleeding time was similar in the two strains, but rebleeding time was markedly increased in the A/J mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. Coagulation times and tail morphology were similar, but tail collagen content was higher in A/J than C57BL/6J mice. Three chromosome substitution strains, B6-Chr5A/J, B6-Chr11A/J, and B6-Chr17A/J, were identified with increased rebleeding time, a phenotype similar to A/J mice. Mice heterosomic for chromosomes 5 or 17 had rebleeding times similar to C57BL/6J mice, but when these two chromosome substitution strains, B6-Chr5A/J and B6-Chr17A/J, were crossed, the A/J phenotype was restored in these doubly heterosomic progeny. Conclusion These results indicate that susceptibility to arterial

  3. Bacteriophage T4D Gene 42 Mutants Exhibit a Defective Genetic Exclusion Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    an adaptive mecanism for promoting individual fitness since the protected re3lource _s used for the production of the primary infecting 1nae𔃽 own...with the direction of transcription toward gene 42 has been mapped to the 26.3 kb region (Gram et al., 1984) (Fig. 2). All of this taken together...i i I I I IN122 E498 NG411 imm- E21x3 I I 1269x3 <------------------direction of transcription NG93 Fig. 3: A genetic map of the amber mutation sites

  4. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Genetic defects of PTH/PTHrP receptor in chondrodysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Naoshi

    2010-10-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling plays important roles in regulating the differentiation of chondrocytes in endochondral bone development. PTHrP signaling functions as an inhibitory effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy which is a terminal stage of differentiation at a growth plate. Mutations of the PTH÷PTHrP receptor have been identified in Jansen metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, Blomstrand's lethal chondrodysplasia, and enchondromatosis. Furthermore, genetic manipulations of the PTHrP and its receptor genes in mice have demonstrated the critical roles of these proteins in regulating both the switch between proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes.

  5. FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Sjozef; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Koumbi, Daphne; Cuppens, Harry; Riccardino, Francesca; Macek, Milan; Scriver, Charles R; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

  6. [Genetics of congenital color vision defects. II. Rare types of color blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, M R

    1995-01-01

    Between the rare types of colour blindness, the known best are defects of blue colour vision, which are called tritanopia or trinanomaly (tritanomalous trichromacy). Their incidence is 1 in 500 and they are inherited in autosomal dominant way with incomplete penetrance. The basis of them are mutations of the short (blue) wavelength sensitive visual pigment gene. The gene has been mapped on the chromosome 7 and has already been cloned and sequenced. However, the loci heterogeneity should not be excluded in that condition. Another rare type of colour blindness in blue cone monochromacy. It is based on the cone sensitivity to short (blue) wavelength only. The condition is inherited in X-linked recessive way and it is known, that it can be caused by 2 different mechanisms. The first one--two-step pathway--consists of green cone pigment gene deletion, and point mutation of red cone pigment gene. The second one--one-step pathway--arose by deletion of regulatory sequence of both genes of visual pigments, mapped on the X chromosome. Different types of total and partial achromatopsia are also described. The best known ones are: rod monochromacy, which is inherited in autosomal recessive way and consist of rod vision only, and cone dystrophy, usually inherited in X-linked recessive way.

  7. [Genetics of congenital color vision defects. I. Common types of color blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, M R

    1995-01-01

    Normal human colour vision is based on the presence of 3 kinds of cones containing 3 different visual pigments, sensitive to short (blue), middle (green) and long (red) wavelengths. Congenital defects of colour vision are based on handicap or total loss of these pigments' function, usually a result of changes in their coding genes. The common types of colour blindness, referred to red-green axis, are present in about 8% of males and 0.44% of females. 3/4 of them are deuteranopes or deuteranomalous trichromats and 1/4 of them are protanopes or protanomalous trichromats. All of them are inherited in X-linked recessive way. The genes have been already mapped and sequenced. The cause of the great majority of their changes is nonhomologous recombination, which produces a gene deletion or creates the red-green or green-red hybrid genes. The result of that is the production of visual pigment with partly or totally changed spectral sensitivity.

  8. Nanolaser spectroscopy of Normal and Genetically Defective Mitochondria: New Biostatistical Tool for Studying Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul; Hendricks, Judy; Naviaux, Robert; Yaffe, Michael

    2007-03-01

    We report an analysis of wild and mutant strains of mitochondria from yeast cells using nanolaser spectroscopy to measure cytochrome density and its statistical variation in the population. The first strain 110 was derived from wild-type strain 104 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), resulting in loss of all mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b that can be detected in the laser spectra. Histograms of laser wavelengths produced by wild-type mitochondria produced peaked distributions, while mutant mitochondria exhibit asymmetric, highly skewed distributions. Surprisingly, all of these distributions exhibit extended tails and can be self-consistently fit with log-normal distribution functions. In striking contrast, the mitochondrial diameters (measured separately by microscopy) exhibit normal Gaussian distributions. These results indicate that the nanolaser spectra are useful for quantifying cytochrome content in mitochondria and may have important implications for quantifying defects in mitochondria that manifest human disease.

  9. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, David S; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S; Priori, Silvia G; Chinitz, Larry A; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5A(E558X/+) pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5A(E558X/+) hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5A(E558X/+) pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias.

  10. Early Determinants of Obesity: Genetic, Epigenetic, and In Utero Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung E. Rhee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging body of work indicating that genes, epigenetics, and the in utero environment can impact whether or not a child is obese. While certain genes have been identified that increase one’s risk for becoming obese, other factors such as excess gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes mellitus, and smoking can also influence this risk. Understanding these influences can help to inform which behaviors and exposures should be targeted if we are to decrease the prevalence of obesity. By helping parents and young children change certain behaviors and exposures during critical time periods, we may be able to alter or modify one’s genetic predisposition. However, further research is needed to determine which efforts are effective at decreasing the incidence of obesity and to develop new methods of prevention. In this paper, we will discuss how genes, epigenetics, and in utero influences affect the development of obesity. We will then discuss current efforts to alter these influences and suggest future directions for this work.

  11. Variation in human recombination rates and its genetic determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Fledel-Alon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the fundamental role of crossing-over in the pairing and segregation of chromosomes during human meiosis, the rates and placements of events vary markedly among individuals. Characterizing this variation and identifying its determinants are essential steps in our understanding of the human recombination process and its evolution. STUDY DESIGN/RESULTS: Using three large sets of European-American pedigrees, we examined variation in five recombination phenotypes that capture distinct aspects of crossing-over patterns. We found that the mean recombination rate in males and females and the historical hotspot usage are significantly heritable and are uncorrelated with one another. We then conducted a genome-wide association study in order to identify loci that influence them. We replicated associations of RNF212 with the mean rate in males and in females as well as the association of Inversion 17q21.31 with the female mean rate. We also replicated the association of PRDM9 with historical hotspot usage, finding that it explains most of the genetic variance in this phenotype. In addition, we identified a set of new candidate regions for further validation. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that variation at broad and fine scales is largely separable and that, beyond three known loci, there is no evidence for common variation with large effects on recombination phenotypes.

  12. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  13. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of a Novel Mutant mst of Rice Defective in Flower Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun; XU Pei-zhou; ZHANG Hong-yu; FU Shao-hong; YANG Jin; ZHANG Ru-quan; WU Xian-jun

    2009-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant with multiple stigmas (mst) was found in an indica rice line 466. The mst mutant exhibits normal at the vegetative development stage and produces normal inflorescence structures. The difference between the mutant and the wild type was observed when the stamen primordium began to develop. In the mst florets, palea and lemma opened, lodicules were homeotically transformed into palea/lemma-like structures, and stamens were homeotically transformed into carpel-like structures. It looked like multiple stigmas being full of the whole floret. The phenotypic changes of mst were very similar to that of B-like mutant spw1. Compared with other mutants with pistillate morphologies, the severe mst florets showed that the inner three floral organs were completely changed into palea/lemma-like structures. Moreover, the mutant was female sterile. Occasionally, with the changing environment, one or two stamens were fertile. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant traits were controlled by a single recessive gene.

  14. Quantitative determination of anti-structured defects applied to alloys of a wide chemical range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yongxin; Lu, Yanli

    2016-11-01

    Anti-structured defects bridge atom migration among heterogeneous sublattices facilitating diffusion but could also result in the collapse of ordered structure. Component distribution Ni75Al x V25-x alloys are investigated using a microscopic phase field model to illuminate relations between anti-structured defects and composition, precipitate order, precipitate type, and phase stability. The Ni75Al x V25-x alloys undergo single Ni3V (stage I), dual Ni3Al and Ni3V (stage II with Ni3V prior; and stage III with Ni3Al prior), and single Ni3Al (stage IV) with enhanced aluminum level. For Ni3V phase, anti-structured defects (VNi1, NiV, except VNi2) and substitution defects (AlNi1, AlNi2, AlV) exhibit a positive correlation to aluminum in stage I, the positive trend becomes to negative correlation or smooth during stage II. For Ni3Al phase, anti-structured defects (AlNi, NiAl) and substitution defects (VNi, VAl) have a positive correlation to aluminum in stage II, but NiAl goes down since stage III and lasts to stage IV. VNi and VAl fluctuate when Ni3Al precipitates prior, but go down drastically in stage IV. Precipitate type conversion of single Ni3V/dual (Ni3V+Ni3Al) affects Ni3V defects, while dual (Ni3V+Ni3Al)/single Ni3Al has little effect on Ni3Al defects. Precipitate order swap occurred in the dual phase region affects on Ni3Al defects but not on Ni3V. Project supported by the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JQ5014), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3102014JCQ01024), the Research Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing (NWPU), China (Grant No. 114-QP-2014), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20136102120021), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51474716 and 51475378).

  15. Young Adults' Belief in Genetic Determinism, and Knowledge and Attitudes towards Modern Genetics and Genomics: The PUGGS Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Rebecca Bruu; Castéra, Jérémy; Gericke, Niklas; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes; El-Hani, Charbel N

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the development and validation a comprehensive questionnaire to assess college students' knowledge about modern genetics and genomics, their belief in genetic determinism, and their attitudes towards applications of modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. Written in everyday language with minimal jargon, the Public Understanding and Attitudes towards Genetics and Genomics (PUGGS) questionnaire is intended for use in research on science education and public understanding of science, as a means to investigate relationships between knowledge, determinism and attitudes about modern genetics, which are to date little understood. We developed a set of core ideas and initial items from reviewing the scientific literature on genetics and previous studies on public and student knowledge and attitudes about genetics. Seventeen international experts from different fields (e.g., genetics, education, philosophy of science) reviewed the initial items and their feedback was used to revise the questionnaire. We validated the questionnaire in two pilot tests with samples of university freshmen students. The final questionnaire contains 45 items, including both multiple choice and Likert scale response formats. Cronbach alpha showed good reliability for each section of the questionnaire. In conclusion, the PUGGS questionnaire is a reliable tool for investigating public understanding and attitudes towards modern genetics and genomic-based technologies.

  16. Young Adults’ Belief in Genetic Determinism, and Knowledge and Attitudes towards Modern Genetics and Genomics: The PUGGS Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Rebecca Bruu; Castéra, Jérémy; Gericke, Niklas; Evangelista, Neima Alice Menezes

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the development and validation a comprehensive questionnaire to assess college students’ knowledge about modern genetics and genomics, their belief in genetic determinism, and their attitudes towards applications of modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. Written in everyday language with minimal jargon, the Public Understanding and Attitudes towards Genetics and Genomics (PUGGS) questionnaire is intended for use in research on science education and public understanding of science, as a means to investigate relationships between knowledge, determinism and attitudes about modern genetics, which are to date little understood. We developed a set of core ideas and initial items from reviewing the scientific literature on genetics and previous studies on public and student knowledge and attitudes about genetics. Seventeen international experts from different fields (e.g., genetics, education, philosophy of science) reviewed the initial items and their feedback was used to revise the questionnaire. We validated the questionnaire in two pilot tests with samples of university freshmen students. The final questionnaire contains 45 items, including both multiple choice and Likert scale response formats. Cronbach alpha showed good reliability for each section of the questionnaire. In conclusion, the PUGGS questionnaire is a reliable tool for investigating public understanding and attitudes towards modern genetics and genomic-based technologies. PMID:28114357

  17. Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Heine, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts…

  18. Atomically resolved structural determination of graphene and its point defects via extrapolation assisted phase retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner [Physics Department, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-01-12

    Previously reported crystalline structures obtained by an iterative phase retrieval reconstruction of their diffraction patterns seem to be free from displaying any irregularities or defects in the lattice, which appears to be unrealistic. We demonstrate here that the structure of a nanocrystal including its atomic defects can unambiguously be recovered from its diffraction pattern alone by applying a direct phase retrieval procedure not relying on prior information of the object shape. Individual point defects in the atomic lattice are clearly apparent. Conventional phase retrieval routines assume isotropic scattering. We show that when dealing with electrons, the quantitatively correct transmission function of the sample cannot be retrieved due to anisotropic, strong forward scattering specific to electrons. We summarize the conditions for this phase retrieval method and show that the diffraction pattern can be extrapolated beyond the original record to even reveal formerly not visible Bragg peaks. Such extrapolated wave field pattern leads to enhanced spatial resolution in the reconstruction.

  19. BMP2 genetically engineered MSCs and EPCs promote vascularized bone regeneration in rat critical-sized calvarial bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs.

  20. Infertility caused by male partners with genetic defects in Sichuan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Q; Li, T J; Ding, X P; Wei, J; Li, L X; Fu, L

    2013-12-11

    The purpose of this study was to detect chromosomal aberrations and azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions in male patients with reproductive problems and to summarize related clinical features to provide reliable information for evaluating prenatal and preimplantation diagnoses. A large cohort of 5083 men with various phenotypes of male infertility was analyzed via G-banding karyotyping, and Origin 8.0 was used to analyze the prevalence of abnormalities. Additionally, patients with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia were analyzed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction to detect microdeletion in the AZF. We identified 387 patients with abnormal karyotypes, and the ratio was 7.61%. Among them were 175 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, which was the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality and accounted for 45.22% of all chromosomal aberrations. The frequencies of increased satellites, balanced translocations, and Robertsonian translocations were 6.47, 7.00, and 3.62%, respectively. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed in 810 cases with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia found a ratio of AZF microdeletions of 4.94%. The finding suggests that chromosomal abnormalities and AZF deletion are main factors that result in male infertility. Detecting these common genetic variations is necessary in infertile men seeking assisted reproductive technology.

  1. Genetic Determination of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Formation: Pros and Cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Pozharishchenskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researches are being actively carried out to identify genetic risk factors for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD in premature infants, including genetic polymorphism encoding surfactants, matrix metalloproteinases, cytokines, growth factors, and components of the body’s antioxidant defence. The review presents the results of foreign and domestic genetic trials in this field aimed at predicting the possible formation of BLD in premature infants and providing a personalized approach to the management of such patients.

  2. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the Herbicide Glyphosate AGENCY: Animal... and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 as regulated... determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated...

  3. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the Herbicide Glyphosate AGENCY: Animal... determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated... Monsanto/Forage Genetics International (FGI) alfalfa events J101 and J163 were no longer considered...

  4. Structure Determination of the 1918 H1N1 Neuraminidase From a Crystal With Lattice-Translocation Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.; Xu, X.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 {angstrom}, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  5. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenase-2 in keratinocytes produces a cell-autonomous defect in tumor formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Using a mouse skin tumor model, we reported previously that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) deficiency reduced papilloma formation. However, this model did not differentiate between the effects of systemic COX-2-deficiency and keratinocyte-specific COX-2 deficiency on tumor formation. To determine whether keratinocyte-specific COX-2 deficiency reduced papilloma formation, v-H-ras-transformed COX-2+/+ and COX-2−/− keratinocytes were grafted onto nude mice and tumor development was compared. Transformed COX-2+/+ and COX-2−/− keratinocytes expressed similar levels of H-ras, epidermal growth factor receptor and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 in vitro; and COX-2-deficiency did not reduce uninfected or v-H-ras infected keratinocyte replication. In contrast, tumors arising from grafted transformed COX-2+/+ and COX-2−/− keratinocytes expressed similar levels of H-ras, but COX-2 deficiency reduced phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and epidermal growth factor receptor levels 50–60% and tumor volume by 80% at 3 weeks. Two factors appeared to account for the reduced papilloma size. First, papillomas derived from COX-2−/− keratinocytes showed about 70% decreased proliferation, as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, compared with papillomas derived from COX-2+/+ keratinocytes. Second, keratin 1 immunostaining of papillomas indicated that COX-2−/− keratinocytes prematurely initiated terminal differentiation. Differences in the levels of apoptosis and vascularization did not appear to be contributing factors as their levels were similar in tumors derived from COX-2−/− and COX-2+/+ keratinocytes. Overall, the data are in agreement with our previous observations that decreased papilloma number and size on COX-2−/− mice resulted from reduced keratinocyte proliferation and accelerated keratinocyte differentiation. Furthermore, the data indicate that deficiency/inhibition of COX-2 in the initiated keratinocyte is an

  6. Determining the internal quantum efficiency of shallow-implanted nitrogen-vacancy defects in bulk diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Boll, Mads; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in bulk diamond are bright sources of luminescence. However, the exact value of their internal quantum efficiency (IQE) has not been measured so far. Here we use an implementation of Drexhage's scheme to quantify the IQE of shallow...... the quantum efficiency to be 0.70 ± 0.07 and 0.82 ± 0.08, respectively....

  7. Boundaries determine the formation energies of lattice defects in two-dimensional buckled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sandeep K.; Juričić, Vladimir; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice defects are inevitably present in two-dimensional materials, with direct implications on their physical and chemical properties. We show that the formation energy of a lattice defect in buckled two-dimensional crystals is not uniquely defined as it takes different values for different boundary conditions even in the thermodynamic limit, as opposed to their perfectly planar counterparts. Also, the approach to the thermodynamic limit follows a different scaling: inversely proportional to the logarithm of the system size for buckled materials, rather than the usual power-law approach. In graphene samples of ˜1000 atoms, different boundary conditions can cause differences exceeding 10 eV. Besides presenting numerical evidence in simulations, we show that the universal features in this behavior can be understood with simple bead-spring models. Fundamentally, our findings imply that it is necessary to specify the boundary conditions for the energy of the lattice defects in the buckled two-dimensional crystals to be uniquely defined, and this may explain the lack of agreement in the reported values of formation energies in graphene. We argue that boundary conditions may also have an impact on other physical observables such as the melting temperature.

  8. Antisite Defects of the L12 Structure Determined by the Phase Field Microelasticity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; CHEN Zheng; LU Yan-Li; WANG Yong-Xin; ZHAO Yan

    2009-01-01

    A phase field microelasticity simulation is performed to examine the antisite defect of L12-Ni3Al in Ni75Al5.3 V19.7 ternary alloy.Combinimg strain energy with the phase field model leads to an atom conflguration change as time proceeds.For the Ni sublattice,the antisite defect AlNi,the equilibrium occupancy probability (OP) of which declines,precedes NiNi and VNi in reaching equilibrium;subsequently,NiNi and VNi present a phenomenon of symmetrical rise and decline individuaily.Similarly,for the Al sublattice,the antisite defect NiAl,the OP of which eventually rises,takes fewer time steps than AlAl and VAl to attain equilibrium.Thereafter,AlAl rises while VAl declines symmetrically at the axes of the NiAl curve.Furthermore,the OP for the Al sublattice is much more sensitive to strain energy than that for the Ni sublattice.%$Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 50671084 and 50875217,the Doctoral Foundation of Northwestcrn Polytechnical University under Grant No CX200806,the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Programme of Higher Education of China under Grant No 20070420218,and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province.

  9. Maternal and infant genetic variants, maternal periconceptional use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and risk of congenital heart defects in offspring: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Wendy N; Tang, Xinyu; Hu, Zhuopei; MacLeod, Stewart; Stowe, Zachary; Webber, Daniel

    2017-03-06

    Objective To evaluate whether the association between maternal periconceptional use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and increased risk of congenital heart defects in offspring is modified by maternal or infant genetic variants in folate, homocysteine, or transsulfuration pathways.Design Population based study. DNA from mothers, fathers, and infants was genotyped with an Illumina GoldenGate custom single nucleotide polymorphism panel. A hybrid design based on a log linear model was used to calculate relative risks and Bayesian false discovery probabilities (BFDP) to identify polymorphisms associated with congenital heart defects modified by SSRI use.Data sources Data from the US National Birth Defects Prevention Study on 1180 liveborn infants with congenital heart defects and 1644 controls, born 1997-2008.Main outcome measures Cases included infants with selected congenital heart defects and control infants had no major defects. SSRI use was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers.Results For women who reported taking SSRIs periconceptionally, maternal SHMT1 (rs9909104) GG and AGgenotypes were associated with a 5.9 and 2.4 increased risk of select congenital heart defects in offspring, respectively, versus the AA genotype (BFDP=0.69). Compared with the AA genotype, BHMT (rs492842 and rs542852) GG and AG genotypes were associated with twice the riskof congenital heart defects (BFDP=0.74 and 0.79, respectively). MGST1 (rs2075237) CC and ACgenotypes were associated with an increased risk compared with the GG genotype (8.0 and 2.8, respectively; BFDP=0.79). Single nucleotide polymorphism in infant genes in the folate (MTHFS rs12438477), homocysteine (TRDMT1 rs6602178 and GNMT rs11752813) and transsulfuration (GSTP1 rs7941395 and MGST1 rs7294985) pathways were also associated with an increased risk of congenital heart defects.Conclusions Common maternal or infant genetic variants in folate, homocysteine, or transsulfuration pathways are

  10. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Genetic determinants of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic markers for host resistance to gastrointestinal parasites have long been sought by the livestock industry as a way to select more resistant individuals, and alternatively, to help farmers with parasite control because high egg shedders will be removed from the flock and reduce parasite trans...

  12. Genetic determination of ploidy level in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, Germán; Martínez, Claudio; Retamales, Patricio; León, Rubén; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2003-01-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (formely Phaffia rhodozyma) is a basidiomycetous yeast-like fungus that produces carotenoids useful for the food industry. Recently, its sexual cycle was reported but little is known about its genetic constitution. To inquire into the ploidy state of X. dendrorhous, biased mutant spectrum, genetic complementation and mitotic recombination analysis were used. A wild-type strain was subjected to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenic treatment. Auxotrophic and carotene mutants were forced to revert to the wild-type phenotype. Pigment producing and prototroph revertants behaved as diploid except for adenine less mutants. These results are in agreement with the limited spectrum of auxotrophs obtained in this strain for the ADE1 locus. To analyze the genetic characteristic of the adenine genetic marker of X. dendrorhous, protoplast fusion experiments with several adenine less mutants were performed. The experiments presented in this work suggest that the ATCC 2430 (UDC 67-385) strain of X. dendrorhous is diploid and a heterozygous constitution is proposed for the ADE1 locus.

  13. Resistance to hepatitis C virus: potential genetic and immunological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael M; Luciani, Fabio; Cameron, Barbara; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R; Booth, David; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    Studies of individuals who were highly exposed but seronegative (HESN) for HIV infection led to the discovery that homozygosity for the Δ32 deletion mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents viral entry into target cells, and is associated with resistance to infection. Additionally, evidence for protective immunity has been noted in some HESN groups, such as sex workers in The Gambia. Population studies of individuals at high risk for hepatitis C virus infection suggest that an HESN phenotype exists. The body of evidence, which suggests that protective immunity allows clearance of hepatitis C virus without seroconversion is growing. Furthermore, proof-of-principle evidence from in-vitro studies shows that genetic polymorphisms can confer resistance to establishment of infection. This Review discusses the possibility that genetic mutations confer resistance against hepatitis C virus, and also explores evidence for protective immunity, including via genetically programmed variations in host responses. The data generally strengthens the notion that investigations of naturally arising polymorphisms within the hepatitis C virus interactome, and genetic association studies of well characterised HESN individuals, could identify potential targets for vaccine design and inform novel therapies.

  14. Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2006-09-30

    This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at

  15. Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubanek Julia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s. We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. Results A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units

  16. Determination of Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetic Subjects in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, J; Ahmed, S; Laila, R; Islam, M T; Rahaman, M F; Snigdha, K R; Sarkar, S; Khan, A S; Sarkar, A K

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. This study was undertaken to explore the basic defect in type 2 diabetes patients in Bangladesh. This was an observational study with case control design, was conducted in the Biomedical Research Group, Research Division, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka, Bangladesh, during the period of July 2008 to June 2009. A total of 153 subjects were included in study of which 63 belonged to type 2 diabetes mellitus group and 90 were healthy controls. Fasting and 2 hours postprandial blood glucose, serum insulin, HOMA%B, HOMA%S, QuickI, Glucose /insulin ratio, TG were measured and age, BMI, WHR were recorded. Waist-hip ratio (WHR), was significantly higher in T2DM as compared to control subjects [WHR, mean±SD, 0.94±0.12 vs. 0.88±0.06, pBangladesh.

  17. Sprinting without myostatin: a genetic determinant of athletic prowess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jin

    2007-10-01

    Genetic studies in several species have demonstrated that myostatin (MSTN) normally functions to limit skeletal muscle mass. In a recent study, Mosher et al. reported that a mutation in the canine MSTN gene is responsible for the double-muscling phenotype seen in 'bully' whippets. Furthermore, they show that loss of even one functional MSTN allele seems to confer a competitive advantage to racing whippets, providing the first definitive evidence that loss of myostatin function can enhance athletic performance.

  18. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangion Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume

  19. The Genetic Determinism of Biochemical Systems Polymorphous From the Blood Serum in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Işfan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of genetic markers and identification of new markers make the subject of an increasing number of research projects in various fields such as genetics of immunology, biochemical genetics, molecular genetics, quantitative genetics and the genetic amelioration of animals. The information provided by electrophoresis graphs has been used to determine the frequency of various categories of alleles (for the loci of pre-albumin, transferines and serum amylases, the frequency of various phenotypes and the genetic structure for each and every locus and, simultaneously, for the loci being studied. The discussion over the varieties of serum proteins was carried on for the purpose of using them as genetic markers, in order to appreciate the levels of genetic unity or diversity within the stock of swine that has been studied. A pair of simple alleles has been determined for each of the three loci. When the three loci were studied simultaneously, out of the 27 possible combinations, only 15 have been found. The sample studied has found to be genetically balanced for every of the three loci. However, when the simultaneous study has been applied, the same sample has not been found genetically balanced.

  20. Genetic backgrounds and modifier genes of NTD mouse models: An opportunity for greater understanding of the multifactorial etiology of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Renee Y M; Singh, Parmveer; McDermid, Heather E

    2016-10-21

    Neurulation, the early embryonic process of forming the presumptive brain and spinal cord, is highly complex and involves hundreds of genes in multiple genetic pathways. Mice have long served as a genetic model for studying human neurulation, and the resulting neural tube defects (NTDs) that arise when neurulation is disrupted. Because mice appear to show mostly single gene inheritance for NTDs and humans show multifactorial inheritance, mice sometimes have been characterized as a simpler model for the identification and study of NTD genes. But are they a simple model? When viewed on different genetic backgrounds, many genes show significant variation in the penetrance and expressivity of NTD phenotypes, suggesting the presence of modifier loci that interact with the target gene to affect the phenotypic expression. Looking at mutations on different genetic backgrounds provides us with an opportunity to explore these complex genetic interactions, which are likely to better emulate similar processes in human neurulation. Here, we review NTD genes known to show strain-specific phenotypic variation. We focus particularly on the gene Cecr2, which is studied using both a hypomorphic and a presumptive null mutation on two different backgrounds: one susceptible (BALB/c) and one resistant (FVB/N) to NTDs. This strain difference has led to a search for genetic modifiers within a region on murine chromosome 19. Understanding how genetic variants alter the phenotypic outcome in NTD mouse models will help to direct future studies in humans, particularly now that more genome wide sequencing approaches are being used. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genetic Determinism in the Genetics Curriculum - An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Mendelian and Weldonian Emphases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Annie; Radick, Gregory

    2017-07-01

    Twenty-first-century biology rejects genetic determinism, yet an exaggerated view of the power of genes in the making of bodies and minds remains a problem. What accounts for such tenacity? This article reports an exploratory study suggesting that the common reliance on Mendelian examples and concepts at the start of teaching in basic genetics is an eliminable source of support for determinism. Undergraduate students who attended a standard `Mendelian approach' university course in introductory genetics on average showed no change in their determinist views about genes. By contrast, students who attended an alternative course which, inspired by the work of a critic of early Mendelism, W. F. R. Weldon (1860-1906), replaced an emphasis on Mendel's peas with an emphasis on developmental contexts and their role in bringing about phenotypic variability, were less determinist about genes by the end of teaching. Improvements in both the new Weldonian curriculum and the study design are in view for the future.

  2. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyde David R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO, subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease.

  3. Determination of Selection Method in Genetic Algorithm for Land Suitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfianti Asti Dwi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic Algoirthm is one alternative solution in the field of modeling optimization, automatic programming and machine learning. The purpose of the study was to compare some type of selection methods in Genetic Algorithm for land suitability. Contribution of this research applies the best method to develop region based horticultural commodities. This testing is done by comparing the three methods on the method of selection, the Roulette Wheel, Tournament Selection and Stochastic Universal Sampling. Parameters of the locations used in the test scenarios include Temperature = 27°C, Rainfall = 1200 mm, hummidity = 30%, Cluster fruit = 4, Crossover Probabiitiy (Pc = 0.6, Mutation Probabilty (Pm = 0.2 and Epoch = 10. The second test epoch incluides location parameters consist of Temperature = 30°C, Rainfall = 2000 mm, Humidity = 35%, Cluster fruit = 5, Crossover Probability (Pc = 0.7, Mutation Probability (Pm = 0.3 and Epoch 10. The conclusion of this study shows that the Roulette Wheel is the best method because it produces more stable and fitness value than the other two methods.

  4. Innate immunity and genetic determinants of urinary tract infection susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godaly, Gabriela; Ambite, Ines; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, dangerous and interesting. Susceptible individuals experience multiple, often clustered episodes, and in a subset of patients, infections progress to acute pyelonephritis (APN), sometimes accompanied by uro-sepsis. Others develop asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Here, we review the molecular basis for these differences, with the intention to distinguish exaggerated host responses that drive disease from attenuated responses that favour protection and to highlight the genetic basis for these extremes, based on knock-out mice and clinical studies. Recent findings The susceptibility to UTI is controlled by specific innate immune signalling and by promoter polymorphisms and transcription factors that modulate the expression of genes controlling these pathways. Gene deletions that disturb innate immune activation either favour asymptomatic bacteriuria or create acute morbidity and disease. Promoter polymorphisms and transcription factor variants affecting those genes are associated with susceptibility in UTI-prone patients. Summary It is time to start using genetics in UTI-prone patients, to improve diagnosis and to assess the risk for chronic sequels such as renal malfunction, hypertension, spontaneous abortions, dialysis and transplantation. Furthermore, the majority of UTI patients do not need follow-up, but for lack of molecular markers, they are unnecessarily investigated. PMID:25539411

  5. Cholesterol Levels in Genetically Determined Familial Hypercholesterolaemia in Russian Karelia

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    V. A. Korneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH is a rare disease that tends to be diagnosed lately. In Russia, the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the disease are not well defined. We investigated 102 patients with definite FH. In 52 of these patients (50.9% genetic analysis was performed, revealing pathogenic mutations of the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor gene in 22 patients. We report here five mutations of the LDL receptor gene found in the Karelian FH sample for the first time. The detection rate of mutations in definite FH patients was 42.3%. Two groups of patients with a definite diagnosis of FH according to the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria were compared: the first group had putatively functionally important LDL receptor gene mutations, while in the second group LDL receptor gene mutations were excluded by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Total and LDL cholesterol levels were higher in the group with LDL receptor mutations compared to the mutation-free population. The frequency of mutations in patients with LDL cholesterol > 6.5 mmol/L was more than 3 times higher than that in patients with LDL < 6.5 mmol/L. Total and LDL cholesterol levels and the frequency of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction were higher in the group with definite FH compared to groups with probable and possible FH. Cholesterol figures in FH patients of different age and sex from the Karelian population were comparable.

  6. Firing up the nature/nurture controversy: bioethics and genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Martín, I

    2005-09-01

    It is argued here that bioethicists might inadvertently be promoting genetic determinism: the idea that genes alone determine human traits and behaviours. Discussions about genetic testing are used to exemplify how they might be doing so. Quite often bioethicists use clinical cases to support particular moral obligations or rights as if these cases were representative of the kind of information we can acquire about human diseases through genetic testing, when they are not. On other occasions, the clinical cases are presented in simplistic ways that portray genetic testing as yielding information more accurate than it actually is. It is concluded that, because of the problematic implications that the ideology of genetic determinism might have for individuals' wellbeing and for our public policies, bioethicists should be careful to present these issues in ways that do not promote questionable ideas about the causal role of genes in human diseases and behaviours.

  7. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysis of a parotid and a thyroid oncocytoma, developed by a BHD and a CS patient, respectively. The BHD lesion was shown to maintain the wild-type allele of FLCN, while losing one PTEN allele. On the other hand, a double heterozygosity for the same two genes was found to be the only detectable tumorigenic hit in the CS oncocytoma. Both conditions occurred in a context of high chromosomal stability, as highlighted by comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. We conclude that, similarly to PTEN, FLCN may not always follow the classical Two Hits model of tumorigenesis and may hence belong to a class of non-canonical tumour suppressor genes. We hence introduce a role of PTEN/FLCN double heterozygosity in syndromic oncocytic tumorigenesis, suggesting this to be an alternative determinant to pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, which are instead the genetic hallmark of sporadic oncocytic tumours. PMID:23386036

  8. Genetic Determinism in School Textbooks: A Comparative Study Conducted among Sixteen Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Clement, Pierre; Abrougui, Mondher; Nisiforou, Olympia; Valanides, Nicos; Turcinaviciene, Jurga; Sarapuu, Tago; Agorram, Boujemaa; Calado, Florbela; Bogner, Franz; Carvalho, Graca

    2008-01-01

    Genetic concepts have significantly evolved over the last ten years, and are now less connected to innate ideas and reductionism. Unique reference to genetic determinism has been replaced by the interaction between the genes and their environment (epigenetics). Our analyses relate to how current school biology textbooks present this new paradigm…

  9. Genetic Determinism of Primary Early-Onset Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aury-Landas, Juliette; Marcelli, Christian; Leclercq, Sylvain; Boumédiene, Karim; Baugé, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. A minority of cases correspond to familial presentation characterized by early-onset forms which are genetically heterogeneous. This review brings a new point of view on the molecular basis of OA by focusing on gene mutations causing early-onset OA (EO-OA). Recently, thanks to whole-exome sequencing, a gain-of-function mutation in the TNFRSF11B gene was identified in two distant family members with EO-OA, opening new therapeutic perspectives for OA. Indeed, unraveling the molecular basis of rare Mendelian OA forms will improve our understanding of molecular processes involved in OA pathogenesis and will contribute to better patient diagnosis, management, and therapy.

  10. Genetic determinants of serum testosterone concentrations in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n = 871 and two de novo replication cohorts (n = 4,620 to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG locus (17p13-p12 were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p = 1.2×10(-41 and rs6258, p = 2.3×10(-22. Subjects with ≥ 3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p = 5.6×10(-16. The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01. Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation.

  11. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  12. Genetic Determinants of Emphysema Distribution in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial

    OpenAIRE

    DeMeo, Dawn L.; Hersh, Craig P; Hoffman, Eric A.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lazarus, Ross; Sparrow, David; Benditt, Joshua O.; Criner, Gerard; Make, Barry; Martinez, Fernando J.; Scanlon, Paul D.; Sciurba, Frank C; Utz, James P.; John J Reilly; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Computed tomography (CT) scanning of the lung may reduce phenotypic heterogeneity in defining subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and allow identification of genetic determinants of emphysema severity and distribution.

  13. Genetic defect in CYP24A1, the vitamin D 24-hydroxylase gene, in a patient with severe infantile hypercalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH) is a disorder the genetic etiology and physiological basis of which are not well understood. The objective of the study was to describe the underlying physiology and genetic cause of hypercalcemia in an infant with severe IIH and to extend these genetic findi...

  14. Genetically Determined Response to Artemisinin Treatment in Western Kenyan Plasmodium falciparum Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebon, Lorna J.; Ngalah, Bidii S.; Ingasia, Luicer A.; Juma, Dennis W.; Muiruri, Peninah; Cheruiyot, Jelagat; Opot, Benjamin; Mbuba, Emmanuel; Imbuga, Mabel; Akala, Hoseah M.; Bulimo, Wallace; Andagalu, Ben; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Genetically determined artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has been described in Southeast Asia. The relevance of recently described Kelch 13-propeller mutations for artemisinin resistance in Sub-Saharan Africa parasites is still unknown. Southeast Asia parasites have low genetic diversity compared to Sub-Saharan Africa, where parasites are highly genetically diverse. This study attempted to elucidate whether genetics provides a basis for discovering molecular markers in response to artemisinin drug treatment in P. falciparum in Kenya. The genetic diversity of parasites collected pre- and post- introduction of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in western Kenya was determined. A panel of 12 microsatellites and 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the P. falciparum genome were genotyped. Parasite clearance rates were obtained for the post-ACT parasites. The 12 microsatellites were highly polymorphic with post-ACT parasites being significantly more diverse compared to pre-ACT (p resistance in Kenya. PMID:27611315

  15. Genetic Determinants of the Gut Microbiome in UK Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Julia K; Davenport, Emily R; Beaumont, Michelle; Jackson, Matthew A; Knight, Rob; Ober, Carole; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T; Clark, Andrew G; Ley, Ruth E

    2016-05-11

    Studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing associations between host genetics and the microbiome. Here we report a 16S rRNA-based analysis of the gut microbiome in 1,126 twin pairs, a subset of which was previously reported. Tripling the sample narrowed the confidence intervals around heritability estimates and uncovered additional heritable taxa, some of which are validated in other studies. Repeat sampling of subjects showed heritable taxa to be temporally stable. A candidate gene approach uncovered associations between heritable taxa and genes related to diet, metabolism, and olfaction. We replicate an association between Bifidobacterium and the lactase (LCT) gene locus and identify an association between the host gene ALDH1L1 and the bacteria SHA-98, suggesting a link between formate production and blood pressure. Additional genes detected are involved in barrier defense and self/non-self recognition. Our results indicate that diet-sensing, metabolism, and immune defense are important drivers of human-microbiome co-evolution.

  16. Genetic diversity of bovine Neospora caninum determined by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, N; Gottstein, B; Haddadzadeh, H R

    2015-10-01

    Neospora caninum is one of the most significant parasitic organisms causing bovine abortion worldwide. Despite the economic impact of this infection, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity of this parasite. In this study, using Nc5 and ITS1 nested PCR, N. caninum has been detected in 12 brain samples of aborted fetuses from 298 seropositive dairy cattle collected from four different regions in Tehran, Iran. These specimen (Nc-Iran) were genotyped in multilocus using 9 different microsatellite markers previously described (MS4, MS5, MS6A, MS6B, MS7, MS8, MS10, MS12 and MS21). Microsatellite amplification was completely feasible in 2 samples, semi-completely in 8 samples, and failed in 2 samples. Within the two completely performed allelic profiles of Nc-Iran strains, unique multilocus profiles were obtained for both and novel allelic patterns were found in the MS8 and MS10 microsatellite markers. The Jaccard's similarity index showed significant difference between these two strains and from other standard isolates derived from GenBank such as Nc-Liv, Nc-SweB1, Nc-GER1, KBA1, and KBA2. All samples originating from the same area showed identical allelic numbers and a correlation between the number of repeats and geographic districts was observed.

  17. Determinants of public attitudes to genetically modified salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Amin

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country.

  18. Determinants of Public Attitudes to Genetically Modified Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Gausmian, Mohd Hanafy; Zulkifli, Faizah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM) salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country. PMID:24489695

  19. CTLA-4 as a genetic determinant in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A S B; Mitchell, A L; Cordell, H J; Short, A; Skinningsrud, B; Ollier, W; Badenhoop, K; Meyer, G; Falorni, A; Kampe, O; Undlien, D; Pearce, S H S; Husebye, E S

    2015-09-01

    In common with several other autoimmune diseases, autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is thought to be caused by a combination of deleterious susceptibility polymorphisms in several genes, together with undefined environmental factors and stochastic events. To date, the strongest genomic association with AAD has been with alleles at the HLA locus, DR3-DQ2 and DR4. The contribution of other genetic variants has been inconsistent. We have studied the association of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the CD28-CTLA-4-ICOS genomic locus, in a cohort comprising 691 AAD patients of Norwegian and UK origin with matched controls. We have also performed a meta-analysis including 1002 patients from European countries. The G-allele of SNP rs231775 in CTLA-4 is associated with AAD in Norwegian patients (odds ratio (OR)=1.35 (confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.66), P=0.004), but not in UK patients. The same allele is associated with AAD in the total European population (OR=1.37 (CI 1.13-1.66), P=0.002). A three-marker haplotype, comprising PROMOTER_1661, rs231726 and rs1896286 was found to be associated with AAD in the Norwegian cohort only (OR 2.43 (CI 1.68-3.51), P=0.00013). This study points to the CTLA-4 gene as a susceptibility locus for the development of AAD, and refines its mapping within the wider genomic locus.

  20. Genetic Determinism vs. Phenotypic Plasticity in Protist Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulot, Matthieu; Marcisz, Katarzyna; Grandgirard, Lara; Lara, Enrique; Kosakyan, Anush; Robroek, Bjorn J M; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Payne, Richard J; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2017-02-23

    Untangling the relationships between morphology and phylogeny is key to building a reliable taxonomy, but is especially challenging for protists, where the existence of cryptic or pseudocryptic species makes finding relevant discriminant traits difficult. Here we use Hyalosphenia papilio (a testate amoeba) as a model species to investigate the contribution of phylogeny and phenotypic plasticity in its morphology. We study the response of H. papilio morphology (shape and pores number) to environmental variables in (i) a manipulative experiment with controlled conditions (water level), (ii) an observational study of a within-site natural ecological gradient (water level), and (iii) an observational study across 37 European peatlands (climate). We showed that H. papilio morphology is correlated to environmental conditions (climate and water depth) as well as geography, while no relationship between morphology and phylogeny was brought to light. The relative contribution of genetic inheritance and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology varies depending on the taxonomic group and the trait under consideration. Thus, our data call for a reassessment of taxonomy based on morphology alone. This clearly calls for a substantial increase in taxonomic research on these globally still under-studied organisms leading to a reassessment of estimates of global microbial eukaryotic diversity.

  1. Determinants of public attitudes to genetically modified salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Gausmian, Mohd Hanafy; Zulkifli, Faizah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM) salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country.

  2. Gestation length in red deer: genetically determined or environmentally controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, G W

    2007-01-01

    The red deer (Cervus elaphus) of European origin (e.g. subspecies scoticus, hispanicus, hippelaphus) is a medium sized (100-150kg mature hind weight) ruminant that exhibits highly seasonally patterns of autumn conceptions and summer births. Historic data indicate average (+/- s.d.) gestation length of 233-234 (+/- 2-4) days. Recently, however, there has been growing awareness that there is considerably greater variation in gestation length than earlier indicated and that there is a significant element of environmental, and possibly even social, control over the duration of pregnancy in this species. Imposition of variable levels of nutrition over late pregnancy of red deer hinds has been observed to influence fetal growth trajectory and gestation length, with no apparent effect on birth weight. This supports a hypothesis that under conditions of modest feed imbalance, variation in gestation length compensates for variation in fetal growth trajectory to ensure optimisation of birth weight. More recent studies on primiparous (24 month old) red deer hinds have identified surprisingly large variation in gestation length (193-263 days) compared with adult hinds (228-243 days), with earlier conceiving individuals within the primiparous cohort expressing significantly longer gestation than the later conceiving hinds, resulting in a higher level of calving synchrony than expected from known conception dates. This introduces an intriguing hypothesis of social indicative effects on parturition timing to promote within-cohort birth synchrony. Collectively, these data debunk the commonly held notion that gestation length of red deer is genetically fixed within strict limits. A review of the literature points to this as possibly a common phenomenon across a range of non-domesticated ruminant species but this conclusion is not supported by numerous conflicting studies on domestic sheep and cattle.

  3. Method of determining external defects of a structure by analyzing a series of its images in the monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Aleksey Alekseevich

    2015-03-01

    geometrical parameters by analyzing a series of images. This is the issue and the subject of this work, which developed the computational algorithms to detect external defects. At the stage of preliminary image processing there is the delineation of characteristic points in the image and the calculation of the optical flow in the area of these points. When determining the defect position, the characteristic points of the image are determined using the detector of Harris-Laplace, which are located in the central part of the image. The characteristic points outside the frame are considered to be background. There is an identification of the changes in characteristic points in the frame in relation to the background by using a pyramidal iterative scheme. In the second stage servo frame focuses on a specific point with the greatest change in relation to the background in the current time. The algorithm for object detection and determination of its parameters includes three procedures: detection procedure start; the procedure of the next image processing; stop procedure for determining the parameters of the object. The method described here can be used to create information-measuring system of monitoring based on the use of photodetectors with high-definition and recognition of defects (color differences and differences in the form compared to the background. Since almost each examination of a building or structure begins with a visual examination and determination of the most probable places of occurrence and presence of the defects, the proposed method can be combined with this stage and it will simplify the process of diagnosing, screening for the development of projects on reconstruction and placement of additional equipment on the existing infrastructure.

  4. Determining the genetic diversity of lactobacilli from the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Argimon, S; Li, Y; Gu, H; Zhou, X; Caufield, P W

    2010-08-01

    Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome.

  5. Determining the Genetic Diversity of Lactobacilli from the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Argimon, S.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Caufield, P. W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome. PMID:20573585

  6. Genetic and modifying factors that determine the risk of brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelli, Terezinha de Cresci Braga; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-01-01

    of tumor escape, CNS tumor immunology, immune defects that impair anti-tumor systemic immunity in brain tumor patients and local immuno-suppressive factors within CNS are also reviewed. New hope to treatment perspectives, as dendritic-cell-based vaccines is summarized too. Concluding, it seems well...... of these treatments, the prognosis for patients is poor. In this review, we highlight general aspects concerning genetic alterations in brain tumors, namely astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, medulloblastomas and ependymomas. The influence of these genetic alterations in patients' prognosis is discussed....... Mutagen sensitivity is associated with cancer risk. The convincing studies that linked DNA damages and DNA repair alterations with brain tumors are also described. Another important modifying factor is immunity. General immune response against cancer, tumor microenvironment and immune response, mechanisms...

  7. Genetics progress on atrioventricular septal defect%先天性房室间隔缺损的遗传学进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓维

    2011-01-01

    先天性房室间隔缺损(atrioventricular sepial defect,AVSD)是一种常见的心血管畸形,由于存在房室间隔(房间隔下部、室间隔上部)以及中央心内膜垫组织的缺损,造成左右心腔之间的异常交通.虽然AVSD的胚胎学、病理生理学以及诊断和治疗目前都已基本阐明,但其确切的发病机制仍无突破性进展.随着分子生物学技术的广泛应用以及分子遗传学研究的深入开展,AVSD在遗传学的研究中取得一系列新进展,一些基因被证实与AVSD的发生发展存在一定的相关性.%Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) is a common cardiovascular malformation because of atrioventricular septal (lower atrial septum, ventricular septal upper) and the endocardial cushion defect,resulting in abnormal chambers of the heart. At the present, although the embryology, pathophysiology,diagnosis and treatment of the AVSD are clarified, but its precise pathogenesis has still no breakthrough progress.With the wide application of molecular biology and the depth research of molecular genetics, a series of new progress about AVSD has been made in the genetic study, and some genes are confirmed to be related to the occurrence and development of AVSD. The aim of this article is to review and discuss genetic mechanisms and related genes of AVSD, and to further identify the major genes causing AVSD.

  8. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7 Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S; Yu, Y Eugene

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two tandem duplications spanning the Tiam1-Kcnj6 genomic region on Mmu16 using recombinase-mediated genome engineering, Dp(16)3Yey and Dp(16)4Yey, spanning the 2.1 Mb Tiam1-Il10rb and 3.7 Mb Ifnar1-Kcnj6 regions, respectively. We found that Dp(16)4Yey/+, but not Dp(16)3Yey/+, led to heart defects, suggesting the triplication of the Ifnar1-Kcnj6 region is sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16)4Yey/+ embryos showed that the Hsa21 gene orthologs located within the duplicated interval were expressed at the elevated levels, reflecting the consequences of the gene dosage alterations. Therefore, we have identified a 3.7 Mb genomic region, the smallest critical genomic region, for DS-associated heart defects, and our results should set the stage for the final step to establish the identities of the causal gene(s), whose elevated expression(s) directly underlie this major DS phenotype.

  9. Genetic determinants of serum vitamin B12 and their relation to body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Friedrich, Nele; Pietzner, Maik

    2016-01-01

    for associations between (1) serum vitamin B12 levels and body mass index (BMI), (2) genetic variants and serum vitamin B12 levels, and (3) genetic variants and BMI. The effect of a genetically determined decrease in serum vitamin B12 on BMI was estimated by instrumental variable regression. Decreased serum...... vitamin B12 associated with increased BMI (P genetic risk score based on eight vitamin B12 associated variants associated strongly with serum vitamin B12 (P ... was associated with a 0.09 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.05; 0.13) increase in BMI (P = 3 × 10(-5)), whereas a genetically induced 20% decrease in serum vitamin B12 had no effect on BMI [-0.03 (95% CI -0.22; 0.16) kg/m(2)] (P = 0.74). Nevertheless, the strongest serum vitamin B12 variant, FUT2 rs602662, which was excluded...

  10. A Statistical Investigation into the Determining Woven Fabric Defects That Occur on Raw Terry Fabrics During Weaving Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Mutlu Ala

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the number of specific woven fabric defects occured on raw terry fabrics during weaving production were investigated with statistical process control techniques. Raw fabrics of a selected standart fabric production were inspected for defect detection after weaving operation in a towel production company. Defects were detected by inspection of fabric on a lighted control board by experienced experts. Number of defects were noted on quality control charts. Applying pareto analysis, defects were revealed that formed 80% of total defects. Cause-effect diagrams and p control charts were created and solution suggestions to avoid these defects were presented keeping in mind that eliminating elementary causes, which is 20% of total problems, can resolve 80% of resources of problems.

  11. Molecular/genetic determinants of repolarization and their modification by environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, M R; Cohen, I S

    2006-01-01

    Although a variety of factors, inherited or environmental, can influence expression of ion channel proteins to impact on repolarization, that environment can affect genetic determinants of repolarization for intervals of varying duration is a concept that is not as generally appreciated as it should be. In the following pages we review the molecular/genetic determinants of cardiac repolarization and summarize how pathologic events and environmental intrusions can affect these determinants. Understanding the chains of events involved should yield insights into both the causes and potential avenues of treatment for abnormalities of repolarization.

  12. Patterns and mechanisms of evolutionary transitions between genetic sex-determining systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G. Sander

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and patchy phylogenetic distribution of genetic sex-determining mechanisms observed in some taxa is thought to have arisen by the addition, modification, or replacement of regulators at the upstream end of the sex-determining pathway. Here, I review the various evolutionary forces acti

  13. Comparison of French and Estonian Students' Conceptions in Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Sarapuu, Tago; Clement, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Innatism is the belief that most of the human personality can be determined by genes. This ideology is dangerous, especially when it claims to be scientific. The present study investigates conceptions of 1060 students from Estonia and France related to genetic determinism of some human behaviours. Factors taken into account included students'…

  14. Genetic determinants of serum vitamin B12 and their relation to body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Friedrich, Nele; Pietzner, Maik

    2017-01-01

    (-4)). We found no support for a causal role of decreased serum vitamin B12 levels in obesity. However, our study suggests that FUT2, through its regulation of the cross-talk between gut microbes and the human host, might explain a part of the observational association between serum vitamin B12 and BMI....... for associations between (1) serum vitamin B12 levels and body mass index (BMI), (2) genetic variants and serum vitamin B12 levels, and (3) genetic variants and BMI. The effect of a genetically determined decrease in serum vitamin B12 on BMI was estimated by instrumental variable regression. Decreased serum...

  15. Determinism and Underdetermination in Genetics: Implications for Students' Engagement in Argumentation and Epistemic Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Aleixandre, María Pilar

    2012-11-01

    In the last two decades science studies and science education research have shifted from an interest in products (of science or of learning), to an interest in processes and practices. The focus of this paper is on students' engagement in epistemic practices (Kelly in Teaching scientific inquiry: Recommendations for research and implementation. Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, pp 99-117, 2008), or on their practical epistemologies (Wickman in Sci Educ 88(3):325-344, 2004). In order to support these practices in genetics classrooms we need to take into account domain-specific features of the epistemology of genetics, in particular issues about determinism and underdetermination. I suggest that certain difficulties may be related to the specific nature of causality in genetics, and in particular to the correspondence between a given set of factors and a range of potential effects, rather than a single one. The paper seeks to bring together recent developments in the epistemology of biology and of genetics, on the one hand, with science education approaches about epistemic practices, on the other. The implications of these perspectives for current challenges in learning genetics are examined, focusing on students' engagement in epistemic practices, as argumentation, understood as using evidence to evaluate knowledge claims. Engaging in argumentation in genetics classrooms is intertwined with practices such as using genetics models to build explanations, or framing genetics issues in their social context. These challenges are illustrated with studies making part of our research program in the USC.

  16. Genetic determinants of sensitivity to beryllium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino-Hutchison, Lauren M; Sorrentino, Claudio; Nadas, Arthur; Zhu, Yiwen; Rubin, Edward M; Tinkle, Sally S; Weston, Ainsley; Gordon, Terry

    2009-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease is caused by exposure to beryllium. This occupational hazard occurs in primary production and machining of Be-metal, BeO, beryllium - containing alloys, and other beryllium products. CBD begins as an MHC Class II-restricted, T(H)1 hypersensitivity, and the Human Leukocyte Antigen, HLA-DPB1E(69), is associated with risk of developing CBD. Because inbred strains of mice have not provided good models of CBD to date, three strains of HLA-DPB1 transgenic mice in an FVB/N background were developed; each contains a single allele of HLA-DPB1 that confers a different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR approximately 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR approximately 3), and HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR approximately 46). The mouse ear swelling test (MEST) was employed to determine if these different alleles would support a hypersensitivity response to beryllium. Mice were first sensitized on the back and subsequently challenged on the ear. In separate experiments, mice were placed into one of three groups (sensitization/challenge): C/C, C/Be, and Be/Be. In the HLA-DPB1*1701 mice, the strain with the highest risk transgene, the Be/Be group was the only group that displayed significant maximum increased ear thickness of 19.6% +/- 3.0% over the baseline measurement (p beryllium in seven inbred strains were investigated through use of the MEST, these included: FVB/N, AKR, Balb/c, C3H/HeJ, C57/BL6, DBA/2, and SJL/J. The FVB/N strain was least responsive, while the SJL/J and C57/BL6 strains were the highest responders. Our results suggest that the HLA-DPB1*1701 transgene product is an important risk factor for induction of the beryllium-sensitive phenotype. This model should be a useful tool for investigating beryllium sensitization.

  17. Determination of Optimal Double Sampling Plan using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath Sundaram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Designing double sampling plan requires identification of sample sizes and acceptance numbers. In this paper a genetic algorithm has been designed for the selection of optimal acceptance numbers and sample sizes for the specified producer’s risk and consumer’s risk. Implementation of the algorithm has been illustrated numerically for different choices of quantities involved in a double sampling plan   

  1. Point defect determination by photoluminescence and capacitance—voltage characterization in a GaN terahertz Gunn diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Lin-An; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2013-08-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) measurement is used to study the point defect distribution in a GaN terahertz Gunn diode, which is able to the degrade high-field transport characteristic during further device operation. PL, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and capacitance—voltage (C—V) measurements are used to discuss the origin of point defects responsible for the yellow luminescence in structures. The point defect densities of about 1011 cm-2 in structures are extracted by analysis of C—V characterization. After thermal annealing treatment, diminishments of point defect densities in structures are efficiently demonstrated by PL and C—V results.

  2. Use of Bioresorbable Hydrogels and Genetic Engineering to Accomplish Rapid Stabilization and Healing in Segmental Long Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    also suggests that the lymphatics play a critical role in fracture repair. With normal healing of tibial fracture, foci of ossification are...Effectiveness in segmental tibial defects in rats. Tissue Eng 12:489–497. Finkemeier CG. 2002. Bone-grafting and bone-graft substitutes. J Bone Joint...Vogelin E, Brekke JH, Jones NF. 2000. Heterotopic and orthotopic bone formation with a vascularized periosteal flap, a matrix and rh-BMP- 2 (bone

  3. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    brain anatomy is largely genetically determined, it is currently unknown to what degree neuromodulatory markers are subjected to genetic and environmental influence. Changes in serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors have been reported to occur in various neuropsychiatric disorders and an association between...... 5-HT(2A) receptor gene variants and neuropsychiatric illness susceptibility also exists. In a classical twin design involving 24 healthy male subjects (6 monozygotic twin pairs and 6 dizygotic twin pairs), we examined the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to interindividual...... examined twice within two weeks with an identical experimental setup. Multivariate analysis was used to separate the phenotypic variance of individuals into additive genetic (heritability) effect (A), shared (family) environment (C), and non-shared (individual-specific) environment (E). Irrespective...

  4. Identification of novel genetic determinants of erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition among Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Korre; Jørsboe, Emil; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2016-01-01

    .181), p = 2.8x10-4). In conclusion, we have identified novel genetic determinants of FA composition in phospholipids in erythrocyte membranes, and have shown examples of links between genetic variants associated with altered FA membrane levels and changes in metabolic traits.......Fatty acids (FAs) are involved in cellular processes important for normal body function, and perturbation of FA balance has been linked to metabolic disturbances, including type 2 diabetes. An individual's level of FAs is affected by diet, lifestyle, and genetic variation. We aimed to improve...... the understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved in regulation of FA tissue levels, by identifying genetic loci associated with inter-individual differences in erythrocyte membrane FA levels. We assessed the levels of 22 FAs in the phospholipid fraction of erythrocyte membranes from 2,626 Greenlanders...

  5. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  6. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  7. Determination of Activation Functions in A Feedforward Neural Network by using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz ÜSTÜN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, activation functions of all layers of the multilayered feedforward neural network have been determined by using genetic algorithm. The main criteria that show the efficiency of the neural network is to approximate to the desired output with the same number nodes and connection weights. One of the important parameter to determine this performance is to choose a proper activation function. In the classical neural network designing, a network is designed by choosing one of the generally known activation function. In the presented study, a table has been generated for the activation functions. The ideal activation function for each node has been chosen from this table by using the genetic algorithm. Two dimensional regression problem clusters has been used to compare the performance of the classical static neural network and the genetic algorithm based neural network. Test results reveal that the proposed method has a high level approximation capacity.

  8. Genetic determinants of trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral densities and bone microstructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Paternoster

    Full Text Available Most previous genetic epidemiology studies within the field of osteoporosis have focused on the genetics of the complex trait areal bone mineral density (aBMD, not being able to differentiate genetic determinants of cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD, trabecular vBMD, and bone microstructural traits. The objective of this study was to separately identify genetic determinants of these bone traits as analysed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT. Separate GWA meta-analyses for cortical and trabecular vBMDs were performed. The cortical vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n = 5,878 followed by replication (n = 1,052 identified genetic variants in four separate loci reaching genome-wide significance (RANKL, rs1021188, p = 3.6×10⁻¹⁴; LOC285735, rs271170, p = 2.7×10⁻¹²; OPG, rs7839059, p = 1.2×10⁻¹⁰; and ESR1/C6orf97, rs6909279, p = 1.1×10⁻⁹. The trabecular vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n = 2,500 followed by replication (n = 1,022 identified one locus reaching genome-wide significance (FMN2/GREM2, rs9287237, p = 1.9×10⁻⁹. High-resolution pQCT analyses, giving information about bone microstructure, were available in a subset of the GOOD cohort (n = 729. rs1021188 was significantly associated with cortical porosity while rs9287237 was significantly associated with trabecular bone fraction. The genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus was associated with fracture risk in the MrOS Sweden cohort (HR per extra T allele 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.93 and GREM2 expression in human osteoblasts. In conclusion, five genetic loci associated with trabecular or cortical vBMD were identified. Two of these (FMN2/GREM2 and LOC285735 are novel bone-related loci, while the other three have previously been reported to be associated with aBMD. The genetic variants associated with cortical and trabecular bone parameters differed, underscoring the complexity of the genetics of bone parameters. We propose

  9. Identification of two mutations that cause defects in the ligninolytic system through an efficient forward genetics in the white-rot agaricomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Izuno, Ayako; Kodera, Rina; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Isagi, Yuji; Honda, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    White-rot fungi play an important role in the global carbon cycle because they are the species that almost exclusively biodegrade wood lignin in nature. Lignin peroxidases (LiPs), manganese peroxidases (MnPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs) are considered key players in the ligninolytic system. Apart from LiPs, MnPs and VPs, however, only few other factors involved in the ligninolytic system have been investigated using molecular genetics, implying the existence of unidentified elements. By combining classical genetic techniques with next-generation sequencing technology, they successfully showed an efficient forward genetics approach to identify mutations causing defects in the ligninolytic system of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus. In this study, they identified two genes - chd1 and wtr1 - mutations in which cause an almost complete loss of Mn(2+) -dependent peroxidase activity. The chd1 gene encodes a putative chromatin modifier, and wtr1 encodes an agaricomycete-specific protein with a putative DNA-binding domain. The chd1-1 mutation and targeted disruption of wtr1 hamper the ability of P. ostreatus to biodegrade wood lignin. Examination of the effects of the aforementioned mutation and disruption on the expression of certain MnP/VP genes suggests that a complex mechanism underlies the ligninolytic system in P. ostreatus. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Understanding sex determination in the mouse: genetics, epigenetics and the story of mutual antagonisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andy Greenfield

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in mouse genetics resources that support research into fundamental mechanisms in organogenesis, including those controlling mammalian sex determinations. Numerous mouse mutants have shed light on molecular pathways of cell fate specification during gonadogenesis and the `decision' as to whether testis or ovary development is achieved. These studies indicate substantial genetic complexity, characterized by redundancy, feedback loops, mutual antagonism between testis-determining and ovary-determining gene regulatory networks and a degree of plasticity in the fully differentiated state of the adult gonad that was not appreciated until conditional loss-of-function studies were performed. One challenge now is to understand how controlled epigenomic changes effect the now familiar sexually dimorphic transcriptomic profiles of the male and female gonads, firstly during primary sex determination, but also in the adult gonad, thereby regulating cellular behaviour during morphogenesis and maintaining the differentiated state.

  11. Genetically Determined Variation in Developmental Physiology of Bivalve Larvae (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis Pan, T-C; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the complex interactions that regulate growth and form is a central question in developmental physiology. We used experimental crosses of pedigreed lines of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to investigate genetically determined variations in larval growth and nutrient transport. We show that (i) transport rates at 10 and 100 μM glycine scale differentially with size; (ii) size-specific maximum transport capacity (Jmax) is genetically determined; and (iii) Jmax serves as an early predictive index of subsequent growth rate. This relationship between genetically determined Jmax and growth suggests the potential use of transporter genes as biomarkers of growth potential. Analysis of the genome of C. gigas revealed 23 putative amino acid transporter genes. The complexity of gene families that underpin physiological traits has additional precedents in this species and others and warrants caution in the use of gene expression as a biomarker for physiological state. Direct in vivo measurements of physiological processes using species with defined genotypes are required to understand genetically determined variance of nutrient flux and other processes that regulate development and growth.

  12. 76 FR 78232 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered To Have a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... the introduction of certain genetically engineered organisms. Our determination is based on our.../biotechnology/not_reg.html and are posted with the previous notice and the comments we received on the... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Evan Chestnut, Policy Analyst, Biotechnology Regulatory Services, APHIS, 4700 River...

  13. QTL analysis of the genetic architecture determining resistance to fire blight in an apple progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenge, F.; Drouet, D.; Weg, van de W.E.; Brisset, M.N.; Paulin, J.P.; Durel, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica). In order to analyse the genetic determinism of resistance to fire blight in apple, a quantitative trait analysis (QTL) approach was used. A F1 progeny of 164

  14. Common Genetic Determinants of Intraocular Pressure and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Ikram, M. Kamran; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Pasutto, Francesca; Hysi, Pirro G.; Macgregor, Stuart; Janssen, Sarah F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Amin, Najaf; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J. M.; Kramer, Rogier; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Struchalin, Maksim; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Weisschuh, Nicole; Zenkel, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y.; Gramer, Eugen; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich; Montgomery, Grant W.; Carbonaro, Francis; Young, Terri L.; Bellenguez, Celine; McGuffin, Peter; Foster, Paul J.; Topouzis, Fotis; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y.; Czudowska, Monika A.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Mackey, David A.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Reis, Andre; Hammond, Christopher J.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Lemij, Hans G.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independen

  15. QTL analysis of the genetic architecture determining resistance to fire blight in an apple progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenge, F.; Drouet, D.; Weg, van de W.E.; Brisset, M.N.; Paulin, J.P.; Durel, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica). In order to analyse the genetic determinism of resistance to fire blight in apple, a quantitative trait analysis (QTL) approach was used. A F1 progeny of 164 individ

  16. Teachers' Conceptions about the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed…

  17. Determining the material parameters for the reconstruction of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymers from data measured by flash thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan P.; Götschel, Sebastian; Maierhofer, Christiane; Weiser, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Flash thermography is a fast and reliable non-destructive testing method for the investigation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials. In this paper numerical simulations of transient thermography data are presented, calculated for a quasi-isotropic flat bottom hole sample. They are compared to experimental data. These simulations are one important step towards the quantitative reconstruction of a flaw by assessing thermographic data. The applied numerical model is based on the finite-element method, extended by a semi-analytical treatment of the boundary of the sample, which is heated by the flash light. A crucial part for a reliable numerical model is the prior determination of the material parameters of the specimen as well as of the experimental parameters of the set-up. The material parameters in plane and in depth diffusivity are measured using laser line excitation. In addition, the absorption and heat transfer process of the first layers is investigated using an IR microscopic lens. The performance of the two distinct components of CFRP during heating - epoxy resin and carbon fibers - is examined. Finally, the material parameters are optimized by variation and comparison of the simulation results to the experimental data. The optimized parameters are compared to the measured ones and further methods to ensure precise material parameter measurements are discussed.

  18. Determination of the stress-strain curve in specimens of Scots pine for numerical simulation of defect free beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baño, V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop a twodimensional numerical model to simulate the response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. defect free timber members in order to predict the behaviour of these members when subjected to external forces. For this purpose, data of the mechanical properties of Scots pine were obtained by performing experimental tests on specimens. We determined the stresses and deformations of timber beams in the elastic-plastic and plastic phases. In addition, we developed a finite element software that considered the orthotropic nature of timber, the non-linearity of the compression-reduction branch and the differing moduli of elasticity in tension and compression for Scots pine beams free from defects. The software developed simulates an experimental four point bending test according to UNE-EN 408 Standard.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es el desarrollo de un modelo numérico bidimensional de piezas de madera de Pinus sylvestris L. libre de defectos que prediga su comportamiento frente a solicitaciones externas. Para su desarrollo, fue necesario realizar ensayos experimentales sobre probetas de pequeño tamaño con el fin de obtener los datos de las propiedades mecánicas para el Pinus sylvestris L. de procedencia española. A partir de los datos experimentales obtenidos, se desarrolla un programa de elementos finitos que considera la ortotropía de la madera, la no linealidad de la rama compresión-acortamiento y los distintos módulos de elasticidad a tracción y a compresión para vigas libres de defectos. El programa simula el ensayo experimental de flexión en cuatro puntos según la Norma UNE-EN 408 y aborda la determinación de las tensiones y deformaciones de las vigas de madera en las tres fases de comportamiento: elástica, elastoplástica y plástica.

  19. Defects in Tendon, Ligament, and Enthesis in Response to Genetic Alterations in Key Proteoglycans and Glycoproteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Juneja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the genetic alterations and knockdown approaches published in the literature to assess the role of key proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the structural development, function, and repair of tendon, ligament, and enthesis. The information was collected from (i genetically altered mice, (ii in vitro knockdown studies, (iii genetic variants predisposition to injury, and (iv human genetic diseases. The genes reviewed are for small leucine-rich proteoglycans (lumican, fibromodulin, biglycan, decorin, and asporin; dermatan sulfate epimerase (Dse that alters structure of glycosaminoglycan and hence the function of small leucine-rich proteoglycans by converting glucuronic to iduronic acid; matricellular proteins (thrombospondin 2, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc, periostin, and tenascin X including human tenascin C variants; and others, such as tenomodulin, leukocyte cell derived chemotaxin 1 (chondromodulin-I, ChM-I, CD44 antigen (Cd44, lubricin (Prg4, and aggrecan degrading gene, a disintegrin-like and metallopeptidase (reprolysin type with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5. Understanding these genes represents drug targets for disrupting pathological mechanisms that lead to tendinopathy, ligamentopathy, enthesopathy, enthesitis and tendon/ligament injury, that is, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

  20. Determination of Genetic Diversity of Some Sage Species Collected From Eastern Mediterranean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Çardaklı

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sage (Salvia spp. is the most important and largest genus of the Lamiaceae family, and the popularity among medical plants is increasing. Sage plant is widely used in pharmaceutical, food and spice industries and as tea by many people. The fact that the plant may be marketed after being collected uncontrollably from the nature threatens its future. Therefore, it is necessary to put these species under protection and to start breeding projects as well to do genetic characterization of them. For this purpose, in the study, 11 different sage species from the Eastern Mediterranean region were collected and genetic differences among species were determined using SRAP (Sequence dependent replicated polymorphism markers. As the result of our experiments, average polymorphism content, allele number and polymorphism information content (PIC of the species were calculated as 90.91%, 4.2 and 0.91, respectively. The PIC values ranged from 0.04 to 0.99. While the average genetic difference among species was determined as 43.15%, the highest genetic difference, which was between Salvia aucheri spp. aucheri and Salvia aramiensis, was found to be 61.46%. The least genetic difference, on the other hand, was detected between Salvia tomentosa and Salvia hypergeia species with 22.62% similarity. Additionally, according to the observations made through the study, the SRAP markers we used were thought to be reliable for the genetic characterization of sage species. In breeding programs where interspecies dissimilarities are considered, selecting parental species with high genetic differences will increase the success.

  1. Beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research: psychometric scale properties, construct associations, demographic correlates, and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Swami, Viren; Loibl, Lisa Mariella; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    Using two new scales, this study examined beliefs in genetic determinism and attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research in student samples from Austria, Malaysia, Romania, and the United Kingdom. For both constructs, effects of culture were detectable, whereas those related to key demographics were either small and inconsistent across samples (political orientation and religiosity) or zero (sex and age). Judged from factorial dimensionality and internal consistency, the psychometric properties of both scales were satisfactory. Belief in genetic determinism had lower prevalence and corresponded only modestly to positive attitudes towards psychiatric genetic research which had higher prevalence. The correlations of both constructs with a preference of inequality among social groups (social dominance orientation) were modest and inconsistent across samples. Both scales appear appropriate for cross-cultural applications, in particular for research into lay theories and public perceptions regarding genetic vs environmental effects on human behavior, mental disorders, and behavioral and psychiatric genetic research related to these.

  2. DETERMINATION OF POSSIBLE REASONS OF DEFECT FORMATION «MICROPITTING» IN HARD-ALLOY WIRE DRAWING INSTRUMENT IN WIRE DRAWING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Kurenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that during operation a hard wear along with uniform attrition occurs in working canal of die because of welding of metal particles to the material of die, what results in formation of separate microholes, their enlargement and further defect creation of type “micropitting of hard alloy”.

  3. Mammalian Cardiovascular Patterning as Determined by Hemodynamic Forces and Blood Vessel Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory Arthur

    Cardiovascular development is a process that involves the timing of multiple molecular events, and numerous subtle three-dimensional conformational changes. Traditional developmental biology techniques have provided large quantities of information as to how these complex organ systems develop. However, the major drawback of the majority of current developmental biological imaging is that they are two-dimensional in nature. It is now well recognized that circulation of blood is required for normal patterning and remodeling of blood vessels. Normal blood vessel formation is dependent upon a complex network of signaling pathways, and genetic mutations in these pathways leads to impaired vascular development, heart failure, and lethality. As such, it is not surprising that mutant mice with aberrant cardiovascular patterning are so common, since normal development requires proper coordination between three systems: the heart, the blood, and the vasculature. This thesis describes the implementation of a three-dimensional imaging technique, optical projection tomography (OPT), in conjunction with a computer-based registration algorithm to statistically analyze developmental differences in groups of wild-type mouse embryos. Embryos that differ by only a few hours' gestational time are shown to have developmental differences in blood vessel formation and heart development progression that can be discerned. This thesis describes how we analyzed mouse models of cardiovascular perturbation by OPT to detect morphological differences in embryonic development in both qualitative and quantitative ways. Both a blood vessel specific mutation and a cardiac specific mutation were analyzed, providing evidence that developmental defects of these types can be quantified. Finally, we describe the implementation of OPT imaging to identify statistically significant phenotypes from three different mouse models of cardiovascular perturbation across a range of developmental time points. Image

  4. Genetic determinants of hair and eye colours in the Scottish and Danish populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Wong, Terence H; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eye and hair colour is highly variable in the European population, and is largely genetically determined. Both linkage and association studies have previously been used to identify candidate genes underlying this variation. Many of the genes found were previously known as underlying...... mutant mouse phenotypes or human genetic disease, but others, previously unsuspected as pigmentation genes, have also been discovered. RESULTS: We assayed the hair of a population of individuals of Scottish origin using tristimulus colorimetry, in order to produce a quantitative measure of hair colour...

  5. The genetic sex-determination system predicts adult sex ratios in tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipoly, Ivett; Bókony, Veronika; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Donald, Paul F; Székely, Tamás; Liker, András

    2015-11-05

    The adult sex ratio (ASR) has critical effects on behaviour, ecology and population dynamics, but the causes of variation in ASRs are unclear. Here we assess whether the type of genetic sex determination influences the ASR using data from 344 species in 117 families of tetrapods. We show that taxa with female heterogamety have a significantly more male-biased ASR (proportion of males: 0.55 ± 0.01 (mean ± s.e.m.)) than taxa with male heterogamety (0.43 ± 0.01). The genetic sex-determination system explains 24% of interspecific variation in ASRs in amphibians and 36% in reptiles. We consider several genetic factors that could contribute to this pattern, including meiotic drive and sex-linked deleterious mutations, but further work is needed to quantify their effects. Regardless of the mechanism, the effects of the genetic sex-determination system on the adult sex ratio are likely to have profound effects on the demography and social behaviour of tetrapods.

  6. Point defect determination by photoluminescence and capacitance-voltage characterization in a GaN terahertz Gunn diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Liang; Yang Lin-An; Zhou Xiao-Wei; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) measurement is used to study the point defect distribution in a GaN terahertz Gunn diode,which is able to the degrade high-field transport characteristic during further device operation.PL,secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS),transmission electron microscope (TEM),and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements are used to discuss the origin of point defects responsible for the yellow luminescence in structures.The point defect densities of about 1011 cm-2 in structures are extracted by analysis of C-V characterization.After thermal annealing treatment,diminishments of point defect densities in structures are efficiently demonstrated by PL and C-V results.

  7. Genetic variants determining survival and fertility in an adverse African environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Pijpe, Jeroen; Böhringer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    . In 4387 individuals, we studied 4052 SNPs in 148 genes that have previously been identified as possible determinants of survival or fertility in animals or humans. We studied their associations with survival comparing newborns, middle-age adults, and old individuals. In women, we assessed......Human survival probability and fertility decline strongly with age. These life history traits have been shaped by evolution. However, research has failed to uncover a consistent genetic determination of variation in survival and fertility. As an explanation, such genetic determinants have been...... their associations with reported and observed numbers of children. We found no statistically significant associations of these SNPs with survival between the three age groups nor with women's reported and observed fertility. Population stratification was unlikely to explain these results. Apart from a lack of power...

  8. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysi...

  9. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Li

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS, encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic

  10. Role of mouse Wdr13 in placental growth; a genetic evidence for lifetime body weight determination by placenta during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Alex, Jomini Liza; Lakshmi, B Jyothi; Sailasree, S Purnima; Raj, T Avinash; Kumar, Satish

    2015-08-26

    Placental development is essential for implantation and growth of foetus in the uterus of eutherian mammals. Numerous growth factors are responsible for placental development and cell lineage differentiation. Gene knockout mice have shown role of various genes in the placenta. Here using Wdr13 knockout mice, we show that this gene is important for proper placental development. Wdr13, a X-linked gene, expresses in multiple trophoblast cell types of placenta and the mutant placenta had reduced size after 17.5 dpc due to reduction of junctional zone (JZ) and labyrinth zone (LZ). We observed reduction in levels of angiopoietin-2 and cd44 mRNA in Wdr13 mutant placenta as compared to that in the wild type. Our findings show that Wdr13 is required for normal placental development and cell differentiation. Wdr13 heterozygous female placenta when the mutant allele was of maternal origin showed similar defects as those in case of Wdr13 null placenta. Using two types of heterozygous females carrying either maternally and paternally derived mutant Wdr13 allele we provide genetic evidence that development of placenta determines body weight of mice for the entire life.

  11. The determinants of mothers' knowledge of the Down syndrome before genetic counseling: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenfeld, M J; Braitman, A; Antley, R M

    1980-01-01

    Mothers coming for genetic counseling because they have an infant with the Down syndrome (DS) vary in their amount of knowledge about the cause, recurrence risk, and options for dealing with the recurrence risk. The purpose of this work has been to determine some predictors of the variability in mothers' knowledge of the DS before coming to genetic counseling. Data were collected before counseling through a detailed interview concerning mothers' knowledge of the DS, their demographic background, fertility plan, and attitude toward family planing. These data were "reduced" by multiple-regression analysis, to 7 variables used in a prediction equation for mothers' level of pre-knowledge attainment. These variables were then used to construct a model which was tested by path analysis. Results of analyses showed that about 2/3 of the variance in mothers' pre-knowledge of the DS could be accounted for by 5 independent variables: 1) time from diagnosis to counseling session, 2) date of counseling session, 3) nonreporting of emotional upset, 4) education-occupational status (EOS), and 5) utilization of birth control methods. These findings led to the conclusion that what occurs before counseling is of importance for the outcome of genetic counseling, as measured by the genetic information acquired by the counselees. Some precounseling precedures are suggested on how genetic counselors might be able to gain more control over the important factors that occur before actual counseling.

  12. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  13. Genetically Determined Variation in Lysis Time Variance in the Bacteriophage φX174.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher W; Miller, Craig R; Thaweethai, Tanayott; Yuan, Jeffrey; Baker, Meghan Hollibaugh; Joyce, Paul; Weinreich, Daniel M

    2016-04-07

    Researchers in evolutionary genetics recently have recognized an exciting opportunity in decomposing beneficial mutations into their proximal, mechanistic determinants. The application of methods and concepts from molecular biology and life history theory to studies of lytic bacteriophages (phages) has allowed them to understand how natural selection sees mutations influencing life history. This work motivated the research presented here, in which we explored whether, under consistent experimental conditions, small differences in the genome of bacteriophage φX174 could lead to altered life history phenotypes among a panel of eight genetically distinct clones. We assessed the clones' phenotypes by applying a novel statistical framework to the results of a serially sampled parallel infection assay, in which we simultaneously inoculated each of a large number of replicate host volumes with ∼1 phage particle. We sequentially plated the volumes over the course of infection and counted the plaques that formed after incubation. These counts served as a proxy for the number of phage particles in a single volume as a function of time. From repeated assays, we inferred significant, genetically determined heterogeneity in lysis time and burst size, including lysis time variance. These findings are interesting in light of the genetic and phenotypic constraints on the single-protein lysis mechanism of φX174. We speculate briefly on the mechanisms underlying our results, and we discuss the potential importance of lysis time variance in viral evolution.

  14. Genetically Determined Variation in Lysis Time Variance in the Bacteriophage φX174

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Baker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in evolutionary genetics recently have recognized an exciting opportunity in decomposing beneficial mutations into their proximal, mechanistic determinants. The application of methods and concepts from molecular biology and life history theory to studies of lytic bacteriophages (phages has allowed them to understand how natural selection sees mutations influencing life history. This work motivated the research presented here, in which we explored whether, under consistent experimental conditions, small differences in the genome of bacteriophage φX174 could lead to altered life history phenotypes among a panel of eight genetically distinct clones. We assessed the clones’ phenotypes by applying a novel statistical framework to the results of a serially sampled parallel infection assay, in which we simultaneously inoculated each of a large number of replicate host volumes with ∼1 phage particle. We sequentially plated the volumes over the course of infection and counted the plaques that formed after incubation. These counts served as a proxy for the number of phage particles in a single volume as a function of time. From repeated assays, we inferred significant, genetically determined heterogeneity in lysis time and burst size, including lysis time variance. These findings are interesting in light of the genetic and phenotypic constraints on the single-protein lysis mechanism of φX174. We speculate briefly on the mechanisms underlying our results, and we discuss the potential importance of lysis time variance in viral evolution.

  15. Beneficence, determinism and justice: an engagement with the argument for the genetic selection of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Kean

    2005-02-01

    In 2001, Julian Savulescu wrote an article entitled 'Procreative Beneficence: Why We Should Select the Best Children', in which he argued for the genetic selection of intelligence in children. That article contributes to a debate on whether genetic research on intelligence should be undertaken at all and, if so, should intelligence selection be available to potential parents. As such, the question of intelligence selection relates to wider issues concerning the genetic determinism of behavioural traits, i.e. alcoholism. This article is designed as an engagement in the intelligence selection debate using an analysis of Savulescu's arguments to raise a series of problematic issues in relation to the ethics of parental selection of intelligence. These problematic issues relate to wider assumptions that are made in order to put forward intelligence selection as a viable ethical option. Such assumptions are more generic in character, but still relate to Savulescu's article, concerning issues of genetic determinism, private allocation and inequality, and, finally, individual versus aggregate justice. The conclusion focuses on what the implications are for the question of agency, especially if intelligence selection is allowed.

  16. Environmental versus genetic sex determination: a possible factor in dinosaur extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David; Summers, Jonathan; Silber, Sherman

    2004-04-01

    This study examined the possibility that genetically based sex-determination mechanisms have evolved to ensure a balanced male/female ratio and that this temperature-independent checkpoint might have been unavailable to long-extinct reptiles, notably the dinosaurs. A review of the literature on molecular and phylogenetic relationships between modes of reproduction and sex determination in extant animals was conducted. Mammals, birds, all snakes and most lizards, amphibians, and some gonochoristic fish use specific sex-determining chromosomes or genes (genetic sex determination, GSD). Some reptiles, however, including all crocodilians studied to date, many turtle and tortoise species, and some lizards, use environmental or temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). We show that various modes of GSD have evolved many times, independently in different orders. Animals using TSD would be at risk of rapid reproductive failure due to a skewed sex ratio favoring males in response to sustained environmental temperature change and favoring the selection of sex-determining genes. The disadvantage to the evolving male sex-determining chromosome, however, is its decay due to nonrecombination and the subsequent loss of spermatogenesis genes. Global temperature change can skew the sex ratio of TSD animals and might have played a significant role in the demise of long-extinct species, notably the dinosaurs, particularly if the temperature change resulted in a preponderance of males. Current global warming also represents a risk for extant TSD species.

  17. Clinical applications of fetal sex determination in maternal blood in a preimplantation genetic diagnosis centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Gérard; Frydman, Nelly; Audibert, Franciois; Ray, Pierre; Kerbrat, Violaine; Ernault, Pauline; Frydman, René; Costa, Jean-Marc

    2002-08-01

    Couples with a risk of transmitting X-linked diseases who are included in a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) programme need early and rapid fetal sex determination in two situations. The first situation is for the control of embryo sexing after PGD and the second situation is for those couples having a spontaneous pregnancy before the start of their PGD cycle. Among invasive techniques, chorionic villus sampling is the earliest procedure for fetal sex determination and molecular analysis of X-linked genetic disorders during the first trimester but it is associated with a risk of fetal loss. Non-invasive procedures such as ultrasound examination allow reliable fetal sex determination only during the second trimester. Reliable fetal sex determination can now be realised by using SRY gene amplification in maternal blood. We report the use of fetal sex determination from maternal serum as a diagnostic tool for the control of embryo sexing (two cases) and to manage spontaneous pregnancies in couples included in a PGD programme for X-linked diseases (five cases). Fetal sex determination using SRY gene amplification in maternal serum were in complete concordance with fetal sex observed by cytogenetic analysis or ultrasound examination and at birth. This novel strategy allowed the PGD results to be controlled precociously and avoided the performance of invasive procedures in four cases of female fetus. This rapid fetal sex determination during the first trimester provides advantages to both clinicians and patients in a PGD centre.

  18. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  19. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...... of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease....

  20. [Determination of Virtual Surgery Mass Point Spring Model Parameters Based on Genetic Algorithms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Xuyi; Zhu, Qiguang

    2015-12-01

    Mass point-spring model is one of the commonly used models in virtual surgery. However, its model parameters have no clear physical meaning, and it is hard to set the parameter conveniently. We, therefore, proposed a method based on genetic algorithm to determine the mass-spring model parameters. Computer-aided tomography (CAT) data were used to determine the mass value of the particle, and stiffness and damping coefficient were obtained by genetic algorithm. We used the difference between the reference deformation and virtual deformation as the fitness function to get the approximate optimal solution of the model parameters. Experimental results showed that this method could obtain an approximate optimal solution of spring parameters with lower cost, and could accurately reproduce the effect of the actual deformation model as well.

  1. Genetic ablation of cyclophilin D rescues mitochondrial defects and prevents muscle apoptosis in collagen VI myopathic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elena; Tiepolo, Tania; Angelin, Alessia; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Basso, Emy; Forte, Michael A; Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy are inherited muscle disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI (ColVI). Mice lacking ColVI (Col6a1(-/-)) display a myopathic phenotype associated with ultrastructural alterations of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial dysfunction with abnormal opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and increased apoptosis of muscle fibers. Treatment with cyclosporin (Cs) A, a drug that desensitizes the PTP by binding to cyclophilin (Cyp)-D, was shown to rescue myofiber alterations in Col6a1(-/-) mice and in UCMD patients, suggesting a correlation between PTP opening and pathogenesis of ColVI muscular dystrophies. Here, we show that inactivation of the gene encoding for Cyp-D rescues the disease phenotype of ColVI deficiency. In the absence of Cyp-D, Col6a1(-/-) mice show negligible myofiber degeneration, rescue from mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural defects, and normalized incidence of apoptosis. These findings (i) demonstrate that lack of Cyp-D is equivalent to its inhibition with CsA at curing the mouse dystrophic phenotype; (ii) establish a cause-effect relationship between Cyp-D-dependent PTP regulation and pathogenesis of the ColVI muscular dystrophy and (iii) validate Cyp-D and the PTP as pharmacological targets for the therapy of human ColVI myopathies.

  2. Disentangling genetic vs. environmental causes of sex determination in the common frog, Rana temporaria

    OpenAIRE

    Merilä Juha; Miura Ikuo; Matsuba Chikako

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding of sex ratio dynamics in a given species requires understanding its sex determination system, as well as access for reliable tools for sex identification at different life stages. As in the case of many other amphibians, the common frogs (Rana temporaria) do not have well differentiated sex chromosomes, and an identification of individuals' genetic sex may be complicated by sex reversals. Here, we report results of studies shedding light on the sex determinat...

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    disease progression in colorectal cancer patients. 5 R01 CA182587-02 (PI: Solit) 1/1/2014 - 12/31/2018 0.60 calendar...patients with muscle invasive and metastatic bladder cancer the prevalence of PI3 kinase alterations, the pattern of co-mutational events, their...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

  4. Genetic Determinants for Promoter Hypermethylation in the Lungs of Smokers: A Candidate Gene-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Liu, Yushi; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Han, Younghun; Landi, Maria Teresa; Thun, Michael; Picchi, Maria A.; Bruse, Shannon E.; Crowell, Richard E.; Van Den Berg, David; Neil E Caporaso; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation in sputum-derived exfoliated cells predicts early lung cancer. Here we identified genetic determinants for this epigenetic process and examined their biological effects on gene regulation. A two-stage approach involving discovery and replication was employed to assess the association between promoter hypermethylation of a 12-gene panel and common variation in 40 genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, regulation of methylation, and ...

  5. Genetic, nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants in developmental programming of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, Allan; Brøns, Charlotte; Gillberg, Linn

    2014-01-01

    the mother and her offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms may explain the link between factors operating in fetal life and later risk of developing T2D, but so far convincing evidence is lacking for epigenetic changes as a prime and direct cause of T2D. This review addresses recent literature on the early origins...... of adult disease hypothesis, with a special emphasis on the role of genetic compared with nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants and disease mechanisms....

  6. Teachers' Conceptions About the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed teachers' conceptions. This illustrates that innatism is present in two distinct ways: in relation to individuals (e.g. gene...

  7. Aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors: a classical twin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celeng, Csilla; Kolossvary, Marton; Kovacs, Attila; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Szilveszter, Balint; Karolyi, Mihaly; Jermendy, Adam L.; Karady, Julia; Merkely, Bela; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, Tamas [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Hydrodynamic Systems, Budapest (Hungary); Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L. [Semmelweis University, Department of Radiology and Oncotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Voros, Szilard [Global Genomics Group, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jermendy, Gyoergy [Bajcsy-Zsilinszky Hospital, Medical Department, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-06-15

    Previous studies using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) observed moderate heritability of aortic root dimensions. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) might provide more accurate heritability estimates. Our primary aim was to assess the heritability of the aortic root with CTA. Our secondary aim was to derive TTE-based heritability and compare this with the CTA-based results. In the BUDAPEST-GLOBAL study 198 twin subjects (118 monozygotic, 80 dizygotic; age 56.1 ± 9.4 years; 126 female) underwent CTA and TTE. We assessed the diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Heritability was assessed using ACDE model (A additive genetic, C common environmental, D dominant genetic, E unique environmental factors). Based on CTA, additive genetic effects were dominant (LVOT: A = 0.67, E = 0.33; annulus: A = 0.76, E = 0.24; sinus of Valsalva: A = 0.83, E = 0.17; sinotubular junction: A = 0.82, E = 0.18; ascending aorta: A = 0.75, E = 0.25). TTE-derived measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence (LVOT: A = 0.38, E = 0.62; annulus: C = 0.47, E = 0.53; sinus of Valsalva: C = 0.63, E = 0.37; sinotubular junction: C = 0.45, E = 0.55; ascending aorta: A = 0.67, E = 0.33). CTA-based assessment suggests that aortic root dimensions are predominantly determined by genetic factors. TTE-based measurements showed moderate to no genetic influence. The choice of measurement method has substantial impact on heritability estimates. (orig.)

  8. A Cost Effective Method for Determining the Position of Mine Haul Road Defects from the Road Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Sokolic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a simple method for estimating haul road defect positions from alongside roads. It is a method that is cheap and easy to implement, needing only a minimal amount of field equipment and training. Observers are required to estimate the bearing and distance to a defect, and to record their location using a GPS receiver. All further processing is automated and can be done entirely within a spatially-enabled database management system such as Microsoft SQL Server or PostgreSQL.

  9. Placebo Responses in Genetically Determined Intellectual Disability: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Aurore; Yang, Kathy; Kirsch, Irving; Gollub, Randy L.; des Portes, Vincent; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Jensen, Karin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetically determined Intellectual Disability (ID) is an intractable condition that involves severe impairment of mental abilities such as learning, reasoning and predicting the future. As of today, little is known about the placebo response in patients with ID. Objective To determine if placebo response exists in patients with genetically determined ID. Data sources and Study selection We searched Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PsycINFO to find all placebo-controlled double-blind randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in patients with genetically determined ID, published up to April 2013, focusing on core ID symptoms. Data extraction and synthesis Two investigators extracted outcome data independently. Main outcomes and measures Bias-corrected standardized mean difference (Hedge’s g) was computed for each outcome measure, using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. A priori defined patient sub-groups were analyzed using a mixed-effect model. The relationship between pre-defined continuous variable moderators (age, IQ, year of publication and trial duration) and effect size was analyzed using meta-regression Results Twenty-two placebo-controlled double-blind RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n = 721, mean age = 17.1 years, 62% men, mean trial duration = 35 weeks). There was a significant overall placebo response from pre- to post-treatment in patients with ID (g = 0.468, p = 0.002), both for “subjective outcomes” (a third-person’s evaluation of the patient) (g = 0.563, p = 0.022) and “objective outcomes” (direct evaluation of the patient’s abilities) (g = 0.434, p = 0.036). Individuals with higher IQ had higher response to placebo (p = 0.02) and no placebo response was observed in ID patients with comorbid dementia. A significant effect of age (p = 0.02) was found, indicating higher placebo responses in treatment of younger patients. Conclusions and relevance Results suggest that patients with genetically determined ID improve in the

  10. Placebo Responses in Genetically Determined Intellectual Disability: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Curie

    Full Text Available Genetically determined Intellectual Disability (ID is an intractable condition that involves severe impairment of mental abilities such as learning, reasoning and predicting the future. As of today, little is known about the placebo response in patients with ID.To determine if placebo response exists in patients with genetically determined ID.We searched Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PsycINFO to find all placebo-controlled double-blind randomized clinical trials (RCTs in patients with genetically determined ID, published up to April 2013, focusing on core ID symptoms.Two investigators extracted outcome data independently.Bias-corrected standardized mean difference (Hedge's g was computed for each outcome measure, using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. A priori defined patient sub-groups were analyzed using a mixed-effect model. The relationship between pre-defined continuous variable moderators (age, IQ, year of publication and trial duration and effect size was analyzed using meta-regression.Twenty-two placebo-controlled double-blind RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n = 721, mean age = 17.1 years, 62% men, mean trial duration = 35 weeks. There was a significant overall placebo response from pre- to post-treatment in patients with ID (g = 0.468, p = 0.002, both for "subjective outcomes" (a third-person's evaluation of the patient (g = 0.563, p = 0.022 and "objective outcomes" (direct evaluation of the patient's abilities (g = 0.434, p = 0.036. Individuals with higher IQ had higher response to placebo (p = 0.02 and no placebo response was observed in ID patients with comorbid dementia. A significant effect of age (p = 0.02 was found, indicating higher placebo responses in treatment of younger patients.Results suggest that patients with genetically determined ID improve in the placebo arm of RCTs. Several mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects in ID, including expectancy, implicit learning and "placebo-by-proxy" induced by

  11. Genetic sex determination in Astatotilapia calliptera, a prototype species for the Lake Malawi cichlid radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin N.; Cline, Maggie E.; Moore, Emily C.; Roberts, Natalie B.; Roberts, Reade B.

    2017-06-01

    East African cichlids display extensive variation in sex determination systems. The species Astatotilapia calliptera is one of the few cichlids that reside both in Lake Malawi and in surrounding waterways. A. calliptera is of interest in evolutionary studies as a putative immediate outgroup species for the Lake Malawi species flock and possibly as a prototype ancestor-like species for the radiation. Here, we use linkage mapping to test association of sex in A. calliptera with loci that have been previously associated with genetic sex determination in East African cichlid species. We identify a male heterogametic XY system segregating at linkage group (LG) 7 in an A. calliptera line that originated from Lake Malawi, at a locus previously shown to act as an XY sex determination system in multiple species of Lake Malawi cichlids. Significant association of genetic markers and sex produce a broad genetic interval of approximately 26 megabases (Mb) using the Nile tilapia genome to orient markers; however, we note that the marker with the strongest association with sex is near a gene that acts as a master sex determiner in other fish species. We demonstrate that alleles of the marker are perfectly associated with sex in Metriaclima mbenjii, a species from the rock-dwelling clade of Lake Malawi. While we do not rule out the possibility of other sex determination loci in A. calliptera, this study provides a foundation for fine mapping of the cichlid sex determination gene on LG7 and evolutionary context regarding the origin and persistence of the LG7 XY across diverse, rapidly evolving lineages.

  12. A Genetic Algorithm for Simultaneous Determination of Thin Films Thermal Transport Properties and Contact Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengxing HUANG; Zhen'an TANG; Ziqiang XU; Haitao DING; Yuqin GU

    2006-01-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA) was studied to simultaneously determine the thermal transport properties and the contact resistance of thin films deposited on a thick substrate. A pulsed photothermal reflectance (PPR) system was employed for the measurements. The GA was used to extract the thermal properties. Measurements were performed on SiO2 thin films of different thicknesses on silicon substrate. The results show that the GA accompanied with the PPR system is useful for the simultaneous determination of thermal properties of thin films on a substrate.

  13. Genetic diversity of pomegranate germplasm collection from Spain determined by fruit, seed, leaf and flower characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Martinez-Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Miguel Hernandez University (Spain created a germplasm bank of the varieties of pomegranate from different Southeastern Spain localities in order to preserve the crop’s wide genetic diversity. Once this collection was established, the next step was to characterize the phenotype of these varieties to determine the phenotypic variability that existed among all the different pomegranate genotypes, and to understand the degree of polymorphism of the morphometric characteristics among varieties. Methods. Fifty-three pomegranate (Punica granatum L. accessions were studied in order to determine their degree of polymorphism and to detect similarities in their genotypes. Thirty-one morphometric characteristics were measured in fruits, arils, seeds, leaves and flowers, as well as juice characteristics including content, pH, titratable acidity, total soluble solids and maturity index. ANOVA, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis showed that there was a considerable phenotypic diversity (and presumably genetic. Results. The cluster analysis produced a dendrogram with four main clusters. The dissimilarity level ranged from 1 to 25, indicating that there were varieties that were either very similar or very different from each other, with varieties from the same geographical areas being more closely related. Within each varietal group, different degrees of similarity were found, although there were no accessions that were identical. These results highlight the crop’s great genetic diversity, which can be explained not only by their different geographical origins, but also to the fact that these are native plants that have not come from genetic improvement programs. The geographic origin could be, in the cases where no exchanges of plant material took place, a key criterion for cultivar clustering. Conclusions. As a result of the present study, we can conclude that among all the parameters analyzed, those related to fruit and seed

  14. Structure and Genetic Variability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, Determined Using Mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Sâmia M.; Coelho, Rui; Chapman, Demian; Howey-Jordan, Lucy; Brooks, Edward J.; Fernando, Daniel; Mendes, Natalia J.; Hazin, Fabio H. V.; Oliveira, Claudio; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto; Mendonça, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding population structure and genetic connectivity is an important contribution when establishing conservation strategies to manage threatened species. The oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, is a highly migratory, large-bodied, pelagic shark listed by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List as "vulnerable" throughout its range and “critically endangered” in the western north Atlantic. In 2014, the species was protected globally under Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), limiting and regulating trade. This study used partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region to determine the population genetic structure of oceanic whitetip sharks across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. 724 base pairs were obtained from 215 individuals that identifed nine polymorphic sites and defined 12 distinct haplotypes. Total nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.0013 and haplotype diversity (h) was 0.5953. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) evidenced moderate levels of population structure (ɸST = 0.1039) with restricted gene flow between the western and eastern Atlantic Ocean, and a strong relationship between the latter region and the Indian Ocean. Even though the oceanic whitetip is a highly migratory animal the results presented here show that their genetic variability is slightly below average of other pelagic sharks. Additionally, this study recommends that at least two populations in the Atlantic Ocean should be considered distinct (eastern and western Atlantic) and conservation efforts should be focused in areas with the greatest genetic diversity by environmental managers. PMID:27187497

  15. Origin and evolution of the dependent lineages in the genetic caste determination system of Pogonomyrmex ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirviö, Anu; Pamilo, Pekka; Johnson, Robert A; Page, Robert E; Gadau, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Hybridizing harvester ants of the Pogonomyrmex barbatus/rugosus complex have an exceptional genetic caste determination (GCD) mechanism. We combined computer simulations, population genomics, and linkage mapping using >1000 nuclear AFLP markers and a partial mtDNA sequence to explore the genetic architecture and origin of the dependent lineages. Our samples included two pairs of hybridizing lineages, and the mitochondrial and nuclear data showed contradicting affinities between them. Clustering of individual genotypes based on nuclear markers indicated some exceptions to the general GCD system, that is, interlineage hybrid genes as well as some pure-line workers. A genetic linkage map of P. rugosus showed one of the highest recombination rates ever measured in insects (14.0 cM/Mb), supporting the view that social insects are characterized by high recombination rates. The population data had 165 markers in which sibling pairs showed a significant genetic difference depending on the caste. The differences were scattered in the genome; 13 linkage groups had loci with F(ST)>0.9 between the hybridizing lineages J1 and J2.The mapping results and the population data indicate that the dependent lineages have been initially formed through hybridization at different points in time but the role of introgression has been insignificant in their later evolution.

  16. Genetic diversity in natural populations of Jacaranda decurrens Cham. determined using RAPD and AFLP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca W. Bertoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacaranda decurrens (Bignoniaceae is an endemic species of the Cerrado with validated antitumoral activity. The genetic diversity of six populations of J. decurrens located in the State of São Paulo was determined in this study by using molecular markers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP. Following optimization of the amplification reaction, 10 selected primers generated 78 reproducible RAPD fragments that were mostly (69.2% polymorphic. Two hundred and five reproducible AFLP fragments were generated by using four selected primer combinations; 46.3% of these fragments were polymorphic, indicating a considerable level of genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA using these two groups of markers indicated that variability was strongly structured amongst populations. The unweighted pair group method with arithmatic mean (UPGMA and Pearson's correlation coefficient (RAPD -0.16, p = 0.2082; AFLP 0.37, p = 0.1006 between genetic matrices and geographic distances suggested that the population structure followed an island model in which a single population of infinite size gave rise to the current populations of J. decurrens, independently of their spatial position. The results of this study indicate that RAPD and AFLP markers were similarly efficient in measuring the genetic variability amongst natural populations of J. decurrens. These data may be useful for developing strategies for the preservation of this medicinal species in the Cerrado.

  17. Structure and Genetic Variability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, Determined Using Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Sâmia M; Coelho, Rui; Chapman, Demian; Howey-Jordan, Lucy; Brooks, Edward J; Fernando, Daniel; Mendes, Natalia J; Hazin, Fabio H V; Oliveira, Claudio; Santos, Miguel N; Foresti, Fausto; Mendonça, Fernando F

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding population structure and genetic connectivity is an important contribution when establishing conservation strategies to manage threatened species. The oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, is a highly migratory, large-bodied, pelagic shark listed by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List as "vulnerable" throughout its range and "critically endangered" in the western north Atlantic. In 2014, the species was protected globally under Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), limiting and regulating trade. This study used partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region to determine the population genetic structure of oceanic whitetip sharks across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. 724 base pairs were obtained from 215 individuals that identifed nine polymorphic sites and defined 12 distinct haplotypes. Total nucleotide diversity (π) was 0.0013 and haplotype diversity (h) was 0.5953. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) evidenced moderate levels of population structure (ɸST = 0.1039) with restricted gene flow between the western and eastern Atlantic Ocean, and a strong relationship between the latter region and the Indian Ocean. Even though the oceanic whitetip is a highly migratory animal the results presented here show that their genetic variability is slightly below average of other pelagic sharks. Additionally, this study recommends that at least two populations in the Atlantic Ocean should be considered distinct (eastern and western Atlantic) and conservation efforts should be focused in areas with the greatest genetic diversity by environmental managers.

  18. Structure and Genetic Variability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, Determined Using Mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia M Camargo

    Full Text Available Information regarding population structure and genetic connectivity is an important contribution when establishing conservation strategies to manage threatened species. The oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus, is a highly migratory, large-bodied, pelagic shark listed by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List as "vulnerable" throughout its range and "critically endangered" in the western north Atlantic. In 2014, the species was protected globally under Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, limiting and regulating trade. This study used partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region to determine the population genetic structure of oceanic whitetip sharks across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. 724 base pairs were obtained from 215 individuals that identifed nine polymorphic sites and defined 12 distinct haplotypes. Total nucleotide diversity (π was 0.0013 and haplotype diversity (h was 0.5953. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA evidenced moderate levels of population structure (ɸST = 0.1039 with restricted gene flow between the western and eastern Atlantic Ocean, and a strong relationship between the latter region and the Indian Ocean. Even though the oceanic whitetip is a highly migratory animal the results presented here show that their genetic variability is slightly below average of other pelagic sharks. Additionally, this study recommends that at least two populations in the Atlantic Ocean should be considered distinct (eastern and western Atlantic and conservation efforts should be focused in areas with the greatest genetic diversity by environmental managers.

  19. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  20. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  1. Genetic and functional studies implicate synaptic overgrowth and ring gland cAMP/PKA signaling defects in the Drosophila melanogaster neurofibromatosis-1 growth deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Walker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a genetic disease that affects 1 in 3,000, is caused by loss of a large evolutionary conserved protein that serves as a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP for Ras. Among Drosophila melanogaster Nf1 (dNf1 null mutant phenotypes, learning/memory deficits and reduced overall growth resemble human NF1 symptoms. These and other dNf1 defects are relatively insensitive to manipulations that reduce Ras signaling strength but are suppressed by increasing signaling through the 3'-5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA pathway, or phenocopied by inhibiting this pathway. However, whether dNf1 affects cAMP/PKA signaling directly or indirectly remains controversial. To shed light on this issue we screened 486 1(st and 2(nd chromosome deficiencies that uncover >80% of annotated genes for dominant modifiers of the dNf1 pupal size defect, identifying responsible genes in crosses with mutant alleles or by tissue-specific RNA interference (RNAi knockdown. Validating the screen, identified suppressors include the previously implicated dAlk tyrosine kinase, its activating ligand jelly belly (jeb, two other genes involved in Ras/ERK signal transduction and several involved in cAMP/PKA signaling. Novel modifiers that implicate synaptic defects in the dNf1 growth deficiency include the intersectin-related synaptic scaffold protein Dap160 and the cholecystokinin receptor-related CCKLR-17D1 drosulfakinin receptor. Providing mechanistic clues, we show that dAlk, jeb and CCKLR-17D1 are among mutants that also suppress a recently identified dNf1 neuromuscular junction (NMJ overgrowth phenotype and that manipulations that increase cAMP/PKA signaling in adipokinetic hormone (AKH-producing cells at the base of the neuroendocrine ring gland restore the dNf1 growth deficiency. Finally, supporting our previous contention that ALK might be a therapeutic target in NF1, we report that human ALK is expressed in cells that

  2. Sex determination of superorder Neognathae (class Aves by molecular genetics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was optimization molecular genetic method for sex determination of superorder Neognathae from class Aves. Molecular-genetic methods was based on the amplification of a chromo-helicase DNA binding 1 (CHD gene region, which is located in both sex chromozomes Z and W. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood and feathers by using commercial column kit QIAamp DNA Mini kit. The intron regions of CHDW and CHDZ genes were amplified by sex specific primers P2 and P8. The PCR method used in this study was based on two differences between CHDW and CHDZ genes. One of them is restriction site for endonuclease HaeIII located only in CHDZ and the second is the lenght polymorphism between CHDW and CHDZ where for the males was detected one band and for the females were detected two bands in 3 % agarose gel. These molecular-genetics methods were successfully used for sex determination in 36 species from superorder Neognathae.

  3. Current concepts of IgE regulation and impact of genetic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potaczek, D P; Kabesch, M

    2012-06-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated immune responses seem to be directed against parasites and neoplasms, but are best known for their involvement in allergies. The IgE network is tightly controlled at different levels as outlined in this review. Genetic determinants were suspected to influence IgE regulation and IgE levels considerably for many years. Linkage and candidate gene studies suggested a number of loci and genes to correlate with total serum IgE levels, and recently genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provided the power to identify genetic determinants for total serum IgE levels: 1q23 (FCER1A), 5q31 (RAD50, IL13, IL4), 12q13 (STAT6), 6p21.3 (HLA-DRB1) and 16p12 (IL4R, IL21R). In this review, we analyse the potential role of these GWAS hits in the IgE network and suggest mechanisms of how genes and genetic variants in these loci may influence IgE regulation.

  4. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana M.; Sánchez, Laura; Díaz, Noelia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD), a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two reference species of

  5. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: Applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulino eMartínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD, a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two

  6. Genetic determinism of bone and mineral metabolism in meat-type chickens: A QTL mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Sellier, Nadine; Chabault-Dhuit, Marie; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Narcy, Agnès

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal integrity in meat-type chickens is affected by many factors including rapid growth rate, nutrition and genetics. To investigate the genetic basis of bone and mineral metabolism, a QTL detection study was conducted in an intercross between two lines of meat-type chickens divergently selected for their high (D +) or low (D -) digestive efficiency. Tibia size (length, diameter, volume) and ash content were determined at 3 weeks of age as well as phosphorus (P) retention and plasma concentration. Heritability of these traits and their genetic correlations with digestive efficiency were estimated. A QTL mapping study was performed using 3379 SNP markers. Tibia size, weight, ash content and breaking strength were highly heritable (0.42 to 0.61). Relative tibia diameter and volume as well as P retention were strongly and positively genetically correlated with digestive efficiency (0.57 to 0.80). A total of 35 QTL were identified (9 for tibia weight, 13 for tibia size, 5 for bone strength, 5 for bone mineralization, 2 for plasma P concentration and 1 for P retention). Six QTL were genome-wide significant, and 3 QTL for tibia relative volume, weight and ash weight on chromosome 6 were fixed, the positive allele coming from the D-line. For two QTL for ash content on chromosome 18 and relative tibia length on chromosome 26, the confidence intervals were small enough to identify potential candidate genes. These findings support the evidence of multiple genetic loci controlling bone and mineral metabolism. The identification of candidate genes may provide new perspectives in the understanding of bone regulation, even beyond avian species.

  7. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana M; Sánchez, Laura; Díaz, Noelia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD), a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two reference species of

  8. Determining Optimal Replacement Policy with an Availability Constraint via Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengliang Zong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a model and a genetic algorithm for determining an optimal replacement policy for power equipment subject to Poisson shocks. If the time interval of two consecutive shocks is less than a threshold value, the failed equipment can be repaired. We assume that the operating time after repair is stochastically nonincreasing and the repair time is exponentially distributed with a geometric increasing mean. Our objective is to minimize the expected average cost under an availability requirement. Based on this average cost function, we propose the genetic algorithm to locate the optimal replacement policy N to minimize the average cost rate. The results show that the GA is effective and efficient in finding the optimal solutions. The availability of equipment has significance effect on the optimal replacement policy. Many practical systems fit the model developed in this paper.

  9. Lay responses to health messages about the genetic risk factors for salt sensitivity: do mass media genetic health messages result in genetic determinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerecnik, Chris M R

    2010-08-01

    Media coverage of genetics may lead to overestimation of the impact of genetics on disease development. In this study, we presented one student sample and one general public sample from the Netherlands with a general or a genetic health message (HM) about salt sensitivity. After reading the genetic (but not the general) HM, participants reported higher perceived impact of genetic versus lifestyle factors and a higher attributable fraction of genetics on disease development. Nevertheless, participants were able to recognise the balance between lifestyle and genetic risk factors in disease development. They also contextualised and restricted the message's implications to the specific information provided, and did not extrapolate these implications to other diseases. These results illustrate the nuanced understanding the general public may have concerning genetic risk factors.

  10. Determination of an Test Condition for IR Thermography to Inspect a Wall-Thinning Defect in Nuclear Piping Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Yun, Won Kyung; Jung, Hyun Chul; Kim, Kyeong Suk [Chosun University, Gwnagju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    This study conducted infrared (IR) thermography tests using pipe and plate specimens with artificial wall-thinning defects to find an optimal condition for IR thermography test on the wall-thinned nuclear piping components. In the experiment halogen lamp was used to heat the specimens. The distance between the specimen and the lamp and the intensity of halogen lamp were regarded as experimental parameter. When the distance was set to 1{approx}2 m and the lamp intensity was above 60 % of full power, a single scanning of IR thermography detected all artificial wall-thinning defects, whose minimum dimension was 2{theta} = 90 .deg., d/t=0.5, and L/D{sub o}, within the pipe of 500 mm in length. Regardless of the distance between the specimen and the lamp, the image of wall-thinning defect in IR thermography became distinctive as the intensity of halogen lamp increased. The detectability of IR thermography was similar for both plate and pipe specimens, but the optimal test condition for IR thermography depended on the type of specimen.

  11. Theoretical Implications of Periacetabular Osteotomy in Various Dysplastic Acetabular Cartilage Defects as Determined by Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Qu, Wenrui; Wang, Yanbing; Zhong, Lei; Zhu, Zhe; Li, Wei; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Jincheng; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Different extents and locations of acetabular cartilage defect have been supposed to be a major cause of undesirable outcomes of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). This study aimed to verify whether different locations of cartilage deficiency affect the biomechanical environment in a three-dimensional model utilizing finite element analysis (FEA). Material/Methods We developed 3 DDH models – DDH-1 (normal shape), DDH-2 (superior defect), and DDH-3 (anterosuperior defect) – by deforming from a normal hip model. We also developed 3 PAO models – PAO-1, PAO-2, and PAO-3 – through rotating osteotomized fragments. Results The maximum von Mises stress in the normal hip was 13.06 MPa. In the DDH-1 model, the maximum value on the load-bearing area decreased from 15.49 MPa pre-PAO to 14.28 MPa post-PAO, while stresses in the DDH-2 and DDH-3 models were higher than in the DDH-1 model, both pre-PAO and post-PAO (30.46 MPa to 26.04 MPa for DDH-2; 33.89 MPa to 27.48 MPa for DDH-3). Conclusions This study shows that, both pre- and post-PAO, different types of cartilage deficiency affect the biomechanical environment. Furthermore, in dysplastic hips, obtaining accurate three-dimensional information about the acetabular cartilage can contribute substantially to PAO decision making. PMID:28017958

  12. Identification of genetic defects underlying FVII deficiency in 10 patients belonging to eight unrelated families of the North provinces from Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmahmoudi Hejer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inherited factor VII (FVII deficiency is a rare disorder characterized by a bleeding phenotype varying from mild to severe. To date, more than 200 mutations have been described along the F7 gene encoding for FVII. The aim of this study was the identification of genetic defects underlying FVII deficiency in 10 patients belonging to eight unrelated families of the North provinces from Tunisia. Mutation detection was performed by sequencing the whole F7 gene coding region, exon-intron boundaries and about 400 bp of the promoter region. We identified 5 mutations in five unrelated families; the novel p.F328Y mutation and the reported mutations: p.R304Q, p.M298I, IVS1aG > A and p.G-39G. For the remaining 5 patients we didn’t identified any mutations using PCR/Sequencing protocol. In conclusion, this study represents the first comprehensive molecular series of FVII deficiency affected patients in Tunisia from the North. We will try in the future to continue the molecular study for Tunisian patients from Center and South provinces in order to have a complete idea about the FVII deficiency mutational profile in our country. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1288044089753085

  13. Determining Relative Importance and Effective Settings for Genetic Algorithm Control Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, K L; Filliben, J J; Haines, A L

    2015-01-01

    Setting the control parameters of a genetic algorithm to obtain good results is a long-standing problem. We define an experiment design and analysis method to determine relative importance and effective settings for control parameters of any evolutionary algorithm, and we apply this method to a classic binary-encoded genetic algorithm (GA). Subsequently, as reported elsewhere, we applied the GA, with the control parameter settings determined here, to steer a population of cloud-computing simulators toward behaviors that reveal degraded performance and system collapse. GA-steered simulators could serve as a design tool, empowering system engineers to identify and mitigate low-probability, costly failure scenarios. In the existing GA literature, we uncovered conflicting opinions and evidence regarding key GA control parameters and effective settings to adopt. Consequently, we designed and executed an experiment to determine relative importance and effective settings for seven GA control parameters, when applied across a set of numerical optimization problems drawn from the literature. This paper describes our experiment design, analysis, and results. We found that crossover most significantly influenced GA success, followed by mutation rate and population size and then by rerandomization point and elite selection. Selection method and the precision used within the chromosome to represent numerical values had least influence. Our findings are robust over 60 numerical optimization problems.

  14. Determination of Mycotoxin Production of Fusarium Species in Genetically Modified Maize Varieties by Quantitative Flow Immunocytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánáti, Hajnalka; Darvas, Béla; Fehér-Tóth, Szilvia; Czéh, Árpád; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Levels of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in genetically modified (GM) and near-isogenic maize, were determined using multi-analyte, microbead-based flow immunocytometry with fluorescence detection, for the parallel quantitative determination of fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2, ochratoxin A, and aflatoxin B1. Maize varieties included the genetic events MON 810 and DAS-59122-7, and their isogenic counterparts. Cobs were artificially infested by F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum conidia, and contained F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides natural infestation. The production of fumonisin B1 and deoxynivalenol was substantially affected in GM maize lines: F. verticillioides, with the addition of F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced significantly lower levels of fumonisin B1 (~300 mg·kg−1) in DAS-59122-7 than in its isogenic line (~580 mg·kg−1), while F. proliferatum, in addition to F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced significantly higher levels of deoxynivalenol (~18 mg·kg−1) in MON 810 than in its isogenic line (~5 mg·kg−1). Fusarium verticillioides, with F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced lower amounts of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone than F. proliferatum, with F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides. T-2 toxin production remained unchanged when considering the maize variety. The results demonstrate the utility of the Fungi-Plex™ quantitative flow immunocytometry method, applied for the high throughput parallel determination of the target mycotoxins. PMID:28241411

  15. [Useage of genetic markers to determine the impact of radiation on the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedgenidze, A G; Namchevadze, E N; Nikuradze, T D; Zalinian, G G; Parsadanian, G G

    2015-02-01

    The timely determination of the fact of radiation impact on the organism is extremely important for preventive and curative interventions. Despite the fact that so far cytogenetic violations are considered to be the best biomarkers to determine the impact of ionizing radiation on the organism, actual problem is to find the optimal combination of different biomarkers. The aim of the work was investigation of the extended set of biomarkers in distant periods of exposure in people previously assigned to the radiation risk group, as well as the identification of genetic disorders in the process of radiotherapy. The object of the study were 37 residents of districts, where at the beginning of this century radioactive sources were discovered, and 6 oncology patients in the course of radiotherapy. Chromosome disorders, the overall level of DNA cells single-stranded damage by comet-assay method and a method of level detection of buccal micronuclei in were investigated. The results showed heterogeneity of different organism response to irradiation. Determination of absorbed dose, identification of various genetic disorders in individuals exposed to identical doses of radiation, offers the opportunity to judge the individual biological effect and is very important for individual preventive activities.

  16. [Genetic determinants of pathogenicity of opportunistic enterobacteria isolated from children with acute intestinal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anganova, E V; Dukhanina, A V; Savilov, E D

    2012-01-01

    Detection of nucleotide sequences of genes controlling synthesis of pathogenicity factors in clinical strains of opportunistic enterobacteria isolated from children with acute intestinal infections (AII), as well as their association with resistance to antibiotics and the course of the infectious process. 175 clinical strains obtained from children with AII undergoing treatment in Irkutsk state infectious diseases hospital (2007-2010) were studied. Primers to a number of genes detected in Escherichia coli pathogenicity islands, controlling type S and type 1 adhesion; formation of hemolysins; iron-regulatory protein synthesis; capsule formation were used in the study. PCR products analysis was performed by agar gel electrophoresis. Genetic determinants of pathogenicity were detected in bacteria genera Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Proteus, Kluyvera, Morganella, Pantoea, Serratia. Fragments of hlyA and hlyB genes (hemolysin production) were detected more frequently; less frequently--sfaA, sfaG, fimA (adhesion), as well as irp-2 gene (synthesis of iron-regulatory protein). The largest set of genetic determinants of pathogenicity was noted in clinical strains of Klebsiella spp. Cultures with DNA fragments specific to genes of E. coli pathogenicity clusters were obtained predominately from children aged up to 3 years, had multiple antibiotic resistance and were isolated significantly more frequently in severe forms of AII when compared with strains in which these determinants were not detected. The studies performed showed that clinical strains of opportunistic bacteria isolated from patients with AII have a certain pathogenic potential, as evidenced by the presence of genetic pathogenicity markers in them.

  17. 77 FR 42693 - Monsanto Company and KWS SAAT AG; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the Herbicide Glyphosate AGENCY... our determination that sugar beet genetically engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate... nonregulated status under 7 CFR part 340 of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) designated as event H7-1...

  18. Genetic determinants of the physical status of human beings at different stages of ontogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanenko V.A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The changes in the structure of physical states at different stages of ontogenesis and the role of genetic factors in these transformations. It is proved that in the process of aging there are changes in physical conditions. Firstly, towards the dominance of aerobic capacity, and secondly - the speed-strength and coordination training. A survey of 125 women aged 20-25 years found that between the individual extrovert and the parameters of their physical status, there are ambiguous dependence which determine constitutional peculiarities, somatotype and cardio-respiratory system. For a typical introverted women increased body weight and power characteristics, combined with lack of capacity oxygen-transport system.

  19. Genetic and environmental determinants of the susceptibility of Amerindian derived populations for having hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2014-07-01

    Here, we discuss potential explanations for the higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in populations with an Amerindian background. Although environmental factors are the triggers, the search for the ethnic related factors that explain the increased susceptibility of the Amerindians is a promising area for research. The study of the genetics of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanic populations faces several challenges. Ethnicity could be a major confounding variable to prove genetic associations. Despite that, the study of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanics has resulted in significant contributions. Two GWAS reports have exclusively included Mexican mestizos. Fifty percent of the associations reported in Caucasians could be generalized to the Mexicans, but in many cases the Mexican lead SNP was different than that reported in Europeans. Both reports included new associations with apo B or triglycerides concentrations. The frequency of susceptibility alleles in Mexicans is higher than that found in Europeans for several of the genes with the greatest effect on triglycerides levels. An example is the SNP rs964184 in APOA5. The same trend was observed for ANGPTL3 and TIMD4 variants. In summary, we postulate that the study of the genetic determinants of hypertriglyceridemia in Amerindian populations which have major changes in their lifestyle, may prove to be a great resource to identify new genes and pathways associated with hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients' knowledge of cystic fibrosis: genetic determinism and implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Elizabeth; Bilton, Diana

    2004-10-01

    This paper uses the self-regulation model of illness perceptions (Leventhal et al. , 1984) to consider the implications of different ways of thinking about the causes of illness. The relationship between anxiety/depression and knowledge or denial of illness is also considered. These issues are explored using adherence to treatment in cystic fibrosis (CF) as an example. Twenty-six CF patients took part in semistructured interviews and completed a standardized anxiety and depression scale (HAD, Zigmond and Snaith, 1983). Interview data were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (Chapman and Smith, 2002). HAD data were analyzed using SPSS. The respondents displayed widely differing levels of knowledge of their condition. Some deterministic comments were also reported. Findings are discussed in relation to the information that physicians might provide to patients and families in the light of increasing knowledge about genetics in society and the genotyping of individuals with genetic conditions specifically. Any important gaps in patient knowledge could usefully be discussed at transition from pediatric to adult care and issues relating to control and genetic determinism discussed with the patients individually.

  1. Genetic determinants of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a population from rural Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Parra, Flavia C; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the heritability of and pleiotropic relationships among triglycerides and cholesterol lipoproteins that have long been considered traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Quantitative lipid and lipoprotein phenotypes were determined for a cross-sectional sample of a community in Jequitinhonha valley in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The sample consisted primarily of subsistence farmers. Two hundred sixty-nine individuals (128 males and 141 females), ages 18-88 years, were sampled. Eighty-eight percent (n = 252) of the individuals belonged to a single pedigree, which was highly informative for genetic analysis. Data on anthropometrics, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for each study participant. Extended pedigrees were constructed using the pedigree-based data management software PedSys. Univariate and bivariate variance-components analyses, adjusted by sex and age, were performed using the SOLAR software package. Heritability estimates of lipids and lipoproteins ranged from 29% to 45% (p genetic correlations were found between triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) (rhog = 0.998) and between total cholesterol and LDL-C (rhog = 0.948). Significant genetic correlations were also found between triglycerides and LDL-C, between total cholesterol and VLDL, and between total cholesterol and LDL-C and VLDL, and finally between LDL and VLDL. There was a significant negative environmental correlation between triglycerides and HDL-C (rhoe = -0.406).

  2. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlyi...... in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants....... differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed...... of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels...

  3. Genetic and environmental determinants of type II diabetes in Mexico City and San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, M P; Gonzalez, C; Mitchell, B D; Villalpando, E; Haffner, S M; Hazuda, H P

    1992-04-01

    To study genetic and environmental determinants of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, we compared a random sample of 35- to 64-yr-old Mexican-American men and women living in several low-income barrio neighborhoods of San Antonio to similarly aged Mexicans living in a low-income colonia of Mexico City (Colonia Liberales). A total of 1138 Mexican Americans, representing 64.3% of the original sample, and 646 Mexicans, representing 69.2% of the original sample, participated in the survey. Diabetes was diagnosed using World Health Organization criteria. Genetic susceptibility to type II diabetes was inferred from the percentage of Native American genetic admixture as estimated from skin reflectance measurements. The prevalence of diabetes was 36% higher among San Antonio Mexican Americans than among Mexicans in Mexico City; this difference was highly statistically significant (age- and sex-adjusted prevalence ratio 1.36, P = 0.006). This excess was observed despite the fact that genetic susceptibility, as inferred from the admixture estimates, was similar in the two cities. On the other hand, Mexicans were somewhat leaner as measured by body mass index and skin folds. Mexican women consumed fewer total calories than Mexican-American women, but there was no difference in the caloric intake of men. Mexico City residents ate less fat (18-19% of total calories vs. 31-32% in San Antonio, P less than 0.001), more carbohydrate (64-65 vs. 49%, P less than 0.001), and performed more physical activity than San Antonio Mexican Americans. Mexicans appeared to consume more refined sugar than Mexican Americans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Determination of interrill soil erodibility coefficient based on Fuzzy and Fuzzy-Genetic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Palizvan Zand

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the fuzzy logic science has been used successfully in various sudies of hydrology and soil erosion, but in literature review no article was found about its performance for estimating of interrill erodibility. On the other hand, studies indicate that genetic algorithm techniques can be used in fuzzy models and finding the appropriate membership functions for linguistic variables and fuzzy rules. So this study was conducted to develop the fuzzy and fuzzy–genetics models and investigation of their performance in the estimation of soil interrill erodibility factor (Ki. Materials and Methods: For this reason 36 soil samples with different physical and chemical properties were collected from west of Azerbaijan province . soilsamples were also taken from the Ap or A horizon of each soil profile. The samples were air-dried , sieved and Some soil characteristics such as soil texture, organic matter (OM, cation exchange capacity (CEC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, EC and pH were determined by the standard laboratory methods. Aggregates size distributions (ASD were determined by the wet-sieving method and fractal dimension of soil aggregates (Dn was also calculated. In order to determination of soil interrill erodibility, the flume experiment performed by packing soil a depth of 0.09-m in 0.5 × 1.0 m. soil was saturated from the base and adjusted to 9% slope and was subjected to at least 90 min rainfall . Rainfall intensity treatments were 20, 37 and 47 mm h-1. During each rainfall event, runoff was collected manually in different time intervals, being less than 60 s at the beginning, up to 15 min near the end of the test. At the end of the experiment, the volumes of runoff samples and the mass of sediment load at each time interval were measured. Finally interrill erodibility values were calculated using Kinnell (11 Equation. Then by statistical analyses Dn and sand percent of the soils were selected as input variables and Ki as

  5. Determination and observation of electronic defect levels in CuInSe sub 2 crystals and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elfotouh, F.A.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Moutinho, H.R.; Wissel, J.M.; Dhere, R.G.; Nelson, A.J.; Bakry, A.M. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado 80401 (US))

    1991-05-01

    The effects of heat and surface treatments used in the fabrication of CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) single-crystal and thin-film solar cells are investigated, and the associated dominant defect states are identified using high-resolution photoluminescence (PL) and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. The results are correlated with junction electrical characteristics, and comparisons between thin films and single crystals are established. For the first time, direct evidence for several major defect types (Cu vacancies, Cu at In sites, and In at Cu sites) responsible for the majority-carrier type of the CIS is presented based upon spectroscopic atomic imaging of the {ital n}- and {ital p}-type semiconductor surfaces. Radiative recombination levels of extrinsic origin resulting from the surface processing (including polishing, etching, and annealing) were detected in the near surface region of the CIS single crystals, but not in the thin-film material having the same composition. The energy locations and depth of these states are responsible for the formation of an interfacial layer that is confirmed from frequency-dependent capacitance--voltage ({ital C}--{ital V}) data. The DLTS measurements on single-crystal and thin-film heterostructure {l brace}i.e., (Cd,Zn)S/CIS{r brace} devices (of nearly identical chemical compositions) have also confirmed the presence of a dominant trap level in the 270-meV region above the valance band. However, the trap density is some two orders of magnitude lower in the thin-film device, giving evidence that this processing-related defect level is responsible for the inferior performance of the single-crystal solar cells.

  6. Determinism and free will in the age of genetics: Theoretical-legal concerns about predictive genetic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salardi Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the use of predictive genetic tests in medical research. I limit my discussion to those advances in genetics which try to overcome the limits represented by our genetic make-up, in particular by gene mutations that lead, or could lead, to the development of genetic diseases. Besides the ethical issues concerning the topic of the current discussion, the reader will also find an evaluation of the legal provisions elaborated at the different levels of the legal order (international, European, and national. The aim of this evaluation is to find out which model of Law is being adopted in bioethical issues like the one discussed in this paper. The paper underlines and argues how Law can contribute (and has already contributed at the different levels: International, European, and national to value and to spread an ethics of responsibility.

  7. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth J Voss

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4% and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  8. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Gareth J; Kump, D Kevin; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4%) and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  9. Biased Random-Key Genetic Algorithms for the Winner Determination Problem in Combinatorial Auctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Carlos Eduardo; Toso, Rodrigo Franco; Resende, Mauricio G C; Miyazawa, Flávio Keidi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of picking a subset of bids in a general combinatorial auction so as to maximize the overall profit using the first-price model. This winner determination problem assumes that a single bidding round is held to determine both the winners and prices to be paid. We introduce six variants of biased random-key genetic algorithms for this problem. Three of them use a novel initialization technique that makes use of solutions of intermediate linear programming relaxations of an exact mixed integer linear programming model as initial chromosomes of the population. An experimental evaluation compares the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms with the standard mixed linear integer programming formulation, a specialized exact algorithm, and the best-performing heuristics proposed for this problem. The proposed algorithms are competitive and offer strong results, mainly for large-scale auctions.

  10. First Attempt of Orbit Determination of SLR Satellites and Space Debris Using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleflie, F.; Coulot, D.; Descosta, R.; Fernier, A.; Richard, P.

    2013-08-01

    We present an orbit determination method based on genetic algorithms. Contrary to usual estimation methods mainly based on least-squares methods, these algorithms do not require any a priori knowledge of the initial state vector to be estimated. These algorithms can be applied when a new satellite is launched or for uncatalogued objects that appear in images obtained from robotic telescopes such as the TAROT ones. We show in this paper preliminary results obtained from an SLR satellite, for which tracking data acquired by the ILRS network enable to build accurate orbital arcs at a few centimeter level, which can be used as a reference orbit ; in this case, the basic observations are made up of time series of ranges, obtained from various tracking stations. We show as well the results obtained from the observations acquired by the two TAROT telescopes on the Telecom-2D satellite operated by CNES ; in that case, the observations are made up of time series of azimuths and elevations, seen from the two TAROT telescopes. The method is carried out in several steps: (i) an analytical propagation of the equations of motion, (ii) an estimation kernel based on genetic algorithms, which follows the usual steps of such approaches: initialization and evolution of a selected population, so as to determine the best parameters. Each parameter to be estimated, namely each initial keplerian element, has to be searched among an interval that is preliminary chosen. The algorithm is supposed to converge towards an optimum over a reasonable computational time.

  11. Mutilocus genetic determinants of LDL particle size in coronary artery disease families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotter, J.I.; Bu, X.; Cantor, R.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Recent interest in atherosclerosis has focused on the genetic determinants of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, because of (1) the association of small dense LDL particles with a three-fold increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and (2) the recent report of linkage of the trait to the LDL receptor (chromosome 19). By utilizing nonparametric quantitative sib-pair and relative-pair-analysis methods in CAD families, we tested for linkage of a gene or genes controlling LDL particle sizes with the genetic loci for the major apolipoproteins and enzymes participating in lipoprotein metabolism. We confirmed evidence for linkage to the LDL receptor locus (P = .008). For six candidate gene loci, including apolipoprotein(apo)B, apoAII, apo(a), apoE-CI-CII, lipoprotein lipase, and high-density lipoprotein-binding protein, no evidence for linkage was observed by sib-pair linkage analyses (P values ranged from .24 to .81). However, in addition, we did find tentative evidence for linkage with the apoAI-CIII-AIV locus (chromosome 11) (P = .06) and significant evidence for linkage of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein locus (chromosome 16) (P = .01) and the manganese superoxide dismutase locus (chromosome 6) (P = .001), thus indicating multilocus determination of this atherogenic trait. 73 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. CNS repair and axon regeneration: Using genetic variation to determine mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Andrea; Omura, Takao; Costigan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The importance of genetic diversity in biological investigation has been recognized since the pioneering studies of Gregor Johann Mendel and Charles Darwin. Research in this area has been greatly informed recently by the publication of genomes from multiple species. Genes regulate and create every part and process in a living organism, react with the environment to create each living form and morph and mutate to determine the history and future of each species. The regenerative capacity of neurons differs profoundly between animal lineages and within the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, we discuss research that suggests that genetic background contributes to the ability of injured axons to regenerate in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), by controlling the regulation of specific signaling cascades. We detail the methods used to identify these pathways, which include among others Activin signaling and other TGF-β superfamily members. We discuss the potential of altering these pathways in patients with CNS damage and outline strategies to promote regeneration and repair by combinatorial manipulation of neuron-intrinsic and extrinsic determinants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic determinants of serum vitamin B12 and their relation to body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allin, Kristine H; Friedrich, Nele; Pietzner, Maik; Grarup, Niels; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan; Pisinger, Charlotta; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Sandholt, Camilla H

    2016-12-19

    Lower serum vitamin B12 levels have been related to adverse metabolic health profiles, including adiposity. We used a Mendelian randomization design to test whether this relation might be causal. We included two Danish population-based studies (ntotal = 9311). Linear regression was used to test for associations between (1) serum vitamin B12 levels and body mass index (BMI), (2) genetic variants and serum vitamin B12 levels, and (3) genetic variants and BMI. The effect of a genetically determined decrease in serum vitamin B12 on BMI was estimated by instrumental variable regression. Decreased serum vitamin B12 associated with increased BMI (P B12 associated variants associated strongly with serum vitamin B12 (P B12 was associated with a 0.09 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.05; 0.13) increase in BMI (P = 3 × 10(-5)), whereas a genetically induced 20% decrease in serum vitamin B12 had no effect on BMI [-0.03 (95% CI -0.22; 0.16) kg/m(2)] (P = 0.74). Nevertheless, the strongest serum vitamin B12 variant, FUT2 rs602662, which was excluded from the B12 genetic risk score due to potential pleiotropic effects, showed a per allele effect of 0.15 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.01; 0.32) on BMI (P = 0.03). This association was accentuated including two German cohorts (ntotal = 5050), with a combined effect of 0.19 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.08; 0.30) (P = 4 × 10(-4)). We found no support for a causal role of decreased serum vitamin B12 levels in obesity. However, our study suggests that FUT2, through its regulation of the cross-talk between gut microbes and the human host, might explain a part of the observational association between serum vitamin B12 and BMI.

  14. Genetic Risk Determinants for Cigarette Smoking Dependence in Mexican Mestizo Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svyryd, Yevgeniya; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; Sánchez-Hernández, Beatriz; Aguayo-Gómez, Adolfo; Luna-Muñoz, Leonora; Arteaga-Vázquez, Jazmín; Regalado-Pineda, Justino; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is a leading cause of mortality in developed and developing countries. Despite antitobacco and smoke-free policies, the prevalence of active smokers in Mexican urban populations has remained stable. Mexican smokers differ from Caucasian and other ethnic groups, probably due to sociocultural and genetic background characteristics. This study explored the effect of known genetic variants on smoking behavior in Mexico City residents. Three hundred sixty-four Mexican Mestizo Mexico City residents from 87 families with at least one smoker were assessed for association of 12 gene variants of six candidate genes (CHRNA4, CHRNB2, DRD2, ANKK1, SLC6A3, and CYP2A6) with cigarette consumption, age of initiation and smoking duration. The Family Based Association Test, an extension of the Transmission Disequilibrium Test, was used to perform family-based association analysis. The Family Based Association Test showed statistically significant association between the rs2072658 polymorphism of the CHRNB2 gene and smoking-related phenotypes such as: smoking status (SS), age of onset (AO), years of smoking, and psychological dependence (PD) evaluated by the Glover-Nilsson Smoking Behavior Questionnaire. After Bonferroni correction, only the association with AO remained significant (P = .003). Statistically significant association was also observed for the CYP2A6 rs28399433 T allele with SS (P = .003) and PD (P = .003). Our results indicate effects of the rs2072658 CHRNB2 and rs28399433 CYP2A6 gene variants on AO, SS and PD in Mexican Mestizo smokers. A mild effect of other analyzed gene variants, which may contribute to a putative polygenic predisposition for smoking, is suggested. The understanding of genetic and environmental determinants in the Mexican population is important for other Latin American populations as well, living in their own countries or moving to other ones, particular due to the current migration characteristics and particular genetic background

  15. Screening Tests for Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . A monosomy is ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A genetic disorder that causes serious heart defects ...

  16. Determinants of Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma : from Seasonality to Quantitative Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luykx, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Most psychiatric conditions are complex genetic as the largest proportion of genetic variance is likely to derive from many genetic variants of small effect. Nonetheless, given the intricacies of the human brain and the heterogeneous nature of psychiatric disease entities, dissecting the genetic mec

  17. A Co-Association Network Analysis of the Genetic Determination of Pig Conformation, Growth and Fatness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Ballester, Maria; Corominas, Jordi; Revilla, Manuel; Estellé, Jordi; Fernández, Ana I.; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Folch, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several QTLs have been identified for major economically relevant traits in livestock, such as growth and meat quality, revealing the complex genetic architecture of these traits. The use of network approaches considering the interactions of multiple molecules and traits provides useful insights into the molecular underpinnings of complex traits. Here, a network based methodology, named Association Weight Matrix, was applied to study gene interactions and pathways affecting pig conformation, growth and fatness traits. Results The co-association network analysis underpinned three transcription factors, PPARγ, ELF1, and PRDM16 involved in mesoderm tissue differentiation. Fifty-four genes in the network belonged to growth-related ontologies and 46 of them were common with a similar study for growth in cattle supporting our results. The functional analysis uncovered the lipid metabolism and the corticotrophin and gonadotrophin release hormone pathways among the most important pathways influencing these traits. Our results suggest that the genes and pathways here identified are important determining either the total body weight of the animal and the fat content. For instance, a switch in the mesoderm tissue differentiation may determinate the age-related preferred pathways being in the puberty stage those related with the miogenic and osteogenic lineages; on the contrary, in the maturity stage cells may be more prone to the adipocyte fate. Hence, our results demonstrate that an integrative genomic co-association analysis is a powerful approach for identifying new connections and interactions among genes. Conclusions This work provides insights about pathways and key regulators which may be important determining the animal growth, conformation and body proportions and fatness traits. Molecular information concerning genes and pathways here described may be crucial for the improvement of genetic breeding programs applied to pork meat production. PMID:25503799

  18. A co-association network analysis of the genetic determination of pig conformation, growth and fatness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Puig-Oliveras

    Full Text Available Several QTLs have been identified for major economically relevant traits in livestock, such as growth and meat quality, revealing the complex genetic architecture of these traits. The use of network approaches considering the interactions of multiple molecules and traits provides useful insights into the molecular underpinnings of complex traits. Here, a network based methodology, named Association Weight Matrix, was applied to study gene interactions and pathways affecting pig conformation, growth and fatness traits.The co-association network analysis underpinned three transcription factors, PPARγ, ELF1, and PRDM16 involved in mesoderm tissue differentiation. Fifty-four genes in the network belonged to growth-related ontologies and 46 of them were common with a similar study for growth in cattle supporting our results. The functional analysis uncovered the lipid metabolism and the corticotrophin and gonadotrophin release hormone pathways among the most important pathways influencing these traits. Our results suggest that the genes and pathways here identified are important determining either the total body weight of the animal and the fat content. For instance, a switch in the mesoderm tissue differentiation may determinate the age-related preferred pathways being in the puberty stage those related with the miogenic and osteogenic lineages; on the contrary, in the maturity stage cells may be more prone to the adipocyte fate. Hence, our results demonstrate that an integrative genomic co-association analysis is a powerful approach for identifying new connections and interactions among genes.This work provides insights about pathways and key regulators which may be important determining the animal growth, conformation and body proportions and fatness traits. Molecular information concerning genes and pathways here described may be crucial for the improvement of genetic breeding programs applied to pork meat production.

  19. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  20. Determining molecular structures and conformations directly from electron diffraction using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2006-02-13

    A global optimization strategy, based upon application of a genetic algorithm (GA), is demonstrated as an approach for determining the structures of molecules possessing significant conformational flexibility directly from gas-phase electron diffraction data. In contrast to the common approach to molecular structure determination, based on trial-and-error assessment of structures available from quantum chemical calculations, the GA approach described here does not require expensive quantum mechanical calculations or manual searching of the potential energy surface of the sample molecule, relying instead upon simple comparison between the experimental and calculated diffraction pattern derived from a proposed trial molecular structure. Structures as complex as all-trans retinal and p-coumaric acid, both important chromophores in photosensing processes, may be determined by this approach. In the examples presented here, we find that the GA approach can determine the correct conformation of a flexible molecule described by 11 independent torsion angles. We also demonstrate applications to samples comprising a mixture of two distinct molecular conformations. With these results we conclude that applications of this approach are very promising in elucidating the structures of large molecules directly from electron diffraction data.

  1. Determination of best-fit potential parameters for a reactive force field using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, Poonam; Chaturvedi, Shashank

    2012-03-01

    The ReaxFF interatomic potential, used for organic materials, involves more than 600 adjustable parameters, the best-fit values of which must be determined for different materials. A new method of determining the set of best-fit parameters for specific molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen is presented, based on a parameter reduction technique followed by genetic algorithm (GA) minimization. This work has two novel features. The first is the use of a parameter reduction technique to determine which subset of parameters plays a significant role for the species of interest; this is necessary to reduce the optimization space to manageable levels. The second is the application of the GA technique to a complex potential (ReaxFF) with a very large number of adjustable parameters, which implies a large parameter space for optimization. In this work, GA has been used to optimize the parameter set to determine best-fit parameters that can reproduce molecular properties to within a given accuracy. As a test problem, the use of the algorithm has been demonstrated for nitromethane and its decomposition products.

  2. Genetic variants in the folate pathway and the risk of neural tube defects: a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural Tube Defects (NTDs are among the most prevalent and most severe congenital malformations worldwide. Polymorphisms in key genes involving the folate pathway have been reported to be associated with the risk of NTDs. However, the results from these published studies are conflicting. We surveyed the literature (1996-2011 and performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide empirical evidence on the association. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of 5 genetic variants from 47 study populations, for a total of 85 case-control comparisons MTHFR C677T (42 studies; 4374 cases, 7232 controls, MTHFR A1298C (22 studies; 2602 cases, 4070 controls, MTR A2756G (9 studies; 843 cases, 1006 controls, MTRR A66G (8 studies; 703 cases, 1572 controls, and RFC-1 A80G (4 studies; 1107 cases, 1585 controls. We found a convincing evidence of dominant effects of MTHFR C677T (OR 1.23; 95%CI 1.07-1.42 and suggestive evidence of RFC-1 A80G (OR 1.55; 95%CI 1.24-1.92. However, we found no significant effects of MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G in risk of NTDs in dominant, recessive or in allelic models. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis strongly suggested a significant association of the variant MTHFR C677T and a suggestive association of RFC-1 A80G with increased risk of NTDs. However, other variants involved in folate pathway do not demonstrate any evidence for a significant marginal association on susceptibility to NTDs.

  3. Response to enemies in the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria is genetically determined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Srijana; Tielbörger, Katja

    2012-11-01

    The enemy release hypothesis assumes that invasive plants lose their co-evolved natural enemies during introduction into the new range. This study tested, as proposed by the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis, whether escape from enemies results in a decrease in defence ability in plants from the invaded range. Two straightforward aspects of the EICA are examined: (1) if invasives have lost their enemies and their defence, they should be more negatively affected by their full natural pre-invasion herbivore spectrum than their native conspecifics; and (2) the genetic basis of evolutionary change in response to enemy release in the invasive range has not been taken sufficiently into account. Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) from several populations in its native (Europe) and invasive range (North America) was exposed to all above-ground herbivores in replicated natural populations in the native range. The experiment was performed both with plants raised from field-collected seeds as well as with offspring of these where maternal effects were removed. Absolute and relative leaf damage was higher for introduced than for native plants. Despite having smaller height growth rate, invasive plants attained a much larger final size than natives irrespective of damage, indicating large tolerance rather than effective defence. Origin effects on response to herbivory and growth were stronger in second-generation plants, suggesting that invasive potential through enemy release has a genetic basis. The findings support two predictions of the EICA hypothesis - a genetically determined difference between native and invasive plants in plant vigour and response to enemies - and point to the importance of experiments that control for maternal effects and include the entire spectrum of native range enemies.

  4. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I; Chanock, Stephen J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L; Hopper, John L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S; Hunter, David J; Gruber, Stephen B; Knight, Julia A; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Hudson, Thomas J; Chan, Andrew T; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2015-09-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10(-15)), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10(-6)). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk.

  5. Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Catherine; Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Sthultz, Christopher M; Leonard, Tierra M; Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V; Whitham, Thomas G

    2014-03-01

    Although the importance of plant-associated microbes is increasingly recognized, little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the composition of that microbiome. We examined the influence of plant genetic variation, and two stressors, one biotic and one abiotic, on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community of a dominant tree species, Pinus edulis. During three periods across 16 years that varied in drought severity, we sampled the EM fungal communities of a wild stand of P. edulis in which genetically based resistance and susceptibility to insect herbivory was linked with drought tolerance and the abundance of competing shrubs. We found that the EM fungal communities of insect-susceptible trees remained relatively constant as climate dried, while those of insect-resistant trees shifted significantly, providing evidence of a genotype by environment interaction. Shrub removal altered the EM fungal communities of insect-resistant trees, but not insect-susceptible trees, also a genotype by environment interaction. The change in the EM fungal community of insect-resistant trees following shrub removal was associated with greater shoot growth, evidence of competitive release. However, shrub removal had a 7-fold greater positive effect on the shoot growth of insect-susceptible trees than insect-resistant trees when shrub density was taken into account. Insect-susceptible trees had higher growth than insect-resistant trees, consistent with the hypothesis that the EM fungi associated with susceptible trees were superior mutualists. These complex, genetic-based interactions among species (tree-shrub-herbivore-fungus) argue that the ultimate impacts of climate change are both ecological and evolutionary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Determination of genetic variability of traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Brondani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The rice (Oryza sativa breeding program of the Rice and Bean research center of the Brazilian agricultural company Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa is well established and provides new cultivars every year to attend the demand for improved high yielding varieties with tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the elite genitors used to compose new populations for selection are closely related, contributing to the yield plateau reached in the last 20 years. To overcome this limit, it is necessary to broaden the genetic basis of the cultivars using diverse germplasm such as wild relatives or traditional varieties, with the latter being more practical because they are more easily crossed with elite germplasm to accelerate the recovery of modern plant types in the breeding lines. The objective of our study was to characterize the allelic diversity of 192 traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR or microsatellite markers. The germplasm was divided into 39 groups by common name similarity. A total of 176 alleles were detected, 30 of which (from 23 accessions were exclusive. The number of alleles per marker ranged from 6 to 22, with an average of 14.6 alleles per locus. We identified 16 accessions as a mixture of pure lines or heterozygous plants. Dendrogram analysis identified six clusters of identical accessions with different common names and just one cluster with identical accessions with the same common name, indicating that SSR markers are fundamental to determining the genetic relationship between landraces. A subset of 24 landraces, representatives of the 13 similarity groups plus the 11 accessions not grouped, was the most variable set of genotypes analyzed. These accessions can be used as genitors to increase the genetic variability available to rice breeding programs.

  7. Genetic defects in hepatocanalicular transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R; Jansen, PLM

    2000-01-01

    Bile is made as the result of active transport of its constituents into the biliary space. Most of this transport occurs across the canalicular membrane, with a further contribution from cholangiocytes. Water moves passively into bile. The major substrates that are transported out of hepatocytes are

  8. Genetic defects in hepatocanalicular transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R; Jansen, PLM

    2000-01-01

    Bile is made as the result of active transport of its constituents into the biliary space. Most of this transport occurs across the canalicular membrane, with a further contribution from cholangiocytes. Water moves passively into bile. The major substrates that are transported out of hepatocytes are

  9. The geographical and environmental determinants of genetic diversity for four alpine conifers of the European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, E; Eckert, A J; Di Pierro, E A; Rocchini, D; La Porta, Nicola; Belletti, P; Neale, D B

    2012-11-01

    Climate is one of the most important drivers of local adaptation in forest tree species. Standing levels of genetic diversity and structure within and among natural populations of forest trees are determined by the interplay between climatic heterogeneity and the balance between selection and gene flow. To investigate this interplay, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 24 to 37 populations from four subalpine conifers, Abies alba Mill., Larix decidua Mill., Pinus cembra L. and Pinus mugo Turra, across their natural ranges in the Italian Alps and Apennines. Patterns of population structure were apparent using a Bayesian clustering program, STRUCTURE, which identified three to five genetic groups per species. Geographical correlates with these patterns, however, were only apparent for P. cembra. Multivariate environmental variables [i.e. principal components (PCs)] were subsequently tested for association with SNPs using a Bayesian generalized linear mixed model. The majority of the SNPs, ranging from six in L. decidua to 18 in P. mugo, were associated with PC1, corresponding to winter precipitation and seasonal minimum temperature. In A. alba, four SNPs were associated with PC2, corresponding to the seasonal minimum temperature. Functional annotation of those genes with the orthologs in Arabidopsis revealed several genes involved in abiotic stress response. This study provides a detailed assessment of population structure and its association with environment and geography in four coniferous species in the Italian mountains.

  10. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  11. Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis but not Alcoholic Pancreatitis Is a Strong Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Shallu; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kabra, Madhulika; Chattopadhyay, Tushar Kanti; Joshi, Yogendra Kumar; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    To study if chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Through a cohort and a case-control study design, CP and other important risk factors including smoking, diabetes, alcohol, obesity, and genetic mutations were studied for their association with pancreatic cancer. In the cohort study, 402 patients with CP were included. During 3967.74 person-years of exposure, 5 of the 402 patients (4 idiopathic CP, 1 hereditary CP) developed pancreatic cancer after 16.60 ± 3.51 years of CP. The standardized incidence ratio was 121. In the case-control study, 249 pancreatic cancer patients and 1000 healthy controls were included. Of the 249 patients with pancreatic cancer, 24 had underlying idiopathic CP, and none had alcoholic pancreatitis. SPINK1 gene mutation was present in 16 of 26 patients with idiopathic CP who had pancreatic cancer. Multivariable analysis showed CP (odds ratio [OR], 97.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.69-751.36), diabetes (>4 years duration) (OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.79-5.18), smoking (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69) as significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The population attributable risk was 9.41, 9.06, and 9.50 for diabetes, CP, and smoking, respectively. Genetically determined CP but not alcoholic CP is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Genetic determinism of anatomical and hydraulic traits within an apple progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Gorza, Olivier; Cochard, Hervé; Martinez, Sébastien; Celton, Jean-Marc; Ripetti, Véronique; Lartaud, Marc; Bry, Xavier; Trottier, Catherine; Costes, Evelyne

    2011-08-01

    The apple tree is known to have an isohydric behaviour, maintaining rather constant leaf water potential in soil with low water status and/or under high evaporative demand. However, little is known on the xylem water transport from roots to leaves from the two perspectives of efficiency and safety, and on its genetic variability. We analysed 16 traits related to hydraulic efficiency and safety, and anatomical traits in apple stems, and the relationships between them. Most variables were found heritable, and we investigated the determinism underlying their genetic control through a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on 90 genotypes from the same progeny. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that all traits related to efficiency, whether hydraulic conductivity, vessel number and area or wood area, were included in the first PC, whereas the second PC included the safety variables, thus confirming the absence of trade-off between these two sets of traits. Our results demonstrated that clustered variables were characterized by common genomic regions. Together with previous results on the same progeny, our study substantiated that hydraulic efficiency traits co-localized with traits identified for tree growth and fruit production.

  13. Identification of Novel Genetic Determinants of Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acid Composition among Greenlanders.

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    Mette Korre Andersen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids (FAs are involved in cellular processes important for normal body function, and perturbation of FA balance has been linked to metabolic disturbances, including type 2 diabetes. An individual's level of FAs is affected by diet, lifestyle, and genetic variation. We aimed to improve the understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved in regulation of FA tissue levels, by identifying genetic loci associated with inter-individual differences in erythrocyte membrane FA levels. We assessed the levels of 22 FAs in the phospholipid fraction of erythrocyte membranes from 2,626 Greenlanders in relation to single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped on the MetaboChip or imputed. We identified six independent association signals. Novel loci were identified on chromosomes 5 and 11 showing strongest association with oleic acid (rs76430747 in ACSL6, beta (SE: -0.386% (0.034, p = 1.8x10-28 and docosahexaenoic acid (rs6035106 in DTD1, 0.137% (0.025, p = 6.4x10-8, respectively. For a missense variant (rs80356779 in CPT1A, we identified a number of novel FA associations, the strongest with 11-eicosenoic acid (0.473% (0.035, p = 2.6x10-38, and for variants in FADS2 (rs174570, LPCAT3 (rs2110073, and CERS4 (rs11881630 we replicated known FA associations. Moreover, we observed metabolic implications of the ACSL6 (rs76430747 and CPT1A (rs80356779 variants, which both were associated with altered HbA1c (0.051% (0.013, p = 5.6x10-6 and -0.034% (0.016, p = 3.1x10-4, respectively. The latter variant was also associated with reduced insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, -0.193 (0.050, p = 3.8x10-6, as well as measures of smaller body size, including weight (-2.676 kg (0.523, p = 2.4x10-7, lean mass (-1.200 kg (0.271, p = 1.7x10-6, height (-0.966 cm (0.230, p = 2.0x10-5, and BMI (-0.638 kg/m2 (0.181, p = 2.8x10-4. In conclusion, we have identified novel genetic determinants of FA composition in phospholipids in erythrocyte membranes, and have shown examples of links

  14. Interpretation of electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, I A; Khan, H A; Shobrak, M; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Sadoon, M; Al Farhan, A H; Bahkali, A H

    2010-02-09

    Microsatellite markers are commonly used for examining population structure, especially inbreeding, outbreeding and gene flow. An array of microsatellite loci, preferably with multiallelic presentation, is preferable for ensuring accurate results. However, artifact peaks or stutters in the electrophoretograms significantly hamper the reliable interpretation of genotypes. We interpreted electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx. All the alleles of different loci exhibited good peak resolutions and hence were clearly identified. Moreover, none of the stutter peaks impaired the recognition or differentiation between homozygote and heterozygote. Our findings suggest that correct identification of alleles in the presence of co-amplified nonspecific fragments is important for reliable interpretation of microsatellite data.

  15. Genetic determinants of hair and eye colours in the Scottish and Danish populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Wong, Terence H; Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eye and hair colour is highly variable in the European population, and is largely genetically determined. Both linkage and association studies have previously been used to identify candidate genes underlying this variation. Many of the genes found were previously known as underlying....... Cluster analysis of this data defined two groups, with overlapping borders, which corresponded to visually assessed dark versus red/light hair colour. The Danish population was assigned into categorical hair colour groups. Both cohorts were also assessed for eye colour. DNA from the Scottish group...... was genotyped at SNPs in 33 candidate genes, using 384 SNPs identified by HapMap as representatives of each gene. Associations found between SNPs and colorimetric hair data and eye colour categories were replicated in a cohort of the Danish population. The Danish population was also genotyped with SNPs in 4...

  16. Determining the Optimal Placement of Sensors on a Concrete Arch Dam Using a Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural modal identification has become increasingly important in health monitoring, fault diagnosis, vibration control, and dynamic analysis of engineering structures in recent years. Based on an analysis of traditional optimization algorithms, this paper proposes a novel sensor optimization criterion that combines the effective independence (EFI method with the modal strain energy (MSE method. Considering the complex structure and enormous degrees of freedom (DOFs of modern concrete arch dam, a quantum genetic algorithm (QGA is used to optimize the corresponding sensor network on the upstream surface of a dam. Finally, this study uses a specific concrete arch dam as an example and determines the optimal sensor placement using the proposed method. By comparing the results with the traditional optimization methods, the proposed method is shown to maximize the spatial intersection angle among the modal vectors of sensor network and can effectively resist ambient perturbations, which will make the identified modal parameters more precise.

  17. ANALYZING THE DETERMINANTS OF THE VOTING BEHAVIOR USING A GENETIC ALGORITHM

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    Vizcaino-Gonzalez, Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Using data about votes emitted by funds in meetings held by United States banks from 2003 to 2013, we apply a genetic algorithm to a set of financial variables in order to detect the determinants of the vote direction. Our findings indicate that there are three main explanatory factors: the market value of the firm, the shareholder activism measured as the total number of funds voting, and the temporal context, which reflects the influence of recent critical events affecting the banking industry, including bankruptcies, reputational failures, and mergers and acquisitions. As a result, considering that voting behavior has been empirically linked to reputational harms, these findings can be considered as a useful insight about the keys that should be taken into account in order to achieve an effective reputational risk management strategy.

  18. [Experimental analysis of the neurobiological basis of genetically determined alcohol addiction in the progeny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'eva, T M; Geĭko, V V

    1990-01-01

    Experiments on 45 nonlinear albino male rats were made to investigate bioelectrogenesis of the limbic-neocortical parts of the brain, function of the systems of positive and negative reinforcement and emotional behavior of the progeny of long alcoholized animals with successive growth of the extent of alcoholism aggravation. Their different initial characteristics were discovered in intact rats as regards parents' alcoholism and in alcoholism aggravated rats, determining different mechanisms and rates of the development of pathological ethanol addiction. The pathogenic influence of "familial" alcoholism lies in the formation in the progeny of the first and fourth generations of the model of alcohol addiction anticipation, whose pathological integration is realized on the basis of the beforehand prepared model which becomes quantitatively different as a result of genetic anomalies.

  19. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Georges

    Full Text Available A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  20. Rapid phenotyping of knockout mice to identify genetic determinants of bone strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Bernard; Logan, John; Croucher, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    The genetic determinants of osteoporosis remain poorly understood, and there is a large unmet need for new treatments in our ageing society. Thus, new approaches for gene discovery in skeletal disease are required to complement the current genome-wide association studies in human populations. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) provide such an opportunity. The IKMC generates knockout mice representing each of the known protein-coding genes in C57BL/6 mice and, as part of the IMPC initiative, the Origins of Bone and Cartilage Disease project identifies mutants with significant outlier skeletal phenotypes. This initiative will add value to data from large human cohorts and provide a new understanding of bone and cartilage pathophysiology, ultimately leading to the identification of novel drug targets for the treatment of skeletal disease. PMID:27535945

  1. A genome scan conducted in a multigenerational pedigree with convergent strabismus supports a complex genetic determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Anouk; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naïma; Karim, Latifa; Georges, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree.

  2. Cardiovascular Patterning as Determined by Hemodynamic Forces and Blood Vessel Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Anderson

    Full Text Available Vascular patterning depends on coordinated timing of arteriovenous specification of endothelial cells and the concomitant hemodynamic forces supplied by the onset of cardiac function. Using a combination of 3D imaging by OPT and embryo registration techniques, we sought to identify structural differences between three different mouse models of cardiovascular perturbation.Endoglin mutant mice shared a high degree of similarity to Mlc2a mutant mice, which have been shown to have a primary developmental heart defect causing secondary vessel remodeling failures. Dll4 mutant mice, which have well-characterized arterial blood vessel specification defects, showed distinct differences in vascular patterning when compared to the disruptions seen in Mlc2a-/- and Eng-/- models. While Mlc2a-/- and Eng-/- embryos exhibited significantly larger atria than wild-type, Dll4-/- embryos had significantly smaller hearts than wild-type, but this quantitative volume decrease was not limited to the developing atrium. Dll4-/- embryos also had atretic dorsal aortae and smaller trunks, suggesting that the cardiac abnormalities were secondary to primary arterial blood vessel specification defects.The similarities in Eng-/- and Mlc2a-/- embryos suggest that Eng-/- mice may suffer from a primary heart developmental defect and secondary defects in vessel patterning, while defects in Dll4-/- embryos are consistent with primary defects in vessel patterning.

  3. Disentangling genetic vs. environmental causes of sex determination in the common frog, Rana temporaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Chikako; Miura, Ikuo; Merilä, Juha

    2008-01-08

    Understanding of sex ratio dynamics in a given species requires understanding its sex determination system, as well as access for reliable tools for sex identification at different life stages. As in the case of many other amphibians, the common frogs (Rana temporaria) do not have well differentiated sex chromosomes, and an identification of individuals' genetic sex may be complicated by sex reversals. Here, we report results of studies shedding light on the sex determination system and sex ratio variation in this species. A microsatellite locus RtSB03 was found to be sex-linked in four geographically disparate populations, suggesting male heterogamy in common frogs. However, in three other populations examined, no or little evidence for sex-linkage was detected suggesting either ongoing/recent recombination events, and/or frequent sex-reversals. Comparison of inheritance patterns of alleles in RtSB03 and phenotypic sex within sibships revealed a mixed evidence for sex-linkage: all individuals with male phenotype carried a male specific allele in one population, whereas results were more mixed in another population. These results make sense only if we assume that the RtSB03 locus is linked to male sex determination factor in some, but not in all common frog populations, and if phenotypic sex-reversals - for which there is earlier evidence from this species - are frequently occurring.

  4. Studies on BN rats model to determine the potential allergenicity of proteins from genetically modified foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Ning Li; Yong-Ning Wu; Xiao-Guang Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a Brown Norway (BN) rat model to determine the potential allergenicity of novel proteins in genetically modified food.METHODS: The allergenicity of different proteins were compared, including ovalbumin (OVA), a potent respiratory and food allergen, bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein that is considered to have a lesser allergenic potential,and potato acid phosphatase (PAP), a non-allergenic protein when administered to BN rats via different routes of exposure (intraperitoneally or by gavage). IgG and IgE antibody responses were determined by ELISA and PCA,respectively. An immunoassay kit was used to determine the plasma histamine level. In addition, possible systemic effect of allergens was investigated by monitoring blood pressure.RESULTS: OVA provoked very vigorous protein-specific IgG and IgE responses, low grade protein-specific IgG and IgE responses were elicited by BSA, while by neither route did PAP elicit anything. In either routes of exposure,plasma histamine level in BN rats sensitized with OVA was higher than that of BSA or PAP. In addition, an oral challenge with BSA and PAP did not induce any effect on blood pressure, while a temporary drop in systolic blood pressure in few animals of each routes of exposure was found by an oral challenge with OVA.CONCLUSION: BN rat model might be a useful and predictive animal model to study the potential allergenicity of novel food proteins.

  5. Sex determination of Pohnpei Micronesian kingfishers using morphological and molecular genetic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Dylan C.; Lopes, I.F.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation-oriented studies of Micronesian Kingfishers (Todiramphus cinnamominus) have been hindered by a lack of basic natural history information, despite the status of the Guam subspecies (T. c. cinnamominus) as one of the most endangered species in the world. We used tissue samples and morphometric measures from museum specimens and wild-captured Pohnpei Micronesian Kingfishers (T. c. reichenbachii) to develop methods for sex determination. We present a modified molecular protocol and a discriminant function that yields the probability that a particular individual is male or female. Our results revealed that females were significantly larger than males, and the discriminant function correctly predicted sex in 73% (30/41) of the individuals. The sex of 86% (18/21) of individuals was correctly assigned when a moderate reliability threshold was set. Sex determination using molecular genetic techniques was more reliable than methods based on morphology. Our results will facilitate recovery efforts for the critically endangered Guam Micronesian Kingfisher and provide a basis for sex determination in the 11 other endangered congeners in the Pacific Basin.

  6. Disentangling genetic vs. environmental causes of sex determination in the common frog, Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merilä Juha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of sex ratio dynamics in a given species requires understanding its sex determination system, as well as access for reliable tools for sex identification at different life stages. As in the case of many other amphibians, the common frogs (Rana temporaria do not have well differentiated sex chromosomes, and an identification of individuals' genetic sex may be complicated by sex reversals. Here, we report results of studies shedding light on the sex determination system and sex ratio variation in this species. Results A microsatellite locus RtSB03 was found to be sex-linked in four geographically disparate populations, suggesting male heterogamy in common frogs. However, in three other populations examined, no or little evidence for sex-linkage was detected suggesting either ongoing/recent recombination events, and/or frequent sex-reversals. Comparison of inheritance patterns of alleles in RtSB03 and phenotypic sex within sibships revealed a mixed evidence for sex-linkage: all individuals with male phenotype carried a male specific allele in one population, whereas results were more mixed in another population. Conclusion These results make sense only if we assume that the RtSB03 locus is linked to male sex determination factor in some, but not in all common frog populations, and if phenotypic sex-reversals – for which there is earlier evidence from this species – are frequently occurring.

  7. Common genetic variations in the CYP2R1 and GC genes are determinants of vitamin D status in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Ioanna

    ), after 6 months intake of vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk (paper II) and in 92 participants in the VitDgen study after artificial UVB irradiation during winter (paper III). Common genetic variations in the CYP2R1 and GC genes were found to be important determinants of vitamin D status in three out...... by genetic variation in vitamin D modulating genes. Twin and family-based studies indicate that genetic variation may have an appreciable influence on vitamin D status. Moreover, several candidate gene studies including two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found single nucleotide polymorphisms...... (SNPs) in CYP2R1, CYP24A1, CYP27B1, C10orf88, DHCR7/NADSYN1, GC and VDR genes to be associated with vitamin D status. The main hypothesis of this work was that genetically determined variation in vitamin D metabolism would influence the effect of vitamin D sources (vitamin D...

  8. 76 FR 8707 - Syngenta Seeds, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically Engineered To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ..., ``Introduction of Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or... produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason to believe are...

  9. 基于小波子图映射的疵点织物判定方法%Defect fabric determining based on wavelet subgraph mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鑫宇; 林意

    2012-01-01

    为了提高织物自动化疵点检测的效率和准确性,提出了一种基于小波子图映射的疵点织物判定方法,并详细阐述了小波子图映射、子图能量统计、子图能量分析,最终判定这一系列操作过程及相关的理论分析.通过实验以及与相关方法的比较,说明该方法的准确性高,可靠性强,计算量低,实现成本小,具有实践意义.%To improve the efficiency and accuracy of automatic fabric defect detection, a method of fabric defects determining based on wavelet subgraph mapping has been proposed, and the process of operation and related theory which the wavelet subgraph mapping, the subgraph energy statistics, analysis of subgraph energy, the final determination is deeply illustrated. Accoding to the experimental results and comparison with related metods, the proposed method is with high accuracy, reliability, low computing cost, small implementation cost, and has a practical significance.

  10. Population size and time since island isolation determine genetic diversity loss in insular frog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Supen; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Xu; Li, Xianping; Yan, Shaofei; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Ji; Gao, Zengxiang; Li, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to loss of genetic diversity in fragmented populations is crucial for conservation measurements. Land-bridge archipelagoes offer ideal model systems for identifying the long-term effects of these factors on genetic variations in wild populations. In this study, we used nine microsatellite markers to quantify genetic diversity and differentiation of 810 pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) from 24 islands of the Zhoushan Archipelago and three sites on nearby mainland China and estimated the effects of the island area, population size, time since island isolation, distance to the mainland and distance to the nearest larger island on reduced genetic diversity of insular populations. The mainland populations displayed higher genetic diversity than insular populations. Genetic differentiations and no obvious gene flow were detected among the frog populations on the islands. Hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that only time since island isolation (square-root-transformed) and population size (log-transformed) significantly contributed to insular genetic diversity. These results suggest that decreased genetic diversity and genetic differentiations among insular populations may have been caused by random genetic drift following isolation by rising sea levels during the Holocene. The results provide strong evidence for a relationship between retained genetic diversity and population size and time since island isolation for pond frogs on the islands, consistent with the prediction of the neutral theory for finite populations. Our study highlights the importance of the size and estimated isolation time of populations in understanding the mechanisms of genetic diversity loss and differentiation in fragmented wild populations.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence determinants and genetic profiles of clinical and nonclinical Enterococcus cecorum from poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Kariyawasam, S; Borst, L B; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M; Woodley, T A

    2015-02-01

    Enterococcus cecorum has been implicated as a possible cause of disease in poultry. However, the characteristics that contribute to pathogenesis of Ent. cecorum in poultry have not been defined. In this study, Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates (n = 75) and diseased broilers and broiler breeders (n = 30) were compared based upon antimicrobial resistance phenotype, the presence of virulence determinants and genetic relatedness using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of the 16 antimicrobials tested, Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates and clinical cases were resistant to ten and six of the antimicrobials, respectively. The majority of Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates was resistant to lincomycin (54/75; 72%) and tetracycline (46/75; 61.3%) while the highest level of resistance among clinical Ent. cecorum was to tetracycline (22/30; 73.3%) and erythromycin (11/30; 36.7%). Multidrug resistance (resistance to ≥2 antimicrobials) was identified in Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates (53/75; 70.7%) and diseased poultry (18/30; 60%). Of the virulence determinants tested, efaAfm was present in almost all of the isolates (104/105; 99%). Using PFGE, the majority of clinical isolates clustered together; however, a few clinical isolates grouped with Ent. cecorum from carcass rinsates. These data suggest that distinguishing the two groups of isolates is difficult based upon the characterization criteria used.

  12. Genetic algorithms for determining the parameters of cellular automata in urban simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that cellular automata (CA) can be a useful tool for analyzing the process of many geographical phenomena. There are many studies on using CA to simulate the evolution of cites. Urban dynamics is determined by many spatial variables. The contribution of each spatial variable to the simulation is quantified by its parameter or weight. Calibration procedures are usually required for obtaining a suitable set of parameters so that the realistic urban forms can be simulated. Each parameter has a unique role in controlling urban morphology in the simulation. In this paper, these parameters for urban simulation are determined by using empirical data. Genetic algorithms are used to search for the optimal combination of these parameters. There are spatial variations for urban dynamics in a large region. Distinct sets of parameters can be used to represent the unique features of urban dynamics for various subregions. A further experiment is to evaluate each set of parameters based on the theories of compact cities. It is considered that the better set of parameters can be identified according to the utility function in terms of compact development. This set of parameters can be cloned to other regions to improve overall urban morphology. The original parameters can be also modified to produce more compact urban forms for planning purposes. This approach can provide a useful exploratory tool for testing various planning scenarios for urban development.

  13. Prevalence and Potential Genetic Determinants of Sensorineural Deafness in KCNQ1 Homozygosity and Compound Heterozygosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicessi, John R.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in KCNQ1 cause Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), a rare, autosomal recessive form of long QT syndrome (LQTS) characterized by deafness, marked QT prolongation, and a high risk of sudden death. However, it is not understood why some individuals with mutations on both KCNQ1 alleles present without deafness. Here, we sought to determine the prevalence and genetic determinants of this phenomenon in a large referral population of LQTS patients. Methods and Results Retrospective analysis of all LQTS patients evaluated from July 1998 to April 2012 was used to identify those with ≥1 KCNQ1 mutation. Of the 249 KCNQ1-positive patients identified, 15 patients (6.0%) harbored a rare putative pathogenic mutation on both KCNQ1 alleles. Surprisingly, 11 (73%) of these patients presented without the sensorineural deafness associated with JLNS. The degree of QT interval prolongation and number of breakthrough cardiac events were similar between cases with and without deafness. Interestingly, truncating mutations were more prevalent in JLNS (79%) than non-deaf cases (36%, pdeafness, but not cardiac expressivity, in individuals harboring ≥1 KCNQ1 mutation on each allele. PMID:23392653

  14. Epigenetics and genetic determinism Epigenética e determinismo genético

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán A. Burbano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper posits that the gene-centered viewpoint of the organism (gene-centrism is not enough to explain biological complexity. Organisms are not completely determined by their genomes; rather, living beings can be seen as interpreters or intentional systems. Epigenetics is the framework that allows the avoidance of gene-centrism and permits the emergence of a more holistic standpoint where determination and novelty can coexist, as shown with examples taken from developmental biology and macromolecules folding. In summary, as P. Medawar and J. Medawar wrote: "Genetics proposes; epigenetics disposes."O presente trabalho afirma que a visão geneticista do organismo (genecentrismo não é suficiente para explicar a complexidade biológica. Os organismos não são completamente determinados por seus genomas; ou melhor, os seres vivos podem ser vistos como intérpretes ou sistemas intencionais. A epigenética é o arcabouço que ajuda a evitar o genecentrismo e permite a emergência de uma posição mais holística, em que determinismo e inovação podem coexistir, conforme demonstrado a partir de exemplos retirados da biologia do desenvolvimento e da estrutura das macromoléculas. Em resumo, como P. Medawar e J. Medawar escreveram: "A genética propõe e a epigenética dispõe".

  15. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F

    2015-03-01

    as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants.

  16. Genetic determinants of circulating interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels and their association with glycemic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Christian; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Shah, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Brunner, Eric J; Carstensen, Maren; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kristiansson, Kati; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Luotola, Kari; Marzi, Carola; Müller, Christian; Peters, Annette; Prokisch, Holger; Raitakari, Olli; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Salmi, Marko; Schramm, Katharina; Swerdlow, Daniel; Tabak, Adam G; Thorand, Barbara; Wareham, Nick; Wild, Philipp S; Zeller, Tanja; Hingorani, Aroon D; Witte, Daniel R; Kumari, Meena; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko

    2014-12-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β is implicated in the development of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, whereas higher circulating levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1β, has been suggested to improve glycemia and β-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the protective role of IL-1RA, this study aimed to identify genetic determinants of circulating IL-1RA concentration and to investigate their associations with immunological and metabolic variables related to cardiometabolic risk. In the analysis of seven discovery and four replication cohort studies, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were independently associated with circulating IL-1RA concentration (rs4251961 at the IL1RN locus [n = 13,955, P = 2.76 × 10(-21)] and rs6759676, closest gene locus IL1F10 [n = 13,994, P = 1.73 × 10(-17)]). The proportion of the variance in IL-1RA explained by both SNPs combined was 2.0%. IL-1RA-raising alleles of both SNPs were associated with lower circulating C-reactive protein concentration. The IL-1RA-raising allele of rs6759676 was also associated with lower fasting insulin levels and lower HOMA insulin resistance. In conclusion, we show that circulating IL-1RA levels are predicted by two independent SNPs at the IL1RN and IL1F10 loci and that genetically raised IL-1RA may be protective against the development of insulin resistance. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Genetic Determinism of Sensitivity to Corynespora cassiicola Exudates in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Minh; Clément-Demange, André; Déon, Marine; Garcia, Dominique; Le Guen, Vincent; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Soumahoro, Mouman; Masson, Aurélien; Label, Philippe; Le, Mau Tuy; Pujade-Renaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    An indirect phenotyping method was developed in order to estimate the susceptibility of rubber tree clonal varieties to Corynespora Leaf Fall (CLF) disease caused by the ascomycete Corynespora cassiicola. This method consists in quantifying the impact of fungal exudates on detached leaves by measuring the induced electrolyte leakage (EL%). The tested exudates were either crude culture filtrates from diverse C. cassiicola isolates or the purified cassiicolin (Cas1), a small secreted effector protein produced by the aggressive isolate CCP. The test was found to be quantitative, with the EL% response proportional to toxin concentration. For eight clones tested with two aggressive isolates, the EL% response to the filtrates positively correlated to the response induced by conidial inoculation. The toxicity test applied to 18 clones using 13 toxinic treatments evidenced an important variability among clones and treatments, with a significant additional clone x treatment interaction effect. A genetic linkage map was built using 306 microsatellite markers, from the F1 population of the PB260 x RRIM600 family. Phenotyping of the population for sensitivity to the purified Cas1 effector and to culture filtrates from seven C. cassiicola isolates revealed a polygenic determinism, with six QTL detected on five chromosomes and percentages of explained phenotypic variance varying from 11 to 17%. Two common QTL were identified for the CCP filtrate and the purified cassiicolin, suggesting that Cas1 may be the main effector of CCP filtrate toxicity. The CCP filtrate clearly contrasted with all other filtrates. The toxicity test based on Electrolyte Leakage Measurement offers the opportunity to assess the sensitivity of rubber genotypes to C. cassiicola exudates or purified effectors for genetic investigations and early selection, without risk of spreading the fungus in plantations. However, the power of this test for predicting field susceptibility of rubber clones to CLF will have

  18. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis isolates as determined by comparative genome hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Hoa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen that causes infections in young piglets. S. suis is a heterogeneous species. Thirty-three different capsular serotypes have been described, that differ in virulence between as well as within serotypes. Results In this study, the correlation between gene content, serotype, phenotype and virulence among 55 S. suis strains was studied using Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH. Clustering of CGH data divided S. suis isolates into two clusters, A and B. Cluster A isolates could be discriminated from cluster B isolates based on the protein expression of extracellular factor (EF. Cluster A contained serotype 1 and 2 isolates that were correlated with virulence. Cluster B mainly contained serotype 7 and 9 isolates. Genetic similarity was observed between serotype 7 and serotype 2 isolates that do not express muramidase released protein (MRP and EF (MRP-EF-, suggesting these isolates originated from a common founder. Profiles of 25 putative virulence-associated genes of S. suis were determined among the 55 isolates. Presence of all 25 genes was shown for cluster A isolates, whereas cluster B isolates lacked one or more putative virulence genes. Divergence of S. suis isolates was further studied based on the presence of 39 regions of difference. Conservation of genes was evaluated by the definition of a core genome that contained 78% of all ORFs in P1/7. Conclusions In conclusion, we show that CGH is a valuable method to study distribution of genes or gene clusters among isolates in detail, yielding information on genetic similarity, and virulence traits of S. suis isolates.

  19. Environmental and genetic determinants of innovativeness in a natural population of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, John L; Cole, Ella F; Reed, Thomas E; Morand-Ferron, Julie

    2016-03-19

    Much of the evidence for the idea that individuals differ in their propensity to innovate and solve new problems has come from studies on captive primates. Increasingly, behavioural ecologists are studying innovativeness in wild populations, and uncovering links with functional behaviour and fitness-related traits. The relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in driving this variation, however, remains unknown. Here, we present the results of the first large-scale study to examine a range of causal factors underlying innovative problem-solving performance (PSP) among 831 great tits (Parus major) temporarily taken into captivity. Analyses show that PSP in this population: (i) was linked to a variety of individual factors, including age, personality and natal origin (immigrant or local-born); (ii) was influenced by natal environment, because individuals had a lower PSP when born in poor-quality habitat, or where local population density was high, leading to cohort effects. Links with many of the individual and environmental factors were present only in some years. In addition, PSP (iii) had little or no measurable heritability, as estimated by a Bayesian animal model; and (iv) was not influenced by maternal effects. Despite previous reports of links between PSP and a range of functional traits in this population, the analyses here suggest that innovativeness had weak if any evolutionary potential. Instead most individual variation was caused by phenotypic plasticity driven by links with other behavioural traits and by environmentally mediated developmental stress. Heritability estimates are population, time and context specific, however, and more studies are needed to determine the generality of these effects. Our results shed light on the causes of innovativeness within populations, and add to the debate on the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in driving phenotypic variation within populations.

  20. Genetic Determinism of Sensitivity to Corynespora cassiicola Exudates in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Minh; Clément-Demange, André; Déon, Marine; Garcia, Dominique; Le Guen, Vincent; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Soumahoro, Mouman; Masson, Aurélien; Label, Philippe; Le, Mau Tuy; Pujade-Renaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    An indirect phenotyping method was developed in order to estimate the susceptibility of rubber tree clonal varieties to Corynespora Leaf Fall (CLF) disease caused by the ascomycete Corynespora cassiicola. This method consists in quantifying the impact of fungal exudates on detached leaves by measuring the induced electrolyte leakage (EL%). The tested exudates were either crude culture filtrates from diverse C. cassiicola isolates or the purified cassiicolin (Cas1), a small secreted effector protein produced by the aggressive isolate CCP. The test was found to be quantitative, with the EL% response proportional to toxin concentration. For eight clones tested with two aggressive isolates, the EL% response to the filtrates positively correlated to the response induced by conidial inoculation. The toxicity test applied to 18 clones using 13 toxinic treatments evidenced an important variability among clones and treatments, with a significant additional clone x treatment interaction effect. A genetic linkage map was built using 306 microsatellite markers, from the F1 population of the PB260 x RRIM600 family. Phenotyping of the population for sensitivity to the purified Cas1 effector and to culture filtrates from seven C. cassiicola isolates revealed a polygenic determinism, with six QTL detected on five chromosomes and percentages of explained phenotypic variance varying from 11 to 17%. Two common QTL were identified for the CCP filtrate and the purified cassiicolin, suggesting that Cas1 may be the main effector of CCP filtrate toxicity. The CCP filtrate clearly contrasted with all other filtrates. The toxicity test based on Electrolyte Leakage Measurement offers the opportunity to assess the sensitivity of rubber genotypes to C. cassiicola exudates or purified effectors for genetic investigations and early selection, without risk of spreading the fungus in plantations. However, the power of this test for predicting field susceptibility of rubber clones to CLF will have

  1. Determining causes of genetic isolation in a large carnivore (Ursus americanus) population to direct contemporary conservation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Harnden, Matthew; McConnell, Sabine; Howe, Eric J.; Burrows, Frank G.; White, Bradley N.; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The processes leading to genetic isolation influence a population’s local extinction risk, and should thus be identified before conservation actions are implemented. Natural or human-induced circumstances can result in historical or contemporary barriers to gene flow and/or demographic bottlenecks. Distinguishing between these hypotheses can be achieved by comparing genetic diversity and differentiation in isolated vs. continuous neighboring populations. In Ontario, American black bears (Ursus americanus) are continuously distributed, genetically diverse, and exhibit an isolation-by-distance structuring pattern, except on the Bruce Peninsula (BP). To identify the processes that led to the genetic isolation of BP black bears, we modelled various levels of historical and contemporary migration and population size reductions using forward simulations. We compared simulation results with empirical genetic indices from Ontario black bear populations under different levels of geographic isolation, and conducted additional simulations to determine if translocations could help achieve genetic restoration. From a genetic standpoint, conservation concerns for BP black bears are warranted because our results show that: i) a recent demographic bottleneck associated with recently reduced migration best explains the low genetic diversity on the BP; and ii) under sustained isolation, BP black bears could lose between 70% and 80% of their rare alleles within 100 years. Although restoring migration corridors would be the most effective method to enhance long-term genetic diversity and prevent inbreeding, it is unrealistic to expect connectivity to be re-established. Current levels of genetic diversity could be maintained by successfully translocating 10 bears onto the peninsula every 5 years. Such regular translocations may be more practical than landscape restoration, because areas connecting the peninsula to nearby mainland black bear populations have been irreversibly modified

  2. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Hierarchy of Interactions between Polycystin-Encoding Genes and Genes Controlling Cilia Function during Left-Right Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Grimes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During mammalian development, left-right (L-R asymmetry is established by a cilia-driven leftward fluid flow within a midline embryonic cavity called the node. This 'nodal flow' is detected by peripherally-located crown cells that each assemble a primary cilium which contain the putative Ca2+ channel PKD2. The interaction of flow and crown cell cilia promotes left side-specific expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM. Whilst the PKD2-interacting protein PKD1L1 has also been implicated in L-R patterning, the underlying mechanism by which flow is detected and the genetic relationship between Polycystin function and asymmetric gene expression remains unknown. Here, we characterize a Pkd1l1 mutant line in which Nodal is activated bilaterally, suggesting that PKD1L1 is not required for LPM Nodal pathway activation per se, but rather to restrict Nodal to the left side downstream of nodal flow. Epistasis analysis shows that Pkd1l1 acts as an upstream genetic repressor of Pkd2. This study therefore provides a genetic pathway for the early stages of L-R determination. Moreover, using a system in which cultured cells are supplied artificial flow, we demonstrate that PKD1L1 is sufficient to mediate a Ca2+ signaling response after flow stimulation. Finally, we show that an extracellular PKD domain within PKD1L1 is crucial for PKD1L1 function; as such, destabilizing the domain causes L-R defects in the mouse. Our demonstration that PKD1L1 protein can mediate a response to flow coheres with a mechanosensation model of flow sensation in which the force of fluid flow drives asymmetric gene expression in the embryo.

  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Hierarchy of Interactions between Polycystin-Encoding Genes and Genes Controlling Cilia Function during Left-Right Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Daniel T; Keynton, Jennifer L; Buenavista, Maria T; Jin, Xingjian; Patel, Saloni H; Kyosuke, Shinohara; Vibert, Jennifer; Williams, Debbie J; Hamada, Hiroshi; Hussain, Rohanah; Nauli, Surya M; Norris, Dominic P

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian development, left-right (L-R) asymmetry is established by a cilia-driven leftward fluid flow within a midline embryonic cavity called the node. This 'nodal flow' is detected by peripherally-located crown cells that each assemble a primary cilium which contain the putative Ca2+ channel PKD2. The interaction of flow and crown cell cilia promotes left side-specific expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Whilst the PKD2-interacting protein PKD1L1 has also been implicated in L-R patterning, the underlying mechanism by which flow is detected and the genetic relationship between Polycystin function and asymmetric gene expression remains unknown. Here, we characterize a Pkd1l1 mutant line in which Nodal is activated bilaterally, suggesting that PKD1L1 is not required for LPM Nodal pathway activation per se, but rather to restrict Nodal to the left side downstream of nodal flow. Epistasis analysis shows that Pkd1l1 acts as an upstream genetic repressor of Pkd2. This study therefore provides a genetic pathway for the early stages of L-R determination. Moreover, using a system in which cultured cells are supplied artificial flow, we demonstrate that PKD1L1 is sufficient to mediate a Ca2+ signaling response after flow stimulation. Finally, we show that an extracellular PKD domain within PKD1L1 is crucial for PKD1L1 function; as such, destabilizing the domain causes L-R defects in the mouse. Our demonstration that PKD1L1 protein can mediate a response to flow coheres with a mechanosensation model of flow sensation in which the force of fluid flow drives asymmetric gene expression in the embryo.

  4. Use Of Pulsed IR Thermography For Determination Of Size And Depth Of Subsurface Defect Taking Into Account The Shape Of Its Cross-Section Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka-Fotek O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to reconstruction of size and depth (distance from the tested surface of artificial defects with square and rectangular cross-section areas using the pulsed IR thermography. Defects in form of flat-bottom holes were made in austenitic steel plate. The defect size was estimated on the basis of surface distribution of the time derivative of the temperature. In order to asses the depth of defects with considered geometries on the basis of calibration relations (i.e. dependence of time of contrast maximum vs. defect depth for given defect diameter obtained for circular defects, the ‘equivalent diameter’ describing not only the defect cross-section area but also its shape was assigned. It has been shown that presented approach gives satisfactory results.

  5. Determining hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions using genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woohan; Hahm, In-Kyeong; Kim, Won-Young; Lee, Jung Mo

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate that GA-MHYPO determines accurate hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions, such as limited number of stations (phase data), large azimuthal gap, and noisy data. The genetic algorithm (GA) in GA-MHYPO searches for the optimal 1-D velocity structure which provides the minimum traveltime differences between observed (true) and calculated P and S arrivals within prescribed ranges. GA-MHYPO is able to determine hypocentral parameters more accurately in many circumstances than conventional methods which rely on an a priori (and possibly incorrect) 1-D velocity model. In our synthetic tests, the accuracy of hypocentral parameters obtained by GA-MHYPO given ill conditions is improved by more than a factor of 20 for error-free data, and by a factor of five for data with errors, compared to that obtained by conventional methods such as HYPOINVERSE. In the case of error-free data, GA-MHYPO yields less than 0.1 km errors in focal depths and hypocenters without strong dependence on azimuthal coverage up to 45°. Errors are less than 1 km for data with errors of a 0.1-s standard deviation. To test the performance using real data, a well-recorded earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone and earthquakes recorded under ill conditions in the High Himalaya are relocated by GA-MHYPO. The hypocentral parameters determined by GA-MHYPO under both good and ill conditions show similar computational results, which suggest that GA-MHYPO is robust and yields more reliable hypocentral parameters than standard methods under ill conditions for natural earthquakes.

  6. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such gene......To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...

  7. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant using a combination of mouse and human genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu;

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 2...... that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure....... recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897...... complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest...

  9. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdanpanah, Mojgan

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely multiple genes are involved which interact with non-genetic factors including diet, physical activity and treatment. The aim of this thesis was to study genes implicated in the susceptibility to macrovascular...

  10. Interferon regulatory factor 8-deficiency determines massive neutrophil recruitment but T cell defect in fast growing granulomas during tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rocca

    Full Text Available Following Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection, immune cell recruitment in lungs is pivotal in establishing protective immunity through granuloma formation and neogenesis of lymphoid structures (LS. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8 plays an important role in host defense against Mtb, although the mechanisms driving anti-mycobacterial immunity remain unclear. In this study, IRF-8 deficient mice (IRF-8⁻/⁻ were aerogenously infected with a low-dose Mtb Erdman virulent strain and the course of infection was compared with that induced in wild-type (WT-B6 counterparts. Tuberculosis (TB progression was examined in both groups using pathological, microbiological and immunological parameters. Following Mtb exposure, the bacterial load in lungs and spleens progressed comparably in the two groups for two weeks, after which IRF-8⁻/⁻ mice developed a fatal acute TB whereas in WT-B6 the disease reached a chronic stage. In lungs of IRF-8⁻/⁻, uncontrolled growth of pulmonary granulomas and impaired development of LS were observed, associated with unbalanced homeostatic chemokines, progressive loss of infiltrating T lymphocytes and massive prevalence of neutrophils at late infection stages. Our data define IRF-8 as an essential factor for the maintenance of proper immune cell recruitment in granulomas and LS required to restrain Mtb infection. Moreover, IRF-8⁻/⁻ mice, relying on a common human and mouse genetic mutation linked to susceptibility/severity of mycobacterial diseases, represent a valuable model of acute TB for comparative studies with chronically-infected congenic WT-B6 for dissecting protective and pathological immune reactions.

  11. Interferon regulatory factor 8-deficiency determines massive neutrophil recruitment but T cell defect in fast growing granulomas during tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Stefano; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Sali, Michela; Anfossi, Antonio Giovanni; Abalsamo, Laura; Palucci, Ivana; Mattei, Fabrizio; Sanchez, Massimo; Giagu, Anna; Antuofermo, Elisabetta; Fadda, Giovanni; Belardelli, Filippo; Delogu, Giovanni; Gabriele, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Following Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, immune cell recruitment in lungs is pivotal in establishing protective immunity through granuloma formation and neogenesis of lymphoid structures (LS). Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) plays an important role in host defense against Mtb, although the mechanisms driving anti-mycobacterial immunity remain unclear. In this study, IRF-8 deficient mice (IRF-8⁻/⁻) were aerogenously infected with a low-dose Mtb Erdman virulent strain and the course of infection was compared with that induced in wild-type (WT-B6) counterparts. Tuberculosis (TB) progression was examined in both groups using pathological, microbiological and immunological parameters. Following Mtb exposure, the bacterial load in lungs and spleens progressed comparably in the two groups for two weeks, after which IRF-8⁻/⁻ mice developed a fatal acute TB whereas in WT-B6 the disease reached a chronic stage. In lungs of IRF-8⁻/⁻, uncontrolled growth of pulmonary granulomas and impaired development of LS were observed, associated with unbalanced homeostatic chemokines, progressive loss of infiltrating T lymphocytes and massive prevalence of neutrophils at late infection stages. Our data define IRF-8 as an essential factor for the maintenance of proper immune cell recruitment in granulomas and LS required to restrain Mtb infection. Moreover, IRF-8⁻/⁻ mice, relying on a common human and mouse genetic mutation linked to susceptibility/severity of mycobacterial diseases, represent a valuable model of acute TB for comparative studies with chronically-infected congenic WT-B6 for dissecting protective and pathological immune reactions.

  12. Ogg1 genetic background determines the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Sampayo-Reyes, Adriana; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2014-03-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a well-established human carcinogen to which millions of people are exposed worldwide. It is generally accepted that the genotoxic effects of i-As after an acute exposure are partially linked to the i-As-induced production of reactive oxygen species, but it is necessary to better determine whether chronic sub-toxic i-As doses are able to induce biologically significant levels of oxidative DNA damage (ODD). To fill in this gap, we have tested the genotoxic and oxidative effects of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures using mouse embryonic fibroblast MEF mutant Ogg1 cells and their wild-type counterparts. Effects were examined by using the comet assay complemented with the use of FPG enzyme. Our findings indicate that MEF Ogg1-/- cells are more sensitive to arsenite-induced acute toxicity, genotoxicity and ODD. Long-term exposure to sub-toxic doses of arsenite generates a detectable increase in ODD and genotoxic DNA damage only in MEF Ogg1-deficient cells. Altogether, the data presented here point out the relevance of ODD and Ogg1 genetic background on the genotoxic risk of i-As at environmentally plausible doses. The persistent accumulation of DNA 8-OH-dG lesions in Ogg1-/- cells during the complete course of the exposure suggests a relevant role in arsenic-associated carcinogenic risk in turn.

  13. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-19

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  14. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Márcia I.; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C.; Barros, Ana Cláudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy. PMID:26745156

  15. An image segmentation based on a genetic algorithm for determining soil coverage by crop residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Angela; Ranz, Juan; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Pajares, Gonzalo; del Arco, Maria J Sanchez; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the soil coverage by crop residues after ploughing is a fundamental element of Conservation Agriculture. This paper presents the application of genetic algorithms employed during the fine tuning of the segmentation process of a digital image with the aim of automatically quantifying the residue coverage. In other words, the objective is to achieve a segmentation that would permit the discrimination of the texture of the residue so that the output of the segmentation process is a binary image in which residue zones are isolated from the rest. The RGB images used come from a sample of images in which sections of terrain were photographed with a conventional camera positioned in zenith orientation atop a tripod. The images were taken outdoors under uncontrolled lighting conditions. Up to 92% similarity was achieved between the images obtained by the segmentation process proposed in this paper and the templates made by an elaborate manual tracing process. In addition to the proposed segmentation procedure and the fine tuning procedure that was developed, a global quantification of the soil coverage by residues for the sampled area was achieved that differed by only 0.85% from the quantification obtained using template images. Moreover, the proposed method does not depend on the type of residue present in the image. The study was conducted at the experimental farm "El Encín" in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, Spain).

  16. Hepatitis C virus has a genetically determined lymphotropism through co-receptor B7.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Huang, Jeffrey Y.; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Tahara, Stanley M; Zhou, Lin; Kondo, Yasuteru; Schechter, Joel; Su, Lishan; Lai, Michael M C.; Wakita, Takaji; Cosset, François-Loïc; Jung, Jae U; Machida, Keigo

    2017-01-01

    B-cell infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a controversial topic. To examine whether HCV has a genetically determined lymphotropism through a co-receptor specific for the infection by lymphotropic HCV, we established an infectious clone and chimeric virus of hepatotropic and lymphotropic HCV strains derived from an HCV-positive B-cell lymphoma. The viral envelope and 5′-UTR sequences of the lymphotropic HCV strain were responsible for the lymphotropism. Silencing of the virus sensor, RIGI, or overexpression of microRNA-122 promoted persistent viral replication in B cells. By cDNA library screening, we identified an immune cell-specific, co-stimulatory receptor B7.2 (CD86) as a co-receptor of lymphotropic HCV. Infection of B cells by HCV inhibited the recall reaction to antigen stimulation. Together, a co-receptor B7.2 enabled lymphotropic HCV to infect memory B cells, leading to inhibition of memory B-cell function and persistent HCV infection in HCV-infected hosts. PMID:28067225

  17. Common genetic determinants of intraocular pressure and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Ramdas, Wishal D; Ikram, M Kamran; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Pasutto, Francesca; Hysi, Pirro G; Macgregor, Stuart; Janssen, Sarah F; Hewitt, Alex W; Viswanathan, Ananth C; ten Brink, Jacoline B; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Amin, Najaf; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J M; Kramer, Rogier; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Struchalin, Maksim; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Weisschuh, Nicole; Zenkel, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y; Gramer, Eugen; Welge-Lüssen, Ulrich; Montgomery, Grant W; Carbonaro, Francis; Young, Terri L; Bellenguez, Céline; McGuffin, Peter; Foster, Paul J; Topouzis, Fotis; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y; Czudowska, Monika A; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wolfs, Roger C W; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Paterson, Andrew D; Mackey, David A; Bergen, Arthur A B; Reis, André; Hammond, Christopher J; Vingerling, Johannes R; Lemij, Hans G; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2012-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p=1.4×10(-8)), and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p=1.6×10(-8)). In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N = 1,432 glaucoma cases), both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p=2.4×10(-2) for rs11656696 and p=9.1×10(-4) for rs7555523). GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.

  18. Common genetic determinants of intraocular pressure and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonieke M E van Koolwijk

    Full Text Available Intraocular pressure (IOP is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p=1.4×10(-8, and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p=1.6×10(-8. In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N = 1,432 glaucoma cases, both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p=2.4×10(-2 for rs11656696 and p=9.1×10(-4 for rs7555523. GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.

  19. Determination of thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic performance using a genetic algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    DeSutter, John; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Optimal radiator thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion efficiency and output power density are determined when temperature effects in the cell are considered. To do this, a framework is designed in which a TPV model that accounts for radiative, electrical and thermal losses is coupled with a genetic algorithm. The TPV device under study involves a spectrally selective radiator at a temperature of 2000 K, a gallium antimonide cell, and a cell thermal management system characterized by a fluid temperature and a heat transfer coefficient of 293 K and 600 Wm-2K-1. It is shown that a maximum conversion efficiency of 38.8% is achievable with an emission spectrum that has emissivity of unity between 0.719 eV and 0.763 eV and zero elsewhere. This optimal spectrum is less than half of the width of those when thermal losses are neglected. A maximum output power density of 41708 Wm-2 is achievable with a spectrum having emissivity values of unity between 0.684 eV and 1.082 eV and zero e...

  20. Genetic Determinism and Evolutionary Reconstruction of a Host Jump in a Plant Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Nikon; Simon, Vincent; Tzima, Aliki; Johansen, Elisabeth; Moury, Benoît

    2016-02-01

    In spite of their widespread occurrence, only few host jumps by plant viruses have been evidenced and the molecular bases of even fewer have been determined. A combination of three independent approaches, 1) experimental evolution followed by reverse genetics analysis, 2) positive selection analysis, and 3) locus-by-locus analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) allowed reconstructing the Potato virus Y (PVY; genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae) jump to pepper (Capsicum annuum), probably from other solanaceous plants. Synthetic chimeras between infectious cDNA clones of two PVY isolates with contrasted levels of adaptation to C. annuum showed that the P3 and, to a lower extent, the CI cistron played important roles in infectivity toward C. annuum. The three analytical approaches pinpointed a single nonsynonymous substitution in the P3 and P3N-PIPO cistrons that evolved several times independently and conferred adaptation to C. annuum. In addition to increasing our knowledge of host jumps in plant viruses, this study illustrates also the efficiency of locus-by-locus AMOVA and combined approaches to identify adaptive mutations in the genome of RNA viruses.

  1. Common genetic determinants of intraocular pressure and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonieke M E van Koolwijk

    Full Text Available Intraocular pressure (IOP is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p=1.4×10(-8, and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p=1.6×10(-8. In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N = 1,432 glaucoma cases, both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p=2.4×10(-2 for rs11656696 and p=9.1×10(-4 for rs7555523. GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.

  2. Molecular and genetic determinants of the NMDA receptor for superior learning and memory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Jacobs

    Full Text Available The opening-duration of the NMDA receptors implements Hebb's synaptic coincidence-detection and is long thought to be the rate-limiting factor underlying superior memory. Here, we investigate the molecular and genetic determinants of the NMDA receptors by testing the "synaptic coincidence-detection time-duration" hypothesis vs. "GluN2B intracellular signaling domain" hypothesis. Accordingly, we generated a series of GluN2A, GluN2B, and GluN2D chimeric subunit transgenic mice in which C-terminal intracellular domains were systematically swapped and overexpressed in the forebrain excitatory neurons. The data presented in the present study supports the second hypothesis, the "GluN2B intracellular signaling domain" hypothesis. Surprisingly, we found that the voltage-gated channel opening-durations through either GluN2A or GluN2B are sufficient and their temporal differences are marginal. In contrast, the C-terminal intracellular domain of the GluN2B subunit is necessary and sufficient for superior performances in long-term novel object recognition and cued fear memories and superior flexibility in fear extinction. Intriguingly, memory enhancement correlates with enhanced long-term potentiation in the 10-100 Hz range while requiring intact long-term depression capacity at the 1-5 Hz range.

  3. Molecular and genetic determinants of the NMDA receptor for superior learning and memory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Cui, Zhenzhong; Feng, Ruiben; Wang, Huimin; Wang, Deheng; Tsien, Joe Z

    2014-01-01

    The opening-duration of the NMDA receptors implements Hebb's synaptic coincidence-detection and is long thought to be the rate-limiting factor underlying superior memory. Here, we investigate the molecular and genetic determinants of the NMDA receptors by testing the "synaptic coincidence-detection time-duration" hypothesis vs. "GluN2B intracellular signaling domain" hypothesis. Accordingly, we generated a series of GluN2A, GluN2B, and GluN2D chimeric subunit transgenic mice in which C-terminal intracellular domains were systematically swapped and overexpressed in the forebrain excitatory neurons. The data presented in the present study supports the second hypothesis, the "GluN2B intracellular signaling domain" hypothesis. Surprisingly, we found that the voltage-gated channel opening-durations through either GluN2A or GluN2B are sufficient and their temporal differences are marginal. In contrast, the C-terminal intracellular domain of the GluN2B subunit is necessary and sufficient for superior performances in long-term novel object recognition and cued fear memories and superior flexibility in fear extinction. Intriguingly, memory enhancement correlates with enhanced long-term potentiation in the 10-100 Hz range while requiring intact long-term depression capacity at the 1-5 Hz range.

  4. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paola Rosa; Miyazaki, Márcia I; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C; Barros, Ana Cláudia M; Boldt, Angelica B W; Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  5. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease.

  6. Genetic structure is determined by stochastic factors in a natural population of Drosophila buzzatii in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardi, J C; Hasson, E; Rodriguez, C; Fanara, J J

    1994-01-01

    D. buzzatii is a cactophilic species associated with several cactaceae in Argentina. This particular ecological niche implies that this species is faced with a non-uniform environment constituted by discrete and ephemeral breeding sites, which are colonized by a finite number of inseminated females. The genetic consequences of this population structure upon the second chromosome polymorphism were investigated by means of F-statistics in a natural endemic population of Argentina. The present study suggests that differentiation of inversion frequencies in third instar larvae among breeding sites has taken place mainly at random and selection is not operating to determine the structure of this population. The average number of parents breeding on a single pad seems to be similar to the number colonizing Opuntia ficus indica rotting cladodes in Carboneras, a derived population from Spain. There is no significant excess of heterokaryotypes within pads or in the population as a whole. The results obtained in the present study suggest that the potential role of selective versus stochastic factors relative to the among pad heterogeneity in the population here studied is different from that of the Spanish population previously reported. Potential mechanisms responsible for these differences are discussed.

  7. Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Otitis Media in an Indigenous Filipino Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Abbe, Izoduwa; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Ajami, Nadim J; Hutchinson, Diane S; Petrosino, Joseph F; Padilla, Carmencita D; Villarta, Romeo L; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa; Chan, Abner L; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Chiong, Charlotte M; Leal, Suzanne M; Abes, Generoso T

    2016-11-01

    To identify genetic and environmental risk factors for otitis media in an indigenous Filipino population. Cross-sectional study. Indigenous Filipino community. Clinical history and information on breastfeeding, tobacco smoke exposure, and swimming were obtained from community members. Heads of households were interviewed for family history and personal beliefs on ear health. Height and weight were measured. Otoscopic findings were described for the presence and character of perforation or discharge. An A2ML1 duplication variant that confers otitis media susceptibility was Sanger sequenced in all DNA samples. Co-occurrence of middle ear bacteria detected by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was determined according to A2ML1 genotype and social cluster. The indigenous Filipino population has a ~50% prevalence of otitis media. Young age was associated with otitis media (4 age strata; P = .004); however, age was nonsignificant as a bistratal or continuous variable. There was no association between otitis media and sex, body mass index, breastfeeding, tobacco exposure, or deep swimming. In multivariate analyses, A2ML1 genotype is the strongest predictor of otitis media, with an odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-10.8; P = .005). When otitis media diagnoses were plotted across ages, otitis media was observed within the first year of life, and chronic otitis media persisted up to adulthood, particularly in A2ML1-variant carriers. Among indigenous Filipinos, A2ML1 genotype is the primary risk factor for otitis media and main determinant of disease progression, although age, the middle ear microbiome, and social clusters might modulate the effect of the A2ML1 genotype. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  8. Genetic dissection of sex determinism, inflorescence morphology and downy mildew resistance in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerit, Elisa; Boury, Christophe; Manicki, Aurélie; Donnart, Martine; Butterlin, Gisèle; Némorin, Alice; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Ollat, Nathalie; Decroocq, Stéphane

    2009-05-01

    A genetic linkage map of grapevine was constructed using a pseudo-testcross strategy based upon 138 individuals derived from a cross of Vitis vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon x Vitis riparia Gloire de Montpellier. A total of 212 DNA markers including 199 single sequence repeats (SSRs), 11 single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCPs) and two morphological markers were mapped onto 19 linkage groups (LG) which covered 1,249 cM with an average of 6.7 cM between markers. The position of SSR loci in the maps presented here is consistent with the genome sequence. Quantitative traits loci (QTLs) for several traits of inflorescence and flower morphology, and downy mildew resistance were investigated. Two novel QTLs for downy mildew resistance were mapped on linkage groups 9 and 12, they explain 26.0-34.4 and 28.9-31.5% of total variance, respectively. QTLs for inflorescence morphology with a large effect (14-70% of total variance explained) were detected close to the Sex locus on LG 2. The gene of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, involved in melon male organ development and located in the confidence interval of all QTLs detected on the LG 2, could be considered as a putative candidate gene for the control of sexual traits in grapevine. Co-localisations were found between four QTLs, detected on linkage groups 1, 14, 17 and 18, and the position of the floral organ development genes GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE1, FRUITFULL, LEAFY and AGAMOUS. Our results demonstrate that the sex determinism locus also determines both flower and inflorescence morphological traits.

  9. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely multi

  10. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Pereyra; X. Jia; P.J. McLaren; A. Telenti; P.I.W. de Bakker; B.D. Walker; S. Ripke; C.J. Brumme; S.L. Pulit; M. Carrington; C.M. Kadie; J.M. Carlson; D. Heckerman; R.R. Graham; R.M. Plenge; S.G. Deeks; L. Gianniny; G. Crawford; J. Sullivan; E. Gonzalez; L. Davies; A. Camargo; J.M. Moore; N. Beattie; S. Gupta; A. Crenshaw; N.P. Burtt; C. Guiducci; N. Gupta; X. Gao; Y. Qi; Y. Yuki; A. Piechocka-Trocha; E. Cutrell; R. Rosenberg; K.L. Moss; P. Lemay; J. O'Leary; T. Schaefer; P. Verma; I. Toth; B. Block; B. Baker; A. Rothchild; J. Lian; J. Proudfoot; D.M.L. Alvino; S. Vine; M.M. Addo; T.M. Allen; M. Altfeld; M.R. Henn; S. Le Gall; H. Streeck; D.W. Haas; D.R. Kuritzkes; G.K. Robbins; R.W. Shafer; R.M. Gulick; C.M. Shikuma; R. Haubrich; S. Riddler; P.E. Sax; E.S. Daar; H.J. Ribaudo; B. Agan; S. Agarwal; R.L. Ahern; B.L. Allen; S. Altidor; E.L. Altschuler; S. Ambardar; K. Anastos; B. Anderson; V. Anderson; U. Andrady; D. Antoniskis; D. Bangsberg; D. Barbaro; W. Barrie; J. Bartczak; S. Barton; P. Basden; N. Basgoz; S. Bazner; N.C. Bellos; A.M. Benson; J. Berger; N.F. Bernard; A.M. Bernard; C. Birch; S.J. Bodner; R.K. Bolan; E.T. Boudreaux; M. Bradley; J.F. Braun; J.E. Brndjar; S.J. Brown; K. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide as

  11. Determinants of primary open-angle glaucoma : a genetic-epidemiologic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.A. Hulsman

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, potential environmental and genetic risk factors for POAG are examined in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study among subjects 55 years and older. In its second part, the population of a genetic isolate is investigated, using a

  12. 78 FR 13302 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to... movement, or release into the environment) of organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason to believe are plant pests. Such...

  13. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely

  14. Variability of the Intestinal Uptake of Lipids Is Genetically Determined in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, M.; Hui, D.Y.; Wild, G.; Clandinin, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    The response of the plasma cholesterol concentration to changes in dietary lipids varies widely in humans and animals. There are variations in the in vivo absorption of cholesterol between different strains of mice. This study was undertaken in three strains of inbred mice to test the hypotheses that: (i) there are strain differences in the in vitro uptake of fatty acids and cholesterol and (ii) the adaptability of the intestine to respond to variations in dietary lipids is genetically determined. An in vitro intestinal ring technique was used to assess the uptake of medium- and long-chain fatty acids and cholesterol into jejunum and ileum of adult DBA/2, C57BL6, and C57L/J mice. The jejunal uptake of cholesterol was similar in C57L/J, DBA/2, or C57BL6 fed ad libitum a low-fat (5.7% fat, no cholesterol) chow diet. This is in contrast to a previous demonstration that in vivo cholesterol absorption was lower in C57L/J than in the other murine strains. The jejunal uptake of several long-chain fatty acids was greater in DBA/2 fed for 4 wk the high-fat (15.8% fat and 1.25% cholesterol) as compared with the low-fat diet. Furthermore, on the high-fat diet, the uptake of many long-chain fatty acids was higher in DBA/2 than in C57BL6 or C57L/J. The differences in cholesterol and fatty acid uptake were not explained by variations in food uptake, body weight gain, or the weight of the intestine. In summary: (i) there are strain differences in the in vitro intestinal uptake of fatty acids but not of cholesterol; (ii) a high-fat diet enhances the uptake of long-chain fatty acids in only one of the three strains examined in this study; and (iii) the pattern of strain- and diet-associated alterations in the in vivo absorption of cholesterol differs from the pattern of changes observed in vitro. We speculate that genetic differences in cholesterol and fatty acid uptake are explained by variations in the expression of protein-mediated components of lipid uptake. PMID:10984106

  15. Paravaginal defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenholt, Louise T S; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Glavind, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    , arcus tendineus fascia pelvis (ATFP), pubocervical fascia, and uterosacral/cardinal ligaments. Studies conclude that physical examination is inconsistent in detecting paravaginal defects. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to describe patterns in the appearance...

  16. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modifed foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has shown consumers to be highly sceptical towards genetic modification in food production. So far, however, little research has tried to explain how consumers form attitudes and make decisions with regard to genetically modified foods. The paper presents the results of a survey...... which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to investigate the formation of consumer attitudes towards genetic modification in food production and of purchase decisions with regard to genetically modified yoghurt and beer. Altogether, 2031 consumers were interviewed...... in the four countries. Results show that attitude formation and decision-making are more comparable among Danish, German and British consumers than with Italian consumers. Italian consumers turned out to be significantly less negative towards genetic modification in foods than particularly Danish and German...

  17. Prevalence, determinants and genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus in the multi-ethnic population living in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mac Donald-Ottevanger, M.S.; Vreden, S.; Helm, J.J. van der; Laar, T. van de; Molenkamp, R.; Dams, E.; Roosblad, J.; Codrington, J.; Hindori-Mohangoo, A.D.; Prins, M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of HCV in Suriname, a former Dutch colony in South America. To study the prevalence, determinants and genetic diversity of HCV, a one-month survey was conducted at the only Emergency Department in the capital Paramaribo. Participants (≥18 years) completed an in

  18. Atopic dermatitis may be a genetically determined dysmaturation of ectodermal tissue, resulting in disturbed T-lymphocyte maturation. A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Ellingsen, A R; Olesen, A B

    1997-01-01

    of mature T-lymphocytes in the blood. We suggest that atopic dermatitis is a genetically determined change of ectodermal tissue. The thymic epithelium is derived from the ectoderm, and because of that we hypothesize that the maturation of the T-cell immune system of persons who develop atopic dermatitis...

  19. The genetic and enzymic regulation of the synthesis of the A and B determinants in the ABO blood group system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, W M; Greenwell, P; Yates, A D

    1981-01-01

    Possible genetic models for the inheritance of the ABO blood groups are discussed in terms of the glycosyltransferase enzymes which complete the synthesis of the A and B determinants. Recent immunologic evidence in support of the allelic status of the ABO genes is reviewed. Results are presented of experiments which demonstrate that the B gene associated alpha-3-D-galactosyltransferase can be used to synthesis blood group A determinants.

  20. Diagnostic laboratory testing for Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT): the spectrum of gene defects in Norwegian patients with CMT and its implications for future genetic test strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Østern, Rune; Fagerheim, Toril; Hjellnes, Helene; Nygård, Bjørn; Mellgren, Svein I; Nilssen, Øivind

    2013-01-01

    Current genetic test algorithms for Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease are based on family details and comprehensive clinical and neurophysiological data gathered under ideal conditions for clinical assessment...

  1. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Juniperus thurifera in Spain and Morocco as determined by SSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Helena; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Nabais, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Juniperus thurifera L. is an important tree endemic to the western Mediterranean basin that it is able to grow in semi-arid climates. It nowadays exhibits a disjunct distribution pattern, occurring in North Africa, Spain, France and the Italian Alps. The Strait of Gibraltar has acted as an efficient barrier against gene flow between African and European populations, which are considered different subspecies by some authors. We aimed at describing the intraspecific genetic diversity of J. thurifera in populations from the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco and the phylogeographical relationships among these populations. The ploidy level of J. thurifera was examined and eleven nuclear microsatellites (nSSRs) developed for J. thurifera were assessed for genotyping this species. Six nSSRs were polymorphic and subsequently used to assess the genetic diversity and structure of the studied populations. Genotyping of the tetraploid J. thurifera using nuclear microsatellites supports the separation of Moroccan and Spanish populations into two genetically differentiated groups that correspond to the proposed subspecies africana and thurifera. High values of within population genetic diversity were found, that accounted for 90% of the total genetic variance, while population structure was weak. The estimators of genetic diversity were higher in populations of Spain than in populations of Morocco pointing for a possible loss of genetic diversity during the spread of this species to Africa from Europe.

  2. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  3. Genome-wide identification of genetic determinants for the cytotoxicity of perifosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perifosine belongs to the class of alkylphospholipid analogues, which act primarily at the cell membrane, thereby targeting signal transduction pathways. In phase I/II clinical trials, perifosine has induced tumour regression and caused disease stabilisation in a variety of tumour types. The genetic determinants responsible for its cytotoxicity have not been comprehensively studied, however. We performed a genome-wide analysis to identify genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were correlated with the cytotoxicity of perifosine, using public databases on the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-60 human cancer cell lines. For demonstrating drug specificity, the NCI Standard Agent Database (including 171 drugs acting through a variety of mechanisms was used as a control. We identified agents with similar cytotoxicity profiles to that of perifosine in compounds used in the NCI drug screen. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were carried out on genes more likely to be perifosine specific. The results suggested that genes correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity are connected by certain known pathways that lead to the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and apoptosis. Biological processes such as 'response to stress', 'inflammatory response' and 'ubiquitin cycle' were enriched among these genes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in CACNA2DI and EXOC4 were found to be correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity. Our results provided a manageable list of genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were strongly correlated with the cytotoxcity of perifosine. These genes could be targets for further studies using candidate-gene approaches. The results also provided insights into the pharmacodynamics of perifosine.

  4. Genetic determinants of response and adverse effects following vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameshwar S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (warfarin/acenocoumarol are commonly used anticoagulants that require careful clinical management to balance the risks of over anticoagulation and bleeding with those of under anticoagulation and clotting. Genetic variants of the enzyme that metabolizes vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant, cytochrome P-450 2C9 (CYP2C9, and of a key pharmacologic target of vitamin K antagonists anticoagulant, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1, contribute to differences in patients responses to various anticoagulant doses. Methods: In thirty patients on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant therapy, presented with either clotting manifestations (valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and DVT or prolonged INR/bleeding manifestations, we assessed CYP2C9 genotypes, VKORC1 haplotypes, clinical characteristics, response to therapy (as determined by the international normalized ratio [INR], and bleeding events. Results: Of the thirty patients, thirteen patients INR was high and four patients presented with major bleeding and four with minor bleeding manifestations. Out of thirteen patients with high INR, ten patients showed CYP2C9 polymorphism ( 1/ 3 and 2/ 3 of poor metabolizer genotype. Most of the high INR patients were recently started on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant. Most patients presented with clotting manifestations with below therapeutic INR are noncompliant with anticoagulants. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the CYP2C9 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of over anticoagulation and of bleeding events among patients on vitamin K antagonists' anticoagulant setting. Screening for CYP2C9 variants may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and surveillance techniques to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions in patients receiving vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. However the cost-effectiveness of genotyping of patients must be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci

  5. [Root Nodule Bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti: Tolerance to Salinity and Bacterial Genetic Determinants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumiantseva, M L; Muntyan, V S

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental data on salt tolerance of root nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti (Ensifer meliloti), an alfalfa symbiont, and on genetic determination of this feature are reviewed. Extensive data on the genes affecting adaptation of proteobacteria are provided, as well as on the groups of genes with activity depending on the osmolarity of the medium. Structural and functional polymorphism of the bet genes involved in betaine synthesis and transport in S. meliloti is discussed. The phenotypic and. genotypic polymorphism in 282 environmental rhizobial strains isolated from the centers of alfalfa diversity affected by aridity and salinity is discussed. The isolates from the Aral Sea area and northern Caucasus were shown to possess the betC gene represented by two types of alleles: the dominant A-type allele found in Rm 1021 and the less common divergent E-type allele, which was revealed in regions at the frequencies at the frequencies of 0.35 and 0.48, respectively. In the isolates with the salt-tolerant phenotype, which were isolated from root nodules and subsequently formed less effective symbioses with alfalfa, the frequency of E-type alleles was 2.5 times higher. Analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the E-type allele of the betC gene revealed that establishment of this allele in the population was a result of positive selection. It is concluded that diversification of the functionally diverse bet genes occurring in S. meliloti affects the salt tolerance and symbiotic effectivity of rhizobia.

  6. Genetic Drift, Not Life History or RNAi, Determine Long-Term Evolution of Transposable Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szitenberg, Amir; Cha, Soyeon; Opperman, Charles H; Bird, David M; Blaxter, Mark L; Lunt, David H

    2016-10-05

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a major source of genome variation across the branches of life. Although TEs may play an adaptive role in their host's genome, they are more often deleterious, and purifying selection is an important factor controlling their genomic loads. In contrast, life history, mating system, GC content, and RNAi pathways have been suggested to account for the disparity of TE loads in different species. Previous studies of fungal, plant, and animal genomes have reported conflicting results regarding the direction in which these genomic features drive TE evolution. Many of these studies have had limited power, however, because they studied taxonomically narrow systems, comparing only a limited number of phylogenetically independent contrasts, and did not address long-term effects on TE evolution. Here, we test the long-term determinants of TE evolution by comparing 42 nematode genomes spanning over 500 million years of diversification. This analysis includes numerous transitions between life history states, and RNAi pathways, and evaluates if these forces are sufficiently persistent to affect the long-term evolution of TE loads in eukaryotic genomes. Although we demonstrate statistical power to detect selection, we find no evidence that variation in these factors influence genomic TE loads across extended periods of time. In contrast, the effects of genetic drift appear to persist and control TE variation among species. We suggest that variation in the tested factors are largely inconsequential to the large differences in TE content observed between genomes, and only by these large-scale comparisons can we distinguish long-term and persistent effects from transient or random changes.

  7. [Morphogenesis and differentiation of the female genital tract. Genetic determinism and epithelium-stromal interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amălinei, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    The epithelium-stromal interaction is important in the process of morphogenesis, differentiation, and hormone response, in female genital tract. This review is organized in four sections: i) female genital tract morphogenesis, based on genetic determinism; ii) hormonal control of endometrial proliferation; iii) TGF-beta key-role in epithelium-stromal communication; iv) endometrial apoptosis. Female genital tract derives from the Müllerian ducts, a number of genes being involved in its regulation, like Lim1, Lhx9, Emx, Pax-2, Hox-A9, Hox-A10, Hox-A11, Hox-A13, Wnt-4, Wnt-7, WT1, SF-1, and GATA-4. TGF-beta, whose expression is modulated by ovarian steroids, regulates cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory and immune responses, extracellular matrix deposition, adhesion molecules, proteases, and protease inhibitor expression. In the endometrium, TGF-beta regulates its own expression, and that of extracellular matrix, adhesion molecules and proteases implicated in trophoblast invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis during embryo implantation, endometriosis, irregular bleeding, and endometrial cancer. Cellular response elicited by TGF-beta, mediated through a serine/threonine kinase receptor, induces the recruitment of multiple intracellular signals, specifically Smads, whose activation and subsequent translocation into the nucleus results in gene expression. Ubiquitin is involved in the degradation of short lived, regulatory or misfolded proteins, by tagging them to be taken to the proteasome. In the endometrium, ubiquitin may allow cells of stromal origin to grow, survive and evade T-cell mediated disposal, showing a functional duality. A complete understanding of the complex regulatory endometrial epithelium-stromal mechanism, concertating genes, hormones, and cytokines, may provide new therapeutic targets in female reproductive tract pathology.

  8. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  9. Transition from Environmental to Partial Genetic Sex Determination in Daphnia through the Evolution of a Female-Determining Incipient W Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Céline M O; Fasel, Dominique; Hürlimann, Evelin; Dukič, Marinela; Haag-Liautard, Cathy; Thuillier, Virginie; Galimov, Yan; Haag, Christoph R

    2016-12-21

    Sex chromosomes can evolve during the evolution of genetic sex determination (GSD) from environmental sex determination (ESD). Despite theoretical attention, early mechanisms involved in the transition from ESD to GSD have yet to be studied in nature. No mixed ESD-GSD animal species have been reported, except for some species of Daphnia, small freshwater crustaceans in which sex is usually determined solely by the environment, but in which a dominant female sex-determining locus is present in some populations. This locus follows Mendelian single-locus inheritance, but has otherwise not been characterized genetically. We now show that the sex-determining genomic region maps to the same low-recombining peri-centromeric region of linkage group 3 (LG3) in three highly divergent populations of D. magna, and spans 3.6 Mb. Despite low levels of recombination, the associated region contains signs of historical recombination, suggesting a role for selection acting on several genes thereby maintaining linkage disequilibrium among the 36 associated SNPs. The region carries numerous genes involved in sex differentiation in other taxa, including transformer2 and sox9 Taken together, the region determining the genetic females shows characteristics of a sex-related supergene, suggesting that LG3 is potentially an incipient W chromosome despite the lack of significant additional restriction of recombination between Z and W. The occurrence of the female-determining locus in a pre-existing low recombining region illustrates one possible form of recombination suppression in sex chromosomes. D. magna is a promising model for studying the evolutionary transitions from ESD to GSD and early sex chromosome evolution.

  10. Thelytokous parthenogenesis, male clonality and genetic caste determination in the little fire ant: new evidence and insights from the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucaud, J; Estoup, A; Loiseau, A; Rey, O; Orivel, J

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that some populations of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata, display an unusual reproduction system polymorphism. Although some populations have a classical haplodiploid reproduction system, in other populations queens are produced by thelytokous parthenogenesis, males are produced by a male clonality system and workers are produced sexually. An atypical genetic caste determination system was also suggested. However, these conclusions were indirectly inferred from genetic studies on field population samples. Here we set up experimental laboratory nests that allow the control of the parental relationships between individuals. The queens heading those nests originated from either putatively clonal or sexual populations. We characterized the male, queen and worker offspring they produced at 12 microsatellite loci. Our results unambiguously confirm the unique reproduction system polymorphism mentioned above and that male clonality is strictly associated with thelytokous parthenogenesis. We also observed direct evidence of the rare production of sexual gynes and arrhenotokous males in clonal populations. Finally, we obtained evidence of a genetic basis for caste determination. The evolutionary significance of the reproduction system polymorphism and genetic caste determination as well as future research opportunities are discussed.

  11. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease. Evidence for concordance or discordance with cardiovascular disease risk has come from Mendelian randomization studies, whereas indirect evidence also has emerged from genome-wide and candidate gene association studies. The major limitations of studies of genetic variation and concordance or discordance with cardiovascular disease are pleiotropic effects of the variants studied, and/or lack of sufficient statistical power of the majority of studies to firmly demonstrate a positive association, or even more difficult, to exclude an association. New and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are concordant with both the magnitude and direction of the expected risk of cardiovascular disease, whereas this is unclear for HDL cholesterol. The data are compatible with cardiovascular disease causality for the three former lipoprotein classes, but not for HDL cholesterol.

  12. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  13. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  14. Chip-based mtDNA mutation screening enables fast and reliable genetic diagnosis of OXPHOS patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.E. van Eijsden (Rudy); E. Briem (Egill); V. Tiranti (Valeria); H.J.M. Smeets (Hubert); M. Gerards (Mike); L.M.T. Eijssen (Lars); A. Hendrickx (Alexandra); R.J.E. Jongbloed (Roselie); J.H.J. Wokke (John); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); M.E. Rubio-Gozalbo (Estela); I.F.M. de Coo (René)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Oxidative phosphorylation is under dual genetic control of the nuclear and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Oxidative phosphorylation disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to determine the genetic defect, and symptom-based protocols which

  15. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  16. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  17. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Coia

    Full Text Available Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet

  18. Patterns of DNA methylation in development, division of labor and hybridization in an ant with genetic caste determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is a common regulator of gene expression, including acting as a regulator of developmental events and behavioral changes in adults. Using the unique system of genetic caste determination in Pogonomyrmex barbatus, we were able to document changes in DNA methylation during development, and also across both ancient and contemporary hybridization events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sodium bisulfite sequencing demonstrated in vivo methylation of symmetric CG dinucleotides in P. barbatus. We also found methylation of non-CpG sequences. This validated two bioinformatics methods for predicting gene methylation, the bias in observed to expected ratio of CpG dinucleotides and the density of CpG/TpG single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. Frequencies of genomic DNA methylation were determined for different developmental stages and castes using ms-AFLP assays. The genetic caste determination system (GCD is probably the product of an ancestral hybridization event between P. barbatus and P. rugosus. Two lineages obligately co-occur within a GCD population, and queens are derived from intra-lineage matings whereas workers are produced from inter-lineage matings. Relative DNA methylation levels of queens and workers from GCD lineages (contemporary hybrids were not significantly different until adulthood. Virgin queens had significantly higher relative levels of DNA methylation compared to workers. Worker DNA methylation did not vary among developmental stages within each lineage, but was significantly different between the currently hybridizing lineages. Finally, workers of the two genetic caste determination lineages had half as many methylated cytosines as workers from the putative parental species, which have environmental caste determination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that DNA methylation may be a conserved regulatory mechanism moderating division of labor in both bees and ants. Current and historic

  19. Sex differences in clinical and genetic determinants of levodopa peak-dose dyskinesias in Parkinson disease: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappia, Mario; Annesi, Grazia; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Arabia, Gennarina; Annesi, Ferdinanda; Messina, Demetrio; Pugliese, Pierfrancesco; Spadafora, Patrizia; Tarantino, Patrizia; Carrideo, Sara; Civitelli, Donatella; De Marco, Elvira V; Cirò-Candiano, Innocenza C; Gambardella, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2005-04-01

    Several factors, both clinical and genetic, may account for the risk of developing levodopa-induced peak-dose dyskinesias (PDD) in patients with Parkinson disease, but it is unclear how these factors interact for modulating the individual susceptibility for PDD. To examine clinical and genetic risk factors for determining individual susceptibility of PDD in patients with Parkinson disease. Cohort study. Referral center for Parkinson disease in Calabria, southern Italy. Patients Two hundred fifty patients with Parkinson disease were screened for the presence or absence of PDD following a short-term levodopa administration, and 215 subjects were available for further evaluations, including genotypic analysis of the CA dinucleotide short tandem repeat (CAn-STR) polymorphism located in the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2). One hundred five patients (48.8%) exhibited PDD following short-term levodopa administration, and 110 patients (51.2%) did not. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that independent predictors for the occurrence of PDD were female sex, earlier age at onset of Parkinson disease, longer duration of treatment, and higher dose of levodopa. Genetic factors related to the DRD2 CAn-STR polymorphism were not independent predictors for PDD in the total population, but they had a strong protective effect on the appearance of PDD when the multivariate analysis was performed in men (odds ratio, 0.34 [95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.84]). In women, a genetic protective effect on PDD was not evident. Risk factors for PDD, both clinical and genetic, act in different ways for men and women. Genetic factors related to the DRD2 polymorphic status have a protective effect on PDD development in men but not in women. A female sex-related effect for the risk of PDD may be so strong that it overcomes any protective effect due to genetic factors.

  20. The use of ISSR markers for species determination and a genetic study of the invasive lionfish in Guanahacabibes, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Labastida

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The red lionfish (Pterois volitans and devil fire-fish (Pterois miles are invasive species that pose a threat to the biodiversity and stability of coral reefs in the Western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Species identification of lionfish is uncertain in some parts of Cuba, and research has mainly been focused on their biology and ecology. The principal aim of this study was to determine highly polymorphic markers (Inter Simple Sequence Repeat, ISSR that could be used in research on lionfish population genetics in addition to confirming the presence of Pterois species in the Guanahacabibes National Park. The genetic profile or "fingerprint" of individuals collected in Mexico, formally identified as P. volitans, was compared with the genetic profile of specimens from Cuba. There were very few "diagnostic bands" and a high number of "common bands", demonstrating that the same species exists in both countries. Furthermore, Nei's genetic distance and the unrooted tree do not show significant differences between both localities. In light of these results, we can confirm the presence of P. volitans in the Guanahacabibes National Park, Cuba. This study demonstrates the functionality of ISSR as a molecular tool for species identification and their application for genetic population studies of this invasive fish species.

  1. Neural circuit architecture defects in a Drosophila model of Fragile X syndrome are alleviated by minocycline treatment and genetic removal of matrix metalloproteinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul S. Siller

    2011-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS, caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 product (FMRP, is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. FXS patients suffer multiple behavioral symptoms, including hyperactivity, disrupted circadian cycles, and learning and memory deficits. Recently, a study in the mouse FXS model showed that the tetracycline derivative minocycline effectively remediates the disease state via a proposed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibition mechanism. Here, we use the well-characterized Drosophila FXS model to assess the effects of minocycline treatment on multiple neural circuit morphological defects and to investigate the MMP hypothesis. We first treat Drosophila Fmr1 (dfmr1 null animals with minocycline to assay the effects on mutant synaptic architecture in three disparate locations: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, clock neurons in the circadian activity circuit and Kenyon cells in the mushroom body learning and memory center. We find that minocycline effectively restores normal synaptic structure in all three circuits, promising therapeutic potential for FXS treatment. We next tested the MMP hypothesis by assaying the effects of overexpressing the sole Drosophila tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP in dfmr1 null mutants. We find that TIMP overexpression effectively prevents defects in the NMJ synaptic architecture in dfmr1 mutants. Moreover, co-removal of dfmr1 similarly rescues TIMP overexpression phenotypes, including cellular tracheal defects and lethality. To further test the MMP hypothesis, we generated dfmr1;mmp1 double null mutants. Null mmp1 mutants are 100% lethal and display cellular tracheal defects, but co-removal of dfmr1 allows adult viability and prevents tracheal defects. Conversely, co-removal of mmp1 ameliorates the NMJ synaptic architecture defects in dfmr1 null mutants, despite the lack of detectable difference in MMP1 expression or gelatinase activity between the single

  2. Connectivity in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) determined using empirical and simulated genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momigliano, Paolo; Harcourt, Robert; Robbins, William D; Stow, Adam

    2015-08-28

    Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) can be one of the numerically dominant high order predators on pristine coral reefs, yet their numbers have declined even in the highly regulated Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Knowledge of both large scale and fine scale genetic connectivity of grey reef sharks is essential for their effective management, but no genetic data are yet available. We investigated grey reef shark genetic structure in the GBR across a 1200 km latitudinal gradient, comparing empirical data with models simulating different levels of migration. The empirical data did not reveal any genetic structuring along the entire latitudinal gradient sampled, suggesting regular widespread dispersal and gene flow of the species throughout most of the GBR. Our simulated datasets indicate that even with substantial migrations (up to 25% of individuals migrating between neighboring reefs) both large scale genetic structure and genotypic spatial autocorrelation at the reef scale were maintained. We suggest that present migration rates therefore exceed this level. These findings have important implications regarding the effectiveness of networks of spatially discontinuous Marine Protected Areas to protect reef sharks.

  3. Pharmacogenetics and anticoagulant therapy: two cases of genetically determined response to warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez-Dias, Nuno; Correia, Maria José; Coutinho, Ana; Fernandes, Catarina; Diogo, A Nunes; Lopes, Mário G

    2009-09-01

    Inter- and intra-individual variability of response to warfarin means that its anticoagulant effect must be monitored, given the risk of thromboembolic complications and bleeding. This variability is influenced by gender, age, body mass index, smoking, diet, comorbid conditions, drug interactions and genetic factors. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetic background to predict drug response, effectiveness and risk of adverse effects in a given patient. The authors illustrate its relevance in two case reports. A 40-year-old woman admitted for massive pulmonary thromboembolism underwent anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy, following which warfarin was needed in unusually high doses to achieve effective anticoagulation. The genetic variants c.430CC and c.1075AA of the CYP2C9 gene were identified, predisposing to rapid warfarin metabolism, as well as the c.-1639GG variant of the VKORC1 gene, associated with low sensitivity to the drug. Together, these variants give high resistance to warfarin. In the second case, a 76-year-old man with permanent atrial fibrillation developed excessive prolongation of prothrombin time after being treated with 5 mg/day warfarin for 5 days. The genetic variants c.430CC and c.1075AC of the CYP2C9 gene and 1639AA of the VKORC1 gene were identified. Together, these polymorphisms confer high sensitivity to warfarin, necessitating smaller doses to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation levels. The authors review the relevance of the study of genetic polymorphisms related to anticoagulant therapy and discuss its potential usefulness in clinical practice.

  4. Quantitative determination of casein genetic variants in goat milk: Application in Girgentana dairy goat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Maria; Segreto, Roberta; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Sardina, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to quantify casein genetic variants (αs2-, β-, and κ-casein) in milk of homozygous individuals of Girgentana goat breed. For calibration experiments, pure genetic variants were extracted from individual milk samples of animals with known genotypes. The described HPLC approach was precise, accurate and highly suitable for quantification of goat casein genetic variants of homozygous individuals. The amount of each casein per allele was: αs2-casein A = 2.9 ± 0.8 g/L and F = 1.8 ± 0.4 g/L; β-casein C = 3.0 ± 0.8 g/L and C1 = 2.0 ± 0.7 g/L and κ-casein A = 1.6 ± 0.3 g/L and B = 1.1 ± 0.2 g/L. A good correlation was found between the quantities of αs2-casein genetic variants A and F, and β-casein C and C1 with other previously described method. The main important result was obtained for κ-casein because, till now, no data were available on quantification of single genetic variants for this protein.

  5. [Contribution of genotyping for fetal sex determination in maternal serum for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of X-linked diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, G; Costa, J M; Frydman, N; Ray, P; Le Dû, A; Kerbrat, V; Ernault, P; Frydman, R

    2003-12-01

    Couples with a risk of transmitting X-linked diseases included in a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) center need early and rapid fetal sex determination during pregnancy in two situations. The first situation corresponds to control of embryo sexing after PGD, the second one being that of couples in PGD program having a spontaneous pregnancy. Determination of fetal sex can be achieved by karyotyping using invasive procedures such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS), amniocentesis or cordocentesis and by non-invasive procedures such as ultrasound (US) examination. CVS is the earliest invasive procedure for fetal sex determination and molecular analysis of X-linked genetic disorders during the first trimester but it is associated with a risk of fetal loss. US allows reliable fetal sex determination only during the second trimester. Recently, reliable non-invasive fetal sex determination was realized by using SRY gene amplification in maternal serum. We report the prospective use of fetal sex determination in maternal serum in our PGD center. Management of pregnancies was performed using this non-invasive procedure in four cases of embryo sexing control and nine cases of spontaneous pregnancies in couples included in PGD program for X-linked diseases. Fetal sex results using SRY gene amplification on maternal serum were in complete concordance with fetal sex observed by cytogenetic analysis or US examination, as well as at birth. This new strategy allowed rapid sex determination during the first trimester and permitted to avoid performing invasive procedures in nine pregnancies.

  6. Microsatellite markers to determine population genetic structure in the golden anchovy, Coilia dussumieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvelpandian, A; Gopalakrishnan, A; Lakra, W S; Krishna, Gopal; Sharma, Rupam; Musammilu, K K; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2014-06-01

    Coilia dussumieri (Valenciennes, 1848) commonly called as golden anchovy, constitutes a considerable fishery in the northern part of both the west and east coasts of India. Despite its clear-cut geographic isolation, the species is treated as a unit stock for fishery management purposes. We evaluated 32 microsatellite primer pairs from three closely related species (resource species) belonging to the family Engraulidae through cross-species amplification in C. dussumieri. Successful cross-priming was obtained with 10 loci, which were sequenced for confirmation of repeats. Loci were tested for delineating the genetic stock structure of four populations of C. dussumieri from both the coasts of India. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 to 18, with a mean of 12.3. Results of pairwise F ST indicated genetic stock structuring between the east and west coast populations of India and also validated the utilization of identified microsatellite markers in population genetic structure analysis.

  7. Genetic Variability Overrides the Impact of Parental Cell Type and Determines iPSC Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija Kyttälä

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reports on the retention of somatic cell memory in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have complicated the selection of the optimal cell type for the generation of iPSC biobanks. To address this issue we compared transcriptomic, epigenetic, and differentiation propensities of genetically matched human iPSCs derived from fibroblasts and blood, two tissues of the most practical relevance for biobanking. Our results show that iPSC lines derived from the same donor are highly similar to each other. However, genetic variation imparts a donor-specific expression and methylation profile in reprogrammed cells that leads to variable functional capacities of iPSC lines. Our results suggest that integration-free, bona fide iPSC lines from fibroblasts and blood can be combined in repositories to form biobanks. Due to the impact of genetic variation on iPSC differentiation, biobanks should contain cells from large numbers of donors.

  8. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington

  9. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington's genetic assimilation

  10. Dispersal ability and habitat requirements determine landscape-level genetic patterns in desert aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipsen, Ivan C; Kirk, Emily H; Bogan, Michael T; Mims, Meryl C; Olden, Julian D; Lytle, David A

    2015-01-01

    Species occupying the same geographic range can exhibit remarkably different population structures across the landscape, ranging from highly diversified to panmictic. Given limitations on collecting population-level data for large numbers of species, ecologists seek to identify proximate organismal traits-such as dispersal ability, habitat preference and life history-that are strong predictors of realized population structure. We examined how dispersal ability and habitat structure affect the regional balance of gene flow and genetic drift within three aquatic insects that represent the range of dispersal abilities and habitat requirements observed in desert stream insect communities. For each species, we tested for linear relationships between genetic distances and geographic distances using Euclidean and landscape-based metrics of resistance. We found that the moderate-disperser Mesocapnia arizonensis (Plecoptera: Capniidae) has a strong isolation-by-distance pattern, suggesting migration-drift equilibrium. By contrast, population structure in the flightless Abedus herberti (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) is influenced by genetic drift, while gene flow is the dominant force in the strong-flying Boreonectes aequinoctialis (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). The best-fitting landscape model for M. arizonensis was based on Euclidean distance. Analyses also identified a strong spatial scale-dependence, where landscape genetic methods only performed well for species that were intermediate in dispersal ability. Our results highlight the fact that when either gene flow or genetic drift dominates in shaping population structure, no detectable relationship between genetic and geographic distances is expected at certain spatial scales. This study provides insight into how gene flow and drift interact at the regional scale for these insects as well as the organisms that share similar habitats and dispersal abilities.

  11. Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to IGF-1 and its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study Within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    I and its Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rudolf J...Genetic Determinants: A Case Control Study within the Cancer Prostate Sweden Project (CAPS) 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0374 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  12. Genetically Determined Insulin Resistance is Characterized by Down-Regulation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas M; Skov, Vibe; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and high-risk individuals have demonstrated a co-ordinated down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) genes, suggesting a link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, whether...... mitochondrial dysfunction is a cause or consequence of insulin resistance remains to be clarified. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative metabolism was down-regulated in skeletal muscle of patients with genetically determined insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle biopsies.......02), and complex V (ATP5B; p=0.005). Our data demonstrate that genetically determined insulin resistance is associated with a co-ordinated down-regulation of OxPhos components both at the transcriptional and translational level. These findings suggest that an impaired biological response to insulin in skeletal...

  13. Distribution of Topological Defects on Axisymmetric Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Tie-Yan; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a general method of determining the distribution of topological defects on axisymmetric surface,and study the distribution of topological defects on biconcave-discoid surface, which is the geometric configuration of red blood cell. There are three most possible cases of the distribution of the topological defects on the biconcave surface:four defects charged with 1/2, two defects charged with +1, or one defect charged with 2. For the four defect charged with 1/2, they sit at the vertices of a square imbedded in the equator of biconcave surface.

  14. Genetic mapping of sex determination in a wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana, reveals earliest form of sex chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigler, R B; Lewers, K S; Main, D S; Ashman, T-L

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) from hermaphroditism is one of the major evolutionary transitions in plants, and this transition can be accompanied by the development of sex chromosomes. Studies in species with intermediate sexual systems are providing unprecedented insight into the initial stages of sex chromosome evolution. Here, we describe the genetic mechanism of sex determination in the octoploid, subdioecious wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana Mill., based on a whole-genome simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based genetic map and on mapping sex determination as two qualitative traits, male and female function. The resultant total map length is 2373 cM and includes 212 markers on 42 linkage groups (mean marker spacing: 14 cM). We estimated that approximately 70 and 90% of the total F. virginiana genetic map resides within 10 and 20 cM of a marker on this map, respectively. Both sex expression traits mapped to the same linkage group, separated by approximately 6 cM, along with two SSR markers. Together, our phenotypic and genetic mapping results support a model of gender determination in subdioecious F. virginiana with at least two linked loci (or gene regions) with major effects. Reconstruction of parental genotypes at these loci reveals that both female and hermaphrodite heterogamety exist in this species. Evidence of recombination between the sex-determining loci, an important hallmark of incipient sex chromosomes, suggest that F. virginiana is an example of the youngest sex chromosome in plants and thus a novel model system for the study of sex chromosome evolution.

  15. Sex without sex chromosomes: genetic architecture of multiple loci independently segregating to determine sex ratios in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Edmands, S; Anholt, B R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-determining systems are remarkably diverse and may evolve rapidly. Polygenic sex-determination systems are predicted to be transient and evolutionarily unstable, yet examples have been reported across a range of taxa. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of polygenic sex determination in Tigriopus californicus, a harpacticoid copepod with no heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Using genetically distinct inbred lines selected for male- and female-biased clutches, we generated a genetic map with 39 SNPs across 12 chromosomes. Quantitative trait locus mapping of sex ratio phenotype (the proportion of male offspring produced by an F2 female) in four F2 families revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios. The sex ratio phenotype varied among loci across chromosomes in both direction and magnitude, with the strongest phenotypic effects on chromosome 10 moderated to some degree by loci on four other chromosomes. For a given locus, sex ratio phenotype varied in magnitude for individuals derived from different dam lines. These data, together with the environmental factors known to contribute to sex determination, characterize the underlying complexity and potential lability of sex determination, and confirm the polygenic architecture of sex determination in T. californicus.

  16. Genetic heterogeneity of Campylobacter concisus determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis-based macrorestriction profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsheka, M.I.; Elisha, B.G.; Lastovica, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the genetic diversity of Campylobacter concisus to assist molecular typing studies, the use of macrorestriction profiling was examined. A suitable protocol was developed that included the use of formaldehyde pretreatment to prevent DNA degradation, and restriction enzyme N...

  17. Independent genetic control of maize (Zea mays L.) kernel weight determination and its phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Prado, Santiago; Sadras, Víctor O; Borrás, Lucas

    2014-08-01

    Maize kernel weight (KW) is associated with the duration of the grain-filling period (GFD) and the rate of kernel biomass accumulation (KGR). It is also related to the dynamics of water and hence is physiologically linked to the maximum kernel water content (MWC), kernel desiccation rate (KDR), and moisture concentration at physiological maturity (MCPM). This work proposed that principles of phenotypic plasticity can help to consolidated the understanding of the environmental modulation and genetic control of these traits. For that purpose, a maize population of 245 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was grown under different environmental conditions. Trait plasticity was calculated as the ratio of the variance of each RIL to the overall phenotypic variance of the population of RILs. This work found a hierarchy of plasticities: KDR ≈ GFD > MCPM > KGR > KW > MWC. There was no phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits per se and trait plasticities. MWC, the trait with the lowest plasticity, was the exception because common quantitative trait loci were found for the trait and its plasticity. Independent genetic control of a trait per se and genetic control of its plasticity is a condition for the independent evolution of traits and their plasticities. This allows breeders potentially to select for high or low plasticity in combination with high or low values of economically relevant traits.

  18. 76 FR 63279 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered for Insect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... considered a regulated article under our regulations governing the introduction of certain genetically... on the Internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/biotechnology/not_reg.html and are posted with the..., Biotechnology Regulatory Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 147, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236; (301) 734-0942, e...

  19. 77 FR 41350 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered To Produce...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... article under our regulations governing the introduction of certain genetically engineered organisms. Our....aphis.usda.gov/biotechnology/not_reg.html and are posted with the previous notice and the comments we..., Biotechnology Regulatory Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 147, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236; (301) 851-3954...

  20. Revisiting an old riddle: what determines genetic diversity levels within species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M Leffler

    Full Text Available Understanding why some species have more genetic diversity than others is central to the study of ecology and evolution, and carries potentially important implications for conservation biology. Yet not only does this question remain unresolved, it has largely fallen into disregard. With the rapid decrease in sequencing costs, we argue that it is time to revive it.

  1. Proteomic studies related to genetic determinants of variability in protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvatovich, Peter; Franke, Lude; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation has multiple effects on the proteome. It may influence the expression level of proteins, modify their sequences through single nucleotide polymorphisms, the occurrence of allelic variants, or alternative splicing (ASP) events. This perspective paper summarizes the major effects of

  2. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Status of Sugar Beet Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the Herbicide Glyphosate AGENCY: Animal and... nonregulated status for a Monsanto/KWS SAAT AG sugar beet line, designated as event H7-1. This notice... CFR part 340 for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) designated as event H7-1, which has been...

  3. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  4. Markerless Escherichia coli rrn Deletion Strains for Genetic Determination of Ribosomal Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Selwyn; Skovgaard, Ole; McLaughlin, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Single-copy rrn strains facilitate genetic ribosomal studies in Escherichia coli. Consecutive markerless deletion of rrn operons resulted in slower growth upon inactivation of the fourth copy, which was reversed by supplying transfer RNA genes encoded in rrn operons in trans. Removal of the sixth...

  5. In Defence of Situational Morality: Genetic, Dispositional and Situational Determinants of Children's Donating to Charity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Pannebakker, Fieke; Out, Dorothee

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we argue that moral behaviour is largely situation-specific. Genetic make-up, neurobiological factors, attachment security and rearing experiences have only limited influence on individual differences in moral performance. Moral behaviour does not develop in a linear and cumulative fashion and individual morality is not stable across…

  6. Genetic variability in spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), determined with microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R.; Bowers, K.; Hensley, R.; Mobley, B.; Belouski, E.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the allele frequencies of five microsatellite loci was surveyed in 1256 individual spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) obtained from 12 bays and estuaries from Laguna Madre, Texas, to Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to St. John's River on the Florida Atlantic Coast. Texas and Louisiana collection sites were resampled each year for two to four years (1998-2001). Genetic differentiation was observed. Spotted seatrout from Florida waters were strongly differentiated from spotted seatrout collected in Louisiana and Texas. The greatest genetic discontinuity was observed between Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor, and Charlotte Harbor seatrout were most similar to Atlantic Coast spotted seatrout. Texas and Louisiana samples were not strongly structured within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and there was little evidence of temporal differentiation within bays. These findings are contrary to those of earlier analyses with allozymes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) where evidence of spatial differentiation was found for spotted seatrout resident on the Texas coast. The differences in genetic structure observed among these markers may reflect differences in response to selective pressure, or may be due to differences in underlying genetic processes.

  7. Phylogeography of Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus harvester ants with genetic and environmental caste determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present a phylogeographic study of at least six reproductively isolated lineages of new world harvester ants within the Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus species group. The genetic and geographic relationships within this clade are complex: four of the identified lineages are divided into...

  8. A Co-Association Network Analysis of the Genetic Determination of Pig Conformation, Growth and Fatness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puig-Oliveras, A.; Ballester, M.; Corominas, J.; Revilla, M.; Estelle, J.; Fernandez, A.I.; Ramayo-Caldas, Y.; Folch, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several QTLs have been identified for major economically relevant traits in livestock, such as growth and meat quality, revealing the complex genetic architecture of these traits. The use of network approaches considering the interactions of multiple molecules and traits provides useful

  9. The Central Role of KNG1 Gene as a Genetic Determinant of Coagulation Pathway-Related Traits: Exploring Metaphenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet, Raimon; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Martin-Fernandez, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Perera, Alexandre; Soria, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Traditional genetic studies of single traits may be unable to detect the pleiotropic effects involved in complex diseases. To detect the correlation that exists between several phenotypes involved in the same biological process, we introduce an original methodology to analyze sets of correlated phenotypes involved in the coagulation cascade in genome-wide association studies. The methodology consists of a two-stage process. First, we define new phenotypic meta-variables (linear combinations of the original phenotypes), named metaphenotypes, by applying Independent Component Analysis for the multivariate analysis of correlated phenotypes (i.e. the levels of coagulation pathway–related proteins). The resulting metaphenotypes integrate the information regarding the underlying biological process (i.e. thrombus/clot formation). Secondly, we take advantage of a family based Genome Wide Association Study to identify genetic elements influencing these metaphenotypes and consequently thrombosis risk. Our study utilized data from the GAIT Project (Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia). We obtained 15 metaphenotypes, which showed significant heritabilities, ranging from 0.2 to 0.7. These results indicate the importance of genetic factors in the variability of these traits. We found 4 metaphenotypes that showed significant associations with SNPs. The most relevant were those mapped in a region near the HRG, FETUB and KNG1 genes. Our results are provocative since they show that the KNG1 locus plays a central role as a genetic determinant of the entire coagulation pathway and thrombus/clot formation. Integrating data from multiple correlated measurements through metaphenotypes is a promising approach to elucidate the hidden genetic mechanisms underlying complex diseases. PMID:28005926

  10. Supersymmetric k-defects

    CERN Document Server

    Koehn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. We find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  11. Genetic determinants of facial clefting: analysis of 357 candidate genes using two national cleft studies from Scandinavia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanand Jugessur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark: 235 case-parent triads. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used two complementary statistical methods, TRIMM and HAPLIN, to look for associations across these two national samples. TRIMM tests for association in each gene by using multi-SNP genotypes from case-parent triads directly without the need to infer haplotypes. HAPLIN on the other hand estimates the full haplotype distribution over a set of SNPs and estimates relative risks associated with each haplotype. For isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (I-CL/P, TRIMM and HAPLIN both identified significant associations with IRF6 and ADH1C in both populations, but only HAPLIN found an association with FGF12. For isolated cleft palate (I-CP, TRIMM found associations with ALX3, MKX, and PDGFC in both populations, but only the association with PDGFC was identified by HAPLIN. In addition, HAPLIN identified an association with ETV5 that was not detected by TRIMM. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Strong associations with seven genes were replicated in the Scandinavian samples and our approach effectively replicated the strongest previously known association in clefting--with IRF6. Based on two national cleft cohorts of similar ancestry, two robust statistical methods and a large panel of SNPs in the most promising cleft candidate genes to date, this study identified a previously unknown association with clefting for ADH1C and provides additional candidates and analytic approaches to advance the field.

  12. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  13. Populational genetic structure of free-living maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus determined by proteic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. R. De Mattos

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic analysis of presumptive twenty gene loci products was conducted in hemolisates and plasma samples of twenty-eight maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus from an area in northeastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The area sampled was divided into three sub-areas, with the Mogi-Guaçu and Pardo rivers regarded as barriers to the gene flow. The polymorphism degree and heterozygosity level (intralocus and average estimated in this study were similar to those detected by other authors for maned wolves and other species of wild free-living canids. The samples of each sub-area and the total sample exhibited genotype frequencies consistent with the genetic equilibrium model. The values of the F-statistics evidenced absence of inbreeding and population subdivision and, consequently, low genetic distances were found among the samples of each area.

  14. Lifestyle and genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 levels in a general adult population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Betina H; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Ovesen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    12 in the general population. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the folate and vitamin B12 status of Danish adults and to investigate associations between vitamin status and distinct lifestyle and genetic factors. The study included a random sample of 6784 individuals aged 30-60 years....... Information on lifestyle factors was obtained by questionnaires and blood samples were analysed for serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations and several genetic polymorphisms. The overall prevalence of low serum folate ( ... and the prevalence was lower with increasing age. Low serum folate was associated with smoking, low alcohol intake, high coffee intake, unhealthy diet, and the TT genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-C677T polymorphism. The overall prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 (

  15. Farming termites determine the genetic population structure of Termitomyces fungal symbionts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobre, Tânia; Fernandes, Cecília; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2011-01-01

    fungal symbionts. However, even in the few termite lineages that secondarily adopted vertical symbiont transmission, the fungal symbionts are not monophyletic. We addressed this paradox by studying differential transmission of fungal symbionts by alate male and female reproductives, and the genetic......Symbiotic interactions between macrotermitine termites and their fungal symbionts have a moderate degree of specificity. Consistent with horizontal symbiont transmission, host switching has been frequent over evolutionary time so that single termite species can often be associated with several...... associated with the alternative termite hosts Macrotermes subhyalinus and Macrotermes natalensis. While Termitomyces associated with these alternative hosts are horizontally transmitted and recombine freely, the genetic population structure of the same Termitomyces associated with M. bellicosus is consistent...

  16. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  17. Determination of Ring-OSF Position in Czochralski Silicon Single Crystals by Numerical Analysis of Distribution of Grown-in Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A numerical analysis technique that incorporates Voronkov's model were examined and used to estimate the distribution of defects during crystal growth. By comparisons of the distribution of the density of LSTD and the position of R-OSF in non-nitrogen-doped (non-N-doped) and nitrogen-doped (N-doped) silicon crystals, it is found that the results of the numerical analyses agree with practically evaluated data. The observations suggest that the R-OSF nucleus is a VO2 complex that is formed by bonds between oxygen atoms and residual vacancies consumed during the formation of void defects. This suggests that Voronkov's model can be used to accurately predict the generation and growth of defects in silicon crystals. This numerical analysis technique was also found to be an effective method of estimating the distribution of defects in silicon crystals during crystal growth.

  18. Genetic determinants for gestational diabetes mellitus and related metabolic traits in Mexican women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Huerta-Chagoya

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI, as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs, in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16 x 10(-06; OR=2.95 and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98 x 10(-05; OR=0.55. In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60' OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727 and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358. Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM.

  19. Genetic Determinants for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Related Metabolic Traits in Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16x10-06; OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98x10-05; OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60’ OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  20. Vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome in co-occurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Herlin, Morten; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background: The vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome are rare conditions. We aimed to present two cases with the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac...... defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser co-occurrence from our local surgical center and through a systematic literature search detect published cases. Furthermore, we aimed to collect existing knowledge...... in the embryopathogenesis and genetics in order to discuss a possible link between the vertebral defect, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula/esophageal atresia, renal defect, and limb defect association and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. Case presentation: Our first case was a white girl...

  1. Relationship between obesity phenotypes and genetic determinants in a mouse model for juvenile obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Schäfer, Nadine; Hesse, Claudia; Heise, Sebastian; Neuschl, Christina; Wagener, Asja; Churchill, Gary A; Li, Renhua

    2013-09-16

    Obesity, a state of imbalance between lean mass and fat mass, is important for the etiology of diseases affected by the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although genome-wide association studies have repeatedly associated genes with obesity and body weight, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between the muscle and adipose tissues remain unknown. Using 351 mice (at 10 wk of age) of an intercross population between Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred (BFMI) and C57BL/6NCrl (B6N) mice, we examined the causal relationships between genetic variations and multiple traits: body lean mass and fat mass, adipokines, and bone mineral density. Furthermore, evidence from structural equation modeling suggests causality among these traits. In the BFMI model, juvenile obesity affects lean mass and impairs bone mineral density via adipokines secreted from the white adipose tissues. While previous studies have indicated that lean mass has a causative effect on adiposity, in the Berlin Fat Mouse model that has been selected for juvenile obesity (at 9 wk of age) for >90 generations, however, the causality is switched from fat mass to lean mass. In addition, linkage studies and statistical modeling have indicated that quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 5 and 6 affect both lean mass and fat mass. These lines of evidence indicate that the muscle and adipose tissues interact with one another and the interaction is modulated by genetic variations that are shaped by selections. Experimental examinations are necessary to verify the biological role of the inferred causalities.

  2. Farming termites determine the genetic population structure of Termitomyces fungal symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Tânia; Fernandes, Cecília; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Korb, Judith; Aanen, Duur K

    2011-05-01

    Symbiotic interactions between macrotermitine termites and their fungal symbionts have a moderate degree of specificity. Consistent with horizontal symbiont transmission, host switching has been frequent over evolutionary time so that single termite species can often be associated with several fungal symbionts. However, even in the few termite lineages that secondarily adopted vertical symbiont transmission, the fungal symbionts are not monophyletic. We addressed this paradox by studying differential transmission of fungal symbionts by alate male and female reproductives, and the genetic population structure of Termitomyces fungus gardens across 74 colonies of Macrotermes bellicosus in four west and central African countries. We confirm earlier, more limited, studies showing that the Termitomyces symbionts of M. bellicosus are normally transmitted vertically and clonally by dispersing males. We also document that the symbionts associated with this termite species belong to three main lineages that do not constitute a monophyletic group. The most common lineage occurs over the entire geographical region that we studied, including west, central and southern Africa, where it is also associated with the alternative termite hosts Macrotermes subhyalinus and Macrotermes natalensis. While Termitomyces associated with these alternative hosts are horizontally transmitted and recombine freely, the genetic population structure of the same Termitomyces associated with M. bellicosus is consistent with predominantly clonal reproduction and only occasional recombination. This implies that the genetic population structure of Termitomyces is controlled by the termite host and not by the Termitomyces symbiont.

  3. Ssr analysis for genetic structure and diversity determination of maize local populations from former Yugoslavia territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović-Micić, D; Drinić, S Mladenović; Nikolić, A; Lazić-Jancić, V

    2008-11-01

    A collection of 2178 local populations from ex-Yugoslavia territories is maintained in Maize Research Institute (MRI) gene bank. These populations were characterized mainly by morphological markers. In this work 21 local populations belonging to seven different agro-ecological groups have been subjected to SSR analysis using a DNA-pooling strategy. The objective of this work was to develop genetic fingerprints for characterization, identification and classification of the populations, as well as for estimation of their genetic diversity. Also, a DNA-pooling strategy was employed with the aim to certify if it could be applied for population analysis with SSR markers. Statistical analysis of 25 informative SSR primers revealing 224 alleles (bands) showed that the average within-population mean number of alleles was 2.55, the average values for total and within-population diversity were 0.784 and 0.502, respectively and G(ST) value was 0.360. Genetic distance values calculated using Modified Rogers' Distance were in the range from 0.35 to 0.60. The silver staining method of DNA used for bulked samples showed some weakness that could be overcome with a more sensitive staining method. Nevertheless, the results in this work indicate that the SSR analysis of bulks could be used for characterizing a large number of populations in gene banks.

  4. Genetic interactions and functional analyses of the fission yeast gsk3 and amk2 single and double mutants defective in TORC1-dependent processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Charalampos; Townsend, StJohn; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling network plays important roles in aging and disease. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the Gsk3 kinase inhibit TOR during stress. We performed genetic interaction screens using synthetic genetic arrays (SGA) with gsk3 and amk2 as query mutants, the latter encoding the regulatory subunit of AMPK. We identified 69 negative and 82 positive common genetic interactors, with functions related to cellular growth and stress. The 120 gsk3-specific negative interactors included genes functioning in translation and ribosomes. The 215 amk2-specific negative interactors included genes functioning in chromatin silencing and DNA damage repair. Both amk2- and gsk3-specific interactors were enriched in phenotype categories related to abnormal cell size and shape. We also performed SGA screen with the amk2 gsk3 double mutant as a query. Mutants sensitive to 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug are under-represented within the 305 positive interactors specific for the amk2 gsk3 query. The triple-mutant SGA screen showed higher number of negative interactions than the double mutant SGA screens and uncovered additional genetic network information. These results reveal common and specialized roles of AMPK and Gsk3 in mediating TOR-dependent processes, indicating that AMPK and Gsk3 act in parallel to inhibit TOR function in fission yeast. PMID:28281664

  5. The roles of standing genetic variation and evolutionary history in determining the evolvability of anti-predator strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Standing genetic variation and the historical environment in which that variation arises (evolutionary history are both potentially significant determinants of a population's capacity for evolutionary response to a changing environment. Using the open-ended digital evolution software Avida, we evaluated the relative importance of these two factors in influencing evolutionary trajectories in the face of sudden environmental change. We examined how historical exposure to predation pressures, different levels of genetic variation, and combinations of the two, affected the evolvability of anti-predator strategies and competitive abilities in the presence or absence of threats from new, invasive predator populations. We show that while standing genetic variation plays some role in determining evolutionary responses, evolutionary history has the greater influence on a population's capacity to evolve anti-predator traits, i.e. traits effective against novel predators. This adaptability likely reflects the relative ease of repurposing existing, relevant genes and traits, and the broader potential value of the generation and maintenance of adaptively flexible traits in evolving populations.

  6. Determination of genetic structure of germplasm collections: are traditional hierarchical clustering methods appropriate for molecular marker data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odong, T L; van Heerwaarden, J; Jansen, J; van Hintum, T J L; van Eeuwijk, F A

    2011-07-01

    Despite the availability of newer approaches, traditional hierarchical clustering remains very popular in genetic diversity studies in plants. However, little is known about its suitability for molecular marker data. We studied the performance of traditional hierarchical clustering techniques using real and simulated molecular marker data. Our study also compared the performance of traditional hierarchical clustering with model-based clustering (STRUCTURE). We showed that the cophenetic correlation coefficient is directly related to subgroup differentiation and can thus be used as an indicator of the presence of genetically distinct subgroups in germplasm collections. Whereas UPGMA performed well in preserving distances between accessions, Ward excelled in recovering groups. Our results also showed a close similarity between clusters obtained by Ward and by STRUCTURE. Traditional cluster analysis can provide an easy and effective way of determining structure in germplasm collections using molecular marker data, and, the output can be used for sampling core collections or for association studies.

  7. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity of breast carcinomas as determined by fine needle aspiration and TaqMan low density array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Maria B.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling is thought to be an important tool in determining treatment strategies for breast cancer patients. Tissues for such analysis may at a preoperative stage be obtained, by fine needle aspiration (FNA) allowing initiation of neoadjuvant treatment. To evaluate...... the extent of the genetic heterogeneity within primary breast carcinomas, we examined whether a gene expression profile obtained by FNA was representative of the tumor. METHODS: Tumors from 12 consecutive cases of early predominantly estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer patients undergoing primary...... by statistical analysis. High correlations between the gene profiles of tumor FNAs and tissue biopsies from the same patient were observed for all patients. A cluster analysis identified clustering of both the two FNAs and the tissue biopsy of the same 9 patients. CONCLUSION: The overall genetic heterogeneity...

  8. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Idewaki

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671 was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2. The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2. Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2. In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  9. Genetic determinants of drug-induced cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli-Magnus, Christiane; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and drug-induced cholestasis are two clinically important forms of acquired cholestatic liver disease. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms of acquired cholestasis has recently made considerable progress by the identification of canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as likely targets for these forms of cholestasis. Cholestasis of pregnancy is linked to estrogen and progesterone metabolites. These metabolites have been shown to impair the bile salt export pump (BSEP) function by an indirect mechanism. In addition, genetic variants (as well as mutants) of the genes coding for the phosphatidylcholine translocator MDR3 and BSEP and for the farnesoid X receptor, which is critical in the transcriptional activation of MDR3 ( ABCB4) and BSEP ( ABCB11) have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. The pathogenesis of drug-induced liver injury encompasses a wide spectrum of mechanisms, some of which are still poorly understood. BSEP is now known to be subject to drug inhibition in susceptible patients. Information on genetic factors rendering individuals susceptible to inhibition of BSEP by drugs or their metabolites is still scarce. Besides rare mutations that have been linked to drug-induced cholestasis, the common p.V444A polymorphism of BSEP has been identified as a potential risk factor. In this review, the authors summarize key concepts of physiology of bile formation, diagnostic principles to indentify these forms of acquired cholestasis, as well as pathogenetic mechanisms leading to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy or drug-induced cholestasis. In addition, they review the current knowledge on genetic susceptibility factors for these two forms of cholestasis.

  10. Genetic determinants of UV-susceptibility in non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen M Welsh

    Full Text Available A milieu of cytokines and signaling molecules are involved in the induction of UV-induced immune suppression and thus the etiology of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Targeting the UV-induced immunosuppression pathway, and using a large population based study of NMSC, we have investigated the risk associated with functional variants in 10 genes (IL10, IL4, IL4R, TNF, TNFR2, HTR2A, HRH2, IL12B, PTGS2, and HAL. The most prominent single genetic effect was observed for IL10. There was increasing risk for both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC with increasing number of variant IL10 haplotypes (BCC: p(trend = 0.0048; SCC: p(trend = 0.031. Having two IL10 GC haplotypes was associated with increased odds ratios of BCC and SCC (OR(BCC = 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; OR(SCC = 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9, and these associations were largely confined to women (OR(BCC = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.4; SCC: OR(SCC = 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0. To examine how combinations of these variants contribute to risk of BCC and SCC, we used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR and classification and regression trees (CART. Results from both of these methods found that in men, a combination of skin type, burns, IL10, IL4R, and possibly TNFR2 were important in both BCC and SCC. In women, skin type, burns, and IL10 were the most critical risk factors in SCC, with risk of BCC involving these same factors plus genetic variants in HTR2A, IL12B and IL4R. These data suggest differential genetic susceptibility to UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer risk by gender.

  11. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during......INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA...

  12. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  13. Genetic determinants of anti-malarial acquired immunity in a large multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer M G; Corran, Patrick; Risley, Paul; Silva, Nilupa; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Cornelius, Victoria; Hensmann, Meike; Molloy, Sile; Sepulveda, Nuno; Clark, Taane G; Band, Gavin; Clarke, Geraldine M; Spencer, Christopher C A; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Campino, Susana; Auburn, Sarah; Tall, Adama; Ly, Alioune Badara; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Maiga, Boubacar; Touré, Ousmane; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Dolo, Amagana; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Mangano, Valentina D; Verra, Frederica; Modiano, David; Bougouma, Edith; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Hussain, Ayman; Eid, Nahid; Elzein, Abier; Mohammed, Hiba; Elhassan, Ahmed; Elhassan, Ibrahim; Williams, Thomas N; Ndila, Carolyne; Macharia, Alexander; Marsh, Kevin; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Reyburn, Hugh; Lemnge, Martha; Ishengoma, Deus; Carter, Richard; Karunaweera, Nadira; Fernando, Deepika; Dewasurendra, Rajika; Drakeley, Christopher J; Riley, Eleanor M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A

    2015-08-28

    Many studies report associations between human genetic factors and immunity to malaria but few have been reliably replicated. These studies are usually country-specific, use small sample sizes and are not directly comparable due to differences in methodologies. This study brings together samples and data collected from multiple sites across Africa and Asia to use standardized methods to look for consistent genetic effects on anti-malarial antibody levels. Sera, DNA samples and clinical data were collected from 13,299 individuals from ten sites in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania, and Sri Lanka using standardized methods. DNA was extracted and typed for 202 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with known associations to malaria or antibody production, and antibody levels to four clinical grade malarial antigens [AMA1, MSP1, MSP2, and (NANP)4] plus total IgE were measured by ELISA techniques. Regression models were used to investigate the associations of clinical and genetic factors with antibody levels. Malaria infection increased levels of antibodies to malaria antigens and, as expected, stable predictors of anti-malarial antibody levels included age, seasonality, location, and ethnicity. Correlations between antibodies to blood-stage antigens AMA1, MSP1 and MSP2 were higher between themselves than with antibodies to the (NANP)4 epitope of the pre-erythrocytic circumsporozoite protein, while there was little or no correlation with total IgE levels. Individuals with sickle cell trait had significantly lower antibody levels to all blood-stage antigens, and recessive homozygotes for CD36 (rs321198) had significantly lower anti-malarial antibody levels to MSP2. Although the most significant finding with a consistent effect across sites was for sickle cell trait, its effect is likely to be via reducing a microscopically positive parasitaemia rather than directly on antibody levels. However, this study does demonstrate a framework for the feasibility of

  14. Which genetic determinants should be considered for tacrolimus dose optimization in kidney transplantation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruckmueller, H; Werk, Anneke Nina; Renders, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Tacrolimus is established as immunosuppressant after kidney transplantation. Polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) gene contributes significantly to tacrolimus dose requirements. Recently, CYP3A4*22 was reported to additionally affect tacrolimus pharmacokinetics (PK). In a...... remains essential in clinical care of kidney transplant patients. Genotyping of CYP3A5 and CYP3A4, however, could facilitate rapid dose finding to adapt the appropriate immunosuppressant dose, whereas other genetic factors had only little or no effect....

  15. A quantitative, high-throughput reverse genetic screen reveals novel connections between Pre-mRNA splicing and 5' and 3' end transcript determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Oana Albulescu

    Full Text Available Here we present the development and implementation of a genome-wide reverse genetic screen in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that couples high-throughput strain growth, robotic RNA isolation and cDNA synthesis, and quantitative PCR to allow for a robust determination of the level of nearly any cellular RNA in the background of ~5,500 different mutants. As an initial test of this approach, we sought to identify the full complement of factors that impact pre-mRNA splicing. Increasing lines of evidence suggest a relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and other cellular pathways including chromatin remodeling, transcription, and 3' end processing, yet in many cases the specific proteins responsible for functionally connecting these pathways remain unclear. Moreover, it is unclear whether all pathways that are coupled to splicing have been identified. As expected, our approach sensitively detects pre-mRNA accumulation in the vast majority of strains containing mutations in known splicing factors. Remarkably, however, several additional candidates were found to cause increases in pre-mRNA levels similar to that seen for canonical splicing mutants, none of which had previously been implicated in the splicing pathway. Instead, several of these factors have been previously implicated to play roles in chromatin remodeling, 3' end processing, and other novel categories. Further analysis of these factors using splicing-sensitive microarrays confirms that deletion of Bdf1, a factor that links transcription initiation and chromatin remodeling, leads to a global splicing defect, providing evidence for a novel connection between pre-mRNA splicing and this component of the SWR1 complex. By contrast, mutations in 3' end processing factors such as Cft2 and Yth1 also result in pre-mRNA splicing defects, although only for a subset of transcripts, suggesting that spliceosome assembly in S. cerevisiae may more closely resemble mammalian models of exon

  16. Expert Network for Die Casing Defect Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiadi WANG; Yongfeng JIANG; Chen LU; Wenjiang DING

    2003-01-01

    Due to the competition and high cost associated with die casting defects, it is urgent to adopt a rapid and effective method for defect analysis. In this research, a novel expert network approach was proposed to avoid some disadvantages of rulebased expert system. The main objective of the system is to assist die casting engineer in identifying defect, determining the probable causes of defect and proposing remedies to eliminate the defect. 14 common die casting defects could be identified quickly by expert system on the basis of their characteristics. BP neural network in combination with expert system was applied to map the complex relationship between causes and defects, and further explained the cause determination process.Cause determination gives due consideration to practical process conditions. Finally, corrective measures were recommended to eliminate the defect and implemented in the sequence of difficulty.

  17. Genetics of sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leo W. Beukeboom; Louis Van De Zande

    2010-09-01

    The parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis reproduces by haplodiploidy; males are haploid and females are diploid. Sex determination in Nasonia is not governed by complementary alleles at one or more sex loci. As in most other insects, the sex-determining pathway consists of the basal switch doublesex that is sex-specifically regulated by transformer. Analysis of a polyploid and a mutant gynandromorphic strain, suggested a parent-specific effect (imprinting) on sex determination in Nasonia. Zygotic activity of transformer is autoregulated and depends on a combination of maternal provision of tra mRNA and a paternal genome set. This constitutes a novel way of transformer control in insect sex determination implying maternal imprinting. The nature of the maternal imprint is not yet known and it remains to be determined how broadly the Nasonia sex-determining mechanism applies to other haplodiploids.

  18. Two case reports of an unusual association between Klippel-Feil syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Do they share same genetic defect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koneru Lakshmi Umamaheshwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS is an unusual skeletal disorder characterized by congenital fusion of two or more cervical vertebrae which can be sporadic or familial. KFS emerges to be a failure of the normal segmentation and fusion of the mesodermal somites during 3 rd and 8 th weeks of embryonic development. The triad of low posterior hairline, short neck, and restricted neck motion is present only in 50% and often associated with scoliosis, spina bifida, Sprengel′s deformity, cervical ribs, deafness, cleft palate, renal anomalies, congenital heart defects, and so on because of heterogeneous nature of the disease. The significance of KFS lies in the secondary effects produced on the nervous system, which usually presents with features of progressive cord and brain stem compression with relatively minor trauma. We here report two cases of KFS presented in association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Only two such cases have been described in the literature in 1954 and 1975.

  19. Physical and genetic mapping of the CMT4A locus and exclusion of PMP-2 as the defect in CMT4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loeb, D.; Roses, A.D.; Pericak-Vance, M.A.; Vance, J.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-20

    We have previously localized one form of the autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4 (CMT4A) to a 5-cM region of chromosome 8q13-q21. We now report the formation of a 7-Bp YAC contig spanning the region. This contig was used to map nine additional microsatellites and six STSs to this region, and subsequent haplotype analysis has narrowed the CMT4A flanking interval to less than 1 cM. In addition, using SSCP and our physical map, we have demonstrated that the myelin protein PMP-2, mapped by FISH to this region, is not the defect in CMT4A. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects.

  1. Multivariate analysis to determine the genetic distance among backcross papaya (Carica papaya) progenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Gonçalves, L S A; Berilli, A P C G; Pinto, F O; Ribeiro, E H

    2012-05-14

    Morpho-agronomic and molecular (RAPD and ISSR markers) data were used to evaluate genetic distances between papaya backcross progenies in order to help identify agronomically superior genotypes. Thirty-two papaya progenies were evaluated based on 15 morpho-agronomic characteristics, 20 ISSR and 19 RAPD primers. Manhattan, Jaccard and Gower distances were used to estimate differences based on continuous and binary data and combined analyses, respectively. Except for production, there were significant differences in the continuous variables among the genotypes. The molecular analysis revealed 193 dominant markers (ISSR and RAPD), being 53 polymorphic loci. Among the various clusters that were generated, the one based on a combined analysis of morpho-agronomic and molecular data gave the highest cophenetic correlation (0.72) compared to individual analysis, consistently allocating the progenies into six groups. We found that the Gower algorithm was more coherent in the discrimination of the genotypes, demonstrating that a combination of molecular and agronomic data is valuable for studies of genetic dissimilarity in papaya.

  2. Psychological determinants of willingness to taste and purchase genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ellen; Campbell, Scott

    2004-10-01

    Decreasing acceptance of biotechnologies over time has been reported in Europe. Studies claim that attitudes are negative, even hostile, and that people are very worried about genetic engineering in food and medicine. However, such studies are mostly based on surveys and these have significant methodological problems, such as low response rates, which may indicate that only those with strong views respond, thus biasing the sample. Here an alternative method, involving "topic-blind" recruitment of participants and a behavioral measure (food tasting), was used. We show that in a topic-blind sample of 100 individuals, 93% willingly tasted and ate what they believed to be genetically modified (GM) food in an experimental setting, and 48% said they would buy GM food in the future, results that are surprising in the context of other reports about attitudes and intentions toward GM food. Purchasers and nonpurchasers differed in their attitudes toward GM food on key risk-related scales (particularly on a dread-not dread scale--a measure of integral affect--and an ethical-unethical scale). Despite these differences, however, and despite their negative attitude, most nonpurchasers (85.7%) still tasted the GM apple. Incidental affect (state stress and trait worry) was not found to influence risk-related judgments about GM food. Integral affect (dread of GM plants and animals used for food) and concerns about the future risks of GM animals in food were found to be key predictors of willingness to purchase GM food.

  3. CYP/PON genetic variations as determinant of organophosphate pesticides toxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GURPREET KAUR; A. K. JAIN; SANDEEP SINGH

    2017-03-01

    In the present scenario of increased accumulation of pesticides in the environment, it is important to understand its impact on human health. The focus is on gene–environment interaction, highlighting the consequences and factors that may halt the biotransformation of some pesticides and change their actual dose response curve due to mixed exposure to pesticides. The paraoxonase and cytochrome P450 gene families are involved in the metabolism of oxon derivate (toxic than its parent compound) of organophosphate pesticides, thus, mutations in these genes may impact the metabolic outcome of pesticides and subsequent health hazards. The complex multi gene–environment interaction and one gene – one risk factor are two different aspects to understand the potential health effect related to environmental exposure studies. The genetic polymorphisms areassociated with varying levels of risk within the population, as gene products of varied genotype alter the biotransformation of exogenous/endogenous substrates. This paper is aimed to review the impact of endogenous and exogenous factors on a mechanistic pathway of organophosphate pesticide biotransformation and various risk associated with it among the humanpopulation. Understanding the genetic polymorphism of genes involved in pesticide metabolism and highlighting the gene isoform dependent interindividual differences to metabolize particular pesticides may help us to unravel the reasons behind differential toxicity for pesticides exposure than expected.

  4. Population genetics of traditionally managed maize : farming practice as a determinant of genetic structure and identity of maize landraces in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of crop genetic diversity is being maintained in farmers' fields worldwide. The population genetics of traditionally managed landraces is therefore of interest to the conservation of genetic resources. The growing trend towards agricultural modernization and the prospect of introducin

  5. Population genetics of traditionally managed maize : farming practice as a determinant of genetic structure and identity of maize landraces in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of crop genetic diversity is being maintained in farmers' fields worldwide. The population genetics of traditionally managed landraces is therefore of interest to the conservation of genetic resources. The growing trend towards agricultural modernization and the prospect of introducin

  6. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, designated as transformation event 305423, which has... evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International in its petition for a determination...

  7. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a corn line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., designated as event DP-32138-1... on our evaluation of data submitted by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., in its petition for...

  8. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...