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Sample records for genetic stability resulting

  1. Viral genome segmentation can result from a trade-off between genetic content and particle stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojosnegros, Samuel; García-Arriaza, Juan; Escarmís, Cristina; Manrubia, Susanna C; Perales, Celia; Arias, Armando; Mateu, Mauricio García; Domingo, Esteban

    2011-03-01

    The evolutionary benefit of viral genome segmentation is a classical, yet unsolved question in evolutionary biology and RNA genetics. Theoretical studies anticipated that replication of shorter RNA segments could provide a replicative advantage over standard size genomes. However, this question has remained elusive to experimentalists because of the lack of a proper viral model system. Here we present a study with a stable segmented bipartite RNA virus and its ancestor non-segmented counterpart, in an identical genomic nucleotide sequence context. Results of RNA replication, protein expression, competition experiments, and inactivation of infectious particles point to a non-replicative trait, the particle stability, as the main driver of fitness gain of segmented genomes. Accordingly, measurements of the volume occupation of the genome inside viral capsids indicate that packaging shorter genomes involves a relaxation of the packaging density that is energetically favourable. The empirical observations are used to design a computational model that predicts the existence of a critical multiplicity of infection for domination of segmented over standard types. Our experiments suggest that viral segmented genomes may have arisen as a molecular solution for the trade-off between genome length and particle stability. Genome segmentation allows maximizing the genetic content without the detrimental effect in stability derived from incresing genome length.

  2. Viral genome segmentation can result from a trade-off between genetic content and particle stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ojosnegros

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary benefit of viral genome segmentation is a classical, yet unsolved question in evolutionary biology and RNA genetics. Theoretical studies anticipated that replication of shorter RNA segments could provide a replicative advantage over standard size genomes. However, this question has remained elusive to experimentalists because of the lack of a proper viral model system. Here we present a study with a stable segmented bipartite RNA virus and its ancestor non-segmented counterpart, in an identical genomic nucleotide sequence context. Results of RNA replication, protein expression, competition experiments, and inactivation of infectious particles point to a non-replicative trait, the particle stability, as the main driver of fitness gain of segmented genomes. Accordingly, measurements of the volume occupation of the genome inside viral capsids indicate that packaging shorter genomes involves a relaxation of the packaging density that is energetically favourable. The empirical observations are used to design a computational model that predicts the existence of a critical multiplicity of infection for domination of segmented over standard types. Our experiments suggest that viral segmented genomes may have arisen as a molecular solution for the trade-off between genome length and particle stability. Genome segmentation allows maximizing the genetic content without the detrimental effect in stability derived from incresing genome length.

  3. Viral Genome Segmentation Can Result from a Trade-Off between Genetic Content and Particle Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojosnegros, Samuel; García-Arriaza, Juan; Escarmís, Cristina; Manrubia, Susanna C.; Perales, Celia; Arias, Armando; Mateu, Mauricio García; Domingo, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary benefit of viral genome segmentation is a classical, yet unsolved question in evolutionary biology and RNA genetics. Theoretical studies anticipated that replication of shorter RNA segments could provide a replicative advantage over standard size genomes. However, this question has remained elusive to experimentalists because of the lack of a proper viral model system. Here we present a study with a stable segmented bipartite RNA virus and its ancestor non-segmented counterpart, in an identical genomic nucleotide sequence context. Results of RNA replication, protein expression, competition experiments, and inactivation of infectious particles point to a non-replicative trait, the particle stability, as the main driver of fitness gain of segmented genomes. Accordingly, measurements of the volume occupation of the genome inside viral capsids indicate that packaging shorter genomes involves a relaxation of the packaging density that is energetically favourable. The empirical observations are used to design a computational model that predicts the existence of a critical multiplicity of infection for domination of segmented over standard types. Our experiments suggest that viral segmented genomes may have arisen as a molecular solution for the trade-off between genome length and particle stability. Genome segmentation allows maximizing the genetic content without the detrimental effect in stability derived from incresing genome length. PMID:21437265

  4. Simultaneous stabilization using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, R.W.; Schmitendorf, W.E. (California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of simultaneously stabilizing a set of plants using full state feedback. The problem is converted to a simple optimization problem which is solved by a genetic algorithm. Several examples demonstrate the utility of this method. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Genetic regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear differential equations with time delays. In this paper, we study both locally and globally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks, taking messenger ribonucleic acid alternative splicing into consideration. Based on nonnegative matrix theory, we first develop necessary and sufficient conditions for locally delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays. Compared to the previous results, these conditions are easy to verify. Then we develop sufficient conditions for global delay-independent stability for genetic regulatory networks. Compared to the previous results, this sufficient condition is less conservative. To illustrate theorems developed in this paper, we analyze delay-independent stability of two genetic regulatory networks: a real-life repressilatory network with three genes and three proteins, and a synthetic gene regulatory network with five genes and seven proteins. The simulation results show that the theorems developed in this paper can effectively determine the delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory networks.

  6. Genetic and Environmental Stability of Neuroticism From Adolescence to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivard, Michel G; Middeldorp, Christel M; Dolan, Conor V; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-01

    Longitudinal studies of neuroticism have shown that, on average, neuroticism scores decrease from adolescence to adulthood. The heritability of neuroticism is estimated between 0.30 and 0.60 and does not seem to vary greatly as a function of age. Shared environmental effects are rarely reported. Less is known about the role of genetic and environmental influences on the rank order stability of neuroticism in the period from adolescence to adulthood. We studied the stability of neuroticism in a cohort sequential (classical) twin design, from adolescence (age 14 years) to young adulthood (age 32 years). A genetic simplex model that was fitted to the longitudinal neuroticism data showed that the genetic stability of neuroticism was relatively high (genetic correlations between adjacent age bins >0.9), and increased from adolescence to adulthood. Environmental stability was appreciably lower (environmental correlations between adjacent age bins were between 0.3 and 0.6). This low stability was largely due to age-specific environmental variance, which was dominated by measurement error. This attenuated the age-to-age environmental correlations. We constructed an environmental covariance matrix corrected for this error, under the strong assumption that all age-specific environmental variance is error variance. The environmental (co)variance matrix corrected for attenuation revealed highly stable environmental influences on neuroticism (correlations between adjacent age bins were between 0.7 and 0.9). Our results indicate that both genetic and environmental influences have enduring effects on individual differences in neuroticism.

  7. Genetic and environmental stability of intelligence in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franić, Sanja; Dolan, Conor V; van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2014-06-01

    The present study examined the genetic and environmental contributions to the temporal stability of verbal, non-verbal and general intelligence across a developmental period spanning childhood and adolescence (5-18 years). Longitudinal twin data collected in four different studies on a total of 1,748 twins, comprising 4,641 measurement points in total, were analyzed using genetic adaptations of the simplex model. The heterogeneity in the type of instrument used to assess psychometric intelligence across the different subsamples and ages allowed us to address the auxiliary question of how to optimally utilize the existing longitudinal data in the context of gene-finding studies. The results were consistent across domains (verbal, non-verbal and general intelligence), and indicated that phenotypic stability was driven primarily by the high stability of additive genetic factors, that the stability of common environment was moderate, and that the unique environment contributed primarily to change. The cross-subscale stability was consistently low, indicating a small overlap between different domains of intelligence over time. The high stability of additive genetic factors justifies the use of a linear combination of scores across the different ages in the context of gene-finding studies.

  8. Genetic stabilization of transthyretin, cerebrovascular disease, and life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornstrup, Louise S; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    Transthyretin can cause amyloidosis attributable to destabilization of transthyretin tetramers in plasma. We tested the hypothesis that genetic stabilization of transthyretin associates with reduced risk of vascular disease and increased life expectancy. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We included 68 602...... participants from 2 prospective studies of the general population. We genotyped for 2 stabilizing genetic variants in the transthyretin gene (TTR), R104H and T119M, and determined the association of genotypes with plasma levels of transthyretin, measures of thyroid function, risk of vascular disease, and life...

  9. Results of Evolution Supervised by Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bălan, Mugur C; Sestraş, Radu E

    2010-01-01

    A series of results of evolution supervised by genetic algorithms with interest to agricultural and horticultural fields are reviewed. New obtained original results from the use of genetic algorithms on structure-activity relationships are reported.

  10. Genetic and environmental stability differs in reactive and proactive aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvblad, Catherine; Raine, Adrian; Zheng, Mo; Baker, Laura A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine stability and change in genetic and environmental influences on reactive (impulsive and affective) and proactive (planned and instrumental) aggression from childhood to early adolescence. The sample was drawn from an ongoing longitudinal twin study of risk factors for antisocial behavior at the University of Southern California (USC). The twins were measured on two occasions: ages 9-10 years (N=1,241) and 11-14 years (N=874). Reactive and proactive aggressive behaviors were rated by parents. The stability in reactive aggression was due to genetic and nonshared environmental influences, whereas the continuity in proactive aggression was primarily genetically mediated. Change in both reactive and proactive aggression between the two occasions was mainly explained by nonshared environmental influences, although some evidence for new genetic variance at the second occasion was found for both forms of aggression. These results suggest that proactive and reactive aggression differ in their genetic and environmental stability, and provide further evidence for some distinction between reactive and proactive forms of aggression.

  11. Some results on stability of difference systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Song Yang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some new results on existence and stability of equilibrium or periodic points for difference systems. First sufficient conditions of existence of asymptotically stable equilibrium point as well as the asymptotic stability of given equilibrium point are given for second order or delay difference systems. Then some similar results on existence of asymptotically stable periodic (equilibrium points to general difference systems are presented.

  12. Stabilization of Electromagnetic Suspension System Behavior by Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Najar Khoda Bakhsh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic suspension system with a nonlinear and unstable behavior, is used in maglev trains. In this paper a linear mathematical model of system is achieved and the state feedback method is used to improve the system stability. The control coefficients are tuned by two different methods, Riccati and a new method based on Genetic algorithm. In this new proposed method, we use Genetic algorithm to achieve the optimum values of control coefficients. The results of the system simulation by Matlab indicate the effectiveness of new proposed system. When a new reference of air gap is needed or a new external force is added, the proposed system could omit the vibration and shake of the train coupe and so, passengers feel more comfortable.

  13. Longitudinal Stability in Genetic Effects on Children's Conversational Language Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura Segebart; Harlaar, Nicole; Petrill, Stephen A.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the longitudinal stability of genetic and environmental influences on children's productive language sample measures during the early school-age years. Method: Twin study methodology with structural equation modeling was used to derive univariate estimates of additive genetic (A), shared environmental (C), and…

  14. Temporal genetic stability of Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria-Soria, A; Kellner, D A; Brown, J E; Gonzalez-Acosta, C; Kamgang, B; Lutwama, J; Powell, J R

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of viruses that cause yellow fever, dengue and Chikungunya fever. In the absence of effective vaccines, the reduction of these diseases relies on vector control strategies. The success of these strategies is tightly linked to the population dynamics of target populations. In the present study, 14 collections from St. aegypti populations separated by periods of 1-13 years were analysed to determine their temporal genetic stability. Although temporal structure is discernible in most populations, the degree of temporal differentiation is dependent on the population and does not obscure the geographic structure of the various populations. The results suggest that performing detailed studies in the years prior to and after population reduction- or modification-based control interventions at each target field site may be useful in assessing the probability of success. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Early Generation Stability in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Jun; Ao Guang-Hui; XIAO Yi; WU Xian-Jun; LI Shi-Gui

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of early generation stability (EGS) in rice was studied via genetic analysis. Three types of crosses were made, namely between EGS varieties, EGS and conventional rice variety, and conventional rice varieties. The genetic analysis was based on the stable lines in F2 population. The stable lines may appear from some combinations of EGS rice crossing with each other and EGS rice crossing with conventional varieties at different frequencies, but stable lines didn't appear in conventional varieties crossing with conventional varieties. Genetic analysis results indicated that the EGS phenomena should just exist in special rice materials, and the frequency of stable lines was closely related to the EGS traits of parents. The EGS traits were neither qualitative nor quantitative traits, and they were controlled by neither dominant genes nor recessive genes. The EGS traits might be inherited by F1 single plant, and the traits of F3 and F4 were corresponded to those of F2 population, i.e. F3 and F4 lines derived from non-segregating F2 showed uniform agronomic traits, and those from segregating F2.did not. The agronomic traits of EGS lines were consistent with those of F1 single plant. On the other hand, when EGS lines occurred, the segregating lines in Mendelian manner were also observed in all F2 population of the same combination. It was suggested that the reason why the stable strains occurred might be a special factor to control (open/close) gene at the beginning of cell division in zygote, resulting in closing mitosis and opening somatic reduction. The somatic reduction of zygote resulted in recombination and homozygosity forming in F1 single plant,and some lines with uniform agronomic traits were observed in some lines of F2 population.

  16. Fault Tolerant Control: A Simultaneous Stabilization Result

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Blondel, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of designing fault tolerant compensators that stabilize a given system both in the nominal situation, as well as in the situation where one of the sensors or one of the actuators has failed. It is shown that such compensators always exist, provided that the system...

  17. Evaluation of genetic stability in cryopreserved Solanum tuberosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... the genetic stability of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plantlets of the cultivars Agria ... detect if there were probably any changes in the level of polyploidy. .... Phor-All buffer (10 mM Tris-HAc pH 7.5, 10 mM MgAc, 50 mM KAc,.

  18. Longitudinal stability in genetic effects on children's conversational language productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura Segebart; Harlaar, Nicole; Petrill, Stephen A; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2012-06-01

    The authors examined the longitudinal stability of genetic and environmental influences on children's productive language sample measures during the early school-age years. Twin study methodology with structural equation modeling was used to derive univariate estimates of additive genetic (A), shared environmental (C), and nonshared environmental (E) effects on language measures at each of 2 time points, based on 487 twins at the 1st-grade time point and 387 twins at the 2nd-grade time point. To address questions of stability over time, the authors used longitudinal latent factor analysis. Stability in the Conversational Language factor was accounted for almost entirely by shared genetic effects between 1st and 2nd grade, meaning no new genetic effects were observed at the 2nd time point. In contrast, nonshared environmental effects were entirely time point specific, meaning whatever nonshared environmental influences were operating at the first time point were not influencing individual variation in the language factor at the second time point. The discussion in this article centers on possible candidates for both genetic and nonshared environmental effects as well as implications for clinical practice and future research.

  19. Cell Factory Stability and Genetic Circuits for Improved Strain Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter

    Development of new chemical-­‐producing microbial cell factories is an iterative trial-­and-­error process, and to screen candidate cells at high throughput, genetic biosensor systems are appealing. Each biosensor has distinct biological parameters, making modular tuning networks attractive....... However, all synthetic gene systems -­ including the target metabolic pathways themselves -­ represent a possible fitness burden to the cell and thus constitute a threat to strain stability. In this thesis, several studies served to develop genetic systems for optimizing cell factory development...... factories in future....

  20. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kozich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J.; Barton, David E.

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report

  1. Asymmetry of genetic variation in fitness-related traits: apparent stabilizing selection on g(max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2009-11-01

    The maintenance of genetic variation in traits closely associated with fitness remains a key unresolved issue in evolutionary genetics. One important qualification on the observation of genetic variation in fitness-related traits is that such traits respond asymmetrically to selection, evolving to a greater extent in the direction of lower fitness. Here we test the hypothesis that standing genetic variation in fitness-related traits is principally maintained for unfit phenotypes. Male Drosophila bunnanda vary in mating success (the primary determinant of male fitness) due to female mate choice. We used competitive mating success to partitioning males into two groups: successful (high fitness) and unsuccessful (low fitness). Relative to successful males, unsuccessful males harbored considerably greater levels of additive genetic variation for sexual signaling traits. This genetic asymmetry was detected for a multivariate trait that we demonstrated was not directly under stabilizing sexual selection, leading us to conclude the trait was under apparent stabilizing selection. Consequently, our results suggest genetic variance might be biased toward low fitness even for traits that are not themselves the direct targets of selection. Simple metrics of genetic variance are unlikely to be adequate descriptors of the complex nature of the genetic basis of traits under selection.

  2. Explicit Optimal Hardness via Gaussian stability results

    CERN Document Server

    De, Anindya

    2012-01-01

    The results of Raghavendra (2008) show that assuming Khot's Unique Games Conjecture (2002), for every constraint satisfaction problem there exists a generic semi-definite program that achieves the optimal approximation factor. This result is existential as it does not provide an explicit optimal rounding procedure nor does it allow to calculate exactly the Unique Games hardness of the problem. Obtaining an explicit optimal approximation scheme and the corresponding approximation factor is a difficult challenge for each specific approximation problem. An approach for determining the exact approximation factor and the corresponding optimal rounding was established in the analysis of MAX-CUT (KKMO 2004) and the use of the Invariance Principle (MOO 2005). However, this approach crucially relies on results explicitly proving optimal partitions in Gaussian space. Until recently, Borell's result (Borell 1985) was the only non-trivial Gaussian partition result known. In this paper we derive the first explicit optimal...

  3. Tracking the Genetic Stability of a Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Breeding Program With Genetic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Lelania; Beaman, Lorraine

    2017-08-01

    A genetic stock identification (GSI) assay was developed in 2008 to distinguish Russian honey bees from other honey bee stocks that are commercially produced in the United States. Probability of assignment (POA) values have been collected and maintained since the stock release in 2008 to the Russian Honey Bee Breeders Association. These data were used to assess stability of the breeding program and the diversity levels of the contemporary breeding stock through comparison of POA values and genetic diversity parameters from the initial release to current values. POA values fluctuated throughout 2010-2016, but have recovered to statistically similar levels in 2016 (POA(2010) = 0.82, POA(2016) = 0.74; P = 0.33). Genetic diversity parameters (i.e., allelic richness and gene diversity) in 2016 also remained at similar levels when compared to those in 2010. Estimates of genetic structure revealed stability (FST(2009/2016) = 0.0058) with a small increase in the estimate of the inbreeding coefficient (FIS(2010) = 0.078, FIS(2016) = 0.149). The relationship among breeding lines, based on genetic distance measurement, was similar in 2008 and 2016 populations, but with increased homogeneity among lines (i.e., decreased genetic distance). This was expected based on the closed breeding system used for Russian honey bees. The successful application of the GSI assay in a commercial breeding program demonstrates the utility and stability of such technology to contribute to and monitor the genetic integrity of a breeding stock of an insect species. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  5. STABILITY RESULTS OF RANDOM IMPULSIVE SEMILINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.GOWRISANKAR; P.MOHANKUMAR; A.VINODKUMAR

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence, uniqueness, continuous dependence, Ulam stabilities and exponential stability of random impulsive semilinear differential equations un-der sufficient condition. The results are obtained by using the contraction mapping principle. Finally an example is given to illustrate the applications of the abstract results.

  6. Inbreeding and genetic diversity in dogs: results from DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Claire M

    2011-08-01

    This review assesses evidence from DNA analysis to determine whether there is sufficient genetic diversity within breeds to ensure that populations are sustainable in the absence of cross breeding and to determine whether genetic diversity is declining. On average, dog breeds currently retain approximately 87% of the available domestic canine genetic diversity. Requirements that breeding stock must be 'clear' for all genetic disorders may firstly place undue genetic pressure on animals tested as being 'clear' of known genetic disorders, secondly may contribute to loss of diversity and thirdly may result in the dissemination of new recessive disorders for which no genetic tests are available. Global exchange of genetic material may hasten the loss of alleles and this practice should be discussed in relation to the current effective population size of a breed and its expected future popularity. Genomic data do not always support the results from pedigree analysis and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  7. New results in subspace-stabilization control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Johnson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Subspace-stabilization is a generalization of the classical idea of stabilizing motions of a dynamical system to an equilibrium state. The concept of subspace-stabilization and a theory for designing subspace-stabilizing control laws was introduced in a previously published paper. In the present paper, two new alternative methods for designing control laws that achieve subspace-stabilization are presented. These two alternative design methods are based on: (i a novel application of existing Linear Quadratic Regulator optimal-control theory, and (ii an algebraic method in which the control-law is expressed as a linear feedback of certain “canonical variables.” In some cases, these new design methods may be more effective than existing ones. The results are illustrated by worked examples.

  8. M-matrix-based stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and noise perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li-Ping; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Li-Zhi; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Stability is essential for designing and controlling any dynamic systems. Recently, the stability of genetic regulatory networks has been widely studied by employing linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, which results in checking the existence of feasible solutions to high-dimensional LMIs. In the previous study, the authors present several stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays, based on M-matrix theory and using the non-smooth Lyapunov function, which results in determining whether a low-dimensional matrix is a non-singular M-matrix. However, the previous approach cannot be applied to analyse the stability of genetic regulatory networks with noise perturbations. Here, the authors design a smooth Lyapunov function quadratic in state variables and employ M-matrix theory to derive new stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays. Theoretically, these conditions are less conservative than existing ones in some genetic regulatory networks. Then the results are extended to genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and noise perturbations. For genetic regulatory networks with n genes and n proteins, the derived conditions are to check if an n × n matrix is a non-singular M-matrix. To further present the new theories proposed in this study, three example regulatory networks are analysed.

  9. New Results on Stability and Stabilization of Markovian Jump Systems with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This technical paper deals with the problem of stochastic stability and stabilization for a class of linear Markovian jumping systems with discrete time-varying delay. A novel delay-dependent stochastic stability criterion for Markovian delay systems is established based on new augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and delay fractioning techniques. Then a state feedback controller is designed to guarantee the stochastic stability of the resulting closed-loop system. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach in this paper.

  10. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kozich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J.; Barton, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report sho

  11. Genetic stability of pestivirus genomes cloned into BACs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Uttenthal, Åse;

    chromosome (BAC) vector “pBeloBAC11”. This BAC vector provides a markedly higher stability of cloned sequences in E. coli compared to plasmids that form the basis for the existing pestivirus cDNA clones. In this study, two of the newly constructed BAC clones were analysed for genetic stability of the cloned...... pestivirus genomes to demonstrate the suitability of the BAC vector for harbouring pestivirus genomes. Two BAC clones, comprising the complete genomes of BDV Gifhorn (pBeloGif3) and CSFV Paderborn (pBeloPader10) were passaged 15 times in E.coli representing at least 360 bacteria generations. From 15th...... passage of the BAC clones, the entire 5’ and 3’ ends of the cloned genomes and parts of the open reading frame were sequenced and compared to the sequences of the parent BAC clones. The sequenced areas represent approximately 20 % of the cloned genome. No mutations were observed after the extensive...

  12. No matter Where You Go, There You Are: The Genetic Foundations of Temporal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio José Figueredo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present empirical tests of the stability of individual differences over the lifespan using a novel methodological technique to combine behavior-genetic data from twin dyads with longitudinal measures of life history-related traits (including health and personality from non-twin samples.  Using data from The Midlife in the United States (MIDUS Longitudinal Survey, we constructed a series of “hybrid” models that permitted the estimation of both temporal stability parameters and behavior-genetic variance components to determine the contributions of genetic and environmental influences on individual differences.  Our results indicate that changes in a higher-order factor of life history strategy (Super-K, composed of the K-Factor, Covitality, and Personality over the study period were very small in magnitude and that this temporal stability is under a considerable degree of shared genetic influence and a substantial degree of non-shared environmental influence, but a statistically non-significant degree of shared environmental influence.  Implications and future directions are discussed. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v5i2.18477

  13. Design of robust stability augmentation system for an airship using genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Jin; QU Wei-dong; XI Yu-geng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the design of stability augmentation system (SAS) for the airship, which is robust with respect to parametric plant uncertainties. A robust pole placement approach is adopted in the design,which uses genetic algorithm (GA) as the optimization tool to derive the most robust solution of the state-feedback gain matrix K. The method can guarantee the resulting closed-loop poles to remain in a specified allocation region despite plant parameter uncertainty. Thus, the longitudinal stability of the airship is augmented by robustly assigning the closed-loop poles in a prescribed region of the left half s-plane.

  14. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, N.C. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Prasad, K. [Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2006-11-15

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration. (author)

  15. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  16. Reducibility and Stability Results for Linear System of Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misir Adil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We first give a theorem on the reducibility of linear system of difference equations of the form . Next, by the means of Floquet theory, we obtain some stability results. Moreover, some examples are given to illustrate the importance of the results.

  17. Global and robust stability analysis of genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and parameter uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang-Xiang Wu

    2011-08-01

    The study of stability is essential for designing or controlling genetic regulatory networks. This paper addresses global and robust stability of genetic regulatory networks with time delays and parameter uncertainties. Most existing results on this issue are based on the linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) approach, which results in checking the existence of a feasible solution to high dimensional LMIs. Based on M-matrix theory, we will present several novel global stability conditions for genetic regulatory networks with time-varying and time-invariant delays. All of these stability conditions are given in terms of M-matrices, for which there are many and very easy ways to be verified. Then, we extend these results to genetic regulatory networks with time delays and parameter uncertainties. To illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results, several genetic regulatory networks are analyzed. Compared with existing results in the literature, we also show that our results are less conservative than existing ones with these illustrative genetic regulatory networks.

  18. Some results on T-stability of Picard's iteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatrajit, Thokchom; Rohen, Yumnam

    2016-01-01

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of fixed points of T-stability for an iteration on partial cone metric space of Zamfirescu contraction. As an application, we prove a theorem for integral equation. We also give illustrative examples to verify our results.

  19. Extended Rearrangement Inequalities and Applications to Some Quantitative Stability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemou, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we prove a new functional inequality of Hardy-Littlewood type for generalized rearrangements of functions. We then show how this inequality provides quantitative stability results of steady states to evolution systems that essentially preserve the rearrangements and some suitable energy functional, under minimal regularity assumptions on the perturbations. In particular, this inequality yields a quantitative stability result of a large class of steady state solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson systems, and more precisely we derive a quantitative control of the L 1 norm of the perturbation by the relative Hamiltonian (the energy functional) and rearrangements. A general non linear stability result has been obtained by Lemou et al. (Invent Math 187:145-194, 2012) in the gravitational context, however the proof relied in a crucial way on compactness arguments which by construction provides no quantitative control of the perturbation. Our functional inequality is also applied to the context of 2D-Euler systems and also provides quantitative stability results of a large class of steady-states to this system in a natural energy space.

  20. Extended Rearrangement Inequalities and Applications to Some Quantitative Stability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemou, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we prove a new functional inequality of Hardy-Littlewood type for generalized rearrangements of functions. We then show how this inequality provides quantitative stability results of steady states to evolution systems that essentially preserve the rearrangements and some suitable energy functional, under minimal regularity assumptions on the perturbations. In particular, this inequality yields a quantitative stability result of a large class of steady state solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson systems, and more precisely we derive a quantitative control of the L 1 norm of the perturbation by the relative Hamiltonian (the energy functional) and rearrangements. A general non linear stability result has been obtained by Lemou et al. (Invent Math 187:145-194, 2012) in the gravitational context, however the proof relied in a crucial way on compactness arguments which by construction provides no quantitative control of the perturbation. Our functional inequality is also applied to the context of 2D-Euler systems and also provides quantitative stability results of a large class of steady-states to this system in a natural energy space.

  1. Stability results for generalized contractions in partial metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Al- Sirehy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1994, Mathews [7] introduced the notion of partial metric spaces as a part of his study of denotational semantics of data.ow networks and obtained a generalization of the Banach contraction principle in partial metric spaces. In this paper, we prove stability results in partial metric spaces.

  2. Genetic stability of micropropagated plants of Crambe abyssinica Hochst using ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, E T; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L; Souza Neto, J D; do Amaral, J A T

    2015-12-09

    Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is a non-edible annual herb, which was first cultivated to extract oil for industry, and now has great potential for biodiesel production. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the genetic stability of micropropagated plants of the C. abyssinica Hochst cultivar 'FMS brilhante' using polymerase chain reaction techniques based on inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The aim was to develop a protocol for the in vitro regeneration of these plants with low genetic variation as compared to the donor plant. For micropropagation, shoot tips from in vitro germinated seedlings were used as explants and were initially cultivated for 90 days on MS medium with 5.0 μM 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), which at 90 days, led to the highest number of shoots per explant (NSE) (12.20 shoots) being detected. After 120 days, the interaction between BAP concentration and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was tested, and the highest NSE was observed following exposure to 0.0/0.5 μM BAP/NAA (11.40 shoots) and 1.0/0.0 μM BAP/NAA (11.00 shoots). The highest proportion of rooting phase were observed following exposure to 0.5 μM NAA (30%). The 13 ISSR primers used to analyze genetic stability produced 91 amplification products, of which only eight bands were polymorphic and 83 were monomorphic for all 10 regenerated crambe plants, compared to the donor plant explant. These results indicate that crambe shoot tips are a highly reliable explant that can be used to micropropagate genetically true-to-type plants or to maintain genetic stability, as verified using ISSR markers.

  3. A Less Conservative Stability Criterion for Delayed Stochastic Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the problem of stability analysis for delayed stochastic genetic regulatory networks. By introducing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing delay-range partition approach, a new stability criterion is given to ensure the mean square stability of genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays and stochastic disturbances. The stability criterion is given in the form of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily tested by the LMI Toolbox of MATLAB. Moreover, it is theoretically shown that the obtained stability criterion is less conservative than the one in W. Zhang et al., 2012. Finally, a numerical example is presented to illustrate our theory.

  4. New results in global stabilization for stochastic nonlinear systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao BIAN; Zhong-Ping JIANG

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new results on the robust global stabilization and the gain assignment problems for stochastic nonlinear systems. Three stochastic nonlinear control design schemes are developed. Furthermore, a new stochastic gain assignment method is developed for a class of uncertain interconnected stochastic nonlinear systems. This method can be combined with the nonlinear small-gain theorem to design partial-state feedback controllers for stochastic nonlinear systems. Two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  5. Adaptive Fixation in Two-Locus Models of Stabilizing Selection and Genetic Drift

    OpenAIRE

    Wollstein, Andreas; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between quantitative genetics and population genetics has been studied for nearly a century, almost since the existence of these two disciplines. Here we ask to what extent quantitative genetic models in which selection is assumed to operate on a polygenic trait predict adaptive fixations that may lead to footprints in the genome (selective sweeps). We study two-locus models of stabilizing selection (with and without genetic drift) by simulations and analytically. For symmetr...

  6. Key issues relating to the genetic stability and preservation of cells and cell banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simione, F P

    1992-01-01

    The long term maintenance of genetically stable cells is important for ensuring reproducible results and continuity in the advance of microbiology, cell biology and biotechnology. As actively growing cultures, cells are constantly at risk of changing, and the necessity for subculturing living materials increases the chances for genetic change and contamination. Many techniques are available for stabilizing living cells; the method employed must be compatible with the intended use of the culture. The most commonly utilized means of preserving living cells are by freezing to cryogenic temperatures, and freeze-drying. Master stocks are usually maintained at liquid nitrogen or comparable temperatures, while working stocks can be frozen or freeze-dried, and maintained at more economical and easily managed temperatures where possible. However, low temperature techniques may cause damage that can result in genetic change, or potential selection when only a small portion of the population survives. Therefore, a good preservation program must include a comprehensive cell characterization regimen that is applied both before and after preserving the cells to ensure that changes are detected when they do occur. Assurance of long term stability necessitates well designed safekeeping and security measures that include minimizing specimen handling through well designed inventory systems, validation and monitoring of storage temperatures, provisions for backup inventory, and training of personnel. Cell banking also requires good cataloguing and data management practices to avoid duplication and misidentification, and to ensure proper tracking of specimens and ease of access.

  7. New results on robust exponential stability of integral delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchor-Aguilar, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The robust exponential stability of integral delay systems with exponential kernels is investigated. Sufficient delay-dependent robust conditions expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities and matrix norms are derived by using the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach. The results are combined with a new result on quadratic stabilisability of the state-feedback synthesis problem in order to derive a new linear matrix inequality methodology of designing a robust non-fragile controller for the finite spectrum assignment of input delay systems that guarantees simultaneously a numerically safe implementation and also the robustness to uncertainty in the system matrices and to perturbation in the feedback gain.

  8. Genetic parameters and simultaneous selection for root yield, adaptability and stability of cassava genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tomé de Farias Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate genetic parameters and to evaluate simultaneous selection for root yield and for adaptability and stability of cassava genotypes. The effects of genotypes were assumed as fixed and random, and the mixed model methodology (REML/Blup was used to estimate genetic parameters and the harmonic mean of the relative performance of genotypic values (HMRPGV, for simultaneous selection purposes. Ten genotypes were analyzed in a complete randomized block design, with four replicates. The experiment was carried out in the municipalities of Altamira, Santarém, and Santa Luzia do Pará in the state of Pará, Brazil, in the growing seasons of 2009/2010, 2010/2011, and 2011/2012. Roots were harvested 12 months after planting, in all tested locations. Root yield had low coefficients of genotypic variation (4.25% and broad-sense heritability of individual plots (0.0424, which resulted in low genetic gain. Due to the low genotypic correlation (0.15, genotype classification as to root yield varied according to the environment. Genotypes CPATU 060, CPATU 229, and CPATU 404 stood out as to their yield, adaptability, and stability.

  9. DNA evidence for strong genetic stability and increasing heritability of intelligence from age 7 to 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaskowski, M; Yang, J; Visscher, P M; Plomin, R

    2014-03-01

    Two genetic findings from twin research have far-reaching implications for understanding individual differences in the development of brain function as indexed by general cognitive ability (g, aka intelligence): (1) The same genes affect g throughout development, even though (2) heritability increases. It is now possible to test these hypotheses using DNA alone. From 1.7 million DNA markers and g scores at ages 7 and 12 on 2875 children, the DNA genetic correlation from age 7 to 12 was 0.73, highly similar to the genetic correlation of 0.75 estimated from 6702 pairs of twins from the same sample. DNA-estimated heritabilities increased from 0.26 at age 7 to 0.45 at age 12; twin-estimated heritabilities also increased from 0.35 to 0.48. These DNA results confirm the results of twin studies indicating strong genetic stability but increasing heritability for g, despite mean changes in brain structure and function from childhood to adolescence.

  10. What Do the Results of Genetic Tests Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthcare professionals consider a person’s medical history, family history, and the type of genetic test that was done. A positive test result means that the laboratory found a change in a particular gene, chromosome, or protein of interest. Depending on the purpose of the ...

  11. ARGO-YBJ: Physics results and detector stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarri, P., E-mail: camarri@roma2.infn.it [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment at 4300 m above sea level on the Tibet plateau is a full-coverage array of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) operated in streamer mode, covering a surface of 74×78 m{sup 2} surrounded by a guard ring. It was designed to detect extensive air showers generated by primary cosmic rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV up to about 1 PeV. It has been running uninterruptedly with its complete layout since October 2007, providing results in γ-ray astrophysics and cosmic-ray physics. Some of the main results obtained by ARGO-YBJ in the study of TeV γ rays from Supernova Remnants and from Active Galactic Nuclei and in the study of the medium-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy will be described. We also discuss the results of a test which proves the feasibility of the control procedure devised to stabilize the response of the detector.

  12. A genetic timer through noise-induced stabilization of an unstable state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Marc; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M

    2008-10-14

    Stochastic fluctuations affect the dynamics of biological systems. Typically, such noise causes perturbations that can permit genetic circuits to escape stable states, triggering, for example, phenotypic switching. In contrast, studies have shown that noise can surprisingly also generate new states, which exist solely in the presence of fluctuations. In those instances noise is supplied externally to the dynamical system. Here, we present a mechanism in which noise intrinsic to a simple genetic circuit effectively stabilizes a deterministically unstable state. Furthermore, this noise-induced stabilization represents a unique mechanism for a genetic timer. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of noise intrinsic to a prototypical two-component gene-circuit architecture composed of interacting positive and negative feedback loops. Genetic circuits with this topology are common in biology and typically regulate cell cycles and circadian clocks. These systems can undergo a variety of bifurcations in response to parameter changes. Simulations show that near one such bifurcation, noise induces oscillations around an unstable spiral point and thus effectively stabilizes this unstable fixed point. Because of the periodicity of these oscillations, the lifetime of the noise-dependent stabilization exhibits a polymodal distribution with multiple, well defined, and regularly spaced peaks. Therefore, the noise-induced stabilization presented here constitutes a minimal mechanism for a genetic circuit to function as a timer that could be used in the engineering of synthetic circuits.

  13. Phylogeography of the genus Podococcus (Palmae/Arecaceae) in Central African rain forests: Climate stability predicts unique genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, A; Deblauwe, V; Mariac, C; Richard, D; Sonké, B; Vigouroux, Y; Couvreur, T L P

    2016-12-01

    The tropical rain forests of Central Africa contain high levels of species diversity. Paleovegetation or biodiversity patterns suggested successive contraction/expansion phases on this rain forest cover during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Consequently, the hypothesis of the existence of refugia e.g. habitat stability that harbored populations during adverse climatic periods has been proposed. Understory species are tightly associated to forest cover and consequently are ideal markers of forest dynamics. Here, we used two central African rain forest understory species of the palm genus, Podococcus, to assess the role of past climate variation on their distribution and genetic diversity. Species distribution modeling in the present and at the LGM was used to estimate areas of climatic stability. Genetic diversity and phylogeography were estimated by sequencing near complete plastomes for over 120 individuals. Areas of climatic stability were mainly located in mountainous areas like the Monts de Cristal and Monts Doudou in Gabon, but also lowland coastal forests in southeast Cameroon and northeast Gabon. Genetic diversity analyses shows a clear North-South structure of genetic diversity within one species. This divide was estimated to have originated some 500,000years ago. We show that, in Central Africa, high and unique genetic diversity is strongly correlated with inferred areas of climatic stability since the LGM. Our results further highlight the importance of coastal lowland rain forests in Central Africa as harboring not only high species diversity but also important high levels of unique genetic diversity. In the context of strong human pressure on coastal land use and destruction, such unique diversity hotspots need to be considered in future conservation planning.

  14. Nuclear structure far off stability - New results from RISING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorska, M [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Grawe, H [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Banu, A [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Buerger, A [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Doornenbal, P [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Gerl, J [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64294 Darmstadt (Germany); Hjorth-Jensen, M [Department of Physics and Center of Mathematics for Applications, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Huebel, H [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Nowacki, F [IReS, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Otsuka, T [Department of Physics and Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Reiter, P [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Cologne (Germany)

    2006-10-10

    A broad range of physics phenomena can be addressed by high-resolution in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments with radioactive beams offered within the Rare ISotopes INvestigation at GSI (RISING) project. It combines the EUROBALL Ge-Cluster detectors, the MINIBALL Ge detectors, the HECTOR-BaF detectors, and the fragment separator FRS. The secondary beams produced at relativistic energies are used for Coulomb excitation or secondary fragmentation experiments to study projectile like nuclei far off the stability line by measuring de-excitation photons. The physics studied comprises the evolution of shell structure towards the drip lines and its signatures as inferred from excitation energies, mirror symmetry and electromagnetic transition strengths. The first results of the 'fast beam campaign' are discussed in comparison to various shell model calculations including the structure of light Sn isotopes based on Coulomb excitation of {sup 108}Sn, the discussion of the N = 32,34 sub-shell closure based on neutron-rich {sup 56,58}Cr isotopes, and the shell structure in light proton-rich Ca isotopes from the fragmentation of a {sup 37}Ca radioactive beam.

  15. An Improved Integral Inequality to Stability Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Networks With Interval Time-Varying Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Wu, Ligang; Cui, Shaochun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on stability analysis for a class of genetic regulatory networks with interval time-varying delays. An improved integral inequality concerning on double-integral items is first established. Then, we use the improved integral inequality to deal with the resultant double-integral items in the derivative of the involved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. As a result, a delay-range-dependent and delay-rate-dependent asymptotical stability criterion is established for genetic regulatory networks with differential time-varying delays. Furthermore, it is theoretically proven that the stability criterion proposed here is less conservative than the corresponding one in [Neurocomputing, 2012, 93: 19-26]. Based on the obtained result, another stability criterion is given under the case that the information of the derivatives of delays is unknown. Finally, the effectiveness of the approach proposed in this paper is illustrated by a pair of numerical examples which give the comparisons of stability criteria proposed in this paper and some literature.

  16. The stabilizing effects of genetic diversity on predator-prey dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Christopher F; Masse, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity among prey in their susceptibility to predation is a potentially important stabilizer of predator-prey interactions, reducing the magnitude of population oscillations and enhancing total prey population abundance. When microevolutionary responses of prey populations occur at time scales comparable to population dynamics, adaptive responses in prey defense can, in theory, stabilize predator-prey dynamics and reduce top-down effects on prey abundance. While experiments have tested these predictions, less explored are the consequences of the evolution of prey phenotypes that can persist in both vulnerable and invulnerable classes. We tested this experimentally using a laboratory aquatic system composed of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as a predator and the prey Synura petersenii, a colony-forming alga that exhibits genetic variation in its propensity to form colonies and colony size (larger colonies are a defense against predators). Prey populations of either low initial genetic diversity and low adaptive capacity or high initial genetic diversity and high adaptive capacity were crossed with predator presence and absence. Dynamics measured over the last 127 days of the 167-day experiment revealed no effects of initial prey genetic diversity on the average abundance or temporal variability of predator populations. However, genetic diversity and predator presence/absence interactively affected prey population abundance and stability; diversity of prey had no effects in the absence of predators but stabilized dynamics and increased total prey abundance in the presence of predators. The size structure of the genetically diverse prey populations diverged from single strain populations in the presence of predators, showing increases in colony size and in the relative abundance of cells found in colonies. Our work sheds light on the adaptive value of colony formation and supports the general view that genetic diversity and intraspecific trait variation of

  17. Well-being & psychological distress : genetic and environmental influences on stability, change, and covariance

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    An important goal to psychological research is to advance knowledge on development and sustenance of positive mental health. This study is the first large scale twin study investigating the genetic and environmental influences on stability and change in both psychological well-being and distress during the developmental juncture of young adulthood. The study also aims to illuminate the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on indicators of well-being and distress are overlappin...

  18. Delay-slope-dependent stability results of recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Wei Xing; Lin, Chong

    2011-12-01

    By using the fact that the neuron activation functions are sector bounded and nondecreasing, this brief presents a new method, named the delay-slope-dependent method, for stability analysis of a class of recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. This method includes more information on the slope of neuron activation functions and fewer matrix variables in the constructed Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Then some improved delay-dependent stability criteria with less computational burden and conservatism are obtained. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and the benefits of the proposed method.

  19. Finite-Time Stability Analysis of Reaction-Diffusion Genetic Regulatory Networks with Time-Varying Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xian; Wu, Ligang; Shi, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time stability problem of the delayed genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with reaction-diffusion terms under Dirichlet boundary conditions. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional including quad-slope integrations, we establish delay-dependent finite-time stability criteria by employing the Wirtinger-type integral inequality, Gronwall inequality, convex technique, and reciprocally convex technique. In addition, the obtained criteria are also reaction-diffusion-dependent. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  20. Pharmacogenomics Bias - Systematic distortion of study results by genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zietemann, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decision analyses of drug treatments in chronic diseases require modeling the progression of disease and treatment response beyond the time horizon of clinical or epidemiological studies. In many such models, progression and drug effect have been applied uniformly to all patients; heterogeneity in progression, including pharmacogenomic effects, has been ignored. Objective: We sought to systematically evaluate the existence, direction and relative magnitude of a pharmacogenomics bias (PGX-Bias resulting from failure to adjust for genetic heterogeneity in both treatment response (HT and heterogeneity in progression of disease (HP in decision-analytic studies based on clinical study data. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in electronic databases for studies regarding the effect of genetic heterogeneity on the validity of study results. Included studies have been summarized in evidence tables. In the case of lacking evidence from published studies we sought to perform our own simulation considering both HT and HP. We constructed two simple Markov models with three basic health states (early-stage disease, late-stage disease, dead, one adjusting and the other not adjusting for genetic heterogeneity. Adjustment was done by creating different disease states for presence (G+ and absence (G- of a dichotomous genetic factor. We compared the life expectancy gains attributable to treatment resulting from both models and defined pharmacogenomics bias as percent deviation of treatment-related life expectancy gains in the unadjusted model from those in the adjusted model. We calculated the bias as a function of underlying model parameters to create generic results. We then applied our model to lipid-lowering therapy with pravastatin in patients with coronary atherosclerosis, incorporating the influence of two TaqIB polymorphism variants (B1 and B2 on progression and drug efficacy as reported in the DNA substudy of the REGRESS

  1. Genetic erosion in crops: concept, research results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouw, van de M.J.; Kik, C.; Hintum, van T.J.L.; Treuren, van R.; Visser, L.

    2010-01-01

    The loss of variation in crops clue to the modernization of agriculture has been described as genetic erosion The current paper discusses the different views that exist on the concept of genetic erosion in crops Genetic erosion of cultivated diversity is reflected in a modernization bottleneck in th

  2. Genetic and environmental stability in attention problems across the lifespan: evidence from the Netherlands Twin Register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, K.J.; Dolan, C.V.; Nivard, M.G.; Middeldorp, C.M.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review findings on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and attention problems (AP) in children, adolescents, and adults, as established in the database of the Netherlands Twin Register and increase the understanding of stability in AP across the lifespan as a function of genetic a

  3. Genetic and Environmental Stability in Attention Problems across the Lifespan: Evidence from the Netherlands Twin Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Dolan, Conor V.; Nivard, Michel G.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review findings on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and attention problems (AP) in children, adolescents, and adults, as established in the database of the Netherlands Twin Register and increase the understanding of stability in AP across the lifespan as a function of genetic and environmental influences. Method: A…

  4. Cryopreservation of Quercus suber somatic embryos by encapsulation-dehydration and evaluation of genetic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Pedro; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Pinto, Glória; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Santos, Conceição

    2008-12-01

    We describe an encapsulation and dehydration procedure for the cryopreservation of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) somatic embryos that resulted in at least 90% survival. Genetic stability of the regenerated material was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR). Cryopreservation of embryogenic clusters involved encapsulation of each cluster in an alginate bead, followed by a 3-day culture in 0.7 M sucrose and subsequent desiccation to 25 or 35% water content (WC), followed by freezing in liquid nitrogen. Thawed, cryopreserved somatic embryos had high viability and exhibited long-term survival. No morphological differences were observed between somatic embryos desiccated to 25 and 35% WC. Analysis of DNA ploidy stability of control (i.e., encapsulated and dehydrated but not frozen) and cryopreserved material by flow cytometry showed no significant differences. Similarly, DNA-marker analyses (AFLPs and SSR) revealed no significant differences between control and cryopreserved samples at the DNA-sequence level. Nonetheless, because polymorphisms were found between control material and samples cryopreserved and desiccated to 25% WC, the 35% WC method is recommended for cryopreservation of this tissue type. Cryopreservation of Q. suber somatic embryos by this encapsulation-dehydration procedure has potential for use in long-term conservation programs.

  5. Molecular markers for genetic stability of intergeneric hybrids Fragaria x Potentilla derived from tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Nicoleta SUTAN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of growth regulators, explant source and culture age on genetic stability of plants obtained from tissue culture propagation of ornamental strawberry “Serenata” were examined. Genomic DNAs of in vitro-derived shoots and control plant were extracted and compared by RAPD-PCR analyses. Ten primers (from 48 previously tested were selected and used in RAPD analysis to prove the clonal fidelity (i.e. genetic stability of the tissue culture-derived ornamental strawberry plants. The lack of polymorphisms in micropropagated plants screened through molecular markers was used to suggest genetic fidelity. Identicaly banding patterns of the RAPD profiles obtaining from vitroplants, regenerated via organogenesis or meristems culture, suggested that in the ornamental strawberry, variety “Serenata”, neither explant source, nor callus age or limited number of subcultures, in basal media supplemented with low concentration of growth regulators, were associated with occurence of somaclonal variation.

  6. Consumer perception of food products involving genetic modification: Results from a qualitative study in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2000-01-01

    1. The present study addresses consumer acceptance of food products involving the use of different applications of genetic modification in four Nordic countries. Three food products were used as examples: hard cheese, hard candy, and salmon. Three types of applications of genetic modification were...... and living/able to function. 2. The results from consumer samples in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are remarkably similar, showing a strong stability in consumer reactions to the use of genetic modification in food production in these four countries. 3. Consumer perception is characterised by a basic...... dichotomy of GM and non-GM products. Being non-GM is regarded as a major benefit in itself. When a product involves genetic modification, this elicits numerous negative assocations, of which the strongest ones are 'unhealthy' and 'uncertainty.' 4. The level of presence of the genetically modified material...

  7. FINANCIAL LITERACY AND RESULTANT STABILITY OF THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novo Plakalović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the author of this paper isto show the relationship between the level of financialresponsibility of individuals and of companymanagers and the stability of financial markets, assetmarkets and the stability of the financial system as awhole. In Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H after the1992-1995 conflict, there was a large influx offunding into the local economy both from the fields ofFDI (Foreign Direct Investment and bilateral andunilateral aid. Many people in BH were keen toaccess loans in a seemingly cash-rich economy, butwere ill-prepared in the fields of financial borrowingand handling debt properly. Subsequently theyexperienced difficulties in servicing obligations andthe loan portfolio of banks has deteriorated. Thus theonset of the financial crisis has brought somethingpositive. Borrowing in B&H dropped, but problemsservicing existing loans rose. The situation has notyet become problematic but banking sector shortfallstend to manifest themselves between 12-18 monthsafter the event. The author believes that a moreserious approach to financial responsibility at microlevelsis necessary for the national economic good.

  8. Determination of genetic stability in long-term somatic embryogenic cultures and derived plantlets of cork oak using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Tina; Pinto, Glória; Loureiro, João; Costa, Armando; Santos, Conceição

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites were used to test genetic stability in somatic embryos (SE) of Quercus suber L. The SE were obtained by a simple somatic embryogenesis protocol: leaf explants from two adult plants (QsG0, QsG5) and from two juvenile plants (QsGM1, QsGM2) were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and zeatin. Calluses with primary embryogenic structures were transferred to MSWH (MS medium without growth regulators) and SE proliferated by secondary somatic embryogenesis. High morphological heterogeneity was found among cotyledonary SE. However, converted plants looked morphologically normal with well-developed rooting systems and shoots. The genetic stability of the plant material during the somatic embryogenesis process was evaluated by using six to eight nuclear microsatellites transferred from Q. myrsinifolia Blume, Q. petraea (Matts.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. Five of eight microsatellites distinguished among the genotypes analyzed, and for QsG0, QsGM1 and QsGM2, uniform microsatellite patterns were generally observed within and between SE and the respective donor genotypes. For genotype QsG5, the same pattern was observed in all samples analyzed except one, where the mutation percentage was 2.5%. We conclude that microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic stability of clonal materials and to determine genetic stability throughout the process of somatic embryogenesis. The simple somatic embryogenesis protocol described has potential for the commercial propagation of Q. suber because it results in a low percentage of mutations.

  9. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Luca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica in Asturias (Spain, using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity. The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species.

  10. Stability of Uncertain Impulsive Stochastic Genetic Regulatory Networks with Time-Varying Delay in the Leakage Term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the stability problem for a class of uncertain impulsive stochastic genetic regulatory networks (UISGRNs with time-varying delays both in the leakage term and in the regulator function. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional which uses the information on the lower bound of the delay sufficiently, a delay-dependent stability criterion is derived for the proposed UISGRNs model by using the free-weighting matrices method and convex combination technique. The conditions obtained here are expressed in terms of LMIs whose feasibility can be checked easily by MATLAB LMI control toolbox. In addition, three numerical examples are given to justify the obtained stability results.

  11. Longitudinal Stability of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Irritability: From Childhood to Young Adulthood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A; Myers, John; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    ... Checklist.Results:Genetic effects differed across the sexes, with males exhibiting increasing heritability from early childhood through young adulthood and females exhibiting decreasing heritability...

  12. Assessment of Genetic Stability Among In Vitro Plants of Arachis retusa Using RAPD and AFLP Markers for Germplasm Preservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel Fatima Gagliardi; Luiz Ricardo Hanai; Georgia Pacheco; Carlos Alberto Oliveira; Leonardo Alves Carneiro; José Francisco Montenegro Valls; Elisabeth Mansur; Maria Lucia Carneiro Vieira

    2007-01-01

    Arachis retusa Krapov. et W. C. Gregory et Valls is endemic in the West-central region of Brazil, occurring in areas endangered by human actions. The establishment of in vitro preservation methods for wild species of Arachis isan alternative to seed banks for germplasm storage, multiplication and distribution. The risk of genetic changesinduced by tissue culture and the monitoring of the genetic stability of the biological material before, during andafter storage must be considered in the context of conservation. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) andamplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting were used to evaluate the genetic stability of invitro plants originated from cotyledons and embryo axes of A. retusa. Cotyledons originated shoots through directorganogenesis and embryo axes displayed multishoot formation induced by 110 mmol/L and 8.8 mmol/L BAP,respectively. Ninety genomlc regions (loci) generated from RAPD and 372 from AFLP analyses were evaluated. Allamplified fragments detected by both techniques in plants derived from the two explant types were monomorphic.The results indicate that the recovered shoots are genetically stable at the assessed genomic regions.

  13. Genetic Variation A mong European Lophodermium piceae Populations - Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÜLLER, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lophodermium piceae is a common needle endophyte of Norway spruce (Picea abies. The aim of the present study was to examine the degree of differentiation within and among European populations separated by various distances and geographical obstacles. For this purpose, populations (including > 10 isolates/subpopulation were collected along a north-south transect stretching from the northern timberline in Finnish Lapland to the southern border of the distribution area of Norway spruce in northern Italy. Differentiation between L. piceae populations was determined from DNA sequences of three genetic markers. One of the markers was the internal transcribed spacer (ITS of the ribosomal DNA and the other two (LP1 and LP2 were based on sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR designed for L. piceae. Preliminary results including sequences of Finnish, Swiss and Italian isolates show low differentiation among populations. According to analysis of molecular variance the among population variation was 1%, 5% and 0% in ITS, LP1 and LP2 markers, respectively.

  14. New results on the robust stability analysis of neural networks with discrete and distributed time delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Weiwei; Chen Yiming

    2008-01-01

    Delay-dependent robust stability of cellular neural networks with time-varying discrete and distributed time-varying delays is considered. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and the linear matrix inequality (LMIs) technique, delay-dependent stability criteria are derived in terms of LMIs avoiding bounding certain cross terms, which often leads to conservatism. The effectiveness of the proposed stability criteria and the improvement over the existing results are illustrated in the numerical examples.

  15. Enhancement of Voltage Stability by Optimal Location of Static Var Compensator Using Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kalaivani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Voltage instability and voltage collapse have been considered as a major threat to present power system networks due to their stressed operation. It is very important to do the power system analysis with respect to voltage stability. Approach: Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS is an alternating current transmission system incorporating power electronic-based and other static controllers to enhance controllability and increase power transfer capability. A FACTS device in a power system improves the voltage stability, reduces the power loss and also improves the load ability of the system. Results: This study investigates the application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Genetic Algorithm (GA to find optimal location and rated value of Static Var Compensator (SVC device to minimize the voltage stability index, total power loss, load voltage deviation, cost of generation and cost of FACTS devices to improve voltage stability in the power system. Optimal location and rated value of SVC device have been found in different loading scenario (115%, 125% and 150% of normal loading using PSO and GA. Conclusion/Recommendations: It is observed from the results that the voltage stability margin is improved, the voltage profile of the power system is increased, load voltage deviation is reduced and real power losses also reduced by optimally locating SVC device in the power system. The proposed algorithm is verified with the IEEE 14 bus, IEEE 30 bus and IEEE 57 bus.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Yield Stability of Potato(Solanum tuberosum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biswas M K; Hossain M; Islam R

    2008-01-01

    The present study was under taken to investigate the genetic distance and the performance of thirty one potato genotypes in diverse environments. Multivariate and canonical analysis were used to study genetic diversity among the genotypes and stability parameters were estimated according to Eberhart and Russell, Parkinge and Jinks and Freeman and Perkins models for plant height, branch number per plant, tuber number and tuber weight. Thirty one genotypes were grouped in to six clusters with the help of Mahalonobis distance and canonical analysis. The stability analysis revealed that yield was greatly influenced by the environments. Most of the studied genotypes were sensitive for yield with the environ-ment. For over-all performance 'Hera','Chamak','Patnai','Lala pekri','TPS-7', 'TPS-364', 'Somerset' and 'Superi-or' were the best genotypes for tuber yield and breeding material for potato breeding.

  17. Assessment of genetic stability in micropropagated plants of some ornamental strawberry varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Nicoleta Şuţan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the genetic stability and uniformity of ornamental strawberry plants micropropagated by using a new and highly efficient protocol we have developed recently, RAPD markers were used with intergeneric hybrids ‘Pink Panda’ and ‘Serenata’. Micropropagated shoots selected at random from four subcultures onto either Murashige & Skoog or Lee & Fossard media, each of them supplemented with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP at 1.0 mg l-1, indolylacetic acid (IAA at 1.0 mg l-1 and gibberellic acid (GA3 at 0.1mg l-1, were subjected to molecular analysis. Ten deca-nucleotide primers (among 48 tested were chosen for RAPD analysis, all of them indicating genetic stability for micropropagated plants of the investigated varieties of ornamental strawberry.

  18. Is lesional stability in vitiligo more important than disease stability for performing surgical interventions? results from a multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ensuring stability of the disease process is essential for undertaking surgical intervention in vitiligo. However, there is no consensus regarding the minimum duration of stability or the relative importance of disease and lesional stability in selecting patients for vitiligo grafting. Aim: This multicentric study aims to assess the relative importance of lesional and disease stability on selecting patients for vitiligo grafting. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy patients were recruited into the study and divided into two groups: Group A with lesional stability of >1 year but overall disease stability of only 6-11 months and Group B with overall disease stability of >1 year. Patients underwent either tissue or cellular vitiligo grafting on the selected lesions and the repigmentation achieved was scored from 0 (no repigmentation to 6 (100% repigmentation. Repigmentation achieved on different sites of the body was compared between the two groups. Adverse effects at both the donor and the recipient sites were also compared. Results: Of the 170 patients who were enrolled, 82 patients were placed in Group A and 88 patients in Group B. Average repigmentation achieved (on scale of 0 to 6 was 3.8 and 4.04 in Group A and Group B, respectively. In Group A, ≥90% repigmentation was achieved in 36.6% (30/82 patients, while 37.5% (33/88 achieved similar results in Group B. Additionally, 47.6% (39/82 and 53.4% (47/88 of cases achieved partial repigmentation in Group A and Group B, respectively. Perigraft halo was the commonest adverse effect observed in both groups. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the repigmentation achieved or adverse effects observed. Repigmentation achieved was the best on the face and neck area, while acral areas responded the least. Conclusions: Lesional stability seems to be as relevant as the overall disease stability in selecting patients for

  19. Optimization of spacers placement in metal oxide surge arresters due to the thermal stability increment using genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Meysam Seyedbarzegar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: in this paper the optimal placement of spacers in surge arrester column is presented in order to achieve temperature reduction and surge arrester thermal stability against power losses due to the overvoltage in power system. The simulation is done by using genetic algorithm in MATLAB software that it is linked by numerical analysis, i.e., Finite Element Method (FEM. First, electro thermal analysis is performed according to the IEC60099-4 standard on selected population in certain interval and, then the required data is applied to the genetic algorithm for the optimal placement of spacers. Simulation results show that the placement of spacers has great influence on surge arrester temperature variations. Finally, the optimal model of surge arrester is simulated in COMSOL software and the results of this model are compared with conventional model results.

  20. Genetic Algorithm-Based Artificial Neural Network for Voltage Stability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Garima Singh; Laxmi Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    With the emerging trend of restructuring in the electric power industry, many transmission lines have been forced to operate at almost their full capacities worldwide. Due to this, more incidents of voltage instability and collapse are being observed throughout the world leading to major system breakdowns. To avoid these undesirable incidents, a fast and accurate estimation of voltage stability margin is required. In this paper, genetic algorithm based back propagation neural network (GABPNN...

  1. Adaptive fixation in two-locus models of stabilizing selection and genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollstein, Andreas; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between quantitative genetics and population genetics has been studied for nearly a century, almost since the existence of these two disciplines. Here we ask to what extent quantitative genetic models in which selection is assumed to operate on a polygenic trait predict adaptive fixations that may lead to footprints in the genome (selective sweeps). We study two-locus models of stabilizing selection (with and without genetic drift) by simulations and analytically. For symmetric viability selection we find that ∼16% of the trajectories may lead to fixation if the initial allele frequencies are sampled from the neutral site-frequency spectrum and the effect sizes are uniformly distributed. However, if the population is preadapted when it undergoes an environmental change (i.e., sits in one of the equilibria of the model), the fixation probability decreases dramatically. In other two-locus models with general viabilities or an optimum shift, the proportion of adaptive fixations may increase to >24%. Similarly, genetic drift leads to a higher probability of fixation. The predictions of alternative quantitative genetics models, initial conditions, and effect-size distributions are also discussed.

  2. Genetic Algorithm-Based Artificial Neural Network for Voltage Stability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of restructuring in the electric power industry, many transmission lines have been forced to operate at almost their full capacities worldwide. Due to this, more incidents of voltage instability and collapse are being observed throughout the world leading to major system breakdowns. To avoid these undesirable incidents, a fast and accurate estimation of voltage stability margin is required. In this paper, genetic algorithm based back propagation neural network (GABPNN has been proposed for voltage stability margin estimation which is an indication of the power system's proximity to voltage collapse. The proposed approach utilizes a hybrid algorithm that integrates genetic algorithm and the back propagation neural network. The proposed algorithm aims to combine the capacity of GAs in avoiding local minima and at the same time fast execution of the BP algorithm. Input features for GABPNN are selected on the basis of angular distance-based clustering technique. The performance of the proposed GABPNN approach has been compared with the most commonly used gradient based BP neural network by estimating the voltage stability margin at different loading conditions in 6-bus and IEEE 30-bus system. GA based neural network learns faster, at the same time it provides more accurate voltage stability margin estimation as compared to that based on BP algorithm. It is found to be suitable for online applications in energy management systems.

  3. Genetic Algorithm Used for Load Shedding Based on Sensitivity to Enhance Voltage Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titare, L. S.; Singh, P.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to calculate optimum load shedding with voltage stability consideration based on sensitivity of proximity indicator using genetic algorithm (GA). Schur's inequality based proximity indicator of load flow Jacobian has been selected, which indicates system state. Load flow Jacobian of the system is obtained using Continuation power flow method. If reactive power and active rescheduling are exhausted, load shedding is the last line of defense to maintain the operational security of the system. Load buses for load shedding have been selected on the basis of sensitivity of proximity indicator. The load bus having large sensitivity is selected for load shedding. Proposed algorithm predicts load bus rank and optimum load to be shed on load buses. The algorithm accounts inequality constraints not only in present operating conditions, but also for predicted next interval load (with load shedding). Developed algorithm has been implemented on IEEE 6-bus system. Results have been compared with those obtained using Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and its variant.

  4. Interpreting Behavioral Genetic Results: Suggestions for Counselors and Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatz, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Contends treatment strategies often are premised on modifying either environmental factors or clients' interpretations of the interpersonal environment, but a more complete analysis would take into account the role played by genetic transmission in an individual's personality. Recommends when developing interventions both counselors and clients…

  5. A Bayesian phylogenetic approach to estimating the stability of linguistic features and the genetic biasing of tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dediu, Dan

    2011-02-07

    Language is a hallmark of our species and understanding linguistic diversity is an area of major interest. Genetic factors influencing the cultural transmission of language provide a powerful and elegant explanation for aspects of the present day linguistic diversity and a window into the emergence and evolution of language. In particular, it has recently been proposed that linguistic tone-the usage of voice pitch to convey lexical and grammatical meaning-is biased by two genes involved in brain growth and development, ASPM and Microcephalin. This hypothesis predicts that tone is a stable characteristic of language because of its 'genetic anchoring'. The present paper tests this prediction using a Bayesian phylogenetic framework applied to a large set of linguistic features and language families, using multiple software implementations, data codings, stability estimations, linguistic classifications and outgroup choices. The results of these different methods and datasets show a large agreement, suggesting that this approach produces reliable estimates of the stability of linguistic data. Moreover, linguistic tone is found to be stable across methods and datasets, providing suggestive support for the hypothesis of genetic influences on its distribution.

  6. Lay responses to health messages about the genetic risk factors for salt sensitivity: do mass media genetic health messages result in genetic determinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerecnik, Chris M R

    2010-08-01

    Media coverage of genetics may lead to overestimation of the impact of genetics on disease development. In this study, we presented one student sample and one general public sample from the Netherlands with a general or a genetic health message (HM) about salt sensitivity. After reading the genetic (but not the general) HM, participants reported higher perceived impact of genetic versus lifestyle factors and a higher attributable fraction of genetics on disease development. Nevertheless, participants were able to recognise the balance between lifestyle and genetic risk factors in disease development. They also contextualised and restricted the message's implications to the specific information provided, and did not extrapolate these implications to other diseases. These results illustrate the nuanced understanding the general public may have concerning genetic risk factors.

  7. An improved robust stability result for uncertain neural networks with multiple time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Sabri

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a new alternative sufficient condition for the existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for the class of delayed neural networks under the parameter uncertainties of the neural system. The existence and uniqueness of the equilibrium point is proved by using the Homomorphic mapping theorem. The asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point is established by employing the Lyapunov stability theorems. The obtained robust stability condition establishes a new relationship between the network parameters of the system. We compare our stability result with the previous corresponding robust stability results derived in the past literature. Some comparative numerical examples together with some simulation results are also given to show the applicability and advantages of our result.

  8. Genetically determined patozoospermia. Literature review and research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Bragina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors (chromosomal aberrations and point mutations are the cause of infertility in 10–15 % of men with impaired fertility. Homogeneous structural and functional defects in the sperm or the total terato-, asthenozoospermia – rare cases of genetically determined male infertility, are autosomal recessive diseases. Currently, described 4 types of «syndromic» spermopatology. 1. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD in men with total asthenozoospermia. Affects axoneme structures (microtubules, dynein arms, radial spokes. It identified more than 20 chromosomal loci responsible for the development of the PCD. 2. Dysplasia of the fibrous sheath of sperm tail in men with asthenozoospermia. The shortened and thickened sperm tail observed with disorganization of vertical columns and cross ribs of the fibrous sheath. Candidate genes – genes family ACAP. 3. Globozoospermia in men with teratozoospermia characterized by the presence of sperm with round heads, primary lack of acrosome and disorganization middle part of the flagellum. Found mutations or deletions of genes SPATA16, PICK1 and DPY19L2. 4. Syndrome decapitated spermatozoa in men with teratozoospermia (microcephaly. Abnormalities in the spermiogenesis development of connecting part jf the tail and proximal (morphologically normal centrioles.In 2012–2014 years we have studied the ultrastructure of 2267 semen samples of men with impaired fertility. Globozoospermia revealed in 7 patients, dysplasia of the fibrous sheath – 13, decapitated sperm – in one. PCD was revealed in 4 patients (lack of axoneme dynein arms was found in 1 patient, absence of axoneme radial spokes – in 3 patients.The problem of genetically determined patozoospermya must be taken into account when the assisted reproductive technologies practises. There are few cases of successful assisted reproductive technologies with sperm of these patients. We don»t know the etiological factors of syndromic spermopatologe, so

  9. Experimental Voltage Stabilization of a Variable Speed Wind Turbine Driving Synchronous Generator using STATCOM based on Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zoghby, Helmy M.; Bendary, Ahmed F.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM) is used for improving the performance of the power grid with wind turbine that drives synchronous generator. The main feature of the STATCOM is that it has the ability to absorb or inject rapidly reactive power to grid. Therefore the voltage regulation of the power grid with STATCOM device is achieved. STATCOM also improves the stability of the power system after occurring severe disturbance such as faults, or suddenly step change in wind speed. The proposed STATCOM controller is a Proportional-Integral (PI) controller tuned by Genetic Algorithm (GA). An experimental model was built in Helwan University to the proposed system. The system is tested at different operating conditions. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of the proposed STATCOM controller in damping the power system oscillations and restoring the power system voltage and stability.

  10. Optimality and stability of symmetric evolutionary games with applications in genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Hao, Yiping; Wang, Min; Zhou, Wen; Wu, Zhijun

    2015-06-01

    Symmetric evolutionary games, i.e., evolutionary games with symmetric fitness matrices, have important applications in population genetics, where they can be used to model for example the selection and evolution of the genotypes of a given population. In this paper, we review the theory for obtaining optimal and stable strategies for symmetric evolutionary games, and provide some new proofs and computational methods. In particular, we review the relationship between the symmetric evolutionary game and the generalized knapsack problem, and discuss the first and second order necessary and sufficient conditions that can be derived from this relationship for testing the optimality and stability of the strategies. Some of the conditions are given in different forms from those in previous work and can be verified more efficiently. We also derive more efficient computational methods for the evaluation of the conditions than conventional approaches. We demonstrate how these conditions can be applied to justifying the strategies and their stabilities for a special class of genetic selection games including some in the study of genetic disorders.

  11. Results on stabilization of nonlinear systems under finite data-rate constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2004-01-01

    We discuss in this paper a result concerning the stabilization problem of nonlinear systems under data-rate constraints using output feedback. To put the result in a broader context, we shall first review a number of recent contributions on the stabilization problem under data-rate constraints when

  12. Treatment results and long-term stability of anterior open bite malocclusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmers, D.; Hullenaar, RW Van't; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Berge, S.J.; Katsaros, C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate treatment results and long-term stability of anterior open bite malocclusion and to identify predictive factors for both treatment results and their stability. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION: The Department of Orthodontics and Oral Biology at the R

  13. Assessment of genetic stability in micropropagules of Jatropha curcas genotypes by RAPD and AFLP analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Sweta K.

    2011-07-01

    Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), a drought resistant non edible oil yielding plant, has acquired significant importance as an alternative renewable energy source. Low and inconsistent yields found in field plantations prompted for identification of high yielding clones and their large scale multiplication by vegetative propagation to obtain true to type plants. In the current investigation plantlets of J. curcas generated by axillary bud proliferation (micropropagation) using nodal segments obtained from selected high yielding genotypes were assessed for their genetic stability using Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analyses. For RAPD analysis, 21 out of 52 arbitrary decamer primers screened gave clear reproducible bands. In the micropropagated plantlets obtained from the 2nd sub-culture, 4 out of a total of 177 bands scored were polymorphic, but in the 8th and 16th sub-cultures (culture cycle) no polymorphisms were detected. AFLP analysis revealed 0.63%, 0% and 0% polymorphism in the 2nd, 8th and 16th generations, respectively. When different genotypes, viz. IC 56557 16, IC 56557 34 and IC 56557 13, were assessed by AFLP, 0%, 0.31% and 0.47% polymorphisms were found, respectively, indicating a difference in genetic stability among the different genotypes. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on assessment of genetic stability of micropropagated plantlets in J. curcas and suggests that axillary shoot proliferation can safely be used as an efficient micropropagation method for mass propagation of J. curcas. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Classical swine fever virus marker vaccine strain CP7_E2alf: genetic stability in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Katja V; Dräger, Carolin; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Recently, CP7_E2alf (SuvaxynCSF Marker), a live marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus, was licensed through the European Medicines Agency. For application of such a genetically engineered virus under field conditions, knowledge about its genetic stability is essential. Here, we report on stability studies that were conducted to assess and compare the mutation rate of CP7_E2alf in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analyses upon passaging confirmed the high stability of CP7_E2alf, and no recombination events were observed in the experimental setup. The data obtained in this study confirm the genetic stability of CP7_E2alf as an important safety component.

  15. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Weißenbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2017-01-31

    Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone northeastern Austria. Tree ring data from larch provenances originating from across the species' natural range were used to estimate the drought reaction in four consecutive drought events (1977, 1981, 1990–1994, and 2003) with extremely low standardized precipitation- and evapotranspiration-index values that affected growth in all provenances. We found significant differences among provenances across the four drought periods for the trees’ capacity to withstand drought (resistance) and for their capacity to reach pre-drought growth levels after drought (resilience). Provenances from the species' northern distribution limit in the Polish lowlands were found to be more drought resistant and showed higher stability across all drought periods than provenances from mountainous habitats at the southern fringe. The degree of genetic determination, as estimated by the repeatability, ranged up to 0.39, but significantly differed among provenances, indicating varying degrees of natural selection at the provenance origin. Generally, the relationship between the provenances’ source climate and drought behavior was weak, suggesting that the contrasting patterns of drought response are a result of both genetic divergence out of different refugial lineages and local adaptation to summer or winter drought conditions. Our analysis suggests that European larch posseses high genetic variation among and within provenances that can be used for assisted migration and breeding programs.

  16. Stability Analysis of Tunnel-Slope Coupling Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Luo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subjects in tunnels, being constrained by terrain and routes, entrances and exits to tunnels, usually stay in the terrain with slopes. Thus, it is necessary to carry out stability analysis by treating the tunnel slope as an entity. In this study, based on the Janbu slices method, a model for the calculation of the stability of the original slope-tunnel-bank slope is established. The genetic algorithm is used to implement calculation variables, safety coefficient expression and fitness function design. The stability of the original slope-tunnel-bank slope under different conditions is calculated, after utilizing the secondary development function of the mathematical tool MATLAB for programming. We found that the bearing capacity of the original slopes is reduced as the tunnels are excavated and the safety coefficient is gradually decreased as loads of the embankment construction increased. After the embankment was constructed, the safety coefficient was 1.38, which is larger than the 1.3 value specified by China’s standards. Thus, the original slope-tunnel-bank slope would remain in a stable state.

  17. Return of individual genetic results in a high-risk sample: enthusiasm and positive behavioral change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Sarah M; Olfson, Emily; Culverhouse, Robert; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia; Chen, Li-Shiun; DuBois, James; Fisher, Sherri; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Kaufman, David; Plunk, Andrew; Ramnarine, Shelina; Solomon, Stephanie; Saccone, Nancy L; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine participant responses to disclosure of genetic results in a minority population at high risk for depression and anxiety. Eighty-two subjects in a genetic study of nicotine dependence were offered personalized genetic results. All were nicotine-dependent and 64% self-identified as African American. Pathway Genomics was used to evaluate genetic risks for five complex diseases. Participants returned 4-8 weeks after enrollment for in-person genetic counseling interviews and evaluation of baseline measures. A telephone follow-up was performed 4-8 weeks later to assess responses to results. Fifty of the 82 subjects (61%) were interested in receiving genetic results. These participants had multiple risk factors, including high baseline measures of depression (66%) and anxiety (32%), as well as low rates of employment (46%), adequate health literacy (46%), and health insurance (45%). Pathway Genomics reported "increased risk" for at least one disease in 77% of subjects. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that they appreciated the genetic results, and receiving these results was not associated with changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Furthermore, after return of genetic results, smoking cessation attempts increased (P = 0.003). Even in an underserved population at high risk for adverse psychological reactions, subjects responded positively to personalized genetic results.

  18. A new result on global exponential robust stability of neural networks with time-varying delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinliang SHAO; Tingzhu HUANG

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the global exponential robust stability of neural networks with time-varying delays is investigated.By using nonnegative matrix theory and the Halanay inequality,a new sufficient condition for global exponential robust stability is presented.It is shown that the obtained result is different from or improves some existing ones reported in the literatures.Finally,some numerical examples and a simulation are given to show the effectiveness of the obtained result.

  19. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  20. Fractional Differential Equations in Terms of Comparison Results and Lyapunov Stability with Initial Time Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşkun Yakar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The qualitative behavior of a perturbed fractional-order differential equation with Caputo's derivative that differs in initial position and initial time with respect to the unperturbed fractional-order differential equation with Caputo's derivative has been investigated. We compare the classical notion of stability to the notion of initial time difference stability for fractional-order differential equations in Caputo's sense. We present a comparison result which again gives the null solution a central role in the comparison fractional-order differential equation when establishing initial time difference stability of the perturbed fractional-order differential equation with respect to the unperturbed fractional-order differential equation.

  1. Chemical variation in a dominant tree species: population divergence, selection and genetic stability across environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne M O'Reilly-Wapstra

    Full Text Available Understanding among and within population genetic variation of ecologically important plant traits provides insight into the potential evolutionary processes affecting those traits. The strength and consistency of selection driving variability in traits would be affected by plasticity in differences among genotypes across environments (G×E. We investigated population divergence, selection and environmental plasticity of foliar plant secondary metabolites (PSMs in a dominant tree species, Eucalyptus globulus. Using two common garden trials we examined variation in PSMs at multiple genetic scales; among 12 populations covering the full geographic range of the species and among up to 60 families within populations. Significant genetic variation in the expression of many PSMs resides both among and within populations of E. globulus with moderate (e.g., sideroxylonal A h(2op = 0.24 to high (e.g., macrocarpal G h(2op = 0.48 narrow sense heritabilities and high coefficients of additive genetic variation estimated for some compounds. A comparison of Qst and Fst estimates suggest that variability in some of these traits may be due to selection. Importantly, there was no genetic by environment interaction in the expression of any of the quantitative chemical traits despite often significant site effects. These results provide evidence that natural selection has contributed to population divergence in PSMs in E. globulus, and identifies the formylated phloroglucinol compounds (particularly sideroxylonal and a dominant oil, 1,8-cineole, as candidates for traits whose genetic architecture has been shaped by divergent selection. Additionally, as the genetic differences in these PSMs that influence community phenotypes is stable across environments, the role of plant genotype in structuring communities is strengthened and these genotypic differences may be relatively stable under global environmental changes.

  2. Artificial insemination in captive Whooping Cranes: Results from genetic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.L.; Nicolich, Jane M.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial insemination has been used frequently in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana) population. In the 1980s, it was necessary at times to inseminate females with semen from several males during the breeding season or with semen from multiple males simultaneously due to unknown sperm viability of the breeding males. The goals of this study were to apply microsatellite DNA profiles to resolve uncertain paternities and to use these results to evaluate the current paternity assignment assumptions used by captive managers. Microsatellite DNA profiles were successful in resolving 20 of 23 paternity questions. When resolved paternities were coupled with data on insemination timing, substantial information was revealed on fertilization timing in captive whooping cranes. Delayed fertilization from inseminations 6+ days pre-oviposition suggests capability of sperm storage.

  3. [Pluripotent stem cells: maintenance of genetic and epigenetic stability and prospects of cell technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeeva, O F; Mitalipov, Sh M

    2008-01-01

    Permanent lines of pluripotent stem cells can be obtained from humans and monkeys using different techniques and from different sources--inner cell mass of the blastocyst, primary germ cells, parthenogenetic oocytes, and mature spermatogonia--as well as by transgenic modification of various adult somatic cells. Despite different origin, all pluripotent lines demonstrate considerable similarity of the major biological properties: active self-renewal and differentiation into various somatic and germ cells in vitro and in vivo, similar gene expression profiles, and similar cell cycle structure. Ten years of intense studies on the stability of different human and monkey embryonic stem cells demonstrated that, irrespective of their origin, long-term in vitro cultures lead to the accumulation of chromosomal and gene mutations as well as epigenetic changes that can cause oncogenic transformation of cells. This review summarizes the research data on the genetic and epigenetic stability of different lines of pluripotent stem cells after long-term in vitro culture. These data were used to analyze possible factors of the genome and epigenome instability in pluripotent lines. The prospects of using pluripotent stem cells of different origin in cell therapy and pharmacological studies were considered.

  4. Analytic stability analysis of three-component self-regulatory genetic circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Julian

    2014-01-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be a simplest form of biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components, DNA, RNA, and the protein, are required to form such a circuit, the stability analysis of fixed points of the self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system into to a two-component system consisting of RNA and protein only, assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component. Here, the stability of fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of full three dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and the saddle points, detailed information can be obtained, such as the number of positive eigenvalues near a saddle point. In particular, complex eigenvalues is shown to exist for sufficiently slow binding and unbinding of the auto-regulatory transcription factor to DNA, l...

  5. Genetic and environmental influences on personality trait stability and growth during the transition to adulthood: A three wave longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Krueger, Robert F.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    During the transition to adulthood individuals typically settle into adult roles in love and work. This transition also involves significant changes in personality traits that are generally in the direction of greater maturity and increased stability. Competing hypotheses have been offered to account for these personality changes: the intrinsic maturation hypothesis suggests that change trajectories are endogenous, whereas the life-course hypothesis suggests that these changes occur because of transactions with the social environment. This study investigated the patterns and origins of personality trait changes from ages 17 to 29 using 3 waves of Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire data provided by twins. Results suggest that a) trait changes were more profound in the first relative to the second half of the transition to adulthood; b) traits tend to become more stable during the second half of this transition, with all the traits yielding retest correlations between .74 and .78; c) negative affectivity declined over time and constraint increased over time; minimal change was observed on agentic or communal aspects of positive affectivity; and d) both genetic and non-shared environmental factors accounted for personality changes. Overall, these genetically-informed results support a life-course perspective on personality development during the transition to adulthood. PMID:21244174

  6. Stability and Change of Genetic and Environmental Effects on the Common Liability to Alcohol, Tobacco, and Cannabis DSM-IV Dependence Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. E.; Corley, R. P.; Hopfer, C. J.; Stallings, M. C.; Hewitt, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the stability of genetic and environmental effects on the common liability to alcohol, tobacco, and cannabis dependence across adolescence and young adulthood. DSM-IV symptom counts from 2,361 adolescents were obtained using a structured diagnostic interview. Several sex-limited longitudinal common pathway models were used to examine gender differences in the magnitude of additive genetic (A), shared environment, and non-shared environmental effects over time. Model fitting indicated limited gender differences. Among older adolescents (i.e., age >14), the heritability of the latent trait was estimated at 0.43 (0.05, 0.94) during the first wave and 0.63 (0.21, 0.83) during the second wave of assessment. A common genetic factor could account for genetic influences at both assessments, as well as the majority of the stability of SAV over time [rA = 1.00 (0.55, 1.00)]. These results suggest that early genetic factors continue to play a key role at later developmental stages. PMID:23760788

  7. New results concerning the stability of equilibria of a delay differential equation modeling leukemia

    CERN Document Server

    Ion, Anca Veronica

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of stability of equilibrium solutions of a delay differential equation that models leukemia. The equation was previously studied in [5] and [6], where the emphasis is put on the numerical study of periodic solutions. Some stability results for the equilibria are also presented in these works, but they are incomplete and contain some errors. Our work aims to complete and to bring corrections to those results. Both Lyapunov first order approximation method and second Lyapunov method are used.

  8. Consumers' cognitions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a qualitative study in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    1999-01-01

    -national differences, differences relating to different outcome groups considered, and differences relating to the presence or non-presence of genetically modified material in the end product. German and Danish results were generally more elaborate and revealed more complex cognitive structures than the results from...... Italy and the United Kingdom. In all four countries, however, genetic modification was associated with unnaturalness and low trustworthiness of the resulting product, independently of whether the genetically modified material was traceable in the product. Moral considerations were voiced as well...

  9. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  10. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  11. [Genetic improvement of cotton varieties in Huang-Huai region in China since 1950's. III. Improvement on agronomy properties, disease resistance and stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, B G; Kong, F L; Zhang, Q Y; Yang, F X; Jiang, R Q

    2000-01-01

    Data from a set of 5-location and 2-year experiments on 10 representative historical cotton varieties and the data of Huang-Huai Regional Cotton Trials from 1973 to 1996 were analyzed to estimate the effects of genetic improvement in agronomy properties, disease resistance and stability of cotton in Huang-Huai Region in China. The results indicated that a great genetic progress of earliness and disease resistance had been achieved by breeding programs since 1950's. The maturity was shortened 3-5 days; The rate of preforst yield was increased about 7 percentages. The problem of resistance to Fususium wilt has been solved and the resistance to Verticillum wilt was improving. Some progress in stability of cotton varieties also has been achieved by breeding programs since 1950.

  12. ENHANCEMENT OF VOLTAGE STABILITY AND REDUCTION OF POWER LOSS USING GENETIC ALGORITHM THROUGH OPTIMAL LOCATION OF SVC, TCSC AND UPFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.KALAIVANI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to huge increase in power demand, power system network will lead to major problems such as voltage instability and voltage collapse in the power system. To overcome these problems, Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS devices have been implemented in power system. By placing these devices in suitable locations, the power system can be operated far away from the instability point. In this paper, the optimal location and the ratings of FACTS devices such as Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC, Static VAR Compensator (SVC and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC are determined using Genetic Algorithm (GA. A multi objective optimization problem is formulated with the consideration of minimizing voltage stability index, real power loss and generator cost. Evolutionary algorithm such as GA is a population based search method is used for solving multi objective optimization problem that is capable of searching for multiple solutions concurrently in a single run and provide an optimal solution. It is observed from the results that the voltages stability index, real power loss and generator cost are reduced by optimally locating the FACTS devices in the power system. IEEE 14 bus and IEEE 57 bus systems are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Reporting genetic results in research studies: summary and recommendations of an NHLBI working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Ebony B; Langehorne, Aleisha A; Eckfeldt, John H; Glass, Kathleen C; Jarvik, Gail P; Klag, Michael; Koski, Greg; Motulsky, Arno; Wilfond, Benjamin; Manolio, Teri A; Fabsitz, Richard R; Luepker, Russell V

    2006-05-15

    Prospective epidemiologic studies aid in identifying genetic variants associated with diseases, health risks, and physiologic traits. These genetic variants may eventually be measured clinically for purposes of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. As evidence of the potential clinical value of such information accrues, research studies face growing pressure to report these results to study participants or their physicians, even before sufficient evidence is available to support widespread screening of asymptomatic persons. There is thus a need to begin to develop consensus on whether and when genetic findings should be reported to participants in research studies. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies to discuss if, when, and how genetic information should be reported to study participants. The Working Group concluded that genetic test results should be reported to study participants when the associated risk for the disease is significant; the disease has important health implications such as premature death or substantial morbidity or has significant reproductive implications; and proven therapeutic or preventive interventions are available. Finally, the Working Group recommended procedures for reporting genetic research results and encouraged increased efforts to create uniform guidelines for this activity.

  14. Further results on stabilization for interval time-delay systems via new integral inequality approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhichen; Bai, Yan; Huang, Congzhi; Yan, Huaicheng

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the stability and stabilization problems for interval time-delay systems. By introducing a new delay partitioning approach, various Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals with triple-integral terms are established to make full use of system information. In order to reduce the conservatism, improved integral inequalities are developed for estimation of double integrals, which show remarkable outperformance over the Jensen and Wirtinger ones. Particularly, the relationship between the time-delay and each subinterval is taken into consideration. The resulting stability criteria are less conservative than some recent methods. Based on the derived condition, the state-feedback controller design approach is also given. Finally, the numerical examples and the application to inverted pendulum system are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Contact Time Between Silicone Impression Materials and Stone on Dimensional Stability of Resultant Cast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Numerous factors have an effect on the accuracy of an impression and resultant cast, and these include: impression material, impression technique, tray selection, impression disinfection, storage time of impression before pouring, stone type used for fabrication of cast. Up to now, there has been little research conducted on the effect of contact time of a cast with an impression, on the dimensional stability of a cast. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the contact time of silicone impression materials with stone casts, on the dimensional stability of resultant casts. Materials and Methods A total of 44 impressions were made from a stainless steel master model, with each one of two silicone impression materials (Elite HD+ and Speedex, and poured with Elite Master Type IV. The thickness of the light-body material (1 mm was provided by using four copings. The resulting casts from each material were placed in four groups(n = 11 after each contact time with the impression (1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week. Distance between anterior and posterior abutments was measured for the casts and master model. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test. Results The relationship between the dimensional stability of the casts and the simultaneous effect of the impression material and contact time of the cast with the impression was not statistically significant (P = 0.099. Type of impression material on the dimensional stability of the cast had no significant effect (P = 0.163. Increased contact time of the cast with the impression resulted in increased dimensional change (P < 0.001. Conclusions Dimensional stability of the casts after different contact time with the impression was acceptable. The best time to separate the cast from the impression was one hour after pouring the impression.

  16. STABILITY IN REAL TIME OF SOME CRYOPRESERVED MICROBIAL STRAINS WITH REFERENCE TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA VINTILĂ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the viability of microorganisms from Collection of Industrial Microorganisms from Faculty of Animal Science and Biotechnology – Timisoara, during freezing and thawing as part of cryopreservation technique. The stability in real time of 19 strains cryopreserved in 16% glycerol was evaluated during a 6-months period. The strains studied were: Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rhizobium meliloti, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride, Bacillus globigii, Bacillus licheniformis, and 9 strains of Bacillus subtilis. The strains cryopreserved at -20oC and -70oC were activated using the fast thawing protocol. A better cell recovery was achieved with the -70oC protocol reaching an average viability for E. coli of 86,3%, comparing with 78,6% in -20oC protocol. The cell recovery percentages for the other strains were: 92,4% for L. acidophilus, 93,9% for A.niger, 89% for A. oryzae, 86,7% for T. viride, 94,2% for R. meliloti, 82,1% for S. cerevisiae, 89,9% for B. licheniformis. Regarding the viability of genetically modified microorganisms, the values shows a good recovering after freezing and thawing, even after 180 days of cryopreservation. With the -20oC protocol lower viability was observed due probably to the formation of eutectic mixtures and recrystalization processes.

  17. Seedling development and evaluation of genetic stability of cryopreserved Dendrobium hybrid mature seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdiano, Renato Fernandes; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; de Faria, Ricardo Tadeu; Vendrame, Wagner Aparecido

    2014-03-01

    Vitrification, a simple, fast, and recommended cryopreservation method for orchid germplasm conservation, was evaluated for Dendrobium hybrid "Dong Yai" mature seeds. The genetic stability of regenerated seedlings was also evaluated using flow cytometry. Mature seeds from this hybrid were submitted to plant vitrification solution (PVS2) for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 h at 0 °C. Subsequently, they were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) at -196 °C for 1 h and recovered in half-strength Murashige and Skoog culture medium (1/2 MS), and seed germination was evaluated after 30 days. Seeds directly submitted to LN did not germinate after cryopreservation. Seeds treated with PVS2 between 1 and 3 h presented the best germination (between 51 and 58%), although longer exposure to PVS2 returned moderated germination (39%). Germinated seeds were further subcultured in P-723 culture medium and developed whole seedlings in vitro after 180 days, with no abnormal characteristics, diseases, or nutritional deficiencies. Seedlings were successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions with over 80% survival. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no chromosomal changes on vitrified seedlings, as well as seedlings germinated from the control treatment (direct exposure to LN). These findings indicate that vitrification is a feasible and safe germplasm cryopreservation method for commercial Dendrobium orchid hybrid conservation.

  18. Genetic Correlations between Young Horse and Dressage Competition Results in Danish Warmblood Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Lina Johanna Maria; Christiansen, Karina; Holm, Maiken;

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Young horse results of conformation and gaits were studied for their heritability and genetic correlation to future dressage competition results, to assess their value as young horse indicator traits. The young horse gait- and conformation scores generally had higher heritabilities (0.......13˗0.48) than the breeding goal trait of dressage competition results (0.16). Young horse results showed medium high to high genetic correlations to dressage competition results (0.32˗0.91) where most recorded young horse gait- and conformation scores contributed with considerable information to future dressage...... competition results. If considering both accuracy of each young horse trait and genetic correlation to dressage competition results, as rg×rIA, the best young horse indicator traits for future performance were capacity, trot, canter, and rideability, all under own rider. Most important conformation traits...

  19. Genetic Correlations between Young Horse and Dressage Competition Results in Danish Warmblood Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Lina Johanna Maria; Christiansen, Karina; Holm, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Young horse results of conformation and gaits were studied for their heritability and genetic correlation to future dressage competition results, to assess their value as young horse indicator traits. The young horse gait- and conformation scores generally had higher heritabilities (0.......13˗0.48) than the breeding goal trait of dressage competition results (0.16). Young horse results showed medium high to high genetic correlations to dressage competition results (0.32˗0.91) where most recorded young horse gait- and conformation scores contributed with considerable information to future dressage...... competition results. If considering both accuracy of each young horse trait and genetic correlation to dressage competition results, as rg×rIA, the best young horse indicator traits for future performance were capacity, trot, canter, and rideability, all under own rider. Most important conformation traits...

  20. Consumers' cognitions with regard to genetically modified foods. Results of a qualitative study in four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredahl, L

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this research was to gain insight into consumers> attitudes towards genetic modification in food production. With means-end chain theory as the theoretical basis, laddering interviews were conducted with 400 consumers in Denmark, Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy. Perceived risks and benefits of genetic modification in foods were investigated using beer and yoghurt as examples. German and Danish responses revealed more complex cognitive structures than did the results from the United Kingdom and Italy. In all four countries, however, applying genetic modification was associated with unnaturalness and low trustworthiness of the resulting products, independently of whether the genetically modified material was traceable in the product. Moral considerations were voiced as well, as were a number of other consequences that were perceived to conflict with both individual and social values.

  1. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, A; Abramov, S; Georgiou, G

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins (e.g., enzymes, single-chain antibodies, on the surface of bacterial cells) (Georgiou et al., 1993). Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article we describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on "bi-layer encagement" (Tor et al., 1989) for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA (46-159)-beta-lactamase fusion that displays beta-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 degrees C of surface anchored beta-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 degrees C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  2. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, A.; Abramov, S. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Georgiou, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins. Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article the authors describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on bi-layer encagement for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA-{beta}-lactamase fusion that displays {beta}-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 C of surface anchored {beta}-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  3. The genetic variability of the Podolica cattle breed from the Gargano area. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cianci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Podolica cattle breed is autochthonous of Southern Italy and denoted by its particular rusticity. This study presents the preliminary results of the genetic characterization of the Podolica breed using DNA STR markers. A total of 20 microsatellite loci were analysed in 79 individuals reared in the Gargano area. Number of polymorphisms, allele fre- quencies, deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, linkage disequilibrium between loci and genetic similarities between animals were calculated. The results showed a high deficiency of heterozygotes, the observed mean of het- erozygosis being 0.449, whereas the expected mean was 0.766. Many markers showed also deviations from the Hardy- Weinberg proportions and significant linkage disequilibrium between loci. However the genetic similarity within the pop- ulation was low (0.281 and the average number of alleles per locus was high (10, representing a high genetic vari- ability. In order to explain these results, a stratification of the breed in sub-populations with a high interior genetic homo- geneity but markedly differentiated one from each other could be hypothesized; this situation probably derived from non- random mating within each herd (consanguinity and from the lack of exchange of genetic material between the herds. A further study is needed on a wider sample and extending the analysis to FAO-ISAG microsatellite panel in order to con- firm this hypothesis. This could eventually provide the information necessary for the correct management of the repro- ductive schemes and for genomic traceability of meat production.

  4. Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Abdelwahab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns with the development of stability indicating the RP-HPLC method for simultaneous determination of guaifenesin (GUF and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH in the presence of guaifenesin related substance (Guaiacol. GUC, and in the presence of syrup excepients with minimum sample pre-treatment. In the developed RP-HPLC method efficient chromatographic separation was achieved for GUF, PSH, GUC and syrup excepients using ODS column as a stationary phase and methanol: water (50:50, v/v, pH = 4 with orthophosphoric acid as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 1 mL min−1 and UV detection at 210 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 10 min. Calibration curves were drawn relating the integrated area under peak to the corresponding concentrations of PSH, GUF and GUC in the range of 1–8, 1–20, 0.4–8 μg mL−1, respectively. The developed method has been validated and met the requirements delineated by ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The validated method was successfully applied for determination of the studied drugs in triaminic chest congestion® syrup; moreover its results were statistically compared with those obtained by the official method and no significant difference was found between them.

  5. Patient Recall, Interpretation, and Perspective of an Inconclusive Long QT Syndrome Genetic Test Result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predham, Sarah; Hathaway, Julie; Hulait, Gurdip; Arbour, Laura; Lehman, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Patients' perceptions of inconclusive results have been previously investigated in cancer genetics. The differences in how patients recall and interpret an uninformative test result compared to a known pathogenic result can affect medical decisions post disclosure. However, there is little to no data available on patients' interpretation and perception of uninformative genetic results in inherited heart disease. We report the results of a qualitative analysis of 16 telephone interviews with participants who received a negative or a variant of unknown significance (VUS) result from Long QT syndrome (LQTS) genetic testing. Our results suggest that the type of result (negative versus VUS) does not affect recall, regardless of the reason for testing. When receiving a negative result, a majority of participants appropriately perceived no change in their diagnosis, while the perception of risk for family members varied. The majority of participants felt they maintained an awareness of their condition after the result disclosure, and that clinical follow-up was similar to that planned prior to the genetic test result. Further work is needed to determine if there are any differences between obtaining a VUS result versus a negative result in this population.

  6. Medial column stabilization improves the early result of calcaneal lengthening in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Che-Nan; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Huang, Shier-Chieg; Kuo, Ken N; Wang, Ting-Ming

    2013-05-01

    Calcaneal lengthening is a popular surgical treatment for pronated foot deformity. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of medial column stabilization in improving the results of calcaneal lengthening for pronated foot deformity in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Twenty-one consecutive (37 feet) children with cerebral palsy with pronated foot deformity who received calcaneal lengthening from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. Talonavicular stabilizations were performed by either stapling alone or fusion depending on the children's age and correctability of midfoot deformity. Satisfaction rates were assessed using Mosca's radiographic, Mosca's clinical, and Yoo's clinical criteria. Talonavicular coverage angle was also measured. Results between groups with and without stabilization of the talonavicular joint were compared. Group 1 included 11 children (19 feet) who had no talonavicular stabilization. Group 2 included 10 children (18 feet) who had talonavicular fixation. Groups were further divided into subgroups A [Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS)≤II] and B (GMFCS≥III). Factors including demography, geographical classification, functional status, and preoperative degree of deformity were similar between the two groups. After the operation, all four radiographic parameters improved significantly. The talonavicular coverage angle was better in group 2 than in group 1. Mosca's radiographic results were satisfactory in 73.68% of cases in group 1 and 100% in group 2; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.027). As for Mosca's clinical results, 63.16% in group 1 and 83.33% in group 2 achieved satisfactory results (P=0.156). On the basis of Yoo's criteria, the results were satisfactory in 57.89% of cases in group 1 and in 94.44% of cases in group 2 (P=0.012). Further analysis on the satisfaction rates between the subgroups showed similar results between the patients in subgroup 1A and 2A, and significantly better results

  7. Stability in and correlation between factors influencing genetic quality of seed lots in seed orchard of Pinus tabuliformis Carr. over a 12-year span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xiaoru; Li, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Coniferous seed orchards require a long period from initial seed harvest to stable seed production. Differential reproductive success and asynchrony are among the main factors for orchard crops year-to-year variation in terms of parental gametic contribution and ultimately the genetic gain. It is fundamental in both making predictions about the genetic composition of the seed crop and decisions about orchard roguing and improved seed orchard establishment. In this paper, a primary Chinese pine seed orchard with 49 clones is investigated for stability, variation and correlation analysis of factors which influence genetic quality of the seed lots from initial seed harvest to the stable seed production over a 12 years span. Results indicated that the reproductive synchrony index of pollen shedding has shown to be higher than that of the strobili receptivity, and both can be drastically influenced by the ambient climate factors. Reproductive synchrony index of the clones has certain relative stability and it could be used as an indication of the seed orchard status during maturity stage; clones in the studied orchard have shown extreme differences in terms of the gametic and genetic contribution to the seed crop at the orchard's early production phase specifically when they severe as either female or male parents. Those differences are closely related to clonal sex tendency at the time of orchard's initial reproduction. Clonal gamete contribution as male and female parent often has a negative correlation. Clone utilization as pollen, seed or both pollen and seed donors should consider the role it would play in the seed crop; due to numerous factors influencing on the mating system in seed orchards, clonal genetic contribution as male parent is uncertain, and it has major influence on the genetic composition in the seed orchard during the initial reproductive and seed production phase.

  8. Stability in and correlation between factors influencing genetic quality of seed lots in seed orchard of Pinus tabuliformis Carr. over a 12-year span.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Coniferous seed orchards require a long period from initial seed harvest to stable seed production. Differential reproductive success and asynchrony are among the main factors for orchard crops year-to-year variation in terms of parental gametic contribution and ultimately the genetic gain. It is fundamental in both making predictions about the genetic composition of the seed crop and decisions about orchard roguing and improved seed orchard establishment. In this paper, a primary Chinese pine seed orchard with 49 clones is investigated for stability, variation and correlation analysis of factors which influence genetic quality of the seed lots from initial seed harvest to the stable seed production over a 12 years span. Results indicated that the reproductive synchrony index of pollen shedding has shown to be higher than that of the strobili receptivity, and both can be drastically influenced by the ambient climate factors. Reproductive synchrony index of the clones has certain relative stability and it could be used as an indication of the seed orchard status during maturity stage; clones in the studied orchard have shown extreme differences in terms of the gametic and genetic contribution to the seed crop at the orchard's early production phase specifically when they severe as either female or male parents. Those differences are closely related to clonal sex tendency at the time of orchard's initial reproduction. Clonal gamete contribution as male and female parent often has a negative correlation. Clone utilization as pollen, seed or both pollen and seed donors should consider the role it would play in the seed crop; due to numerous factors influencing on the mating system in seed orchards, clonal genetic contribution as male parent is uncertain, and it has major influence on the genetic composition in the seed orchard during the initial reproductive and seed production phase.

  9. MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCES FOR THE GENETIC STABILITY OF DOXORUBICIN RESISTANT CELL LINE S-180R IN VIVO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Guoqiang; Han Fusheng; Zhang Tingjun; Zhan Maocheng; Chen Xiangling; Xu Guangwei

    1998-01-01

    Objective: In order to assess the genetic stability of doxorubicin resistance sarcoma S-180R cell line in vivo.Methods: The drug resistant genes and molecules were examined by flow cytometry, Southern blot, Northern blot and RT-PCR. Results: The results showed that drugefflux in S-180R increased nearly 100-folds, as compared with its parent cells, the rate of half peak width resistant cell/peak high decreased from 0.56 to 0.23 measured by flow cytometry after two years. The mdr1 gene amplified and overexpressed significantly in S-180R and the expression of topoisomerase Ⅱα gene decreased remarkably in S-180R. There was no significant different of the MRP expression between S-180R and S-180.Conclusion: These results indicated that drug resistance of S-180R was maintained and also increased. The major mechanism of drug resistance is the amplification and overexpression of mdr1 gene, the decreased expression of topoisomerase Ⅱα also contributed to it. So, S-180R is an ideal experimental model for the study of doxorubicin resistance and its reversion in vivo.

  10. Linear stability of ideal MHD configurations. II. Results for stationary equilibrium configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerel, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we continue exploring the consequences of the general equation of motion (EOM) governing all Lagrangian perturbations ξ about a time-dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) configuration, which includes self-gravity, external gravity, pressure gradients, compressibility, inertial effects, and anisotropic Lorentz force. We here address the specific case of MHD stability for 3D stationary equilibria, where the perturbed EOM features a symmetric operator F and an antisymmetric Doppler-Coriolis operator v . ∇ . For this case, we state and prove the general properties for the solutions ξ of the governing dynamical system. For axisymmetric perturbations about axisymmetric equilibria with purely toroidal, or purely poloidal magnetic fields, specific stability theorems can be formulated. We derive a useful integral expression for the quadratic quantity given by the inner product ⟨ ξ , F [ ξ ] ⟩ . For deriving stability statements on MHD states where self-gravity is involved as well, we provide an upper bound on the perturbed self-gravitational energy associated with the displacement ξ . The resulting expression elucidates the role of potentially stabilizing versus destabilizing contributions and shows the role of gravity, entropy gradients, velocity shear, currents, Lorentz forces, inertia, and pressure gradients in offering many routes to unstable behavior in flowing gases and plasmas. These have historically mostly been studied for static v = 0 configurations, looking at stability of exactly force-balanced states, or by assuming stationarity similar to our approach here (i.e., ∂ t ≡ 0 for the state we perturb), but typically in combination with some reduced dimensionality on the configuration of interest (translational or axisymmetry). We show that in these limits, we find and generalize expressions well-known from, e.g., the study of ideal MHD stability of tokamak plasmas or from Schwarzschild's criteria controlling convection in

  11. The Genetic Equidistance Result of Molecular Evolution is Independent of Mutation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi

    2008-12-26

    The well-established genetic equidistance result shows that sister species are approximately equidistant to a simpler outgroup as measured by DNA or protein dissimilarity. The equidistance result is the most direct evidence, and remains the only evidence, for the constant mutation rate interpretation of this result, known as the molecular clock. However, data independent of the equidistance result have steadily accumulated in recent years that often violate a constant mutation rate. Many have automatically inferred non-equidistance whenever a non-constant mutation rate was observed, based on the unproven assumption that the equidistance result is an outcome of constant mutation rate. Here it is shown that the equidistance result remains valid even when different species can be independently shown to have different mutation rates. A random sampling of 50 proteins shows that nearly all proteins display the equidistance result despite the fact that many proteins have non-constant mutation rates. Therefore, the genetic equidistance result does not necessarily mean a constant mutation rate. Observations of different mutation rates do not invalidate the genetic equidistance result. New ideas are needed to explain the genetic equidistance result that must grant different mutation rates to different species and must be independently testable.

  12. Reverse genetics of measles virus and resulting multivalent recombinant vaccines: applications of recombinant measles viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, M A; Naim, H Y; Udem, S A

    2009-01-01

    An overview is given on the development of technologies to allow reverse genetics of RNA viruses, i.e., the rescue of viruses from cDNA, with emphasis on nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses (Mononegavirales), as exemplified for measles virus (MV). Primarily, these technologies allowed site-directed mutagenesis, enabling important insights into a variety of aspects of the biology of these viruses. Concomitantly, foreign coding sequences were inserted to (a) allow localization of virus replication in vivo through marker gene expression, (b) develop candidate multivalent vaccines against measles and other pathogens, and (c) create candidate oncolytic viruses. The vector use of these viruses was experimentally encouraged by the pronounced genetic stability of the recombinants unexpected for RNA viruses, and by the high load of insertable genetic material, in excess of 6 kb. The known assets, such as the small genome size of the vector in comparison to DNA viruses proposed as vectors, the extensive clinical experience of attenuated MV as vaccine with a proven record of high safety and efficacy, and the low production cost per vaccination dose are thus favorably complemented.

  13. New results on stability analysis for time-varying delay systems with non-linear perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2013-05-01

    The problem of stability for linear time-varying delay systems under nonlinear perturbation is discussed, with delay assumed as time-varying. Delay decomposition approach allows information of the delayed plant states to be fully considered. A less conservative delay-dependent robust stability condition is derived, using integral inequality approach to express the relationship of Leibniz-Newton formula terms in the within the framework of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Merits of the proposed results lie in lesser conservatism, which are realized by choosing different Lyapunov matrices in the decomposed integral intervals and estimating the upper bound of some cross term more exactly. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and lesser conservatism of the proposed method.

  14. Political Disaffection and Stability of Electoral Results in Chilean, 1993-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Avendaño

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the electoral stability vis à vis the increase of unstable votes in 1993 and 2009 parliamentary elections in Chile. In contrast with other academic works which conceive little volatility as corollary of a persistent voter’s behavior, we argue that the electoral results are consequence of the electoral system which in fact generates change in electoral behavior. We have named this phenomenon as “self-compensation”. Data analyzed in this paper show an important decrease in stable voters and that mobility exists. Nevertheless, the special characteristic of the electoral mobility is what gives stability to voter’s behavior during this period. Palabras claves: Chile, sistema de partidos, elecciones, volatilidad, voto no estable. Keywords: Chile, party system, elections, volatility, vote not stable.

  15. Genetic stability of murine pluripotent and somatic hybrid cells may be affected by conditions of their cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovna, Shramova Elena; Alekseevich, Larionov Oleg; Mikhailovich, Khodarovich Yurii; Vladimirovna, Zatsepina Olga

    2011-01-01

    Using mouse pluripotent teratocarcinoma PCC4azal cells and proliferating spleen lymphocytes we obtained a new type of hybrids, in which marker lymphocyte genes were suppressed, but expression the Oct-4 gene was not effected; the hybrid cells were able to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. In order to specify the environmental factors which may affect the genetic stability and other hybrid properties, we analyzed the total chromosome number and differentiation potencies of hybrids respectively to conditions of their cultivation. Particular attention was paid to the number and transcription activity of chromosomal nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), which harbor the most actively transcribed - ribosomal - genes. The results showed that the hybrids obtained are characterized by a relatively stable chromosome number which diminished less than in 5% during 27 passages. However, a long-term cultivation of hybrid cells in non-selective conditions resulted in preferential elimination of some NO- chromosomes, whereas the number of active NORs per cell was increased due to activation of latent NORs. On the contrary, in selective conditions, i.e. in the presence of hypoxantine, aminopterin and thymidine, the total number of NOR-bearing chromosomes was not changed, but a partial inactivation of remaining NORs was observed. The higher number of active NORs directly correlated with the capability of hybrid cells for differentiation to cardiomyocytes.

  16. [Genetic and environmental factors of asthma and allergy: Results of the EGEA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzigon, E; Nadif, R; Le Moual, N; Dizier, M-H; Aschard, H; Boudier, A; Bousquet, J; Chanoine, S; Donnay, C; Dumas, O; Gormand, F; Jacquemin, B; Just, J; Margaritte-Jeannin, P; Matran, R; Pison, C; Rage, E; Rava, M; Sarnowski, C; Smit, L A M; Temam, S; Varraso, R; Vignoud, L; Lathrop, M; Pin, I; Demenais, F; Kauffmann, F; Siroux, V

    2015-10-01

    The EGEA study (epidemiological study on the genetics and environment of asthma, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and atopy), which combines a case-control and a family-based study of asthma case (n=2120 subjects) with three surveys over 20 years, aims to identify environmental and genetic factors associated with asthma and asthma-related phenotypes. We summarize the results of the phenotypic characterization and the investigation of environmental and genetic factors of asthma and asthma-related phenotypes obtained since 2007 in the EGEA study (42 articles). Both epidemiological and genetic results confirm the heterogeneity of asthma. These results strengthen the role of the age of disease onset, the allergic status and the level of disease activity in the identification of the different phenotypes of asthma. The deleterious role of active smoking, exposure to air pollution, occupational asthmogenic agents and cleaning products on the prevalence and/or activity of asthma has been confirmed. Accounting for gene-environment interactions allowed the identification of new genetic factors underlying asthma and asthma-related traits and better understanding of their mode of action. The EGEA study is contributing to the advances in respiratory research at the international level. The new phenotypic, environmental and biological data available in EGEA study will help characterizing the long-term evolution of asthma and the factors associated to this evolution. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological distress with direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a case report of an unexpected BRCA positive test result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohany, Lindsay; Gustafson, Shanna; Ducaine, Whitney; Zakalik, Dana

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of a client who discovered she had a BRCA mutation following direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing in the absence of genetic counseling. After testing she presented for genetic counseling with anxiety, distress, and a deficit of knowledge about what the DTC genetic testing revealed. Genetic counseling helped alleviate distress while empowering the client to apply the results of testing to improve medical management. Despite recent studies demonstrating no negative psychological impact of DTC genetic testing on the consumer, this case illustrates that significant psychological distress and confusion can occur as a result of DTC genetic testing for highly penetrant single gene disorders. Pre- and post-test genetic counseling in conjunction with DTC genetic testing may alleviate consumers' distress and empower clients to proactively utilize their result information.

  18. [Results of decompressive-stabilizing procedures via unilateral approach in lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krut'ko, A V

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the capabilities, advantages and limitations of bilateral decompression via unilateral approach in decompressive-stabilizing procedures in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease, and to develop the technology and its technical performance. The controlled study included 372 patients (age range was 27-74 years). All of them were operated due to clinical manifestation of lumbar spinal stenosis. The main group consisted of 44 patients who underwent bilateral decompression via unilateral approach with stabilization of involved segments. The control group included 328 patients who were operated using standard bilateral technique with stabilization. A total of 52 segments were treated in the first group and 351 in the second one. In all patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication symptoms relieved after decompressive-stabilizing surgery. Analysis of duration of surgery (considering 1 segment) demonstrated that less invasive technique requires as much time as conventional. However mean intraoperative blood loss in the first group was twice as low as the second. Neither patient from the first group required hemotransfusion while in the second group in 57 (17.4%) cases hemotransfusion was performed due to blood loss. In the early postoperative period in both groups intensity of pain (according to VAS) gradually decreased. Mean hospital stay was 9.9 +/- 3.1 day in the main group and 14.7 +/- 4.7 days in the control group. Bilateral spinal canal decompression via unilateral approach decreases surgical trauma, blood loss, complication rate and hospital stay. Postoperative results are comparable with conventional technique.

  19. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Lacava, A. N.; Walier, M; D. Holler; Steffens, M; Gieger, C; C. Furlanello; Lamina, C; Wichmann, H E; Becker, T

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n = 728). Genetic heterogeneity was ev...

  20. Deaf Adults' Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results from a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults' motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf,…

  1. Optimal explicit strong-stability-preserving general linear methods : complete results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Sandu, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2009-03-03

    This paper constructs strong-stability-preserving general linear time-stepping methods that are well suited for hyperbolic PDEs discretized by the method of lines. These methods generalize both Runge-Kutta (RK) and linear multistep schemes. They have high stage orders and hence are less susceptible than RK methods to order reduction from source terms or nonhomogeneous boundary conditions. A global optimization strategy is used to find the most efficient schemes that have low storage requirements. Numerical results illustrate the theoretical findings.

  2. Parents' responses to disclosure of genetic test results of their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosfeld, FJM; Beemer, FA; Lips, CJM; ten Kroode, HFJ

    2000-01-01

    The psychological reactions of 22 parental couples and 3 single parents were investigated after disclosure of genetic test results of their children. The children were tested for the early-onset, monogenetic cancer disorder multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. Participants came from 13 different fam

  3. Consumers' cognitions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a qualitative study in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    rankings of different beer and yoghurt products showed consistently low preferences for the genetically modified product alternatives across countries and product categories. Both in the case of yoghurt and beer, more traditional product alternatives were preferred. 5. In all four countries, genetic...... as unwholesome and untrustworthy, and a range of negative consequences were inferred, which would eventually prevent the attainment of individual life values such as happi and inner harmony, a long and healthy life, quality of life and security, and more social life values such as responsibility for nature...... were derived from the application of genetic engineering to produce beer and yoghurt, whereas a large palette of consequences were perceived in the three other countries. The results revealed no substantive differences in beliefs relating to the different outcome groups considered. 7. Overall...

  4. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  5. Effect of Genetic Connectedness on the Selection Results of Breeding Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Two pig populations were simulated with Monte Carlo method; each consisted of 5 boars and 50 sows per generation.Genetic connectedness between herds was established by randomly selecting 1 or 2 boars from one population to mate sows of the other population. Breeding pigs were selected within populations according to animal model BLUP. The benefits of genetic connectedness between herds were examined. The results showed that, the average coefficients of inbreeding decreased, while the cumulative selection responses of populations increased, and the higher response occurred randomly in the two populations at generation 5 with the increase of the genetic connectedness between herds.Selection response was affected by genetic connectedness and trait heritability, the lower heritability and higher connectedness, the better selection results. When the number of exchanged litters between populations per generation was 6 litters, the selection results reached a reflection point; if the number of exchanged litters between populations increased further from this point, neither the increase of the cumulative selection responses nor the decrease of coefficients of inbreeding was significant.

  6. Longitudinal Stability of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Irritability: From Childhood to Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A; Myers, John; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about genetic influences on juvenile irritability and whether such influences are developmentally stable and/or dynamic. This study examined the temporal pattern of genetic and environmental effects on irritability using data from a prospective, four-wave longitudinal twin study. Parents and their twin children (N=2,620 children) from the Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development reported on the children's irritability, defined using a previously identified scale from the Child Behavior Checklist. Genetic effects differed across the sexes, with males exhibiting increasing heritability from early childhood through young adulthood and females exhibiting decreasing heritability. Genetic innovation was also more prominent in males than in females, with new genetic risk factors affecting irritability in early and late adolescence for males. Shared environment was not a primary influence on irritability for males or females. Unique, nonshared environmental factors suggested strong effects early for males followed by an attenuating influence, whereas unique environmental factors were relatively stable for females. Genetic effects on irritability are developmentally dynamic from middle childhood through young adulthood, with males and females displaying differing patterns. As males age, genetic influences on irritability increase while nonshared environmental influences weaken. Genetic contributions are quite strong in females early in life but decline in importance with age. In girls, nonshared environmental influences are fairly stable throughout development.

  7. [Clonal micropropagation of a rare species Hedysarum theinum Krasnob (Fabaceae) and assessment of the genetic stability of regenerated plants using ISSR markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erst, A A; Svyagina, N S; Novikova, T I; Dorogina, O V

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, a protocol was developed for the in vitro propagation of a rare medicinal plant, Hedysarum theinum (tea sweetvetch), from axillary buds, and identification of the regenerants was performed with the use of ISSR markers. It was demonstrated that Gamborg and Eveleigh medium supplemented with 5 μM 6-benzylaminopurine was the best for H. theinum for initial multiplication. On the other hand, half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 7 μM α-naphthaleneacetic acid proved to be the best for explant rooting. Molecular genetic analysis of the H. theinum mother plants and the obtained regenerants was performed with six ISSR markers. Depending on the primer, four to ten amplified fragments with sizes ranging from 250 to 3000 bp were identified. Our results confirmed the genetic stability of regenerants obtained in five passages and their identity to the mother plant.

  8. Recent results on stability and response bounds of linear systems - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Christian; Kliem, Wolfhard

    2006-01-01

    of stability and response bounds of linear systems. In addition to reporting some interesting recent stability investigations, the basic concepts of stability are reviewed, and a short introduction to Lyapunov’s direct method is also presented. Particularly important for applications are response bounds...

  9. Deaf Adults’ Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results From a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults’ motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf, or both communities, rated interest in testing for 21 reasons covering 5 life domains. Findings suggest strong interest in testing to learn why they ...

  10. Dynamic stability of the Solar System: Statistically inconclusive results from ensemble integrations

    CERN Document Server

    Zeebe, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the Solar System, the question of its long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, for instance, based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization of the inner planets, leading to close encounters and/or collisions can be initiated through a large increase in Mercury's eccentricity, with a currently assumed likelihood of ~1%. However, little is known at present about the robustness of this number. Here I report ensemble integrations of the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5 Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The results show that different numerical algorithms lead to statistically different results for the evolution of Mercury's eccentricity (eM). For instance, starting at present initial conditions (eM ~= 0.21), Mercury's maximum eccentricity achieved over 5 Gyr is on average significantly higher in symplectic ensemble integrations using heliocentricthan Jacobi coordinates and stricter er...

  11. Dynamic stability test results on an 0.024 scale B-1 air vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Dynamic longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the B-1 air vehicle were investigated in three wind tunnels at the Langley Research Center. The main rotary derivatives were obtained for an angle of attack range of -3 degrees to +16 degrees for a Mach number range of 0.2 to 2.16. Damping in roll data could not be obtained at the supersonic Mach numbers. The Langley 7 x 10 foot high speed tunnel, the 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel, and the 4 foot Unitary Plan wind tunnel were the test sites. An 0.024 scale light-weight model was used on a forced oscillation type balance. Test Reynolds number varied from 474,000/ft to 1,550,000/ft. through the Mach number range tested. The results showed that the dynamic stability characteristics of the model in pitch and roll were generally satisfactory up to an angle attack of about +6 degrees. In the wing sweep range from 15 to 25 degrees the positive damping levels in roll deteriorated rapidly above +2 degrees angle of attack. This reduction in roll damping is believed to be due to the onset of separation over the wing as stall is approached.

  12. Life insurance and genetic test results: a mutation carrier's fight to achieve full cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Louise A; Otlowski, Margaret F A

    2013-09-01

    Currently, there is debate about life insurance companies' use of genetic information for assessing applicants. In his early 20s, James (pseudonym) was denied full life insurance cover because he revealed that he had discussed genetic testing with a genetic counsellor. He was later tested and found to carry a mutation in the MSH6 gene; after disclosing this, he was denied cover for cancer by two other life insurance companies. Unsatisfied with the insurance companies' risk assessments, and based on his understanding that regular colonoscopy significantly reduced his risk of cancer, James made a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. After informing the third insurance company that he had done so, he was offered full coverage, which suggests that the company did not have actuarial data to justify its decision. This case provides evidence of the high level of initiative and proactivity required for a consumer to achieve a fair result. Few Australians would be in a position to pursue the level of research and advocacy undertaken by James (a professional with scientific training). We call on a collaborative approach between industry, government and researchers to address the issues that James's case raises about genetic testing and life insurance.

  13. Effect of posterior condylar offset on clinical results after posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Tao Wang; Yu Zhang; Qing Liu; Qiang He; Dong-Liang Zhang; Ying Zhang; Ji-Xuan Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose:To determine the effect of the posterior condylar offset (PCO) on clinical results after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a high-flex posterior-stabilized (PS) fixed-bearing prosthesis.Methods:We prospectively studied the clinical and radiographic materials of 89 consecutive female patients (89 knees),who had undergone primary TKAs for end-stage osteoarthritis.All operations were performed by a single senior surgeon or under his supervision using the same operative technique.Based on the corrected PCO change,we divided all cases into two groups:group A (corrected PCO change ≥0 mm,58 knees) and group B (corrected PCO change <0 mm,31 knees).One-year postoperatively,clinical and radiographic variables from the two groups were compared by independent t-test.The associations between the corrected PCO changes and the improvements of clinical variables in all patients were analyzed by Pearson linear correlation.Results:One-year postoperatively,the Knee Society Scores,the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index,non-weight-bearing active and passive range of knee flexion,flexion contracture,extensor lag,and their improvements had no statistical differences between the two groups (all p > 0.05).The corrected PCO change was not significantly correlated with the improvement of any clinical variable (all p > 0.05).Group A demonstrated greater flexion than group B during active weight bearing (p < 0.05).Conclusions:Restoration of PCO plays an important role in the optimization of active knee flexion during weight-bearing conditions after posterior-stabilized TKA,while it has no benefit to non-weight-bearing knee flexion or any other clinical result.

  14. The Potential of Genetic Engineering in Agriculture to Affect Global Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    to the development of Genetically Modified Organisms ( GMO ).8 The very first GMO was a bacteria developed by Ananda Chakrabarty in 1972 that was...would outweigh any small benefit gained. The bigger risk of litigation lies in propagation from one of the small plots growing unlicensed genetically...delicate balance to any ecosystem. In some cases, it is a symbiotic relationship in which all parties benefit , but in other cases, it is a matter of

  15. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Diaz-Lacava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n=728. Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (HO. Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher HO values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data.

  16. [Diversity and genetic stability of yeast flocculation caused by variation of tandem repeats in yeast flocculin genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2013-07-01

    Yeast flocculation is described as a reversible, asexual and calcium dependent process, in which cells adhere to form flocs by interaction of specific cell surface proteins named flocculins on yeast cells with mannose residues present on the cell wall of adjacent yeast cells. Yeast flocculation provides a very economical and convenient pathway for separation of yeast cells from the fermentation broth or removal of heavy metal ions from effluent. A large number of tandem repeats have been found in genes encoding flocculins, which not only have great regulatory effect on the structure and function of flocculins, generating the diversity of flocculation characteristics, but lead to genetic instability in flocculation as well for driving slippage and recombination reactions within and between FLO genes. Here, the research progress in effect of variation of tandem repeats in FLO genes on flocculation characteristics and genetic stability were reviewed to direct and promote the controllable application of flocculation in industrial fermentation process and environmental remediation.

  17. Stability results of a free air ionization chamber in standard mammography beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are absolute dosimeters, because they can measure basic physical quantities directly without the need of their calibration in a standard radiation beam. They are used for measuring exposure and air kerma in X and gamma radiation beams. The Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN has a free air ionization chamber of the cylindrical type for low energies. The characterization of this ionization chamber was already performed and reported in a previous study. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder devices, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the new alignment protocol of the free air ionization chamber in low energies of X-ray beams of standard mammography qualities, assuring the positioning reproducibility, and new results of stability tests performed with the application of this protocol will be presented. (author)

  18. Absence of fks1p in lager brewing yeast results in aberrant cell wall composition and improved beer flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-jing; Xu, Wei-na; Li, Xin'er; Li, Jia; Li, Qi

    2014-06-01

    The flavor stability during storage is very important to the freshness and shelf life of beer. However, beer fermented with a yeast strain which is prone to autolyze will significantly affect the flavor of product. In this study, the gene encoding β-1,3-glucan synthetase catalytic subunit (fks1) of the lager yeast was destroyed via self-clone strategy. β-1,3-glucan is the principle cell wall component, so fks1 disruption caused a decrease in β-1,3-glucan level and increase in chitin level in cell wall, resulting in the increased cell wall thickness. Comparing with wild-type strain, the mutant strain had 39.9 and 63.41 % less leakage of octanoic acid and decanoic acid which would significantly affect the flavor of beer during storage. Moreover, the results of European Brewery Convention tube fermentation test showed that the genetic manipulation to the industrial brewing yeast helped with the anti-staling ability, rather than affecting the fermentation ability. The thiobarbituric acid value reduced by 65.59 %, and the resistant staling value increased by 26.56 %. Moreover, the anti-staling index of the beer fermented with mutant strain increased by 2.64-fold than that from wild-type strain respectively. China has the most production and consumption of beer around the world, so the quality of beer has a significant impact on Chinese beer industry. The result of this study could help with the improvement of the quality of beer in China as well as around the world.

  19. Maximizing influence in a social network: Improved results using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaiqi; Du, Haifeng; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2017-07-01

    The influence maximization problem focuses on finding a small subset of nodes in a social network that maximizes the spread of influence. While the greedy algorithm and some improvements to it have been applied to solve this problem, the long solution time remains a problem. Stochastic optimization algorithms, such as simulated annealing, are other choices for solving this problem, but they often become trapped in local optima. We propose a genetic algorithm to solve the influence maximization problem. Through multi-population competition, using this algorithm we achieve an optimal result while maintaining diversity of the solution. We tested our method with actual networks, and our genetic algorithm performed slightly worse than the greedy algorithm but better than other algorithms.

  20. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C A

    2011-03-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. The structure of Spy is unlike that of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors.

  1. Genetic mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance that translate to crop yield stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickelbart, Michael V; Hasegawa, Paul M; Bailey, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Crop yield reduction as a consequence of increasingly severe climatic events threatens global food security. Genetic loci that ensure productivity in challenging environments exist within the germplasm of crops, their wild relatives and species that are adapted to extreme environments. Selective bre

  2. Physical activity attenuates genetic effects on BMI: Results from a study of Chinese adult twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biqi; Gao, Wenjing; Lv, Jun; Yu, Canqing; Wang, Shengfeng; Pang, Zengchang; Cong, Liming; Dong, Zhong; Wu, Fan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Xianping; Jiang, Guohong; Wang, Xiaojie; Wang, Binyou; Cao, Weihua; Li, Liming

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the gene-environment interaction of physical activity and body mass index (BMI) using the Chinese National Twin Registry (CNTR). A total of 19,308 same-sex adult twins from CNTR were included in the analysis. Twin zygosity was determined by self-reported questionnaire. Height and weight were measured using self-reported questionnaire. The vigorous physical activity was defined as greater or equal to five times a week of at least 30 min moderate- or high-intensity physical activity. A twin structural equation model was used to analyze the gene-environment interaction of vigorous exercise with BMI among 13,506 monozygotic twins and 5,802 dizygotic twins. A structural equation model adjusting for age and sex found vigorous exercise significantly moderated the additive genetic effects (P genetic contributions to BMI were significantly lower for people who adopted a physically active lifestyle [h(2) = 40%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 35%-46%] than those who were relative sedentary (h(2) = 59%, 95% CI: 52%-66%). The observed gene-physical activity interaction was more pronounced in men than women. Our results suggested that adopting a physically active lifestyle may help to reduce the genetic influence on BMI among the Chinese population. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  3. Effects of disclosing hypothetical genetic test results for salt sensitivity on salt restriction behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshima T

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Taro Takeshima,1,2 Masanobu Okayama,1 Masanori Harada,3 Ryusuke Ae,4 Eiji Kajii1 1Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Department of Healthcare Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; 3Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Yamaguchi, Japan; 4Department of General Internal Medicine, Hamasaka Public Hospital, Mikata, Japan Background: A few studies have explored the effects of disclosure of genetic testing results on chronic disease predisposition. However, these effects remain unclear in cases of hypertension. Reducing salt intake is an important nonpharmacological intervention for hypertension. We investigated the effects of genetic testing for salt sensitivity on salt restriction behavior using hypothetical genetic testing results. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-completed questionnaire. We enrolled consecutive outpatients who visited primary care clinics and small hospitals between September and December 2009 in Japan. We recorded the patients’ baseline characteristics and data regarding their salt restriction behavior, defined as reducing salt intake before and after disclosure of hypothetical salt sensitivity genetic test results. Behavioral stage was assessed according to the five-stage transtheoretical model. After dividing subjects into salt restriction and no salt restriction groups, we compared their behavioral changes following positive and negative test results and analyzed the association between the respondents’ characteristics and their behavioral changes. Results: We analyzed 1562 participants with a mean age of 58 years. In the no salt restriction group, which included patients at the precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages, 58.7% stated that their behavioral stage progressed after a positive test result, although 29

  4. Stenting is improving and stabilizing anatomical results of coiled intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubicz, Boris [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Bandeira, Alexandra; Baleriaux, Danielle [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Bruneau, Michael; Witte, Olivier de [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Brussels (Belgium); Dewindt, Aloys [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-06-15

    Stent-assisted coiling (SAC) is an alternative to surgical clipping for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms (IA). However, little information is available concerning the long-term results of this treatment. The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical and anatomical findings in 32 patients with 34 wide-necked IA treated by SAC. A retrospective review of our prospectively maintained database identified all patients followed up for wide-necked IA treated by SAC. The clinical charts, procedural data, and angiographic results were reviewed. Thirty-two patients with 34 IA were identified including 25 asymptomatic patients, four with cranial nerve palsies, two with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one with transient ischemic attacks. Mean aneurysm size was 10.2 mm (range 3.5 to 26 mm). Embolization was successful in all patients and no procedure-related neurological morbidity or mortality was observed. Immediate anatomical results included nine complete occlusions (26.5%), two neck remnants (6%), and 23 incomplete occlusions (67.5%). Mean imaging follow-up of 20 months showed 18 further thrombosis (53%) and 16 stable results (47%). Finally, 27 aneurysms were completely occluded (79%), three had a neck remnant (9%), and four were incompletely occluded (12%). Asymptomatic and nonsignificant in-stent stenosis occurred in seven patients (22%). SAC is safe and effective for the treatment of wide-necked IA. Despite unsatisfying immediate aneurysm occlusion, the adjunctive effect of the stent is stabilizing or significantly improving long-term anatomical results. (orig.)

  5. Influence of heat stress, sex and genetic groups on reference genes stability in muscle tissue of chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedraz de Oliveira, Haniel; Pinto Garcia, Antonio Amandio; Gonzaga Gromboni, Juliana Gracielle; Vasconcelos Farias Filho, Ronaldo; Souza do Nascimento, Carlos; Arias Wenceslau, Amauri

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative RT-PCR is an important technique for assessing gene expression. However, a proper normalization of reference genes prior to expression analyses of target genes is necessary. The best normalizer is that gene which remains stable in all samples from different treatments. The aim of this study was to identify stable reference genes for normalization of target genes in muscle tissue from three genetically divergent chickens groups (Peloco, Cobb 500® and Caneluda) under environmental (heat stress and comfort) and sex influence. Expressions of ten reference genes were tested for stability in breast muscular tissue (Pectoralis major muscle). Samples were obtained from 36 males and females of two backyard breeds (Caneluda and Peloco) and one commercial line (Cobb 500®) under two environments. The heat stress and comfort temperature were 39 and 23°C, respectively. Animals were housed in the Animal Science Department at Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia. We analyzed the expression data by four statistical tools (SLqPCR, NormFinder, Bestkeeper and Comparative CT). According to these tools, genes stability varied according to sex, genetic group and environment, however, some genes remained stable in all analyzes. There was no difference between the most stable genes for sex effect, being MRPS27 more stable for both males and females. In general, MRPS27 was the most stable gene. Within the three genetic groups, the most stable genes were RPL5, HMBS and EEF1 to Cobb 500®, Peloco and Caneluda, respectively. Within the environment, the most stable gene under comfort and heat stress conditions was HMBS and MRPS27, respectively. BestKeeper and Comparative Ct were less correlated (28%) and SLqPCR and NormFinder were the most correlated (98%). MRPS27, RPL5 and MRPS30 genes were considered stable according the overall ranking and can be used as normalizer of relative expression of target genes in muscle tissue of chickens under heat stress.

  6. Deficit Policy within the Framework of the Stability and Growth Pact: Empirical Results and Lessons for the Fiscal Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS D eficit Policy Within the Framework of the Stability and Growth Pact: Empirical Results and Lessons for the Fiscal Compact 6. AUTHOR(S... Fiscal Policy 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19, SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT OF THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED... POLICY WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE STABILITY AND GROWTH PACT EMPIRICAL RESULTS AND LESSONS FOR THE FISCAL COMPACT Nicolas Afftatet Zusammenfassung

  7. Cascades of genetic instability resulting from compromised break-induced replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumini Vasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Break-induced replication (BIR is a mechanism to repair double-strand breaks (DSBs that possess only a single end that can find homology in the genome. This situation can result from the collapse of replication forks or telomere erosion. BIR frequently produces various genetic instabilities including mutations, loss of heterozygosity, deletions, duplications, and template switching that can result in copy-number variations (CNVs. An important type of genomic rearrangement specifically linked to BIR is half-crossovers (HCs, which result from fusions between parts of recombining chromosomes. Because HC formation produces a fused molecule as well as a broken chromosome fragment, these events could be highly destabilizing. Here we demonstrate that HC formation results from the interruption of BIR caused by a damaged template, defective replisome or premature onset of mitosis. Additionally, we document that checkpoint failure promotes channeling of BIR into half-crossover-initiated instability cascades (HCC that resemble cycles of non-reciprocal translocations (NRTs previously described in human tumors. We postulate that HCs represent a potent source of genetic destabilization with significant consequences that mimic those observed in human diseases, including cancer.

  8. Aluminum Stabilized NbTi Conductor Test Coil Design, Fabrication, and Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.; Makarov, A.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab; Nakamoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-09-01

    A new generation of precision muon conversion experiments is planned at both Fermilab and KEK. These experiments will depend upon a complex set of solenoid magnets for the production, momentum selection and transport of a muon beam to a stopping target, and for tracking detector momentum analysis of candidate conversion electrons from the target. Baseline designs for the production and detector solenoids use NbTi cable that is heavily stabilized by an extruded high RRR aluminum jacket. A U.S.-Japan research collaboration has begun whose goal is to advance the development of optimized Al-NbTi conductors, gain experience with the technology of winding coils from this material, and test the conductor performance as modest length samples become available. For this purpose, a 'conductor test' solenoid with three coils was designed and built at Fermilab. A sample of the RIKEN Al-NbTi conductor from KEK was wound into a 'test' coil; this was sandwiched between two 'field' coils wound from doubled SSC cable, to increase the peak field on the RIKEN test coil. All three solenoid coils were epoxy impregnated, and utilized aluminum outer bandage rings to apply preload to the coils when cold. The design and fabrication details, and results of the magnet quench performance tests are presented and discussed.

  9. Local conditions for global stability in the space of codons of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2016-12-01

    The polar requirement is an attribute of amino acids that is a major determinant of the structure and function of the proteins, and it plays a role in the flexibility and robustness of the genetic code. The viability of an organism depends on flexibility, which allows the exploration of new functions. However, robustness is necessary to protect the organism from deleterious changes derived from misreading errors and single-point mutations. Compared with random codes, the standard genetic code is one of the most robust against such errors. Here, using analytical and numerical calculations and the set of amino acid-encoding codons, we have proposed some local conditions that are necessary for the optimal robustness of the genetic code, and we explored the association between the local conditions and the robustness. The localness of the proposed conditions and the underlying evolutionary mechanism, which begins with a random code and progresses toward more efficient codes (e.g., the standard code), might be biologically plausible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The contribution of dormant origins to genome stability: from cell biology to human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, Robert C; Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Blow, J Julian

    2014-07-01

    The ability of a eukaryotic cell to precisely and accurately replicate its DNA is crucial to maintain genome stability. Here we describe our current understanding of the process by which origins are licensed for DNA replication and review recent work suggesting that fork stalling has exerted a strong selective pressure on the positioning of licensed origins. In light of this, we discuss the complex and disparate phenotypes observed in mouse models and humans patients that arise due to defects in replication licensing proteins.

  11. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods - Results of a cross-national survey

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    1. Previous research has shown consumers to be highly sceptical towards genetic modification in food production. So far, however, little research has tried to explain how consumers form attitudes and make decisions with regard to genetically modified foods. 2. The paper presents the results of a survey which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to investigate the formation of consumer attitudes towards genetic modification in food production and of purchase decisi...

  12. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a cross-national survey

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Executive summary 1. Previous research has shown consumers to be highly sceptical towards genetic modification in food production. So far, however, little research has tried to explain how consumers form attitudes and make decisions with regard to genetically modified foods. 2. The paper presents the results of a survey which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to investigate the formation of consumer attitudes towards genetic modification in food production and ...

  13. DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM: STATISTICALLY INCONCLUSIVE RESULTS FROM ENSEMBLE INTEGRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeebe, Richard E., E-mail: zeebe@soest.hawaii.edu [School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1000 Pope Road, MSB 629, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the solar system, the question of its long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, for instance, based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization of the inner planets, leading to close encounters and/or collisions can be initiated through a large increase in Mercury's eccentricity, with a currently assumed likelihood of ∼1%. However, little is known at present about the robustness of this number. Here I report ensemble integrations of the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5 Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The results show that different numerical algorithms lead to statistically different results for the evolution of Mercury's eccentricity (e{sub M}). For instance, starting at present initial conditions (e{sub M}≃0.21), Mercury's maximum eccentricity achieved over 5 Gyr is, on average, significantly higher in symplectic ensemble integrations using heliocentric rather than Jacobi coordinates and stricter error control. In contrast, starting at a possible future configuration (e{sub M}≃0.53), Mercury's maximum eccentricity achieved over the subsequent 500 Myr is, on average, significantly lower using heliocentric rather than Jacobi coordinates. For example, the probability for e{sub M} to increase beyond 0.53 over 500 Myr is >90% (Jacobi) versus only 40%-55% (heliocentric). This poses a dilemma because the physical evolution of the real system—and its probabilistic behavior—cannot depend on the coordinate system or the numerical algorithm chosen to describe it. Some tests of the numerical algorithms suggest that symplectic integrators using heliocentric coordinates underestimate the odds for destabilization of Mercury's orbit at high initial e{sub M}.

  14. The effect of genetic selection for Johne's disease resistance n dairy cattle: Results of a genetic-epidemiological model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzen, van K.J.E.; Koets, A.P.; Nielen, M.; Heuven, H.C.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Klinkenberg, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model genetic selection for Johne’s disease resistance and to study the effect of different selection strategies on the prevalence in the dairy cattle population. In the Netherlands, a certification-and-surveillance program is in use to reduce prevalence and presen

  15. Theoretical investigations on model ternary polypeptides using genetic algorithm—Some new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vinita; Bakhshi, A. K.

    2011-04-01

    Using genetic algorithm (GA) model ternary polypeptides containing glycine, alanine and serine in β-pleated conformation have been theoretically investigated. In designing, the criterion to attain the optimum solution at the end of GA run is minimum band gap and maximum delocalization in the polypeptide chain. Ab initio results obtained using Clementi's minimal basis set are used as input. Effects of (i) change of basis set from minimal to double zeta, (ii) change in secondary structure from β-pleated to α-helical, (iii) presence of solvation shell and (iv) binding of H + and Li + ions to peptide group on the resulting solution as well as on electronic structure and conduction properties of polypeptides are investigated. A comparison is drawn between results obtained for the two cationic adducts. The protonated adduct is expected to withdraw more negative charge from the polypeptide chain due to smaller size of H + and is found to have high electron affinity compared to Li + adduct.

  16. Pediatric Cancer Genetics Research and an Evolving Preventive Ethics Approach for Return of Results after Death of the Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollon, Sarah; Bergstrom, Katie; McCullough, Laurence B; McGuire, Amy L; Gutierrez, Stephanie; Kerstein, Robin; Parsons, D Williams; Plon, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    The return of genetic research results after death in the pediatric setting comes with unique complexities. Researchers must determine which results and through which processes results are returned. This paper discusses the experience over 15 years in pediatric cancer genetics research of returning research results after the death of a child and proposes a preventive ethics approach to protocol development in order to improve the quality of return of results in pediatric genomic settings.

  17. Aeroelastic effects in multirotor vehicles. Part 2: Methods of solution and results illustrating coupled rotor/body aeromechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a sequel to the earlier report titled, Aeroelastic Effects in Multi-Rotor Vehicles with Application to Hybrid Heavy Lift System, Part 1: Formulation of Equations of Motion (NASA CR-3822). The trim and stability equations are presented for a twin rotor system with a buoyant envelope and an underslung load attached to a flexible supporting structure. These equations are specialized for the case of hovering flight. A stability analysis, for such a vehicle with 31 degrees of freedom, yields a total of 62 eigenvalues. A careful parametric study is performed to identify the various blade and vehicle modes, as well as the coupling between various modes. Finally, it is shown that the coupled rotor/vehicle stability analysis provides information on both the aeroelastic stability as well as complete vehicle dynamic stability. Also presented are the results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a single rotor helicopter in ground resonance. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby validating the analytical model for the dynamics of the coupled rotor/support system.

  18. Stability of genetic variance and covariance for reproductive characters in the face of climate change in a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garant, Dany; Hadfield, Jarrod D; Kruuk, Loeske E B; Sheldon, Ben C

    2008-01-01

    Global warming has had numerous effects on populations of animals and plants, with many species in temperate regions experiencing environmental change at unprecedented rates. Populations with low potential for adaptive evolutionary change and plasticity will have little chance of persistence in the face of environmental change. Assessment of the potential for adaptive evolution requires the estimation of quantitative genetic parameters, but it is as yet unclear what impact, if any, global warming will have on the expression of genetic variances and covariances. Here we assess the impact of a changing climate on the genetic architecture underlying three reproductive traits in a wild bird population. We use a large, long-term, data set collected on great tits (Parus major) in Wytham Woods, Oxford, and an 'animal model' approach to quantify the heritability of, and genetic correlations among, laying date, clutch size and egg mass during two periods with contrasting temperature conditions over a 40-year period (1965-1988 [cooler] vs. 1989-2004 [warmer]). We found significant additive genetic variance and heritability for all traits under both temperature regimes. We also found significant negative genetic covariances and correlations between clutch size and egg weight during both periods, and among laying date and clutch size in the colder years only. The overall G matrix comparison among periods, however, showed only a minor difference among periods, thus suggesting that genotype by environment interactions are negligible in this context. Our results therefore suggest that despite substantial changes in temperature and in mean laying date phenotype over the last decades, and despite the large sample sizes available, we are unable to detect any significant change in the genetic architecture of the reproductive traits studied.

  19. The stabilizing effects of genetic diversity on predator-prey dynamics [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/9u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Steiner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity among prey in their susceptibility to predation is a potentially important stabilizer of predator-prey interactions, reducing the magnitude of population oscillations and enhancing total prey population abundance. When microevolutionary responses of prey populations occur at time scales comparable to population dynamics, adaptive responses in prey defense can, in theory, stabilize predator-prey dynamics and reduce top-down effects on prey abundance. While experiments have tested these predictions, less explored are the consequences of the evolution of prey phenotypes that can persist in both vulnerable and invulnerable classes. We tested this experimentally using a laboratory aquatic system composed of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as a predator and the prey Synura petersenii, a colony-forming alga that exhibits genetic variation in its propensity to form colonies and colony size (larger colonies are a defense against predators. Prey populations of either low initial genetic diversity and low adaptive capacity or high initial genetic diversity and high adaptive capacity were crossed with predator presence and absence. Dynamics measured over the last 127 days of the 167-day experiment revealed no effects of initial prey genetic diversity on the average abundance or temporal variability of predator populations. However, genetic diversity and predator presence/absence interactively affected prey population abundance and stability; diversity of prey had no effects in the absence of predators but stabilized dynamics and increased total prey abundance in the presence of predators. The size structure of the genetically diverse prey populations diverged from single strain populations in the presence of predators, showing increases in colony size and in the relative abundance of cells found in colonies. Our work sheds light on the adaptive value of colony formation and supports the general view that genetic diversity and intraspecific

  20. Stability of genetic-based defensive chemistry across life stages in a Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Humphreys, Jonathan R; Potts, Brad M

    2007-10-01

    Defensive chemistry is a key plant fitness trait, and the investigation of the expression of plant secondary metabolites across life stages is important in understanding the lifetime evolutionary selection pressures on a plant. The expression of genetic-based differences in foliar defensive chemistry, known to influence mammalian herbivore preferences, was studied across two contrasting life phases of the heteroblastic tree, Eucalyptus globulus. With plants from different subraces of E. globulus growing in a field trial, we compared the levels of seven chemical constituents in adult and juvenile foliage from related coppiced plants. Defensive chemistry was generally higher in more vulnerable coppice foliage than adult foliage. Significant, genetic-based differences among subraces were detected for two key defensive chemicals, a sideroxylonal and a macrocarpal, and these differences were stable across life phases. In contrast, significant differences among subraces in adult leaf condensed tannins were not evident in the coppice because of the absence of this group of tannins in this foliage. These findings lend support to hypotheses that suggest condensed tannins may have evolved for reasons other than mammalian herbivore defense.

  1. Is it possible to preserve lumbar lordosis after hybrid stabilization? Preliminary results of a novel rigid-dynamic stabilization system in degenerative lumbar pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, Matteo; Cavagnaro, Luca; Basso, Marco; Zanirato, Andrea; Felli, Lamberto; Formica, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the results of a novel rigid-dynamic stabilization technique in lumbar degenerative segment diseases (DSD), expressly pointing out the preservation of postoperative lumbar lordosis (LL). Forty-one patients with one level lumbar DSD and initial disc degeneration at the adjacent level were treated. Circumferential lumbar arthrodesis and posterior hybrid instrumentation were performed to preserve an initial disc degeneration above the segment that has to be fused. Clinical and spino-pelvic parameters were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. At 2-year follow-up, a significant improvement of clinical outcomes was reported. No statistically significant difference was noted between postoperative and 2-year follow-up in LL and in disc/vertebral body height ratio at the upper adjacent fusion level. When properly selected, this technique leads to good results. A proper LL should be achieved after any hybrid stabilization to preserve the segment above the fusion.

  2. Median of patient results as a tool for assessment of analytical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Steen Ingemann; Petersen, Per Hyltoft;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of the well-established external quality assessment and proficiency testing surveys of analytical quality performance in laboratory medicine, a simple tool to monitor the long-term analytical stability as a supplement to the internal control procedures is often needed. METHOD...

  3. A New Robust Stabilization Analysis Result for Uncertain Systems with Time-Varying Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-sheng; WANG Dong-yun; LIAO Xiao-xin

    2005-01-01

    The robust stabilization problem for uncertain systems with time-varying delay has been discussed. A new sufficient criterion is obtained to guarantee the closed-loop system robust stabilizable. The controller gain matrix is included in a Hamiltonian matrix. The Hamiltonian matrix can be constructed by the boundedness of the uncertainties. Some examples are given to illustrate the feasibility of the criterion.

  4. Genetic stability and phytochemical analysis of the in vitro regenerated plants of Dendrobium nobile Lindl., an endangered medicinal orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Paromik; Kumaria, Suman; Diengdoh, Reemavareen; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-12-01

    An efficient genetically stable regeneration protocol with increased phytochemical production has been established for Dendrobium nobile, a highly prized orchid for its economic and medicinal importance. Protocorm like bodies (PLBs) were induced from the pseudostem segments using thidiazuron (TDZ; 1.5 mg/l), by-passing the conventional auxin-cytokinin complement approach for plant regeneration. Although, PLB induction was observed at higher concentrations of TDZ, plantlet regeneration from those PLBs was affected adversely. The best rooting (5.41 roots/shoot) was achieved in MS medium with 1.5 mg/l TDZ and 0.25% activated charcoal. Plantlets were successfully transferred to a greenhouse with a survival rate of 84.3%, exhibiting normal development. Genetic stability of the regenerated plants was investigated using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism markers which detected 97% of genetic fidelity among the regenerants. The PIC values of RAPD and SCoT primers were recorded to be 0.92 and 0.76 and their Rp values ranged between 3.66 and 10, and 4 and 12 respectively. The amplification products of the regenerated plants showed similar banding patterns to that of the mother plant thus demonstrating the homogeneity of the micropropagated plants. A comparative phytochemical analysis among the mother and the micropropagated plants showed a higher yield of secondary metabolites. The regeneration protocol developed in this study provides a basis for ex-situ germplasm conservation and also harnesses the various secondary metabolite compounds of medicinal importance present in D. nobile.

  5. Dengue type 4 live-attenuated vaccine viruses passaged in vero cells affect genetic stability and dengue-induced hemorrhaging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chi Lee

    Full Text Available Most live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus vaccines in current clinical trials are produced from Vero cells. In a previous study we demonstrated that an infectious cDNA clone-derived dengue type 4 (DEN-4 virus retains higher genetic stability in MRC-5 cells than in Vero cells. For this study we investigated two DEN-4 viruses: the infectious cDNA clone-derived DEN-4 2A and its derived 3' NCR 30-nucleotide deletion mutant DEN-4 2AΔ30, a vaccine candidate. Mutations in the C-prM-E, NS2B-NS3, and NS4B-NS5 regions of the DEN genome were sequenced and compared following cell passages in Vero and MRC-5 cells. Our results indicate stronger genetic stability in both viruses following MRC-5 cell passages, leading to significantly lower RNA polymerase error rates when the DEN-4 virus is used for genome replication. Although no significant increases in virus titers were observed following cell passages, DEN-4 2A and DEN-4 2AΔ30 virus titers following Vero cell passages were 17-fold to 25-fold higher than titers following MRC-5 cell passages. Neurovirulence for DEN-4 2A and DEN-4 2AΔ30 viruses increased significantly following passages in Vero cells compared to passages in MRC-5 cells. In addition, more severe DEN-induced hemorrhaging in mice was noted following DEN-4 2A and DEN-4 2AΔ30 passages in Vero cells compared to passages in MRC-5 cells. Target mutagenesis performed on the DEN-4 2A infectious clone indicated that single point mutation of E-Q(438H, E-V(463L, NS2B-Q(78H, and NS2B-A(113T imperatively increased mouse hemorrhaging severity. The relationship between amino acid mutations acquired during Vero cell passage and enhanced DEN-induced hemorrhages in mice may be important for understanding DHF pathogenesis, as well as for the development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines. Taken together, the genetic stability, virus yield, and DEN-induced hemorrhaging all require further investigation in the context of live-attenuated DEN vaccine

  6. THE BREED TRACEABILITY OF SHEEP MEAT BY USING MOLECULAR GENETICS METHODS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bramante

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Safety and quality foods of animal origin are extremely important for consumers. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a method to track the breed origin of sheep meat all along the production chain using molecular genetics tools. A total of 800 samples evenly distributed among seven Italian sheep breeds have been typed at 19 STR markers, together with 90 samples from both imported sheep animals and local crossbred animals withdrawn at slaughterhouses. A maximum likelihood assignment test was adopted to evaluate STR ability to allocate samples to their true breed of origin. Sarda animals were all correctly allocated, as well as more than 98% of samples from the other breeds. Only slightly worst allocation performances were observed for imported and crossbred animals. Preliminary results seem quite promising, though further analyses will be needed in order to better understand the statistical power of such an assignment test before implementation in the sheep meat production chain.

  7. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  8. Genetic and environmental influences on personality trait stability and growth during the transition to adulthood: a three-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Donnellan, M Brent; Blonigen, Daniel M; Krueger, Robert F; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G; Burt, S Alexandra

    2011-03-01

    During the transition to adulthood individuals typically settle into adult roles in love and work. This transition also involves significant changes in personality traits that are generally in the direction of greater maturity and increased stability. Competing hypotheses have been offered to account for these personality changes: The intrinsic maturation hypothesis suggests that change trajectories are endogenous, whereas the life-course hypothesis suggests that these changes occur because of transactions with the social environment. This study investigated the patterns and origins of personality trait changes from ages 17 to 29 using 3 waves of Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire data provided by twins. Results suggest that (a) trait changes were more profound in the first relative to the second half of the transition to adulthood; (b) traits tend to become more stable during the second half of this transition, with all the traits yielding retest correlations between .74 and .78; (c) Negative Affectivity declined over time, and Constraint increased over time; minimal change was observed on agentic or communal aspects of Positive Emotionality; and (d) both genetic and nonshared environmental factors accounted for personality changes. Overall, these genetically informed results support a life-course perspective on personality development during the transition to adulthood.

  9. Major Results and Research Challenges in Cotton Molecular Genetics at CIRAD (France)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LACAPE Jean-marc; CLAVERIE M; DESSAUW D; GIBAND M; VIOT C

    2008-01-01

    @@ CIRAD (Montpellier,France) develops research activities centered on tropical and sub-tropical agricultural systems.Among others crops,cotton is the focus of a series of research programs in different disciplines from economics to breeding.Major areas in genetics and breeding relate to (1) genetic diversity,(2) eultivar development through classical and molecular breeding,and (3) applied genomics.An important but under-exploited reservoir of genetic diversity exists within the genus Gossypium.

  10. On the parabolicity of the Muskat problem: Well-posedness, fingering, and stability results

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We consider in this paper the Muskat problem in a periodic geometry and incorporate capillary as well as gravity effects in the modelling. The problem re-writes as an abstract evolution equation and we use this property to prove well-posedness of the problem and to establish exponential stability of some flat equilibrium. Using bifurcation theory we also find finger shaped steady-states which are all unstable.

  11. Impact of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 testing on deaf identity and comprehension of genetic test results in a sample of deaf adults: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christina G S; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2014-01-01

    Using a prospective, longitudinal study design, this paper addresses the impact of genetic counseling and testing for deafness on deaf adults and the Deaf community. This study specifically evaluated the effect of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results on participants' deaf identity and understanding of their genetic test results. Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic testing was offered to participants in the context of linguistically and culturally appropriate genetic counseling. Questionnaire data collected from 209 deaf adults at four time points (baseline, immediately following pre-test genetic counseling, 1-month following genetic test result disclosure, and 6-months after result disclosure) were analyzed. Four deaf identity orientations (hearing, marginal, immersion, bicultural) were evaluated using subscales of the Deaf Identity Development Scale-Revised. We found evidence that participants understood their specific genetic test results following genetic counseling, but found no evidence of change in deaf identity based on genetic counseling or their genetic test results. This study demonstrated that culturally and linguistically appropriate genetic counseling can improve deaf clients' understanding of genetic test results, and the formation of deaf identity was not directly related to genetic counseling or Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results.

  12. Long-term effective population sizes, temporal stability of genetic composition and potential for local adaptation in anadromous brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Ruzzante, D.E.; Eg Nielsen, Einar;

    2002-01-01

    (3 km) river showed Ne greater than or equal to 300. Assuming a stepping-stone model of gene flow we considered the relative roles of gene flow, random genetic drift and selection to assess the possibilities for local adaptation. The requirements for local adaptation were fulfilled, but only......We examined the long-term temporal (1910s to 1990s) genetic variation at eight microsatellite DNA loci in brown trout (Salmo trutta L) collected from five anadromous populations in Denmark to assess the long-term stability of genetic composition and to estimate effective population sizes (N......-e). Contemporary and historical samples consisted of tissue and archived scales, respectively. Pairwise Theta(ST) estimates, a hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and multidimensional scaling analysis of pairwise genetic distances between samples revealed much closer genetic relationships among...

  13. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final experiment design, monitoring results and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Eng, Anders [Acuo Engineering AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-12-15

    The field part of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) was finished in 2004. The experiment was designed to induce and monitor the process of brittle failure, spalling, in a fractured rock mass under controlled conditions. The field part was successfully conducted and a large data set was obtained. This report presents the final design of the experiment, the results of the monitoring, and the observations made during the spalling process and when the spalled rock was removed. When heating of the rock was initiated the rock responded quickly. After only a few days the spalling process was activated in the notch, as indicated by the acoustic emission system, and shortly thereafter displacement readings were recorded. Contraction (radial expansion) of the rock was recorded by several instruments before the notch reached the instrument levels. This contraction is probably the result of a 3D re-distribution of the stresses. The temperature increase in the system was both slower and reached a steady state much earlier than predicted by the numerical models. The propagation of the notch was therefore halted after approximately one month of heating. The power to the electrical heaters was therefore doubled. Spalling then started up again, and in one month's time it had propagated to a depth of approximately five metres in the hole. A second steady state was now reached, but this time the heater power was kept constant for a while to let the rock settle before the confinement pressure was reduced from 700 kPa to 0 in decrements of 50 kPa. The rock mass response to the pressure drop was very limited until the pressure was lowered to approximately 200 kPa (the atmospheric pressure is not included in the given pressure values). Large displacements and a high acoustic emission hit frequency were then measured in the open hole. After the de-pressurization of the confined hole, the heaters were left on for approximately one week

  14. Effects of silicon on the growth and genetic stability of passion fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Nogueira Souza Costa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the silicon concentration that would provide good growth in passion fruit plants. Passion fruit seeds were sown in polystyrene. After 60 days, when they were approximately 15 cm tall, the plants were transplanted into polyethylene pots containing 1.1 kg Tropstrato® substrate. Treatments consisted of four concentrations (0, 0.28, 0.55, and 0.83 g pot-1 of silicon applied as a silicic acid solution 1%. This solution was applied around the stem of the plants (drenched, with the first application being administered 15 days after transplanting. In total, three applications were made at intervals of 15 days. After the last application, the plants were subjected to chemical analysis to determine the silicon concentration and to X-ray microanalysis and flow cytometry. Phytotechnical analyses were performed during the applications. The use of silicon in concentrations of 0.28 and 0.55 g pot-1 provides better growth of the passion fruit, and the absorption and deposition of the silicon in the passion fruit leaves are proportional to the availability of this element in the plant. The roots of the passion fruit plant are silicon accumulators, and the DNA stability and amount are preserved in the silicon-treated passion fruit plants.

  15. Theoretical investigations on model ternary polypeptides using genetic algorithm-Some new results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Vinita [Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Bakhshi, A.K., E-mail: akbakhshi2000@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2011-04-28

    Graphical abstract: Model ternary polypeptide chains consisting of glycine, alanine and serine amino acids as repeat units in anti-parallel {beta}-pleated sheet conformation have been theoretically investigated and designed using the genetic algorithm. The optimum solution or the polypeptide chain being searched for using the algorithm is the one having minimum band gap and maximum electronic delocalization in the polypeptide chain. The effects of (i) change of basis set from minimal to double zeta, (ii) change in secondary structure from {beta}-pleated to {alpha}-helical, (iii) presence of solvation shell, and (iv) binding of ions such as H{sup +} and Li{sup +} to the peptide group on the resulting optimum solution as well as on electronic structure and conduction properties of polypeptides have been investigated taking the ab initio Hartree-Fock crystal orbital results as input. The band gap value was also found to decrease in presence of a solvation shell, in presence of cations in the vicinity of the polypeptide chain as well as with the use of an improved basis set. Highlights: {yields} GA has been used for theoretical tailoring of aperiodic ternary polypeptides. {yields} Band gap of polypeptide chain decreases in presence of solvation shell. {yields} Band gap decreases in presence of cations in the vicinity of the chain. {yields} H{sup +} ion acts as a strong electron acceptor than Li{sup +} ion due to smaller size. - Abstract: Using genetic algorithm (GA) model ternary polypeptides containing glycine, alanine and serine in {beta}-pleated conformation have been theoretically investigated. In designing, the criterion to attain the optimum solution at the end of GA run is minimum band gap and maximum delocalization in the polypeptide chain. Ab initio results obtained using Clementi's minimal basis set are used as input. Effects of (i) change of basis set from minimal to double zeta, (ii) change in secondary structure from {beta}-pleated to {alpha

  16. Etiology of Sudden Death in the Community: Results of Anatomic, Metabolic and Genetic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Peterson, Gary; Apple, Fred S.; Titus, Jack; King, Richard; Luepker, Russell V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Identifying persons at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is challenging. A comprehensive evaluation may reveal clues about the clinical, anatomic, genetic and metabolic risk factors for SCD. Methods Seventy-one SCD victims (25–60 years-old) without an initially apparent cause of death were evaluated at the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s office from August, 2001 to July, 2004. We reviewed their clinic records conducted next-of-kin interviews and performed autopsy, laboratory testing and genetic analysis for mutations in genes associated with the long-QT syndrome. Results Mean age was 49.5±7 years, 86% were male and 2 subjects had history of coronary heart disease (CHD). Coronary risk factors were highly prevalent in comparison to individuals of the same age group in this community (e.g. smoking 61%; hypertension 27%; hyperlipidemia 25%) but inadequately treated. On autopsy, 80% of the subjects had high-grade coronary stenoses. Acute coronary lesions and previous silent myocardial infarction (MI) were found in 27% and 34%, respectively. Further, 32% of the subjects had recently smoked cigarettes and 50% had ingested analgesics. Possible deleterious mutations of the ion channel genes were detected in 5 (7%) subjects. Of these, 4 were in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Conclusions Overwhelming majority of the SCD victims in the community had severe subclinical CHD, including undetected previous MI. Traditional coronary risk factors were prevalent and under-treated. Mutations in the long-QT syndrome genes were detected in a few subjects. These findings imply that improvements in the detection and treatment of subclinical CHD in the community are needed to prevent SCD. PMID:20102864

  17. Subchronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether resulting in genetic damage in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2013-09-15

    Ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) is biofuel additive recently used in Japan and some other countries. Limited evidence shows that ETBE has low toxicity. Acetaldehyde (AA), however, as one primary metabolite of ETBE, is clearly genotoxic and has been considered to be a potential carcinogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ALDH2 gene on ETBE-induced genotoxicity and metabolism of its metabolites after inhalation exposure to ETBE. A group of wild-type (WT) and Aldh2 knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 500ppm ETBE for 1-6h, and the blood concentrations of ETBE metabolites, including AA, tert-butyl alcohol and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, were measured. Another group of mice of WT and KO were exposed to 0, 500, 1750, or 5000ppm ETBE for 6h/day with 5 days per weeks for 13 weeks. Genotoxic effects of ETBE in these mice were measured by the alkaline comet assay, 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase modified comet assay and micronucleus test. With short-term exposure to ETBE, the blood concentrations of all the three metabolites in KO mice were significantly higher than the corresponding concentrations of those in WT mice of both sexes. After subchronic exposure to ETBE, there was significant increase in DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner in KO male mice, while only 5000ppm exposure significantly increased DNA damage in male WT mice. Overall, there was a significant sex difference in genetic damage in both genetic types of mice. These results showed that ALDH2 is involved in the detoxification of ETBE and lack of enzyme activity may greatly increase the sensitivity to the genotoxic effects of ETBE, and male mice were more sensitive than females.

  18. Major Results and Research Challenges in Cotton Molecular Genetics at CIRAD(France)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LACAPE; Jean-marc; CLAVERIE; M; DESSAUW; D; GIBAND; M; VIOT; C

    2008-01-01

    CIRAD(Montpellier,France) develops research activities centered on tropical and sub-tropical agricultural systems.Among others crops,cotton is the focus of a series of research programs in different disciplines from economics to breeding.Major areas in genetics and breeding relate to(1) genetic diversity,(2) cultivar development through classical and molecular breeding,and(3) applied

  19. Consumers' cognitions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a qualitative study in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this article was to gain insight into consumers' cognitions with regard to genetically modified foods to get a better understanding of the constituents of consumer attitudes to genetic modification in food production overall. Means-end chain theory served...

  20. Research results on productivity stabilization by ultrasonic camera (plant with membrane ceramic elements during vine processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Antufyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes solutions to the problems of declining productivity of ceramic membrane elements for wine processing on the final manufacturing phase. A relative stabilization of filtration velocity, venting efficiency and wine lightening were experimentally confirmed during contacts with oscillation waves of ultrasonic transmitter on the ceramic filter. Which significantly reduced the cost of various preservatives to increase periods storage. To study the processes of wine processing by the proposed method it was made an experimental installation on the basis of pilot machine MRp-1/2 for bottling of quiet liquids and an ultrasonic device "Volna– M" UZTA-1/22-OM with a firmly, waveguide which transmits sound, fixed filter frame on the ultrasound emitter. To stabilize the performance of ultrasonic units with ceramic membrane elements without quality deterioration of wines it was empirically determined rational parameters of power of ultrasound input and pressure in the system. The given derived dependencies and graphs allow to define the time of relatively stable operating filter regime. It was revealed a significant cost reduction on filtration, as it allows escape from the contamination of the product by various preservatives, and increasing of storage duration in a sealed container during aseptic filling without a thermal sterilization. Ultrasonic emitter contact by superposition wave vibrations on the ceramic filter increases not only the efficiency of gas removal, but also improves the organoleptic characteristics, stabilizes the filters, improves their productivity. Gas removal creates unfavorable conditions for development of the yeast, which in turn increases the shelf life of semisweet wine.

  1. High-pressure discharges with imposed stability resulting in reduced power requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, N. H.; Jensen, T. H.; Moeller, C. M.

    2003-08-01

    High-pressure plasma discharge columns that are long and straight, as well as uniform in the axial direction, have been generated in a steady state. These discharges, stabilized by rotation of the containment envelope about a horizontal axis, have reduced heat transport to the wall due to the absence of buoyancy-driven radial convection and the elimination of eddies caused by sheared flow. These "rotating tube discharges" may take the form of electric arcs powered with dc or low-frequency ac; or of electrodeless plasmas, heated by electromagnetic waves at rf or microwave frequencies.

  2. A Stability Result for Stochastic Differential Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saussereau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the stability of the solutions of stochastic differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions with Hurst parameter greater than half. We prove that when the initial conditions, the drift, and the diffusion coefficients as well as the fractional Brownian motions converge in a suitable sense, then the sequence of the solutions of the corresponding equations converge in Hölder norm to the solution of a stochastic differential equation. The limit equation is driven by the limit fractional Brownian motion and its coefficients are the limits of the sequence of the coefficients.

  3. Further results for global exponential stability of stochastic memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kai; Zhu, Song; Yang, Qiqi

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the stability problems of memristor-based neural networks have been studied extensively. This paper not only takes the unavoidable noise into consideration but also investigates the global exponential stability of stochastic memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays. The obtained criteria are essentially new and complement previously known ones, which can be easily validated with the parameters of system itself. In addition, the study of the nonlinear dynamics for the addressed neural networks may be helpful in qualitative analysis for general stochastic systems. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to substantiate our results.

  4. Further results on global state feedback stabilization of high-order nonlinear systems with time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangzheng; Wu, Yuqiang

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of global stabilization by state feedback for a class of high-order nonlinear systems with time-varying delays. Comparing with the existing relevant literature, the systems under investigation allow more uncertainties, to which the existing control methods are inapplicable. By introducing sign function and necessarily modifying the method of adding a power integrator, a state feedback controller is successfully constructed to preserve the equilibrium at the origin and guarantee the global asymptotic stability of the resulting closed-loop system. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Absolute stability results for well-posed infinite-dimensional systems with applications to low-gain integral control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H; Curtain, RF

    2000-01-01

    We derive absolute stability results for well-posed infinite-dimensional systems which, in a sense, extend the well-known circle criterion to the case that the underlying linear system is the series interconnection of an exponentially stable well-posed infinite-dimensional system and an integrator a

  6. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  7. Conservation genetics of threatened Hippocampus guttulatus in vulnerable habitats in NW Spain: temporal and spatial stability of wild populations with flexible polygamous mating system in captivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena López

    Full Text Available This study was focused on conservation genetics of threatened Hippocampus guttulatus on the Atlantic coast of NW Iberian Peninsula. Information about spatial structure and temporal stability of wild populations was obtained based on microsatellite markers, and used for monitoring a captive breeding program firstly initiated in this zone at the facilities of the Institute of Marine Research (Vigo, Spain. No significant major genetic structure was observed regarding the biogeographical barrier of Cape Finisterre. However, two management units under continuous gene flow are proposed based on the allelic differentiation between South-Atlantic and Cantabrian subpopulations, with small to moderate contemporary effective size based on single-sample methods. Temporal stability was observed in South-Atlantic population samples of H. guttulatus for the six-year period studied, suggesting large enough effective population size to buffer the effects of genetic drift within the time frame of three generations. Genetic analysis of wild breeders and offspring in captivity since 2009 allowed us to monitor the breeding program founded in 2006 in NW Spain for this species. Similar genetic diversity in the renewed and founder broodstock, regarding the wild population of origin, supports suitable renewal and rearing processes to maintain genetic variation in captivity. Genetic parentage proved single-brood monogamy in the wild and in captivity, but flexible short- and long-term mating system under captive conditions, from strict monogamy to polygamy within and/or among breeding seasons. Family analysis showed high reproductive success in captivity under genetic management assisted by molecular relatedness estimates to avoid inbreeding. This study provides genetic information about H. guttulatus in the wild and captivity within an uncovered geographical range for this data deficient species, to be taken into account for management and conservation purposes.

  8. Adult's Degenerative Scoliosis: Midterm Results of Dynamic Stabilization without Fusion in Elderly Patients—Is It Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Di Silvestre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. A retrospective study. Purpose. Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation used for degenerative lumbar scoliosis can lead to several complications. In elderly patients without sagittal imbalance, dynamic stabilization could represent an option to avoid these adverse events. Methods. 57 patients treated by dynamic stabilization without fusion were included. All patients had degenerative lumbar de novo scoliosis (average Cobb angle 17.2°, without sagittal imbalance, associated in 52 cases (91% with vertebral canal stenosis and in 24 (42% with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Nineteen patients (33% had previously undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Results. At an average followup of 77 months, clinical results improved with statistical significance. Scoliosis Cobb angle was 17.2° (range, 12° to 38° before surgery and 11.3° (range, 4° to 26° at last follow-up. In the patients with associated spondylolisthesis, anterior vertebral translation was 19.5% (range, 12% to 27% before surgery, 16.7% (range, 0% to 25% after surgery, and 17.5% (range, 0% to 27% at followup. Complications incidence was low (14%, and few patients required revision surgery (4%. Conclusions. In elderly patients with mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis without sagittal imbalance, pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization is an effective option, with low complications incidence, granting curve stabilization during time and satisfying clinical results.

  9. Increasing the Stability of Streambanks through the Hydrologic Effects of Riparian Vegetation: Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Pollen, N. L.

    2003-12-01

    Riparian vegetation can provide both mechanical and hydrologic benefits to the shear strength of streambanks. Recent research has shown that the hydrologic effects of water withdrawal on streambank stability can be significant, and far exceeds that provided by root reinforcement during certain times of the year. To accurately quantify the hydrologic effects of riparian vegetation on streambank stability and to determine optimum species for bank stabilization, experiments with common riparian species (planted in 2000) were conducted in large soil monoliths. Pore-water pressure data from depths of 30 and 70 cm within soil monoliths containing Black Willow, River Birch, Eastern Sycamore, and bare soil were monitored for the period February through June, 2002 (Figure XX1). This period was selected because it represents the wettest and, therefore, the most critical period for streambank stability. With rainfall, all of the tensiometers showed decreases in matric suction (negative pore-water pressure) or increases in positive pore-water pressure reflecting the addition of water. However, both the magnitude of the changes and the absoulute values attained within the soil monoliths differed by treatment. At both 30 cm and 70 cm depths, the soil in the control monoliths became the wettest during and after rainfall indicating the role of the woody species in maintaining matric suction and enhancing shear strength. During late February and early March before leaves appeared on stems and branches, there appeared to be little difference in matric suction values between individual species although matirc suction values within these monoliths were still greater than within the control monoliths. This lack of significant differences between the vegetated monoliths and the controls are at least in part a function of the young age of the specimens and the lack of a carryover of high values of matric suction from the previous summer that can be typical in more mature stands of trees

  10. [Schizophrenia and birth seasonality--contrary results in relation to genetic risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzek, E; Beckmann, H

    1993-01-01

    In 1299 DSM III-R schizophrenics a slight excess of winter and spring births was evident when compared to the general population. However, when patients were allocated to different diagnostic subgroups according to the Leonhard classification this remained true only for those forms without obvious genetic loading (cycloid psychoses and systematic schizophrenias). On the contrary those forms with high genetic loading (unsystematic schizophrenias) showed a clearcut decrease of births in these months. This decrease, however, was significantly caused by periodic catatonics and cataphasics, but not by affect-laden paraphrenics. The findings corroborate the hypothesis that exogenous noxious agents, present in a crucial period of brain maturation, may be of etiological significance in schizophrenia with low genetic loading. Further, it was suggested that in some foetuses at high genetic risk for the disorder more abortions, stillbirths, postnatal deaths and early childhood deaths can occur, if additional exogenous noxious agents affect these individuals.

  11. Individual Differences in Exercise Behavior: Stability and Change in Genetic and Environmental Determinants From Age 7 to 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; de Zeeuw, Eveline L; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Hudziak, James J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; de Geus, Eco J C

    2016-09-01

    Exercise behavior during leisure time is a major source of health-promoting physical activity and moderately tracks across childhood and adolescence. This study aims to investigate the absolute and relative contribution of genes and the environment to variance in exercise behavior from age 7 to 18, and to elucidate the stability and change of genetic and shared environmental factors that underlie this behavior. The Netherlands Twin Register collected data on exercise behavior in twins aged approximately 7, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 years (N = 27,332 twins; 48 % males; 47 % with longitudinal assessments). Three exercise categories (low, middle, high) were analyzed by means of liability threshold models. First, a univariate model was fitted using the largest available cross-sectional dataset with linear and quadratic effects of age as modifiers on the means and variance components. Second, a simplex model was fitted on the longitudinal dataset. Heritability was low in 7-year-olds (14 % in males and 12 % in females), but gradually increased up to age 18 (79 % in males and 49 % in females), whereas the initially substantial relative influence of the shared environment decreased with age (from 80 to 4 % in males and from 80 to 19 % in females). This decrease was due to a large increase in the genetic variance. The longitudinal model showed the genetic effects in males to be largely stable and to accumulate from childhood to late adolescence, whereas in females, they were marked by both transmission and innovation at all ages. The shared environmental effects tended to be less stable in both males and females. In sum, the clear age-moderation of exercise behavior implies that family-based interventions might be useful to increase this behavior in children, whereas individual-based interventions might be better suited for adolescents. We showed that some determinants of individual differences in exercise behavior are stable across childhood and youth, whereas

  12. Conveying a probabilistic genetic test result to families with an inherited heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    The evolution of genetic testing in the past few years has been astounding. In a matter of only a few years, we now have comprehensive gene tests comprising vast panels of "cardiac" genes, whole exome sequencing (the entire coding region) and even whole genome sequencing (the entire genome). Making the call as to whether a DNA variant is causative or benign is difficult and the focus of intense research efforts. In most cases, the final answer will not be a simple yes/no outcome but rather a graded continuum of pathogenicity. This allows classification of variants in a more probabilistic way. How we convey this to a patient is the challenge, and certainly shines a spotlight on the important skills of the cardiac genetic counselor. This is an exciting step forward, but the overwhelming complexity of the information generated from these tests means our current practices of conveying genetic information to the family must be carefully considered. Despite the challenges, a genetic diagnosis in a family has great benefit both in reassuring unaffected family members and removing the need for lifetime clinical surveillance. The multidisciplinary specialized clinic model, incorporating genetic counselors, cardiologists and geneticists, provides the ideal framework for ensuring the best possible care for genetic heart disease families. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using genetic mouse models to gain insight into glaucoma: Past results and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kimberly A; Harder, Jeffrey M; Williams, Pete A; Rausch, Rebecca L; Kiernan, Amy E; Nair, K Saidas; Anderson, Michael G; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R; Libby, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    While all forms of glaucoma are characterized by a specific pattern of retinal ganglion cell death, they are clinically divided into several distinct subclasses, including normal tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, congenital glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma. For each type of glaucoma there are likely numerous molecular pathways that control susceptibility to the disease. Given this complexity, a single animal model will never precisely model all aspects of all the different types of human glaucoma. Therefore, multiple animal models have been utilized to study glaucoma but more are needed. Because of the powerful genetic tools available to use in the laboratory mouse, it has proven to be a highly useful mammalian system for studying the pathophysiology of human disease. The similarity between human and mouse eyes coupled with the ability to use a combination of advanced cell biological and genetic tools in mice have led to a large increase in the number of studies using mice to model specific glaucoma phenotypes. Over the last decade, numerous new mouse models and genetic tools have emerged, providing important insight into the cell biology and genetics of glaucoma. In this review, we describe available mouse genetic models that can be used to study glaucoma-relevant disease/pathobiology. Furthermore, we discuss how these models have been used to gain insights into ocular hypertension (a major risk factor for glaucoma) and glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell death. Finally, the potential for developing new mouse models and using advanced genetic tools and resources for studying glaucoma are discussed.

  14. Further improvement on delay-range-dependent stability results for linear systems with interval time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides an improved delay-range-dependent stability criterion for linear systems with interval time-varying delays. No model transformation and no slack matrix variable are introduced. Furthermore, overly bounding for some cross term is avoided. The resulting criterion has advantages over some previous ones in that it involves fewer matrix variables but has less conservatism, which is established theoretically. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  15. Genetic diversity in migratory bats: Results from RADseq data for three tree bat species at an Ohio windfarm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Sovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses can identify the scale at which wildlife species are impacted by human activities, and provide demographic information useful for management. Here, we use thousands of nuclear DNA genetic loci to assess whether genetic structure occurs within Lasiurus cinereus (Hoary Bat, L. borealis (Red Bat, and Lasionycteris noctivagans (Silver-Haired Bat bats found at a wind turbine site in Ohio, and to also estimate demographic parameters in each of these three groups. Our specific goals are to: 1 demonstrate the feasibility of isolating RADseq loci from these tree bat species, 2 test for genetic structure within each species, including any structure that may be associated with time (migration period, and 3 use coalescent-based modeling approaches to estimate genetically-effective population sizes and patterns of population size changes over evolutionary timescales. Thousands of loci were successfully genotyped for each species, demonstrating the value of RADseq for generating polymorphic loci for population genetic analyses in these bats. There was no evidence for genetic differentiation between groups of samples collected at different times throughout spring and fall migration, suggesting that individuals from each species found at the wind facility are from single panmictic populations. Estimates of present-day effective population sizes varied across species, but were consistently large, on the order of 105–106. All populations show evidence of expansions that date to the Pleistocene. These results, along with recent work also suggesting limited genetic structure in bats across North America, argue that additional biomarker systems such as stable-isotopes or trace elements should be investigated as alternative and/or complementary approaches to genetics for sourcing individuals collected at single wind farm sites.

  16. Genetic Stability of Streptomyces Lividans pIJ702 in Response to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K. S.; Goins, T. L.; Voeikova, T. A.; Pyle, B. H.

    2008-06-01

    Streptomyces lividans carrying plasmid pIJ702 encoding genes for thiostrepton resistance (tsr-) and melanin production (mel+) was plated on agar and flown on the Russian satellite Foton-M3 for 16 days. The percentage loss of plasmid expression in flight samples was lower than that in ground samples when both samples were grown in enriched (ISP) media. Differences in media content also affect plasmid expression rate; ISP media have a higher loss of plasmid expression than samples in minimum media when both were grown on ground conditions. Results suggest that stress resulted in the increased expression of plasmid pIJ702 by S. lividans. Screening of thiostrepton resistant white (tsr+ mel-) mutants showed similar proportions of variants in ground samples and flight samples. To determine if there are mutations in the mel gene, DNA extracted from flight and control white mutants was amplified and gel electrophoresis of amplified products show no major mutation in the products. Sequencing of amplified products is required to identify mutations resulting in loss of pigmentation.

  17. Winning the genetic lottery: biasing birth sex ratio results in more grandchildren.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collette M Thogerson

    Full Text Available Population dynamics predicts that on average parents should invest equally in male and female offspring; similarly, the physiology of mammalian sex determination is supposedly stochastic, producing equal numbers of sons and daughters. However, a high quality parent can maximize fitness by biasing their birth sex ratio (SR to the sex with the greatest potential to disproportionately outperform peers. All SR manipulation theories share a fundamental prediction: grandparents who bias birth SR should produce more grandoffspring via the favored sex. The celebrated examples of biased birth SRs in nature consistent with SR manipulation theories provide compelling circumstantial evidence. However, this prediction has never been directly tested in mammals, primarily because the complete three-generation pedigrees needed to test whether individual favored offspring produce more grandoffspring for the biasing grandparent are essentially impossible to obtain in nature. Three-generation pedigrees were constructed using 90 years of captive breeding records from 198 mammalian species. Male and female grandparents consistently biased their birth SR toward the sex that maximized second-generation success. The most strongly male-biased granddams and grandsires produced respectively 29% and 25% more grandoffspring than non-skewing conspecifics. The sons of the most male-biasing granddams were 2.7 times as fecund as those of granddams with a 50∶50 bias (similar results are seen in grandsires. Daughters of the strongest female-biasing granddams were 1.2 times as fecund as those of non-biasing females (this effect is not seen in grandsires. To our knowledge, these results are the first formal test of the hypothesis that birth SR manipulation is adaptive in mammals in terms of grandchildren produced, showing that SR manipulation can explain biased birth SR in general across mammalian species. These findings also have practical implications: parental control of birth

  18. Genetic effects on information processing speed are moderated by age--converging results from three samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ising, M; Mather, K A; Zimmermann, P; Brückl, T; Höhne, N; Heck, A; Schenk, L A; Rujescu, D; Armstrong, N J; Sachdev, P S; Reppermund, S

    2014-06-01

    Information processing is a cognitive trait forming the basis of complex abilities like executive function. The Trail Making Test (TMT) is a well-established test of information processing with moderate to high heritability. Age of the individual also plays an important role. A number of genetic association studies with the TMT have been performed, which, however, did not consider age as a moderating factor. We report the results of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on age-independent and age-dependent TMT performance in two population-representative community samples (Munich Antidepressant Response Signature, MARS: N1 = 540; Ludwig Maximilians University, LMU: N2 = 350). Age-dependent genome-wide findings were then evaluated in a third sample of healthy elderly subjects (Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, Sydney MAS: N3 = 448). While a meta-analysis on the GWAS findings did not reveal age-independent TMT associations withstanding correction for multiple testing, we found a genome-wide significant age-moderated effect between variants in the DSG1 gene region and TMT-A performance predominantly reflecting visual processing speed (rs2199301, P(meta-analysis) = 1.3 × 10(-7)). The direction of the interaction suggests for the minor allele a beneficial effect in younger adults turning into a detrimental effect in older adults. The detrimental effect of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism rs1426310 within the same DSG1 gene region could be replicated in Sydney MAS participants aged 70-79, but not in those aged 80 years and older, presumably a result of survivor bias. Our findings demonstrate opposing effects of DSG1 variants on information processing speed depending on age, which might be related to the complex processes that DSG1 is involved with, including cell adhesion and apoptosis.

  19. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Harju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A saxitoxin (STX proficiency test (PT was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories’ capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  20. Midterm results following medial closed wedge distal femoral osteotomy stabilized with a locking internal fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Philipp; Achtnich, Andrea; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Zantop, Thore; Petersen, Wolf

    2015-07-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective and radiological outcome and to evaluate the complications of a medial closing wedge osteotomy at the femur for lateral osteoarthritis with genu valgum. Twenty-three patients with grade III to IV cartilage damage and valgus knee alignment were treated with medial closing wedge osteotomy at the distal femur. The osteotomy was stabilized with an internal plate fixator. Age varied between 25 and 55 years (mean 47 years). One patient was lost to final follow-up. After 3.5 years, all Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subitems increased significantly. There was no significant difference in the subgroup analysis of KOOS subitems for patients with and without microfracture or age (>50 vs. <50 years). There were no perioperative complications. One patient had an overcorrection. All, but one osteotomy, showed stable bone healing. There was a loss of correction due to delayed bone healing in one case. Possible explanations for this complication were injury of the lateral cortex or smoking. This case required revision with bone graft and an additional lateral plate. In no case, a conversion to an endoprosthesis was necessary. The femoral medial closing wedge osteotomy is a surgical method for improving symptoms of lateral osteoarthritis in the valgus knee. IV.

  1. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: rationale, design, and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, Bruce; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kaltman, Jonathan; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Rosenberg, Ellen; Seiden, Howard; Seidman, Christine; Sleeper, Lynn; Tennstedt, Sharon; Kaltman, Jonathan; Schramm, Charlene; Burns, Kristin; Pearson, Gail; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the leading cause of infant mortality among birth defects, and later morbidities and premature mortality remain problematic. Although genetic factors contribute significantly to cause CHD, specific genetic lesions are unknown for most patients. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium established the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to investigate relationships between genetic factors, clinical features, and outcomes in CHD. The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium comprises 6 main and 4 satellite sites at which subjects are recruited, and medical data and biospecimens (blood, saliva, cardiovascular tissue) are collected. Core infrastructure includes an administrative/data-coordinating center, biorepository, data hub, and core laboratories (genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, candidate gene evaluation, and variant confirmation). Eligibility includes all forms of CHD. Annual follow-up is obtained for probands age is 5.5 years. The one third enrolled at age <1 year are contacted annually for follow-up information. The distribution of CHD favors more complex lesions. Approximately, 11% of probands have a genetic diagnosis. Adequate DNA is available from 97% and 91% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. Genomic analyses of probands with heterotaxy, atrial septal defects, conotruncal, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive lesions are underway. The scientific community's use of Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium resources is welcome.

  2. GPA-MDS: A Visualization Approach to Investigate Genetic Architecture among Phenotypes Using GWAS Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Ramos, Paula S; Hunt, Kelly J; Wolf, Bethany J; Hardiman, Gary; Chung, Dongjun

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified tens of thousands of genetic variants associated with hundreds of phenotypes and diseases, which have provided clinical and medical benefits to patients with novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Recently, there has been accumulating evidence suggesting that different complex traits share a common risk basis, namely, pleiotropy. Previously, a statistical method, namely, GPA (Genetic analysis incorporating Pleiotropy and Annotation), was developed to improve identification of risk variants and to investigate pleiotropic structure through a joint analysis of multiple GWAS datasets. While GPA provides a statistically rigorous framework to evaluate pleiotropy between phenotypes, it is still not trivial to investigate genetic relationships among a large number of phenotypes using the GPA framework. In order to address this challenge, in this paper, we propose a novel approach, GPA-MDS, to visualize genetic relationships among phenotypes using the GPA algorithm and multidimensional scaling (MDS). This tool will help researchers to investigate common etiology among diseases, which can potentially lead to development of common treatments across diseases. We evaluate the proposed GPA-MDS framework using a simulation study and apply it to jointly analyze GWAS datasets examining 18 unique phenotypes, which helps reveal the shared genetic architecture of these phenotypes.

  3. Micropropagation of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. and genetic stability of long term cultivated plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyp-Borowska Iwona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study on the in vitro micropropagation of Robinia pseudoacacia L. shows the possibility of the rapid increase of the vegetative progeny using organogenesis. The culture system consists of sequential use of three media, namely, the initiation medium (MS medium supplemented with 0.6 mg · l−1 6-BA (6-benzylamino-purine, 0.1 mg · l−1 NAA (naphthalene acetic acid, proliferation medium (1/2 MS medium added with 1 mg · l−1 6-BA, and root-induction medium (1/2 MS medium fortified with 0.2 mg · l−1 NAA. The resulting micropropagated plants, fully acclimatised to an in vivo environment, did not show any visually detectable morphological variation.

  4. HSDP II Drill Core: Preliminary Rock Strength Results and Implications to Flank Stability, Mauna Kea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N.; Watters, R. J.; Schiffman, P.

    2004-12-01

    Selected portions of the 3-km HSDP II core were tested to provide unconfined rock strength data from hyaloclastite alteration zones and pillow lavas. Though the drilling project was not originally intended for strength purpose, it is believed the core can provide unique rock strength insights into the flank stability of the Hawaiian Islands. The testing showed that very weak rock exists in the hyaloclastite abundant zones in the lower 2-km of the core with strength dependent on the degree of consolidation and type of alteration. Walton and Schiffman identified three zones of alteration, an upper incipient alteration zone (1080-1335m), a smectitic zone (1405-1573m) and a lower palagonitic zone from about 1573 m to the base of the core. These three zones were sampled and tested together with pillow lava horizons for comparison. Traditional cylindrical core was not available as a consequence of the entire core having been split lengthwise for archival purposes. Hence, point load strength testing was utilized which provides the unconfined compressive strength on irregular shaped samples. The lowest unconfined strengths were recorded from incipient alteration zones with a mean value of 9.5 MPa. Smectitic alteration zones yielded mean values of 16.4 MPa, with the highest measured alteration strengths from the palagonite zones with a mean value of 32.1 MPa. As anticipated, the highest strengths were from essentially unaltered lavas with a mean value of 173 MPa. Strength variations of between one to two orders of magnitude were identified in comparing the submarine hyaloclastite with the intercalated submarine lavas. The weakest zones within the hyaloclastites may provide horizons for assisting flank collapse by serving as potential thrust zones and landslide surfaces.

  5. Genetical stability and osteogenic ability of mesenchimal stem cells on demineralized bone matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pozzuoli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Tissue engineering is a rapidly expanding field with regard to the use of biomaterials and stem cells in the orthopedic surgery. Many experimental studies have been done to understand the best characteristics of cells, materials and laboratory methods for safe clinical applications. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of 2 different human demineralized bone matrices (DBMs, the one enriched and the other not enriched with hyaluronic acid, to stimulate in vitro the proliferation and the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs seeded onto an osteoconductive scaffold. Materials and Methods ADSCs were isolated, by enzymatic digestion, from abdominal adipose tissue of 5 patients undergoing cosmetic lipoaspiration surgery. ADSCs were then seeded onto a 3D scaffold in the presence of the two different osteoinductive matrices of human demineralized bone and evaluated for proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The safety of the methods was verified using array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH. Results ADSCs were able to differentiate in osteogenic sense. Both DBMs showed the ability to induce osteogenic differentiation of the cells. Conclusion array-CGH showed no changes at genome level, thus confirming the safety of materials and methods.

  6. Genetic and environmental influences on plasma homocysteine: results from a Danish twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; Petersen, Inge; Christiansen, Lene;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased plasma homocysteine has been linked to many clinical conditions including atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. We assessed the genetic and environmental influences on homocysteine in adult twins and tested the influence of 3 candidate polymorphisms. METHODS: Homocysteine...... was analyzed in 1206 healthy twins, who were genotyped for 3 polymorphisms: MTHFR 677C>T, MTR 2756A>G, and NNMT (dbSNP: rs694539). To perform quantitative trait linkage analysis of the MTHFR locus, the genotyping was supplemented with 2 genetic markers localized on each site of the MTHFR locus. The twin data...... of the MTHFR locus is estimated to explain 53% (95% CI, 0.07-0.67) of the total phenotypic variation in persons 18-39 years old and 24% (95% CI, 0.00-0.39) in persons 40-65 years old, i.e., almost all additive genetic variance. CONCLUSIONS: Homocysteine concentrations have a high heritability that decreases...

  7. Colombian forensic genetics as a form of public science: The role of race, nation and common sense in the stabilization of DNA populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Wade, Peter; Cruz-Santiago, Arely; Cárdenas, Roosbelinda

    2015-12-01

    Abstract This article examines the role that vernacular notions of racialized-regional difference play in the constitution and stabilization of DNA populations in Colombian forensic science, in what we frame as a process of public science. In public science, the imaginations of the scientific world and common-sense public knowledge are integral to the production and circulation of science itself. We explore the origins and circulation of a scientific object--'La Tabla', published in Paredes et al. and used in genetic forensic identification procedures--among genetic research institutes, forensic genetics laboratories and courtrooms in Bogotá. We unveil the double life of this central object of forensic genetics. On the one hand, La Tabla enjoys an indisputable public place in the processing of forensic genetic evidence in Colombia (paternity cases, identification of bodies, etc.). On the other hand, the relations it establishes between 'race', geography and genetics are questioned among population geneticists in Colombia. Although forensic technicians are aware of the disputes among population geneticists, they use and endorse the relations established between genetics, 'race' and geography because these fit with common-sense notions of visible bodily difference and the regionalization of race in the Colombian nation.

  8. Studies on Immature Embryo Culture in vitro in Wheat:Genetic Stability analysis of Somatic variation in main agronomic characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenxiang; Zenghanbing; 等

    1995-01-01

    The genetic stablility of variations of main agronomic characteristics in progenies from the regenerated plants of immature embryo culture in vitro was studied.The results showed that the variations of earliness in maturity,high 1000-grain weight,plant height and grain weight per spike were heritable and tended to be stable in IE3 and completely stable in IE4,The wide variation of main agronomic characteristics induced by embryo culture in vitro provided the probability of sclection in wheat improvement.Some somaclonal lines with useful variations could be used directly in wheat production.

  9. Gradient Correlation Method for the Stabilization of Inversion Results of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Retrieved from Profiles of Optical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolgotin Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation relationships between aerosol microphysical parameters and optical data are investigated. The results show that surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for arbitrary particle size distribution. The correlation relationships that we obtained can be used as constraints in our inversion of optical lidar data. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of aerosol microphysical data products if we apply the gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique.

  10. Communication Between Breast Cancer Patients Who Received Inconclusive Genetic Test Results and Their Daughters and Sisters Years After Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Jessica E.; Ausems, Margreet G E M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18756969X; van Riel, Els|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/265022495; Kars, Marijke C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28486711X; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2016-01-01

    Inconclusive genetic test results including screening recommendations for the breast cancer patients and their first-degree relatives are the most common outcomes of BRCA 1/2 testing. Patients themselves should communicate these results to their relatives. Our aim was to explore communication of bre

  11. Genetic analysis of results of a Swedish behavior test on German Shepherd Dogs and Labrador Retrievers1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, van der E.H.; Wilsson, E.; Strandberg, E.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters and the influence of systematic effects on behavior test results in dogs. Behavior test results on 1,813 Labrador Retrievers (LR) and 2,757 German Shepherd Dogs (GSD) were analyzed. The behavior test included observations on courage,

  12. Legal limitations on genetic research and the commercialisation of its results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, M.H.M.; van van Erp, J.H.M.; van van Vliet, L.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Developments in genetics hold a strong promise for future possibilities in the cure of diseases and the prevention of health hazards. Research by Groningen University has e.g. brought to light that presently unknown mutations of alleles on the fifth chromosome make children susceptible to the

  13. Genetic amniocentesis in twin pregnancies: results of a multicenter study of 529 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruggmayer, M.R.K.; M.G. Jahoda (M.); Van der Pol, J.G.; Baumann, P.; Holzgreve, W.; Karkut, G.; Lettau, R.; Eiben, B.; Osmers, R.; Gola, H.W.; Duda, V.; Polak, P.; Körner, H.; Schulte‐Valentin, M.; Schütte, H.

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo evaluate the risk of abortion after genetic amniocentesis in twin pregnancies, a retrospective study of 15 centers was performed. The spontaneous abortion rate up to 20 completed weeks of gestation was 2.3%; the abortion rate up to 28 completed weeks, as defined by WHO, was 3.7%. The

  14. Results for five sets of forensic genetic markers studied in a Greek population sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Skitsa, I; Steinmeier, E;

    2015-01-01

    A population sample of 223 Greek individuals was typed for five sets of forensic genetic markers with the kits NGM SElect™, SNPforID 49plex, DIPplex(®), Argus X-12 and PowerPlex(®) Y23. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed for any of the studied markers after Hol...

  15. Does indirect speech promote nondirective genetic counseling? Results of a sociolinguistic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkendorf, J L; Prince, M B; Rose, M A; De Fina, A; Hamilton, H E

    2001-01-01

    To date, research examining adherence to genetic counseling principles has focused on specific counseling activities such as the giving or withholding of information and responding to client requests for advice. We audiotaped 43 prenatal genetic counseling sessions and used data-driven, qualitative, sociolinguistic methodologies to investigate how language choices facilitate or hinder the counseling process. Transcripts of each session were prepared for sociolinguistic analysis of the emergent discourse that included studying conversational style, speaker-listener symmetry, directness, and other interactional patterns. Analysis of our data demonstrates that: 1) indirect speech, marked by the use of hints, hedges, and other politeness strategies, facilitates rapport and mitigates the tension between a client-centered relationship and a counselor-driven agenda; 2) direct speech, or speaking literally, is an effective strategy for providing information and education; and 3) confusion exists between the use of indirect speech and the intent to provide nondirective counseling, especially when facilitating client decision-making. Indirect responses to client questions, such as those that include the phrases "some people" or "most people," helped to maintain counselor neutrality; however, this well-intended indirectness, used to preserve client autonomy, may have obstructed direct explorations of client needs. We argue that the genetic counseling process requires increased flexibility in the use of direct and indirect speech and provide new insights into how "talk" affects the work of genetic counselors.

  16. Genetic disruption of dopamine production results in pituitary adenomas and severe prolactinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons into the median eminence activates dopamine-D2 receptors in the pituitary gland where it inhibits lactotroph function. We have previously described genetic dopamine-deficient mouse models which lack the ability to synthesize dopamine. Because...

  17. Ethical, legal, and counseling challenges surrounding the return of genetic results in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, M.P.; Gadellaa-van Hooijdonk, C.G.; Bredenoord, A.L.; Kapitein, P.; Roach, N.; Cuppen, E.; Knoers, N.V.; Voest, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, an overwhelming number of genetic aberrations have been discovered and linked to the development of treatment for cancer. With the rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques, it is expected that large-scale DNA analyses will increasingly be used to select pa

  18. A genetic study on attention problems and academic skills: results of a longitudinal study in twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, T.J.C.; Huizink, A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bartels, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several studies reported a negative association between ADHD symptoms and academic achievement. We investigated the etiology of the association between Attention Problems (AP, one of the core symptoms in ADHD) in early childhood and four academic skills across childhood in a genetically in

  19. Genetic amniocentesis in twin pregnancies: results of a multicenter study of 529 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruggmayer, M.R.K.; M.G. Jahoda (M.); Van der Pol, J.G.; Baumann, P.; Holzgreve, W.; Karkut, G.; Lettau, R.; Eiben, B.; Osmers, R.; Gola, H.W.; Duda, V.; Polak, P.; Körner, H.; Schulte‐Valentin, M.; Schütte, H.

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo evaluate the risk of abortion after genetic amniocentesis in twin pregnancies, a retrospective study of 15 centers was performed. The spontaneous abortion rate up to 20 completed weeks of gestation was 2.3%; the abortion rate up to 28 completed weeks, as defined by WHO, was 3.7%. The

  20. Legal limitations on genetic research and the commercialisation of its results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, M.H.M.; van van Erp, J.H.M.; van van Vliet, L.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Developments in genetics hold a strong promise for future possibilities in the cure of diseases and the prevention of health hazards. Research by Groningen University has e.g. brought to light that presently unknown mutations of alleles on the fifth chromosome make children susceptible to the advers

  1. Animal genetic resources in Brazil: result of five centuries of natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariante, A da S; Egito, A A

    2002-01-01

    Brazil has various species of domestic animals, which developed from breeds brought by the Portuguese settlers soon after their discovery. For five centuries, these breeds have been subjected to natural selection in specific environments. Today, they present characteristics adapted to the specific Brazilian environmental conditions. These breeds developed in Brazil are known as "Crioulo," "local," or naturalized. From the beginning of the 20th century, some exotic breeds, selected in temperate regions, have begun to be imported. Although more productive, these breeds do not have adaptive traits, such as resistance to disease and parasites found in breeds considered to be "native." Even so, little by little, they replaced the native breeds, to such an extent that the latter are in danger of extinction. In 1983, to avoid the loss of this important genetic material, the National Research Center for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (Cenargen) of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) decided to include conservation of animal genetic resources in its research program Conservation and Utilization of Genetic Resources. Until this time, they were only concerned with conservation of native plants. Conservation has been carried out by various research centers of Embrapa, universities, state research corporations, and private farmers, with a single coordinator at the national level, Cenargen. Specifically, conservation is being carried out by conservation nuclei, which are specific herds in which the animals are being conserved, situated in the habitats where the animals have been subjected to natural selection. This involves storage of semen and embryos from cattle, horses, buffaloes, donkeys, goats, sheep, and pigs. The Brazilian Animal Germplasm Bank is kept at Cenargen, which is responsible for the storage of semen and embryos of various breeds of domestic animals threatened with extinction, where almost 45,000 doses of semen and more than 200

  2. Some well-posedness and general stability results in Timoshenko systems with infinite memory and distributed time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmia, Aissa

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a Timoshenko system in one-dimensional bounded domain with infinite memory and distributed time delay both acting on the equation of the rotation angle. Without any restriction on the speeds of wave propagation and under appropriate assumptions on the infinite memory and distributed time delay convolution kernels, we prove, first, the well-posedness and, second, the stability of the system, where we present some decay estimates depending on the equal-speed propagation case and the opposite one. The obtained decay rates depend on the growths of the memory and delay kernels at infinity. In the nonequal-speed case, the decay rate depends also on the regularity of initial data. Our stability results show that the only dissipation resulting from the infinite memory guarantees the asymptotic stability of the system regardless to the speeds of wave propagation and in spite of the presence of a distributed time delay. Applications of our approach to specific coupled Timoshenko-heat and Timoshenko-wave systems as well as the discrete time delay case are also presented.

  3. Development of a Tool to Guide Parents Carrying a BRCA1/2 Mutation Share Genetic Results with Underage Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santerre-Theil, Ariane; Bouchard, Karine; St-Pierre, Dominique; Drolet, Anne-Marie; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Dorval, Michel

    2016-11-02

    Although most parents carrying a BRCA1/2 genetic mutation share their test result with their underage children, they report needing support to decide if, when, and how to share risk information and what reactions to expect from their children. We developed a tool to guide parents carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation share their genetic result with underage children. Here, we report on the development of this tool using a qualitative methodology. A tool prototype was developed based on the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration framework. Content was assessed using feedback from focus groups, individual interviews, and a 12-item reading grid. Participants were nine BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with underage children and three cancer genetics health professionals. Thematic content analysis was conducted on interview transcripts. The tool was developed using an iterative process until saturation of data. An independent advisory committee was involved in all steps of tool development until reaching consensus. Rather than a decision aid per se (to communicate or not), the parents wanted a more comprehensive tool to help them communicate genetic test result to their children. To meet parents' needs, a communication guidance booklet was developed, setting out the pros and cons of communication, steps to prepare sharing the test result, communication tips, and parents' testimonies. This communication tool responds to a significant unmet need faced by parents carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer. Future studies are needed to assess how the information from the parent's genetic test result impacts the child's development, health behaviors, and relationship with the parent.

  4. New results on the robust stability of PID controllers with gain and phase margins for UFOPTD processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q B; Liu, Q; Huang, B

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of determining all the robust PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers in terms of the gain and phase margins (GPM) for open-loop unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD) processes. It is the first time that the feasible ranges of the GPM specifications provided by a PID controller are given for UFOPTD processes. A gain and phase margin tester is used to modify the original model, and the ranges of the margin specifications are derived such that the modified model can be stabilized by a stabilizing PID controller based on Hermite-Biehlers Theorem. Furthermore, we obtain all the controllers satisfying a given margin specification. Simulation studies show how to use the results to design a robust PID controller.

  5. Combining comparative proteomics and molecular genetics uncovers regulators of synaptic and axonal stability and degeneration in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Wishart

    Full Text Available Degeneration of synaptic and axonal compartments of neurons is an early event contributing to the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel "top-down" approach for identifying proteins and functional pathways regulating neurodegeneration in distal compartments of neurons. A series of comparative quantitative proteomic screens on synapse-enriched fractions isolated from the mouse brain following injury identified dynamic perturbations occurring within the proteome during both initiation and onset phases of degeneration. In silico analyses highlighted significant clustering of proteins contributing to functional pathways regulating synaptic transmission and neurite development. Molecular markers of degeneration were conserved in injury and disease, with comparable responses observed in synapse-enriched fractions isolated from mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD and spinocerebellar ataxia type 5. An initial screen targeting thirteen degeneration-associated proteins using mutant Drosophila lines revealed six potential regulators of synaptic and axonal degeneration in vivo. Mutations in CALB2, ROCK2, DNAJC5/CSP, and HIBCH partially delayed injury-induced neurodegeneration. Conversely, mutations in DNAJC6 and ALDHA1 led to spontaneous degeneration of distal axons and synapses. A more detailed genetic analysis of DNAJC5/CSP mutants confirmed that loss of DNAJC5/CSP was neuroprotective, robustly delaying degeneration in axonal and synaptic compartments. Our study has identified conserved molecular responses occurring within synapse-enriched fractions of the mouse brain during the early stages of neurodegeneration, focused on functional networks modulating synaptic transmission and incorporating molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal modifiers, and calcium-binding proteins. We propose that the proteins and functional pathways identified in

  6. Combining comparative proteomics and molecular genetics uncovers regulators of synaptic and axonal stability and degeneration in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Wishart

    Full Text Available Degeneration of synaptic and axonal compartments of neurons is an early event contributing to the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel "top-down" approach for identifying proteins and functional pathways regulating neurodegeneration in distal compartments of neurons. A series of comparative quantitative proteomic screens on synapse-enriched fractions isolated from the mouse brain following injury identified dynamic perturbations occurring within the proteome during both initiation and onset phases of degeneration. In silico analyses highlighted significant clustering of proteins contributing to functional pathways regulating synaptic transmission and neurite development. Molecular markers of degeneration were conserved in injury and disease, with comparable responses observed in synapse-enriched fractions isolated from mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD and spinocerebellar ataxia type 5. An initial screen targeting thirteen degeneration-associated proteins using mutant Drosophila lines revealed six potential regulators of synaptic and axonal degeneration in vivo. Mutations in CALB2, ROCK2, DNAJC5/CSP, and HIBCH partially delayed injury-induced neurodegeneration. Conversely, mutations in DNAJC6 and ALDHA1 led to spontaneous degeneration of distal axons and synapses. A more detailed genetic analysis of DNAJC5/CSP mutants confirmed that loss of DNAJC5/CSP was neuroprotective, robustly delaying degeneration in axonal and synaptic compartments. Our study has identified conserved molecular responses occurring within synapse-enriched fractions of the mouse brain during the early stages of neurodegeneration, focused on functional networks modulating synaptic transmission and incorporating molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal modifiers, and calcium-binding proteins. We propose that the proteins and functional pathways identified in

  7. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Stability and Change of ADHD Symptoms between 8 and 13 Years of Age: A Longitudinal Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jan-Olov; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms between 8 and 9 and 13 and 14 years of age. Method: The sample included 1,480 twin pairs born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986. At wave 1 in 1994, when twins were 8-9 years old, 1,106 (75%)…

  8. Results on single cell PCR for Huntington's gene and WAVE product analysis for preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, K C; Liu, M C; Lilleberg, S; Kipersztok, S; Williams, R S

    2001-10-22

    Triple repeat base pair amplification is the basis for a number of prevalent genetic diseases such as Huntington's, Fragile X, Myotonic Dystrophy and others. We have chosen to investigate the use of PCR to amplify a portion of the Huntington's gene in single cells in order to develop a clinical test system for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Amplification of CAG triple repeat sequences poses difficulties due to resistance of GC melting for amplification. Special PCR modifications are necessary to carry out the amplification of GC rich areas found in most triple base pair expansions. We have used a modified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol to amplify the expanded repeat sequence of the Huntington's gene with satisfactory efficiency. Detection of the amplified expanded CAG repeats is shown to be possible using both agarose gel electrophoresis and high definition denaturing high pressure liquid (DHPLC) chromatography. The incidence of allele dropout (ADO) is documented.

  9. A Genetic Study on Attention Problems and Academic Skills: Results of a Longitudinal Study in Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Polderman TJ; Huizink AC; Verhulst FC; van Beijsterveldt CE; Boomsma DI; Bartels M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several studies reported a negative association between ADHD symptoms and academic achievement. We investigated the etiology of the association between Attention Problems (AP, one of the core symptoms in ADHD) in early childhood and four academic skills across childhood in a genetically informative design. Method Academic skills (mathematics, spelling, reading and comprehension) were measured with standardized tests performed at school in grade 2, 4, and 6. AP were measured with mot...

  10. Systematic testing of literature reported genetic variation associated with coronary restenosis: results of the GENDER Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J W Verschuren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention still remains a significant problem, despite all medical advances. Unraveling the mechanisms leading to restenosis development remains challenging. Many studies have identified genetic markers associated with restenosis, but consistent replication of the reported markers is scarce. The aim of the current study was to analyze the joined effect of previously in literature reported candidate genes for restenosis in the GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis (GENDER databank. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Candidate genes were selected using a MEDLINE search including the terms 'genetic polymorphism' and 'coronary restenosis'. The final set included 36 genes. Subsequently, all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomic region of these genes were analyzed in GENDER using set-based analysis in PLINK. The GENDER databank contains genotypic data of 2,571,586 SNPs of 295 cases with restenosis and 571 matched controls. The set, including all 36 literature reported genes, was, indeed, significantly associated with restenosis, p = 0.024 in the GENDER study. Subsequent analyses of the individual genes demonstrated that the observed association of the complete set was determined by 6 of the 36 genes. CONCLUSION: Despite overt inconsistencies in literature, with regard to individual candidate gene studies, this is the first study demonstrating that the joint effect of all these genes together, indeed, is associated with restenosis.

  11. On the Possibility of Habitable Moons in the System of HD 23079: Results from Orbital Stability Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Cuntz, M; Eberle, J; Shukayr, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of habitable moons orbiting the giant planet HD 23079b, a Jupiter-mass planet, which follows a low-eccentricity orbit in the outer region of HD 23079's habitable zone. We show that HD 23079b is able to host habitable moons in prograde and retrograde orbits, as expected, noting that the outer stability limit for retrograde orbits is increased by nearly 90% compared to that of prograde orbits, a result consistent with previous generalized studies. For the targeted parameter space it was found that the outer stability limit for habitable moons varies between 0.05236 and 0.06955 AU (prograde orbits) and between 0.1023 and 0.1190 AU (retrograde orbits) depending on the orbital parameters of the Jupiter-type planet if a minimum mass is assumed. These intervals correspond to 0.306 and 0.345 (prograde orbits) and 0.583 and 0.611 (retrograde orbits) of the planet's Hill radius. Larger stability limits are obtained if an increased value for the planetary mass m_p i...

  12. RESULTS OF SHOULDER STABILIZATION BY A MODIFIED BRISTOW - LATARJET PROCEDURE WITH ARTHROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Gladkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the minimally invasive technique for Bristow-Latarjet bone unfree autoplasty with arthroscopy in patients with bone loss more than 25% of anterior-posterior diameter of the glenoid, the poor quality of the capsule or deep defects of Hill-Sachs. The analysis of the early results of treatment in 19 patients and midterm results - in 13 soldiers operated in 2011-2014. Features of the proposed technique are the shortening of surgical approach and the reduction of subscapularis muscle damage. In addition, arthroscopic support allows to attain the precision location of the graft relative to the articular surface of scapula, at the same time restoring the damaged anatomy SLAP, rotator cuff tendons and posterior labrum and restore shoulder ligaments tension and isolate bone graft from the joint cavity, contributing to a better articulation of the humeral head and reducing the risk of nonunion and resorption.

  13. Stability results for backward parabolic equations with time-dependent coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho Hào, Dinh; Van Duc, Nguyen

    2011-02-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space with the norm || sdot || and A(t) (0 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 114 1162-5), and Agmon and Nirenberg (1963 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 16 121-239). Our regularization method with a priori and a posteriori parameter choice yields error estimates of Hölder type. This is the only result when a regularization method for backward parabolic equations with time-dependent coefficients provides a convergence rate. Dedicated to Professor Rudolf Gorenflo on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  14. Stability and Existence Results for Quasimonotone Quasivariational Inequalities in Finite Dimensional Spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, Marco; Giuli, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.giuli@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Information Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We study pseudomonotone and quasimonotone quasivariational inequalities in a finite dimensional space. In particular we focus our attention on the closedness of some solution maps associated to a parametric quasivariational inequality. From this study we derive two results on the existence of solutions of the quasivariational inequality. On the one hand, assuming the pseudomonotonicity of the operator, we get the nonemptiness of the set of the classical solutions. On the other hand, we show that the quasimonoticity of the operator implies the nonemptiness of the set of nonzero solutions. An application to traffic network is also considered.

  15. Results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Here we present the results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and two alleged fathers. The laboratories were encouraged...

  16. Results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and an alleged father. The laboratories were encouraged to answer...

  17. The genetic equidistance result: misreading by the molecular clock and neutral theory and reinterpretation nearly half of a century later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taobo; Long, Mengping; Yuan, Dejian; Zhu, Zhubing; Huang, Yimin; Huang, Shi

    2013-03-01

    In 1963, Margoliash discovered the unexpected genetic equidistance result after comparing cytochrome c sequences from different species. This finding, together with the hemoglobin analyses of Zuckerkandl and Pauling in 1962, directly inspired the ad hoc molecular clock hypothesis. Unfortunately, however, many biologists have since mistakenly viewed the molecular clock as a genuine reality, which in turn inspired Kimura, King, and Jukes to propose the neutral theory of molecular evolution. Many years of studies have found numerous contradictions to the theory, and few today believe in a universal constant clock. What is being neglected, however, is that the failure of the molecular clock hypothesis has left the original equidistance result an unsolved mystery. In recent years, we fortuitously rediscovered the equidistance result, which remains unknown to nearly all researchers. Incorporating the proven virtues of existing evolutionary theories and introducing the novel concept of maximum genetic diversity, we proposed a more complete hypothesis of evolutionary genetics and reinterpreted the equidistance result and other major evolutionary phenomena. The hypothesis may rewrite molecular phylogeny and population genetics and solve major biomedical problems that challenge the existing framework of evolutionary biology.

  18. The PRL Stabilized High Resolution Echelle Fiber-fed Spectrograph: Instrument Description & First Radial Velocity Results

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Roy, Arpita; Dixit, Vaibhav; Richardson, Eric Harvey; Dongre, Varun; Pathan, F M; Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Shah, Vishal; Ubale, Girish P; Anandarao, B G

    2013-01-01

    We present spectrograph design details and initial radial velocity results from the PRL optical fiber-fed high-resolution cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph (PARAS), which has recently been commissioned at the Mt Abu 1.2 m telescope, in India. Data obtained as part of the post-commissioning tests with PARAS show velocity precision better than 2m/s over a period of several months on bright RV standard stars. For observations of sigma-Dra we report 1.7m/s precision for a period of seven months and 2.1m/s for HD 9407 over a period of 2 months. PARAS is capable of a single-shot spectral coverage of 3800A - 9500A at a resolution of about 67,000. The RV results were obtained between 3800A and 6900A using simultaneous wavelength calibration with a Thorium-Argon (ThAr) hollow cathode lamp. The spectrograph is maintained under stable conditions of temperature with a precision of 0.01 - 0.02C (rms) at 25.55C, and enclosed in a vacuum vessel at pressure of 0.1 +/-0.03 mbar. The blaze peak efficiency of the spectrograp...

  19. Plasmon-soliton waves in planar slot waveguides: II. Results for stationary waves and stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Walasik, Wiktor; Renversez, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the two methods we developed to calculate the stationary nonlinear solutions in one-dimensional plasmonic slot waveguides made of a finite-thickness nonlinear dielectric core surrounded by metal regions. These two methods are described in detail in the preceding article [Walasik et al., submitted]. For symmetric waveguides, we provide the nonlinear dispersion curves obtained using the two methods and compare them. We describe the well known low-order modes and the higher-modes that were not described before. All the modes are classified into two families: modes with and without nodes. We also compare nonlinear modes with nodes with the linear modes in similar linear slot waveguides with a homogeneous core. We recover the symmetry breaking Hopf bifurcation of the first symmetric nonlinear mode toward an asymmetric mode and we show that one of the higher modes also exhibits a bifurcation. We study the behavior of the bifurcation of the fundamental mode as a function of the permittivit...

  20. Landscape genetics reveals inbreeding and genetic bottlenecks in the extremely rare short-globose cacti Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae as a result of habitat fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Maya-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammillaria pectinifera is an endemic, short-globose cactus species, included in the IUCN list as a threatened species with only 18 remaining populations in the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley in central Mexico. We evaluated the population genetic diversity and structure, connectivity, recent bottlenecks and population size, using nuclear microsatellites. M. pectinifera showed high genetic diversity but some evidence of heterozygote deficiency (FIS, recent bottlenecks in some populations and reductions in population size. Also, we found low population genetic differentiation and high values of connectivity for M. pectinifera, as the result of historical events of gene flow through pollen and seed dispersal. M. pectinifera occurs in sites with some degree of disturbance leading to the isolation of its populations and decreasing the levels of gene flow among them. Excessive deforestation also changes the original vegetation damaging the natural habitats. This species will become extinct if it is not properly preserved. Furthermore, this species has some ecological features that make them more vulnerable to disturbance such as a very low growth rates and long life cycles. We suggest in situ conservation to prevent the decrease of population sizes and loss of genetic diversity in the natural protected areas such as the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Biosphere Reserve. In addition, a long-term ex situ conservation program is need to construct seed banks, and optimize seed germination and plant establishment protocols that restore disturbed habitats. Furthermore, creating a supply of living plants for trade is critical to avoid further extraction of plants from nature.

  1. Effects of heme on the thermal stability of mesophilic and thermophilic cytochromes c: Comparison between experimental and theoretical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Koji; Kodama, Ryota; Yoshidome, Takashi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Sambongi, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    We have recently proposed a measure of the thermal stability of a protein: the water-entropy gain at 25 °C upon folding normalized by the number of residues, which is calculated using a hybrid of the angle-dependent integral equation theory combined with the multipolar water model and the morphometric approach. A protein with a larger value of the measure is thermally more stable. Here we extend the study to analyses on the effects of heme on the thermal stability of four cytochromes c (PA c551, PH c552, HT c552, and AA c555) whose denaturation temperatures are considerably different from one another despite that they share significantly high sequence homology and similar three-dimensional folds. The major conclusions are as follows. For all the four cytochromes c, the thermal stability is largely enhanced by the heme binding in terms of the water entropy. For the holo states, the measure is the largest for AA c555. However, AA c555 has the lowest packing efficiency of heme and the apo polypeptide with hololike structure, which is unfavorable for the water entropy. The highest stability of AA c555 is ascribed primarily to the highest efficiency of side-chain packing of the apo polypeptide itself. We argue for all the four cytochromes c that due to covalent heme linkages, the number of accessible conformations of the denatured state is decreased by the steric hindrance of heme, and the conformational-entropy loss upon folding becomes smaller, leading to an enhancement of the thermal stability. As for the apo state modeled as the native structure whose heme is removed, AA c555 has a much larger value of the measure than the other three. Overall, the theoretical results are quite consistent with the experimental observations (e.g., at 25 °C the α-helix content of the apo state of AA c555 is almost equal to that of the holo state while almost all helices are collapsed in the apo states of PA c551, PH c552, and HT c552).

  2. Genetic stability and phytochemical analysis of the in vitro regenerated plants of Dendrobium nobile Lindl., an endangered medicinal orchid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharyya, Paromik; Kumaria, Suman; Diengdoh, Reemavareen; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    An efficient genetically stable regeneration protocol with increased phytochemical production has been established for Dendrobium nobile, a highly prized orchid for its economic and medicinal importance...

  3. 6q24 transient neonatal diabetes – how to manage while waiting for genetic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Ramona Nicolescu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes, rare in the neonatal period, should be evoked in every newborn presenting with unexplained intrauterine and early postnatal growth retardation.This case report illustrates the clinical course and therapeutic approach of a newborn diagnosed with transient diabetes. The baby was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a severe intrauterine growth restriction. Except a mild macroglossia and signs of growth restriction, physical examination was normal. On the 5th day of life hyperglycemia (180 mg/dl was noted and the next day the diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed (high blood sugar, glucosuria, undetectable levels of insulin and C-peptide. Insulin infusion, initially intravenously and then subcutaneously was started, tailored to assure the growth catch-up and normalize the blood sugar levels. At the age of 4 weeks, the baby returned at home under pump.At 8 weeks, the clinical impression of evolution to a transient diabetes (decreasing needs of insulin with very satisfactory weight gain was genetically confirmed (paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 6.There is no screening for neonatal diabetes, but the clinical suspicion avoids the metabolic decompensation and allows early initiation of insulin therapy. The genetic approach (for disease itself and its associated features relies on timely clinical updates.

  4. 6q24 Transient Neonatal Diabetes – How to Manage while Waiting for Genetic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudvoye, Julie; Farhat, Khaldoun; De Halleux, Virginie; Nicolescu, Corina Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, rare in the neonatal period, should be evoked in every newborn presenting with unexplained intrauterine and early postnatal growth retardation. This case report illustrates the clinical course and therapeutic approach of a newborn diagnosed with transient diabetes. The baby was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a severe intrauterine growth restriction. Except a mild macroglossia and signs of growth restriction, physical examination was normal. On the fifth day of life, hyperglycemia (180 mg/dl) was noted, and the next day, the diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed (high blood sugar, glucosuria, undetectable levels of insulin and C-peptide). Insulin infusion, initially intravenously and then subcutaneously, was started, tailored to assure the growth catch-up and normalize the blood sugar levels. At the age of 4 weeks, the baby returned at home under pump. At 8 weeks, the clinical impression of evolution to a transient diabetes (decreasing needs of insulin with very satisfactory weight gain) was genetically confirmed (paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 6). There is no screening for neonatal diabetes, but the clinical suspicion avoids the metabolic decompensation and allows early initiation of insulin therapy. The genetic approach (for disease itself and its associated features) relies on timely clinical updates. PMID:27909691

  5. Modeling misidentification errors that result from use of genetic tags in capture-recapture studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, J.; Brownie, C.; Pollock, K.H.; Link, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Misidentification of animals is potentially important when naturally existing features (natural tags) such as DNA fingerprints (genetic tags) are used to identify individual animals. For example, when misidentification leads to multiple identities being assigned to an animal, traditional estimators tend to overestimate population size. Accounting for misidentification in capture-recapture models requires detailed understanding of the mechanism. Using genetic tags as an example, we outline a framework for modeling the effect of misidentification in closed population studies when individual identification is based on natural tags that are consistent over time (non-evolving natural tags). We first assume a single sample is obtained per animal for each capture event, and then generalize to the case where multiple samples (such as hair or scat samples) are collected per animal per capture occasion. We introduce methods for estimating population size and, using a simulation study, we show that our new estimators perform well for cases with moderately high capture probabilities or high misidentification rates. In contrast, conventional estimators can seriously overestimate population size when errors due to misidentification are ignored. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Percutaneous Stabilization System Osseofix® for Treatment of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures - Clinical and Radiological Results after 12 Months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Albrecht Ender

    Full Text Available A prospective consecutive cohort study (follow-up study.Our study investigated whether implantation of an expandable titanium mesh cage (Osseofix® is a successful and safe minimally invasive therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCF. Our experiences, clinical and radiological findings after 12 months follow-up are presented. Kypho- and vertebroplasty are well-established minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of osteoporotic VCF. The main complications associated with both procedures are uncontrolled bone cement leakage. Therefore a suitable alternative has been investigated.During June 2010 to May 2011 24 patients were included with 32 osteoporotic VCF (T6 to L4. All of them were stabilized with the Osseofix® system. Preinterventionally we performed X-ray, MRI, and bone density measurements (DXA. Clinical and radiological results were evaluated preop., postop. and after 12 months postop. based on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, X-ray (Beck Index, Cobb-angle and CT.There was a significant improvement in the mean ODI (70,6% to 30,1% as well as a significant reduction in pain intensity (VAS (7,7 to 1,4 after 12 month. The mean kyphotic angle according to Cobb showed significant improvements (11,7° to 10,4° after 12 months. Postinterventional imaging showed only one case of loss of height in a stabilized vertebral body (3.1%. We saw no changes in posterior vertebral wall or adjacent fractures. Except for one pronounced postoperative hematoma we saw no surgical complications including no cement leakage.Stabilization of symptomatic osteoporotic VCF with Osseofix® system is a safe and effective procedure, even in fractures with posterior wall involvement. The clinical mid-term results are good at a very low complication rate. The Osseofix® system is an interesting alternative to the established procedures of cement augmentation.

  7. On new non-modal hydrodynamic stability modes and resulting non-exponential growth rates - a Lie symmetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlack, Martin; Nold, Andreas; Sanjon, Cedric Wilfried; Wang, Yongqi; Hau, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Classical hydrodynamic stability theory for laminar shear flows, no matter if considering long-term stability or transient growth, is based on the normal-mode ansatz, or, in other words, on an exponential function in space (stream-wise direction) and time. Recently, it became clear that the normal mode ansatz and the resulting Orr-Sommerfeld equation is based on essentially three fundamental symmetries of the linearized Euler and Navier-Stokes equations: translation in space and time and scaling of the dependent variable. Further, Kelvin-mode of linear shear flows seemed to be an exception in this context as it admits a fourth symmetry resulting in the classical Kelvin mode which is rather different from normal-mode. However, very recently it was discovered that most of the classical canonical shear flows such as linear shear, Couette, plane and round Poiseuille, Taylor-Couette, Lamb-Ossen vortex or asymptotic suction boundary layer admit more symmetries. This, in turn, led to new problem specific non-modal ansatz functions. In contrast to the exponential growth rate in time of the modal-ansatz, the new non-modal ansatz functions usually lead to an algebraic growth or decay rate, while for the asymptotic suction boundary layer a double-exponential growth or decay is observed.

  8. Results for five sets of forensic genetic markers studied in a Greek population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, C; Skitsa, I; Steinmeier, E; Poulsen, L; Ampati, A; Børsting, C; Morling, N

    2015-05-01

    A population sample of 223 Greek individuals was typed for five sets of forensic genetic markers with the kits NGM SElect™, SNPforID 49plex, DIPplex®, Argus X-12 and PowerPlex® Y23. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed for any of the studied markers after Holm-Šidák correction. Statistically significant (Pstudied X-chromosome linkage groups. AMOVA analyses of the five sets of markers did not show population structure when the individuals were grouped according to their geographic origin. The Greek population grouped closely to the other European populations measured by F(ST)(*) distances. The match probability ranged from a value of 1 in 2×10(7) males by using haplotype frequencies of four X-chromosome haplogroups in males to 1 in 1.73×10(21) individuals for 16 autosomal STRs.

  9. Identifying plausible genetic models based on association and linkage results: application to type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Boehnke, Michael; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Cox, Nancy J; Scott, Laura J

    2012-12-01

    When planning resequencing studies for complex diseases, previous association and linkage studies can constrain the range of plausible genetic models for a given locus. Here, we explore the combinations of causal risk allele frequency (RAFC ) and genotype relative risk (GRRC ) consistent with no or limited evidence for affected sibling pair (ASP) linkage and strong evidence for case-control association. We find that significant evidence for case-control association combined with no or moderate evidence for ASP linkage can define a lower bound for the plausible RAFC . Using data from large type 2 diabetes (T2D) linkage and genome-wide association study meta-analyses, we find that under reasonable model assumptions, 23 of 36 autosomal T2D risk loci are unlikely to be due to causal variants with combined RAFC < 0.005, and four of the 23 are unlikely to be due to causal variants with combined RAFC < 0.05.

  10. Genetic analyses of Per.C6 cell clones producing a therapeutic monoclonal antibody regarding productivity and long-term stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Lopes Dos Santos, Mariana; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Moro, Ana Maria

    2016-12-01

    Genetic characterization of protein-producing clones represents additional value to cell line development. In the present study, ten Per.C6 clones producing a Rebmab100 monoclonal antibody were selected using two cloning methods: six clones originated from limiting dilution cloning and four by the automated colony picker ClonePix FL. A stability program was performed for 50 generations, including 4 batches distributed along the timeframe to determine specific productivity (Qp) maintenance. Four stable clones (two from limiting dilution and two from ClonePix FL) were further evaluated. The relative mRNA expression levels of both heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes were verified at generations 0, 30-35, and 50-55 of the stability program. At generations 0 and 30-35, LC gene expression level was higher than HC gene, whereas at generation 50-55, the opposite prevailed. A high correlation was observed between Qp and HC or LC mRNA expression level for all clones at each generation analyzed along the continuous culture. The mRNA stability study was performed at steady-state culture. The LC gene displayed a higher half-life and lower decay constant than HC gene, accounting for the higher observed expression level of LC mRNA in comparison to HC mRNA. Clone R6 was highlighted due its high Qp, mRNA expression levels, and mRNA stability. Besides the benefits of applying genetic characterization for the selection of stable and high-producing clones, the present study shows for the first time the correlation between Qp and HC or LC expression levels and also mRNA stability in clones derived from human cell line Per.C6(®).

  11. Direct results of recent multidisciplinary ethno-genetic research of the Serbs and the Serbian population (in Aleksandrovac district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović Ivica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents immediate results of a multidisciplinary research into ethno genesis, that is, the origin of the Serbs and the Serbian population, based on genetic indicators. The most direct results of the carried out survey are 85 haplotypes with 17 DYS markers/locuses of the respondents from Aleksandrovac district, a representative area as it is in the very centre of Serbian, Kosovo-Resava linguistic and cultural zone. Unlike previous texts that the authors have written on this subject, this paper, for the first time, presents actual results which correlate ethnological facts - starting from older up to latest records on origin - with genetic results obtained owing to the cooperation of the SASA Institute of Ethnography and the Laboratory for DNA analysis of the National forensic centre at the Ministry of Interior, Republic of Serbia. In this way, new findings, which could have been summoned only by parallel use of ethnological and genetic information (and which are given in the paper as clear proofs of necessity and effectiveness of the applied methodological approach, are being obtained and presented. Among other things, the given results of the preliminary survey (compared with the latest relevant surveys by other authors and institutions indicate the dominance of 12a and R1a haplogroups, decisive in the ethnogenesis of the Slavs, which matches common Serbian perception of the Serbs as of a nation of the Slav language and origin.

  12. Gene Flow Results in High Genetic Similarity Between Sibiraea (Rosaceae species in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Cheng Fu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying closely related species and divergent populations provides insight into the process of speciation. Previous studies showed that the Sibiraea complex's evolutionary history on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP was confusing and could not be distinguishable on the molecular level. In this study, the genetic structure and gene flow of S. laevigata and S. angustata on the QTP was examined across 45 populations using 8 microsatellite loci. Microsatellites revealed high genetic diversity in Sibiraea populations. Most of the variance was detected within populations (87.45% rather than between species (4.39%. We found no significant correlations between genetic and geographical distances among populations. Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all individuals in the sympatric area of Sibiraea into one cluster and other individuals of S. angustata into another. Divergence history analysis based on the approximate Bayesian computation method indicated that the populations of S. angustata at the sympatric area derived from the admixture of 2 species. The assignment test assigned all individuals to populations of their own species rather than its congeneric species. Consistently, intraspecies were detected rather than interspecies first-generation migrants. The bidirectional gene flow in long-term patterns between the 2 species was asymmetric, with more from S. angustata to S. laevigata. In conclusion, the Sibiraea complex was distinguishable on the molecular level using microsatellite loci. We found that the high genetic similarity of these 2 species resulted from huge bidirectional gene flow, especially on the sympatric area where population admixtures between the species occurred.

  13. Structure and stability of genetic variance-covariance matrices: A Bayesian sparse factor analysis of transcriptional variation in the three-spined stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, J; Ovaskainen, O; Merilä, J

    2017-07-26

    The genetic variance-covariance matrix (G) is a quantity of central importance in evolutionary biology due to its influence on the rate and direction of multivariate evolution. However, the predictive power of empirically estimated G-matrices is limited for two reasons. First, phenotypes are high-dimensional, whereas traditional statistical methods are tuned to estimate and analyse low-dimensional matrices. Second, the stability of G to environmental effects and over time remains poorly understood. Using Bayesian sparse factor analysis (BSFG) designed to estimate high-dimensional G-matrices, we analysed levels variation and covariation in 10,527 expressed genes in a large (n = 563) half-sib breeding design of three-spined sticklebacks subject to two temperature treatments. We found significant differences in the structure of G between the treatments: heritabilities and evolvabilities were higher in the warm than in the low-temperature treatment, suggesting more and faster opportunity to evolve in warm (stressful) conditions. Furthermore, comparison of G and its phenotypic equivalent P revealed the latter is a poor substitute of the former. Most strikingly, the results suggest that the expected impact of G on evolvability-as well as the similarity among G-matrices-may depend strongly on the number of traits included into analyses. In our results, the inclusion of only few traits in the analyses leads to underestimation in the differences between the G-matrices and their predicted impacts on evolution. While the results highlight the challenges involved in estimating G, they also illustrate that by enabling the estimation of large G-matrices, the BSFG method can improve predicted evolutionary responses to selection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The role of disease perceptions and results sharing in psychological adaptation after genetic susceptibility testing: the REVEAL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Koehly, Laura M; Roberts, J Scott; Chen, Clara A; Hiraki, Susan; Green, Robert C

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluates the extent to which psychological adaptation (validated measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and test-specific distress) after genetic susceptibility testing is influenced by changes in beliefs about Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sharing of test results with others. Adult children of AD patients (N=269) from a randomized clinical trial involving genetic testing for apolipoprotein E (APOE) provided information before, as well as 6 weeks and 12 months after results disclosure. The levels of adaptation varied highly among participants at 12-month assessment. Participants who learned that they were ε4 negative (lower risk) had a reduction in perceived risk and concern about developing AD compared with those who learned that they were ε4 positive. Those who received results through an extended educational protocol (three in-person visits) had a larger decline in AD concern than those in a condensed protocol (educational brochure and two in-person visits). Increase in AD concern 6 weeks after disclosure was associated with increase in depression scores (b=0.20, Ptesting (b=0.18, P=0.02) 1 year after testing. Increase in perceived risk (b=0.16, P=0.04) was also associated with higher AD genetic testing distress. Sharing the test results with health professionals and friends (but not family) was associated with decrease in depression (b=-0.11, P=0.05) and anxiety levels (b=-0.16, Ptesting may help facilitate test recipients' long-term psychological adaptation.

  15. Catalytic properties and heat stabilities of novel recombinant human N-acetyltransferase 2 allozymes support existence of genetic heterogeneity within the slow acetylator phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, David W; Doll, Mark A

    2017-08-01

    Human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) catalyzes the N-acetylation of numerous aromatic amine drugs such as sulfamethazine (SMZ) and hydrazine drugs such as isoniazid (INH). NAT2 also catalyzes the N-acetylation of aromatic amine carcinogens such as 2-aminofluorene and the O- and N,O-acetylation of aromatic amine and heterocyclic amine metabolites. Genetic polymorphism in NAT2 modifies drug efficacy and toxicity as well as cancer risk. Acetyltransferase catalytic activities and heat stability associated with six novel NAT2 haplotypes (NAT2*6C, NAT2*14C, NAT2*14D, NAT2*14E, NAT2*17, and NAT2*18) were compared with that of the reference NAT2*4 haplotype following recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. N-acetyltransferase activities towards SMZ and INH were significantly (p N-acetyltransferase activities catalyzed by NAT2 14C and NAT2 14D were significantly lower (p N-Acetylation catalyzed by recombinant human NAT2 17 was over several hundred-fold lower than by recombinant NAT2 4 precluding measurement of its kinetic or heat inactivation constants. Similar results were observed for the O-acetylation of N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene and N-hydroxy-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine and the intramolecular N,O-acetylation of N-hydroxy-N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene. The apparent V max of the novel recombinant NAT2 allozymes NAT2 6C, NAT2 14C, NAT2 14D, and NAT2 14E towards AF, 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), and 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMABP) were each significantly (p  0.05) from recombinant NAT2 4. The apparent V max catalyzed by NAT2 14C and NAT2 14D were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the apparent V max catalyzed by NAT2 6C and NAT2 14E towards AF, ABP, and DMABP. Heat inactivation rate constants for recombinant human NAT2 14C, 14D, 14E, and 18 were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than NAT2 4. These results provide further evidence of genetic heterogeneity within the NAT2 slow acetylator phenotype.

  16. Do Organic Consumers Oppose Genetically Modified Food Stronger than Others? Results of a Consumer Research in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Wirthgen, Antje

    2007-01-01

    The majority of consumers, in particular European consumers oppose genetic modifi-cation of food. Although consumers oppose strongly genetic modification of food, genetically modified food production increases world wide. The co-existence of both, genetically modified food production and food production free of genetic modification cannot be ensured. There is always a risk that non-genetically modified food gets contaminated despite safety regulations. Thus, even organic production, which is ...

  17. In Vitro Mass Multiplication and Assessment of Genetic Stability of In Vitro Raised Artemisia absinthium L. Plants Using ISSR and SSAP Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigations were made attempting to develop a rapid, reliable, and reproducible in vitro regeneration protocol for Artemisia absinthium L., a medicinal plant of Kashmir Himalayas. Out of several auxin-cytokinin combinations tested, Murashige and Skoog’s (MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mgL−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and 0.5 mgL−1 kinetin (Kn was found to be the best for the callus induction. On the other hand, 4.5 mgL−1 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP and 0.5 mgL−1 1-α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA in the medium resulted in maximum shoot induction from the callus. Similarly, BAP and NAA at a concentration of 1.5 mgL−1 and 0.5 mgL−1, respectively, proved to be the best for the multiple shoot induction from nodal explants. Numerous shoots were obtained from nodal explants after third subculture. In vitro rooting was maximum on medium containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA at 0.5 mgL−1. The genetic stability of the in vitro raised plants of Artemisia absinthium was assessed using the intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR and sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP molecular markers. Both markers were able to detect the somaclonal variations in the callus regenerated plants, while no variation was detected in the plants regenerated from the nodal explants. SSAP has been found to be more useful in detection of variability as compared to ISSR molecular marker. The results of present study concluded that the direct regeneration protocol will be useful for the production of true to type plants of this medicinally important plant. This will go a long way in reducing the pressure on the natural populations for the secondary metabolite production, especially for extraction of essential oils.

  18. An Exponential Stability Result of a Timoshenko System with Thermoelasticity with Second Sound and in the Presence of Delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apalara, Tijani A., E-mail: tijani@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Affiliated Colleges at Hafr Al-Batin, General Science and Studies Unit-Mathematics (Saudi Arabia); Messaoudi, Salim A., E-mail: messaoud@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we consider a one-dimensional linear thermoelastic system of Timoshenko type with a delay, where the heat flux is given by Cattaneo’s law. We prove an exponential decay result under a smallness condition on the delay and a stability number introduced first in Santos et al. (J Diff Eqs 253:2715–2733, 2012), using a method different from that of Santos et al. (J Diff Eqs 253:2715–2733, 2012). We also reproduce the polynomial decay of Santos et al. (J Diff Eqs 253:2715–2733, 2012) using the multiplier method in the case of absence of delay. The polynomial decay issue in the presence of a small delay is an open question.

  19. Clinal variation in a brown lemur (Eulemur spp.) hybrid zone: combining morphological, genetic and climatic data to examine stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmore, K E; Brenneman, R A; Lei, R; Bailey, C A; Brelsford, A; Louis, E E; Johnson, S E

    2013-08-01

    Studies of hybrid zones can inform our understanding of reproductive isolation and speciation. Two species of brown lemur (Eulemur rufifrons and E. cinereiceps) form an apparently stable hybrid zone in the Andringitra region of southeastern Madagascar. The aim of this study was to identify factors that contribute to this stability. We sampled animals at 11 sites along a 90-km transect through the hybrid zone and examined variation in 26 microsatellites, the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA, six pelage and nine morphological traits; we also included samples collected in more distant allopatric sites. Clines in these traits were noncoincident, and there was no increase in either inbreeding coefficients or linkage disequilibrium at the centre of the zone. These results could suggest that the hybrid zone is maintained by weak selection against hybrids, conforming to either the tension zone or geographical selection-gradient model. However, a closer examination of clines in pelage and microsatellites indicates that these clines are not sigmoid or stepped in shape but instead plateau at their centre. Sites within the hybrid zone also occur in a distinct habitat, characterized by greater seasonality in precipitation and lower seasonality in temperature. Together, these findings suggest that the hybrid zone may follow the bounded superiority model, with exogenous selection favouring hybrids within the transitional zone. These findings are noteworthy, as examples supporting the bounded superiority model are rare and may indicate a process of ecologically driven speciation without geographical isolation.

  20. Effect of environmental and genetic factors on the correlation and stability of grain yield components in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More effective breeding and development of new wheat genotypes depend on an intricate analysis of the complex relationships among many different traits. The objective of this paper was to determine the interrelationship, direct and indirect effects, and stability of different yield components in wheat. Forty divergent genotypes were analyzed in a three- year study (2005-2007. Highly significant correlations were found between grain yield per plant and all the other traits analyzed except spike length, with the only negative correlation being that with plant height. Path analysis revealed highly significant direct effects of grain number per spike, grain mass per spike and 1000 grain weight on grain yield per plant. Analysis of stability parameters showed that the stability of grain yield per plant depended for the most part on the stability of grain number per spike, grain mass per spike and harvest index. Cluster analysis identified genotypes with a high performance for grain yield per plant and good stability parameters, indicating the possibility of developing wheat varieties with a high potential and high stability for a particular trait.

  1. Examination of solidified and stabilized matrices as a result of solidification and stabilization process of arseniccontaining sludge with portland cement and lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanapon Phenrat

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available By solidification and stabilization (S/S with Portland cement and lime, it is possible to reduce arsenic concentration in leachate of the arsenic-containing sludge from arsenic removal process by coagulation with ferric chloride. From the initial arsenic concentration in leachate of unsolidified /unstabilized sludge which was around 20.75 mg/L, the arsenic concentrations in leachate of solidified/stabilized waste were reduced to 0.3, 0.58, 1.09, and 1.85 mg/L for the waste-to-binder ratios of 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, and 1, respectively, due tothe formation of insoluble calcium-arsenic compounds. To be more cost effective for the future, alternative uses of these S/S products were also assessed by measurement of compressive strength of the mortar specimens. It was found that the compressive strengths of these matrices were from 28 ksc to 461 ksc. In conclusion, considering compressive strength and leachability of the solidified matrices, some of these solidified/ stabilized products have potential to serve as an interlocking concrete paving block.

  2. Chest Press Exercises With Different Stability Requirements Result in Similar Muscle Damage Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogo V; Ferreira-Júnior, João B; Soares, Saulo R S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Izquierdo, Mikel; Brown, Lee E; Bottaro, Martim

    2017-01-01

    Ferreira, DV, Ferreira-Júnior, JB, Soares, SRS, Cadore, EL, Izquierdo, M, Brown, LE, and Bottaro, M. Chest press exercises with different stability requirements result in similar muscle damage recovery in resistance trained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 71-79, 2017-This study investigated the time course of 96 hours of muscle recovery after 3 different chest press exercises with different stability requirements in resistance-trained men. Twenty-seven men (23.5 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups: (a) Smith machine bench press; (b) barbell bench press; or (c) dumbbell bench press. Participants performed 8 sets of 10 repetition maximum with 2 minutes rest between sets. Muscle thickness, peak torque (PT), and soreness were measured pre, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after exercise. There were no differences in the time course of PT or muscle thickness values of the pectoralis major (p = 0.98 and p = 0.91, respectively) or elbow extensors (p = 0.07 and p = 0.86, respectively) between groups. Muscle soreness of the pectoralis major was also not different between groups (p > 0.05). However, the Smith machine and barbell groups recovered from triceps brachii muscle soreness by 72 hours after exercise (p > 0.05), whereas the dumbbell group did not present any triceps brachii muscle soreness after exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, resistance-trained men experience similar muscle damage recovery after Smith machine, barbell, and dumbbell chest press exercise. However, muscle soreness of the elbow extensors takes a longer time to recover after using a barbell chest press exercise.

  3. Charge compensation and electrostatic transferability in three entropy-stabilized oxides: Results from density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Zs.; Rost, C. M.; Lim, M.; Sarker, P.; Toher, C.; Curtarolo, S.; Maria, J.-P.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out for three entropic rocksalt oxides, (Mg0.1Co0.1Ni0.1Cu0.1Zn0.1)O0.5, termed J14, and J14 + Li and J14 + Sc, to understand the role of charge neutrality and electronic states on their properties, and to probe whether simple expressions may exist that predict stability. The calculations predict that the average lattice constants of the ternary structures provide good approximations to that of the random structures. For J14, Bader charges are transferable between the binary, ternary, and random structures. For J14 + Sc and J14 + Li, average Bader charges in the entropic structures can be estimated from the ternary compositions. Addition of Sc to J14 reduces the majority of Cu, which show large displacements from ideal lattice sites, along with reduction of a few Co and Ni cations. Addition of Li to J14 reduces the lattice constant, consistent with experiment, and oxidizes some of Co as well as some of Ni and Cu. The Bader charges and spin-resolved density of states (DOS) for Co+3 in J14 + Li are very different from Co+2, while for Cu and Ni the Bader charges form continuous distributions and the two DOS are similar for the two oxidation states. Experimental detection of different oxidation states may therefore be challenging for Cu and Ni compared to Co. Based on these results, empirical stability parameters for these entropic oxides may be more complicated than those for non-oxide entropic solids.

  4. Charge compensation and electrostatic transferability in three entropy-stabilized oxides: Results from density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rak, Zs.; Rost, C. M.; Lim, M.; Maria, J.-P.; Brenner, D. W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States); Sarker, P.; Toher, C.; Curtarolo, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Center for Materials Genomics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out for three entropic rocksalt oxides, (Mg{sub 0.1}Co{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.1})O{sub 0.5}, termed J14, and J14 + Li and J14 + Sc, to understand the role of charge neutrality and electronic states on their properties, and to probe whether simple expressions may exist that predict stability. The calculations predict that the average lattice constants of the ternary structures provide good approximations to that of the random structures. For J14, Bader charges are transferable between the binary, ternary, and random structures. For J14 + Sc and J14 + Li, average Bader charges in the entropic structures can be estimated from the ternary compositions. Addition of Sc to J14 reduces the majority of Cu, which show large displacements from ideal lattice sites, along with reduction of a few Co and Ni cations. Addition of Li to J14 reduces the lattice constant, consistent with experiment, and oxidizes some of Co as well as some of Ni and Cu. The Bader charges and spin-resolved density of states (DOS) for Co{sup +3} in J14 + Li are very different from Co{sup +2}, while for Cu and Ni the Bader charges form continuous distributions and the two DOS are similar for the two oxidation states. Experimental detection of different oxidation states may therefore be challenging for Cu and Ni compared to Co. Based on these results, empirical stability parameters for these entropic oxides may be more complicated than those for non-oxide entropic solids.

  5. Further results on saturated globally stabilizing linear state feedback control laws for single-input neutrally stable planar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Tao; Stoorvogel, Anton A.; Saberi, Ali; Johansson, Karl H.

    2013-01-01

    It is known that for single-input neutrally stable planar systems, there exists a class of saturated globally stabilizing linear state feedback control laws. The goal of this paper is to characterize the dynamic behavior for such a system under arbitrary locally stabilizing linear state feedback con

  6. Further results on saturated globally stabilizing linear state feedback control laws for single-input neutrally stable planar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Tao; Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Saberi, Ali; Johansson, Karl H.

    2013-01-01

    It is known that for single-input neutrally stable planar systems, there exists a class of saturated globally stabilizing linear state feedback control laws. The goal of this paper is to characterize the dynamic behavior for such a system under arbitrary locally stabilizing linear state feedback

  7. Prevention of ARD through stabilization of waste rock with alkaline by-products : results from a meso-scale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backstrom, M.; Allard, B. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology Environment Research Centre; Sartz, L.; Karlsson, S. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology Environment Research Centre; Bergskraft Bergslagen, Kopparberg (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Mine waste can be mixed with alkaline materials to neutralize and increase the immobilization of trace elements. An impermeable layer can also be created if the alkaline additions react with the waste to form hardpans. Alkaline injection processes have been used in the western United States, where approximately 2 to 3.5 million tonnes of mine tailings have been limed with calcite, calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}), and calcium oxide (CaO). In this study, stabilization experiments were conducted to simulate conditions where weathered mine waste was mixed with various alkaline materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal conditions for preventing the oxidation of mine waste isolating surfaces. The alkaline materials included fly ash, lime mud, green liquor dregs, and lime kiln dust. The mine waste and alkaline materials were layered in barrels. Expanded clay aggregates were used to minimize the risk of clogging. Results of the experiments showed that the pH in the alkaline-treated systems increased between 1.3 and 27 pH units when compared with untreated reference samples. The increased pH resulted in a decrease in trace element concentrations of approximately 96 percent. The samples containing fly ash performed better than other systems. 4 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. Genetic antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Gram-negative sepsis - impact on time to results in a routine laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommedal, Øyvind; Aasen, Johanne Lind; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic testing of positive blood cultures is among the most critical tasks performed by clinical microbiology laboratories, and the total analysis time from sampling to results should be kept as short as possible. By providing identification of pelleted bacteria directly from positive blood-cultures, MALDI-TOF MS opens for relatively low-complex species-adjusted genetic susceptibility testing from the same bacterial pellet. In our lab routine, we prospectively evaluated a rapid in-house real-time PCR targeting the most common aminoglycoside and cephalosporin resistance genes in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and measured time to preliminary susceptibility reporting for 138 samples. The results were compared to direct phenotypic susceptibility testing with interpretation after 6 h and overnight incubation respectively. Results from the genetic susceptibility testing were available for 69.5% (96/138) of the positive blood cultures within 24 h after sample collection. No phenotypic susceptibility results were available at this time. Compared to overnight direct susceptibility testing, the average time from sample collection to preliminary susceptibility reporting was reduced with 43%, from 45 h and 5 min to 25 h and 44 min, providing an earlier adjustment of antimicrobial therapy for 12 patients. Minor logistic adjustments have the potential to save yet another 4 h.

  9. Effect on perceived control and psychological distress of genetic knowledge in women with breast cancer receiving a BRCA1/2 test result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Kop, Jean-Luc; De Pauw, Antoine; Caron, Olivier; Fajac, Anne; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Information provision during BRCA1/2 genetic counseling is complex and expected to be increasingly so with gene panel testing. This prospective study evaluated whether genetic knowledge in counselees with breast cancer (BC) after a pre-test genetic counseling visit (T1) enhance their feeling of personal control while minimizing distress after the notification of BRCA1/2 result (T2). At T1, 243 (89% response rate) counselees completed questionnaires on genetic knowledge (BGKQ), perceived cancer genetic risk; of which, at T2, 180 (66%) completed the BGKQ again, scales of anxiety/depression, distress specific to genetic risk, and perceived control. Multilevel models were performed accounting for clinician, and testing an effect of knowledge on psychological outcomes according to the adequacy of counselees' perceived genetic predisposition to cancer. The mean knowledge score was moderate at T1, decreased while not significantly differing by BRCA1/2 test result at T2. Knowledge at T1 had no direct effect on psychological outcomes, but in counselees who over-estimated their cancer genetic risk, higher knowledge at T1 predicted higher specific distress at T2. In BC affected counselees who over-estimate their cancer genetic risk, higher BRCA1/2 pre-test genetic knowledge seem to lead to increased specific distress. Identifying these BC affected counselees who over-estimate their genetic cancer risk and helping them to interpret their genetic knowledge instead of providing them with exhaustive genetic information could minimize their distress after test result receipt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  11. Diversity and genetic stability in banana genotypes in a breeding program using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A V C; Nascimento, A L S; Vitória, M F; Rabbani, A R C; Soares, A N R; Lédo, A S

    2017-02-23

    Banana (Musa spp) is a fruit species frequently cultivated and consumed worldwide. Molecular markers are important for estimating genetic diversity in germplasm and between genotypes in breeding programs. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 21 banana genotypes (FHIA 23, PA42-44, Maçã, Pacovan Ken, Bucaneiro, YB42-47, Grand Naine, Tropical, FHIA 18, PA94-01, YB42-17, Enxerto, Japira, Pacovã, Prata-Anã, Maravilha, PV79-34, Caipira, Princesa, Garantida, and Thap Maeo), by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Material was generated from the banana breeding program of Embrapa Cassava & Fruits and evaluated at Embrapa Coastal Tablelands. The 12 primers used in this study generated 97.5% polymorphism. Four clusters were identified among the different genotypes studied, and the sum of the first two principal components was 48.91%. From the Unweighted Pair Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA) dendrogram, it was possible to identify two main clusters and subclusters. Two genotypes (Garantida and Thap Maeo) remained isolated from the others, both in the UPGMA clustering and in the principal cordinate analysis (PCoA). Using ISSR markers, we could analyze the genetic diversity of the studied material and state that these markers were efficient at detecting sufficient polymorphism to estimate the genetic variability in banana genotypes.

  12. Large effective population size and temporal genetic stability in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Swain, Douglas P.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, many commercial fish stocks have experienced dramatic declines due to overfishing. Such fisheries-induced population reductions could potentially erode the genetic diversity of marine fish populations. Based on analyses of DNA extracted from archived and contemporary samples, this paper...

  13. Large effective population size and temporal genetic stability in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Swain, Douglas P.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, many commercial fish stocks have experienced dramatic declines due to overfishing. Such fisheries-induced population reductions could potentially erode the genetic diversity of marine fish populations. Based on analyses of DNA extracted from archived and contemporary samples, this paper...

  14. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817......-3T>G in ENG) initially seemed to be homozygous for the mutation. Aim: To explore the possibility of allelic dropout causing a false result in this patient. Methods: Mutation analysis of additional family members was performed and haplotype analysis carried out. New primers were designed to reveal...

  15. Bonding, Structure, and Stability of Clusters: Some Surprising Results from an Experimental and Theoretical Investigation in Gas Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Caetano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure and stability of clusters in the ground state were analyzed at the theoretical and experimental levels. Our experimental and theoretical findings showed that the clusters in gas phase tend to form mainly planar rings of four members. The symmetry and the small dipole moment in these specific configurations suggested that their stability could be associated with an alignment of the water molecules, maximizing attractive electrostatic interactions caused by changes in the charge distribution of the clusters.

  16. Pan-neurexin perturbation results in compromised synapse stability and a reduction in readily releasable synaptic vesicle pool size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Dylan P.; Kolar, Annette; Wigerius, Michael; Gomm-Kolisko, Rachel N.; Atwi, Hanine; Fawcett, James P.; Krueger, Stefan R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurexins are a diverse family of cell adhesion molecules that localize to presynaptic specializations of CNS neurons. Heterologous expression of neurexins in non-neuronal cells leads to the recruitment of postsynaptic proteins in contacting dendrites of co-cultured neurons, implicating neurexins in synapse formation. However, isoform-specific knockouts of either all α- or all β-neurexins show defects in synaptic transmission but an unaltered density of glutamatergic synapses, a finding that argues against an essential function of neurexins in synaptogenesis. To address the role of neurexin in synapse formation and function, we disrupted the function of all α- and β-neurexins in cultured hippocampal neurons by shRNA knockdown or by overexpressing a neurexin mutant that is unable to bind to postsynaptic neurexin ligands. We show that neurexin perturbation results in an attenuation of neurotransmitter release that is in large part due to a reduction in the number of readily releasable synaptic vesicles. We also find that neurexin perturbation fails to alter the ability of neurons to form synapses, but rather leads to more frequent synapse elimination. These experiments suggest that neurexins are dispensable for the formation of initial synaptic contacts, but play an essential role in the stabilization and functional maturation of synapses. PMID:28220838

  17. Genetic ablation of Dicer in adult forebrain neurons results in abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hébert, Sébastien S; Papadopoulou, Aikaterini S; Smith, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Type III RNase Dicer is responsible for the maturation and function of microRNA (miRNA) molecules in the cell. It is now well-documented that Dicer and the fine-tuning of the miRNA gene network are important for neuronal integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in neuronal death...... demonstrate that miRNAs belonging to the miR-15 family are potent regulators of ERK1 expression in mouse neuronal cells and co-expressed with ERK1/2 in vivo. Finally, we show that miR-15a is specifically downregulated in Alzheimer's disease brain. In summary, these results support the hypothesis that changes...... in the miRNA network may contribute to a neurodegenerative phenotype by affecting tau phosphorylation....

  18. Genetic stability of physiological responses to defoliation in a eucalypt and altered chemical defence in regrowth foliage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzak, Christina L; Potts, Brad M; Barry, Karen M; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M

    2017-02-01

    Defoliation may initiate physiological recovery and chemical defence mechanisms that allow a plant to improve fitness after damage. Such responses may result in changes in plant resource allocation that influence growth and foliar chemistry. In this study, we investigated the nature and stability of the defoliation response of juvenile plants from three divergent populations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. A partial defoliation treatment that removed all upper crown leaves and the apical buds was applied to plants sourced from eight families from each of three populations representing contrasting chemical resistance to mammalian herbivory. Growth, photosynthetic rate and chlorophyll content were assessed pre-defoliation and periodically up to 12 weeks post-defoliation. The content of key plant primary and secondary metabolites was assessed pre-defoliation, at 12 weeks post-defoliation in the old foliage (positioned below the point of defoliation) and in the new foliage of the control plants and regrowth (from axillary buds) on the defoliated plants. There were clear treatment impacts on physiological responses, growth and foliar chemical traits, but despite significant constitutive differences in physiology, growth and chemistry the three E. globulus populations did not vary in their response to foliage loss. Distinct physiological responses to defoliation were observed with treatment plants showing significant up-regulation of photosynthetic rate and increased chlorophyll content in the old foliage remaining in the lower crown. There was a significant increase in the concentrations of a number of foliar chemical compounds in the regrowth arising from previously dormant axillary buds compared with new growth derived from apical meristems. There were changes in biomass allocation; defoliated plants had increased branching and leaf biomass, with changes in regrowth morphology to increase light capture. This study argues for multiple responses of E. globulus juveniles

  19. Consumer perception of food products involving genetic modification: Results from a qualitative study in four Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus G. Grunert; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Nielsen, Niels Asger; Poulsen, Jacob B.; Ueland, Oydis; Åström, Annika

    2000-01-01

    1. The present study addresses consumer acceptance of food products involving the use of different applications of genetic modification in four Nordic countries. Three food products were used as examples: hard cheese, hard candy, and salmon. Three types of applications of genetic modification were investigated: modification of the raw material, use of genetic modification in enzyme production, and direct use of genetically modified microorganisms. In addition, three levels of presence of the ...

  20. Results of long-term genetic monitoring of animal populations chronically irradiated in the radiocontaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharova, R.; Riabokon, N. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    1998-03-01

    The artificial geochemical land where all organisms lived and will live under the conditions of increased level of radiation was set up due to the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. An urgent necessity for studying the various biological effects of chronic influence of low intensity radiation on both individual organisms and populations arose. Combined cytogenetic and radioecological investigations in wild populations of terrestrial small mammals (bank vole = Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber and yellow-necked mouse = Apodemus flavicollus, Melchior) and in laboratory mice have been carried out by our laboratory since 1986. Our test organisms have contacted closely with low intensity radiation in the radiocontaminated areas of Belarus and absorbed low whole-body dose. We study the following problems: dynamics of radionuclide concentration in wild populations of small rodents; dynamics of mutation process in somatic and germ cells over many generations as well as embryonal lethality; dynamics of population density, age and sex structure of mammalian populations. The large part of results obtained are presented here. (J.P.N.)

  1. New results on delay-range-dependent stability analysis for interval time-varying delay systems with non-linear perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the problem of the stability analysis of interval time-varying delay systems with nonlinear perturbations. Based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF), a sufficient delay-range-dependent criterion for asymptotic stability is derived in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI) and integral inequality approach (IIA) and delayed decomposition approach (DDA). Further, the delay range is divided into two equal segments for stability analysis. Both theoretical and numerical comparisons have been provided to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the present method. Two well-known examples are given to show less conservatism of our obtained results and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. The Italian National External Quality Assessment Program in Molecular Genetic Testing: Results of the VII Round (2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Censi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001 the Istituto Superiore di Sanità established a quality assurance programme for molecular genetic testing that covers four pathologies: Cystic Fibrosis (CF, Beta Thalassemia (BT, Fragile X Syndrome (FX, and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC. Since 2009 this activity is an institutional activity and participation is open to both public and private laboratories. Seven rounds have been performed until now and the eighth is in progress. Laboratories receive 4 DNA samples with mock clinical indications. They analyze the samples using their routine procedures. A panel of assessors review the raw data and the reports; all data are managed through a web utility. In 2010 the number of participants was 43, 17, 15, 5 for CF, BT, FX, APC schemes respectively. Genotyping results were correct in 96%, 98.5%, 100%, and 100% of CF, BT, FX, and APC samples, respectively. Interpretation was correct in 74%, 91%, 88%, and 60% of CF, BT, FX, and APC reports, respectively; however in most of them it was not complete but a referral to genetic counseling was given. Reports were satisfactory in more than 60% of samples in all schemes. This work presents the 2010 results in detail comparing our data with those from other European schemes.

  3. Unilateral Laminectomy Approach for the Removal of Spinal Meningiomas and Schwannomas: Impact on Pain, Spinal Stability, and Neurologic Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Alfredo; Caroli, Fabrizio; Crispo, Francesco; Giovannetti, Maddalena; Raus, Laura; Vidiri, Antonello; Telera, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Spinal intradural tumors are usually removed with laminectomy/laminotomy with a midline dural incision. Pain, discomfort, postoperative kyphosis, and instability may be minimized with unilateral microsurgery. Seventy patients with schwannoma (73 tumors) and 27 patients with meningioma (29 tumors) were operated on with unilateral hemilaminectomy (June 2000 to March 2014). Surgery was generally kept to 1 or 2 levels, removing all the craniocaudal ligamentum flavum. Careful radioscopic identification is mandatory; in thoracolumbar schwannomas, the tumor may be mobile; in the prone position, it may move cranially than appears on magnetic resonance imaging. The dura was opened paramedially, and the tumor was dissected and removed either en bloc or piecemeal after ultrasonic debulking. Neurophysiologic monitoring was performed. The tumor was approached tangentially with no cord rotation or minimal manipulation. Average duration of surgery was 160 minutes (100-320 minutes). Removal was total in 72 of 73 schwannomas; Simpson grade was 1 in 10 meningiomas and 2 in 19. Patients with no complications were discharged on day 5-7. Ten patients had orthostatic headaches; 2 had pseudomeningocele that required reoperation. Pain improvement (Dennis Scale) was significant either at discharge or at follow-up (P meningiomas). Neurologic results (McCormick Scale, Karnofsky Performance Score) were excellent/good: of 39 patients with preoperative neurologic impairment, 19 recovered completely, 17 had minor spasticity, and 3 had moderate spasticity but autonomous ambulation. Sphincters recovered in 5 of 10 patients At follow-up, average Karnofsky Performance Score improved from 60 to 90 (P spinal instability was observed. Neurologic and oncologic results were good and postoperative pain and discomfort were reduced. Stability was preserved with a unilateral technique. No bracing was necessary, permitting early rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Stability of long-term professional objectives of young physicians during postgraduate training. Results of a multicenter cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birck, S; Gedrose, B; Robra, B-P; Schmidt, A; Schultz, J-H; Stosch, C; Wagner, R; Janßen, N; Scherer, M; van den Bussche, H

    2014-10-01

    We investigated persistences and changes of career preferences of medical residents in Germany after two years of postgraduate training with regard to future working place and position. The results are compared with those forwarded at graduation from medical school in a gender comparative perspective. The study is based on a standardized postal survey among the participants in the "KarMed" study, originally based on 1012 graduates of the medical faculties of Erlangen, Giessen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Cologne, Leipzig and Magdeburg in 2009. 2107 persons were contacted. The return rate at baseline was 48 %, and the two surveys after the baseline reached return rates of 87 % and 89 % respectively. In all samples 2/3 were women as in actual medical undergraduate education. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were performed. After 2 years of residency, residents after 2 years of postgraduate training still preferred the hospital over private practice as their final workplace after postgraduate training. The attractiveness of leading positions in the hospital declined among men, whereas it was already low for women at graduation. A large proportion of those physicians preferring the ambulatory sector, especially women, wishes to work as employee instead of private practice. At the personal level, almost 60 % forwarded the same preferences as those at graduation. Gender, parenthood and region of study (East vs. West Germany) did not influence stability or change of preferences. The results demonstrate the persistence of professional preferences regarding future sector and position of medical work during postgraduate training. These preferences do neither match with principles of gender equality nor with future workforce needs (e. g. in primary care). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Genetic and non-genetic causes of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency: Results of the HYPOPIT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.G. Graaff, de (Laura Corina Geertruida)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHypopituitarism, the deficiency of one or more pituitary hormones, causes stunted growth and severe health problems. Understanding the etiology of pituitary hormone deficiencies is important for anticipation of clinical problems, for genetic counselling and for possible prevention. This

  6. Genetic Exchange in an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Results in Increased Rice Growth and Altered Mycorrhiza-Specific Gene Transcription▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate symbionts with most terrestrial plants. They improve plant nutrition, particularly phosphate acquisition, and thus are able to improve plant growth. In exchange, the fungi obtain photosynthetically fixed carbon. AMF are coenocytic, meaning that many nuclei coexist in a common cytoplasm. Genetic exchange recently has been demonstrated in the AMF Glomus intraradices, allowing nuclei of different Glomus intraradices strains to mix. Such genetic exchange was shown previously to have negative effects on plant growth and to alter fungal colonization. However, no attempt was made to detect whether genetic exchange in AMF can alter plant gene expression and if this effect was time dependent. Here, we show that genetic exchange in AMF also can be beneficial for rice growth, and that symbiosis-specific gene transcription is altered by genetic exchange. Moreover, our results show that genetic exchange can change the dynamics of the colonization of the fungus in the plant. Our results demonstrate that the simple manipulation of the genetics of AMF can have important consequences for their symbiotic effects on plants such as rice, which is considered the most important crop in the world. Exploiting natural AMF genetic variation by generating novel AMF genotypes through genetic exchange is a potentially useful tool in the development of AMF inocula that are more beneficial for crop growth. PMID:21784911

  7. Diagnostic and genetic studies on fibrin-stabilizing factor with a new assay based on amine incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorand, L; Urayama, T; De Kiewiet, J W; Nossel, H L

    1969-06-01

    Fibrinoligase, the fibrin cross-linking enzyme, transiently appearing during the course of coagulation in normal blood, was shown to catalyze the incorporation of a fluorescent amine, monodansylcadaverine [or N-(5-aminopentyl)-5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide] into casein. The reaction provided the basis of a sensitive fluorimetric method for measuring the activity of the enzyme (and also of similar other transpeptidases, such as transglutaminase). In tests involving plasma, certain difficulties had to be overcome which were mainly due to the fact that the enzyme itself does not occur in citrated plasma. Only its precursor (fibrin-stabilizing factor or factor XIII) is present, still requiring limited proteolytic activation by thrombin. Thus, in order to measure amine incorporation with plasma as a source of the factor, thrombin must be added. This necessitated a differential desensitization of the intrinsic fibrinogen so that the latter could not clot and could not thereby interfere with amine incorporation. Also, the thrombin-inactivating capacity of plasma had to be saturated to enable full conversion of the factor to the transpeptidase. Concentrations of casein, monodansylcadaverine, calcium, and hydrogen ions were chosen to permit almost maximal velocity of amine incorporation. A linear relationship with regard to plasma concentration could be obtained only under such conditions. No similar assay is presently available for quantitatively evaluating fibrin-stabilizing factor levels in plasma.The amine incorporation test was applied to a clinical case of hereditary total fibrin-stabilizing factor deficiency. The effect of transfusion therapy was studied, and some of the patient's relatives were examined. Whereas a paternal aunt and uncle gave values well within the normal range, a brother and the mother proved to be partially deficient and could be considered as heterozygous carriers. The father appeared to have a reduced level of fibrin-stabilizing

  8. Fitness impact and stability of a transgene conferring resistance to dengue-2 virus following introgression into a genetically diverse Aedes aegypti strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W E Franz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, we reported a mariner (Mos1-transformed Aedes aegypti line, Carb77, which was highly resistant to dengue-2 virus (DENV2. Carb77 mosquitoes expressed a DENV2-specific inverted-repeat (IR RNA in midgut epithelial cells after ingesting an infectious bloodmeal. The IR-RNA formed double-stranded DENV2-derived RNA, initiating an intracellular antiviral RNA interference (RNAi response. However, Carb77 mosquitoes stopped expressing the IR-RNA after 17 generations in culture and lost their DENV2-refractory phenotype. In the current study, we generated new transgenic lines having the identical transgene as Carb77. One of these lines, Carb109M, has been genetically stable and refractory to DENV2 for >33 generations. Southern blot analysis identified two transgene integration sites in Carb109M. Northern blot analysis detected abundant, transient expression of the IR-RNA 24 h after a bloodmeal. Carb109M mosquitoes were refractory to different DENV2 genotypes but not to other DENV serotypes. To further test fitness and stability, we introgressed the Carb109M transgene into a genetically diverse laboratory strain (GDLS by backcrossing for five generations and selecting individuals expressing the transgene's EGFP marker in each generation. Comparison of transgene stability in replicate backcross 5 (BC5 lines versus BC1 control lines demonstrated that backcrossing dramatically increased transgene stability. We subjected six BC5 lines to five generations of selection based on EGFP marker expression to increase the frequency of the transgene prior to final family selection. Comparison of the observed transgene frequencies in the six replicate lines relative to expectations from Fisher's selection model demonstrated lingering fitness costs associated with either the transgene or linked deleterious genes. Although minimal fitness loss (relative to GDLS was manifest in the final family selection stage, we were able to select homozygotes for the transgene in

  9. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  10. Is the psychological impact of genetic testing moderated by support and sharing of test results to family and friends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Julie; Dorval, Michel; Noguès, Catherine; Fabre, Roxane; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2013-12-01

    Receiving the results of genetic tests for a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility can be a stressful experience. Here we studied the effects of social support (SS) and the sharing of test results on the psychological impact of BRCA1/2 test result disclosure. We also compared carriers and non-carriers on sharing, SS and psychological impact. Five-hundred and twenty-two unaffected women were followed prospectively for 2 years after receiving their test results. Psychological impact was measured on the impact of event scale. Multivariate multi-level models were used, and all the analyses were stratified depending on mutation status (carriers vs non-carriers). Two weeks after receiving their BRCA1/2 results, carriers had shared their test results less frequently than non-carriers (p test results was not significantly associated with psychological impact. Availability of SS was significantly associated with better psychological adjustment across time among carriers (p < 0.01), but not among non-carriers. For female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, the importance of SS should be stressed, and possible ways of enlisting people in their entourage for this purpose should be discussed in the context of clinical encounters.

  11. Human adipose stromal cells (ASC for the regeneration of injured cartilage display genetic stability after in vitro culture expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Neri

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration due to their multi-potency, immune-modulation and secretome activities, but safety remains one of the main concerns, particularly when in vitro manipulation, such as cell expansion, is performed before clinical application. Indeed, it is well documented that in vitro expansion reduces replicative potential and some multi-potency and promotes cell senescence. Furthermore, during in vitro aging there is a decrease in DNA synthesis and repair efficiency thus leading to DNA damage accumulation and possibly inducing genomic instability. The European Research Project ADIPOA aims at validating an innovative cell-based therapy where autologous adipose stromal cells (ASCs are injected in the diseased articulation to activate regeneration of the cartilage. The primary objective of this paper was to assess the safety of cultured ASCs. The maintenance of genetic integrity was evaluated during in vitro culture by karyotype and microsatellite instability analysis. In addition, RT-PCR array-based evaluation of the expression of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways was performed. Finally, the senescence and replicative potential of cultured cells was evaluated by telomere length and telomerase activity assessment, whereas anchorage-independent clone development was tested in vitro by soft agar growth. We found that cultured ASCs do not show genetic alterations and replicative senescence during the period of observation, nor anchorage-independent growth, supporting an argument for the safety of ASCs for clinical use.

  12. Assessment of the Ecological Stability of the Village of Bielovce as a Result of to Changes in Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Peter; Chebeňová, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Globally, the human population is growing, which causes increasing demands on landscapes. Human activity significantly influences the ecological balance, especially in the negative. Ecological stability is the basis for assessments of all environmental conditions and for assessments according to new land uses. The area of interest is evaluated according to both positive and negative factors. There are many methodologies for calculating ecological stability, e.g., Muchová et al. (2009); Řeháčková - Pauditšová (2007); Kupková (2002); Streďanský et al. (1995) and Löw et al. (1984). The aim of this paper is to compare the works of the mentioned authors concerning the ecological stability of the district of Levice (Slovakia), specifically in the municipal cadastre region of Bielovce. The land uses of this territory have changed during some periods. We compared the state of the land uses in the years 1950, 2012 and 2014. During this period, the proportion of arable land increased, and the proportion of forest decreased. In the area of interest, the ecological stability increased, but not as significantly as we expected. The processed data were prepared in GIS.

  13. Sexual Arousal and Self-Control: Results from a Preliminary Experimental Test of the Stability of Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jeffrey; Kunzi, Tasha

    2012-01-01

    A central proposition of Gottfredson and Hirschi's (1990) General Theory of Crime is the relative stability of low self-control, however research on "self-control strength" suggests that it may vary across contexts. The current study examines these differing conceptions by randomly assigning participants to one of two sexual arousal conditions or…

  14. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6 is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, and methionine synthase (MS, in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV. To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state. SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer.

  15. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, JIE; CHEN, KE-DA; GAO, MENG; CHEN, GANG; JIN, SU-FENG; ZHUANG, FANG-CHENG; WU, XIAO-HONG; JIANG, YUN-SHUI; LI, JIAN-BO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×109 IU/ml and 3.0×109 IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 109 IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ2MSB=20.00 and χ2WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development. PMID:25780403

  16. Additive and Over-dominant Effects Resulting from Epistatic Loci Are the Primary Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojin Luo; Yongcai Fu; Peijiang Zhang; Shuang Wu; Feng Tian; Jiayong Liu; Zuofeng Zhu; Jinshui Yang; Chuanqing Sun

    2009-01-01

    A set of 148 F9 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from the cross of an indica cultivar 93-11 and japonica cultivar DTT13,showing strong F1 heterosis.Subsequently,two backcross F1 (BCF1) populations were constructed by backcrossing these 148 RILs to two parents,93-11 and DT713.These three related populations (281BCF1 lines,148 RILs) were phenotyped for six yield-related traits in two locations.Significant inbreeding depression was detected in the population of RILS and a high level of heterosis was observed in the two BCF1 populations.A total of 42 main-effect quantitative trait loci (M-QTLs) and 109 epistatic effect QTL pairs (E-QTLs) were detected in the three related populations using the mixed model approach.By comparing the genetic effects of these QTLs detected in the RILs,BCF1 performance and mid-parental heterosis (HMp),we found that,in both BCF1 populations,the QTLs detected could be classified into two predominant types:additive and over-domlnant loci,which indicated that the additive and over-dominant effect were more important than complete or partially dominance for M-QTLs and E-QTLs.Further,we found that the E-QTLs detected collectively explained a larger portion of the total phenotypic variation than the M-QTLs in both RILs and BCF1 populations.All of these results suggest that additive and over-dominance resulting from epistatic loci might be the primary genetic basis of heterosis in rice.

  17. Common genetic variation in the Estrogen Receptor Beta (ESR2 gene and osteoarthritis: results of a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivadeneira Fernando

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between common genetic variation of the ESR2 gene and osteoarthritis. Methods In the discovery study, the Rotterdam Study-I, 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and tested for association with hip (284 cases, 2772 controls, knee (665 cases, 2075 controls, and hand OA (874 cases, 2184 controls using an additive model. In the replication stage one SNP (rs1256031 was tested in an additional 2080 hip, 1318 knee and 557 hand OA cases and 4001, 2631 and 1699 controls respectively. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analyses were performed over the complete dataset including 2364 hip, 1983 knee and 1431 hand OA cases and approximately 6000 controls. Results The C allele of rs1256031 was associated with a 36% increased odds of hip OA in women of the Rotterdam Study-I (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08-1.70, p = 0.009. Haplotype analysis and analysis of knee- and hand OA did not give additional information. With the replication studies, the meta-analysis did not show a significant effect of this SNP on hip OA in the total population (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.99-1.15, p = 0.10. Stratification according to gender did not change the results. In this study, we had 80% power to detect an odds ratio of at least 1.14 for hip OA (α = 0.05. Conclusion This study showed that common genetic variation in the ESR2 gene is not likely to influence the risk of osteoarthritis with effects smaller than a 13% increase.

  18. Temperature sensitive influenza A virus genome replication results from low thermal stability of polymerase-cRNA complexes

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    Tiley Laurence S

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Influenza A virus is a determinant of viral pathogenicity and host range that is responsible for transcribing and replicating the negative sense segmented viral genome (vRNA. Transcription produces capped and polyadenylated mRNAs whereas genome replication involves the synthesis of an alternative plus-sense transcript (cRNA with unmodified termini that is copied back to vRNA. Viral mRNA transcription predominates at early stages of viral infection, while later, negative sense genome replication is favoured. However, the "switch" that regulates the transition from transcription to replication is poorly understood. Results We show that temperature strongly affects the balance between plus and minus-sense RNA synthesis with high temperature causing a large decrease in vRNA accumulation, a moderate decrease in cRNA levels but (depending on genome segment either increased or unchanged levels of mRNA. We found no evidence implicating cellular heat shock protein activity in this effect despite the known association of hsp70 and hsp90 with viral polymerase components. Temperature-shift experiments indicated that polymerase synthesised at 41°C maintained transcriptional activity even though genome replication failed. Reduced polymerase association with viral RNA was seen in vivo and in confirmation of this, in vitro binding assays showed that temperature increased the rate of dissociation of polymerase from both positive and negative sense promoters. However, the interaction of polymerase with the cRNA promoter was particularly heat labile, showing rapid dissociation even at 37°C. This suggested that vRNA synthesis fails at elevated temperatures because the polymerase does not bind the promoter. In support of this hypothesis, a mutant cRNA promoter with vRNA-like sequence elements supported vRNA synthesis at higher temperatures than the wild-type promoter. Conclusion The differential stability of

  19. CIL-102 induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Yeh-Long; Chang, Long-Sen

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the CIL-102 suppression mechanism on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. CIL-102 attenuated K562 cell invasion with decreased MMP-2/MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced luciferase activity of MMP-2/MMP-9 promoter constructs and MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA stability. CIL-102 treatment induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation but reduced the phospho-ERK level. Transfection of constitutively active MEK1 restored MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoter activity in CIL-102-treated cells, while suppression of p38 MAPK/JNK activation abolished CIL-102-induced MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay. CIL-102-induced p38 MAPK/JNK activation led to protein phosphatase 2A-mediated tristetraprolin (TTP) down-regulation. The reduction in TTP-KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) complexes formation promoted KSRP-mediated MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay in CIL-102-treated K562 cells. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced invasion and MMP-2/MMP-9 expression in breast and liver cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that CIL-102 induces MMP-2/MMP-2 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability, and suggest a potential utility for CIL-102 in reducing MMP-2/MMP-9-mediated cancer progression.

  20. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  1. Selenium, selenoenzymes, oxidative stress and risk of neoplastic progression from Barrett's esophagus: results from biomarkers and genetic variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumie Takata

    Full Text Available Clinical trials have suggested a protective effect of selenium supplementation on the risk of esophageal cancer, which may be mediated through the antioxidant activity of selenoenzymes. We investigated whether serum selenium concentrations, selenoenzyme activity, oxidative stress and genetic variation in selenoenzymes were associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and two intermediate endpoints, aneuploidy and tetraploidy. In this prospective cohort study, during an average follow-up of 7.3 years, 47 EA cases, 41 aneuploidy cases and 51 tetraploidy cases accrued among 361 participants from the Seattle Barrett's Esophagus Research Study who were free of EA at the time of blood draw and had at least one follow-up visit. Development to EA was assessed histologically and aneuploidy and tetraploidy by DNA content flow cytometry. Serum selenium concentrations were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX 1 and GPX3 by substrate-specific coupled test procedures, selenoprotein P (SEPP1 concentrations and protein carbonyl content by ELISA method and malondialdehyde concentrations by HPLC. Genetic variants in GPX1-4 and SEPP1 were genotyped. Serum selenium was not associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to EA, aneuploidy or tetraploidy (P for trend = 0.25 to 0.85. SEPP1 concentrations were positively associated with the risk of EA [hazard ratio (HR = 3.95, 95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.42-10.97 comparing the third tertile with the first] and with aneuploidy (HR = 6.53, 95% CI = 1.31-32.58, but not selenoenzyme activity or oxidative stress markers. No genetic variants, overall, were associated with the risk of neoplastic progression to EA (global p = 0.12-0.69. Our results do not support a protective effect of selenium on risk of neoplastic progression to EA. Our study is the first to report positive associations of plasma SEPP1

  2. Topology Engineering of Proteins in Vivo Using Genetically Encoded, Mechanically Interlocking SpyX Modules for Enhanced Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are traditionally limited to linear configuration. Herein, we report in vivo protein topology engineering using highly efficient, mechanically interlocking SpyX modules named AXB and BXA. SpyX modules are protein domains composed of p53dim (X), SpyTag (A), and SpyCatcher (B). The p53dim guides the intertwining of the two nascent protein chains followed by autocatalytic isopeptide bond formation between SpyTag and SpyCatcher to fulfill the interlocking, leading to a variety of backbone topologies. Direct expression of AXB or BXA produces protein catenanes with distinct ring sizes. Recombinant proteins containing SpyX modules are obtained either as mechanically interlocked obligate dimers if the protein of interest is fused to the N- or C-terminus of SpyX modules, or as star proteins if the protein is fused to both N- and C-termini. As examples, cellular syntheses of dimers of (GB1)2 (where GB1 stands for immunoglobulin-binding domain B1 of streptococcal protein G) and of four-arm elastin-like star proteins were demonstrated. Comparison of the catenation efficiencies in different constructs reveals that BXA is generally much more effective than AXB, which is rationalized by the arrangement of three domains in space. Mechanical interlocking induces considerable stability enhancement. Both AXB and BXA have a melting point ∼20 °C higher than the linear controls and the BXA catenane has a melting point ~2 °C higher than the cyclic control BX’A. Notably, four-arm elastin-like star proteins demonstrate remarkable tolerance against trypsin digestion. The SpyX modules provide a convenient and versatile approach to construct unconventional protein topologies via the “assembly-reaction” synergy, which opens a new horizon in protein science for stability enhancement and function reinforcement via topology engineering. PMID:28573210

  3. Patterns of genetic diversity resulting from bottlenecks in European black pine, with implications on local genetic conservation and management practices in Bulgaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naydenov, Krassimir D.; Mladenov, Ivica; Alexandrov, Alexander; Naydenov, Michel K.; Gyuleva, Veselka; Goudiaby, Venceslas; Nikolić, Biljana; Kamary, Salim

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic structure and diversity of P.nigra populations in Bulgaria, using simple sequence nuclear repeats. Among-population structure was studied with distance and Bayesian frequency methods, assuming geometric distance and a “non-admixture” model. The “N

  4. Static and dynamic stability results for a class of three-dimensional configurations of Kirchhoff elastic rods

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the dynamical stability of a naturally straight, inextensible and unshearable elastic rod, under tension and controlled end rotation, within the Kirchhoff model in three dimensions. The cases of clamped boundary conditions and isoperimetric constraints are treated separately. We obtain explicit criteria for the static stability of arbitrary extrema of a general quadratic strain energy. We exploit the equivalence between the total energy and a suitably defined norm to prove that local minimizers of the strain energy, under explicit hypotheses, are stable in the dynamic sense due to Liapounov. We also extend our analysis to damped systems to show that static equilibria are dynamically stable in the Liapounov sense, in the presence of a suitably defined local drag force. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Stability of Boolean Multiplex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzo, Emanuele; Moreno, Yamir

    2012-01-01

    We extend the formalism of Random Boolean Networks with canalizing rules to multilevel complex networks. The formalism allows to model genetic networks in which each gene might take part in more than one signaling pathway. We use a semi-annealed approach to study the stability of this class of models when coupled in a multiplex network and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Our main finding is that the multiplex structure provides a mechanism for the stabilization of the system and of chaotic regimes of individual layers. Our results help understanding why some genetic networks that are theoretically expected to operate in the chaotic regime can actually display dynamical stability.

  6. Contrasting results from molecular and pedigree-based population diversity measures in captive zebra highlight challenges facing genetic management of zoo populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Ogden, Rob; Langenhorst, Tanya; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-01-01

    Zoo conservation breeding programs manage the retention of population genetic diversity through analysis of pedigree records. The range of demographic and genetic indices determined through pedigree analysis programs allows the conservation of diversity to be monitored relative to the particular founder population for a species. Such approaches are based on a number of well-documented founder assumptions, however without knowledge of actual molecular genetic diversity there is a risk that pedigree-based measures will be misinterpreted and population genetic diversity misunderstood. We examined the genetic diversity of the captive populations of Grevy's zebra, Hartmann's mountain zebra and plains zebra in Japan and the United Kingdom through analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. Very low nucleotide variability was observed in Grevy's zebra. The results were evaluated with respect to current and historic diversity in the wild, and indicate that low genetic diversity in the captive population is likely a result of low founder diversity, which in turn suggests relatively low wild genetic diversity prior to recent population declines. Comparison of molecular genetic diversity measures with analogous diversity indices generated from the studbook data for Grevy's zebra and Hartmann's mountain zebra show contrasting patterns, with Grevy's zebra displaying markedly less molecular diversity than mountain zebra, despite studbook analysis indicating that the Grevy's zebra population has substantially more founders, greater effective population size, lower mean kinship, and has suffered less loss of gene diversity. These findings emphasize the need to validate theoretical estimates of genetic diversity in captive breeding programs with empirical molecular genetic data. Zoo Biol. 36:87-94, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods: Results of a cross-national survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    2000-01-01

    Executive summary 1. Previous research has shown consumers to be highly sceptical towards genetic modification in food production. So far, however, little research has tried to explain how consumers form attitudes and make decisions with regard to genetically modified foods. 2. The paper presents...

  8. Evidence for host genetic regulation of altered lipid metabolism in experimental toxoplasmosis supported with gene data mining results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Ivan; Busarčević, Miloš; Trbovich, Alexander; Ivović, Vladimir; Uzelac, Aleksandra; Djurković-Djaković, Olgica

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most successful parasites on Earth, infecting a wide array of mammals including one third of the global human population. The obligate intracellular protozoon is not capable of synthesizing cholesterol (Chl), and thus depends on uptake of host Chl for its own development. To explore the genetic regulation of previously observed lipid metabolism alterations during acute murine T. gondii infection, we here assessed total Chl and its fractions in serum and selected tissues at the pathophysiological and molecular level, and integrated the observed gene expression of selected molecules relevant for Chl metabolism, including its biosynthetic and export KEGG pathways, with the results of published transcriptomes obtained in similar murine models of T. gondii infection. The serum lipid status as well as the transcript levels of relevant genes in the brain and the liver were assessed in experimental models of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis in wild-type mice. The results showed that acute infection was associated with a decrease in Chl content in both the liver and periphery (brain, peripheral lymphocytes), and a decrease in Chl reverse transport. In contrast, in chronic infection, a return to normal levels of Chl metabolism has been noted. These changes corresponded to the brain and liver gene expression results as well as to data obtained via mining. We propose that the observed changes in Chl metabolism are part of the host defense response. Further insight into the lipid metabolism in T. gondii infection may provide novel targets for therapeutic agents.

  9. Genetic Influences on Blood Pressure Response to the Cold Pressor Test: Results from the HAPI Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Weir, Matthew R.; Sorkin, John D.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Sack, Paul A.; Hines, Scott; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Post, Wendy; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Douglas, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) response to the cold pressor test (CPT) has been found to predict the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in prospective studies. However, the determinants of BP response to the CPT, including the role of genetic factors, are largely unknown. Additionally, to our knowledge, no study has examined the genetics of BP recovery from the CPT, including whether shared genetic factors influence both reactivity and recovery. As part of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study, we administered a 2½-minute hand CPT to 835 participants from 18 extended Amish families. We estimated the heritability of BP reactivity and recovery (measured by the incremental area under the curve) and the genetic correlations between baseline, reactivity, and recovery BP phenotypes. After adjustment for relevant covariates, including baseline BP, the heritability estimates for both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) reactivity and recovery differed significantly from zero (P<0.01), with 12–25% of the total variation in BP response attributable to additive genetic effects. The genetic correlations between baseline DBP and response phenotypes were not significantly different from 0, while the genetic correlation between DBP reactivity and recovery (0.74) was significantly different from 0 and one (P<0.005). The genetic correlation between SBP reactivity and recovery was similar (0.81, P<0.05). We conclude that, independent of baseline BP, BP response to the CPT is heritable, and that both shared and unshared genetic factors influence BP reactivity and recovery, thus stressing the importance of identifying genetic variants that influence both traits. PMID:18327083

  10. Analiza rezultata određivanja sadržaja stabilizatora u prirodno starenim barutima / Content of stabilizer determination results analysis of naturally aged gun propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Grbović

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Praćenje sadržaja stabilizatora jedna je od suvremenih i pouzdanih metoda koja se u svetu, a i kod nas, primenjuje za kontrolu kemijske stabilnosti i prognoziranje veka upotrebljivosti baruta. Radi ocene kemijske stabilnosti baruta domaće proizvodnje u radu su analizirani rezultati određivanja sadržaja stabilizatora u prirodno starenim jednobaznim barutima tipa NC i NCD i dvobaznim barutima tipa NGB i NGH. Pri tome su uporedno analizirani rezultati uzoraka iz kolekcija baruta iz Kragujevca (KB-1 i Zelenike (KB-2. Dobijeni rezultati ukazuju na znatno brži pad stabilnosti uzoraka baruta iz kolekcije KB-2, što se može objasniti značajnim uticajem klimatskih uslova. Osim toga, dobijeni rezultati potvrđuju uticaj mnogih faktora na kemijsku stabilnost baruta, kao što su: sastav, kvalitet sirovina, tehnološki postupak, oblik i dimenzije barutnog zrna i sl. / Monitoring of the stabilizer content is one of the modern and reliable methods in the world, and here also, which is used to control chemical stability and to predict the usage time of gun propellants. For the purpose of evaluation of gun propellants' chemical stability manufactured in our country, in this paper -we analyzed results from the content of stabilizer determination in naturally aged single base, NC and NCD type, and double base, NGB and NGH type of gun propellants. At the same time -we analyzed results from both collections of gun propellant samples, one from Kragujevac factory (KB-1 and the other from Zelenika factory (KB-2. Obtained results point that the stability decays faster for KB-2 collection samples, -which can be explained due to climate factors. Beside this influence, obtained results prove the influence of many factors on chemical stability of gun propellants: used components, quality of the ingredients, procedures of manufacture, shape and dimensions of gun propellant grains, etc.

  11. ISSR and RAPD based evaluation of genetic stability of encapsulated micro shoots of Glycyrrhiza glabra following 6 months of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Khwaja, O; Kukreja, A K; Rahman, L

    2012-11-01

    In vitro grown axillary micro shoots of Glycyrrhiza glabra were encapsulated in alginate beads. Following 6 months of normal storage at 25 ± 2°C the re growth of encapsulated G. glabra micro shoots, reached 98% within 30 days of incubation on MS medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/l IAA. Re growth was characterized by the development of both shoot and root from single encapsulated micro shoot. Healthy plants were established to glass house with 95% survival. The genetic fidelity of plants obtained after conversion of alginate beads was ascertained through 10 RAPD and 13 ISSR primers. Of the 10 RAPD primers tested, 6 of them produced 14 clear and reproducible amplicons with an average of 2.3 bands per primer out of which 28.57% were polymorphic generated by only two primers. Eight ISSR primers produced total 37 bands ranging between 300 and 3,500 bp length. Number of scorable bands for each primer varied from 3 to 8 with an average of 4.6 bands per primer. Cluster analysis from ISSR and RAPD showed that all the tested plants including the mother plant distributed in two major groups with similarity coefficient ranging from 0.91 to 0.96 for RAPD and 0.89 to 0.97 for ISSR.

  12. A comparison of the phenotypic and genetic stability of recombinant Trichoderma spp. generated by protoplast- and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Vizcaino, Juan Antonio; Hermosa, Maria Rosa; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2006-08-01

    Four different Trichoderma strains, T. harzianum CECT 2413, T. asperellum T53, T. atroviride T11 and T. longibrachiatum T52, which represent three of the four sections contained in this genus, were transformed by two different techniques: a protocol based on the isolation of protoplasts and a protocol based on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Both methods were set up using hygromycin B or phleomycin resistance as the selection markers. Using these techniques, we obtained phenotypically stable transformants of these four different strains. The highest transformation efficiencies were obtained with the T. longibrachiatum T52 strain: 65-70 transformants/microg DNA when transformed with the plasmid pAN7-1 (hygromycin B resistance) and 280 transformants/107 spores when the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was performed with the plasmid pUR5750 (hygromycin B resistance). Overall, the genetic analysis of the transformants showed that some of the strains integrated and maintained the transforming DNA in their genome throughout the entire transformation and selection process. In other cases, the integrated DNA was lost.

  13. Analysis of functions in plasmid pHZ1358 influencing its genetic and structural stability in Streptomyces lividans 1326.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhui; He, Xinyi; Liang, Jingdan; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin

    2009-02-01

    The complete DNA sequence of plasmid pHZ1358, a widely used vector for targeted gene disruption and replacement experiments in many Streptomyces hosts, has been determined. This has allowed a detailed analysis of the basis of its structural and segregational instability, compared to the high copy number plasmid pIJ101 of Streptomyces lividans 1326 from which it was derived. A 574-bp DNA region containing sti (strong incompatibility locus) was found to be a determinant for segregational instability in its original S. lividans 1326 host, while the structural instability was found to be related to the facile deletion of the entire Escherichia coli-derived part of pHZ1358, mediated by recombination between 36-bp direct repeats. A point mutation removing the BamHI site inside the rep gene encoding a replication protein (rep*) and/or a spontaneous deletion of the 694-bp region located between rep and sti including the uncharacterized ORF85 (orf85(-)) produced little or no effect on stability. A pHZ1358 derivative (pJTU412, sti(-), rep*, orf85(-)) was then constructed which additionally lacked one of the 36-bp direct repeats. pJTU412 was demonstrated to be structurally stable but segregationally unstable and, in contrast to sti(+) pHZ1358, allowed efficient targeted gene replacement in S. lividans 1326.

  14. Use of individual race results in the estimation of genetic parameters of trotting performance for Finnhorse and Standardbred trotters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. THUNEBERG-SELONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The heritability and repeatability for trotting performance traits were estimated from individual race results. Data comprised of records from 1991 to 1995 for 4808 Finnhorses and from 1993 to 1995 for 5869 Standardbred trotters. The statistical model included the additive genetic effect of an animal and two permanent environmental effects, and the fixed effects of sex, age, starting method*starting lane combination, driver and race. The first permanent environmental effect described repeatability over a horse’s career while the second one characterized repeatability within a racing year. Variance components for three trotting performance traits were estimated by the animal model and the method of restricted maximum likelihood (REML. Heritability and repeatability estimates were moderately high for time at finish (h 2 =0.23–0.28 and r=0.50–0.57, moderate for ranking within a race (h 2 =0.12 and r=0.25 and low for earnings (h 2 =0.05–0.09 and r=0.15–0.18. Time at finish seemed to be the most usable measure of trotting performance because of its wide information substance. However, time at finish does not take into account records of disqualified horses or of those which did not finish, but use of earnings, either from individual race results or preferably from annual records, is one possible way to consider records of such horses.;

  15. The genetics of multiple sclerosis: principles, background and updated results of the United Kingdom systematic genome screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataway, J; Feakes, R; Coraddu, F; Gray, J; Deans, J; Fraser, M; Robertson, N; Broadley, S; Jones, H; Clayton, D; Goodfellow, P; Sawcer, S; Compston, A

    1998-10-01

    22q. This result further highlights the genetic complexity of multiple sclerosis. What can now be inferred is that a gene of major effect is excluded from 95% of the genome and one with a moderate role from 65%, whereas genes which make a very small biological contribution cannot be discounted from any region. The available results suggest that multiple sclerosis depends on independent or epistatic effects of several genes each with small individual effects, rather than a very few genes of major biological importance.

  16. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  17. 基于遗传算法的汽车平顺性和操纵稳定性优化%Optimization Study on the Vehicle Handling Stability and Ride Comfort Using Genetic Algorithm Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘筱; 陈潇凯; 林逸; 王冬成

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the automobile ride comfort and handling stability, a nonlinear threefreedom handling stability model was established and the influence of the load transfer and the tire nonlinear stiffness characteristic on the automobile stability was researched during the high speed lane- change condition. An optimization of the suspension parameters based on genetic algorithm was proposed. The vehicle body roll angle was selected for minimum optimization objectives , the suspension frequency and the vehicle understeer performance was selected for constraint condition, and the suspension stiffness parameters were taken as the the design variables. The computation results show that the suspension design scheme through optimization has apparant effects on improving ride comfort and handling stability. Finally, the result of analysis indicates that the ride comfort and handling stability during high speed can be improved effectively through this matching method.%为改善汽车行驶的平顺性和操纵稳定性,建立了某SUV非线性三自由度操纵稳定性模型,研究了高速转弯工况侧倾载荷转移及轮胎的非线性特性对整车操纵稳定性的影响.提出了基于遗传算法的悬架刚度参数的优化匹配方法.以车身侧倾最小为优化目标,以弹簧刚度对悬架偏频及不足转向度影响为约束,以前、后悬架弹簧刚度及前、后稳定杆刚度为设计自变量.计算结果及实车对比表明:优化后的方案比原方案在平顺性和操纵稳定性方面有了较大的改善;采用该匹配方法,可以有效提高车辆的平顺性和高速车辆操纵稳定性.

  18. Short-term psychological impact of the BRCA1/2 test result in women with breast cancer according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Kop, J L; Depauw, A; Caron, O; Sultan, S; Leblond, D; Fajac, A; Buecher, B; Gauthier-Villars, M; Noguès, C; Flahault, C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Dolbeault, S

    2013-03-19

    The effect of BRCA1/2 gene test result on anxiety, depression, cancer-related thought intrusion or avoidance and perceived control over cancer risk was assessed in breast cancer (BC) patients, according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer. Two hundred and forty-three (89% response rate) women with BC completed questionnaires after an initial genetic counselling visit (T1), of which 180 (66%) completed questionnaires again after receiving the BRCA1/2 results (T2). The discrepancy between women's perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition at T1 and the geneticist's computed estimates was assessed. In all, 74% of women received a negative uninformative (NU), 11% a positive BRCA1/2 and 15% an unclassified variant (UV) result. On hierarchical regression analysis, in women with a positive BRCA1/2 result (vs NU or UV), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted lower levels of anxiety at T2 (β=-0.28; Presult (vs NU or positive BRCA1/2), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted higher levels of anxiety (β=0.20; Presult differently affects distress according to women's perceived probability of genetic predisposition before testing.

  19. Partial Results Regarding the Genetic Analysis of Thoroughbred Horse from Cislău Studfarm: Reproductive Isolation and Age Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Maftei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of an ample research concerning the genetic analysis (history of Thoroughbred horses from Cislău studfarm. The genetic analysis studies are a part of Animal Genetic Resources Management because just start of them we elaborate the strategies for inbreeding management. This study has as purpose to present two important aspects of genetic analysis: reproductive isolation level and age structure.This parameters has a capital importance in animal breeding because there has a directly influence in animal population evolution. The reproductive isolation situation was quantified using the relation elaborated by S. Wright in 1921. The age structure situation is based on the age distribution histogram. The analysis showed that the Nonius horse from Izvin stud is a reproductively isolated population and have its own evolutionary path. Age structure is not balanced with negative repercurssions on generation interval.

  20. Rice Husk Ash to Stabilize Heavy Metals Contained in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash: First Results by Applying New Pre-treatment Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Benassi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new technology was recently developed for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash stabilization, based on the employment of all waste and byproduct materials. In particular, the proposed method is based on the use of amorphous silica contained in rice husk ash (RHA, an agricultural byproduct material (COSMOS-RICE project. The obtained final inert can be applied in several applications to produce “green composites”. In this work, for the first time, a process for pre-treatment of rice husk, before its use in the stabilization of heavy metals, based on the employment of Instant Pressure Drop technology (DIC was tested. The aim of this work is to verify the influence of the pre-treatment on the efficiency on heavy metals stabilization in the COSMOS-RICE technology. DIC technique is based on a thermomechanical effect induced by an abrupt transition from high steam pressure to a vacuum, to produce changes in the material. Two different DIC pre-treatments were selected and thermal annealing at different temperatures were performed on rice husk. The resulting RHAs were employed to obtain COSMOS-RICE samples, and the stabilization procedure was tested on the MSWI fly ash. In the frame of this work, some thermal treatments were also realized in O2-limiting conditions, to test the effect of charcoal obtained from RHA on the stabilization procedure. The results of this work show that the application of DIC technology into existing treatment cycles of some waste materials should be investigated in more details to offer the possibility to stabilize and reuse waste.

  1. Genetic stability of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.Bulgaricus mutant stain with low post-acidification%弱后酸化保加利亚乳杆菌突变菌株的遗传稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘飞; 焦月华; 郭文奎; 于微; 谷春涛; 高学军

    2012-01-01

    The genetic stability of a mutant with reduced membrane-bound H+-ATPase activity from L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus originated from the traditional dairy product was studied to develop a yoghurt starter culture with low post-acidification capacity. The mutant was propagated in MRS broth continuously, the morphological trait of mutant was examined by microscope, the glucose and lactic acid content of supernatant of fermented broth was determined by HPLC, and the genome DNA stability was analyzed by RAPD. The result showed that the low post-acidification capacity of mutant strain was still stable while being propagated in MRS broth continuously after eight generation. During this period, the morphological trait of mutant cell didn't change, the glucose content fermented by KLDS 1.9201-4 and the content of lactic acid of fermented broth increased gradually. Furthermore, the RAPD results showed that the genome DNA of KLDS 1.9201-4 was stable all the time. Thus the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus mutant KLDS 1.9201-4 with reduced membrane-bound H+-ATPase activity had adequate genetic stability, which could be applied to develop yoghurt starter culture with lower post-acidification.%对从传统乳制品中筛选得到的德氏乳杆菌保加利亚亚种自发突变株KLDS 1.9201-4的遗传稳定性进行研究.将突变菌株进行连续传代,观察形态学变化,利用HPLC分析葡萄糖和乳酸的代谢情况,RAPD分析基因组DNA的稳定性.结果表明,突变菌株KLDS1.9201-4能够稳定遗传至第8代,在传代过程中菌落和菌体特征没有发生明显变化,KLDS 1.9201-4对初始葡萄糖的代谢率逐渐升高,终产物中乳酸的浓度也逐渐升高.KLDS 1.9201-4的基因组DNA相对稳定,没有发生明显变异.弱后酸化德氏乳杆菌保加利亚亚种的自发突变株KLDS 1.9201-4具有适宜的遗传稳定性,可被用于制作弱后酸化的酸奶发酵剂.

  2. Aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and stability of hang gliders. Experimental results. [Ames 7- by 10-ft wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroo, I. M.

    1981-01-01

    One-fifth-scale models of three basic ultralight glider designs were constructed to simulate the elastic properties of full scale gliders and were tested at Reynolds numbers close to full scale values. Twenty-four minor modifications were made to the basic configurations in order to evaluate the effects of twist, reflex, dihedral, and various stability enhancement devices. Longitudinal and lateral data were obtained at several speeds through an angle of attack range of -30 deg to +45 deg with sideslip angles of up to 20 deg. The importance of vertical center of gravity displacement is discussed. Lateral data indicate that effective dihedral is lost at low angles of attack for nearly all of the configurations tested. Drag data suggest that lift-dependent viscous drag is a large part of the glider's total drag as is expected for thin, cambered sections at these relatively low Reynolds numbers.

  3. SOME STABILITY RESULTS FOR TIMOSHENKO SYSTEMS WITH COOPERATIVE FRICTIONAL AND INFINITE-MEMORY DAMPINGS IN THE DISPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aissa GUESMIA; Salim MESSAOUDI

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a vibrating system of Timoshenko-type in a one-dimensional bounded domain with complementary frictional damping and infinite memory acting on the transversal displacement. We show that the dissipation generated by these two complementary controls guarantees the stability of the system in case of the equal-speed propagation as well as in the opposite case. We establish in each case a general decay estimate of the solutions. In the particular case when the wave propagation speeds are different and the frictional damping is linear, we give a relationship between the smoothness of the initial data and the decay rate of the solutions. By the end of the paper, we discuss some applications to other Timoshenko-type systems.

  4. The Kurtzke EDSS rank stability increases 4 years after the onset of multiple sclerosis: results from the MSBase Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stella; Spelman, Timothy; Trojano, Maria; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'maison, Francois; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Hupperts, Raymond; Boz, Cavit; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Giuliani, Giorgio; Rio, Maria Edite; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; van Pesch, Vincent; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fiol, Marcela; Verheul, Freek; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Herbert, Joseph; Kister, Ilya; Vella, Norbert; Moore, Fraser; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Jokubaitis, Vilija; McDonnell, Gavin; Hawkins, Stanley; Kee, Frank; Gray, Orla; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2012-03-01

    The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) is widely used to rate multiple sclerosis (MS) disability, but lack of disease duration information limits utility in assessing severity. EDSS ranking at specific disease durations was used to devise the MS Severity Score, which is gaining popularity for predicting outcomes. As this requires validation in longitudinal cohorts, we aimed to assess the utility of EDSS ranking as a predictor of 5-year outcome in the MSBase Registry. Rank stability of EDSS over time was examined in the MSBase Registry, a large multicentre MS cohort. Scores were ranked for 5-year intervals, and correlation of rank across intervals was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation. EDSS progression outcomes at 10 years were disaggregated by 5-year EDSS scores. Correlation coefficients for EDSS rank over 5-year intervals increased with MS duration: years 1-6=0.55, years 4-9=0.74, years 7-12=0.80 and years 10-15=0.83. EDSS progression risk at 10 years after onset was highly dependent on EDSS at 5 years; one-point progression risk was greater for EDSS score of >2 than ≤2. Two-point progression was uncommon for EDSS score of EDSS score of 4. EDSS rank stability increases with disease duration, probably due to reduced relapses and less random variation in later disease. After 4 years duration, EDSS rank was highly predictive of EDSS rank 5 years later. Risk of progression by 10 years was highly dependent on EDSS score at 5 years duration. We confirm the utility of EDSS ranking to predict 5-year outcome in individuals 4 years after disease onset.

  5. DAC-3 Pointing Stability Analysis Results for SAGE 3 and Other Users of the International Space Station (ISS) Payload Attachment Sites (PAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Rombado, Gabriel

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide final results of a pointing stability analysis for external payload attachment sites (PAS) on the International Space Station (ISS). As a specific example, the pointing stability requirement of the SAGE III atmospheric science instrument was examined in this paper. The instrument requires 10 arcsec stability over 2 second periods. SAGE 3 will be mounted on the ISS starboard side at the lower, outboard FIAS. In this engineering analysis, an open-loop DAC-3 finite element model of ISS was used by the Microgravity Group at Johnson Space Flight Center to generate transient responses at PAS to a limited number of disturbances. The model included dynamics up to 50 Hz. Disturbance models considered included operation of the solar array rotary joints, thermal radiator rotary joints, and control moment gyros. Responses were filtered to model the anticipated vibration attenuation effects of active control systems on the solar and thermal radiator rotary joints. A pointing stability analysis was conducted by double integrating acceleration transient over a 2 second period. Results of the analysis are tabulated for ISS X, Y, and Z Axis rotations. These results indicate that the largest excursions in rotation during pointing occurred due to rapid slewing of the thermal radiator. Even without attenuation at the rotary joints, the resulting pointing error was limited to less than 1.6 arcsec. With vibration control at the joints, to a maximum 0.5 arcsec over a 2 second period. Based on this current level of model definition, it was concluded that between 0 - 50 Hz, the pointing stability requirement for SAGE 3 will not be exceeded by the disturbances evaluated in this study.

  6. Treating low back pain resulted from lumbar degenerative instability using Chinese Tuina combined with core stability exercises: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shujie; Qian, Xiuling; Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Yuanmei

    2016-04-01

    The therapeutic effect of Tuina combined with core stability exercises on low back pain resulted from lumbar degenerative instability is unclear. This article aims to evaluate whether core stability exercises can improve the effect of Tuina in this regard. This trial was designed as a randomized controlled trial and carried out in Qingzhou hospital of Traditional Chinese medicine between June 2011 and June 2013. Eighty-eight patients with low-grade lumbar degenerative instability were included and divided randomly into experimental and control groups, 44 in each. The experimental group were treated using Tuina combined with core stability exercises, but the control group using Tuina alone. The evaluation of Visual analogue scale (VAS), Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores (JOA) and recurrence rate were performed. Two weeks after treatment, JOA scores increased (p0.05) between the two groups. At the end of six weeks, VAS scores (pcore stability exercises has better effect than Tuina alone in treating low back pain resulted from low-grade lumbar degenerative instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. RESULTS OF MEDICO-GENETIC STUDY OF PATIENTS WITH DUCHENNE/BECKER PROGRESSIVE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHIES IN UZBEKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umida Tulkinovna Omonova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of study was to analyze clinical and genetic polymorphism of Duchenne/Becker progressive muscular dystrophies among patients with neuromuscular diseases in Uzbekistan. 106 male patients with progressive pseudohypertrophic forms of muscular dystrophy were retrospectively and prospectively analyzed in the period from 2004 till 2014: 93 patients with Duchenne PMD aged from 3 years to 18 years and 13 patients with Becker PMD aged from 10 years to 25 years, who had been examined in the medico-genetic consulting department of the Republican Center “Mother and Child Screening” of Tashkent city. Comprehensive clinical, neurophysiological, biochemical and genetic study of patients as the integral part in the differential diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker progressive muscular dystrophies allows creating the national database on D/B PMD to prevent the birth of children in families burdened by this disease.

  8. Ureaplasma parvum undergoes selection in utero resulting in genetically diverse isolates colonizing the chorioamnion of fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Polglase, Graeme R; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H; Knox, Christine L

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasmas are the microorganisms most frequently isolated from the amniotic fluid of pregnant women and can cause chronic intrauterine infections. These tiny bacteria are thought to undergo rapid evolution and exhibit a hypermutatable phenotype; however, little is known about how ureaplasmas respond to selective pressures in utero. Using an ovine model of chronic intraamniotic infection, we investigated if exposure of ureaplasmas to subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin could induce phenotypic or genetic indicators of macrolide resistance. At 55 days gestation, 12 pregnant ewes received an intraamniotic injection of a nonclonal, clinical Ureaplasma parvum strain followed by (i) erythromycin treatment (intramuscularly, 30 mg/kg/day, n = 6) or (ii) saline (intramuscularly, n = 6) at 100 days gestation. Fetuses were then delivered surgically at 125 days gestation. Despite injecting the same inoculum into all the ewes, significant differences between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas were detected following chronic intraamniotic infection. Numerous polymorphisms were observed in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of ureaplasmas isolated from the chorioamnion (but not the amniotic fluid), resulting in a mosaiclike sequence. Chorioamnion isolates also harbored the macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and msr(D) and were associated with variable roxithromycin minimum inhibitory concentrations. Remarkably, this variability occurred independently of exposure of ureaplasmas to erythromycin, suggesting that low-level erythromycin exposure does not induce ureaplasmal macrolide resistance in utero. Rather, the significant differences observed between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas suggest that different anatomical sites may select for ureaplasma subtypes within nonclonal, clinical strains. This may have implications for the treatment of intrauterine ureaplasma infections.

  9. The genetic background affects composition, oxidative stability and quality traits of Iberian dry-cured hams: purebred Iberian versus reciprocal Iberian × Duroc crossbred pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Ventanas, Sonia; Ventanas, Jesús; Estévez, Mario

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the physico-chemical characteristics, oxidative stability and sensory properties of Iberian cry-cured hams as affected by the genetic background of the pigs: purebred Iberian (PBI) pigs vs reciprocal cross-bred Iberian × Duroc pigs (IB × D pigs: Iberian dams × Duroc sires; D × IB pigs: Duroc dams × Iberian sires). Samples from PBI pigs contained significantly higher amounts of IMF, monounsaturated fatty acids, heme pigments and iron than those from crossbred pigs. The extent of lipid and protein oxidation was significantly larger in dry-cured hams of crossbred pigs than in those from PBI pigs. Dry-cured hams from PBI pigs were defined by positive sensory properties (i.e. redness, brightness and juiciness) while hams from crossbred pigs were ascribed to negative ones (i.e. hardness, bitterness and sourness). Hams from PBI pigs displayed a superior quality than those from crossbred pigs. The position of the dam or the sire in reciprocal Iberian × Duroc crosses had no effect on the quality of Iberian hams.

  10. Clinical correlates and genetic linkage of social and communication difficulties in families with obsessive-compulsive disorder: Results from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jack; Shugart, Yin Yao; Wang, Ying; Grados, Marco A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Pinto, Anthony; Rauch, Scott L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Knowles, James A; Fyer, Abby J; Piacentini, John; Pauls, David L; Cullen, Bernadette; Rasmussen, Steven A; Stewart, S Evelyn; Geller, Dan A; Maher, Brion S; Goes, Fernando S; Murphy, Dennis L; McCracken, James T; Riddle, Mark A; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-06-01

    Some individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have autistic-like traits, including deficits in social and communication behaviors (pragmatics). The objective of this study was to determine if pragmatic impairment aggregates in OCD families and discriminates a clinically and genetically distinct subtype of OCD. We conducted clinical examinations on, and collected DNA samples from, 706 individuals with OCD in 221 multiply affected OCD families. Using the Pragmatic Rating Scale (PRS), we compared the prevalence of pragmatic impairment in OCD-affected relatives of probands with and without pragmatic impairment. We also compared clinical features of OCD-affected individuals in families having at least one, versus no, individual with pragmatic impairment, and assessed for linkage to OCD in the two groups of families. The odds of pragmatic impairment were substantially greater in OCD-affected relatives of probands with pragmatic impairment. Individuals in high-PRS families had greater odds of separation anxiety disorder and social phobia, and a greater number of schizotypal personality traits. In high-PRS families, there was suggestive linkage to OCD on chromosome 12 at marker D12S1064 and on chromosome X at marker DXS7132 whereas, in low-PRS families, there was suggestive linkage to chromosome 3 at marker D3S2398. Pragmatic impairment aggregates in OCD families. Separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and schizotypal personality traits are part of a clinical spectrum associated with pragmatic impairment in these families. Specific regions of chromosomes 12 and X are linked to OCD in high-PRS families. Thus, pragmatic impairment may distinguish a clinically and genetically homogeneous subtype of OCD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Genetic stability of the VHSV consensus sequence of G-gene in diagnostic samples from an acute outbreak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Ahrens, Peter; Lorenzen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    The negative stranded RNA virus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) is an important disease-causing agent in aquacultured fish and internationally harmonized diagnostic procedures are continuously under development. The present study concerns the suitability of genotyping by sequencing...... of RT-PCR products for epidemiological analysis. Focus was put on a specific case story involving an acute outbreak of VHS in a Danish rainbow trout farm which otherwise had been free of VHSV during the previous 5 years. Tissue materials from individual fish were collected during routine inspection......, and that initial passage of the virus on BF-2 cells did not result in changes within the G-gene at a detectable level. The results suggest that genotyping of VHSV isolates based on RT-PCR products amplified from infected primary tissues material is a reliable tool for epidemiological studies....

  12. The association between lower educational attainment and depression owing to shared genetic effects? Results in ∼25 000 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); S.U. Lee (Seung); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); M. Abdellaoui (Mohammed); E.M. Byrne (Enda); T. Esko (Tõnu); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G. Hemani; J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Kloiber (Stefan); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); S. Lucae (Susanne); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); A. Metspalu (Andres); L. Milani (Lili); M.M. Noethen; J.B. Potash (James B); M. Rietschel (Marcella); C.A. Rietveld (Niels); S. Ripke (Stephan); J. Shi (Jianxin); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); Z. Zhu; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.R. Wray (Naomi); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.M. Lewis (Cathryn); S.P. Hamilton (Steven P); M.M. Weissman; G. Breen (Gerome); S. Cichon (Sven); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); F. Holsboer; P.A. Madden; P. McGuffin (Peter); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); M.L. Pergadia (Michele); D. Lin; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); S. Steinberg; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); R.H. Perlis (Roy H); M. Preisig; J.W. Smoller; J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); R. Uher; Z. Kutalik; K.E. Tansey; A. Teumer (Alexander); A. Viktorin (Alexander); M. Barnes (Michael); T. Bettecken (Thomas); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); R. Breuer; V.M. Castro; S.E. Churchill; W.H. Coryell (William H); N. Craddock; I.W. Craig (Ian); D. Czamara (Darina); F. Degenhardt; A.E. Farmer (Anne E); M. Fava; J. Frank; V.S. Gainer; P. Gallagher (Patience); S.D. Gordon (Scott D.); S. Goryachev; M. Gross; M. Guipponi; A.K. Henders (Anjali); S. Herms (Stefan); I.B. Hickie (Ian); S. Hoefels (Susanne); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); D.V. Iosifescu; M. Ising (Marcus); I. Jones; L. Jones (Louisa); J.-Y. Tzeng (Jung-Ying); J.A. Knowles (James A); I.S. Kohane; M.A. Kohli (Martin); A. Korszun (Ania); M. Landén (Mikael); W.B. Lawson (William B); G. Lewis; D.J. Macintyre (Donald J); W. Maier (Wolfgang); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); P.J. McGrath; A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); W.H.I. Mclean (Irwin); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); L. Middleton (Lefkos); G.M. Montgomery; S.N. Murphy; M. Nauck (Matthias); W.A. Nolen (Willem); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); M.C. O'donovan (Michael); H. Oskarsson (Hogni); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); W.A. Scheftner (William A); A. Schulz (Ansgar); T.G. Schulze; S.I. Shyn (Stanley I); E. Sigurdsson (Engilbert); S. Slager (Susan); J.H. Smit (Johannes); M. Kallela (Mikko); M. Steffens (Michael); T.E. Thorgeirsson (Thorgeir); P. Muglia (Pierandrea); J. Treutlein (Jens); M. Uhr; E.J.C.G. van den Oord (Edwin); G. van Grootheest (Gerard); H. Völzke (Henry); J.B. Weilburg; G. Willemsen; F.G. Zitman (Frans); B. Neale; M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sullivan (Patrick); A. Agrawal (Arpana); E. Albrecht (Eva); B. Z Alizadeh (Behrooz); J. Allik; N. Amin (Najaf); J. Attia (John); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J. Barnard (John); F. Bastardot (Francois); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); P.J. Benke (Paul); D.A. Bennett (David); K. Berger (Klaus); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); L.J. Bierut (Laura); J.A. Boatman (Jeffrey); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); U. Bültmann (Ute); H. Campbell (Harry); D. Cesarini (David); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); L. Cherkas (Lynn); M.K. Chung (Mina); D. Conley (Dalton); F. Cucca (Francesco); G.D. Smith; G. Davies (Gail); M. de Andrade (Mariza); P.L. de Jager (Philip); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J. Derringer; M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); N. Eklund (Niina); M.F. Elderson (Martin); K. Hagen (Knut); D.S. Evans (Daniel); D.M. Evans (David M.); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); K. Fischer (Krista); L. Franke (Lude); M. Garcia (Melissa); C. Gieger (Christian); H.K. Gjessing (Hkon K.); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Hägg (Sara); P. Hall (Per); J.R. Harris (Jennifer); J.M. Harris (Juliette); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); N. Hastie (Nick); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); W.H.A. Hofman (Adriaan); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); C. Holzapfel (Christina); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); T. Illig (Thomas); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B. Jacobsson (Bo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); J. Kaprio (Jaakkko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); J. Karjalainen (Juha); R.M. Kirkpatrick (Robert); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M. Kowgier (Matthew); K. Kristiansson (Kati); R.F. Krueger; Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); J. Lahti (Jari); D. Laibson (David); A. Latvala (Antti); L.J. Launer (Lenore); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); T. Lethimäki (Terho); J. Li (Jingmei); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P. Lichtner (Peter); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P. Lin (Peng); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Y. Liu (Yongmei); K. Lohman (Kurt); M. Loitfelder (Marisa); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); T. Mäkinen (Tuukka); P.M. Vidal (Pedro Marques); N.W. Martin (Nicolas); G. Masala (Giovanna); M. McGue (Matt); G. Mcmahon (George); O. Meirelles; M.N. Meyer (Michelle N.); A. Mielck (Andreas); L. Milani (Lili); M. Miller (Mike); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); S. Mukherjee (Sutapa); R. Myhre (Ronny); M.-L. Nuotio (Marja-Liisa); D.R. Nyholt (Dale R.); C. J Oldmeadow (Christopher); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); M. Perola (Markus); K. Petrovic (Katja); P.A. Peyser (Patricia A.); O. Polasek (Ozren); D. Posthuma (Danielle); M. Preisig (Martin); L. Quaye (Lydia); K. Räikkönen (Katri); O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); A. Realo; E. Reinmaa (Eva); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); T.S. Rizzi (Thais); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Rustichini (Aldo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); A.-P. Sarin; D. Schlessinger (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R.J. Scott (Rodney); K. Shakhbazov (Konstantin); A.V. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); H. Snieder (Harold); B. St Pourcain (Beate); J.M. Starr (John); J.H. Sul (Jae Hoon); I. Surakka (Ida); R. Svento (Rauli); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Terracciano; A. Teumer (Alexander); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); N. Timpson (Nicholas); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M.J.H.M. van der Loos (Matthijs); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); D.R. van Wagoner (David); E. Vartiainen (Erkki); J. Viikari (Jorma); P.M. Visscher (Peter); V. Vitart (Veronique); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); H. Völzke (Henry); J.M. Vonk (Judith); G. Waeber (Gérard); D.R. Weir (David R.); J. Wellmann (Jürgen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J.F. Wilson (James F); A. Wright (Alan); J. Yang (Joanna); L. Yu (Lei); W. Zhao (Wei)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAn association between lower educational attainment (EA) and an increased risk for depression has been confirmed in various western countries. This study examines whether pleiotropic genetic effects contribute to this association. Therefore, data were analyzed from a total of 9662 major

  13. The association between lower educational attainment and depression owing to shared genetic effects? Results in ∼25 000 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); S.U. Lee (Seung); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); M. Abdellaoui (Mohammed); E.M. Byrne (Enda); T. Esko (Tõnu); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G. Hemani; J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Kloiber (Stefan); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); S. Lucae (Susanne); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); A. Metspalu (Andres); L. Milani (Lili); M.M. Noethen; J.B. Potash (James B); M. Rietschel (Marcella); C.A. Rietveld (Niels); S. Ripke (Stephan); J. Shi (Jianxin); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); Z. Zhu; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.R. Wray (Naomi); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.M. Lewis (Cathryn); S.P. Hamilton (Steven P); M.M. Weissman; G. Breen (Gerome); S. Cichon (Sven); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); F. Holsboer; P.A. Madden; P. McGuffin (Peter); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); M.L. Pergadia (Michele); D. Lin; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); S. Steinberg; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); R.H. Perlis (Roy H); M. Preisig; J.W. Smoller; J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); R. Uher; Z. Kutalik; K.E. Tansey; A. Teumer (Alexander); A. Viktorin (Alexander); M. Barnes (Michael); T. Bettecken (Thomas); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); R. Breuer; V.M. Castro; S.E. Churchill; W.H. Coryell (William H); N. Craddock; I.W. Craig (Ian); D. Czamara (Darina); F. Degenhardt; A.E. Farmer (Anne E); M. Fava; J. Frank; V.S. Gainer; P. Gallagher (Patience); S.D. Gordon (Scott D.); S. Goryachev; M. Gross; M. Guipponi; A.K. Henders (Anjali); S. Herms (Stefan); I.B. Hickie (Ian); S. Hoefels (Susanne); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); D.V. Iosifescu; M. Ising (Marcus); I. Jones; L. Jones (Louisa); J.-Y. Tzeng (Jung-Ying); J.A. Knowles (James A); I.S. Kohane; M.A. Kohli (Martin); A. Korszun (Ania); M. Landén (Mikael); W.B. Lawson (William B); G. Lewis; D.J. Macintyre (Donald J); W. Maier (Wolfgang); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); P.J. McGrath; A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); W.H.I. Mclean (Irwin); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); L. Middleton (Lefkos); G.M. Montgomery; S.N. Murphy; M. Nauck (Matthias); W.A. Nolen (Willem); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); M.C. O'donovan (Michael); H. Oskarsson (Hogni); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); W.A. Scheftner (William A); A. Schulz (Ansgar); T.G. Schulze; S.I. Shyn (Stanley I); E. Sigurdsson (Engilbert); S. Slager (Susan); J.H. Smit (Johannes); M. Kallela (Mikko); M. Steffens (Michael); T.E. Thorgeirsson (Thorgeir); P. Muglia (Pierandrea); J. Treutlein (Jens); M. Uhr; E.J.C.G. van den Oord (Edwin); G. van Grootheest (Gerard); H. Völzke (Henry); J.B. Weilburg; G. Willemsen; F.G. Zitman (Frans); B. Neale; M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sullivan (Patrick); A. Agrawal (Arpana); E. Albrecht (Eva); B. Z Alizadeh (Behrooz); J. Allik; N. Amin (Najaf); J. Attia (John); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J. Barnard (John); F. Bastardot (Francois); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); P.J. Benke (Paul); D.A. Bennett (David); K. Berger (Klaus); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); L.J. Bierut (Laura); J.A. Boatman (Jeffrey); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); U. Bültmann (Ute); H. Campbell (Harry); D. Cesarini (David); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); L. Cherkas (Lynn); M.K. Chung (Mina); D. Conley (Dalton); F. Cucca (Francesco); G.D. Smith; G. Davies (Gail); M. de Andrade (Mariza); P.L. de Jager (Philip); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J. Derringer; M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); N. Eklund (Niina); M.F. Elderson (Martin); K. Hagen (Knut); D.S. Evans (Daniel); D.M. Evans (David M.); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); K. Fischer (Krista); L. Franke (Lude); M. Garcia (Melissa); C. Gieger (Christian); H.K. Gjessing (Hkon K.); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Hägg (Sara); P. Hall (Per); J.R. Harris (Jennifer); J.M. Harris (Juliette); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); N. Hastie (Nick); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); W.H.A. Hofman (Adriaan); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); C. Holzapfel (Christina); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); T. Illig (Thomas); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B. Jacobsson (Bo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); J. Kaprio (Jaakkko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); J. Karjalainen (Juha); R.M. Kirkpatrick (Robert); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAn association between lower educational attainment (EA) and an increased risk for depression has been confirmed in various western countries. This study examines whether pleiotropic genetic effects contribute to this association. Therefore, data were analyzed from a total of 9662 major

  14. Experts' opinions on ethical issues of genetic research into Alzheimer's disease: results of a Delphi study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorm, A. van der; Laan, A.L. van der; Borm, G.F.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Most publications on the ethical aspects of genetic research into Alzheimer's Disease (AD) concentrate on the differences between the opinions of professionals and non-professionals. Differences in rating of morally relevant issues between groups of professionals have not yet been described. A modif

  15. Common genetic variation in the Estrogen Receptor Beta (ESR2) gene and osteoarthritis: Results of a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); A. Gonzalez (Antonio); D.J. Hart (Deborah); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); N.E. Lane; J. Loughlin (John); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Slagboom (Eline); T.D. Spector (Tim); L. Stolk (Lisette); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between common genetic variation of the ESR2 gene and osteoarthritis.Methods: In the discovery study, the Rotterdam Study-I, 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and tested for association with hip

  16. Atopic dermatitis may be a genetically determined dysmaturation of ectodermal tissue, resulting in disturbed T-lymphocyte maturation. A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Ellingsen, A R; Olesen, A B

    1997-01-01

    of mature T-lymphocytes in the blood. We suggest that atopic dermatitis is a genetically determined change of ectodermal tissue. The thymic epithelium is derived from the ectoderm, and because of that we hypothesize that the maturation of the T-cell immune system of persons who develop atopic dermatitis...

  17. Stability Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Daniel; Wang, Zuoqin

    2008-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of stability functions in geometric invariant theory and apply stability function techniques to problems in toric geometry. In particular we show how one can use these techniques to recover results of Burns-Guillemin-Uribe and Shiffman-Tate-Zelditch on asymptotic properties of sections of holomorphic line bundles over toric varieties.

  18. Design aspects of the Alpha Repository. I. Preliminary results of facility layout, room stability, and equipment selection efforts. Summary progress report RSI-0024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnirk, P.F.; Grams, W.H.; Zeller, T.J.; Ellis, D.B.; Pariseau, W.G.; Fossum, A.F.; Ratigan, J.L.; Hansen, F.D.

    1975-04-14

    Results of preliminary analysis of the stability of mines in salt formations underlying Eddy and Lea Counties in New Mexico are presented. Methods and equipment for drilling canister emplacement holes in these formations were evaluated along with methods for excavating storage areas and transport of the excavated salt. Progress during the period is reported in chapters on geological and rock properties at the repository site, preliminary mine layout, basic requirements for repository usage, excavation geometries, drill selection, excavation systems, and safety requirements. (JRD)

  19. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  20. Genotype adaptability and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in breeding programs is a small genotype reaction to environmental factor variation for better usage of yield genetic potential. Particularly if one takes in consideration that yield could van greatly because of more and more variable meteorological conditions. Studies conducted to observe genotype and environmental relations relay on numerous mathematical models, but genotype behavior in various ecological conditions is not, still, precisely defined Major sources of variation influencing genotype behavior in different environments are genotype/environment interaction, genetic background and environmental conditions. These factors could play an important role in establishing growth regions for maximal realization of genotype genetic potential, as well as in selection of genotypes having better response to complex requirements of particular growth region. Stability, the genotype ability to perform high, uniform yield no meter of different environmental conditions, and adaptability, genotype ability to give uniform yield in a different environmental conditions, are two common terms used to define genotype reaction in a consequence of environmental changes. Most of the models dealing with stability and adaptability are based on variation sources appearing under the influence of treatment, multivariate effects and residue. No meter which statistical model is used for GE interaction estimation, there is an opinion that no solid proof for the existence of stable genotypes obtained in breeding programs, which make some space for further investigations. There are still questions to answer dealing with definitions, sources of variation, usage value of existent models and interpretation of the results. .

  1. Preliminary Structural Design Using Topology Optimization with a Comparison of Results from Gradient and Genetic Algorithm Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Adam O.; Tinker, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, genetic algorithm based and gradient-based topology optimization is presented in application to a real hardware design problem. Preliminary design of a planetary lander mockup structure is accomplished using these methods that prove to provide major weight savings by addressing the structural efficiency during the design cycle. This paper presents two alternative formulations of the topology optimization problem. The first is the widely-used gradient-based implementation using commercially available algorithms. The second is formulated using genetic algorithms and internally developed capabilities. These two approaches are applied to a practical design problem for hardware that has been built, tested and proven to be functional. Both formulations converged on similar solutions and therefore were proven to be equally valid implementations of the process. This paper discusses both of these formulations at a high level.

  2. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunc Oktenoglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group. The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications.

  3. Genetic variation in plant volatile emission does not result in differential attraction of natural enemies in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Elizabeth L; Hunter, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    Volatile organic chemical (VOC) emission by plants may serve as an adaptive plant defense by attracting the natural enemies of herbivores. For plant VOC emission to evolve as an adaptive defense, plants must show genetic variability for the trait. To date, such variability has been investigated primarily in agricultural systems, yet relatively little is known about genetic variation in VOCs emitted by natural populations of native plants. Here, we investigate intraspecific variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced plant VOC emission using the native common milkweed plant (Asclepias syriaca) and its monarch caterpillar herbivore (Danaus plexippus) in complementary field and common garden greenhouse experiments. In addition, we used a common garden field experiment to gauge natural enemy attraction to milkweed VOCs induced by monarch damage. We found evidence of genetic variation in the total constitutive and induced concentrations of VOCs and the composition of VOC blends emitted by milkweed plants. However, all milkweed genotypes responded similarly to induction by monarchs in terms of their relative change in VOC concentration and blend. Natural enemies attacked decoy caterpillars more frequently on damaged than on undamaged milkweed, and natural enemy visitation was associated with higher total VOC concentrations and with VOC blend. Thus, we present evidence that induced VOCs emitted by milkweed may function as a defense against herbivores. However, plant genotypes were equally attractive to natural enemies. Although milkweed genotypes diverge phenotypically in their VOC concentrations and blends, they converge into similar phenotypes with regard to magnitude of induction and enemy attraction.

  4. Effects of alkaline earth metal ion complexation on amino acid zwitterion stability: Results from infrared action spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M. F.; Oomens, J.; Saykally, R. J.; Williams, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of isolated alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theory. These results indicate that arginine, glutamine, proline, serine, and valine all adopt zwitterionic structures when complexed with diva

  5. In vitro microrhizomes induction and genetic stability of a medicinal plant Acorus calamus L. towards germplasm conservation through synthetic seed production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajit KANUNGO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Germplasm conservation through in vitro multiplication is one of the important mass cloning method to protect endangered medicinal plants. Synthetic seed technology offers potential advantages by increased efficiency for in vitro propagation in terms of space, labour, time and overall experimental costs. In vitro shoot formation (3.1±0.34 shoots per in vitro raised explants with shoot length of 2.9±0.11 cm of Acorus calamus (Bach was achieved after 4 weeks of culture in Murashige & Skoog (MS media supplemented with 4 mg l-1 BAP and 1 mg l-1 IAA with 30g sucrose l-1. Highest number of shoot multiplication per explant was recorded in 8 mg l-1 BAP and 2mg l-1 IAA and successful profuse rooting was observed in 1 mg l-1 IBA (3.6±0.2 roots per explant with an average root length of 4.7±0.6 cm. Synthetic seeds of in vitro raised microrhizomes were produced in a artificial matrix containing 3% (w/v sodium alginate prepared in MS basal medium for 20 min and dropped in to 3% (w/v calcium chloride solution for 30 min for polymerization. The encapsulated microrhizomes were stored at cold (10ºC in dark condition with different storage intervals of 3 and 6 months to evaluate the effect of storage duration and germination of zygotic embryos in A. calamus. From the RAPD analysis of both in vivo and in vitro regenerated plants it was observed that there were no significant variation of DNA profiles, thus ensuring the genetic stability of the plants and regeneration of true to type plants.

  6. Differential genetic interactions between Sgs1, DNA-damage checkpoint components and DNA repair factors in the maintenance of chromosome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Lillian; Harris, Lorena; Viebranz, Emilie; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2011-10-31

    Genome instability is associated with human cancers and chromosome breakage syndromes, including Bloom's syndrome, caused by inactivation of BLM helicase. Numerous mutations that lead to genome instability are known, yet how they interact genetically is poorly understood. We show that spontaneous translocations that arise by nonallelic homologous recombination in DNA-damage-checkpoint-defective yeast lacking the BLM-related Sgs1 helicase (sgs1Δ mec3Δ) are inhibited if cells lack Mec1/ATR kinase. Tel1/ATM, in contrast, acts as a suppressor independently of Mec3 and Sgs1. Translocations are also inhibited in cells lacking Dun1 kinase, but not in cells defective in a parallel checkpoint branch defined by Chk1 kinase. While we had previously shown that RAD51 deletion did not inhibit translocation formation, RAD59 deletion led to inhibition comparable to the rad52Δ mutation. A candidate screen of other DNA metabolic factors identified Exo1 as a strong suppressor of chromosomal rearrangements in the sgs1Δ mutant, becoming even more important for chromosomal stability upon MEC3 deletion. We determined that the C-terminal third of Exo1, harboring mismatch repair protein binding sites and phosphorylation sites, is dispensable for Exo1's roles in chromosomal rearrangement suppression, mutation avoidance and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings suggest that translocations between related genes can form by Rad59-dependent, Rad51-independent homologous recombination, which is independently suppressed by Sgs1, Tel1, Mec3 and Exo1 but promoted by Dun1 and the telomerase-inhibitor Mec1. We propose a model for the functional interaction between mitotic recombination and the DNA-damage checkpoint in the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements in sgs1Δ cells.

  7. Temporal Stability of ADHD in the High-IQ Population: Results from the MGH Longitudinal Family Studies of ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antshel, Kevin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Maglione, Katherine; Doyle, Alysa; Fried, Ronna; Seidman, Larry; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish the relationship between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity (ADHD) disorder and high-IQ children and whether ADHD has a high predictive value among youths with high-IQ. Results further supported the hypothesis for the predictive validity of ADHD in high-IQ youths.

  8. Stability of mutagenic tautomers of uracil and its halogen derivatives: the results of quantum-mechanical investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Hovorun D. M.; Brovarets’ O. O.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To investigate using the quantum-mechanical methods uracil (Ura) intramolecular tautomerisation and the effect of the thymine (Thy) methyl (Me) group substitution by the halogen on that process. Methods. Non-empirical quantum mechanic, analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM) theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. For the first time it has been established that the substitution of thymine Me-group for the halogen (Br, F, Cl) has practi...

  9. Does a medical history of hypertension influence disclosing genetic testing results of the risk for salt-sensitive hypertension, in primary care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okayama M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masanobu Okayama,1,2 Taro Takeshima,2 Masanori Harada,3 Ryusuke Ae,4 Eiji Kajii2 1Division of Community Medicine and Medical Education, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo, 2Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, 3Department of Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Hofu, Yamaguchi, 4Division of Public Health, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan Objective: Disclosing genetic testing results may contribute to the prevention and management of many common diseases. However, whether the presence of a disease influences these effects is unclear. This study aimed to clarify the difference in the effects of disclosing genetic testing results of the risk for developing salt-sensitive hypertension on the behavioral modifications with respect to salt intake in hypertensive and nonhypertensive patients.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted for outpatients aged >20 years (N=2,237 at six primary care clinics and hospitals in Japan. The main factors assessed were medical histories of hypertension, salt preferences, reduced salt intakes, and behavior modifications for reducing salt intake. Behavioral modifications of participants were assessed using their behavior stages before and after disclosure of the hypothetical genetic testing results. Results: Of the 2,237 participants, 1,644 (73.5% responded to the survey. Of these respondents, 558 (33.9% patients were hypertensive and 1,086 (66.1% were nonhypertensive. After being notified of the result “If with genetic risk”, the nonhypertensive participants were more likely to make positive behavioral modifications compared to the hypertensive patients among all participants and in those aged <65 years (adjusted relative ratio [ad-RR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.12−2.76 and ad-RR, 1

  10. Altered expression of MGMT in high-grade gliomas results from the combined effect of epigenetic and genetic aberrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ramalho-Carvalho

    Full Text Available MGMT downregulation in high-grade gliomas (HGG has been mostly attributed to aberrant promoter methylation and is associated with increased sensitivity to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy. However, HGG harboring 10q deletions also benefit from treatment with alkylating agents. Because the MGMT gene is mapped at 10q26, we hypothesized that both epigenetic and genetic alterations might affect its expression and predict response to chemotherapy. To test this hypothesis, promoter methylation and mRNA levels of MGMT were determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP or methylation-specific multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, in a retrospective series of 61 HGG. MGMT/chromosome 10 copy number variations were determined by FISH or MS-MLPA analysis. Molecular findings were correlated with clinical parameters to assess their predictive value. Overall, MGMT methylation ratios assessed by qMSP and MS-MLPA were inversely correlated with mRNA expression levels (best coefficient value obtained with MS-MLPA. By FISH analysis in 68.3% of the cases there was loss of 10q26.1 and in 15% of the cases polysomy was demonstrated; the latter displayed the highest levels of transcript. When genetic and epigenetic data were combined, cases with MGMT promoter methylation and MGMT loss depicted the lowest transcript levels, although an impact in response to alkylating agent chemotherapy was not apparent. Cooperation between epigenetic (promoter methylation and genetic (monosomy, locus deletion changes affecting MGMT in HGG is required for effective MGMT silencing. Hence, evaluation of copy number alterations might add relevant prognostic and predictive information concerning response to alkylating agent-based chemotherapy.

  11. Modification of the ATP inhibitory site of the Ascaris suum phosphofructokinase results in the stabilization of an inactive T state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.S.J.; Cook, P.F.; Harris, B.G. (Univ. of North Texas, Fort Worth (United States))

    1991-10-15

    Treatment of the Ascaris suum phosphofructokinase (PFK) with 2{prime},3{prime}-dialdehyde ATP (oATP) results in an enzyme form that is inactive. The conformational integrity of the active site, however, is preserved, suggesting that oATP modification locks the PFK into an inactive T state that cannot be activated. A rapid, irreversible first-order inactivation of the PFK is observed in the presence of oATP. The rate of inactivation is saturable and gives a K{sub oATP} of 1.07 {plus minus} 0.27 mM. Complete protection against inactivation is afforded by high concentrations of ATP. This desensitized enzyme incorporates only 0.2-0.3 mol of ({sup 3}H)oATP/subunit, suggesting that in te native enzyme inactivation perhaps results from the modification of the ATP inhibitory site rather than the catalytic site. Modification of an active-site thiol by 4,4{prime}-dithiodipyridine is prevented yb ATP before and after oATP treatment. Finally, gel filtration HPLC studies show that the oATP-modified enzyme retains its tetrameric state and neither the tryptophan fluorescence nor the circular dichroic spectra of the modified enzyme are affected by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, suggesting that the enzyme is locked into a tetrameric inactive T state.

  12. Climate change and permafrost stability in the eastern Canada Cordillera:The results of 33 years of measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart; A.Harris

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 33 years,a network of climate stations has been set up at high altitude mountain permafrost sites from Plateau Mountain near Claresholm,Alberta,north to Sheldon Lake on the North Canol Road in the Yukon.Taken together with the data from the US National Weather Service and the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service,the results indicate a cooling of mean annual air temperature south of Calgary,no significant change in Calgary,a slight warming at Jasper,and a major warming at Summit Lake,west of Fort Nelson.In contrast,the south eastern and central Yukon show only a minor warming trend that lies well within the limits of a sixty-year record measured by the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service.Along the Mackenzie valley and on the North Slope of Alaska,the mean annual air temperature is rising.Permafrost is aggrading on Plateau Mountain,degrading at Summit Lake,and appears to be stable in southern Yukon and southern Alaska.This is in contrast to the warming occurring on the Arctic coastal plain and along the Mackenzie valley.It therefore appears that changes in climate vary considera-bly from place to place,and even where warming may occur,it may not continue indefinitely.There has been a northward shift of the arctic front due to a weakening of air pressure in the Yukon and Alaska relative to the continental tropical(cT) and maritime polar(mT) air masses to the south.Any actual changes that may be occurring appear to undergo amplification along the Mackenzie valley and Arctic coastal plain and reduction by buffering in the interior Yukon and Alaskan mountains,a result of mi-cro-environmental factors.Continued,careful monitoring of the climate is required and needs to be expanded in the National Parks in the mountains in order to provide data on the changes that may be taking place.Such measurements can provide a sound basis for interpreting ecological and other climate-related data.The existing climate models are not working satisfactorily because

  13. Climate change and permafrost stability in the eastern Canada Cordillera: The results of 33 years of measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart A. Harris

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 33 years, a network of climate stations has been set up at high altitude mountain permafrost sites from Plateau Mountain near Claresholm, Alberta, north to Sheldon Lake on the North Canol Road in the Yukon. Taken together with the data from the US National Weather Service and the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service, the results indicate a cooling of mean annual air temperature south of Calgary, no significant change in Calgary, a slight warming at Jasper, and a major warming at Summit Lake, west of Fort Nelson. In contrast, the south eastern and central Yukon show only a minor warming trend that lies well within the limits of a sixty-year record measured by the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service. Along the Mackenzie valley and on the North Slope of Alaska, the mean annual air temperature is rising. Permafrost is aggrading on Plateau Mountain,degrading at Summit Lake, and appears to be stable in southern Yukon and southern Alaska. This is in contrast to the warming occurring on the Arctic coastal plain and along the Mackenzie valley. It therefore appears that changes in climate vary considerably from place to place, and even where warming may occur, it may not continue indefinitely. There has been a northward shift of the arctic front due to a weakening of air pressure in the Yukon and Alaska relative to the continental tropical (cT) and maritime polar (mT) air masses to the south. Any actual changes that may be occurring appear to undergo amplification along the Mackenzie valley and Arctic coastal plain and reduction by buffering in the interior Yukon and Alaskan mountains, a result of micro-environmental factors. Continued, careful monitoring of the climate is required and needs to be expanded in the National Parks in the mountains in order to provide data on the changes that may be taking place. Such measurements can provide a sound basis for interpreting ecological and other climate-related data. The existing climate models are not

  14. How the Magnitude of Prey Genetic Variation Alters Predator-Prey Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    Evolution can alter the stability and dynamics of ecological communities; for example, prey evolution can drive cyclic dynamics in predator-prey systems that are not possible in the absence of evolution. However, it is unclear how the magnitude of additive genetic variation in the evolving species mediates those effects. In this study, I explore how the magnitude of prey additive genetic variation determines what effects prey evolution has on the dynamics and stability of predator-prey systems. I use linear stability analysis to decompose the stability of a general eco-evolutionary predator-prey model into components representing the stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems as well as the interactions between those subsystems. My results show that with low genetic variation, the cyclic dynamics and stability of the system are determined by the ecological subsystem. With increased genetic variation, disruptive selection always destabilizes stable communities, stabilizing selection can stabilize or destabilize communities, and prey evolution can alter predator-prey phase lags. Stability changes occur approximately when the magnitude of genetic variation balances the (in)stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems. I discuss the connections between my stability results and prior results from the theory of adaptive dynamics.

  15. Experts' opinions on ethical issues of genetic research into Alzheimer's disease: results of a Delphi study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorm, A; van der Laan, A L; Borm, G; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Olde Rikkert, M; van Leeuwen, E; Dekkers, W

    2010-04-01

    Most publications on the ethical aspects of genetic research into Alzheimer's Disease (AD) concentrate on the differences between the opinions of professionals and non-professionals. Differences in rating of morally relevant issues between groups of professionals have not yet been described. A modified Delphi study in two rounds was held to identify differences between groups of experts (i.e. clinicians, representatives of patient organisations, ethicists and persons with a commercial background). The strongest correlation was found between the opinions of ethicists and representatives of patient organisations (0.67) and between clinicians and ethicists (0.62). Moderate correlation (0.55) was found between the opinions of clinicians and representatives of patient organisations. Persons with a commercial background showed a weak correlation with clinicians (0.41), ethicists (0.35) and representatives of patient organisations (0.30). These differences in rating of morally relevant issues between various professional groups are relevant for clinical practice and dementia care, particularly the different rating of prenatal diagnosis found between clinicians and representatives of patient organisations. Interdisciplinary consultations between various professional groups -including at least researchers, clinicians and ethicists -are recommended to guarantee that all considerations will be incorporated into the debate on ethical issues of genetic research into AD.

  16. [Genetic history of Aleuts of the Komandor islands from results of analyzing variability of class II HLA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volod'ko, N V; Derbeneva, O A; Uinuk-ool, T S; Sukernik, R I

    2003-12-01

    Variability of the HLA class II genes (alleles of the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci) was investigated in a sample of Aleuts of the Commanders (n = 31), whose ancestors inhabited the Commander Islands for many thousand years. Among 19 haplotypes revealed in Aleuts of the Commanders, at most eight were inherited from the native inhabitants of the Commander Islands. Five of these haplotypes (DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1401-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0503, DRB1*0802-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402, DRB1*1101-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, and DRB1*1201-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301) were typical of Beringian Mongoloids, i.e., Coastal Chukchi and Koryaks, as well as Siberian and Alaskan Eskimos. Genetic contribution of the immigrants to the genetic pool of proper Aleuts constituted about 52%. Phylogenetic analysis based on Transberingian distribution of the DRB1 allele frequencies favored the hypothesis on the common origin of Paleo-Aleuts, Paleo-Eskimos, and the Indians from the northwestern North America, whose direct ancestors survived in Beringian/southwestern Alaskan coastal refugia during the late Ice Age.

  17. The ethics of contacting family members of a subject in a genetic research study to return results for an autosomal dominant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Holly A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-01-01

    This case explores the ethical landscape around recontacting a subject's relatives to return genetic research results when the informed consent form signed by the original cohort of subjects is silent on whether investigators may share new information with the research subject's family. As a result of rapid advances in genetic technology, methods to identify genetic markers can mature during the life course of a study. In this case, the investigators identified the genetic mutation responsible for the disorder after a number of their original subjects had died. The researchers now have the ability to inform relatives of the subject about their risk of developing the same disease. Mark Rothstein, JD, from the University of Louisville School of Medicine, provides an overview of the medical/scientific, legal, and ethical issues underlying this case. Lauren Milner, PhD, and colleagues at Stanford University explore how the relationship between researcher and subject affect this debate. Seema Shah, JD, and colleagues at the National Institutes of Health and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) discuss whether and how requirements of the duty to warn are applicable in this case.

  18. Genetic Test Results and Disclosure to Family Members: Qualitative Interviews of Healthcare Professionals' Perceptions of Ethical and Professional Issues in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Audiffret Van Haecke, Diane; de Montgolfier, Sandrine

    2016-06-01

    The benefit of disclosing test results to next of kin is to improve prognosis and-in some cases-even prevent death though earlier monitoring or preventive therapies. Research on this subject has explored the question of intra-familial communication from the standpoint of patients and relatives but rarely, from the standpoint of healthcare professionals. The purpose of this study was to interview relevant healthcare professionals in France, where legislation framing the issue was recently passed. A qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews was set up to get a clearer picture of the challenges arising from this issue, its consequences in terms of medical care-service practices, and the positions that frontline professionals have taken in response to this new legal framework. The findings from eight interviews with 7 clinical geneticists and 1 genetic counselor highlight very different patterns of practices among care services and among the genetic diseases involved. It is equally crucial to investigate other issues such as the nature of genetic testing and its consequences in terms of disclosing results to kin, the question of the role of genetic counseling in the disclosure process, the question of prescription by non-geneticist clinicians, and practical questions linked to information content, consent and medical follow-up for patients and their relatives.

  19. Stability of mutagenic tautomers of uracil and its halogen derivatives: the results of quantum-mechanical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D.M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate using the quantum-mechanical methods uracil (Ura intramolecular tautomerisation and the effect of the thymine (Thy methyl (Me group substitution by the halogen on that process. Methods. Non-empirical quantum mechanic, analysis of the electron density by means of Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM theory and physicochemical kinetics were used. Results. For the first time it has been established that the substitution of thymine Me-group for the halogen (Br, F, Cl has practically no effect on the main physico-chemical characteristics of intramolecular tautomerisation. At the same time, the energy of Ura tautomerisation increases for 3,08 kcal/mol in comparison with corresponding value for Thy under standard conditions. Conclusions. So, Thy, unlike Ura, is obviously able, as a canonical DNA nucleotide base, to provide together with Ade, Gua and Cyt an acceptable mutability degree of the genome from the point of view of its adaptation reserve. Mutagenic action of the Ura halogen derivatives is not directly associated with their tautomerisation.

  20. Recent Experimental and Numerical Results on Turbulence, Flows and Global Stability Under Biasing in a Magnetized Linear Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Desjardins, T. R.; Fisher, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing experiments and numerical modeling on the effects of flow shear on electrostatic turbulence in the presence of electrode biasing are being conducted in helicon plasmas in the linear HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device. It is found that changes in flow shear, affected by electrode biasing through Er x Bz rotation, can strongly affect fluctuation dynamics, including fully suppressing the fluctuations or inducing chaos. The fundamental underlying instability, at least in the case of low magnetic field, is identified as a hybrid resistive drift-Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At higher magnetic fields, multiple modes (resistive drift, rotation-driven interchange and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz) are present, and interact nonlinearly. At high positive electrode bias (V >10Te), a large amplitude, global instability, identified as the potential relaxation instability is observed. Numerical modeling is also being conducted, using a 3 fluid global Braginskii solver for no or moderate bias cases, and a 1D PIC code for high bias cases. Recent experimental and numerical results will be presented. Supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award 1500423.

  1. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  2. PADI4 and HLA-DRB1 are genetic risks for radiographic progression in RA patients, independent of ACPA status: results from the IORRA cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Suzuki

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic, chronic inflammatory disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, leading to joint destruction and functional impairment. Recently, a large-scaled GWAS meta-analysis using more than 37,000 Japanese samples were conducted and 13 RA susceptibility loci were identified. However, it is not clear whether these loci have significant impact on joint destruction or not. This is the first study focused on the 13 loci to investigate independent genetic risk factors for radiographic progression in the first five years from onset of RA. METHODS: Sharp/van der Heijde score of hands at 5-year disease duration, which represents joint damage, were measured retrospectively and used as an outcome variable in 865 Japanese RA patients. Genetic factors regarded as putative risk factors were RA-susceptible polymorphisms identified by the Japanese GWAS meta-analysis, including HLA-DRB1 (shared epitope, SE, rs2240340 (PADI4, rs2230926 (TNFAIP3, rs3093024 (CCR6, rs11900673 (B3GNT2, rs2867461 (ANXA3, rs657075 (CSF2, rs12529514 (CD83, rs2233434 (NFKBIE, rs10821944 (ARID5B, rs3781913 (PDE2A-ARAP1, rs2841277 (PLD4 and rs2847297 (PTPN2. These putative genetic risk factors were assessed by a stepwise multiple regression analysis adjusted for possible non-genetic risk factors: autoantibody positivity (anti-citrullinated peptide antibody [ACPA] and rheumatoid factor, history of smoking, gender and age at disease onset. RESULTS: The number of SE alleles (P = 0.002 and risk alleles of peptidyl arginine deiminase type IV gene (PADI4, P = 0.04 had significant impact on progressive joint destruction, as well as following non-genetic factors: ACPA positive (P = 0.0006, female sex (P = 0.006 and younger age of onset (P = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we found that PADI4 risk allele and HLA-DRB1 shared epitope are independent genetic risks for radiographic progression in Japanese

  3. Korelacija rezultata ispitivanja hemijske stabilnosti prirodno i ubrzano starenih baruta / Correlation of chemical stability estimation results of naturally and accelerated aging gun powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Grbović

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Praćenje sadržaja stabilizatora jedna je od savremenih i pouzdanih metoda koja se u svetu, a i kod nas, primenjuje za kontrolu kemijske stabilnosti i prognoziranje veka upotrebljivosti baruta. Radi ocene pouzdanosti metode ispitivani su uzorci prirodno starenog jednobaznog baruta tipa NC i dvobaznog baruta tipa NGB različitih godina proizvodnje. Uzorci su uzimani iz ubojnih sredstava. Određene su konstante brzine reakcije utroška stabilizatora i vremena upotrebljivosti baruta. Ove vrednosti upoređene su sa analognim rezultatima dobijenim za iste barute pre dvadeset godina pri čemu je utvrđeno zadovoljavajuće slaganje kako za prirodno tako i ubrzano starenje. Pored toga, utvrđeno je da NC baruti iz dehermetizovanog pakovanja municije pokazuju znatno manju stabilnost od baruta iz originalnog pakovanja. / Monitoring the content of the stabilizer is one of the most reliable and modern methods used all over the world as well as in our country for chemical stability control and shelf life prediction of gun powders. For reliability rating of the used method, there has been examined samples of naturally aged single-based gun powder NC type and double-based gun powder NGB type all manufactured in different years. The samples were taken from explosive ordnance. Reaction rates constants of stabilizer consumption and shelf life of gun powders have been determined. These values were compared to analog results taken for the same gun powders tested 20 years ago. Satisfactory agreement either for naturally or accelerating aging gun powders has been confirmed. Beside that, it was determined that NC gun powder from non hermetic munitions cases proved to be considerably less stable than the originally packed NC gun powder.

  4. Development of a Genetic Algorithm Based Optimal Power Flow Considering Stability Constraints%基于遗传算法并考虑稳定约束的最优潮流开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Angle stability (both transient and oscillatory) is an important constraint in power system operation. This paper describes a genetic algorithm (GA) based approach for solving the problem of angle stability constrained optimal power flow. The control parameter modeled in the chromosome of the GA is generation power of the units. The application presented here is in the UK balancing market using Balancing Mechanism Units (BMUs). The selection of BMUs to be optimized by the GA depends on their bid/offer price or their impact of generation change on system stability. Sensitivity factors, obtained by doing perturbations, are used to represent a BMU's impact on system stability. To ensure that the generation is always matching the demand, a novel mapping method is employed to maintain the power balance. Stability constraints are dealt with as penalty cost, and their contribution to the fitness of the objective function is evaluated independently, so that the search for the optimal solution concentrates on feasible solutions. Tests on a reduced UK system show that the proposed GA is able to cope with the highly non-linear optimization problem.Numerical simulation results of the test system are presented.%功角稳定(暂态或振荡)是电力系统运行的一个重要约束.本文描述了一种基于遗传算法(GA)并考虑功角稳定性约束的最优潮流求解方法.在该GA算法中,染色体的控制参量为发电机组的出力.本文应用实例选择英国电力市场中的平衡机制发电机组(BMU).平衡机制机组的选择和优化由GA算法依据BMU的出价(竞价)高低或其出力变化对系统稳定性影响的程度来确定.本文使用灵敏度因子来代表BMU机组对系统稳定性的影响程度,而这些灵敏度因子则是通过开展系统扰动仿真得出的.为确保发电出力始终与用电负荷相匹配,本文采用一种新的映射方法来保持系统有功平衡.文中使用因停电而导致的罚金成本或费用来

  5. Development of a Genetic Algorithm Based Optimal Power Flow Considering Stability Constraints%基于遗传算法并考虑稳定约束的最优潮流开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Zhang; R.W.Dunn; F.Li

    2007-01-01

    Angle stability(both transient and oscillatory)is an important constraint in power system operation.This paper describes a genetic algorithm (GA) based approach for solving the problem of angle stability constrained optimal power flow,The control parameter modeled in the chromosome of the GA is generation power of the units.The application presented here is in the UK balancing market using Balancing Mechanism Units(BMUs).The selection of BMUs to be optimized by the GA depends on their bid/offer price or their impact of generation change on system stability.Sensitivity factors,obtained by doing perturbations.are used to represent a BMU's impact on system stability.To ensure that the generation is always matching the demand,a novel mapping method is employed to maintain the power balance.Stability constraints are dealt with as penalty cost.and their contribution to the fitness of the objective function is evaluated independently, so that the search for the optimal solution concentrates on feasible solutions.Tests on a reduced UK system show that the proposed GA is able to cope with the highly non-linear optimization Droblem.Numerical simulation results of the test system are presented.%功角稳定(暂态或振荡)是电力系统运行的一个重要约束.本文描述了一种基于遗传算法(GA)并考虑功角稳定性约束的最优潮流求解方法.在该GA算法中,染色体的控制参量为发电机组的出力.本文应用实例选择英国电力市场中的平衡机制发电机组(BMU).平衡机制机组的选择和优化由GA算法依据BMU的出价(竞价)高低或其出力变化对系统稳定性影响的程度来确定.本文使用灵敏度因子来代表BMU机组对系统稳定性的影响程度,而这些灵敏度因子则是通过开展系统扰动仿真得出的.为确保发电出力始终与用电负荷相匹配,本文采用一种新的映射方法来保持系统有功平衡.文中使用因停电而导致的罚金成本或费用来处理系统稳

  6. Distance learning training in genetics and genomics testing for Italian health professionals: results of a pre and post-test evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Benedetta Michelazzo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProgressive advances in technologies for DNA sequencing and decreasing costs are allowing an easier diffusion of genetic and genomic tests. Physicians’ knowledge and confidence on the topic is often low and not suitable for manage this challenge. Tailored educational programs are required to reach a more and more appropriate use of genetic technologies.MethodsA distance learning course has been created by experts from different Italian medical associations with the support of the Italian Ministry of Health. The course was directed to professional figures involved in prescription and interpretation of genetic tests. A pretest-post-test study design was used to assess knowledge improvement. We analyzed the proportion of correct answers for each question pre and post-test, as well as the mean score difference stratified by gender, age, professional status and medical specialty.ResultsWe reported an improvement in the proportion of correct answers for 12 over 15 questions of the test. The overall mean score to the questions significantly increased in the post-test, from 9.44 to 12.49 (p-value < 0.0001. In the stratified analysis we reported an improvement in the knowledge of all the groups except for geneticists; the pre-course mean score of this group was already very high and did not improve significantly.ConclusionDistance learning is effective in improving the level of genetic knowledge. In the future, it will be useful to analyze which specialists have more advantage from genetic education, in order to plan more tailored education for medical professionals.

  7. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Development and Stability of Executive Functions in Children of Preschool Age: A Longitudinal Study of Japanese Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Keiko K.; Todo, Naoya; Ando, Juko

    2017-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are an important predictor of later adaptive development. A number of environmental influences, such as parenting, have been suggested as important promoters of EF development. However, behavioural genetic research has demonstrated that many environmental influences could be affected by genetic influences. Therefore, it is…

  8. Parent, sibling and peer influences on smoking initiation, regular smoking and nicotine dependence. Results from a genetically informative design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Xian, Hong; Pan, Hui; Pergadia, Michele L; Madden, Pamela A F; Grant, Julia D; Sartor, Carolyn E; Haber, Jon Randolph; Jacob, Theodore; Bucholz, Kathleen K

    2012-03-01

    We sought to determine whether parenting, sibling and peer influences are associated with offspring ever smoking, regular smoking and nicotine dependence (ND) after controlling for familial factors. We used a twin-family design and data from structured diagnostic surveys of 1919 biological offspring (ages 12-32 years), 1107 twin fathers, and 1023 mothers. Offspring were classified into one of four familial risk groups based on twin fathers' and their co-twins' history of DSM-III-R nicotine dependence. Multivariate multinomial logistic regression was used to model familial risk, paternal and maternal parenting behavior and substance use, sibling substance use, and friend and school peer smoking, alcohol and drug use. Ever smoking was associated with increasing offspring age, white race, high maternal pressure to succeed in school, sibling drug use, and friend smoking, alcohol and drug use. Offspring regular smoking was associated with these same factors with additional contribution from maternal ND. Offspring ND was associated with increasing offspring age, male gender, biological parents divorce, high genetic risk from father and mother ND, maternal problem drinking, maternal rule inconsistency and sibling drug use, and friend smoking, alcohol and drug use. Friend smoking had the largest magnitude of association with offspring smoking. This effect remains after accounting for familial liability and numerous parent and sibling level effects. Smoking interventions may have greatest impact by targeting smoking prevention among peer groups in adolescent and young adult populations.

  9. Risk Model for Colorectal Cancer in Spanish Population Using Environmental and Genetic Factors: Results from the MCC-Spain study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Alonso, M. Henar; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Bustamante, Mariona; Martin, Vicente; Llorca, Javier; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Tardón, Adonina; Jiménez-Moleón, Jose J.; Peiró, Rosana; Alguacil, Juan; Navarro, Carmen; Guinó, Elisabet; Binefa, Gemma; Navarro, Pablo Fernández; Espinosa, Anna; Dávila-Batista, Verónica; Molina, Antonio José; Palazuelos, Camilo; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina; Moreno, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening of the average risk population is only indicated according to age. We aim to elaborate a model to stratify the risk of CRC by incorporating environmental data and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The MCC-Spain case-control study included 1336 CRC cases and 2744 controls. Subjects were interviewed on lifestyle factors, family and medical history. Twenty-one CRC susceptibility SNPs were genotyped. The environmental risk model, which included alcohol consumption, obesity, physical activity, red meat and vegetable consumption, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, contributed to CRC with an average per factor OR of 1.36 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.45). Family history of CRC contributed an OR of 2.25 (95% CI 1.87 to 2.72), and each additional SNP contributed an OR of 1.07 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.10). The risk of subjects with more than 25 risk alleles (5th quintile) was 82% higher (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.98) than subjects with less than 19 alleles (1st quintile). This risk model, with an AUROC curve of 0.63 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.66), could be useful to stratify individuals. Environmental factors had more weight than the genetic score, which should be considered to encourage patients to achieve a healthier lifestyle. PMID:28233817

  10. Association of ADH4 genetic variants with alcohol dependence risk and related phenotypes: results from a larger multicenter association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Ulrich W; Ridinger, Monika; Rujescu, Dan; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Fehr, Christoph; Wurst, Friedrich M; Koller, Gabriele; Bondy, Brigitta; Wodarz, Norbert; Debniak, Tadeusz; Grzywacz, Anna; Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Genetic variants of the alcohol-metabolizing enzyme ADH4, located on chromosome 4q22-4q23, have been related to alcohol dependence (AD) risk in previous research. The aim of this association study in a large multicenter sample of alcohol-dependent individuals and controls is to confirm ADH4 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and haplotype association with AD and relevant related phenotypes. One thousand, six hundred and twenty-two (1622) inpatient subjects and 1469 control subjects with DSM-IV. AD from four addiction treatment centres were included. Characteristics of AD and related phenotypes including alcohol withdrawal, Cloninger's type I and II and first ages of drinking, regular drinking and AD onset were obtained using standardized structured interviews. After subjects were genotyped for 2 ADH4 polymorphisms, single SNP case-control and haplotype analyses were conducted. Both variants--rs1800759 and rs1042364--and the A-A and C-G haplotypes were significantly related to AD across samples. Furthermore, associations with AD-related phenotypes and subtypes revealed a potential protective influence of this haplotype. This study confirms the significant relationship of ADH4 variants with AD and related phenotypes. While the rs1800759 and rs1042364 A-A haplotype had a potential protective influence on the risk for several AD-related phenotypes, this effect is rather small compared to functional variants of other alcohol or acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzymes like ALDH2*2 or ADH1B*2.

  11. Impact of choice of stabilized hysteresis loop on the end result of investigation of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA steel on low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High strength low-alloy steel under low cycle fatigue at a certain level of strain controlled achieve stabilized condition. During the fatigue loading stabilized hysteresis loop is determined, which typical cycle of stabilization is calculated as half number of cycles to failure. Stabilized hysteresis loop is a representative of all hysteresis and it’s used to determine all of the parameters for the assessment of low cycle fatigue. This paper shows comparison of complete strain-life curves of low cycle fatigue for two chosen stabilized hysteresis loop cycles of base metal HSLA steel marked as Nionikral 70.

  12. improbable molecular results and the need to reevaluate a priori genetic risks: A report of 2 neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giardine, R.M.; Rose, N.C.; Fischbeck, K.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Case 1: A 27-year-old woman whose brother and deceased father were diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy presented for preconceptional counseling. Three other first and second degree relatives were judged clinically affected on the basis of myotonia by positive electromyelograms (EMGs). The proband appeared to be clinically affected with mild percussion myotonia and a positive EMG. Initial studies by linkage analysis required postulation that the at-risk chromosome 19 inherited by the patient and her brother had undergone recombination in the brother between 2 very closely linked RFLP markers. Conclusion: Molecular testing did not support a unifying diagnosis for myotonia in this family. In addition to one classic example of myotonic dystrophy, it is possible a milder form of myotonia is also segregating in this pedigree. Case 2: The maternal aunt of a young man with Becker`s muscular dystrophy (BMD) presented for reproductive counseling. Serum CK values were elevated in her mother, who shared an X chromosome haplotype with the affected grandson and was judged an obligate carrier. The aunt was judged a likely carrier because of elevated serum CK values. Three maternal uncles, including ones with the same X chromosome haplotype as the affected nephew, were clinically normal. Finally, dosage analysis for dystrophin exons deleted in the grandson showed the grandmother and aunt to be non-carriers, but the mother of the affected boy to be a somatic carrier. The grandmother and aunt are not BMD carriers. Since the elevated CK levels do not segregate with the affected X chromosome, they may reflect autosomal inheritance or nongenetic influences; in either case their clinical significance is uncertain. These cases reinforce the importance of periodic reevaluation of initial genetic assignments, particularly when rare events must be invoked to explain molecular studies.

  13. Influence of a dopamine pathway additive genetic efficacy score on smoking cessation: results from two randomized clinical trials of bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sean P; Strong, David R; Leventhal, Adam M; Lancaster, Molly A; McGeary, John E; Munafò, Marcus R; Bergen, Andrew W; Swan, Gary E; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F; Conti, David V; Brown, Richard A; Lerman, Caryn; Niaura, Raymond

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the associations of treatment and an additive genetic efficacy score (AGES) based on dopamine functional polymorphisms with time to first smoking lapse and point prevalence abstinence at end of treatment among participants enrolled into two randomized clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Double-blind pharmacogenetic efficacy trials randomizing participants to active or placebo bupropion. Study 1 also randomized participants to cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation treatment (CBT) or this treatment with CBT for depression. Study 2 provided standardized behavioural support. Two hospital-affiliated clinics (study 1), and two university-affiliated clinics (study 2). A total of 792 self-identified white treatment-seeking smokers aged ≥18 years smoking ≥10 cigarettes per day over the last year. Age, gender, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, dopamine pathway genotypes (rs1800497 [ANKK1 E713K], rs4680 [COMT V158M], DRD4 exon 3 variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism [DRD4 VNTR], SLC6A3,3' VNTR) analyzed both separately and as part of an AGES, time to first lapse and point prevalence abstinence at end of treatment. Significant associations of the AGES (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-1.14, P = 0.009) and of the DRD4 VNTR (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.17-1.41, P = 0.0073) were observed with time to first lapse. A significant AGES by pharmacotherapy interaction was observed (β standard error = -0.18 [0.07], P = 0.016), such that AGES predicted risk for time to first lapse only for individuals randomized to placebo. A score based on functional polymorphisms relating to dopamine pathways appears to predict lapse to smoking following a quit attempt, and the association is mitigated in smokers using bupropion. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Profound Differences in Virus Population Genetics Correspond to Protection from CD4 Decline Resulting from Feline Lentivirus Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash Padhi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CD4 decline is a hallmark of disease onset in individuals infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV or Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1. Cats that are infected with a poorly replicating, apathogenic FIV (PLV prior to exposure to a virulent FIV strain (FIVC maintain CD4 numbers by mechanisms that are not correlated with a measurable adaptive immune response or reduction in circulating viral load. We employed population genetic approaches based on the 3' portion of the viral genome to estimate the population structure of FIVC from single and dual infected cats. In dual infected cats, FIVC effective population size was decreased during the initial viral expansion phase, and after three weeks of infection, the population declined sharply. The FIVC population recovered to pre-bottleneck levels approximately seven weeks post-FIVC infection. However, the population emerging from the bottleneck in dual infected cats was distinct based on estimates of temporal population structure and substitution profiles. The transition to transversion rate ratio (k increased from early to late phases in dual infected cats due primarily to a decrease in transversions whereas in single infected cats, k declined over time. Although one clone with extensive G to A substitutions, indicative of host cytidine deaminase editing, was recovered from a dual infected cat during the bottleneck, the post bottleneck population had an overall reduction in G to A substitutions. These data are consistent with a model of PLV-induced host restriction, putatively involving host DNA editing, that alters the dynamics of FIVC throughout the course of infection leading to disease attenuation.

  15. Genetic Variants Are Not Associated with Outcome in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Results of the Genetic Sub-study of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Arthur M.; She, Lilin; McNamara, Dennis M.; Mann, Douglas L.; Bristow, Michael R.; Maisel, Alan S.; Wagner, Daniel R.; Andersson, Bert; Chiariello, Luigi; Hayward, Christopher S.; Hendry, Paul; Parker, John D.; Racine, Normand; Selzman, Craig H.; Senni, Michele; Stepinska, Janina; Zembala, Marian; Rouleau, Jean; Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives and Background We evaluated the ability of 23 genetic variants to provide prognostic information in patients enrolled in the Genotype Sub-studies of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials. Methods Patients in STICH Hypothesis 1 were randomized to medical therapy with or without CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting). Those in STICH Hypothesis 2 were randomized to CABG or CABG with left ventricular reconstruction. Results In patients assigned to STICH Hypothesis 2 (n=714), no genetic variant met the pre-specified Bonferroni-adjusted threshold for statistical significance (p<0.002); however, several met nominal prognostic significance: variants in the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (β2-AR Gln27Glu) and in the A1-adenosine receptor gene (A1-717 T/G) were associated with an increased risk of a subject dying or being hospitalized for a cardiac problem (p=0.027 and 0.031, respectively). These relationships remained nominally significant even after multivariable adjustment for prognostic clinical variables. However, none of the 23 genetic variants influenced all-cause mortality or the combination of death or cardiovascular hospitalization in the STICH Hypothesis 1 population (n=532) by either univariate or multivariable analysis. Conclusion We were unable to identify the predictive genotypes in optimally treated patients in these two ischemic heart failure populations. PMID:25592552

  16. Behavioural changes, sharing behaviour and psychological responses after receiving direct-to-consumer genetic test results: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelly F J; Wesselius, Anke; Schreurs, Maartje A C; Schols, Annemie M W J; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2017-06-29

    It has been hypothesised that direct-to-consumer genetic tests (DTC-GTs) could stimulate health behaviour change. However, genetic testing may also lead to anxiety and distress or unnecessarily burden the health care system. The aim is to review and meta-analyse the effects of DTC-GT on (1) behaviour change, (2) psychological response and (3) medical consumption. A systematic literature search was performed in three databases, using "direct-to-consumer genetic testing" as a key search term. Random effects meta-analyses were performed when at least two comparable outcomes were available. After selection, 19 articles were included involving 11 unique studies. Seven studies involved actual consumers who paid the retail price, whereas four included participants who received free genetic testing as part of a research trial (non-actual consumers). In meta-analysis, 23% had a positive lifestyle change. More specifically, improved dietary and exercise practices were both reported by 12%, whereas 19% quit smoking. Seven percent of participants had subsequent preventive checks. Thirty-three percent shared their results with any health care professional and 50% with family and/or friends. Sub-analyses show that behaviour change was more prevalent among non-actual consumers, whereas sharing was more prevalent among actual consumers. Results on psychological responses showed that anxiety, distress and worry were low or absent and that the effect faded with time. DTC-GT has potential to be effective as a health intervention, but the right audience needs to be addressed with tailored follow-up. Research is needed to identify consumers who do and do not change behaviour or experience adverse psychological responses.

  17. Scientific and technical assistance on the provisional results of the study on genetic resistance to Classical scrapie in goats in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This EFSA Scientific Report reviews and discusses the provisional results of a study (EURL/Cypriot study on genetic resistance to Classical scrapie in goats in Cyprus. It is concluded that the provisional results obtained in the study further support the lower susceptibility to Classical scrapie in goats carrying the D146 and S146 alleles compared to wild type (N146N goats. The results from intracerebral challenge are not compatible with a level of resistance as high as the one observed in sheep carrying the ARR allele or in goats carrying the K222 allele. Final results from the oral challenge will be crucial in determining the level of resistance associated with the D146 and S146 alleles. Furthermore, it is concluded that the provisional results obtained in the study are compatible with the possibility to use the D146 and S146 alleles to build a genetic strategy to control and eradicate Classical scrapie in goats in Cyprus. However, the success of such a strategy will be determined by the level of resistance associated with the D146 and S146 alleles against infection with all the different TSE agents proved to be circulating in Cyprus, which at this stage of the EURL/Cypriot study remains to be definitively assessed. In addition, as compared to the results of the model developed in the study, it is concluded that the efficiency of the implementation in the field of a breeding strategy selecting for the D146 and S146 alleles may be lower due to potential practical constraints related to the management of genetic diversity, to the selection for production and health traits and to the need of moving animals for breeding purposes in Cyprus. Recommendations on aspects that may be considered when completing the study are formulated.

  18. Crop Genetics: The Seeds of Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, H. Garrett

    1983-01-01

    Current research in plant genetics is described. Benefits of this research (which includes genetic engineering applications) will include reduction/elimination of crop diseases, assurance of genetic stability, and the creation of new crop varieties. (JN)

  19. The National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC): Results from Phase I and Scientific Opportunities in Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Barbara L.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Basson, Craig T.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Devereux, Richard B.; Dietz, Harry C.; Song, Howard; Ringer, Danny; Mitchell, Megan; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Ravekes, William; Menashe, Victor; Eagle, Kim A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetically triggered thoracic aortic conditions (GenTAC) represent an important problem for patients and their families. Accordingly, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) established the first phase of its national GenTAC Registry in 2006. Enrollment and Diagnoses Between 2007 and 2010, six enrolling centers established the GenTAC I Registry consisting of 2,046 patients [(Marfan syndrome 576 (28.2%); bicuspid aortic valve disease 504 (24.6%), aneurysm or dissection age <50 years 369 (18%), and others.] Biologic samples for DNA analyses (WBC’s or saliva) are available in 97% and stored plasma is available in 60% of enrollees. Results Initial scientific inquiry using the GenTAC Registry has included validation studies of genetic causes for aortic syndromes, potential usefulness of TGFB blood levels in Marfan subjects, and current surgical approaches to ascending aortic conditions. Future Opportunity GenTAC II will allow biannual follow-up of GenTAC I enrollees for up to nine years, enrollment of an additional 1,500 subjects, further integration of imaging findings with clinical and genetic data through utilization of an imaging core lab, important validation of phenotype-genotype correlations through a phenotyping core lab, and integration of a scientific advisory committee to help define the full range and depth of the Registry’s scientific capabilities. The registry resources are available to the external scientific community through an application process accessible at https://gentac.rti.org. PMID:21982653

  20. Genetic stability of strains preserved on LENTICULE discs and by freeze-drying: a comparison using fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Meeta; Russell, Julie Elizabeth; Gharbia, Saheer

    2006-04-01

    Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) analysis, a high-resolution genome fingerprinting method, was used to ascertain the DNA integrity of bacterial strains during preservation by lenticulation and by traditional freeze-drying into glass ampoules. This was achieved by comparing FAFLP genotypes of a range of paired bacterial isolates recovered from LENTICULE discs (preserved between 1995 and 2004) and from freeze-dried (FD) cultures in glass ampoules (preserved between 1966 and 2000). A choice of two endonuclease combinations EcoRI/MseI or HindIII/HhaI was used for FAFLP analysis of the five different bacterial genera comprising of 10 strains. Each of these 10 strains exhibited unique FAFLP profiles. However, there were no detectable differences between the FAFLP profiles for each of the individual strains, irrespective of their preservation format or their year of preservation. Thus, the FAFLP data suggests that LENTICULE production does not result in any detectable genetic changes during drying onto LENTICULE discs and storage for at least 5 years. The provision of such FD reference cultures on LENTICULE discs rather than FD glass ampoules will provide a cost-effective format that is easier to use.

  1. Genetic Variation in the Vitamin D Pathway in Relation to Risk of Prostate Cancer – Results from Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondul, Alison M.; Shui, Irene M.; Yu, Kai; Travis, Ruth C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Campa, Daniele; Schumacher, Frederick R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Berndt, Sonja; Crawford, E. D.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Key, Timothy J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Purdue, Mark; Stampfer, Meir J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that vitamin D status may be associated with prostate cancer risk, although the direction and strength of this association differs between experimental and observational studies. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) status. We examined prostate cancer risk in relation to SNPs in four genes shown to predict circulating levels of 25(OH)D. Methods SNP markers localized to each of four genes (GC, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, and DHCR7) previously associated with 25(OH)D were genotyped in 10,018 cases and 11,052 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and cumulative association between genetic variants and risk of overall and aggressive prostate cancer. Results We observed a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with the allele in rs6013897 near CYP24A1 associated with lower serum 25(OH)D (per A allele, OR=0.86, 95%CI=0.80–0.93, p-trend=0.0002), but an increased risk for non-aggressive disease (per a allele: OR=1.10, 95%CI=1.04–1.17, p-trend=0.002). Examination of a polygenic score of the four SNPs revealed statistically significantly lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with a greater number of low vitamin D alleles (OR for 6–8 vs. 0–1 alleles = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.44 – 0.98; p-trend=0.003). Conclusions In this large, pooled analysis, genetic variants related to lower 25(OH)D were associated with a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Impact Our genetic findings do not support a protective association between loci known to influence vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk. PMID:23377224

  2. Genetic analyses using GGE model and a mixed linear model approach, and stability analyses using AMMI bi-plot for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in bread wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Fofana, Bourlaye

    2017-06-01

    Low falling number and discounting grain when it is downgraded in class are the consequences of excessive late-maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Grain expressing high LMAA produces poorer quality bread products. To effectively breed for low LMAA, it is necessary to understand what genes control it and how they are expressed, particularly when genotypes are grown in different environments. In this study, an International Collection (IC) of 18 spring wheat genotypes and another set of 15 spring wheat cultivars adapted to South Dakota (SD), USA were assessed to characterize the genetic component of LMAA over 5 and 13 environments, respectively. The data were analysed using a GGE model with a mixed linear model approach and stability analysis was presented using an AMMI bi-plot on R software. All estimated variance components and their proportions to the total phenotypic variance were highly significant for both sets of genotypes, which were validated by the AMMI model analysis. Broad-sense heritability for LMAA was higher in SD adapted cultivars (53%) compared to that in IC (49%). Significant genetic effects and stability analyses showed some genotypes, e.g. 'Lancer', 'Chester' and 'LoSprout' from IC, and 'Alsen', 'Traverse' and 'Forefront' from SD cultivars could be used as parents to develop new cultivars expressing low levels of LMAA. Stability analysis using an AMMI bi-plot revealed that 'Chester', 'Lancer' and 'Advance' were the most stable across environments, while in contrast, 'Kinsman', 'Lerma52' and 'Traverse' exhibited the lowest stability for LMAA across environments.

  3. Increased efficacy of VX-809 in different cellular systems results from an early stabilization effect of F508del-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Sousa, Marisa; Canato, Sara; Schmidt, André; Uliyakina, Inna; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common recessive autosomal disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, F508del, leads to CFTR impaired plasma membrane trafficking. Therapies modulating CFTR basic defect are emerging, such as VX-809, a corrector of F508del-CFTR traffic which just succeeded in a Phase III clinical trial. We recently showed that VX-809 is additive to two other correctors (VRT-325 and compound 4a). Here, we aimed to determine whether the differential rescuing by these compounds results from cell-specific factors or rather from distinct effects at the early biogenesis and/or processing. The rescuing efficiencies of the above three correctors were first compared in different cellular models (primary respiratory cells, cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial and baby hamster kidney [BHK] cell lines) by functional approaches: micro-Ussing chamber and iodide efflux. Next, biochemical methods (metabolic labeling, pulse-chase and immunoprecipitation) were used to determine their impact on CFTR biogenesis / processing. Functional analyses revealed that VX-809 has the greatest rescuing efficacy and that the relative efficiencies of the three compounds are essentially maintained in all three cellular models tested. Nevertheless, biochemical data show that VX-809 significantly stabilizes F508del-CFTR immature form, an effect that is not observed for C3 nor C4. VX-809 and C3 also significantly increase accumulation of immature CFTR. Our data suggest that VX-809 increases the stability of F508del-CFTR immature form at an early phase of its biogenesis, thus explaining its increased efficacy when inducing its rescue.

  4. All in the family: evaluation of the process and content of sisters' communication about BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chanita; Lerman, Caryn; Schwartz, Marc; Peshkin, Beth N; Wenzel, Lari; Narod, Steven; Corio, Camille; Tercyak, Kenneth P; Hanna, Danielle; Isaacs, Claudine; Main, David

    2002-01-15

    Despite the potential importance of family communication, little is known about the process and content of communicating BRCA1/2 test results to relatives. The objectives of this observational study were to describe the process and content of communicating BRCA1/2 test results to sisters, and to evaluate whether the proband's carrier status influenced communication outcomes. Participants were 43 women who were the first family member to have genetic testing (probands). Probands reported on communication outcomes for 81 sisters. Process and content variables were evaluated 1-month after receipt of BRCA1/2 test results using the Family Communication Questionnaire (FCQ). Overall, BRCA1/2 test results were communicated to 85% of sisters, and carriers communicated their results to significantly more sisters compared to uninformative (96% vs. 76%, FET = 0.02). The most important reason for communicating results was to provide genetic risk information; however, compared to uninformatives, carriers communicated their results to significantly more sisters to obtain emotional support (74%) and to get advice about medical decisions (42%) (FET = 0.001). Carriers also discussed the possibility of discrimination and recommendations for cancer management with significantly more sisters. Among sisters to whom BRCA1/2 test results were not communicated, the most important reason for not sharing test results was because of emotionally distant relationships. The results of this study suggest that probands are likely to quickly communicate their BRCA1/2 test results to relatives and that although needs for social support may motivate family communication, emotionally distant relationships may be a barrier to communication with relatives.

  5. 长期培养的黄瓜毛状根中外源基因遗传稳定性分析%Genetic Stability Analysis of Exogenous Gene in Long-term Cultured Cucumber Hairy Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹庆丰; 向太和; 孟莎莎; 王沙沙; 陆文怡

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated that the genetic stability ofgfp gene in the cucumber hairy roots that had been cultured on solid medium for 3 years. The analysis of PCR for gfp and rol (root loci) genes, qRT-PCR for gfp gene and Western blot for GFP protein were conducted, while green fluorescence was checked on hairy roots. The results showed that the expression of gfp driven by constitutive promoter 35S was relatively stable at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the morphology-related rol genes of the hairy roots after 3-year culturing can be amplified. Overall, this study provided important experimental supports for using hairy roots in the long-term industrial production of proteins and active ingredients of medicinal plants.%对在固体培养基上培养3年的黄瓜转gfp基因毛状根进行gfp和rol位点系列基因的PCR扩增、gfp的荧光定量PCR、Westernblot杂交以及荧光观察分析。结果显示,由组成型启动子35S驱动的g章在转录水平上能正常表达,而且能够翻译出编码蛋白;此外,培养3年后的毛状根,能扩增出与毛状根形态构成有关的rol系列基因。本研究结果表明长期培养的毛状根能保持其遗传稳定性,这为利用毛状根长期工厂化生产外源基因表达的蛋白产物和药用植物的活性成分提供了理论依据。

  6. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Behavioral Stability and Change in Children 6-36 months of Age Using Louisville Twin Study Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deborah Winders; Finkel, Deborah; Turkheimer, Eric; Dickens, William

    2015-11-01

    The Infant Behavior Record (IBR) from the Bayley Scales of Infant Development has been used to study behavioral development since the 1960s. Matheny (1983) examined behavioral development at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months from the Louisville Twin Study (LTS). The extracted temperament scales included Task Orientation, Affect-Extraversion, and Activity. He concluded that monozygotic twins were more similar than same-sex dizygotic twins on these dimensions. Since this seminal work was published, a larger LTS sample and more advanced analytical methods are available. In the current analyses, Choleksy decomposition was applied to behavioral data (n = 1231) from twins 6-36 months. Different patterns of genetic continuity vs genetic innovations were identified for each IBR scale. Single common genetic and shared environmental factors explained cross-age twin similarity in the Activity scale. Multiple shared environmental factors and a single genetic factor coming on line at age 18 months contributed to Affect-Extraversion. A single shared environmental factor and multiple genetic factors explained cross-age twin similarity in Task Orientation.

  7. Molecular Evolution and Genetic Analysis of the Major Capsid Protein VP1 of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses: Implications for Antigenic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Huang, Bing; Qi, Lihong; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Kexiang; Liu, Cunxia; Qin, Zhuoming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the family Picornaviridae, is the major cause of outbreaks with high mortality rates in young ducklings. It has three distinctive serotypes and among them, serotypes 1 (DHAV-1) and 3 (DHAV-3) were recognized in China. To investigate evolutionary and antigenic properties of the major capsid protein VP1 of these two serotypes, a primary target of neutralizing antibodies, we determined the VP1 coding sequences of 19 DHAV-1 (spanning 2000-2012) and 11 DHAV-3 isolates (spanning 2008-2014) associated with disease outbreaks. By bioinformatics analysis of VP1 sequences of these isolates and other DHAV strains reported previously, we demonstrated that DHAV-1 viruses evolved into two genetic lineages, while DHAV-3 viruses exhibited three distinct lineages. The rate of nucleotide substitution for DHAV-1 VP1 genes was estimated to be 5.57 x 10(-4) per site per year, which was about one-third times slower than that for DHAV-3 VP1 genes. The population dynamics analysis showed an upward trend for infection of DHAV-1 viruses over time with little change observed for DHAV-3 viruses. Antigenic study of representative DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 strains covering all observed major lineages revealed no detectable changes in viral neutralization properties within the serotype, despite the lack of cross-neutralization between serotypes 1 and 3 strains. Structural analysis identified VP1 mutations in DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 viruses that underpin the observed antigenic phenotypes. Results of our experiments described here shall give novel insights into evolution and antigenicity of duck picornaviruses.

  8. Temporal genetic stability and high effective population size despite fisheries-induced life-history trait evolution in the North Sea sole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuveliers, E.L.; Volckaert, F.A.M.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Larmuseau, M.H.D.; Maes, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Heavy fishing and other anthropogenic influences can have profound impact on a species’ resilience to harvesting. Besides the decrease in the census and effective population size, strong declines in mature adults and recruiting individuals may lead to almost irreversible genetic changes in life-hist

  9. Multilocus sequence typing and FlaA sequencing reveal the genetic stability of Campylobacter jejuni enrichment during coculture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griekspoor, Petra; Olofsson, Jenny; Axelsson-Olsson, Diana; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn

    2013-04-01

    Low concentrations of Campylobacter jejuni cells in environmental samples make them difficult to study with conventional culture methods. Here, we show that enrichment by amoeba cocultures works well with low-concentration samples and that this method can be combined with molecular techniques without loss of genetic specificity.

  10. HIV-1 Genetic Variation Resulting in the Development of New Quasispecies Continues to Be Encountered in the Peripheral Blood of Well-Suppressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Will; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Mell, Joshua; Earl, Joshua; Ehrlich, Garth D; Pirrone, Vanessa; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Zhong, Wen; Kercher, Katherine; Passic, Shendra; Williams, Jean W; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Wigdahl, Brian

    2016-01-01

    As a result of antiretroviral therapeutic strategies, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has become a long-term clinically manageable chronic disease for many infected individuals. However, despite this progress in therapeutic control, including undetectable viral loads and CD4+ T-cell counts in the normal range, viral mutations continue to accumulate in the peripheral blood compartment over time, indicating either low level reactivation and/or replication. Using patients from the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort, whom have been sampled longitudinally for more than 7 years, genetic change was modeled against to the dominant integrated proviral quasispecies with respect to selection pressures such as therapeutic interventions, AIDS defining illnesses, and other factors. Phylogenetic methods based on the sequences of the LTR and tat exon 1 of the HIV-1 proviral DNA quasispecies were used to obtain an estimate of an average mutation rate of 5.3 nucleotides (nt)/kilobasepair (kb)/year (yr) prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Following ART the baseline mutation rate was reduced to an average of 1.02 nt/kb/yr. The post-ART baseline rate of genetic change, however, appears to be unique for each patient. These studies represent our initial steps in quantifying rates of genetic change among HIV-1 quasispecies using longitudinally sampled sequences from patients at different stages of disease both before and after initiation of combination ART. Notably, while long-term ART reduced the estimated mutation rates in the vast majority of patients studied, there was still measurable HIV-1 mutation even in patients with no detectable virus by standard quantitative assays. Determining the factors that affect HIV-1 mutation rates in the peripheral blood may lead to elucidation of the mechanisms associated with changes in HIV-1 disease severity.

  11. Melanocortin-1 receptor, skin cancer and phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project: study design and methods for pooling results of genetic epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For complex diseases like cancer, pooled-analysis of individual data represents a powerful tool to investigate the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors to the development of a disease. Pooled-analysis of epidemiological studies has many advantages over meta-analysis, and preliminary results may be obtained faster and with lower costs than with prospective consortia. Design and methods Based on our experience with the study design of the Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene, SKin cancer and Phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project, we describe the most important steps in planning and conducting a pooled-analysis of genetic epidemiological studies. We then present the statistical analysis plan that we are going to apply, giving particular attention to methods of analysis recently proposed to account for between-study heterogeneity and to explore the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors in the development of a disease. Within the M-SKIP project, data on 10,959 skin cancer cases and 14,785 controls from 31 international investigators were checked for quality and recoded for standardization. We first proposed to fit the aggregated data with random-effects logistic regression models. However, for the M-SKIP project, a two-stage analysis will be preferred to overcome the problem regarding the availability of different study covariates. The joint contribution of MC1R variants and phenotypic characteristics to skin cancer development will be studied via logic regression modeling. Discussion Methodological guidelines to correctly design and conduct pooled-analyses are needed to facilitate application of such methods, thus providing a better summary of the actual findings on specific fields. PMID:22862891

  12. 基于质谱检测转基因生物外源蛋白质的消化稳定性%Mass Spectrometry-Based Analysis of Digestive Stability of Target Protein in Genetically Modified Organism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛劼; 孙兴; 程娟献; 王心正; 赵永强; 王红霞; 何昆; 夏晴

    2016-01-01

    Ac, the exogenous protein of the geneticaly modified rice‘Huahui No. 1’. The results showed that the ratio was lower than 0.50 after digestion in SGF for 2 minutes, while it decreased to less than 0.50 after digestion in SIF for 15 seconds, indicating that it is very liable to be digested. Our study provides a novel MS-based method for digestive stability analysis of target proteins from genetically modified organisms, which is easy to operate with no need for specific antibody.

  13. 麻疹减毒活疫苗S191生产用毒株的遗传稳定性%Genetic Stability of S191 Strain for Production of Live Attenuated Measles Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵炜炜; 封多佳; 董小曼

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析麻疹减毒活疫苗S191生产用毒株病毒结构基因的遗传稳定性.方法 将北京天坛生物制品股份有限公司(天坛生物)用于麻疹疫苗生产的S191株25代病毒(S191-BJ25)传至29代(S191-BJ29),上海生物制品研究所保存的S191株24代病毒(S191-SH24)传至33代(S191-SH33).从S191株传代病毒中提取RNA,对病毒结构基因片段N、M、F,H进行扩增及测序.将测序结果与GenBank中1994年收录的S191株麻疹病毒的相应序列进行比较分析.结果 S191-BJ25传代病毒N、M、F、H 4个基因的总突变率为0.02%,S191-SH2A传代病毒为0.15%;与1994年的S191疫苗株相比,S191-BJ25传代病毒N、M、F、H 4个基因的总突变率为0.3%,S191-SH24传代病毒为0.4%.结论 目前天坛生物使用的麻疹疫苗S191株生产用三级种子库具有可靠的遗传稳定性,从主代种子到疫苗的传代过程中,N、M、F、H结构基因表现出稳定的分子遗传特征.目前使用的S191毒株的4个结构基因较1994年以前的疫苗株发生了变化.但目前没有证据表明这些变化对免疫原性产生不利影响.%Objective To analyze the genetic stability of structural gene of S191 strain for production of live attenuated measles vaccine.Methods The S191 strain for production of measles vaccine by Beijing Tiantan Biological Products Co.Ltd Was subcuhured from passage 25(S191-BJ25)to 29 (S191-BJ29),and that by Shanghai Institute of Biological Products from passage 24(S191-SH24)to 33(S191-SH33).RNAs were extracted from the subcultured strains for amplification and sequencing of structural gene fragments N,M,F and H.The sequencing results were compared with those of the corresponding sequences of S191 strain included in GenBank in 1994.Results The total mutation rate of N,M,F and H genes of subcultured S191-BJ25 Was 0.02%.while that of subcuhured S191-SH24 was 0.15%.Compared with those of S191 strain included in GenBank in 1994,the total mutation rate of the four genes of

  14. Early results of reverse less invasive stabilization system plating in treating elderly intertrochanteric fractures: a prospective study compared to proximal femoral nail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chen; ZHANG Chang-qing; JIN Dong-xu; CHEN Yun-feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Intertrochanteric femur fracture is common in elderly population. Though multiple treatment options are available, the choice of implant remains controversial. The reverse less invasive stabilization system (LISS) plating was introduced for treatment of a patient with ipsilateral intertrochanteric and midshaft femoral fractures. The aim of this research was to compare such technique to intramedullary nailing (proximal femoral nail, PFN) for intertrochanteric fractures.Methods Fifty-six patients with an age of at least sixty-five years and an AO/OTA type-A1 or A2 fractures were included and divided into LISS and PFN treatment group. Background parameters, fracture and surgery details were documented. Follow-up time was at least 12 months. Radiology, complication, Harris Hip Score and Rapid Disability Rating Score (RDRS) were recorded to evaluate fixation status and hip function for each patient during follow-up.Results There was no significant difference between the two groups in surgical time ((48.0±8.6) minutes, vs.(51.8±10.8) minutes, P=0.3836) and intraoperative blood loss ((149.1±45.1) ml vs. (176.4±25.4) ml, P=0.0712). The LISS group had less postoperative haemoglobin (Hb) reduction ((10.2±4.5) g/L Hb, vs. (15.1~5.9) g/L Hb, P=0.0475). There was no complication observed in PFN group. All 31A1 type fracture in LISS group showed 100% maintenance of reduction. One nonunion with locking screw breakage and 2 varus union were found in the LISS group. Postoperative hip function was similar between the two groups.Conclusions Though reverse LISS plating may not be recommended as a routine fixation method for elderly unstable intertrochanteric fractures compared to PFN, it may possibly be reserved for rapid fixation and damage control in polytrauma patients and ORIF of subtrochanteric and reverse oblique intertrochanteric fractures.

  15. Targeted expression of a protease-resistant IGFBP-4 mutant in smooth muscle of transgenic mice results in IGFBP-4 stabilization and smooth muscle hypotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyu; Smith, Eric P; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Banach, Walter; Chernausek, Steven D; Fagin, James A

    2002-06-14

    The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4), the most abundant IGF-binding protein produced by rodent smooth muscle cells (SMC), is degraded by specific protease(s) potentially releasing IGF-I for local bioactivity. IGFBP-4 protease(s) recognizes basic residues within the midregion of the molecule. We constructed a mutant IGFBP-4 with the cleavage domain substitution 119-KHMAKVRDRSKMK-133 to 119-AAMAAVADASAMA-133. Myc-tagged native and IGFBP-4.7A retained equivalent IGF-I binding affinity. Whereas native IGFBP-4 was cleaved by SMC-conditioned medium, IGFBP-4.7A was completely resistant to proteolysis. To explore the function of the protease-resistant IGFBP-4 in vivo, expression of the mutant and native proteins was targeted to SMC of transgenic mice by means of a smooth muscle alpha-actin promoter. Transgene expression was confined to SMC-rich tissues in all lines. Bladder and aortic immunoreactive IGFBP-4/transgene mRNA ratios in SMP8-BP4.7A mice were increased by 2- to 4-fold relative to SMP8-BP4 mice, indicating that the IGFBP-4.7A protein was stabilized in vivo. SMP8-BP4.7A mice had lower aortic, bladder, and stomach weight and intestinal length relative to SMP8-BP4 counterparts matched for protein expression by Western blotting. Thus, IGFBP-4.7A results in greater growth inhibition than equivalent levels of native IGFBP-4 in vivo, demonstrating a role for IGFBP-4 proteolysis in the regulation of IGF-I action.

  16. An ENSO stability analysis. Part II: results from the twentieth and twenty-first century simulations of the CMIP3 models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Tae [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of California, Department of Earth System Science, Irvine, CA (United States); Jin, Fei-Fei [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2011-04-15

    In this study, a Bjerknes stability (BJ) index, proposed by Jin et al. (2006), is adopted to assess the overall stability of El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in state-of-the-art coupled models. The twentieth and twenty-first century simulations of 12 coupled models among the coupled model intercomparison project phase 3 models used in the intergovernmental panel on climate change forth assessment report demonstrate a significant positive correlation between ENSO amplitude and ENSO stability as measured by the BJ index. The simulations also show a diversity of behavior regarding the ENSO stability among the coupled models, which can be attributed to different mean state and sensitivity of an oceanic and atmospheric response to wind and SST forcing from model to model. When respective components of the BJ index obtained from the coupled models are compared with those from observations, it is revealed that most coupled models underestimate the thermodynamic damping effect and the positive effect of the zonal advective and thermocline feedback. Under increased CO{sub 2} induced warm climate, changes, relative to the twentieth century simulations, in the damping and feedback terms responsible for the ENSO stability measured by the BJ index can be linked to mean state changes and associated atmospheric and oceanic response sensitivity changes. There is a clear multi-model trend in the damping terms and positive zonal advective feedback, thermocline feedback, and Ekman feedback terms under enhanced greenhouse gas conditions. However, the various behavior among the coupled models in competition between the positive feedback and negative damping terms in the BJ index formula prevent the formation of a definitive conclusion regarding future projections of ENSO stability using the current coupled models. (orig.)

  17. Global stability results for a generalized Lotka-Volterra system with distributed delays. Applications to predator-prey and to epidemic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, E; Capasso, V; Rinaldi, F

    1988-01-01

    The paper contains an extension of the general ODE system proposed in previous papers by the same authors, to include distributed time delays in the interaction terms. The new system describes a large class of Lotka-Volterra like population models and epidemic models with continuous time delays. Sufficient conditions for the boundedness of solutions and for the global asymptotic stability of nontrivial equilibrium solutions are given. A detailed analysis of the epidemic system is given with respect to the conditions for global stability. For a relevant subclass of these systems an existence criterion for steady states is also given.

  18. A study of the use of experimental stability derivatives in the calculation of the lateral disturbed motions of a swept-wing airplane and comparison with flight results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, John D; Jaquet, Byron M

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the accuracy with which the lateral flight motions of a swept-wing airplane could be predicted from experimental stability derivatives, determined in the 6-foot-diameter rolling-flow test section and 6 by 6-foot curved-flow test section of the Langley stability tunnel. In addition, determination of the significance of including the nonlinear aerodynamic effects of sideslip in the calculations of the motions was desired. All experimental aerodynamic data necessary for prediction of the lateral flight motions are presented along with a number of comparisons between flight and calculated motions caused by rudder and aileron disturbances.

  19. Landscape genetics applied to a recovering otter (Lutra lutra ppopulation in the UK: preliminary results and potential methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Hobbs

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    The Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra has declined significantly across its European range. In the UK, the decline was particularly severe during the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, and by the mid 1970’s the population was largely confined to strongholds in parts of Scotland, Northern Ireland, mid and West Wales and south west England. In recent years the otter population has started to recover, with otter surveys confirming an increased distribution of otters in Wales, Scotland and England. In England, population expansion and recolonisation is believed to be occurring both through breeding and by dispersal, from the west (south west England and the Welsh borders and from the north (Scotland. However, little is known about the degree of genetic loss due to the decline, potential barriers to recolonisation, routes of dispersal, or the contribution of reintroduction programmes to population increases. This project aims to use tissues collected since 1994 (complete with geographic location from over 500 otters found dead on roads in Wales and England, to analyse the genetic diversity and structure of otter populations. Using molecular genetic analysis of the otter population, we will identify whether and when bottlenecks occurred, whether population decline has resulted in a loss of genetic variability, and to what degree. Preliminaryanalysis from 177 otters has shown that observed is generally lower than expected het- erozygosity, and that the population is in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium for 11 out of the 15 loci. Spatial patterns in genetic data will be analysed, to identify clines, isolation by distance and genetic boundaries to gene flow, the contribution of released animals will also beassessed. Geographical information systems (GIS will be used to map spatial genetic pat- terns and to generate hypotheses about the potential cause of genetic boundaries such as landscape or environmental features. RIASSUNTO – La

  20. The role of rheumatoid arthritis genetic susceptibility markers in the prediction of erosive disease in patients with early inflammatory polyarthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Darren; Thomson, Wendy; Lunt, Mark; Flynn, Edward; Martin, Paul; Eyre, Steven; Farragher, Tracey; Bunn, Diane; Worthington, Jane; Symmons, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Recent whole-genome and candidate gene association studies in RA have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that predispose to disease with moderate risk. It remains poorly understood how recently identified genetic factors may contribute to RA severity. We therefore sought to investigate the role of recently identified RA susceptibility SNP markers in predicting erosive outcome in patients with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis (IP). Methods. DNA and X-ray data were available for 1049 patients who were registered between 1990 and 2003 with the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR); a primary care-based inception cohort of patients with recent-onset IP. Demographic and clinical data were recorded at inclusion, and at yearly assessments thereafter. Patients were genotyped for 18 SNP markers. The presence of serum anti citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) was assessed in samples collected at inclusion to the NOAR. The association of serological and genetic markers with poor radiological (Larsen) score at Years 1 and 5, and erosions at Years 1 and 5 was investigated. Results. Baseline ACPA positivity was associated with erosive disease and higher radiological damage. SNP markers within the TRAF1/C5 locus were associated with erosive disease at Year 1 [rs2900180: odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95% CI 1.14, 2.05)] and Year 5 [rs2900180: OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.07, 2.02)]. None of the SNP markers tested was associated with Larsen score. Conclusion. Our results are in keeping with a previous report and suggest that the TRAF1/C5 region is associated with risk of development of radiological erosions in IP/RA patients. The finding requires replication in other large data sets. PMID:20219786

  1. Stocking impact and temporal stability of genetic composition in a brackish northern pike population ( Esox lucius L.), assessed using microsatellite DNA analysis of historical and contemporary samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Foged; Hansen, Michael Møller; Eg Nielsen, Einar;

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, brackish northern pike populations in Denmark have been subject to stocking programmes, using nonindigenous pike from freshwater lakes, in order to compensate for drastic population declines. The present study was designed to investigate the genetic impact of stocking...... freshwater pike into a brackish pike population in Stege Nor, Denmark. We analysed polymorphism at eight microsatellite loci in samples representing the indigenous Stege Nor population prior to stocking (ie from 1956 to 1957), along with a sample of the contemporary Stege Nor population and samples from...

  2. Does Formal Integration between Child Welfare and Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability for Adolescents Engaged with Both Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

    2012-01-01

    National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training…

  3. Partial dispensability of Djp1's J domain in peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results from genetic redundancy with another class II J protein, Caj1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobriyal, Neha; Tripathi, Prerna; Sarkar, Susrita; Tak, Yogesh; Verma, Amit K; Sahi, Chandan

    2017-03-06

    J proteins are obligate co-chaperones of Hsp70s. Via their signature J domain, all J proteins interact with their partner Hsp70s and stimulate their weak ATPase activity, which is vital for Hsp70 functions. The dependency of J proteins on their J domain is such that mutations in critical amino acids in the J domain often results into a null phenotype for a particular J protein. Here, we show that the J domain of Djp1, a cytosolic J protein important for peroxisomal protein import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is partially dispensable. A complete deletion of Djp1 J domain resulted into only partial loss in peroxisomal protein import function. Instead, the C-terminal domain of Djp1 was found to be essential for proper localization of the peroxisomal targeted GFP-PTS1. Furthermore, we show that Caj1, another cytosolic J protein, also has some role in peroxisomal protein import. Caj1 was found to be partially redundant with Djp1 as cells lacking both Djp1 and Caj1 resulted into a much more severe defect in GFP-PTS1 localization. Based on these results, we propose that dispensability of J domains could be attributed to genetic redundancy between different J proteins sharing common structural topology and cellular localization.

  4. Analysis of 2 654 cases of non invasive prenatal genetic test results%2654例无创产前基因检测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯暄; 闫有圣; 胡秀琴; 郝胜菊; 张庆华; 郑雷

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨无创产前基因检测在胎儿染色体非整倍体疾病诊断中的临床应用价值。方法选择在该院行胎儿染色体非整倍体无创基因检测的单胎孕妇2654例,对孕妇外周血中游离DNA 进行高通量测序,对检测结果高风险者进行羊膜腔穿刺及胎儿染色体核型分析,对检测结果阴性者进行电话随访。结果2654例孕妇无创基因检测结果高风险29例,包括21‐三体14例,18‐三体6例,47,XXY 5例,45,XO 2例,常染色体异常1例,母体染色体异常1例。对29例高风险孕妇行羊膜腔穿刺羊水细胞染色体核型分析,结果显示21‐三体11例,18‐三体5例,性染色体异常4例。结论无创产前基因检测在诊断胎儿染色体非整倍体异常有较高的特异性和准确性,有较高的临床应用价值,但存在一定的假阳性,应掌握指征。%Objective To explore the clinical value of noninvasive prenatal genetic testing in diagnosis of fetal chromosomal non‐integral disease .Methods A total of 2 654 pregnant women receiving fetal chromosomal aneuploidy noninvasive prenatal genetic testing in the hospital were selected ,high‐throughput sequencing of free DNA in peripheral blood of pregnant women was conduc‐ted ,amniocentesis and fetal karyotyping were carried out among the high risk pregnant women ,the negative pregnant women were followed up by telephone .Results Among 2 654 pregnant women ,29 high risk pregnant women were found by noninvasive prenatal genetic testing ,including 14 cases with trisomy 21 ,6 cases with trisomy 18 ,5 cases with 47 ,XXY ,2 cases with 45 ,XO ,1 cases with abnormal chromosome ,1 cases with maternal chromosome abnormalities .29 cases of high‐risk pregnant women with amniotic fluid cell chromosome karyotype analysis ,the results show that 11 cases with trisomy 21 ,5 cases with trisomy 18 ,4 cases with sex chro‐mosome abnormalities .Conclusion Noninvasive prenatal genetic

  5. Dangers resulting from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with regard to forensic genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, R; Lewandowski, K; Rupa-Matysek, J; Jędrzejczyk, M; Berent, J

    2015-01-01

    The study documents the risk that comes with DNA analysis of materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in forensic genetics. DNA chimerism was studied in 30 patients after allo-HSCT, based on techniques applied in contemporary forensic genetics, i.e. real-time PCR and multiplex PCR-STR with the use of autosomal DNA as well as Y-DNA markers. The results revealed that the DNA profile of the recipient's blood was identical with the donor's in the majority of cases. Therefore, blood analysis can lead to false conclusions in personal identification as well as kinship analysis. An investigation of buccal swabs revealed a mixture of DNA in the majority of recipients. Consequently, personal identification on the basis of stain analysis of the same origin may be impossible. The safest (but not ideal) material turned out to be the hair root. Its analysis based on autosomal DNA revealed 100% of the recipient's profile. However, an analysis based on Y-chromosome markers performed in female allo-HSCT recipients with male donors demonstrated the presence of donor DNA in hair cells - similarly to the blood and buccal swabs. In the light of potential risks arising from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from persons after allotransplantation in judicial aspects, certain procedures were proposed to eliminate such dangers. The basic procedures include abandoning the approach based exclusively on blood collection, both for kinship analysis and personal identification; asking persons who are to be tested about their history of allo-HSCT before sample collection and profile entry in the DNA database, and verification of DNA profiling based on hair follicles in uncertain cases.

  6. Genetic risk factors for BMI and obesity in an ethnically diverse population: results from the population architecture using genomics and epidemiology (PAGE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesinmeyer, Megan D; North, Kari E; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Lim, Unhee; Franceschini, Nora; Wilkens, Lynne R; Gross, Myron D; Bůžková, Petra; Glenn, Kimberly; Quibrera, P Miguel; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Li, Qiong; Fowke, Jay H; Li, Rongling; Carlson, Christopher S; Prentice, Ross L; Kuller, Lewis H; Manson, Joann E; Matise, Tara C; Cole, Shelley A; Chen, Christina T L; Howard, Barbara V; Kolonel, Laurence N; Henderson, Brian E; Monroe, Kristine R; Crawford, Dana C; Hindorff, Lucia A; Buyske, Steven; Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loic; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated that common genetic variants contribute to obesity. However, studies of this complex trait have focused on ancestrally European populations, despite the high prevalence of obesity in some minority groups. As part of the "Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE)" Consortium, we investigated the association between 13 GWAS-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and BMI and obesity in 69,775 subjects, including 6,149 American Indians, 15,415 African-Americans, 2,438 East Asians, 7,346 Hispanics, 604 Pacific Islanders, and 37,823 European Americans. For the BMI-increasing allele of each SNP, we calculated β coefficients using linear regression (for BMI) and risk estimates using logistic regression (for obesity defined as BMI ≥ 30) followed by fixed-effects meta-analysis to combine results across PAGE sites. Analyses stratified by racial/ethnic group assumed an additive genetic model and were adjusted for age, sex, and current smoking. We defined "replicating SNPs" (in European Americans) and "generalizing SNPs" (in other racial/ethnic groups) as those associated with an allele frequency-specific increase in BMI. By this definition, we replicated 9/13 SNP associations (5 out of 8 loci) in European Americans. We also generalized 8/13 SNP associations (5/8 loci) in East Asians, 7/13 (5/8 loci) in African Americans, 6/13 (4/8 loci) in Hispanics, 5/8 in Pacific Islanders (5/8 loci), and 5/9 (4/8 loci) in American Indians. Linkage disequilibrium patterns suggest that tagSNPs selected for European Americans may not adequately tag causal variants in other ancestry groups. Accordingly, fine-mapping in large samples is needed to comprehensively explore these loci in diverse populations. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  7. Dangers resulting from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT with regard to forensic genetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Jacewicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study documents the risk that comes with DNA analysis of materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT in forensic genetics. DNA chimerism was studied in 30 patients after allo-HSCT, based on techniques applied in contemporary forensic genetics, i.e. real-time PCR and multiplex PCR-STR with the use of autosomal DNA as well as Y-DNA markers. The results revealed that the DNA profile of the recipient’s blood was identical with the donor’s in the majority of cases. Therefore, blood analysis can lead to false conclusions in personal identification as well as kinship analysis. An investigation of buccal swabs revealed a mixture of DNA in the majority of recipients. Consequently, personal identification on the basis of stain analysis of the same origin may be impossible. The safest (but not ideal material turned out to be the hair root. Its analysis based on autosomal DNA revealed 100% of the recipient’s profile. However, an analysis based on Y-chromosome markers performed in female allo-HSCT recipients with male donors demonstrated the presence of donor DNA in hair cells – similarly to the blood and buccal swabs. In the light of potential risks arising from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from persons after allotransplantation in judicial aspects, certain procedures were proposed to eliminate such dangers. The basic procedures include abandoning the approach based exclusively on blood collection, both for kinship analysis and personal identification; asking persons who are to be tested about their history of allo-HSCT before sample collection and profile entry in the DNA database, and verification of DNA profiling based on hair follicles in uncertain cases.

  8. The genetic variant on chromosome 10p14 is associated with risk of colorectal cancer: results from a case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs10795668, located at 10p14, was first identified to be significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC by a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 2008; however, another GWAS and following replication studies yielded conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 470 cases and 475 controls in a Chinese population and then performed a meta-analysis, integrating the current study and 9 publications to evaluate the association between rs10795668 and CRC risk. Heterogeneity among studies and publication bias were assessed by the χ²-based Q statistic test and Egger's test, respectively. RESULTS: In the case-control study, significant association between the SNP and CRC risk was observed, with per-A-allele OR of 0.71 (95%CI: 0.54-0.94, P = 0.017. The following meta-analysis further confirmed the significant association, with per-A-allele OR of 0.91 (95%CI: 0.89-0.93, P(heterogeneity >0.05 in European population and 0.86 (95%CI: 0.78-0.96, P(heterogeneity <0.05 in Asian population. Besides, sensitivity analyses and publication bias assessment indicated the robust stability and reliability of the results. CONCLUSIONS: Results from our case-control study and the followed meta-analysis confirmed the significant association of rs10795668 with CRC risk.

  9. Role of the XRCC1 - APE1 interaction in the maintenance of genetic stability; Etude du role de l' interaction entre XRCC1 et APE1 dans la stabilite genetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sossou-Becker, M.

    2005-09-15

    This thesis is divided in four chapters: the first one concerns the genetic instability, the second one is devoted to the DNA repair, the third one is related to the XRCC1 and the chapter four concerns APE1. Then, are defined the objectives and the results. This work fits into the studies of repair mechanisms. The physical and functional characterisation of the interaction between XRCC1 and APE1 allowed to understand its involvement in the prevention of the genetic instability at the origin of cancer. (N.C.)

  10. Stability of dendriplexes formed by anti-HIV genetic material and poly(propylene imine) dendrimers in the presence of glucosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Michal; Drzewinska, Joanna; Dzmitruk, Volha; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Klajnert, Barbara; Appelhans, Dietmar; Bryszewska, Maria

    2012-12-20

    There are several barriers to the application of dendriplexes formed by poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and genetic material for gene therapy. One limitation is their interaction with extracellular matrix components such as glucosaminoglycans. These can displace the genetic material from the dendriplexes, affecting their transfection activity. In this study, we analyzed the interaction between dendriplexes and the four main glucosaminoglycans (heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid) by fluorescence polarization and gel electrophoresis. Dendriplexes were formed by combining three anti-HIV antisense oligodeoxynucleotides with three poly(propylene imine) dendrimers of the fourth generation: unmodified and partially modified with maltose and maltotriose (open shell glycodendrimers). The data showed that the effect of glucosaminoglycans on dendriplexes depends on the glucosaminoglycan type and the oligosaccharide serving as the surface group of the dendrimer. Heparin at physiological concentrations destroys dendriplexes formed by open shell glycodendrimers, but dendriplexes based on unmodified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers are stable in its presence. The other glucosaminoglycans at physiological concentrations cannot destroy dendriplexes formed by any of the dendrimers studied.

  11. Genetic Stability Analysis of the Fifth Generation of Transgenic Soybeans Expressing γ-linolenic Acid%T5代γ-亚麻酸转基因大豆的遗传稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晟; 郭丽琼; 宋景深; 林俊芳

    2012-01-01

    利用PCR检测和标记基因抗性检测对表达γ-亚麻酸转基因大豆第5代植株的外源基因遗传稳定性及目的基因和抗性基因的分离情况进行了分析.结果表明:在20个转基因大豆株系中,有2个转基因大豆株系(TS824和TS825)只含有Δ6-fad基因而没有bar基因;7个转基因大豆株系(TS81、TS83、TS85、TS87、TS811、TS814、TS818)只含有bar基因而没有Δ6-fad基因;9个转基因大豆株系(TS88、TS89、TS810、TS813、TS815、TS816、TS817、TS819和TS820)既有Δ6 -fad基因也有bar基因;2个转基因大豆株系(TS82和TS86)既没有Δ6-fad基因也没有bar基因.因此,Δ6-fad基因在部分株系中获得了稳定的遗传,同时有2个株系目的基因和抗性基因在后代中分离.%The genetic stability of foreign gene and separation of Δ6-fad and bar gene were observed in the 5th generation of transgenic soybeans expressing -γ-linolenic acid. By PCR amplification and resistance testing of selective marker gene, the ge nome of transgenic soybeans TS824 and TS825 were integrated Δ6-fad gene(marker free) ;TS81 ,TS83,TS85,TS87,TS814, TS816 and TS818 were integrated bar gene;TS88 ,TS89 ,TS810,TS813 ,TS815 ,TS816.TS817 ,TS819 and TS820 were integrat ed both Δ6-fad gene and bar gene;neither Δ6-fad gene nor bar gene was detected in TS82 and TS86. The results showed that Δ6-fad gene was stably maintained in the genome of part of transgenic soybeans,and Δ6-fad and bar gene of transgenic soy beans TS824 and TS825 were separated.

  12. Genetic analysis and evaluation indexes for high temperature stability of photosynthesis in rice%水稻光合能力的高温稳定性评价指标与遗传分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳洪; 李海霞; 董红霞; 曾汉来

    2011-01-01

    Simple and useful evaluation indexes for the high temperature stability of photosynthesis (HTSP) in different rice varieties was studied for screening and identifying germplasm resources and new variety breeding.The diurnal changes of photosynthesis were tested under high temperature both in natural and illuminating incubator conditions using CIRAS-I portable photosynthesis system.Meanwhile,the genetic characters of HTSP were analyzed using F2 population derived from Texianzhan, a worse HTSP variety,and Shuhui 527, a better HTSP variety, respectively.The results showed that the difference value (D-value) of net photosynthetic rate (Pn) at 09:00 a.m and 13:00 p.m,as well as stomatal conductance (Sc),in flag leaf could be regarded as the evaluation indexes for high temperature stability of photosynthesis (HTSP) in the natural condition.The D-value of Pn of individual plant from F2 population of Shuhui 527/Texianzhan showed a continuous distribution at 09:00 a.m and 13:00 p.m under high temperature.Based on the proportion of D-value of individual plant to population, 10%~30% accounted for the maximum part.In addition, the aptness test of D-value distribution curve and theoretic normal distribution of Pn in F2 generation indicated that, the trait of midday depression in photosynthesis was inherited as quantitative character controlled by polygene,other than a simple qualitative character.It was suggested that the identification of and screening HTSP should be carried out in advanced generation populations.%为了探讨一种简单适用的可用于水稻品种资源的光合速率高温稳定性评价指标,以指导水稻高温适应性研究和高光效牛理育种,利用CIRAS-I型便携式光合测定系统,对不同类型水稻品种在武汉夏日高温和人工控制温度条件下的光合作用日变化进行了多年测定,并用光合高温稳定性较好的品种蜀恢527和稳定性较差的品种特籼占杂交F群体对光合作用高温稳定性

  13. Rewriting the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Takahito; Lajoie, Marc J; Englert, Markus; Söll, Dieter

    2017-09-08

    The genetic code-the language used by cells to translate their genomes into proteins that perform many cellular functions-is highly conserved throughout natural life. Rewriting the genetic code could lead to new biological functions such as expanding protein chemistries with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) and genetically isolating synthetic organisms from natural organisms and viruses. It has long been possible to transiently produce proteins bearing ncAAs, but stabilizing an expanded genetic code for sustained function in vivo requires an integrated approach: creating recoded genomes and introducing new translation machinery that function together without compromising viability or clashing with endogenous pathways. In this review, we discuss design considerations and technologies for expanding the genetic code. The knowledge obtained by rewriting the genetic code will deepen our understanding of how genomes are designed and how the canonical genetic code evolved.

  14. Early results from genetic trials on the growth of Spanish cedar and itssusceptibility to the shoot borer moth in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheila E. Ward; Kevyn E. Wightman; Bartolo. Rodriguez Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Cedrela odorata (Spanish cedar) is a neotropical broadleaf tree species that is in high demand for furniture and interior fittings. In 1998, seed collections were made from Spanish cedar in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, for genetic conservation and tree improvement projects. Progeny from these collections were established in genetic trials at Bacalar, Noh Bec, and Zoh...

  15. Risk assessment models in genetics clinic for array comparative genomic hybridization: Clinical information can be used to predict the likelihood of an abnormal result in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Rachel M; Mercurio, Laura; Kanter, Rebecca; Doyle, Richard; Abuelo, Dianne; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2013-03-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) testing can diagnose chromosomal microdeletions and duplications too small to be detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques. We need to consider which patients are more likely to receive a diagnosis from aCGH testing versus patients that have lower likelihood and may benefit from broader genome wide scanning. We retrospectively reviewed charts of a population of 200 patients, 117 boys and 83 girls, who underwent aCGH testing in Genetics Clinic at Rhode Island hospital between 1 January/2008 and 31 December 2010. Data collected included sex, age at initial clinical presentation, aCGH result, history of seizures, autism, dysmorphic features, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia and failure to thrive. aCGH analysis revealed abnormal results in 34 (17%) and variants of unknown significance in 24 (12%). Patients with three or more clinical diagnoses had a 25.0% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings, while patients with two or fewer clinical diagnoses had a 12.5% incidence of abnormal aCGH findings. Currently, we provide families with a range of 10-30% of a diagnosis with aCGH testing. With increased clinical complexity, patients have an increased probability of having an abnormal aCGH result. With this, we can provide individualized risk estimates for each patient.

  16. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Archive Regulation of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Overview Many Americans fear that participating in research ... I) and employment (Title II). Read more Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws Genetic Discrimination and Other Laws ...

  17. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of Eu{sup 3+}-doped nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} sols and thermal stability of the resulting xerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borlaf, Mario; Moreno, Rodrigo [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ortiz, Angel L. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Energética y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas S/N, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Colomer, María T., E-mail: tcolomer@icv.csic.es [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} sols without and with Eu{sup 3+} doping (1, 2, or 3 mol%) by the colloidal sol–gel method in aqueous media was investigated, with emphasis on the effect of the Eu{sup 3+} doping on the peptization time and rheological properties of the sols. It was found that the addition of Eu{sup 3+} increasingly retards the peptization process, and also results in sols with greater aggregate sizes which are therefore more viscous, although in all cases the distributions of aggregate sizes are unimodal and the flow behavior is Newtonian. The shifting of the isoelectric point of the sols toward greater pH with increasing Eu{sup 3+} doping indicates that the aforementioned trends are due to the chemical adsorption of europium ionic complexes in the form of solvated species. Furthermore, the effect of Eu{sup 3+} doping on the ultraviolet–visible spectrum and photocatalytic activity of the peptized sols was also explored. It was found that the Eu{sup 3+} doping increasingly shifts slightly the absorption edge from the ultraviolet to the visible range, and that its effect on the photocatalytic activity is certainly complex because this is enhanced only if the Eu{sup 3+} cations have some electronic transition (charge transfer transition or transitions between the ground state and the excited states) at the wavelength of the incident radiation, in which case the photocatalytic activity first increases with increasing Eu{sup 3+} content and then decreases perhaps due to occurrence of Eu–Eu interactions or simply to the greater aggregation state. Finally, the influence of the Eu{sup 3+} doping on the thermal stability of the nanoparticulate xerogels resulting from the drying of the peptized sols was also examined by X-ray thermo-diffractometry together with transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffractometry, and X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry. It was found that although the xerogels crystallize all as anatase

  18. Ecologically relevant stress resistance: from microarrays and quantitative trait loci to candidate genes – A research plan and preliminary results using Drosophila as a model organism and climatic and genetic stress as model stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volker Loeschcke; Jesper G Sørensen; Torsten N Kristensen

    2004-12-01

    We aim at studying adaptation to genetic and environmental stress and its evolutionary implications at different levels of biological organization. Stress influences cellular processes, individual physiology, genetic variation at the population level, and the process of natural selection. To investigate these highly connected levels of stress effects, it is advisable – if not critical – to integrate approaches from ecology, evolution, physiology, molecular biology and genetics. To investigate the mechanisms of stress resistance, how resistance evolves, and what factors contribute to and constrain its evolution, we use the well-defined model systems of Drosophila species, representing both cosmopolitan species such as D. melanogaster with a known genome map, and more specialized and ecologically well described species such as the cactophilic D. buzzatii. Various climate-related stresses are used as model stresses including desiccation, starvation, cold and heat. Genetic stress or genetic load is modelled by studying the consequences of inbreeding, the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations, hybridization or the loss of genetic variability. We present here a research plan and preliminary results combining various approaches: molecular techniques such as microarrays, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses, quantitative PCR, ELISA or Western blotting are combined with population studies of resistance to climatic and genetic stress in natural populations collected across climatic gradients as well as in selection lines maintained in the laboratory.

  19. How do Concerns about Pesticides Impact Consumer Willingness to Buy Genetically Modified French Fries in Germany? Results from a Purchasing Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Thea

    2012-01-01

    A purchasing experiment in which genetically modified (GM) and conventional french fries were offered for sale at fast food stands in Germany was conducted to assess whether a market exists for GM fries and to identify factors influencing the willingness to buy such fries. The GM and conventional fries were offered for sale at the same price at eight different locations. The GM fries were labelled as being made from “environmentally-friendlier genetically modified potatoes (much less sprays)”...

  20. Is HLA the cause of the high incidence of type 1 diabetes in the Canary Islands? Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Del Pino, Angelo; Medina-Rodríguez, Nathan; Hernández-García, Marta; Nóvoa-Mogollón, Francisco J; Wägner, Ana M

    2017-03-01

    Incidence of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus in the Canary Islands is the highest reported so far in Spain, and among the highest worldwide. The HLA region accounts for approximately half the genetic risk of type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to assess distribution of high-risk and protective HLA haplotypes in the Canarian families included in the T1DGC, as compared to the rest of Spain. The T1DGC study, an international project to study the genetics and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, enrolled more than 3000 families with type 1 diabetes worldwide. Spain provided 149 of these families, of whom 42 were from Tenerife and Gran Canaria. HLA was genotyped centrally using a PCR-based, sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system. Haplotypes were reconstructed using the deterministic algorithm alleHap in the R programming environment. Based on prior T1DGC results in Caucasian population, haplotypes DRB1*0405-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302, DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302, DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201, DRB1*0402-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 and DRB1*0404-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 were considered high-risk. DRB1*0701-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0303, DRB1*1401-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0503, DRB1*1501-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602, DRB1*1101-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1104-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1303-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 and DRB1*0403-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 were considered protective. The distribution of protective, high-risk, and other haplotypes in the (first two) affected siblings and unaffected parents from Canarian and non-Canarian Spanish families was compared (Chi-square test). No significant differences were found between the regions in distribution of the HLA haplotypes in the affected siblings or in the non-affected parents. The high incidence of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes in the Canarian population does not appear to be explained by a greater prevalence of high-risk class II HLA haplotypes in families with the disease. However, sample size limits the differences that can be detected

  1. Additive effects of LPL, APOA5 and APOE variant combinations on triglyceride levels and hypertriglyceridemia: results of the ICARIA genetic sub-study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the influence of several genetic variants in genes related with triglyceride (TG) metabolism has been described, including LPL, APOA5 and APOE. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms could produce clinically meaningful complementary information. Methods A subgroup of the ICARIA study comprising 1825 Spanish subjects (80% men, mean age 36 years) was genotyped for the LPL-HindIII (rs320), S447X (rs328), D9N (rs1801177) and N291S (rs268) polymorphisms, the APOA5-S19W (rs3135506) and -1131T/C (rs662799) variants, and the APOE polymorphism (rs429358; rs7412) using PCR and restriction analysis and TaqMan assays. We used regression analyses to examine their combined effects on TG levels (with the log-transformed variable) and the association of variant combinations with TG levels and hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 1.69 mmol/L), including the covariates: gender, age, waist circumference, blood glucose, blood pressure, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results We found a significant lowering effect of the LPL-HindIII and S447X polymorphisms (p hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:20429872

  2. Six Things Everyone Should Know About Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Six Things Six Things Everyone Should Know About Genetics 1. Genes 2. Inheritance 3. Stability 4. Variation ... deoxyribonucleic acid) and is basically a type of genetic instruction. Those instructions can be used for making ...

  3. Erosion protection benefits of stabilized SnF2 dentifrice versus an arginine-sodium monofluorophosphate dentifrice: results from in vitro and in situ clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N X; He, T; Macdonald, E L; Seong, J; Hellin, N; Barker, M L; Eversole, S L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of these investigations was to assess the ability of two fluoride dentifrices to protect against the initiation and progression of dental erosion using a predictive in vitro erosion cycling model and a human in situ erosion prevention clinical trial for verification of effectiveness. A stabilized stannous fluoride (SnF2) dentifrice (0.454 % SnF2 + 0.077 % sodium fluoride [NaF]; total F = 1450 ppm F) [dentifrice A] and a sodium monofluorophosphate [SMFP]/arginine dentifrice (1.1 % SMFP + 1.5 % arginine; total F = 1450 ppm F) [dentifrice B] were tested in a 5-day in vitro erosion cycling model and a 10-day randomized, controlled, double-blind, two-treatment, four-period crossover in situ clinical trial. In each study, human enamel specimens were exposed to repetitive product treatments using a standardized dilution of test products followed by erosive acid challenges in a systematic fashion. Both studies demonstrated statistically significant differences between the two products, with dentifrice A providing significantly better enamel protection in each study. In vitro, dentifrice A provided a 75.8 % benefit over dentifrice B (p erosion. Stabilized SnF2 dentifrices may provide more significant benefits to consumers than conventional fluoride dentifrices.

  4. Genetic Stability of Rice Aneuploid during Its Asexual Propagation%水稻非整倍体无性繁殖过程中的遗传稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚志云; 石国新; 刘秀秀; 裔传灯; 于恒秀

    2011-01-01

    无性繁殖是保存非整倍体的一个有效手段.为研究该过程中非整倍体的遗传稳定性,从水稻第8染色体短臂端三体(2n+-8S)自交后代中筛选出相应的端四体(2n+·8S+·8S),其田间性状表现为植株矮小,叶片非常窄且内卷,结实率差.在多年无性繁殖过程中,该端四体所添加的其中1条.8S容易丢失使无性系产生性状变异.通过FISH分析发现该无性变异系的原始株中所添加的2条-8S具有以下特点:其中1条-8S在着丝粒区域检测不到水稻着丝粒的基本组分CentO序列,但可以检测到水稻着丝粒的另一基本组分CRR序列,该染色体可以稳定遗传;另外1条-8S在着丝粒区域同时检测不到CentO和CRR序列,该染色体不能稳定遗传.而在最初保存的相应端三体亲本材料的.8S中,同时包含CentO和CRR序列.说明.8S上的CentO和CRR在多年的组织培养过程中会随机丢失,导致含有-8S的非整倍体在无性繁殖过程中的遗传不稳定性.%Telotetrasome is a kind of aneuploid with two additional identical telocentric chromosomes. To investigate the genetic stability of rice aneuploid during its asexual propagation, a telotetrasome (2n+·8S+·8S) was selected from the progenies of a rice telotrisome (2n+·8S), and preserved by asexual reproduction. But one of the extra short arms (·8S) was easy to be lost in the asexual propagation offspring of 2n+·8S+·8S and led to morphological variations. FISH results indicated that one of the two extra ·8S was short of detectable rice centromeric satellite repeat (CentO) and centromere-specific retrotransposon (CRR) and could not be transmitted stably. The other extra ·8S contained CRR, but no detectable CentO and could be transmitted steadily. However, the extra ·8S containes the CentO and CRR sequences simultaneously in the initial telotrisomic line (2n+·8S). These results showed that CentO and CRR of the extra ·8S may be randomly lost and led inheritance

  5. Ideal Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We define and explore the concept of ideal stabilization. The program is ideally stabilizing if its every state is legitimate. Ideal stabilization allows the specification designer to prescribe with arbitrary degree of precision not only the fault-free program behavior but also its recovery operation. Specifications may or may not mention all possible states. We identify approaches to designing ideal stabilization to both kinds of specifications. For the first kind, we state the necessary condition for an ideally stabilizing solution. On the basis of this condition we prove that there is no ideally stabilizing solution to the leader election problem. We illustrate the utility of the concept by providing examples of well-known programs and proving them ideally stabilizing. Specifically, we prove ideal stabilization of the conflict manager, the alternator, the propagation of information with feedback and the alternating bit protocol.

  6. Dipole stabilizers for a four-vane high current RFQ: Theoretical analysis and experimental results on a real-scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grespan, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, via Celoria, 16 I-20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.grespan@lnl.infn.it; Pisent, A.; Palmieri, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy)

    2007-11-21

    The Dipole Stabilizing Rods (DSRs) are devices used in order to reduce a priori the effect of perturbation on the operating mode of a four-vane RFQ caused by neighboring dipole modes by increasing the frequency spacing between the TE210 mode and dipole modes, without, in principle, affecting the quadrupole TE210 mode. They have proven to be particularly useful in the case of coupled RFQ's whose overall length is significantly greater than the operating wavelength. In this article we present a circuit model of such DSRs, that, used in combination with a Transmission Line Model of a four vane RFQ, has allowed us to predict the dimensioning of the DSRs in the case of the aluminium model of TRASCO RFQ. The DSR parameters and, in general, the accuracy of the model have been also confirmed by HFSS simulations and by RF measurements on the above-mentioned model.

  7. Assessing the relative stabilities of engineered hemoglobins using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, I

    1999-07-15

    An ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray source was used to examine the relative thermodynamic stabilities of various hemoglobins with respect to both tetramer dissociation and hemin dissociation. The results demonstrated that the stability of hemoglobin molecules can be differentiated by the amount of applied collision-induced dissociation (CID) energy necessary to break up the intact tetramer into its constituent globins. The stability of the intact tetramer was affected by single mutations in the beta-globins. The stabilities of the constituent hologlobins were assessed via trap CID of selected ions. The results demonstrated the importance of the contributions of the hologlobin components to the stability of the intact tetramer. Genetic fusion of two alpha-globins, through the introduction of a single glycine residue between the C-terminus of one alpha-chain and the N-terminus of the second, significantly increased the stability of the hemoglobin pseudo-tetramer. Chemical crosslinking of the beta-globins in addition to genetic fusion of alpha-globins further stabilized the hemoglobin molecule. A dihemoglobin molecule produced by the genetic fusion of two di-alpha-globins with a flexible linker demonstrated a decreased stability relative to the corresponding monohemoglobin.

  8. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/3. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Geology and mechanical stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanfors, R. [RS Consulting, Lund (Sweden); Olsson, Paer [Skanska AB Stockholm (Sweden); Stille, H. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    Prior to excavation of the laboratory in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase. The predictions concern five key issues: Geology, groundwater flow, groundwater chemistry, transport of solutes, and mechanical stability. Comparisons between predictions and observations were made during excavation in order to verify the reliability of the pre-investigations. This report presents a comparison between the geological and mechanical stability predictions and observations and an evaluation of data and investigation methods used for the 700-2874 m section of the tunnel. The report is specially highlighting the following conclusions: It is possible to localize major fracture zones during the pre-investigation at shallow (<200 m) depths; A number of minor fracture zones striking NNW-NNE were predicted to be hydraulically important and penetrate the southern area. A number of narrow fracture zone indications - 0.1-1 m wide - striking WNW-NE were mapped in the tunnel and pre-grouted sections confirm hydraulic conductors; It has not been possible to confirm the gently dipping zone EW-5, which was predicted as `possible`, with data from the tunnel; Predictions of the amount of different rock types were generally reliable as regards the major rocks, but the prediction of the distribution in space were poor as regards the minor rock types; The prediction of rock stress orientation corresponds well to the outcome; The prediction of rock quality for the tunnel, while applying the RMR-system, shows good correspondence to the observations made in the tunnel. 59 refs, 51 figs, 21 tabs.

  9. Genetic variation in the beta2-adrenergic receptor but not catecholamine-O-methyltransferase predisposes to chronic pain: results from the 1958 British Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Lynne J; Smith, Blair H; Jones, Gareth T; Reid, David M; Strachan, David P; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2010-04-01

    More than 1 in 10 adults in the general population experience chronic widespread body pain (CWP), which lies at one end of a continuous spectrum of pain ranging in both severity and duration. Neuroendocrine factors can modify the effect of known psychological and psychosocial risk factors for progression along the spectrum of pain and development of CWP, and genetic variants that affect neuroendocrine and neural processing potentially affect susceptibility to chronic pain development. We have examined variants across genes encoding the beta2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) and catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT) - key neuroendocrine signalling factors - in a large population-based sample to determine whether these may be involved in pain progression and CWP development. A nested association study was conducted using individuals from the 1958 British Birth Cohort Study who had been assessed for pain status. Genotypes were available for nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across ADRB2 and 11 SNPs across COMT. ADRB2 SNPs rs12654778 and rs1042713 were associated either with CWP alone (p=0.02 for both) or with position along pain spectrum (pain status; p=0.04). Common functional ADRB2 haplotype combinations were also associated with pain status (p(model)=0.002) and, further, with both extent and duration of pain (p(model)=0.003 and p(model)=0.002, respectively). There were no associations of either CWP or pain status with COMT genotypes or haplotypes. These results are the first to suggest that functional ADRB2 variants are involved in regulating pain status at a population level. A role for COMT in chronic pain development was not identified, though could not be excluded.

  10. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  11. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  12. Disclosing Huntington's Genetic Testing Results in the Context of Intellectual Disability and Guardianship: Using the Family Illness Narrative to Guide the Flow of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mark B; Schak, Kathryn M

    2016-10-15

    A diagnosis of Huntington's disease has broad social, vocational, reproductive and psychological implications. The ability to accurately diagnose the illness via genetic testing is not new. However, given a persistent lack of robustly effective interventions, it remains an area of ethical concern. The difficulty is compounded in cases of intellectual disability. This paper presents a case of genetic testing for Huntington's disease conducted on a patient with intellectual disability with guardian consent, but without the patient's direct knowledge and how the family illness narrative and psychiatric care were employed in the eventual disclosure of the patient's diagnosis and subsequent management.

  13. The impact of x-ray tube stabilization on localized radiation dose in axial CT scans: initial results in CTDI phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2016-10-01

    Rise, fall, and stabilization of the x-ray tube output occur immediately before and after data acquisition on some computed tomography (CT) scanners and are believed to contribute additional dose to anatomy facing the x-ray tube when it powers on or off. In this study, we characterized the dose penalty caused by additional radiation exposure during the rise, stabilization, and/or fall time (referred to as overscanning). A 32 cm CT dose-index (CTDI) phantom was scanned on three CT scanners: GE Healthcare LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare Discovery CT750 HD, and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash. Radiation exposure was detected for various x-ray tube start acquisition angles using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed in the peripheral chamber hole at the phantom’s 12 o’clock position. Scan rotation time, ionization chamber location, phantom diameter, and phantom centering were varied to quantify their effects on the dose penalty caused by overscanning. For 1 s single, axial rotations, CTDI at the 12 o’clock chamber position (CTDI100, 12:00) was 6.1%, 4.0%, and 4.4% higher when the start angle of the x-ray tube was aligned at the top of the gantry (12 o’clock) versus when the start angle was aligned at 9 o’clock for the Siemens Flash, GE CT750 HD, and GE VCT scanner, respectively. For the scanners’ fastest rotation times (0.285 s for the Siemens and 0.4 s for both GE scanners), the dose penalties increased to 22.3%, 10.7%, and 10.5%, respectively, suggesting a trade-off between rotation speed and the dose penalty from overscanning. In general, overscanning was shown to have a greater radiation dose impact for larger diameter phantoms, shorter rotation times, and to peripheral phantom locations. Future research is necessary to determine an appropriate method for incorporating the localized dose penalty from overscanning into standard dose metrics, as well as to assess the impact on organ dose.

  14. Genetic Variation in the Vitamin D Pathway in Relation to Risk of Prostate Cancer-Results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mondul, Alison M.; Shui, Irene M.; Yu, Kai; Travis, Ruth C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Campa, Daniele; Schumacher, Frederick R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Berndt, Sonja; Crawford, E. D.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Key, Timothy J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstroem, Sara; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Purdue, Mark; Stampfer, Meir J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies suggest that vitamin D status may be associated with prostate cancer risk although the direction and strength of this association differs between experimental and observational studies. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with 25-hydroxyvit

  15. PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer : results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dossus, Laure; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Albanes, Demetrius; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, John M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Dan O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Riboli, Elio; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Cox, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostat

  16. Melanocortin-1 receptor, skin cancer and phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project: Study design and methods for pooling results of genetic epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Raimondi (Susana); S. Gandini (Sara); M.C. Fargnoli (Maria Concetta); V. Bagnardi (Vincenzo); P. Maisonneuve (Patrick); C. Specchia (Claudia); R. Kumar (Rajiv); E. Nagore (Eduardo); J. Han; J. Hansson (Johan); P.A. Kanetsky (Peter A); P. Ghiorzo (Paola); N.A. Gruis (Nelleke); T. Dwyer (Terry); L. Blizzard (Leigh); R. Fernandez-De-Misa (Ricardo); W. Branicki (Wojciech); T. Debniak (Tadeusz); N. Morling (Niels); M.T. Landi (Maria Teresa); D. Palmieri (Dario); G. Ribas (Gloria); A. Stratigos (Alexander); L. Cornelius (Lynn); T. Motokawa (Tomonori); H. Anno (Hirofumi); P. Helsing (Per); T.H. Wong (Terence H); P.J.M. Autier (Philippe); J.C. García-Borrón (José C); J. Little (Julian); J. Newton-Bishop (Julia); J.P. de Sera; F. Liu (Fan); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: For complex diseases like cancer, pooled-analysis of individual data represents a powerful tool to investigate the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors to the development of a disease. Pooled-analysis of epidemiological studies has many advantag

  17. Genetic variability in Sudanese Acacia senegal (L.) assessed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUOYO

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... Gum Arabic producing agroforestry tree species in. Sudan. A. senegal .... Algadamblia 4, simmer 2, Simmer 1 and Nabg as sisters,. (Alphil 1, alphil 2 as .... RAPD markers could be used for differentiating Acacia senegal genotypes ... the result of genetic stability due to long overlapping generations, and a ...

  18. Low temperature conservation of Dioscorea bulbifera microtuber and genetic stability of its germination seedling%黄独微型块茎低温保存及其萌发苗遗传稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹明华; 洪森荣; 夏瑾华; 林国卫; 王爱斌; 柯维忠

    2015-01-01

    Using Dioscorea bulbifera microtubers as material,the anatomical structure and the physiological and bio-chemical indexes of microtubers during low-temperature conservation were observed and measured,the genetic stabil-ity of germination seedlings after low-temperature conservation was also tested in this article.The results were as fol-lows:HE staining method was complicated,whose effect was difficult to observe.Compared with HE staining meth-od,safranin fast green staining was much simpler,whose effect was better.Therefore,Safranin-fast green method was more suitable for staining of D.bulbifera microtubers;Without low temperature conservation,the starch grains in the cells around D.bulbifera microtuber has not begun to be exploited and be still conserved.When D.bulbifera microtuber treated with low temperature,the starch grains in the cells surrounding microtuber began to disappear.The longer the conservation time is,the more the cell number with no starch grains also increased.The starch grains in cells had started to translate into other substances for cell life activities during low temperature stor-age.When conserving for 90 d,the cell whose starch grains disappeared extended to the middle of the microtuber;During the low temperature conservation period,the antioxidase,the amylase activity,the proline content and the sol-uble sugar content of D.bulbifera microtubers all showed an increasing trend;During the low temperature conserva-tion of D.bulbifera microtubers for 0-90 d,SOD activity during 18-54 d continued to increase,and SOD activity during 54-90 d still remained unchanged;POD activity increased significantly within 18-36 d,maintained stability within 3-54 d,increased significantly during 54-72 d,kept stable again in 72-90 d;CAT activity trends is consist-ent with the SOD activity,which continued to increase in 18-54 d,and remain unchanged in 54-90 d;α-amylase and total amylase activity increased rapidly in 18-36 d,had no significant change in 36-54 d

  19. Genetic aspects and genetic epidemiology of parasomnias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublin, Christer; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2003-10-01

    Parasomnias are undesirable phenomena associated with sleep. Many of them run in families, and genetic factors have been long suggested to be involved in their occurrence. This article reviews the present knowledge of the genetics of the major classical behavioral parasomnias as well as present results from genetic epidemiological studies. The level and type of evidence for genetic effects varies much from parasomnia to parasomnia. The genetic factors are best established in enuresis, with several linkages to chromosomal loci, but their functions are not so far known. Environmental causes and gene-environment interactions are most probably also of great importance in the origin of complex traits or disorders such as parasomnias.

  20. Intrabody application of eptotermin alpha enhances bone formation in osteoporotic fractures of the lumbar spine; however, fails to increase biomechanical stability - results of an experimental sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Roepenack, Paula; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Roesner, Jan; Martin, Heiner; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses the effect of eptotermin α application into fractured vertebrae. It is hypothesized that eptotermin α is capable to enhance bony healing of the osteoporotic spine. In 10 Merino sheep osteoporosis induction was performed by ovariectomy, corticosteroid therapy and calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet; followed by standardized creation of lumbar vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) type A3.1 and consecutive fracture reduction/fixation using expandable mesh cages. Randomly, intravertebral eptotermin α (G1) or no augmentation was added (G2). Macroscopic, micro-CT, and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation two months postoperatively: Micro-CT data revealed bony consolidation for all cases with significant increased callus development for G2 (60%) and BV/TV (bone volume/total volume 73.45%, osteoporotic vertebrae 35.76%). Neither group showed improved biomechanical stability. Eptotermin α enhanced mineralisation in VCFs in an experimental setup with use of cementless augmentation via an expandable cage. However, higher bone mineral density did not lead to superior biomechanical properties.

  1. Genetic stability of a Vero-cell-derived, inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (P3 strain)%乙型脑炎Vero细胞灭活疫苗毒株的遗传稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海燕; 曹晗; 王俊荣; 张名; 梁疆莉; 马艳; 顾琴; 杨卉娟; 孙明波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate genetic stability of P3 strain of Vero cell derived inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine.Methods The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of E protein of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) P3 strain at different culture period including the mouse brain one passage seed,master seed,working seed the vaccine lot in addition to its 5 passages lot were determined,while the E gene and protein sequences were compared with JEV wide stain (AF036919) from the GenBank.Furthermore,the master seed,working seed,vaccine lot and its 5 passages lot of P3 stain were determined for virus titer,antigen concentration and the vaccine potency.Results The E gene and protein sequences of the above 5 passages of vaccine strain prepared for JEV vaccine showed no difference with homologies of 100%.When the 5 passages of vaccine stain compared with those JEV wide stain (AF036919),the gene sequence at E9,E10,E324,E330,E1223,E1338 showed difference with homologies of 99.73%.No silent mutation were investigated except the amino acid mutation at aE408 (L→S) but was no virulence-associated sites with homologies of 99.80%.The virus titers of the master seed,working seed,vaccine lot and its 5 passages lot of P3 stain were higher than 8.0 lgLD50/ml,while the antigen concentrations and the vaccine potency showed no difference.Conclusion The virus seed bank of P3 strain for Vero cell derived inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine showed high genetic stable.%目的 研究流行性乙型脑炎Vero细胞灭活疫苗毒种(P3毒株)在生产过程中的遗传稳定性,为疫苗的安全性和免疫原性评价提供依据.方法 检测P3毒株鼠脑传代一代毒株、主种子、工作种子、疫苗及疫苗续传5代后病毒E蛋白基因核苷酸及氨基酸序列,并与GenBank中乙脑病毒P3株(AF036919)进行比对分析,同时比较主种子、工作种子、疫苗及疫苗续传5代后毒株的病毒滴度、抗原含量及效价.结果 以上5代次病毒

  2. The IBEX Ribbon and the Pickup Ion Ring Stability in the Outer Heliosheath II. Monte-Carlo and Particle-in-cell Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, J.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The nearly circular ribbon of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission discovered by NASA’s Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer satellite (IBEX), is most commonly attributed to the effect of charge exchange of secondary pickup ions (PUIs) gyrating about the magnetic field in the outer heliosheath (OHS) and the interstellar space beyond. The first paper in the series (Paper I) presented a theoretical analysis of the pickup process in the OHS and hybrid-kinetic simulations, revealing that the kinetic properties of freshly injected proton rings depend sensitively on the details of their velocity distribution. It was demonstrated that only rings that are not too narrow (parallel thermal spread above a few km s-1) and not too wide (parallel temperature smaller than the core plasma temperature) could remain stable for a period of time long enough to generate ribbon ENAs. This paper investigates the role of electron dynamics and the extra spatial degree of freedom in the ring ion scattering process with the help of two-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic simulations. A good agreement is observed between ring evolution under unstable conditions in hybrid and PIC models, and the dominant modes are found to propagate parallel to the magnetic field. We also present more realistic ribbon PUI distributions generated using Monte Carlo simulations of atomic hydrogen in the global heliosphere and examine the effect of both the cold ring-like and the hot “halo” PUIs produced from heliosheath ENAs on the ring stability. It is shown that the second PUI population enhances the fluctuation growth rate, leading to faster isotropization of the solar-wind-derived ring ions.

  3. STABILIZATION PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarsih Sunarsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for natural syst ems used in Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP Sewon Bantul. The model is m odeling development, derived from the physical and biochemical phenomena involved in the biological treatment process. The numerical solution of the resulting on 13 simultaneous systems of nonlinear equations by the Quasi_Newton. Data validation is measured by facultative pond at the inlet and outlet of the pond to the concentration of b acteria, algae, zooplankton, organic matter, detritus, organic nitrogen, NH3, organi c phosphor, dissolved phosphorus, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, total coliform, faecal coliform and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD. A simulation model is presented to predict performance regime steady state of domestic wastewater treatment facultative stabilization pond. The high degree of significant of at least 10% indicates that the effluent parameters can be reasonably accurately predicted.

  4. Are genetic variations in OXTR, AVPR1A, and CD38 genes important to social integration? Results from two large U.S. cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, M Maria; Rewak, Marissa; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Walter, Stefan; Koenen, Karestan C; Kawachi, Ichiro; Liang, Liming; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that genetic polymorphisms in oxytocin pathway genes influence various social behaviors, but findings thus far have been mixed. Many studies have been based in small samples and there is possibility of publication bias. Using data from 2 large U.S. prospective cohorts with over 11,000 individuals, we investigated 88 SNPs in OXTR, AVPR1A, and CD38, in relation to social integration (measured as social connectedness in both binary and continuous forms and being continuously married). After correction for multiple testing only one SNP in CD38 (rs12644506) was significantly associated with social integration and that SNP predicted when using a dichotomized indicator of social connectedness (adjusted p=0.02), but not a continuous measure of social connectedness or the continuously married outcome. A significant gender-heterogeneous effect was identified in one OXTR SNP on dichotomized social connectedness; specifically, rs4686302 T allele was nominally associated with social connectedness in men, whereas the association direction was opposite in women (adjusted gender heterogeneity p=0.02). Furthermore, the rs53576 A allele was significantly associated with social connectedness only in women, and the effect magnitude was stronger in a dominant genetic model (adjusted p=0.003). In summary, our findings suggested that common genetic variants of OXTR, CD38, and AVPR1A are not associated with social integration as measured in this study using the simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index, but these findings and other work hint that effects may be modified by gender or other social experiences. Further work considering genetic pathways in relation to social integration may be more fruitful if these additional factors can be more comprehensively evaluated.

  5. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troedhan Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT. Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP or monophasic (100% bTCP SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV measured as clinical expression of the (biomechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (biomechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (biomechanical stable restored alveolar bone.

  6. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L.; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary ‘ratchets’, limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431522

  7. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    cheaper products. One aspect that can have a large impact on the efficiency of an enzyme is its stability. By increasing the enzyme stability production cost and time can be reduced, and consumers will have a better product with longer activity. In the past it was only possible to increasing enzymes...... stability by randomly generate mutants and lengthy screening processes to identify the best new mutants. However, with the increase in available genomic sequences of thermophilic or hyperthermophilic organisms a world of enzymes with intrinsic high stability are now available. As these organisms are adapted...... to life at high temperatures so are their enzymes, as a result the high stability is accompanied by low activity at moderate temperatures. Thus, much effort had been put into decoding the mechanisms behind the high stability of the thermophilic enzymes. The hope is to enable scientist to design enzymes...

  8. Development, evaluation, and use of a genetic literacy concept inventory for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany Vice

    There is continued emphasis on increasing and improving genetics education for grades K-12, medical professionals, and the general public. An additional critical audience is the undergraduate student in introductory biology and genetics courses. There has been little effort to assess these students' understanding of genetics concepts and their level of genetic literacy (i.e. genetics knowledge as it relates to and impacts their lives). We have developed, evaluated, and used a new survey instrument to assess the genetic literacy of undergraduate students taking introductory biology or genetics courses. The Genetic Literacy Concept Inventory (GLCI) is a 31-item multiple choice test that addresses 17 concepts identified as central to genetic literacy by a team of ASHG professional geneticists. The items were selected and modified based upon reviews by 25 genetic professionals and educators. The inventory underwent additional review in student focus groups and pilot testing. Analysis was carried out on content validity, discriminate validity, internal consistency, and stability of the inventory, with results indicating it is reasonably valid and reliable. The GLCI has been utilized pre-course and post-course in six introductory non-major biology and genetics courses, with over 350 students taking the inventory. Current data from students in introductory biology courses show a pre-course average of 41% correct. Post-course scores increased only modestly to an average of 48% in these courses which emphasized genetics to varying degrees. Even in an introductory genetics course the pre-course average of 54% increased to only 59%. These results are consistent with similar studies in physics and chemistry where concept inventories have been implemented in courses using more traditional teaching methods. This study directly enhances genetics education research by providing a valid and reliable instrument for assessing genetic literacy in undergraduate students. It also begins

  9. Trunk orientation, stability and quadrupedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri P Ivanenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Interesting cases of human quadrupedalism described by Uner Tan and colleagues (2005-2012 have attracted the attention of geneticists, neurologists and anthropologists. Since his first publications in 2005, the main attention has focused on the genetic aspects of disorders that lead to quadrupedalism within an evolutionary framework. In recent years this area has undergone a convincing critique (Downey 2010 and ended with a call "... to move in a different direction … away from thinking solely in terms of genetic abnormality and evolutionary atavism". We consider quadrupedalism as a ‘natural experiment’ that may contribute to our knowledge of the physiological mechanisms underlying our balance system and our tendency toward normal (upright posture. Bipedalism necessitates a number of characteristics that distinguish us from our ancestors and present-day mammals, including: size and shape of the bones of the foot, structure of the axial and proximal musculature, and the orientation of the human body and head. In this review we address the results of experimental studies on the mechanisms that stabilize the body in healthy people, as well as how these mechanisms may be disturbed in various forms of clinical pathology. These disturbances are related primarily to automatic rather than voluntary control of posture and suggest that human quadrupedalism is a behavior that can result from adaptive processes triggered by disorders in postural tone and environmental cues. These results will serve as a starting point for comparing and contrasting bi- and quadrupedalism.

  10. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  11. Spatial Pattern of the Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Genetic Variation in Poland as a Result of the Migration of Abies alba Mill. from Different Glacial Refugia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Litkowiec

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the information on the gene pool of silver fir (Abies alba Mill. at the northeastern edge of its distribution in Poland is scarce and insufficient. Using the advantage provided by markers with different modes of inheritance, a hypothesis that gene flow via both seeds and pollen contributed to the genetic structure across the entire analyzed region was investigated. The geographic distribution of maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, nad5-4 and paternally inherited chloroplast DNA (cpDNA, psbC variation was studied in 81 Polish populations and three reference populations from Ukraine and Romania. The spatial pattern of mtDNA haplotypes (dispersed via seeds indicated that the Apennine Peninsula was the only maternal glacial refugium for the entire territory of Poland and also the Ukraine no 1 population, whereas the other two populations—Ukraine no 2 and Romania—had the haplotype representing the Balkan origin. By contrast, the cpDNA haplotypes (dispersed via pollen from all studied Polish and reference populations showed that A. alba colonized the current natural range from two genetically distinct glacial refugia located on the Apennine and Balkan peninsulas. The occurrence of cpDNA haplotypes varied among the studied populations. Additionally, statistical analyses were used to infer the genetic structure of examined populations. Two distinct groups of A. alba populations were identified showing the postglacial geographic distribution of haplotypes of both mtDNA and cpDNA. A. alba is an important ecological and economic component of forest ecosystems in Europe. An understanding of the Holocene history of this species is relevant for planning sustainable forest management, and acquired data can contribute to strategies of conservation and restoration.

  12. Improved genetic algorithm freely searching for dangerous slip surface of slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Wen; CAO Ping; FENG Tao; YUAN Hai-ping

    2005-01-01

    Based on the slice method of the non-circular slip surface for the calculation of integral stability of slope, an improved genetic algorithm was proposed, which can freely search for the most dangerous slip surface of slope and the corresponding minimum safety factor without supposing the geometric shape of the most dangerous slip surface. This improved genetic algorithm can simulate the genetic evolution process of organisms and avoid the local minimum value compared with the classical methods. The results of engineering cases show that it is a global optimal algorithm and has many advantages, such as higher efficiency and shorter time than the simple genetic algorithm.

  13. MAPT H1 haplotype is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease risk in APOE ε 4 noncarriers: Results from the dementia genetics Spanish consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor, Pau; Bullido, María Jesús; Sastre, Isabel; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    The MAPT H1 haplotype has been linked to several disorders, but its relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. A rare variant in MAPT (p.A152T) has been linked with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD. We genotyped H1/H2 and p.A152T MAPT in 11,572 subjects from Spain (4,327 AD, 563 FTD, 648 Parkinson's disease (PD), 84 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 5,950 healthy controls). Additionally, we included 101 individuals from 21 families with genetic FTD. MAPT p.A...

  14. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  15. Identification of two key genes controlling chill haze stability of beer in barley (Hordeum vulgare L)

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Ning, Huajiang; Li, Chengdao; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    Background In bright beer, haze formation is a serious quality problem, degrading beer quality and reducing its shelf life. The quality of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) malt, as the main raw material for beer brewing, largely affects the colloidal stability of beer. Results In this study, the genetic mechanism of the factors affecting beer haze stability in barley was studied. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of alcohol chill haze (ACH) in beer was carried out using a Franklin/Yerong doubl...

  16. Longitudinal stability in reading comprehension is largely heritable from grades 1 to 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Brooke; Christopher, Micaela E; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Olson, Richard K; Cutting, Laurie; Keenan, Janice M; Thompson, Lee A; Wadsworth, Sally J; Willcutt, Erik G; Petrill, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Reading comprehension is a foundational academic skill and significant attention has focused on reading development. This report is the first to examine the stability and change in genetic and environmental influences on reading comprehension across Grades 1 to 6. This developmental range is particularly important because it encompasses the timespan in which most children move from learning how to read to using reading for learning. Longitudinal simplex models were fitted separately for two independent twin samples (N = 706; N = 976). Results suggested that the shared environment contributed to variance in early but not later reading. Instead, stability in reading development was largely mediated by continuous genetic influences. Thus, although reading is clearly a learned skill and the environment remains important for reading development, individual differences in reading comprehension appear to be also influenced by a core of genetic stability that persists through the developmental course of reading.

  17. Longitudinal stability in reading comprehension is largely heritable from grades 1 to 6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Soden

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension is a foundational academic skill and significant attention has focused on reading development. This report is the first to examine the stability and change in genetic and environmental influences on reading comprehension across Grades 1 to 6. This developmental range is particularly important because it encompasses the timespan in which most children move from learning how to read to using reading for learning. Longitudinal simplex models were fitted separately for two independent twin samples (N = 706; N = 976. Results suggested that the shared environment contributed to variance in early but not later reading. Instead, stability in reading development was largely mediated by continuous genetic influences. Thus, although reading is clearly a learned skill and the environment remains important for reading development, individual differences in reading comprehension appear to be also influenced by a core of genetic stability that persists through the developmental course of reading.

  18. Results of an intervention for individuals and families with BRCA mutations: a model for providing medical updates and psychosocial support following genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Wendy; Naud, Shelly; Ashikaga, Taka; Colletti, Rose; Wood, Marie

    2007-08-01

    : Providing medical management updates and long-term support to families with hereditary cancer syndromes in rural areas is a challenge. To address this, we designed a one-day retreat for BRCA1/2 carriers in our region. The retreat included educational updates about medical management, genetic privacy and discrimination, and addressed psychological and family issues. Evaluations completed at the conclusion of the retreat were overwhelmingly positive with requests for a similar event in the future. The impact of this retreat on a variety of health behaviors was assessed. Eligible participants completed questionnaires before and 6 months after the retreat. Questionnaires focused on lifestyle, cancer screening and prevention practices, psychological history and distress, decision-making regarding genetic testing, and family communication issues. For individuals who completed both the pre and post retreat questionnaires, one-half made lifestyle changes and nearly two-thirds increased cancer screening, initiated chemoprevention, completed or planned to complete preventative surgery in the future. We conclude that this type of forum provides a valuable opportunity for BRCA carriers and their families to receive updated medical information, share personal experiences, provide and receive support, as well as change health behaviors.

  19. Genetic network models: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Someren, Eugene P.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2001-06-01

    Currently, the need arises for tools capable of unraveling the functionality of genes based on the analysis of microarray measurements. Modeling genetic interactions by means of genetic network models provides a methodology to infer functional relationships between genes. Although a wide variety of different models have been introduced so far, it remains, in general, unclear what the strengths and weaknesses of each of these approaches are and where these models overlap and differ. This paper compares different genetic modeling approaches that attempt to extract the gene regulation matrix from expression data. A taxonomy of continuous genetic network models is proposed and the following important characteristics are suggested and employed to compare the models: inferential power; predictive power; robustness; consistency; stability and computational cost. Where possible, synthetic time series data are employed to investigate some of these properties. The comparison shows that although genetic network modeling might provide valuable information regarding genetic interactions, current models show disappointing results on simple artificial problems. For now, the simplest models are favored because they generalize better, but more complex models will probably prevail once their bias is more thoroughly understood and their variance is better controlled.

  20. Adaptive genetic potential of coniferous forest tree species under climate change: implications for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Teodosiu, Maria; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Daia, Mihai; Mirancea, Ionel; Ivanov, Paula; Alin, Alexandru

    2017-04-01

    Mountain ecosystems are extremely vulnerable to climate change. The real potential for adaptation depends upon the existence of a wide genetic diversity in trees populations, upon the adaptive genetic variation, respectively. Genetic diversity offers the guarantee that forest species can survive, adapt and evolve under the influence of changing environmental conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the genetic diversity and adaptive genetic potential of two local species - Norway spruce and European silver fir - in the context of regional climate change. Based on data from a long-term provenance experiments network and climate variables spanning over more than 50 years, we have investigated the impact of climatic factors on growth performance and adaptation of tree species. Our results indicate that climatic and geographic factors significantly affect forest site productivity. Mean annual temperature and annual precipitation amount were found to be statistically significant explanatory variables. Combining the additive genetic model with the analysis of nuclear markers we obtained different images of the genetic structure of tree populations. As genetic indicators we used: gene frequencies, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, genetic variance, plasticity. Spatial genetic analyses have allowed identifying the genetic centers holding high genetic diversity which will be valuable sources of gene able to buffer the negative effects of future climate change. Correlations between the marginal populations and in the optimal vegetation, between the level of genetic diversity and ecosystem stability, will allow the assessment of future risks arising from current genetic structure. Therefore, the strategies for sustainable forest management have to rely on the adaptive genetic variation and local adaptation of the valuable genetic resources. This work was realized within the framework of the project GENCLIM (Evaluating the adaptive potential of the main

  1. Modeling and stabilization results for a charge or current-actuated active constrained layer (ACL) beam model with the electrostatic assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özer, Ahmet Özkan

    2016-04-01

    An infinite dimensional model for a three-layer active constrained layer (ACL) beam model, consisting of a piezoelectric elastic layer at the top and an elastic host layer at the bottom constraining a viscoelastic layer in the middle, is obtained for clamped-free boundary conditions by using a thorough variational approach. The Rao-Nakra thin compliant layer approximation is adopted to model the sandwich structure, and the electrostatic approach (magnetic effects are ignored) is assumed for the piezoelectric layer. Instead of the voltage actuation of the piezoelectric layer, the piezoelectric layer is proposed to be activated by a charge (or current) source. We show that, the closed-loop system with all mechanical feedback is shown to be uniformly exponentially stable. Our result is the outcome of the compact perturbation argument and a unique continuation result for the spectral problem which relies on the multipliers method. Finally, the modeling methodology of the paper is generalized to the multilayer ACL beams, and the uniform exponential stabilizability result is established analogously.

  2. On the macroscopic response, microstructure evolution, and macroscopic stability of short-fibre-reinforced elastomers at finite strains: I - Analytical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazmohammadi, Reza; Ponte Castañeda, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a homogenization-based constitutive model for the mechanical behaviour of particle-reinforced elastomers with random microstructures subjected to finite deformations. The model is based on a recently improved version of the tangent second-order (TSO) method (Avazmohammadi and Ponte Castañeda, J. Elasticity 112 (2013) p.139-183) for two-phase, hyperelastic composites and is able to directly account for the shape, orientation, and concentration of the particles. After a brief summary of the TSO homogenization method, we describe its application to composites consisting of an incompressible rubber reinforced by aligned, spheroidal, rigid particles, undergoing generally non-aligned, three-dimensional loadings. While the results are valid for finite particle concentrations, in the dilute limit they can be viewed as providing a generalization of Eshelby's results in linear elasticity. In particular, we provide analytical estimates for the overall response and microstructure evolution of the particle-reinforced composites with generalized neo-Hookean matrix phases under non-aligned loadings. For the special case of aligned pure shear and axisymmetric shear loadings, we give closed-form expressions for the effective stored-energy function of the composites with neo-Hookean matrix behaviour. Moreover, we investigate the possible development of "macroscopic" (shear band-type) instabilities in the homogenized behaviour of the composite at sufficiently large deformations. These instabilities whose wavelengths are much larger than the typical size of the microstructure are detected by making use of the loss of strong ellipticity condition for the effective stored-energy function of the composites. The analytical results presented in this paper will be complemented in Part II (Avazmohammadi and Ponte Castaneda, Phil. Mag. (2014)) of this work by specific applications for several representative microstructures and loading configurations.

  3. Ca(2+) -complex stability of GAPAGPLIVPY peptide in gas and aqueous phase, investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis and molecular dynamics simulations and compared to mass spectrometric results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, Markus; El Deeb, Sami; Mozafari, Mona; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Preu, Lutz; Redweik, Sabine; Lehmann, Wolf Dieter; Wätzig, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Strong, sequence-specific gas-phase bindings between proline-rich peptides and alkaline earth metal ions in nanoESI-MS experiments were reported by Lehmann et al. (Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 20, 2404-2410), however its relevance for physiological-like aqueous phase is uncertain. Therefore, the complexes should also be studied in aqueous solution and the relevance of the MS method for binding studies be evaluated. A mobility shift ACE method was used for determining the binding between the small peptide GAPAGPLIVPY and various metal ions in aqueous solution. The findings were compared to the MS results and further explained using computational methods. While the MS data showed a strong alkaline earth ion binding, the ACE results showed nonsignificant binding. The proposed vacuum state complex also decomposed during a molecular dynamic simulation in aqueous solution. This study shows that the formed stable peptide-metal ion adducts in the gas phase by ESI-MS does not imply the existence of analogous adducts in the aqueous phase. Comparing peptide-metal ion interaction under the gaseous MS and aqueous ACE conditions showed huge difference in binding behavior.

  4. Set-based Tasks within the Singularity-robust Multiple Task-priority Inverse Kinematics Framework: General Formulation, Stability Analysis and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe eMoe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inverse kinematics algorithms are commonly used in robotic systems to transform tasks to joint references, and several methods exist to ensure the achievement of several tasks simultaneously. The multiple task-priority inverse kinematicsframework allows tasks to be considered in a prioritized order by projecting task velocities through the nullspaces of higherpriority tasks. This paper extends this framework to handle setbased tasks, i.e. tasks with a range of valid values, in addition to equality tasks, which have a specific desired value. Examples of set-based tasks are joint limit and obstacle avoidance. The proposed method is proven to ensure asymptotic convergence of the equality task errors and the satisfaction of all high-priority set-based tasks. The practical implementation of the proposed algorithm is discussed, and experimental results are presented where a number of both set-based and equality tasks have been implemented on a 6 degree of freedom UR5 which is an industrial robotic arm from Universal Robots. The experiments validate thetheoretical results and confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Ensuring Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    "Stable"will be a key word for China’s economy in 2012.That’s the beat set at the annual Central Economic Work Conference held in Beijing on December 12-14,which reviewed this year’s development and mapped out plans for the next year.Policymakers at the conference decided to keep macroeconomic policies stable,seek a stable and relatively fast economic growth,stabilize consumer prices and maintain social stability in 2012.On the basis of stability,the government will transform the development model,deepen reform and improve people’s livelihood.

  6. PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer: results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossus, Laure; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Albanes, Demetrius; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, John M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Dan O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Riboli, Elio; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Cox, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00–1.74, Ptrend = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75–1.02; Ptrend = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99–1.26; Ptrend = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04–1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers. PMID:19965896

  7. Stabilizing Niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    international intervention in Niger. Their main objective is to secure their own strategic, economic and political interests by strengthening the Nigerien authorities through direct intervention and capacity building activities. For western states reinforcing state security institutions and stabilizing elite...

  8. Maintaining genome stability in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Active maintenance of genome stability is a prerequisite for the development and function of the nervous system. The high replication index during neurogenesis and the long life of mature neurons highlight the need for efficient cellular programs to safeguard genetic fidelity. Multiple DNA damage response pathways ensure that replication stress and other types of DNA lesions, such as oxidative damage, do not affect neural homeostasis. Numerous human neurologic syndromes result from defective DNA damage signaling and compromised genome integrity. These syndromes can involve different neuropathology, which highlights the diverse maintenance roles that are required for genome stability in the nervous system. Understanding how DNA damage signaling pathways promote neural development and preserve homeostasis is essential for understanding fundamental brain function.

  9. Stability of Blood Samples for Hemoglobin Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira Valdés Fraser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: the National Medical Genetics Center has conducted the prenatal screening for hemoglobinopathies in the province of Artemisa and the quality control of this program nationwide; reliability of the results is determined by the quality of the samples used. Objective: to describe the stability of whole blood samples using EDTAK2 and heparin as anticoagulants. Methods: a descriptive study of 100 samples of whole blood from pregnant women and their husbands was conducted at the National Medical Genetics Center. Hemoglobin electrophoresis with Hydrasis technology was performed using 10 % EDTAK2, 2.2 % and 5 % heparin, temperature at 4-8 0C and shelf-life of 7.15 and 30 days. Results: samples with EDTAK2 showed stability for a month with accuracy and repeatability in the electrophoresis runs. By using 5 % and 2.2 % heparin, problems were found in all periods analyzed. Conclusions: 10 % EDTAK2 anticoagulant is appropriate to ensure the reliability of the results in the screening for hemoglobinopathies. The results obtained in this study can be applied in all clinical, hematological and hemoglobin electrophoresis laboratories.

  10. Genetic simplex modeling of Eysenck's dimensions of personality in a sample of young Australian twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Evans, David E; Wright, Margie M; Martin, Nicholas G

    2004-12-01

    The relative stability and magnitude of genetic and environmental effects underlying major dimensions of adolescent personality across time were investigated. The Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was administered to over 540 twin pairs at ages 12, 14 and 16 years. Their personality scores were analyzed using genetic simplex modeling which explicitly took into account the longitudinal nature of the data. With the exception of the dimension lie, multivariate model fitting results revealed that familial aggregation was entirely explained by additive genetic effects. Results from simplex model fitting suggest that large proportions of the additive genetic variance observed at ages 14 and 16 years could be explained by genetic effects present at the age of 12 years. There was also evidence for smaller but significant genetic innovations at 14 and 16 years of age for male and female neuroticism, at 14 years for male extraversion, at 14 and 16 years for female psychoticism, and at 14 years for male psychoticism.

  11. Legacy Compliance Final Report: Results of the Navy/Encapo Soil Stabilization Study at the Nevada Test Site, Nye Coun