WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetic skin diseases

  1. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person.

  2. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  3. Cell-Type-Specific Differentiation and Molecular Profiles in Skin Transplantation: Implication of Medical Approach for Genetic Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Oyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin is highly accessible and valuable organ, which holds promise to accelerate the understanding of future medical innovation in association with skin transplantation, engineering, and wound healing. In skin transplantation biology, multistage and multifocal damages occur in both grafted donor and perilesional host skin and need to be repaired properly for the engraftment and maintenance of characteristic skin architecture. These local events are more unlikely to be regulated by the host immunity, because human skin transplantation has accomplished the donor skin engraftment onto the immunocompromised or immunosuppressive animals. Recent studies have emerged the importance of α-smooth muscle actin- (SMA- positive myofibroblasts, via stage- and cell-specific contribution of TGFβ, PDGF, ET-1, CCN-2 signalling pathways, and mastocyte-derived mediators (e.g., histamine and tryptase, for the functional reorganisation of the grafted skin. Moreover, particular cell lineages from bone marrow (BM cells have been shown to harbour the diferentiation capacity into multiple skin cell phenotypes, including epidermal keratinocytes and dermal endothelial cells and pericytes, undercontrolled by chemokines or cytokines. From a dermatological viewpoint, we review the recent update of cell-type- and molecular-specific action associated with reconstitution of the grafted skin and also focus on the novel application of BM transplantation medicine in genetic skin diseases.

  4. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  5. Genetic illnesses of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordania Velázquez Avila

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At present, many genetic diseases, from 85 to 90 %, are considered rare diseases, since they affect a small number of individuals. The poor knowledge about them makes it difficult to diagnose them; they are chronic, incapacitating, with few therapeutic options diseases and often makes the patients’ adequate social integration impossible. The genodermatosis are part of the group of rare, uncommon and difficult to diagnose skin diseases; they are a frequent cause of stigmatization of those people who suffer from them. They may include: ichthyosis, epidermolysis bullosa, mastocytosis, neurofibromatosis, ectodermal dysplasia, palmoplantar keratoderma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, pityriasis rubra pylaris, xeroderma pigmentosum, epiloia, Darier's disease, and vascular tumors, among others. It is necessary to increase knowledge about them in the field of medical sciences, allowing a better treatment for patients and improve their quality of life, as well as contribute to their prevention.

  6. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing technolog

  7. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing technolog

  8. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  9. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  10. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, Vera; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Alfonso, Jose Hernan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  11. Smoking and skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic wounds. Most likely, alteration of inflammatory cell function and extracellular matrix turnover caused by smoking-induced oxidative stress are involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  12. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  13. Gene therapy for skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorell, Emily; Nguyen, Ngon; Lane, Alfred; Siprashvili, Zurab

    2014-04-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene therapy widely available clinically.

  14. Gene Therapy for Skin Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The skin possesses qualities that make it desirable for gene therapy, and studies have focused on gene therapy for multiple cutaneous diseases. Gene therapy uses a vector to introduce genetic material into cells to alter gene expression, negating a pathological process. This can be accomplished with a variety of viral vectors or nonviral administrations. Although results are promising, there are several potential pitfalls that must be addressed to improve the safety profile to make gene thera...

  15. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...... wounds. Most likely, alteration of inflammatory cell function and extracellular matrix turnover caused by smoking-induced oxidative stress are involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms....

  16. Skin involvement in Dupuytren's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, R.; Igali, L; Figus, A

    2016-01-01

    Whether the palmar skin has a role in the development, propagation or recurrence of Dupuytren's disease remains unclear. Clinical assessment for skin involvement is difficult and its correlation with histology uncertain. We prospectively biopsied the palmar skin of consecutive patients undergoing single digit fasciectomy (for primary Dupuytren's disease without clinically involved skin) and dermofasciectomy (for clinically involved skin or recurrence) in order to investigate this relationship...

  17. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  18. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  19. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  20. Hereditary skin diseases of hemidesmosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF

    1999-01-01

    Studies of hereditary blistering skin diseases (epidermolysis bullosa) and targeted gene mutation experiments in knockout mice have greatly improved our understanding of hemidesmosomes and their associated structures in the cytoskeleton and basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. At leas

  1. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  2. Skin disorders in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Astrid-Helene; Thyssen, Jacob P; Egeberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    with bullous pemphigoid. Moreover, a 2-fold increase in risk of new-onset PD has been observed in patients with rosacea. Besides the association between PD and various dermatological disorders, the skin may be useful in the diagnosis of PD. Early PD pathology is found not only in the brain but also in extra......-neuronal tissues. Thus, the protein α-synuclein, which is genetically associated with PD, is present not only in the CNS but also in the skin. Hence, higher values of α-synuclein have been observed in the skin of patients with PD. Furthermore, an increased risk of PD has been found in the Cys/Cys genotype, which...... is associated with red hair color. In this review, we summarize the current evidence of the association between PD and dermatological disorders, the cutaneous adverse effects of neurological medications, and describe the potential of skin protein expression and biomarkers in identification of risk and diagnosis...

  3. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Napolitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient’s overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  4. [Skin cancer as occupational disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of epithelial skin neoplasms, such as squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma is significantly increasing worldwide. Leisure time solar UV exposure is causative in the overwhelming majority of cases in the general population; however, occupational exposure is responsible for a certain percentage of cases. Employees with a relevant exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot, raw paraffin, coal tar, anthracene, pitch or similar substances, to sunlight in outdoor occupations as well as to arsenic and ionizing radiation have a significantly increased risk to develop occupational skin cancer compared to the general population. In the official occupational disease list in the appendix of the German by-law on occupational diseases, the following occupational diseases concerning skin cancer are listed: BK 5102 "skin cancer and carcinoma in situ caused by soot, raw paraffin, coal tar, anthracene, pitch or similar substances" (e.g. various solid paraffins, asphalt and mazut as well as mineral oils, grease, cylinder and drilling oils), BK 5103 "squamous cell carcinoma or multiple actinic keratosis caused by natural UV radiation", BK 1108 "diseases caused by arsenic and its compounds" and BK 2402 "diseases caused by ionizing radiation". For further occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances and potential occupationally acquired skin tumors, no official lists are currently available. These cancers might be considered under a special opt out paragraph in the German Social Law (§ 9 para 2 SGB VII). Tumors in scars after occupational skin trauma or occupational burns are compensated as consequences of work accidents. The current official list of occupational skin cancers and new developments for expert opinions are described in this article.

  5. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You can ... contributions to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of genetic diseases. Learn how advances at Mount Sinai have impacted ...

  6. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  7. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  8. Genetics of Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Christine; Westenberger, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years of genetic research in Parkinson's disease (PD) have led to the identification of several monogenic forms of the disorder and of numerous genetic risk factors increasing the risk to develop PD...

  9. [Skin changes in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrić, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The Intruduction includes those eflorescences that might be useful for diagnostics in rheumatology. Further in the text we have described four groups of rheumatic disorders. The first group: rheumatic diseases (lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, the mixed connective tissue disease, allergic vasculitis, polyarteritis) which are the most common from the dermatological point of view. The second group: rheumatic diseases (Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren, Reiter and Behçet syndrome and Kawasaki's disease) which are rarely of interest to our dermatologists. In this group there is also psoriatic arthritis, which is not rare in dermatology but its diagnostics and treatment belong to rheumatologists' field of expertise. The third group: infections (rheumatic fever, diseminated gonococcal infection, subacute bacterial endocarditis, Lyme disesease). The fourth group: metabolic disorders (gout). The diseases of the first group are described completely. In the second, third and fourth group of the diseases we have included only skin changes.

  10. Obesity, genetics and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millington, G W M

    2013-01-01

    The increasing problem of obesity in childhood is recognized as both a short-term and long-term serious public-health concern. Excess body weight may contribute to psychological morbidity; cancers; metabolic, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders; and dermatological conditions. There is increasing recognition of the role of genetic factors in the aetiology of obesity. Although in the vast majority of cases these influences are polygenic, some obese children suffer from monogenic disorders, which may present with obesity alone. However, more often than not, they generally display other syndromic features. Some of these syndromes have a clear cutaneous phenotype, and these conditions will be the focus of this review. © The Author(s) CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Genetic diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolettis, Peter N

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diseases that do not primarily affect the genitourinary tract may have urologic manifestations. These urologic manifestations range from benign and malignant renal disease to infertility. Thus, the practicing urologist may be involved in the care of these patients and should have knowledge of these diseases. Continued improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these genetic diseases will likely result in improved survival and will increase the number of patients who may develop urologic manifestations of these diseases.

  12. [Occupational skin diseases in medical personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases develop mostly in certain occupational groups at risk. The authors studied features of occupational skin diseases in medical personnel examined over 2003-2007. During this time, occupational skin disease was diagnosed in 118 individuals out of which 24 (20.3%) were medical staffers. All 24 examinees suffered from occupational allergic skin conditions. Most common causes of these were medicines, latex, desinfectants. Nurses are most prone to skin conditions (91.67%). Special risk group covers surgeons, psychiatrists and dentists. As medical staffers are occupational risk group for occupational skin conditions, diagnosed allergic dermatoses in them should be considered as having possible occupational occupational origin.

  13. Pattern of skin disease in Hail region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz Al Shammrie

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Dermatitis, acne, vitiligo, alopecia, viral wart and psoriasis are the most common top six skin diseases in hail region compared to other previous study in Hail region. The prevalence of skin disease in any community depends upon various factors, namely the genetic, racial constitution, the social and hygienic standards, customs and occupations, the nutritional status, age structure of the community, climatic factors and state of industrialization.

  14. Parkinson's disease and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jacobo; Otero-Siliceo, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) is a condition of unknown cause. Several factors are believed to contribute to its onset, and many studies have been conducted in search of the possible etiology of Parkinson disease. Genetic factors have become relevant when trying to explain the onset of Parkinson disease. The studies are divided into 2 categories: epidemiological and studies that analyze twins from families with members suffering from Parkinson disease, thus looking for the responsible genetic mutations. In this article we address this controversial topic, reviewing some of the most significant studies trying to provide evidence which relates genetics to Parkinson disease. We present current epidemiological studies and the most important genetic factors related to Parkinson disease, including the latest information currently available on each issue.

  15. Research on Skin Diseases - USSR -

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    group 6, Today Tilth the introduction of mandatory accounting on form 25-v, wre have begun to enter information on the morbidity of the infantile ...34 population. Table 2 illustrates preliminary data on the morbidity of the infantile population in the first half of 1958 for Leningrad but does not...Skin cancer 0.01 16« Acute eczema 5.6 33. Non-malignant tumor 1.9 17. Chronic eczema 2.7 . 39, Other diseases .’. 2.0 18. Eczemotization

  16. Expert System For Diagnosis Of Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.L.C. Amarathunga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dermatology is a one of major session of medicine that concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases. Skin diseases are the most common form of disease in humans. Recently many of researchers have advocated and developed the imaging of human vision or in the loop approach to visual object recognition. This research paper presents a development of a skin diseases diagnosis system which allows user to identify diseases of the human skin and to provide advises or medical treatments in a very short time period. For this purpose user will have to upload an image of skin disease to our system and answer questions based on their skin condition or symptoms. It will be used to detect diseases of the skin and offer a treatment recommendation. This system uses technologies such as image processing and data mining for the diagnosis of the disease of the skin. The image of skin disease is taken and it must be subjected to various preprocessing for noise eliminating and enhancement of the image. This image is immediately segmentation of images using threshold values. Finally data mining techniques are used to identify the skin disease and to suggest medical treatments or advice for users. This expert system exhibits disease identification accuracy of 85 for Eczema 95 for Impetigo and 85 for Melanoma.

  17. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    , as have many diseases. The method can provide accurate measures of epidermal and nail changes in normal tissue. Skin cancer and other tumors, as well as inflammatory diseases, have been studied and good agreement found between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT also allows noninvasive......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studied...... monitoring of morphologic changes in skin diseases and may have a particular role in the monitoring of medical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The technology is however still evolving and continued technological development will necessitate an ongoing evaluation of its diagnostic accuracy. Several...

  18. Gluten intolerance and skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Philippe; Pelletier, Fabien; Dreno, Brigitte; Puzenat, Eve; Aubin, François

    2006-01-01

    Gluten sensitivity with or without coeliac disease (CD) symptoms and intestinal pathology has been suggested as a potentially treatable cause of various diseases. CD is a chronic disease which improves on withdrawal of wheat gliadins and barley, rye and oat prolamins from the diet. There have been numerous reports linking CD with several skin conditions. A body of evidence shows that dermatitis herpetiformis is actually a cutaneous manifestation of CD. Autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, psoriasis and miscellaneous diseases have also been described with gluten intolerance. Dermatologists should be familiar with the appraisal of gluten sensitive enteropathy and should be able to search for an underlying gluten intolerance (GI). Serological screening by means of antigliadin, antiendomysial and transglutaminase antibodies should be performed. HLA typing is often useful in association with serologic tests. Intestinal biopsy is usually needed to establish the diagnosis of CD or GI. Thus, gluten intolerance gives rise to a variety of dermatological manifestations which may benefit from a gluten-free diet.

  19. Diseases of the Earth's skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The German Government's Scientific Advisory Council on Global Climate Change recently diagnosed a score of ailments of the “Earth's skin,” according to the German Research Service. Like numerous viral and bacterial diseases, many of the earthidermal diseases are named for the regions where scientists first discovered them. For some symptoms, the German Council has also recommended therapeutic treatments, such as terracing of slopes near rivers. It remains to be seen whether universities worldwide will start cranking out specialists in Earth dermatology. But judging by the condition of many regions of the world, it appears this field may offer great growth potential for the Earth sciences, which is welcome news in the current tight job market.

  20. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  1. Skin diseases : prevalence and predictors of itch and disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Elisabeth Wilhelmina Maria

    2009-01-01

    Chronic skin diseases are known to be common among the general population. Nevertheless, little research attention has been paid to patients with skin diseases in the general population, and consequently, little is known about the impact of skin diseases on daily life within this population. General

  2. Skin diseases : prevalence and predictors of itch and disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Elisabeth Wilhelmina Maria

    2009-01-01

    Chronic skin diseases are known to be common among the general population. Nevertheless, little research attention has been paid to patients with skin diseases in the general population, and consequently, little is known about the impact of skin diseases on daily life within this population. General

  3. Skin protection in the prevention of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases comprise a wide spectrum of conditions. Under epidemiological aspects, occupational contact dermatitis that is usually manifested on the hands is the most frequent occupational skin disease with an estimated average incidence rate of 0.7-1.5 cases per 1,000 workers per year. Irritant dermatitis is due to individual susceptibility and the exposure to irritants such as wet work combined with detergents or other hydrophilic irritants or solvents at the workplace. Chronic irritant dermatitis is a risk factor for delayed-type sensitization and subsequently allergic contact dermatitis. It is therefore the prevention of chronic or cumulative irritant dermatitis that is the decisive factor in the prevention of occupational skin disease. Within prevention programs at the workplace, skin protection plays an important, but limited role. Others are technical and organizational means to avoid or reduce skin exposure to irritants and allergens. Educational measures to increase the awareness of workers for workplace hazards and to motivate them to use skin protection measures appropriately are just as important as the careful selection of skin protection materials.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Ollier disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ollier disease Educational Resources (5 links) Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology Disease InfoSearch: ...

  5. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... prevent cancer are being studied. General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  6. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  7. Skin diseases among schoolchildren in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, Adriaan Anne

    2012-01-01

    Many skin diseases among schoolchildren in sub-Sahara Africa cause disturbing complaints like itch and pain and several of them are contagious.This high prevalence causes a major public health problem.Although in several countries and also in our studies skin diseases present in large numbers, they

  8. Skin diseases among schoolchildren in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, Adriaan Anne

    2012-01-01

    Many skin diseases among schoolchildren in sub-Sahara Africa cause disturbing complaints like itch and pain and several of them are contagious.This high prevalence causes a major public health problem.Although in several countries and also in our studies skin diseases present in large numbers, they

  9. Vectors for gene therapy of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The success of gene therapy mainly depends on the gene vector (GV) responsible for the efficient transport of genetic information. The qualities of a GV have a profound influence on the method of application, the efficiency of gene transfer in the target tissue, the amount and persistence of gene expression and the potential side effects and safety risks. Clinical gene therapy studies over the past 20 years have contributed to the development and testing of different GV systems, some of which also show great potential for the treatment of skin diseases. In this review the structures, methods of application, characteristics, clinical uses and possibilities for optimization of these GV will be discussed with regard to their cutaneous applications.

  10. Genetics of gallstone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal B

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Gallstone disease is a complex disorder where both environmental and genetic factors contribute towards susceptibility to the disease. Epidemiological and family studies suggest a strong genetic component in the causation of this disease. Several genetically derived phenotypes in the population are responsible for variations in lipoprotein types, which in turn affect the amount of cholesterol available in the gall bladder. The genetic polymorphisms in various genes for apo E, apo B, apo A1, LDL receptor, cholesteryl ester transfer and LDL receptor-associated protein have been implicated in gallstone formation. However, presently available information on genetic differences is not able to account for a large number of gallstone patients. The molecular studies in the animal models have not only confirmed the present paradigm of gallstone formation but also helped in identification of novel genes in humans, which might play an important role in pathogenesis of the disease. Precise understanding of such genes and their molecular mechanisms may provide the basis of new targets for rational drug designs and dietary interventions.

  11. Skin immune sentinels in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Frank O; Di Meglio, Paola; Qin, Jian-Zhong; Nickoloff, Brian J

    2009-10-01

    Human skin and its immune cells provide essential protection of the human body from injury and infection. Recent studies reinforce the importance of keratinocytes as sensors of danger through alert systems such as the inflammasome. In addition, newly identified CD103(+) dendritic cells are strategically positioned for cross-presentation of skin-tropic pathogens and accumulating data highlight a key role of tissue-resident rather than circulating T cells in skin homeostasis and pathology. This Review focuses on recent progress in dissecting the functional role of skin immune cells in skin disease.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease Genetic Testing Registry: Polycystic kidney disease 2 Genetic Testing Registry: Polycystic kidney disease 3 Genetic Testing ...

  13. Bullous Skin Diseases: Classical Types of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Damoiseaux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototypic bullous skin diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid, are characterized by the blister formation in the skin and/or oral mucosa in combination with circulating and deposited autoantibodies reactive with (hemidesmosomes. Koch’s postulates, adapted for autoimmune diseases, were applied on these skin diseases. It appears that all adapted Koch’s postulates are fulfilled, and, therefore, these bullous skin diseases are to be considered classical autoimmune diseases within the wide and expanding spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Periostin in Skin Tissue Skin-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, periostin—a matricellular protein—has been highlighted for its pivotal functions in the skin. Analysis of periostin null mice has revealed that periostin contributes to collagen fibrillogenesis, collagen cross-linking, and the formation of ECM meshwork via interactions with other ECM components. Periostin expression is enhanced by mechanical stress or skin injury; this is indicative of the physiologically protective functions of periostin, which promotes wound repair by acting on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Along with its physiological functions, periostin plays pathogenic roles in skin fibrosis and chronic allergic inflammation. In systemic sclerosis (SSc patients, periostin levels reflect the severity of skin fibrosis. Periostin null mice have shown reduced skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, indicating a key role of periostin in fibrosis. Moreover, in atopic dermatitis (AD, attenuated AD phenotype has been observed in periostin null mice in a house dust mite extract-induced AD mouse model. Th2 cytokine-induced periostin acts on keratinocytes to produce inflammatory cytokines that further enhance the Th2 response, thereby sustaining and amplifying chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, periostin is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of AD and other inflammation-related disorders affecting the skin. Understanding the dynamic actions of periostin would be key to dissecting pathogenesis of skin-related diseases and to developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Skin microbiome and skin disease: the example of rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardo, Mauro; Ottaviani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance and/or the perturbation of the microbial populations that colonize the skin and that contribute to its defense may represent one of the causes of the development of noninfectious skin diseases. Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, and rosacea can be listed among these kinds of pathologies. In particular, considering that microbes have been long addressed as having a role in rosacea, this common dermatosis can be an interesting model to evaluate the correlation between microbiome alterations and the occurrence of clinical manifestations. Different microorganisms have been suggested to have a role in rosacea, but no direct correlation with the incidence of the pathology has been clearly defined. Skin microbiome composition is crucial for the correct skin immune functions and recent findings indicate an abnormal activation of innate immune system associated with the rosacea. The enhanced expression of toll-like receptor 2 in the epidermis of rosacea patients can represent a possible explanation for the amplified inflammatory response to external stimuli observed during the disease. In addition, significantly higher small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in rosacea subjects has been found and its eradication has been associated with a regression of the skin lesions. In conclusion, both skin and gut microbiome seem to have a role, even if synergistic with other factors, in the pathogenesis of rosacea. A deeper knowledge of human microbiome composition and microbe-host interactions will contribute to clarify the mechanism of development of rosacea and possibly will provide innovative therapeutic approaches.

  16. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma — including information about specific gene mutations and related cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing skin cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these syndromes.

  17. Genetics of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier

    2015-01-01

    New insights into the underlying molecular pathophysiology of celiac disease (CeD) over the last few years have been guided by major advances in the fields of genetics and genomics. The development and use of the Immunochip genotyping platform paved the way for the discovery of 39 non-HLA loci assoc

  18. Genetic diversity and disease susceptibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmer, W F

    1997-01-01

    The range of genetic diversity within human populations is enormous. Genetic susceptibility to common chronic disease is a significant part of this genetic diversity, which also includes a variety of rare clear-cut inherited diseases. Modern DNA-based genomic analysis can now routinely lead to the identification of genes involved in disease susceptibility, provides the basis for genetic counselling in affected families, and more widely for a genetically targeted approach to disease prevention...

  19. Genetics of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Foroud, Tatiana

    2007-12-01

    During the past decade five genes have been identified that are important in autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson disease. The identification of these genes has increased our understanding of the likely pathogenic mechanisms resulting in disease. However, mutations in these genes likely contribute to disease in fewer than 5% of all cases of Parkinson disease. Thus, researchers have continued to search for genes that may influence disease susceptibility. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for four of the genes mutated in Parkinson disease. Evidence for reduced penetrance, possible effects of haploinsufficiency, and the identification of nondisease causing polymorphisms within several of these genes has made genetic counseling challenging. Current recommendations are to limit molecular testing only to those individuals who are symptomatic. Furthermore, because treatment is unaltered by the presence or absence of mutations in these genes, restraint is recommended when considering the value of screening for mutations in a clinical setting.

  20. Genetics of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and affects 2% of the population over the age of 60 years. Due to the increasing proportion of elderly individuals in developed countries, Parkinson's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders represent a growing burden on the health care system. In the majority of cases, the cause of the disease is still unknown, and its elucidation remains one of the major challenges of the neurosciences. Recent findings in rare genetic forms of Parkinson's disease have allowed the development of novel animal models, providing a basis for a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease, setting the stage for the development of novel treatment strategies. Several novel genes for monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease, such as PINK-1 for an autosomal-recessive early-onset variant, and LRRK2 for a relatively common late-onset autosomal-dominant form have recently been discovered, and several novel animal models have been generated on the basis of genes that had been found earlier. The combination of genetic, pathologic and molecular findings provide increasing evidence that the pathways identified through the cloning of different disease genes are interacting on different levels and share several major pathogenic mechanisms.

  1. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  2. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  3. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  4. The Psychological Burden of Skin Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgard, Florence J; Gieler, Uwe; Tomas-Aragones, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of psychological disorders to the burden of skin disease has been poorly explored, and this is a large-scale study to ascertain the association between depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation with various dermatological diagnoses. This international multicenter observational...... with depression and anxiety was highest for patients with psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema, and leg ulcers. These results identify a major additional burden of skin disease and have important clinical implications....

  5. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning about my family's health history help me prevent disease? How can I learn about my family's health ...

  6. Genetics of Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Foroud, Tatiana

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have consistently demonstrated that in some families, disease is attributable to a mutation in a single gene. To date, genetic analyses have detected linkage to six chromosomal regions and have identified three causative genes: PARK1 (alpha-synuclein), PARK2 (parkin), and PARK7 (DJ-1). In addition, mutations in several other genes have been implicated in familial PD. Identification of the mutations in these genes has led to the recognition that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is an important pathway that may be disrupted in PD. Studies are ongoing to identify additional genes that may contribute to PD susceptibility, particularly in late-onset families without a clear pattern of disease inheritance. With the identification of mutations in particular genes and the likely role of additional genes that are important in PD risk-susceptibility, appropriate protocols must be developed so that accurate and informative genetic counseling can be offered to families in which one or more members has PD. Further diagnostic testing should be delayed until more is learned about the frequency, penetrance, and risk assessment of certain gene mutations. Important lessons can be learned from the implementation of counseling protocols for other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease and Alzheimer disease. PMID:15717024

  7. Genetics of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Foroud, Tatiana

    2004-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have consistently demonstrated that in some families, disease is attributable to a mutation in a single gene. To date, genetic analyses have detected linkage to six chromosomal regions and have identified three causative genes: PARK1 (alpha-synuclein), PARK2 (parkin), and PARK7 (DJ-1). In addition, mutations in several other genes have been implicated in familial PD. Identification of the mutations in these genes has led to the recognition that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is an important pathway that may be disrupted in PD. Studies are ongoing to identify additional genes that may contribute to PD susceptibility, particularly in late-onset families without a clear pattern of disease inheritance. With the identification of mutations in particular genes and the likely role of additional genes that are important in PD risk-susceptibility, appropriate protocols must be developed so that accurate and informative genetic counseling can be offered to families in which one or more members has PD. Further diagnostic testing should be delayed until more is learned about the frequency, penetrance, and risk assessment of certain gene mutations. Important lessons can be learned from the implementation of counseling protocols for other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease and Alzheimer disease.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Genetic Testing Registry: Classical maple syrup urine disease Genetic Testing Registry: Intermediate maple syrup urine disease Genetic Testing Registry: Maple syrup urine disease Other Diagnosis ...

  10. Should We Genetically Select for the Beauty Norm of Fair Skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marway, Herjeet

    2017-03-21

    Fair skin is often regarded as a beauty ideal in many parts of the world. Genetic selection for non-disease traits may allow reproducers to select fair skin for the purposes of beauty, and may be justified under various procreative principles. In this paper I assess the ethics of genetic selection for fair skin as a beauty feature. In particular, I explore the discriminatory aspects and demands of such selection. Using race and colour hierarchies that many would find objectionable, I argue that selection for beauty that is underpinned by such hierarchies is not a trivial selection. Given this, I claim that we should not make such selections.

  11. Urgent advice on lumpy skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the effects on disease spread and persistence of partial stamping out of only clinically affected animals in holdings where the presence of lumpy skin disease has been confirmed, against total stamping-out policy of infected herds coupled with vaccination, a mathematical model...

  12. Stem cells and genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we have discussed a role of stem cells in the treatment of genetic diseases including cochlear and retinal regeneration. The most perceptive use of stem cells at the genetic diseases is cellular repair of tissues affected by a genetic mutation when stem cells without such mutation are transplanted to restore normal tissue function.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Crohn disease Crohn disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Crohn disease is a complex, chronic disorder that primarily affects ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Aging National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Parkinson's Disease Research Web Educational Resources (9 links) Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Disease InfoSearch: Parkinson Disease MalaCards: lrrk2- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: moyamoya disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as neurofibromatosis type 1 , sickle cell disease , or Graves disease . These individuals are said to have moyamoya syndrome. ... Achrol AS, Guzman R, Lee M, Steinberg GK. Pathophysiology and genetic factors in moyamoya disease. Neurosurg Focus. ...

  16. Genetic epidemiology of Scheuermann's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Frank; Engell, Vilhelm; Nielsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The genetic/environmental etiology of Scheuermann's disease is unclear. We estimated the heritability of the disease using an etiological model adjusted for sex and time of diagnosis, and examined whether the prevalence of Scheuermann's disease was constant over time.......The genetic/environmental etiology of Scheuermann's disease is unclear. We estimated the heritability of the disease using an etiological model adjusted for sex and time of diagnosis, and examined whether the prevalence of Scheuermann's disease was constant over time....

  17. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J; Lander, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead.

  18. Changes in Bacteria Induce Inflammatory Skin Diseases | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that manifests as dry skin with a relentless itch and eczema. AD is considered an allergic disease in which the skin inflammation manifests in response to chronic exposure to contact allergens. However, identification of a responsible allergen is uncommon. Meanwhile, analyses have demonstrated that the surface of the human body is colonized by large numbers of diverse bacteria. This observation has led researchers to examine the roles these bacteria play in healthy and diseased skin. In a variety of genetic and chronic inflammatory skin diseases, including in patients with AD or with cancer who receive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium species are the predominant bacteria isolated from the skin. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between this microbial imbalance and skin inflammation has not been determined.

  19. Managing Amphibian Disease with Skin Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bletz, Molly; Kueneman, Jordan; McKenzie, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The contribution of emerging amphibian diseases to the sixth mass extinction is driving innovative wildlife management strategies, including the use of probiotics. Bioaugmentation of the skin mucosome, a dynamic environment including host and microbial components, may not provide a generalized solution. Multi-omics technologies and ecological context underlie effective implementation.

  20. Viral skin diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Anna L

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the viral skin diseases affecting the domestic rabbit, the most important being myxomatosis. Transmission and pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and control are described and the article will be of interest to veterinary practitioners who treat rabbits. Shope fibroma virus, Shope papilloma virus, and rabbitpox are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Leukodystrophy Information Page Educational Resources (7 links) Center for Jewish Genetic Diseases, Mount Sinai School of Medicine Disease InfoSearch: ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Gaucher disease Gaucher disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... cerebroside lipidosis syndrome Gaucher splenomegaly Gaucher syndrome Gaucher's ... deficiency glucocerebrosidosis glucosyl cerebroside lipidosis ...

  3. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION TO PREVALENCE OF SKIN DISEASES AMONG ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toraub Kawshar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pattern of skin diseases in any community is influenced by genetic constitution, climate, socioeconomic status, occupation, education, hygienic standards, customs and quality of medical care. The burden of skin disease also has an impact on the Quality of Life of adolescents. This study aims to investigate the level of awareness and assess the prevalence of different types of skin diseases among adolescents in Mauritius. Material and Methods: 500 adolescents and young adults of both sexes and aged between 11-23 years were recruited. A questionnaire was used to elicit information and to assess the knowledge status of skin diseases and to determine possible risk factors. In addition, a validated questionnaire based on Quality of Life Index was used to determine the psychosocial effect of adolescents suffering from skin diseases. Data was analysed using IBM Statistics SPSS version 20 and Microsoft Excel 2007. Results: Incidence of skin diseases was 22.9% in males and 24.7% females respectively. Acne was the most common skin problems in both gender followed by fungal infection (2.9% in males and eczema (2.4% in females. Climatic conditions (e.g summer, consumption of oily and spicy foods, sports practice and familial history were correlated positively with prevalence of skin diseases. Conclusion: Acne, eczema and fungal infection were the most common skin diseases identified. The findings also indicate that more respondents between 15-19 years old were more prone to skin diseases.

  4. Genetic testing in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; MacRae, Calum A

    2014-05-01

    The review is designed to outline the major developments in genetic testing in the cardiovascular arena in the past year or so. This is an exciting time in genetic testing as whole exome and whole genome approaches finally reach the clinic. These new approaches offer insight into disease causation in families in which this might previously have been inaccessible, and also bring a wide range of interpretative challenges. Among the most significant recent findings has been the extent of physiologic rare coding variation in the human genome. New disease genes have been identified through whole exome studies in neonatal arrhythmia, congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease that were simply inaccessible with other techniques. This has not only shed light on the challenges of genetic testing at this scale, but has also sharply defined the limits of prior gene-panel focused testing. As novel therapies targeting specific genetic subsets of disease become available, genetic testing will become a part of routine clinical care. The pace of change in sequencing technologies has begun to transform clinical medicine, and cardiovascular disease is no exception. The complexity of such studies emphasizes the importance of real-time communication between the genetics laboratory and genetically informed clinicians. New efforts in data and knowledge management will be central to the continued advancement of genetic testing.

  5. Skin diseases in uranium industry workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevcova, M.

    1976-01-01

    Ten years of activity of the dermato-venerologic department of the Factory Centre of National Health of the uranium industry in Pribram is evaluated. In spite of some specific conditions of the working environment the chief problem of the plant dermatologist is the diagnosis and treatment of common dermatological diseases caused by dust, chemicals, rubber boots, excessive humidity in some places and the permanent presence of low-activity radioactive substances in the air and external ionizing radiation. Occupational diseases form a very small group of skin impairments--mostly allergic contact eczema of the lower limbs caused by rubber boots, chromium compounds during work with cement, blasting material and other allergens. The specificity of the job of the dermatologist here requires good knowledge of the working environment in view of the risk of ionizing radiation and its biological effects, especially the hazard of skin tumors following external exposure to alpha radiation from radon daughter products.

  6. Oedematous skin disease of buffalo in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, S A

    2001-05-01

    This review covers a historical view and etiology of oedematous skin disease which affects buffalo in Egypt, the microbiology of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causing the disease: its virulence; clinical signs; mechanism of pathogenesis; histopathology; mode of transmission; immunological aspects; treatment and control. It is concluded that C. pseudotuberculosis serotype II is the main cause of OSD and exotoxin phospholipase D and its lipid contents of the cell wall are the major causes of pathogenesis. After declaring the role of Hippobosca equina in transmission of the causative agent among buffaloes, control of OSD is now available.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Most of the genetic variations that have been discovered are thought to have a small impact on ... Treatment Options MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: TSI National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Thyroid Function Tests ...

  8. Genetic Aspects of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jennifer; Goldman, Jill; Marder, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a genetically complex disorder. Mutations in 3 genes, presenilin 1, amyloid precursor protein, and presenilin 2, lead to early-onset familial AD in rare families with onset of disease occurring prior to age 65. Specific polymorphisms in apolipoprotein E are associated with the more common, late-onset AD occurring after age 65. In this review, we discuss current advances in AD genetics, the implications of the known AD genes, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, amyloid precursor protein, and apolipoprotein E, and other possible genes on the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling of patients and families with early- and late-onset AD. Review Summary In addition to the mutations in 4 known genes associated with AD, mutations in other genes may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Most recently, 2 different research groups have reported genetic association between 2 genes, sortilin-related receptor and GAB2, and AD. These associations have not changed the diagnostic and medical management of AD. Conclusions New research in the genetics of AD have implicated novel genes as having a role in the disease, but these findings have not been replicated nor have specific disease causing mutations been identified. To date, clinical genetic testing is limited to familial early-onset disease for symptomatic individuals and asymptomatic relatives and, although not recommended, amyloid precursor protein apolipoprotein E testing as an adjunct to diagnosis of symptomatic individuals. PMID:19276785

  9. Occupational skin diseases in automotive industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Yunus; Uçmak, Derya; Akkurt, Zeynep Meltem; Akdeniz, Sedat; Palanci, Yilmaz; Sula, Bilal

    2014-03-01

    Studies on occupational skin diseases in workers of the automotive industry are few. To investigate the prevalence of occupational skin diseases in workers of the automotive industry. Between September and December 2011, a total of 405 workers from the automotive repair industry in Diyarbakır were interviewed. They were active workers in the repair industry who had been employed for at least six months. Business owners, sellers of spare parts and accounting officers were not included. The employees were examined at their workplaces and the working conditions were observed. Detailed dermatological examination was performed. The mean age of the 405 workers who participated in the study was 27.7 ± 10.3. The mean working time of employees was 13.3 ± 10.4 years. All of the employees were male. Dermatological diseases were not detected in 144 out of 405 workers (35.6%) and at least one condition was diagnosed in 261 (64.4%). The most frequent diagnosis was callus, hyperkeratosis, clavus (27.7%), followed by nail changes (16.8%) and superficial mycoses (12.1%). Contact dermatitis was seen at a rate of 5.9%. Traumatic lesions such as hyperkeratotic lesions and nail changes were found most frequently. Traumatic lesions were common among individuals who did not use gloves. Most nail changes were localized leuconychia, a finding not reported in the studies on automotive industry workers. In accordance with the literature, irritant contact dermatitis was observed in patients with a history of atopy and who had been working for a long time. Occupational skin diseases comprise an important field in dermatology, deserving much attention. Further studies on occupational dermatology are necessary.

  10. Report: Genetics of complex diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOTULSKY Arno G.

    2006-01-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  11. Quantitative genetics of disease traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, N R; Visscher, P M

    2015-04-01

    John James authored two key papers on the theory of risk to relatives for binary disease traits and the relationship between parameters on the observed binary scale and an unobserved scale of liability (James Annals of Human Genetics, 1971; 35: 47; Reich, James and Morris Annals of Human Genetics, 1972; 36: 163). These two papers are John James' most cited papers (198 and 328 citations, November 2014). They have been influential in human genetics and have recently gained renewed popularity because of their relevance to the estimation of quantitative genetics parameters for disease traits using SNP data. In this review, we summarize the two early papers and put them into context. We show recent extensions of the theory for ascertained case-control data and review recent applications in human genetics.

  12. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Oscar Wilde's skin disease: allergic contact dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nater, J P

    1992-07-01

    During the last years of his life, Oscar Wilde (1856-1900) suffered from a suppurating otitis media as well as from an unidentified skin disease. The eruption was localized to his face, arms, chest and back and itched severely. A new theory is suggested, based on the fact that Wilde almost certainly used a dye to conceal his rapidly graying hair. He sensitized himself to p-phenylenediamine and developed a stubborn allergic contact dermatitis. Patch testing, the only proof of such a diagnosis, had not yet been devised.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Juvenile ... on PubMed Daroszewska A, Ralston SH. Mechanisms of disease: genetics of Paget's disease of bone and related disorders. ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Alexander disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up study of 22 Chinese children with Alexander disease and analysis of parental origin of de novo GFAP mutations. J Hum Genet. 2013 Apr;58(4):183-8. doi: 10.1038/jhg.2012.152. Epub 2013 Jan 31. Citation on ... GS. Alexander disease: ventricular garlands and abnormalities of the medulla and ...

  16. [The genetics of Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Mathias; Aasly, Jan

    2004-04-01

    Parkinson's disease, PD, is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. A genetic component in Parkinson's disease was long thought to be unlikely, but recent genetic studies have identified several genes associated with the disease. A review of the literature and personal experiences from genetic studies in central Norway are presented. Nine loci on the human genome have been linked to Parkinson's disease. Mutations in the alfa-synuclein, parkin, DJ-1, and arguably UCH-L1 genes are identified for familial PD. Recently a locus on chromosome 1 was linked to common late-onset PD in the Icelandic population. Iceland's population is primarily of Norse descent. This locus may be of significant importance to Norwegian PD patients. The genes and loci identified have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis in PD significantly. This knowledge may help to create new treatment strategies for PD.

  17. Diagnosis of Skin Diseases using Online Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Asghar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes Expert System (ES for diagnosis and management of skin diseases. More than 13 types of skin diseases can be diagnosed and treated by our system. It is rule based web-supported expert system, assisting skin specialists, medical students doing specialization in dermatology, researchers as well as skin patients having computer know-how. System was developed with Java Technology. The expert rules were developed on the symptoms of each type of skin disease, and they were presented using tree-graph and inferred using forward-chaining with depth-first search method. User interaction with system is enhanced with efficient user interfaces. The web based expert system described in this paper can detect and give early diagnosis of thirteen plus skin diseases. This ES can be extended to diagnose all types of skin-diseases.

  18. Optimal screening for genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nævdal, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Screening for genetic diseases is performed in many regions and/or ethnic groups where there is a high prevalence of possibly malign genes. The propagation of such genes can be considered a dynamic externality. Given that many of these diseases are untreatable and give rise to truly tragic outcomes, they are a source of societal concern, and the screening process should perhaps be regulated. This paper incorporates a standard model of genetic propagation into an economic model of dynamic management to derive cost benefit rules for optimal screening. The highly non-linear nature of genetic dynamics gives rise to perhaps surprising results that include discontinuous controls and threshold effects. One insight is that any screening program that is in place for any amount of time should screen all individuals in a target population. The incorporation of genetic models may prove to be useful to several emerging fields in economics such as genoeconomics, neuroeconomics and paleoeconomics.

  19. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Psoriasis: experiencing a chronic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrissopoulos, A; Cleaver, G

    1996-03-01

    Psoriasis is an incurable chronic skin disease that affects one in fifty people. Psychological factors play a role in the aetiology and experience of psoriasis but there is little pertaining to the psychological experience of psoriasis in research literature. In this study the phenomenological approach is used to describe the everyday experiences of a person with psoriasis. By using Giorgi's (1985) steps of data analysis a description of the lifeworld of the person with psoriasis was compiled. The description presented several essential components of the experience of psoriasis and the results emphasize the effects of the disease on the sufferer's life. Problematic interpersonal relationships, a negative selfconcept, fluctuating moods, loss of control, negativity and loneliness are a part of this experience. It is hoped that knowledge of the world of the psoriasis sufferer will assist the help professions to understanding and empathize with the suffering and limitations that psoriasis brings.

  1. Urgent advice on lumpy skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the effects on disease spread and persistence of partial stamping out of only clinically affected animals in holdings where the presence of lumpy skin disease has been confirmed, against total stamping-out policy of infected herds coupled with vaccination, a mathematical model...... for the transmission of LSDV between farms was developed and different scenarios explored. According to the model, vaccination has a greater impact in reducing LSDV spread than any culling policy, even when low vaccination effectiveness is considered. When vaccination is evenly applied so that 95% of the farms...... in reducing LSDV spread if protection had already been developed at the time of virus entry, followed by protection of herds after virus entry. No vaccination is the least effective option in reducing LSDV spread. In order to reach the above described effects, it is necessary to implement vaccination...

  2. Revertant Mosaicism in Heritable Skin Diseases - Mechanisms of Natural Gene Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Uitto, Jouni

    Revertant mosaicism (RM) refers to the co-existence of cells carrying disease-causing mutations with cells in which the inherited mutation is genetically corrected by a spontaneous event. It has been discovered in an increasing number of heritable skin diseases: ichthyosis with confetti and

  3. PEMPHIGUS: A DISEASE STAMPED IN THE SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Bicalho Matias

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pemphigus are autoimmune blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. The blisters characteristics of pemphigus tend to break, causing painful erosions that easily bleed. This study aimed to identify the experiences involved in the triggering of pemphigus and how patients face the illness and treatment. Material and Methods: The study included 31 patients diagnosed with pemphigus foliaceus and vulgaris, under a standardized pulsetherapy treatment. Data collection was through semi-structured interviews, which were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using a qualitative approach. Results: During the journey in search of the phenomenon, were defined two thematic categories, subdivided into eleven subcategories. Months before the triggering of the illness, patients experienced feelings of losses, familiar conflicts and concerns; also showed an experience permeated by heartache and disappointments. After the first signs of pemphigus, patients experienced a long journey until the correct diagnose; worsening of the lesions after the communication of the diagnosis; feelings of isolation, shame and prejudgment; interruptions of the future plans; lack of information about the disease and treatment; difficult adherence to the pulsetherapy and the appearance of new lesions or worse by stressful events. Discussion: It might be observed that the disease is not just a biological deviation, but also a social deviance, which explicit the need to adapt to the new reality of the disease and face the isolation, prejudgment and shame of living with a stigmatizing disease.

  4. Periodontal disease: a genetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Taba Jr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease that causes tooth loss. The complex pathogenesis of periodontitis implies the involvement of a susceptible host and a bacterial challenge. Many studies have provided a valuable contribution to understanding the genetic basis of periodontal disease, but the specific candidate genes of susceptibility are still unknown. In fact, genome-wide studies and screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms have yielded new genetic information without a definitive solution for the management of periodontal disease. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the most relevant literature, presenting the main concepts and insights of the strategies that have been emerging to better diagnose and treat periodontal disease based on biomarker analysis and host modulation.

  5. Genetics of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Stephanie; Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and often the result of congenital malformations. However, the prevalence is increasing in adults not only because of the growing aging population, but also because of improvements in the medical and surgical care of children with congenital heart valve defects. The success of the Human Genome Project and major advances in genetic technologies, in combination with our increased understanding of heart valve development, has led to the discovery of numerous genetic contributors to heart valve disease. These have been uncovered using a variety of approaches including the examination of familial valve disease and genome-wide association studies to investigate sporadic cases. This review will discuss these findings and their implications in the treatment of valvular heart disease.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in Kawasaki disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho-chang KUO; Wei-chiao CHANG

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis,and the cause of KD is not well understood.It is likely due to multiple interactions between genes and environmental factors.The development of genetic association and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has opened an avenue to better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying KD.A novel ITPKC signaling pathway was recently found to be responsible for the susceptibility to KD.Furthermore,the GWAS demonstrated the functionally related susceptibility loci for KD in the Caucasian population.In the last decade,the identification of several genomic regions linked to the pathogenesis of KD has made a major breakthrough in understanding the genetics of KD.This review will focus on genetic polymorphisms associated with KD and describe some of the possible clinical implications and molecular mechanisms that can be used to explain how genetic variants regulate the pathogenesis in KD.

  7. Genetic counseling in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, Jodie M; Pappa, Belen

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a genetically and clinically diverse group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by alterations in nuclear DNA and/or mitochondrial DNA. Although some mitochondrial syndromes have been described clearly in the literature many others present as challenging clinical cases with multisystemic involvement at variable ages of onset. Given the clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of these conditions, patients and their families often experience a lengthy and complicated diagnostic process. The diagnostic journey may be characterized by heightened levels of uncertainty due to the delayed diagnosis and the absence of a clear prognosis, among other factors. Uncertainty surrounding issues of family planning and genetic testing may also affect the patient. The role of the genetic counselor is particularly important to help explain these complexities and support the patient and family's ability to achieve effective coping strategies in dealing with increased levels of uncertainty.

  8. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini;

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  9. Sarcoptic mange: a zoonotic ectoparasitic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Kiran Madhusudhan; Saikumar, Chitralekha

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year old man attended the Dermatology Outpatients Department with the complaint of a localized, extremely itchy, erythematous papular lesion of acute onset on the ventral aspect of the right thigh. The patient was referred to the Microbiology Lab for the microscopic detection of the fungal elements. The KOH mount from the skin scrapings showed no fungal elements, but it showed the mites of Sarcopetes scabiei mange. The Sarcoptic Mange is noteworthy because of the fact that it is a zoonotic disease which can easily be passed on to humans. A close contact with infested pet dogs was considered as the main predisposing factor in this case. The response to the antiscabietic treatment was dramatic.

  10. Genetic predisposition to Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Jónrit; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic variants of CYP2D6 and HFE are more frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls in a population where the prevalence of these variants and PD are increased. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 79 PD patients and 154...

  11. Genetic predisposition to Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Jónrit; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic variants of CYP2D6 and HFE are more frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls in a population where the prevalence of these variants and PD are increased. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 79 PD patients and 154...

  12. Feature selection for optimized skin tumor recognition using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Ross, T; Kreusch, J; Wolff, H H; Pöppl, S J

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, a new approach to computer supported diagnosis of skin tumors in dermatology is presented. High resolution skin surface profiles are analyzed to recognize malignant melanomas and nevocytic nevi (moles), automatically. In the first step, several types of features are extracted by 2D image analysis methods characterizing the structure of skin surface profiles: texture features based on cooccurrence matrices, Fourier features and fractal features. Then, feature selection algorithms are applied to determine suitable feature subsets for the recognition process. Feature selection is described as an optimization problem and several approaches including heuristic strategies, greedy and genetic algorithms are compared. As quality measure for feature subsets, the classification rate of the nearest neighbor classifier computed with the leaving-one-out method is used. Genetic algorithms show the best results. Finally, neural networks with error back-propagation as learning paradigm are trained using the selected feature sets. Different network topologies, learning parameters and pruning algorithms are investigated to optimize the classification performance of the neural classifiers. With the optimized recognition system a classification performance of 97.7% is achieved.

  13. A summary about dendritic cells in skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Robert Gniadecki

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cellls (DCs) comprise an essential component of the immune system, are crucial in the initiation of antigen specific immune responses. In this summary we focus on summarizing on the central role of DCs in skin diseases: Bullous dermatoses,Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Lichen Planus , Graft-versus-host disease, Connect Tissue Diseases, Virus Diseases, Fungi Diseases, HIV, Urticaria, Urticaria pigmentosa, Mastocytosis, Tumour, Solar dermatoses. Moreover, in this summary we review the distribution and phenotype of DCs in human skin. Markers and phenotyps ' s study have provided strong support for a concept in which DCs play an important role in the pothogenesis of some skin diseases.

  14. Nanoscale alterations of corneocytes indicate skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franz, J; Beutel, M; Gevers, K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The skin barrier protects the organism against exogenous stressors and simultaneously prevents excessive water loss. While the delicate regulation of skin barrier is not completely understood, morphological and histological evaluation remain key features of clinical investigations. Here...... dermatitis, a common inflammatory skin condition. CONCLUSION: The presence of these corneocyte-nanostructures might be used as a diagnostic parameter for skin disorders - even in cases below a clinical threshold....

  15. The skin microbiome: Associations between altered microbial communities and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Dixit, Shreya; Farrer, Andrew G; Cooper, Alan J; Cooper, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    A single square centimetre of the human skin can contain up to one billion microorganisms. These diverse communities of bacteria, fungi, mites and viruses can provide protection against disease, but can also exacerbate skin lesions, promote disease and delay wound healing. This review addresses the current knowledge surrounding the healthy skin microbiome and examines how different alterations to the skin microbial communities can contribute to disease. Current methodologies are considered, changes in microbial diversity and colonisation by specific microorganisms are discussed in the context of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne vulgaris and chronic wounds. The recent impact of modern Westernised lifestyles on the human skin microbiome is also examined, as well as the potential benefits and pitfalls of novel therapeutic strategies. Further analysis of the human skin microbiome, and its interactions with the host immune system and other commensal microorganisms, will undoubtedly elucidate molecular mechanisms for disease and reveal gateways for novel therapeutic treatment strategies.

  16. Genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that directly affects more than 1 in 10,000 persons in Western societies but, as a family disorder with a long, costly, debilitating course, it has an indirect impact on a far greater proportion of the population. Although some palliative treatments are used, no effective treatment exists for preventing clinical onset of the disorder or for delaying its inevitable progression toward premature death, approximately 15 years after diagnosis. Huntington's disease involves a movement disorder characterized by chorea, as well as a variety of psychiatric disturbances and intellectual decline, with a gradual loss of independence. A dire need exists for effective HD therapies to alleviate the suffering and costs to the individual, family, and health care system. In past decades, genetics, the study of DNA sequence variation and its consequences, provided the tools to map the HD gene to chromosome 4 and ultimately to identify its mutation as an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the coding sequence of a large protein, dubbed huntingtin. Now, advances in genetic technology offer an unbiased route to the identification of genetic factors that are disease-modifying agents in human patients. Such genetic modifiers are expected to highlight processes capable of altering the course of HD and therefore to provide new, human-validated targets for traditional drug development, with the goal of developing rational treatments to delay or prevent onset of HD clinical signs.

  17. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  18. Ultraviolet A phototherapy for sclerotic skin diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroft, E.B.M.; Berkhof, N.J.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, R.M.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet (UV) A-1 phototherapy is now available for a variety of skin diseases. Increasingly since 1995, there have been investigations of the efficacy of UVA-1 (340-400 nm) therapy for sclerotic skin diseases. Most studies undertaken treated patients who had localized scleroderma, bu

  19. Skin diseases in family medicine: prevalence and health care use.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, E.W.M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Weel, C. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Duller, P.; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; Schers, H.J.; Evers, A.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Ongoing care for patients with skin diseases can be optimized by understanding the incidence and population prevalence of various skin diseases and the patient-related factors related to the use of primary, specialty, and alternative health care for these conditions. We examined the recent

  20. Nonmotor symptoms in genetic Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten, Meike; Kertelge, Lena; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD.......To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD....

  1. Systems genetics : From GWAS to disease pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Ng, Aylwin; Fu, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Most common diseases are complex, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. In the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified thousands of genetic variants underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. However, the results fro

  2. Skin signs of systemic disease. When the problem is more than skin-deep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C E; Massa, M C

    1994-12-01

    The cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases are diverse. In some cases, they are the first signs of an underlying disorder, such as Cowden's disease, dermatomyositis, and Lyme disease. Sister Mary Joseph's nodule (metastatic involvement of the umbilicus) is an ominous sign of internal malignant disease. Drug-induced skin necrosis may result from therapy with coumarin (Coumadin, Panwarfin, Sofarin) or heparin.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  4. Targeting JAK/STAT signalling in inflammatory skin diseases with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Katharina; Holstein, Julia; Laurence, Arian; Ghoreschi, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    For most inflammatory skin diseases topical glucocorticosteroids and traditional oral immunosuppressive drugs remain the principle treatment choices, but this has started to change. A deeper understanding in individual disease pathogenesis, basic immune mechanisms and molecular signalling pathways, together with advances in pharmaceutical drug development, allow us to interfere more precisely with disease-related factors. Some examples of inflammation-controlling interventions include antibodies neutralizing disease-associated cytokines, and small molecules targeting intracellular pathways relevant to cytokine production or cytokine signalling. So far, this is best established for psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease dominated by Th17 cytokines. In this review, we focus on chronic inflammatory skin diseases where cytokines using type I/II cytokine receptors play a dominant role in disease pathogenesis and where novel treatments with inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway are already under clinical investigation. To better understand the rationale of using JAK/STAT inhibitors in the discussed skin diseases, we give an overview of important genetic and immunological associations with the JAK/STAT pathway and summarize the stage of clinical development of small molecular inhibitors. JAK/STAT inhibitors will presumably find wide application in dermatology, since they can be applied not only systematically but also topically for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by muta

  6. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by muta

  7. Skin disease in paper mill workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, F.H.W.; Lensen, G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Coenraads, P.J.

    Background Paper mill workers have frequent and prolonged exposure to skin irritants and allergens and may have a higher risk of developing occupational dermatitis. Aims The aim of this study was to determine the extent of skin problems in a paper mill and how much was attributable to contact with

  8. Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McPherson, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute importantly to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the past decade, there has been major progress in this area. The tools applied include genome-wide association studies encompassing >200,000 individuals complemented by bioinformatic approaches, including...... factors and identify those individuals who will benefit most from statin therapy. Such information also has important applications in clinical medicine and drug discovery by using a Mendelian randomization approach to interrogate the causal nature of many factors found to associate with CAD risk...... have led to a broader understanding of the genetic architecture of CAD and demonstrate that it largely derives from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles individually of small effect size rather than rare variants with large effects on CAD risk. Despite this success, there has been...

  9. Pediatric genetic diseases causing glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichhpujani, Parul; Singh, Rohan B.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathy may be considered as an endpoint of multiple systemic factors. Genetic conditions commonly causing glaucoma in children and adolescents include Axenfeld-Reiger syndrome, aniridia, Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchessani syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, nevus of Ota, congenital rubella and neurofibromatosis type 1. In the recent years, with the advancements in genetic research our understanding of the fundamental causes of glaucoma associated with inherited disorders has improved. In addition to intraocular pressure reduction, it is important for the clinician to be familiar with the multiple systemic associations with glaucoma, to re-evaluate treatment frequently, and to target the underlying disease process, if present. PMID:27625878

  10. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials... of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  11. Skin microbiota: overview and role in the skin diseases acne vulgaris and rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Nathalia; Raoult, Didier

    2013-02-01

    As the first barrier to environmental exposures, human skin has developed an integrated immune system to protect the inner body from chemical, physical or microbial insults. Microorganisms inhabiting superficial skin layers are known as skin microbiota and include bacteria, viruses, archaea and fungi. The microbiota composition is crucial in the instruction and support of the skin's immune system. Changes in microbiota can be due to individual, environmental or behavioral factors, such as age, climate, hygiene or antibiotic consumption, which can cause dysbiosis. The contribution of skin microbiota to disease development is known in atopic dermatitis, where there is an increase in Staphylococcus aureus. Culture-independent studies have enabled more accurate descriptions of this complex interplay. Microbial imbalance is associated with the development of various diseases. This review focuses on microbial imbalances in acne vulgaris and rosacea.

  12. Modelling skin disease: lessons from the worlds of mathematics, physics and computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Theoretical biology is a field that attempts to understand the complex phenomena of life in terms of mathematical and physical principles. Likewise, theoretical medicine employs mathematical arguments and models as a methodology in approaching the complexities of human disease. Naturally, these concepts can be applied to dermatology. There are many possible methods available in the theoretical investigation of skin disease. A number of examples are presented briefly. These include the mathematical modelling of pattern formation in congenital naevi and erythema gyratum repens, an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of genetic networks in autoimmunity, and computer simulations of early melanoma growth. To conclude, an analogy is drawn between the behaviour of well-known physical processes, such as earthquakes, and the spatio-temporal evolution of skin disease. Creating models in skin disease can lead to predictions that can be investigated experimentally or by observation and offer the prospect of unexpected or important insights into pathogenesis.

  13. Study on application of optical clearing technique in skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hao; Liang, Yanmei; Wang, Jingyi; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    So far, the study of the optical clearing is almost always about healthy tissue. However, the ultimate goal is to detect diseases for clinical application. Optical clearing on diseased skins is explored. The effect is evaluated by applying a combined liquid paraffin and glycerol mixed solution on several kinds of diseased skins in vitro. Scanning experiments from optical coherence tomography show that it has different effects among fibroma, pigmented nevus, and seborrheic keratosis. Based on the results, we conclude that different skin diseases have different compositions and structures, and their optical parameters and biological characteristics should be different, which implies that the optical clearing technique may have selectivity and may not be suitable for all kinds of skin diseases.

  14. Morgellons Disease: Managing a Mysterious Skin Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the skin Severe fatigue Difficulty concentrating Short-term memory loss The intense itching and open sores associated with ... your doctor's recommendations for treatment — which may include long-term mental health therapy. Seek treatment for other conditions. ...

  15. RARE DISEASES AND GENETIC DISCRIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Yaneva – Deliverska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases are characterised by their low prevalence (less than 1/2,000 and their heterogeneity. They affect both children and adults anywhere in the world. From the medical perspective, rare diseases are characterised by the large number and broad diversity of disorders and symptoms that vary not only from disease to disease, but also within the same disease.Main characteristics of rare diseases include:· Rare diseases are often chronic, progressive, degenerative, and often life-threatening· Rare diseases are disabling: the quality of life of patients is often compromised by the lack or loss of autonomy· High level of pain and suffering for the patient and his/ her family · No existing effective cure· There are between 6000 and 8000 rare diseases· 75% of rare diseases affect children· 30% of rare disease patients die before the age of 5· 80% of rare diseases have identified genetic origins. Other rare diseases are the result of infections (bacterial or viral, allergies and environmental causes, or are degenerative and proliferative.Beyond the diversity of the diseases, rare disease patients and their families are confronted with the same wide range of difficulties arising directly from the rarity of these pathologies. The period between the emergence of the first symptoms and the appropriate diagnosis involves unacceptable and highly risky delays, as well as wrong diagnosis leading to inaccurate treatments. Living with a rare disease has implications in all areas of life, whether school, choice of future work, leisure time with friends, or affective life. It may lead to stigmatisation, isolation, exclusion from social community, discrimination for insurance subscription (health insurance, travel insurance, mortgage, and often reduced professional opportunities.Innovative treatments are often unevenly available in the EU because of delays in price determination and/or reimbursement decision, lack of experience of the treating

  16. Gap junction remodeling in skin repair following wounding and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churko, Jared M; Laird, Dale W

    2013-05-01

    In the present review, we provide an overview of connexin expression during skin development and remodeling in wound healing, and reflect on how loss- or gain-of-function connexin mutations may change cellular phenotypes and lead to diseases of the skin. We also consider the therapeutic value of targeting connexins in wound healing.

  17. The Diagnostic Value of Skin Disease Diagnosis Expert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Arabfard, Masoud; Arabkermany, Zahra; Gilasi, Hamidreza

    2016-02-01

    Evaluation is a necessary measure to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of all systems, including expert systems. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of expert system for diagnosis of complex skin diseases. A case-control study was conducted in 2015 to determine the diagnostic value of an expert system. The study population included patients who were referred to Razi Specialized Hospital, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The control group was selected from patients without the selected skin diseases. Data collection tool was a checklist of clinical signs of diseases including pemphigus vulgaris, lichen planus, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and scabies. The sample size formula estimated 400 patients with skin diseases selected by experts and 200 patients without the selected skin diseases. Patient selection was undertaken with randomized stratified sampling and their sign and symptoms were logged into the system. Physician's diagnosis was determined as the gold standard and was compared with the diagnosis of expert system by SPSS software version 16 and STATA. Kappa statistics, indicators of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and confidence intervals were calculated for each disease. An accuracy of 90% was considered appropriate. Comparing the results of expert system and physician's diagnosis at the evaluation stage showed an accuracy of 97.1%, sensitivity of 97.5% and specificity of 96.5% The Kappa test indicated a high agreement of 93.6%. The expert system can diagnose complex skin diseases. Development of such systems is recommended to identify all skin diseases.

  18. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, Knut E. A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity

  19. New experimental models of skin homeostasis and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, F; Espada, J; Díaz-Ley, B; Jaén, P; Juarranz, A; Quintanilla, M

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis, whose regulation at the molecular level is still poorly understood, is intimately related to the functions of epidermal stem cells. Five research groups have been brought together to work on new in vitro and in vivo skin models through the SkinModel-CM program, under the auspices of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Madrid. This project aims to analyze the functions of DNA methyltransferase 1, endoglin, and podoplanin in epidermal stem cell activity, homeostasis, and skin cancer. These new models include 3-dimensional organotypic cultures, immunodeficient skin-humanized mice, and genetically modified mice. Another aim of the program is to use skin-humanized mice to model dermatoses such as Gorlin syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum in order to optimize new protocols for photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Pattern of skin diseases in a tertiary institution in Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay Kar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are very little elaborative studies in India about various patterns of skin diseases and various factors those influence the diseases in a tertiary institution. Aims: To find out the various patterns of skin diseases in relation to age, sex, occupation, and socio-economic status. To find out the magnitude of skin diseases and compare with other similar studies . Materials and Methods: Collection of data of all new skin cases in a specified period of one year and put on proforma for diagnosis. Few investigations were done for correct diagnosis. Results: It was found that skin OPD patients (new were 4.16% of total new OPD patients, and male female ratio was 1.1:1. Among all patients (12910, infection was commonest (39.54%, followed by allergic skin disorder (29.20%. 25.05% patients were housewives, followed by students (23.21%. Study showed that 33.28% patients had per capita income of ` 361-720/month, and 22.35% patients were educated and/or studied up to class V. Conclusion: Pattern of skin diseases are mostly depend not only on environmental factors but also on occupation, socio-economic status, literacy, and age of the patients.

  1. Pattern of skin diseases among Central African refugees in Chad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fawzi Ismael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to describe the pattern of skin diseases among refugees attending the dermatology clinic in refugee camps in southern Chad. Methods: A descriptive clinic-based cross-sectional study was done in two refugee camps of people from Republic of Central Africa in Southern Chad. Diagnosis of skin diseases was done through clinical examination by a single dermatologist along with the help of hand lens provided with illumination. Lack of investigations and other skin diagnostic tools prevented further confirmation of diagnosis. Data was manually analyzed and diagnosis was presented as number and percent using the ICD -10 of the World Health Organization. Results: A total of 366 dermatologic diseases were diagnosed in 361 patients. Certain infectious and parasitic diseases and dermatitis/ eczema were the commonest diagnostic categories (39.9% and 22.45; respectively followed by disorders of skin appendices (15% and infections of skin and subcutaneous tissues (13.1%. Tinea barbae /capitis, ringworm and impetigo are the commonest recorded infections (11.5%, 10.1% and 7.9%; respectively. Miliaria and acne vulgaris were the most frequent disorders of skin appendages. Conclusions: Infectious skin diseases are common among refugees. There are urgent needs for health education and promotion of personal hygiene with adequate sanitation as well as availability of diagnostic tests [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(4.000: 324-328

  2. Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162192.html Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection? RoxP ... Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are ...

  3. The skin microbiota: composition and function in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    will discuss the evidence and counterevidence for the involvement of skin microbes in diseases such as acne vulgaris, progressive macular hypomelanosis as well as other skin disorders. The talk will also introduce the existing challenges to study the impact of our skin microbiota on our skin health as well...... protective function or its immunomodulatory properties. The skin microbiota of the face and upper back is dominated by species of the genera Staphylococcus and Propionibacterium. In particular, the species Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) predominately colonizes sebaceous areas. This species has several...... conflicting properties, some of which are mutualistic with potential beneficial effects for skin health while others are potentially harmful for the host, such as P. acnes’ pro-inflammatory activity. Analysis of the population structure of P. acnes highlighted its multiphyletic composition; together...

  4. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The NIDDK would like to thank: John J. Zone, M.D., University of Utah School of Medicine ... Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de ...

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a neglected component of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Bauer, Johann W; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial structure and function influence tissue homeostasis and thereby contribute to multiple human disorders and ageing. Ten per cent of patients with primary mitochondrial disorders present skin manifestations that can be categorized into hair abnormalities, rashes, pigmentation abnormalities and acrocyanosis. Less attention has been paid to the fact that several disorders of the skin are linked to alterations of mitochondrial energy metabolism. This review article summarizes the contribution of mitochondrial pathology to both common and rare skin diseases. We explore the intriguing observation that a wide array of skin disorders presents with primary or secondary mitochondrial pathology and that a variety of molecular defects can cause dysfunctional mitochondria. Among them are mutations in mitochondrial- and nuclear DNA-encoded subunits and assembly factors of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes; mutations in intermediate filament proteins involved in linking, moving and shaping of mitochondria; and disorders of mitochondrial DNA metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and heme synthesis. Thus, we assume that mitochondrial involvement is the rule rather than the exception in skin diseases. We conclude the article by discussing how improving mitochondrial function can be beneficial for aged skin and can be used as an adjunct therapy for certain skin disorders. Consideration of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skin creates a new perspective for both dermatologists and experts in metabolic disease.

  6. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  7. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, M A M

    2004-11-15

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by mutations in one of the genes coding for the constituent proteins of gap junctions, known as connexins. In this review, the currently known connexin disorders that feature skin abnormalities are described: keratitis-ichthyosis deafness syndrome, erythrokeratoderma variabilis, Vohwinkel's syndrome, and a novel disorder called hypotrichosis-deafness syndrome. What is known about the pathogenesis of these disorders is discussed and related to gap junction physiology. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The Genetics and Evolution of Human Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This case explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point. Students read the story and discuss a series of questions probing the genetics of the family in the tale. Students then read an article about the evolution of skin color and write an essay analyzing the…

  9. The Genetics and Evolution of Human Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This case explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point. Students read the story and discuss a series of questions probing the genetics of the family in the tale. Students then read an article about the evolution of skin color and write an essay analyzing the…

  10. Genetic Determinants of Skin Color, Aging, and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Jacobs (Leonie)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractChapter 1 gives a general introduction to this thesis. In Chapter 2 we validated perceived skin color as skin color measurement. In Chapter 3 we investigated whether digitally quantified skin color was a suitable measure to discover new skin color genes. In Chapter 4 we investi

  11. Dupuytren Disease Infiltrating a Full-Thickness Skin Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie George; Igali, Laszlo; Figus, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of the skin in the development and propagation of Dupuytren disease remains unclear, dermofasciectomy and full-thickness skin grafting (FTSG) appears to delay recurrence. In 2011, a 71-year-old, left-handed man presented with recurrent Dupuytren disease in the dominant hand. In 1991, he originally underwent a primary dermofasciectomy and FTSG for Dupuytren disease involving the palmar skin. Twenty years later, the left middle finger was drawn into flexion by a recurrent cord, and the old graft and adjacent palmar skin were clinically involved by fibromatosis. We performed a revision dermofasciectomy and FTSG. Microscopic analysis of the excised graft demonstrated dense infiltration of the entire skin graft by Dupuytren disease, with areas of active and burnt-out fibromatosis distinct from hypertrophic scarring. This report of Dupuytren fibromatosis infiltrating a skin graft raises questions about the pathophysiology of Dupuytren disease. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathologies of the skin and its appendages in endocrine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arasiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from endocrine disorders often present a wide profile of skin lesions. In hyperthyroidism we observe hair loss, lower leg myxedema and onycholysis or, in the case of hormone deficiency, generalized swelling of the skin, which becomes cold and pale. Primary hyperparathyroidism is revealed by pruritus, presence of chronic urticaria or deposition of amorphous calcium salts. In hypoparathyroidism, the skin is dry while the nails become very brittle. Skin lesions in diabetes include necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, scleroderma-like diabetic edema and acanthosis nigricans. Overactive pituitary gland is often manifested as acromegaly with hypertrophy of soft tissue thickening and hypertrichosis. The skin in the early stages of hypopituitarism feels swollen, is pale yellow and oily, and finally becomes alabaster and dry. The characteristic features of Cushing syndrome are central obesity, lunar face, buffalo hump, and striae. In Addison’s disease we observe hyperpigmentation. Hyperandrogenism in women leads to acne, hirsutism and virilization.

  13. Complement system in dermatological diseases – fire under the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana Helena Panelius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation e.g. in SLE, phospholipid antibody syndrome and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g. hydralazine, procainamide could interact with C4A, C4B or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1 inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation.The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders.

  14. Overexpression of constitutively active BMP-receptor-IB in mouse skin causes an ichthyosis-vulgaris-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xueyan; Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón A; Sun, Cheng; Lin, Lisong; He, Fenglei; Xiong, Wei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Alun; Chen, Yiping

    2010-12-01

    The skin is the outer layer of protection against the environment. The development and formation of the skin is regulated by several genetic cascades including the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway, which has been suggested to play an important role during embryonic organ development. Several skin defects and diseases are caused by genetic mutations or disorders. Ichthyosis is a common genetic skin disorder characterized by dry scaly skin. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene have been identified as the cause of the ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) phenotype; however, the direct regulation of filaggrin expression in vivo is unknown. We present evidence that BMP signaling regulates filaggrin expression in the epidermis. Mice expressing a constitutively active form of BMP-receptor-IB in the developing epidermis exhibit a phenotype resembling IV in humans, including dry flaky skin, compact hyperkeratosis, and an attenuated granular layer associated with a significantly downregulated expression of filaggrin. Regulation of filaggrin expression by BMP signaling has been further confirmed by the application of exogenous BMP2 in skin explants and by a transgenic model overexpressing Noggin in the epidermis. Our results demonstrate that aberrant BMP signaling in the epidermis causes overproliferation and hyperkeratinization, leading to an IV-like skin disease.

  15. Primary skin fibroblasts as a model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auburger, G.; Klinkenberg, M.; Droste, J.A.H.; Marcus, K.; Morales-Gordo, B.; Kunz, W.S.; Brandt, U.; Broccoli, V.; Reichmann, H.; Gispert, S.; Jendrach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. While most cases occur sporadic mutations in a growing number of genes including Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 (PARK6) have been associated with the disease. Different animal models and cell models like patient skin fibroblasts

  16. Transmission dynamics of lumpy skin disease in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molla, W.; Frankena, Klaas; Jong, de Mart

    2017-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a severe disease of cattle caused by a Capripoxvirus and often caused epidemics in Ethiopia and many other countries. This study was undertaken to quantify the transmission between animals and to estimate the infection reproduction ratio in a predominantly mixed crop–live

  17. Transmission dynamics of lumpy skin disease in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molla, W.; Frankena, Klaas; Jong, de Mart

    2017-01-01

    Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a severe disease of cattle caused by a Capripoxvirus and often caused epidemics in Ethiopia and many other countries. This study was undertaken to quantify the transmission between animals and to estimate the infection reproduction ratio in a predominantly mixed

  18. Primary skin fibroblasts as a model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auburger, G.; Klinkenberg, M.; Droste, J.A.H.; Marcus, K.; Morales-Gordo, B.; Kunz, W.S.; Brandt, U.; Broccoli, V.; Reichmann, H.; Gispert, S.; Jendrach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. While most cases occur sporadic mutations in a growing number of genes including Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 (PARK6) have been associated with the disease. Different animal models and cell models like patient skin fibroblasts a

  19. Disturbed skin barrier in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited data on skin lesions in children with end-stage renal failure. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the skin barrier in children with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of xerosis, its severity, as well as its link selected demographic factors, were examined. Methods The study included 103 children: 72 with CKD stages 3–5 (38 on conservative treatment and 34 on dialysis) and 31 patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enur...

  20. The canine and feline skin microbiome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J Scott

    2013-02-01

    The skin harbours a diverse and abundant, yet inadequately investigated, microbial population. The population is believed to play an important role in both the pathophysiology and the prevention of disease, through a variety of poorly explored mechanisms. Early studies of the skin microbiota in dogs and cats reported a minimally diverse microbial composition of low overall abundance, most probably as a reflection of the limitations of testing methodology. Despite these limitations, it was clear that the bacterial population of the skin plays an important role in disease and in changes in response to both infectious and noninfectious diseases. Recent advances in technology are challenging some previous assumptions about the canine and feline skin microbiota and, with preliminary application of next-generation sequenced-based methods, it is apparent that the diversity and complexity of the canine skin microbiome has been greatly underestimated. A better understanding of this complex microbial population is critical for elucidation of the pathophysiology of various dermatological (and perhaps systemic) diseases and to develop novel ways to manipulate this microbial population to prevent or treat disease.

  1. Distilling pathophysiology from complex disease genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2013-09-26

    Technologies for genome-wide sequence interrogation have dramatically improved our ability to identify loci associated with complex human disease. However, a chasm remains between correlations and causality that stems, in part, from a limiting theoretical framework derived from Mendelian genetics and an incomplete understanding of disease physiology. Here we propose a set of criteria, akin to Koch's postulates for infectious disease, for assigning causality between genetic variants and human disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetics of Behçet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer İrfan Kaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet's disease (BD is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized mainly by recurrent oral and genital ulcers and eye involvement. Although the pathogenesis remains poorly understood, a variety of studies have demonstrated that genetic predisposition is a major factor in disease susceptibility. Peculiar geographical distribution of BD along the ancient Silk Road has been regarded as evidence supporting genetic influence. The observed aggregation of BD in families of patients with BD is also supportive for a genetic component in its etiology. HLA-B51 (B510101 subtype is the most strongly associated genetic marker for BD in countries on the Silk Road. In recent years, several genome-wide association studies and genetic polymorphism studies have also found new genetic associations with BD, which may have a supplementary role in disease susceptibility and/or severity. The author reviewed the HLA and non-HLA genetic association studies.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Cushing disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and in the face. Affected individuals may get stretch marks (striae) on their thighs and abdomen and bruise ... to weakness and reduced stamina, thinning skin causing stretch marks and easy bruising, thinning of the bones resulting ...

  4. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  5. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations.

  6. Mutations in COX7B Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Lesions, an Unconventional Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS) is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disorder associated with mutations in holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS), which encodes a crucial player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Unlike other mitochondrial diseases, MLS is characterized by a well-recognizable neurodevelopmental phenotype. Interestingly, not all clinically diagnosed MLS cases have mutations in HCCS, thus suggesting genetic heterogeneity for this disorder. Among the possi...

  7. Genetic variants in periodontal health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandrina L. [Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Dentistry; Kobayashi, Junya [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Genome Repair Dynamics

    2010-07-01

    Periodontitis is a complex, multifactorial disease and its susceptibility is genetically determined. The present book systematically reviews the evidence of the association between the genetic variants and periodontitis progression and/or treatment outcomes. Genetic syndromes known to be associated with periodontal disease, the candidate gene polymorphisms investigated in relation to periodontitis, the heritability of chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as common guidelines for association studies are described. This growing understanding of the role of genetic variation in inflammation and periodontal chronic disease presents opportunities to identify healthy persons who are at increased risk of disease and to potentially modify the trajectory of disease to prolong healthy aging. The book represents a new concept in periodontology with its pronounced focus on understanding through knowledge rather than presenting the presently valid answers. Connections between genetics and periodontology are systematically reviewed and covered in detail. (orig.)

  8. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  9. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: insights from population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paula S; Shedlock, Andrew M; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-11-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are a family of complex heterogeneous disorders with similar underlying mechanisms characterized by immune responses against self. Collectively, ADs are common, exhibit gender and ethnic disparities, and increasing incidence. As natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation, and immune function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, it is thought that the prevalence of AD risk alleles seen in different population is partially the result of differing selective pressures (for example, due to pathogens). With the advent of high-throughput technologies, new analytical methodologies and large-scale projects, evidence for the role of natural selection in contributing to the heritable component of ADs keeps growing. This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different ADs and concomitant evidence for selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Examples of specific adaptive variants with phenotypic effects are included as an evidence of natural selection increasing AD susceptibility. Many of the complexities of gene effects in different ADs can be explained by population genetics phenomena. Integrating AD susceptibility studies with population genetics to investigate how natural selection has contributed to genetic variation that influences disease risk will help to identify functional variants and elucidate biological mechanisms. As such, the study of population genetics in human population holds untapped potential for elucidating the genetic causes of human disease and more rapidly focusing to personalized medicine.

  10. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  11. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Knut E A; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity have been gained. However, genetic screening is not sensitive and specific enough to accurately predict disease development. The current method to diagnose individuals with coeliac disease is serological testing for the presence of autoantibodies whilst the patient is on a regular, gluten-containing diet, followed by gastroduodenoscopy with duodenal biopsy. Serological test results can also predict the probability of coeliac disease development, even if asymptomatic. In patients with autoimmune diseases known to occur alongside coeliac disease (particularly type 1 diabetes mellitus or thyroid disorders), disease screening-and subsequent treatment if coeliac disease is detected-could have beneficial effects on progression or potential complications of both diseases, owing to the effectiveness of gluten-free dietary interventions in coeliac disease. However, whether diagnosis of coeliac disease and subsequent dietary treatment can prevent autoimmune diseases is debated. In this Review, the genetic and immunological features of coeliac disease, overlap with other autoimmune diseases and implications for current screening strategies will be discussed.

  12. Psychological factors in skin diseases: stress and skin: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress (PS) has long been related to many common skin diseases and conditions, thought to be the cause of their onset or aggravation. Although clinical experience is often in concordance with this notion, apparently scientific proof can sometimes be challenging rather than straight forward. Although many data have been published, it appears that not enough good statistical evidence exists to support them. The difficulty in validating beyond a doubt the stress-skin interactions has rendered some skepticism among physicians. The gap between clinical expertise and problematic clinical research data has led scientists to bypass the need to tackle the question directly by searching the evidence in basic science.

  13. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard

    2015-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking work in genetics has identified thousands of small-effect genetic variants throughout the genome that are associated with almost all major diseases. These genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often proposed as a source of future medical breakthroughs. However......, with several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...... alongside existing drug discovery methods. Our aim is to evaluate human genetic confidence as a rationale for drug target selection....

  14. [Incidence of skin manifestations of Lyme disease in Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, A; Balić-Winter, A; Bolanca-Bumber, S; Skerlev, M

    1992-01-01

    In the study, the most relevant historical data concerning Lyme-borreliosis are shortly reviewed. The most frequent skin manifestations, i.e. erythema cronicum migrans (ECM), lymphocytoma cutis (LCC) and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA) are described. The clinical course of Lyme disease and the chronologic review of the most significant data on the disease are given. The frequency of skin manifestations of Lyme-borreliosis in various areas of Croatia from 1988 to 1989 based on the reports of dermatologists throughout Croatia is presented. According to our results, it can be concluded that skin manifestations of Lyme-borreliosis are much more frequent in the central and western parts of Croatia than elsewhere. The authors hope that the use of a fluorescent method for detecting antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi since 1989 in the Serologic Laboratory of the Department of Dermatology, Salata, Zagreb will lead to more precise results about this disorder in the future.

  15. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF SKIN DISEASES USING TEXTURE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR.RANJAN PAREKH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automated system for recognizing disease conditions of human skin in context to health informatics. The disease conditions are recognized by analyzing skin texture images using a set of normalized symmetrical Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrices (GLCM. GLCM defines the probability of grey level i occurring in the neighborhood of another grey level j at a distance d in direction θ. Directional GLCMs are computed along four directions: horizontal (θ = 0º, vertical (θ = 90º, right diagonal (θ = 45º and left diagonal (θ= 135º, and a set of features computed from each, are averaged to provide an estimation of the texture class.The system is tested using 180 images pertaining to three dermatological skin conditions viz. Dermatitis, Eczema, Urticaria. An accuracy of 96.6% is obtained using a multilayer perceptron (MLP as a classifier.

  16. Ribosomal protein s6-ps240 is expressed in lesional skin from patients with autoimmune skin blistering diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The in situ signaling transduction within skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases is not well-characterized. Aim : In autoimmune skin blistering diseases, autoantibodies seem to trigger several intracellular signaling pathways and we investigated the presence of the phosphorylated form of ribosomal protein S6-pS240 within autoimmune skin blistering diseases biopsies. Materials and Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate the presence of S6-pS240 in lesional skin biopsies of patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases including patients with an endemic and nonendemic pemphigus foliaceus (non EPF, with bullous pemphigoid (BP, pemphigus vulgaris (PV, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, and the respective controls. Results: Most autoimmune bullous skin diseases biopsies stained positive for S6-pS240 around lesional blisters, including adjacent areas of the epidermis; and within upper dermal inflammatory infiltrates, and/or mesenchymal-endothelial cell junctions within the dermis. Conclusions: We document that S6-pS240 is expressed in lesional areas of skin biopsies from patients with autoimmune skin blistering diseases, as well as on eccrine glands and piloerector muscles. Thus, the role of this molecule in autoimmune skin blistering diseases warrants further study.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Kawasaki disease Kawasaki disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Kawasaki disease is a sudden and time-limited (acute) ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hartnup disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hartnup disease Hartnup disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hartnup disease is a condition caused by the body's ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Krabbe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (3 links) MalaCards: krabbe disease Orphanet: Krabbe disease Tulane University Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Hunter's Hope Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions celiac disease celiac disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Celiac disease is a condition in which the immune system ...

  1. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  2. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2004-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  3. Genetic determinants of hair, eye and skin pigmentation in Europeans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Stacey, S.N.; Helgason, A.; Rafnar, T.; Magnusson, K.P.; Manolescu, A.; Karason, A.; Palsson, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Steinberg, S.; Palsson, S.; Jonasson, F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Olafsson, J.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Kong, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2007-01-01

    Hair, skin and eye colors are highly heritable and visible traits in humans. We carried out a genome-wide association scan for variants associated with hair and eye pigmentation, skin sensitivity to sun and freckling among 2,986 Icelanders. We then tested the most closely associated SNPs from six re

  4. Genetic determinants of hair, eye and skin pigmentation in Europeans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Stacey, S.N.; Helgason, A.; Rafnar, T.; Magnusson, K.P.; Manolescu, A.; Karason, A.; Palsson, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Steinberg, S.; Palsson, S.; Jonasson, F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Olafsson, J.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Kong, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2007-01-01

    Hair, skin and eye colors are highly heritable and visible traits in humans. We carried out a genome-wide association scan for variants associated with hair and eye pigmentation, skin sensitivity to sun and freckling among 2,986 Icelanders. We then tested the most closely associated SNPs from six

  5. Optimal Feature Extraction for Discriminating Raman Spectra of Different Skin Samples using Statistical Methods and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Dehghani Bidgoli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Raman spectroscopy, that is a spectroscopic technique based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light, can provide valuable information about molecular vibrations, so using this technique we can study molecular changes in a sample. Material and Methods: In this research, 153 Raman spectra obtained from normal and dried skin samples. Baseline and electrical noise were eliminated in the preprocessing stage with subsequent normalization of Raman spectra. Then, using statistical analysis and Genetic algorithm, optimal features for discrimination between these two classes have been searched.  In statistical analysis for choosing optimal features, T test, Bhattacharyya distance and entropy between two classes have been calculated. Seeing that T test can better discriminate these two classes so this method used for selecting the best features. Another time Genetic algorithm used for selecting optimal features, finally using these selected features and classifiers such as LDA, KNN, SVM and neural network, these two classes have been discriminated. Results: In comparison of classifiers results, under various strategies for selecting features and classifier, the best results obtained in combination of genetic algorithm in feature selection and SVM in classification. Finally using combination of genetic algorithm and SVM, we could discriminate normal and dried skin samples with accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 91%. Discussion and Conclusion: According to obtained results, we can conclude that genetic algorithm demonstrates better performance than statistical analysis in selection of discriminating features of Raman spectra. In addition, results of this research illustrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy in study of different material effects on skin and skin diseases related to skin dehydration.

  6. Emergence of Lumpy Skin Disease in Greece, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasioudi, K E; Antoniou, S E; Iliadou, P; Sachpatzidis, A; Plevraki, E; Agianniotaki, E I; Fouki, C; Mangana-Vougiouka, O; Chondrokouki, E; Dile, C

    2016-06-01

    Lumpy skin disease was first reported in the EU, Greece, in August 2015. Until the end of December 2015, six regional units have been affected in northern Greece and the island of Limnos. This article presents the epidemiological situation, the diagnosis, the control measures including emergency vaccination and the preliminary conclusions from the experience gained.

  7. Distribution and degradation of albumin in extensive skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Anne-Marie; Taaning, E; Rossing, N;

    1981-01-01

    The distribution and degradation of albumin were determined in twelve patients with extensive skin disease and in ten control subjects by measuring the metabolic turnover and transcapillary escape of 132 I-labelled albumin. The ratio of intravascular to total mass of albumin was normal. Thus the ...... catabolic rate of albumin supports the concept of a causal relationship between these parameters....

  8. Prevalence of skin diseases in Varanasi school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valia A

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available In a school survey in Varanasi city, 12481 children were examined. More than half (54% had one or more skin diseases. The commonest ones were peduculosis capitis (35%, pityriasis alba (12% acne vulgaris (8%, miliaria (4% and pyodermas (3%

  9. WILDE,OSCAR SKIN-DISEASE - ALLERGIC CONTACT-DERMATITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NATER, JP

    1992-01-01

    During the last years of his life, Oscar Wilde (1856-1900) suffered from a suppurating otitis media as well as from an unidentified skin disease. The eruption was localized to his face, arms, chest and back and itched severely. A new theory is suggested, based on the fact that Wilde almost certainly

  10. WILDE,OSCAR SKIN-DISEASE - ALLERGIC CONTACT-DERMATITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NATER, JP

    1992-01-01

    During the last years of his life, Oscar Wilde (1856-1900) suffered from a suppurating otitis media as well as from an unidentified skin disease. The eruption was localized to his face, arms, chest and back and itched severely. A new theory is suggested, based on the fact that Wilde almost certainly

  11. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  12. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  13. Incidence of skin and respiratory diseases among Danish hairdressing apprentices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Majken Gabriel; Winther, Lone; Johnsen, Claus R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hairdressing is one of the professions with the highest risk of occupational skin and respiratory diseases. The incidence of these diseases in hairdressing apprentices has been studied only sparsely. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of skin and respiratory diseases in hairdressing...... apprentices, and to explore whether hairdressing apprentices leave the trade during training because of these diseases. METHODS: A 3-year follow-up questionnaire study was conducted among 248 hairdressing apprentices and a control group comprising 816 young adults from the general population. RESULTS......: The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for contact urticaria (IRR 4.7, 95%CI: 2.6-8.6), hand eczema (IRR 1.7, 95%CI: 1.1-2.6) and rhinitis symptoms (IRR 1.6, 95%CI: 1.2-2.2) were significantly increased in the hairdressing apprentices, whereas wheezing was similar between groups. During the follow-up period, 21...

  14. Pattern analysis of drug-induced skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justiniano, Hildamari; Berlingeri-Ramos, Alma C; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2008-08-01

    Drug eruptions are common adverse reactions to drug therapy and are a frequent reason for consultation in clinical practice. Even though any medication can potentially cause an adverse cutaneous reaction, some drugs are implicated more commonly than others. Histologically, drugs can elicit a variety of inflammatory disease patterns in the skin and panniculus, no pattern being specific for a particular drug. The most common pattern elicited by systemically administered medications is the perivascular pattern. Psoriasiform or granulomatous patterns are rarely caused by medications. The usual histologic patterns of drug eruptions are discussed in this review using the basic patterns of inflammatory diseases. Clinicopathologic correlation is established for relevant patterns. However, the changes of drug-induced skin disease must be made considering clinical presentation, histopathological analysis, and course of the disease.

  15. Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    98) Prescribed by ANSI Std . Z39.18 SCLERODERMA RESEARCH PROGRAM  Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers Proposal...NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada. 20Division of Rheumatology, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. 21Instituto...844, 1720 2nd Ave S. Birmingham AL 35294-3408. USA qUniversity of Minnesota. Division of Rheumatic/Autoimmune Diseases. MCC 108, 420 Delaware St SE

  16. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  17. Genetic variants associated with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonia Michail,1 Gilberto Bultron,1 R William DePaolo2 1The University of Southern California, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Crohn's disease is an immune-related disorder characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which can occur in any area throughout the digestive tract. This life-long disease commonly presents with abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss. While the exact etiology of this disease is largely unknown, it is thought to arise from an interaction between microbial, immunological, and environmental factors in a genetically susceptible host, whereby the immune system attacks the intestine as it cross reacts against gut microbial antigens. The study of genetic variants associated with Crohn's disease has shed light on our understanding of disease pathophysiology. A large number of genetic variants identified in Crohn's disease are related to genes targeting microbial recognition and bacterial wall sensing, the most common being NOD2/CARD15 gene. This review will discuss the recent advance in our knowledge of genetic variants of this disease and how they influence the disease course and prognosis. Keywords: Crohn's disease, genetics, autophagy

  18. Classification of papulo-squamous skin diseases using image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaly, H M; Masood, N A; Mohamed, Abdalla S A

    2012-02-01

    Papulo-squamous skin diseases are variable but are very close in their clinical features. They present with the same lesions, erythematous scaly lesions. Clinical evaluation of skin lesions is based on common sense and experience of the dermatologist to differentiate features of each disease. To evaluate a computer-based image analysis system as a helping tool for classification of commonly encountered diseases. The study included 50 selected images from each of psoriasis, lichen planus, atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, pityrasis rosea, and pitryasis rubra pilaris with a total of 300 images. The study comprised three main processes peformed on the 300 included images: segmentation, feature extraction followed by classification. Rough sets recorded the highest percentage of accuracy and sensitivity of segmentation for the six groups of diseases compared with the other three used techniques (topological derivative, K-means clustering, and watershed). Rule-based classifier using the concept of rough sets recorded the best percentage of classification (96.7%) for the six groups of diseases compared with the other six techniques of classification used: K-means clustering, fuzzy c-means clustering, classification and regression tree, rule-based classifier with discretization, and K-nearest neighbor technique. Rough sets approach proves its superiority for both the segmentation and the classification processes of papulo-squamous skin diseases compared with the other used segmentation and classification techniques. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Genetically Modified Pig Models for Human Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nana Fan; Liangxue Lai

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies.Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases,some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology.Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy,physiology,and genome.Thus,pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases.This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological,cardiovascular,and diabetic disorders.We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Garbern JY. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: pathogenic mechanisms and insights into the roles of proteolipid protein 1 in ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  1. The Roles of ADAMs Family Proteinases in Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kawaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs are members of a new gene family of transmembrane and secreted proteins, which belong to the zinc proteinase superfamily. These molecules are involved in various biological events such as cell adhesion, cell fusion, cell migration, membrane protein shedding, and proteolysis. Growing evidence now attests to the potential involvement of ADAMs proteinases in diverse processes such as skin wound healing, inflammation, pigmentation, tumor development, cell proliferation, and metastasis. This paper focuses on the roles of ADAMs proteinases in a wide variety of skin diseases.

  2. Parkinson disease and progressive supranuclear palsy: protein expression in skin

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study characterizes the expression of tau (p‐tau) and α‐synuclein (α‐syn) by immunohistochemistry in the skin of three different populations: healthy control (HC), Parkinson disease (PD), and progressive supranuclear paralysis (PSP) subjects, with the purpose of finding a biomarker that could differentiate between subjects with PD and PSP. Material and Methods We evaluated the presence of p‐tau and α‐syn in a pilot study in the skin of three distinct groups of patients...

  3. Factors influencing and modifying the decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Jaju, Prajakta D; Li, Shufeng; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-05-01

    Across cancers, the decision to pursue genetic testing is influenced more by subjective than objective factors. However, skin cancer, which is more prevalent, visual, and multifactorial than many other malignancies, may offer different motivations for pursuing such testing. The primary objective was to determine factors influencing the decision to receive genetic testing for skin cancer risk. A secondary objective was to assess the impact of priming with health questions on the decision to receive testing. We distributed anonymous online surveys through ResearchMatch.org to assess participant health, demographics, motivations, and interest in pursuing genetic testing for skin cancer risk. Two surveys with identical questions but different question ordering were used to assess the secondary objective. We received 3783 responses (64% response rate), and 85.8% desired testing. Subjective factors, including curiosity, perceptions of skin cancer, and anxiety, were the most statistically significant determinants of the decision to pursue testing (P skin cancer (odds ratio 0.5, P = .01). Age and family history of skin cancer did not influence this decision. Participants increasingly chose testing if first queried about health behaviors (P skin cancer is primarily determined by subjective factors, such as anxiety and curiosity. Health factors, including skin cancer history, also influenced decision-making. Priming with consideration of objective health factors can increase the desire to pursue testing. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AJ, Germain DP, Goldman M, Grabowski G, Packman S, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease, an under-recognized multisystemic disorder: ... Sims K, Brodie SE, Pastores GM, Strotmann JM, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease: guidelines for the evaluation and ...

  5. Genetics of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Michael R; Lewthwaite, Alistair J; Nicholl, David J

    2007-06-01

    The past 10 years has seen a shift in our etiological concepts of Parkinson's disease, moving from a nearly exclusively environmentally mediated disease towards a complex disorder with important genetic contributors. The identification of responsible mutations in certain genes, particularly alpha-synuclein, Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and LRRK2, has increased our understanding of the clinical and pathological changes underlying Parkinson's disease, with implications for patient diagnosis, management and future research. This review will outline the specific genetic advances, discuss their implications for clinical practice and hint at future directions for research into this common and disabling disease.

  6. THE FREQUENT SKIN DISEASES DIAGNOSED AT UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim KAYMAK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of some skin diseases are increasing at adolescent and early adulthood period. The most frequent disease at this period is acne vulgaris whereas fungal diseases, dermatitis, dermatosis which are due to stress and other reasons, oral mucosal lesions and herpetic lesions of perioral region are also frequent. In this research we aim to determine the frequent dermatologic diseases of university students and 147 female, 74 male, a total of 221 students are included. We questioned the dermatologic complaints of students, then examined dermatologically in detail and registered ages, sexes, findings of the dermatological examination and dermatological diagnostic informations. As a result it is found out that the most frequent diseases are acne vulgaris (34.1%, allergic and pruritic dermatosis (16.6%, fungal diseases ( 13.0%, and eritamatous-squamous disease (8.3%. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 313-320

  7. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  8. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  9. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  10. 78 FR 58320 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  11. 78 FR 64509 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  12. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  13. 78 FR 7790 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  14. 75 FR 6676 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  15. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  16. 78 FR 38065 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  17. 77 FR 61011 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  18. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  19. 78 FR 40486 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  20. 76 FR 28440 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  1. 77 FR 12605 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee....

  2. 78 FR 20118 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  3. 77 FR 64814 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS clinical trial and planning grant applications in... Review Officer, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National...

  4. 77 FR 60447 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  5. 77 FR 16246 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 10,...

  6. 78 FR 32261 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  7. 78 FR 66021 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Mentored Career Development, Institutional Research... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892. Contact...

  8. 77 FR 35416 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and...: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel; Program..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  9. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Wilson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Mutations in the ATP7B gene prevent the transport protein from functioning properly. With a shortage of functional ... GeneReview: Wilson Disease MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Wilson's disease National Human Genome Research Institute General Information from MedlinePlus (5 ...

  11. Parkinson's disease: piecing together a genetic jigsaw.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.J. Dekker (Marieke); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe role of genetics in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease has been subject to debate for decades. In recent years, the discovery of five genes and several more loci has provided important insight into its molecular aetiology. Some Parkinson's disease genes possibly cause

  12. A genetic perspective on coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Coeliac disease is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine with an autoimmune component and strong heritability. Genetic studies have confirmed strong association to HLA and identified 39 nonHLA risk genes, mostly immune-related. Over 50% of the disease-associated single nucleotide

  13. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  14. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  15. Parkinson's disease: piecing together a genetic jigsaw.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.J. Dekker (Marieke); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe role of genetics in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease has been subject to debate for decades. In recent years, the discovery of five genes and several more loci has provided important insight into its molecular aetiology. Some Parkinson's disease genes possibly cause Parkinson'

  16. Genetic Testing in Huntington’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    The historical and clinical profiles of Huntington’s disease (HD) presenting in 44 juveniles who were tested for CAG repeat expansions in the gene for HD were defined in a study reported by the US Huntington Disease Genetic Testing Group from the Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

  17. Review article : inflammatory bowel disease and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersma, R. K.; Van Dullemen, H. M.; Van der Steege, G.; Nolte, I. M.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprising ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is multigenic disorder. Tremendous progress has been achieved in unravelling the genetic background of IBD. It has led to the discovery of mutations in NOD2 associated with ileal CD and numerous

  18. Nutrition and genetic susceptibility to common diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1992-06-01

    Genetic factors play a role in chronic disease and conditions such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, and obesity. Individual responses to nutritional factors involved in such conditions vary depending upon a person's genetic make-up. The role of individual genes is best understood for the hyperlipidemias that predispose to coronary heart disease. Until more and better information on gene-nutritional interactions is available, general population-wide recommendations regarding a prudent diet appear reasonable. At the same time, high risk screening for certain conditions such as the hyperlipidemias is appropriate.

  19. Occupational skin diseases in hairdressing apprentices - has anything changed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Majken G; Winther, Lone; Søsted, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hairdressers are at risk for occupational skin diseases. Since 2008, an educational programme has been conducted in Danish hairdressing schools to prevent occupational skin diseases. Its effect is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the current frequency of self-reported hand eczema...... and contact urticaria in Danish hairdressing apprentices as compared with controls, and to determine the occurrence of hand eczema and contact urticaria in hairdressing apprentices with different durations of exposure to the trade. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, web-based questionnaire study conducted...... among 504 hairdressing apprentices and a control group of 1400 adolescents from the general population. RESULTS: Hand eczema was significantly more prevalent in the hairdressing apprentices than in controls (34.5% versus 18.8%, p hairdressing apprentices...

  20. MicroRNA-146a suppresses IL-17-mediated skin inflammation and is genetically associated with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ankit; Nikamo, Pernilla; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Li, Dongqing; Meisgen, Florian; Xu Landén, Ning; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor; Sonkoly, Enikö

    2017-02-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic background in which activation of IL-17 signaling is central in the pathogenesis. Little has been known about the role of noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), in predisposition to the disease. We sought to investigate the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA-146a (miR-146a) to psoriasis and to explore its function in the initiation and resolution of the disease. Analysis of the genetic association of miR-146a rs2910164 and psoriasis was carried out on 1546 patients with psoriasis and 1526 control subjects. The role of miR-146a in patients with psoriasis was assessed by using miR-146a(-/-) mice in conjunction with the imiquimod-induced mouse model of psoriasis. The severity of psoriasis-like skin inflammation was evaluated at morphologic, histologic, and molecular levels. miR-146a was ectopically overexpressed and inhibited in keratinocytes treated with IL-17. Synthetic miR-146a was injected intradermally into mice. Here we report protective association of a functional polymorphism in the miR-146a precursor (rs2910164). Genetic deficiency in miR-146a leads to earlier onset and exacerbated pathology of skin inflammation, with increased expression of IL-17-induced keratinocyte-derived inflammatory mediators, epidermal hyperproliferation, and increased neutrophil infiltration. Moreover, miR-146a-deficient mice do not resolve inflammation after discontinuation of imiquimod challenge. The overexpression of miR-146a suppressed, whereas its inhibition enhanced, IL-17-driven inflammation in keratinocytes. Functionally, miR-146a impairs the neutrophil chemoattractant capacity of keratinocytes. Finally, delivery of miR-146a mimics into the skin leads to amelioration of psoriasiform skin inflammation, decreased epidermal proliferation, and neutrophil infiltration. Our results define a crucial role for miR-146a in modulating IL-17-driven inflammation in the

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Caffey disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not experience its signs or symptoms; this phenomenon is called incomplete penetrance. In some cases, an ... O, Phadke SR. COL1A1 mutation in an Indian child with Caffey disease. Indian J Pediatr. 2011 Jul; ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Schindler disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spectrum disorders are characterized by impaired communication and socialization skills. Related Information What does it mean if ... deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) ISMRD: The ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Tangier disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characterized by significantly reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein ( HDL ) in the blood. HDL transports cholesterol and ... This Condition A-alphalipoprotein Neuropathy alpha High Density Lipoprotein Deficiency Disease Analphalipoproteinemia Cholesterol thesaurismosis Familial High Density ...

  4. An unusual case of granulomatous slack skin disease with necrobiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Emma Clare; Morris, Stephen L; Robson, Alistair; Whittaker, Sean J

    2008-10-01

    Granulomatous slack skin disease (GSS) is a very rare form of T-cell lymphoma, with only 52 cases reported in the literature. In the recent World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus classification GSS is considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. We describe a patient with GSS and histologic evidence of necrobiosis, which has not been previously reported.

  5. Skin symptoms as diagnostic clue for autoinflammatory diseases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alvaro; Torres, Barbara; Peruzzo, Juliano; Mota, Alberto; Eyerich, Kilian; Ring, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are immune-mediated diseases with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and absence of detectable autoantibodies. They course with recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation and fever is the most common symptom. Cutaneous manifestations are prevalent and important to diagnosis and early treatment of the syndromes. The purpose of this review is to emphasize to dermatologists the skin symptoms present in these syndromes in order to provide their early diagnosis. PMID:28225960

  6. Huntington’s Disease Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Richard H Myers

    2004-01-01

    Summary:Huntington’s disease (HD) is a dominantly transmitted neurodegenerative disorder with wide variation in onset age but with an average age at onset of 40 years. Children of HD gene carriers have a 50% chance of inheriting the disease. The characteristic symptoms of HD are involuntary choreiform movements, cognitive impairment, mood disorders, and behavioral changes which are chronic and progressive over the course of the illness. HD is a “trinucleotide repeat” disorder, which is caused...

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease: Genetic and epidemiologic considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judy H Cho

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have firmly established that many genomic loci contribute to inflammatory bowel disease, especially in Crohn's disease. These studies have newly-established the importance of the interleukin 23 and autophagy pathways in disease pathogenesis. Future challenges include: (1) the establishment of precisely causal alleles, (2) definition of altered functional outcomes of associated and causal alleles and (3) integration of genetic findings with environmental factors.

  8. [Inherited skin diseases - a review of selected genodermatoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Gos, Monika; Niepokój, Katarzyna; Kowalewski, Cezary

    2012-01-01

    Inherited distubances in skin structure and its function are the main cause of diseases classified as genodermatoses. The following clinical entities are classified as genodermatoses: epidermolysis bullosa, keratotic disorders, disorders of skin color, ectodermal genodermatoses, genodermatoses associated with connective tissue, vascular genodermatoses and genodermatoses with skin manifestation and elevated cancer risk. One of the most clinically heterogenous group of genodermatoses, is epidermolysis bullosa. Four main subtypes were described: simplex, dystrophic, junctional and Kindler syndrome. These diseases are caused by mutations in the genes encoding proteins forming junctions between the dermis and epidermis (eg. COL7A1, COL17A1, KRT14, KRT5 or genes coding for 332 laminin). They are inherited in an autosomal recessive or dominant manner. The disease that is inherited as a dominant, sex dependent trait, is incontinenia pigmenti (Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome) characterized by the presence of extensive pigmentation changes already in the neonatal period. In patients with incontinenia pigmenti, mutations in the NEMO gene are found. The protein encoded by NEMO is involved in the negative regulation of activity of the NFκB transcription factor that is responsible for apoptosis and cell proliferation control. In the regulation of cell proliferation, the neurofibromin (NF1) - the suppressor of RAS/MAPK signaling pathway activity, is also involved. The mutations in the NF1 gene are identified in neurofibromatosis type I - a genodermatosis with higher risk of cancer development and tumor formation. Herein, a review of selected genodermatoses in the context of their molecular pathology is presented.

  9. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals the genetic basis of skin color variation in common carp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied.In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains.In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values.

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of Skin Color Variation in Common Carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Songhao; Xu, Jian; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Sun, Xiaowen; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains. Conclusions In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values. PMID:25255374

  11. Genetic influences in caries and periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassell, T M; Harris, E L

    1995-01-01

    Deciphering the relative roles of heredity and environmental factors ("nature vs. nurture") in the pathogenesis of dental caries and diseases of the periodontium has occupied clinical and basic researchers for decades. Success in the endeavor has come more easily in the case of caries; the complex interactions that occur between host-response mechanisms and putative microbiologic pathogens in periodontal disease have made elucidation of genetic factors in disease susceptibility more difficult. In addition, during the 30-year period between 1958 and 1987, only meager resources were targeted toward the "nature" side of the nature/nurture dipole in periodontology. In this article, we present a brief history of the development of genetic epistemology, then describe the three main research mechanisms by which questions about the hereditary component of diseases in humans can be addressed. A critical discussion of the evidence for a hereditary component in caries susceptibility is next presented, also from a historical perspective. The evolution of knowledge concerning possible genetic ("endogenous", "idiotypic") factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal disease is initiated with an analysis of some foreign-language (primarily German) literature that is likely to be unfamiliar to the reader. We identify a turning point at about 1960, when the periodontal research community turned away from genetics in favor of microbiology research. During the past five years, investigators have re-initiated the search for the hereditary component in susceptibility to common adult periodontal disease; this small but growing body of literature is reviewed. Recent applications of in vitro methods for genetic analyses in periodontal research are presented, with an eye toward a future in which persons who are at risk--genetically predisposed--to periodontal disease may be identified and targeted for interventive strategies. Critical is the realization that genes and environment

  12. Genetics of Parkinson disease and essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2010-08-01

    Elucidating the genetic background of Parkinson disease and essential tremor is crucial to understand the pathogenesis and improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. A number of approaches have been applied including familial and association studies, and studies of gene expression profiles to identify genes involved in susceptibility to Parkinson disease. These studies have nominated a number of candidate Parkinson disease genes and novel loci including Omi/HtrA2, GIGYF2, FGF20, PDXK, EIF4G1 and PARK16. A recent notable finding has been the confirmation for the role of heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) as risk factors for Parkinson disease. Finally, association studies have nominated genetic variation in the leucine-rich repeat and Ig containing 1 gene (LINGO1) as a risk for both Parkinson disease and essential tremor, providing the first genetic evidence of a link between the two conditions. Although undoubtedly genes remain to be identified, considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the genetic basis of Parkinson disease. This same effort is now required for essential tremor. The use of next-generation high-throughput sequencing and genotyping technologies will help pave the way for future insight leading to advances in diagnosis, prevention and cure.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: prion disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein called prion protein (PrP). Although the precise function of this protein is unknown, researchers have proposed roles in several ... promote its transformation into PrP Sc . The abnormal protein builds up in the brain, forming ... have no family history of the disease and no identified mutation in ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: multiminicore disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Page Ferreiro A, Estournet B, Chateau D, Romero NB, Laroche C, Odent S, Toutain A, Cabello A, Fontan D, dos Santos HG, Haenggeli CA, Bertini E, Urtizberea JA, Guicheney P, Fardeau M. Multi-minicore disease--searching for ... Straub V, Villanova M, Leroy JP, Romero NB, Martin JJ, Muntoni F, Voit T, Estournet ...

  15. [Complex diseases: the importance of genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libioulle, C; Bours, V

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases usually harbour hereditary factors linked with multiple susceptibility genes. The additive effects of genetic and environmental factors are responsible for the pathology. The impact of heredity has been demonstrated through family studies, but also, and mostly, through the study of adopted people and twins. Recently, genome wide association studies (GWAS) allowed the identification of many susceptibility genes for most complex diseases. However, a large part of the heritability is still missing, probably because of insufficient exploration of rare genetic variants and/or epigenetic factors. The ultimate goal of these genetic studies is the definition of an individual risk leading to specific preventive measures (model "predict and prevent"), but this purpose remains very remote for the majority of complex diseases.

  16. Signalling in inflammatory skin disease by AP-1 (Fos/Jun).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluçkan, Özge; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Jimenez, Maria; Wagner, Erwin F

    2015-01-01

    Skin inflammation is a physiological reaction to tissue injury, pathogen invasion and irritants. During this process, innate and/or adaptive immune cells are activated and recruited to the site of inflammation to either promote or suppress inflammation. The sequential recruitment and activation of immune cells is modulated by a combination of cytokines and chemokines, which are regulated by transcription factors, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-κB, NFATs, and STATs. Here we review the present evidence and the underlying mechanisms of how Jun/AP-1 proteins control skin inflammation. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) in which AP-1 proteins are deleted in the epidermis have revealed that these proteins control cytokine expression at multiple levels. Constitutive epidermal deletion of JunB in mice leads to a multi-organ disease characterised by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These JunB-deficient mutant mice display several phenotypes from skin inflammation to a G-CSF-dependent myeloproliferative disease, as well as kidney atrophy and bone loss, reminiscent of psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Importantly, epidermal deletion of both JunB and c-Jun in an inducible manner in adult mice leads to a psoriasis-like disease, in which the epidermal proteome expression profile is comparable to the one from psoriasis patient samples. In this GEMM and in psoriasis patient-derived material, S100A8/A9-dependent C3/CFB complement activation, as well as a miR-21-dependent TIMP-3/TACE pathway leading to TNF-α shedding, plays causal roles in disease development. The newly identified therapeutic targets from GEMMs together with investigations in human patient samples open up new avenues for therapeutic interventions for psoriasis and related inflammatory skin diseases.

  17. Permanent disability pension due to skin diseases in Denmark 2003-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2011-01-01

    in the understanding of how skin diseases affect patients and in arguments for continued specialist services. An approach to explore the societal impact of skin diseases is to investigate the incidence of permanent disability pensions granted due to skin diseases. The present study evaluated the number of permanent...... disability pensions granted due to skin diseases in Denmark during the 2003-2008 period and related them to previous findings. In view of the high prevalence of skin diseases in the society, and particularly their role in occupational medicine, only a low number of disability pensions are granted. This may...

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, T.; Thomsen, S.F.; Vestbo, J.

    2008-01-01

    smokers develop COPD. This indicates a genetic contribution to the individual disease susceptibility. Although many genes have been examined, the puzzle of COPD genetics seems still largely unsolved. It is therefore important to measure phenotypes and to perform genome-wide scans of COPD patients in order......Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by airflow limitation and is associated with an inflammatory response of the lungs primarily caused by cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking is by far the most important environmental risk factor for COPD, but less than half of all heavy...

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, T.; Thomsen, S.F.; Vestbo, J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by airflow limitation and is associated with an inflammatory response of the lungs primarily caused by cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking is by far the most important environmental risk factor for COPD, but less than half of all heavy...... smokers develop COPD. This indicates a genetic contribution to the individual disease susceptibility. Although many genes have been examined, the puzzle of COPD genetics seems still largely unsolved. It is therefore important to measure phenotypes and to perform genome-wide scans of COPD patients in order...

  20. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  1. Skin ultrastructural findings in type 2 Gaucher disease: diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Aegean; Holleran, Walter M; Ferguson, Tajh; Crumrine, Debra; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Schiffmann, Raphael; Tayebi, Nahid; Ginns, Edward I; Elias, Peter M; Sidransky, Ellen

    2011-12-01

    Type 2 Gaucher disease is a rare and progressive subtype of this lysosomal storage disorder, marked by rapid, early-onset neurodegeneration. Distinguishing type 2 from types 1 and 3 Gaucher disease has remained challenging, due to the lack of a clear correlation between phenotype and enzymatic activity or genotype. β-glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, also has an essential role in maintaining epidermal permeability function, by regulating the ratio of ceramides to glucosylceramides in the stratum corneum of the skin. To further assess the diagnostic utility of epidermal evaluations in distinguishing patients with type 2 Gaucher disease in an expanded cohort. Epidermal samples were evaluated from twenty children with type 2, three patients with type 3 Gaucher disease and two adults with type 1 Gaucher disease with different clinical manifestations and genotypes. Electron microscopy on ruthenium tetroxide post-fixed tissue was performed. Compared to controls and subjects with type 1 and type 3 Gaucher disease, only patients with type 2 Gaucher disease displayed characteristic electron dense, non-lamellar clefts and immature-lamellar membranes. The appearance of characteristic alterations in epidermal ultrastructure provides an early and specific diagnostic tool to help in distinguishing type 2 from the other types of Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic parameters of wool colour and skin traits in Corriedale sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Benavides

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Clean wool colour (CWC is an important wool price determinant and has been related to suint characteristics, i.e. sudoriparous and sebaceous gland secretions, such as suint percentage and suint K content. In this work heritability, phenotypic and genetic correlations among wool colour and skin traits were examined. The genetic estimates were assessed by Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML procedures using average information algorithm (AIREML in a Corriedale flock. The traits analysed were wool colour traits (CWC, yellow predictive colour (YPC, and Visual Score; suint traits such as suint percentage and potassium and sodium concentrations in suint, and physiological traits such as potassium and sodium concentrations in the skin, including plasma and red blood cells. The objectives of this study were to assess phenotypic and genetic correlations between wool colour and skin traits, and to find the suitability of these traits as indirect selection criteria for clean wool colour. Suint traits were highly genetically correlated to YPC. Suint K, but not suint percentage, was found to have a high genetic correlation with CWC. Skin K, Visual Score, YPC and suint K were amongst the best indirect selection criteria for clean wool colour. However, selection using these traits was expected to reduce CWC from 52% to 49% of that estimated under direct selection.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Genetic Testing Registry: Glycogen storage disease 0, muscle Genetic Testing Registry: Hypoglycemia with deficiency of glycogen synthetase in ... Sheet (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Glycogen storage disease 0, ... Manual Consumer Version: Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Orphanet: Glycogen ...

  4. Novel genetic markers in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors play a significant role in determining inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility. Epidemiologic data support genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD, which include familial aggregation, twin studies, racial and ethnic differences in disease prevalence. Linkage studies have identified several susceptibility genes contained in different genomic regions named IBD1 to IBD9. Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD2) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most extensively studied genetic regions (IBD1 and IBD3 respectively) in IBD. Mutations of the NOD2 gene are associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and several HLA genes are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) and CD. Toll like receptors (TLRs) have an important role in the innate immune response against infections by mediating recognition of pathogen-associated microbial patterns. Studying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in molecules involved in bacterial recognition seems to be essential to define genetic backgrounds at risk of IBD. Recently, numerous new genes have been identified to be involved in the genetic susceptibility to IBD: NOD1/Caspase-activation recruitment domains 4 (CARD4), Chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), IL-11, and IL-18 among others. The characterization of these novel genes potentially will lead to the identification of therapeutic agents and clinical assessment of phenotype and prognosis in patients with IBD.

  5. Psoriasis and systemic inflammatory diseases: potential mechanistic links between skin disease and co-morbid conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovici, B.B.; Sattar, N.; Prinz, J.C.; Puig, L.; Emery, P.; Barker, J.N.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Stahle, M.; Nestle, F.O.; Girolomoni, G.; Krueger, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is now classified as an immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) of the skin. It is being recognized that patients with various IMIDs, including psoriasis, are at higher risk of developing "systemic" co-morbidities, e.g., cardiovascular disease (CVD), metabolic syndrome, and overt diabe

  6. Genetic parameters of wool colour and skin traits in Corriedale sheep

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Clean wool colour (CWC) is an important wool price determinant and has been related to suint characteristics, i.e. sudoriparous and sebaceous gland secretions, such as suint percentage and suint K content. In this work heritability, phenotypic and genetic correlations among wool colour and skin traits were examined. The genetic estimates were assessed by Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) procedures using average information algorithm (AIREML) in a Corriedale flock. The traits analysed were...

  7. The modular nature of genetic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oti, M.O.; Brunner, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence from many sources suggests that similar phenotypes are begotten by functionally related genes. This is most obvious in the case of genetically heterogeneous diseases such as Fanconi anemia, Bardet-Biedl or Usher syndrome, where the various genes work together in a single biological module.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Paget disease of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clin Pathol. 2010 Mar;63(3):199-203. doi: 10.1136/jcp.2009.064428. Epub 2009 Oct 26. Review. Citation on PubMed Ralston SH, Albagha OM. Genetics of Paget's disease of bone. Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2014 Sep;12(3):263-71. doi: 10.1007/s11914-014-0219-y. Review. Citation ...

  9. Genetic risk factors for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feltkamp, T.E.W.; Aarden, L.A.; Lucas, C.J.; Verweij, C.L.; Vries, R.R.P. de

    1999-01-01

    In most autoimmune diseases multigenic factors play a significant role in pathogenesis. Progress in identifying these genetic factors, many of which are located outside the major histocompatibility complex, was the subject of a recent meeting. Chemicals/CAS: Interleukin-10, 130068-27-8; Transforming

  10. Molecular genetic response to varied wavelengths of light in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Boswell, William T; Boswell, Mikki; Caballero, Kaela L; Walter, Ronald B

    2015-12-01

    Xiphophorus fishes represent a model often utilized to study UVB induced tumorigenesis. Recently, varied genetic responses to UVB exposure have been documented in the skin of female and male Xiphophorus, as have differences in UVB response in the skin of different parental species and for interspecies hybrids produced from crossing them. Additionally, it has been shown that exposure to "cool white" fluorescent light induces a shift in the genetic profiles of Xiphophorus skin that is nearly as robust as the UVB response, but involves a fundamentally different set of genes. Given these results and the use of Xiphophorus interspecies hybrids as an experimental model for UVB inducible melanoma, it is of interest to characterize genes that may be transcriptionally modulated in a wavelength specific manner. The global molecular genetic response of skin upon exposure of the intact animal to specific wavelengths of light has not been investigated. Herein, we report results of RNA-Seq experiments from the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B following exposure to varied 50nm wavelengths of light ranging from 300-600nm. We identify two specific wavelength regions, 350-400nm (88 genes) and 500-550nm (276 genes), that exhibit transcriptional modulation of a significantly greater number of transcripts than any of the other 50nm regions in the 300-600nm range. Observed functional sets of genes modulated within these two transcriptionally active light regions suggest different mechanisms of gene modulation.

  11. The Malassezia Genus in Skin and Systemic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiatis, Prokopios; Hantschke, Markus; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Velegraki, Aristea

    2012-01-01

    Summary: In the last 15 years, the genus Malassezia has been a topic of intense basic research on taxonomy, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, immunology, and metabolomics. Currently, the genus encompasses 14 species. The 1996 revision of the genus resulted in seven accepted taxa: M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, and M. slooffiae. In the last decade, seven new taxa isolated from healthy and lesional human and animal skin have been accepted: M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana, M. caprae, M. equina, and M. cuniculi. However, forthcoming multidisciplinary research is expected to show the etiopathological relationships between these new species and skin diseases. Hitherto, basic and clinical research has established etiological links between Malassezia yeasts, pityriasis versicolor, and sepsis of neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Their role in aggravating seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, folliculitis, and onychomycosis, though often supported by histopathological evidence and favorable antifungal therapeutic outcomes, remains under investigation. A close association between skin and Malassezia IgE binding allergens in atopic eczema has been shown, while laboratory data support a role in psoriasis exacerbations. Finally, metabolomic research resulted in the proposal of a hypothesis on the contribution of Malassezia-synthesized aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands to basal cell carcinoma through UV radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:22232373

  12. Molecular characterisation of lumpy skin disease virus and sheeppox virus based on P32 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.A.Rashid

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV and sheeppox virus (SPV have a considerable economic impact on the cattle and small ruminant industry. They are listed in group A of contagious disease by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE. This study addressed molecular characterisation of first LSDV outbreak and an endemic SPV in Kurdistan region of Iraq based on P32 gene. The results indicated that P32 gene can be successfully used for diagnosis of LSDV. The phylogenic and molecular analysis showed that there may be a new LSDV isolate circulating in Kurdistan which uniquely shared the same characteristic amino acid sequence with SPV and GPV, leucine at amino acid position 51 in P32 gene as well as few genetically distinct SPV causing pox disease in Kurdistan sheep. This study provided sequence information of P32 gene for several LSDV isolates, which positively affects the epidemiological study of Capripoxvirus

  13. 77 FR 51544 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. Date... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  14. Functional and Genetic Analysis of Plectin in Skin and Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezniczek, Günther A; Winter, Lilli; Walko, Gernot; Wiche, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Plectin is a large cytoskeletal linker protein with a multitude of functions affecting various cellular processes. It is expressed as several different isoforms from a highly complex gene. Both, this transcript diversity (mainly caused by short 5'-sequences contained in alternative first exons) and the size (>500 kDa) of the resulting proteins, present considerable challenges to plectin researchers. In this chapter, we will consider these problems and offer advice on how to tackle them best. As plectin has been studied most extensively in skin and muscle, we will focus on these types of tissues and describe some selected methods in detail. Foremost, however, we aim to give the readers some good pointers to available tools and into the existing literature.

  15. Genetic diseases with rheumatic manifestations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, S; Colbert, R A

    1998-09-01

    Many nonrheumatic diseases of childhood present with musculoskeletal abnormalities. A significant proportion of these disorders have a genetic basis, many involving defects in structural proteins of the connective tissue. Chief among these are collagen mutations resulting in spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, as well as fibrillin defects associated with Marfan's syndrome. A variety of other chromosomal anomalies are associated with musculoskeletal abnormalities, and may result from as yet unidentified connective tissue defects. In addition, metabolic diseases may result in findings of hyper- or hypomobility, or carpal tunnel syndrome. Helpful clinical clues to identify nonrheumatologic musculoskeletal disease, as well as recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of several of these disorders, are reviewed here.

  16. Advances in the genetics of eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephanie; Freund, Paul R; MacDonald, Ian

    2013-12-01

    An update on heritable eye disease will allow informed patient counseling and improved patient care. New loci and genes have been associated with identifiable heritable ocular traits. Molecular genetic analysis is available for many of these genes either as part of research or for clinical testing. The advent of gene array technologies has enabled screening of samples for known mutations in genes linked to various disorders. Exomic sequencing has proven to be particularly successful in research protocols in identifying the genetic causation of rare genetic traits by pooling patient resources and discovering new genes. Further, genetic analysis has led improvement in patient care and counselling, as exemplified by the continued advances in our treatment of retinoblastoma. Patients and families are commonly eager to participate in either research or clinical testing to improve their understanding of the cause and heritability of an ocular condition. Many patients hope that testing will then lead to appropriate treatments or cures. The success of gene therapy in the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis has provided a brilliant example of this hope; that a similar trial may become available to other patients and families burdened by genetic disease.

  17. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency with a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders has been well established, the effects of the deficiency of other lectin pathway components (ficolins, MASPs) have been less extensively investigated due to our incomplete knowledge of the genetic background of such deficiencies and the functional activity of those components. For complement regulators and receptors, the consequences of their genetic deficiency vary depending on their specific involvement in the regulatory or signalling steps within the complement cascade and beyond. This article reviews current knowledge and concepts about the genetic load of complement component deficiencies and their association with diseases. An integrative presentation of genetic data with the latest updates provides a background to further investigations of the disease association investigations of the complement system from the perspective of systems biology and systems genetics.

  18. A genetic future for coronary heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kate; Martin, Paul

    2008-04-01

    This paper is concerned with changing conceptions of genetic disease. It is based on an analysis of biomedical literature and focuses on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) in four published commentary papers. The aim of this analysis is to explore the ways in which CHD is constructed as genetic and the place of genetic discourses in the wider set of ideas that circulate about the disease. This analysis is then used to consider some of the claims of the geneticisation thesis (Lippman 1991, 1992). The analysis suggests that a genetic vision for understanding and managing CHD has emerged, which has many of the hallmarks of the geneticisation imagined by Lippman. However, a number of alternative and competing models of CHD are also supported within the biomedical discourse. These are related to the different disciplines with a stake in the field of CHD, and their struggles for authority. In conclusion, it is suggested that the geneticisation thesis, as a universal claim, is at odds with the diffuse and distributed nature of biomedical knowledge and practice. Rather than analysing geneticisation in a literal way, it may be more fruitful to see the thesis, itself, as a form of boundary work (Gieryn 1983).

  19. The spectrum of nephrocutaneous diseases and associations: Genetic causes of nephrocutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Jay; Fenves, Andrew Z; Jackson, J Mark; Kimball, Alexa B; Menter, Alan

    2016-02-01

    There are a significant number of diseases and treatment considerations of considerable importance relating to the skin and renal systems. This emphasizes the need for dermatologists in practice or in clinical training to be aware of these associations. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews the genetic syndromes with both renal and cutaneous involvement that are most important for the dermatologist to be able to identify, manage, and appropriately refer to nephrology colleagues. Part II reviews the inflammatory syndromes with relevant renal manifestations and therapeutic agents commonly used by dermatologists that have drug-induced effects on or require close consideration of renal function. In addition, we will likewise review therapeutic agents commonly used by nephrologists that have drug-induced effects on the skin that dermatologists are likely to encounter in clinical practice. In both parts of this continuing medical education article, we discuss diagnosis, management, and appropriate referral to our nephrology colleagues in the context of each nephrocutaneous association. There are a significant number of dermatoses associated with renal abnormalities and disease, emphasizing the need for dermatologists to be keenly aware of their presence in order to avoid overlooking important skin conditions with potentially devastating renal complications. This review discusses important nephrocutaneous disease associations with recommendations for the appropriate urgency of referral to nephrology colleagues for diagnosis, surveillance, and early management of potential renal sequelae.

  20. Biomarkers of An Autoimmune Skin Disease-Psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Jiang; Taylor E Hinchliffe; Tianfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent autoimmune skin diseases. However, its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear. Over the last decade, omics-based technologies have been exten-sively utilized for biomarker discovery. As a result, some promising markers for psoriasis have been identified at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome level. These discoveries have provided new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in psoriasis pathogenesis. More importantly, some of these markers may prove useful in the diagnosis of psoriasis and in the prediction of disease progression once they have been validated. In this review, we summarize the most recent findings in psoriasis biomarker discovery. In addition, we will discuss several emerging technologies and their potential for novel biomarker discovery and diagnostics for psoriasis.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wolfsdorf JI, Watson MS; American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Diagnosis and management of glycogen storage disease type ... practice guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Genet Med. 2014 Nov;16(11):e1. Citation ...

  2. Skin disease in United Nations peacekeepers in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Liu, T; Zhang, Z

    2017-02-01

    Skin disease is one of the major components of health problems for soldiers either during war or peacetime. Despite increased numbers and scale of military missions, dermatological survey is limited. The aim of this study was to outline the dermatological profile in international peacekeepers in Lebanon and to explore the features of disease pattern. The dermatological records of peacekeepers visiting a Chinese Level 2 hospital during a 7-year period were retrospectively assessed. Comparisons with previous reports of skin disease in military personnel were performed. A total of 1658 patients (91% men, with a mean age of 32 years) were included. More than half of them were Asian (62%). Dermatitis and eczema (27%) was the leading category. Tinea pedis (13%), lichen simplex chronicus (9%), unspecified dermatitis (8%), verruca vulgaris (7%) and alopecia areata (5%) were the top five complaints. Dermatitis and eczematous eruptions appeared to be the most common condition in troops deployed in the Middle East, whereas fungal infection was highly prevalent in tropical regions. Additionally, a remarkably high rate of alopecia areata was noted in two studies including ours. Environment, group living, occupational activities and work-related stress act as initiating and/or aggravating factors in the development and/or spread of some conditions. The knowledge of disease profile empowers doctors to enforce preventive measures and prepare for treatment modalities. In particular, the underlying psychological component in lichen simplex chronicus and alopecia areata should be addressed appropriately. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. New Genetic Insights from Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry F. Davies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs (Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are complex genetic diseases which most likely have more than 20 genes contributing to the clinical phenotypes. To date, the genes known to be contributing fall into two categories: immune regulatory genes (including HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, CD25, and FCRL3 and thyroid-specific genes (TG and TSHR. However, none of these genes contribute more than a 4-fold increase in risk of developing one of these diseases, and none of the polymorphisms discovered is essential for disease development. Hence, it appears that a variety of different gene interactions can combine to cause the same clinical disease pattern, but the contributing genes may differ from patient to patient and from population to population. Furthermore, this possible mechanism leaves open the powerful influence of the environment and epigenetic modifications of gene expression. For the clinician, this means that genetic profiling of such patients is unlikely to be fruitful in the near future.

  4. [Molecular genetic investigations in muscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgunder, J M

    2003-08-01

    The last couple of years have witnessed a rapid development in discoveries of the genetic background in myopathies. It is therefore timely to review the impact they have on clinical work. The recognition of a myopathy remains a clinical activity, and biopsy retains a major role. Molecular genetic investigation can be contemplated early in cases with certain typical clinical presentation. In others, the correct indication to such an investigation can only be made based on findings at biopsy. The information of precise mutation can be used for genetic counselling of the family. Knowledge of genes, whose mutations are sufficient to cause certain myopathies, have provided a great amount of knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Some are arguably rare diseases, however, this knowledge also helps understand more frequent myopathies, as it has been the case in neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Inter individual variations of the fish skin microbiota: host genetics basis of mutualism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boutin

    Full Text Available The commensal microbiota of fish skin is suspected to provide a protection against opportunist infections. The skin of fish harbors a complex and diverse microbiota that closely interacts with the surrounding water microbial communities. Up to now there is no clear evidence as to whether the host regulates the recruitment of environmental bacteria to build a specific skin microbiota. To address this question, we detected Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL associated with the abundance of specific skin microbiota bacterial strains in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis, combining 16S RNA tagged-amplicon 454 pyrosequencing with genetic linkage analysis. Skin microbiota analysis revealed high inter-individual variation among 86 F2 fish progeny based upon the relative abundance of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Out of those OTUs, the pathogenic strain Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the non-pathogenic strain Methylobacterium rhodesianum explained the majority of inter-individual distances. Furthermore, a strong negative correlation was found between Flavobacterium and Methylobacterium, suggesting a mutually competitive relationship. Finally, after considering a total of 266 markers, genetic linkage analysis highlighted three major QTL associated with the abundance of Lysobacter, Rheinheimera and Methylobacterium. All these three genera are known for their beneficial antibacterial activity. Overall, our results provide evidence that host genotype may regulate the abundance of specific genera among their surface microbiota. They also indicate that Lysobacter, Rheinheimera and Methylobacterium are potentially important genera in providing protection against pathogens.

  6. Genetics in Ophthalmology III – Posterior Segment Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Aslı Utine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diseases are congenital or acquired hereditary diseases that result from structural/functional disorders of the human genome. Today, the genetic factors that play a role in many diseases are being highlighted with the rapid progress in the field of genetics science. It becomes increasingly important that physicians from all disciplines have knowledge about the basic principles of genetics, patterns of inheritance, etc., so that they can follow the new developments. In genetic eye diseases, ophthalmologists should know the basic clinical and recently rapidly developing genetic characteristics of these diseases in order to properly approach the diagnosis and treatment and to provide genetic counseling. In this paper, posterior segment eye diseases of genetic origin are reviewed, and retinoblastoma, mitochondrial diseases, retinal dysplasia, retinitis pigmentosa, choroideremia, gyrate atrophy, Alström disease, ocular albinism, optic nerve hypoplasia, anophthalmia/microphthalmia and Leber’s congenital amaurosis are covered. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 386-92

  7. Infectious diseases: Surveillance, genetic modification and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, H. L.; Teh, S.Y.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases such as influenza and dengue have the potential of becoming a worldwide pandemic that may exert immense pressures on existing medical infrastructures. Careful surveillance of these diseases, supported by consistent model simulations, provides a means for tracking the disease evolution. The integrated surveillance and simulation program is essential in devising effective early warning systems and in implementing efficient emergency preparedness and control measures. This paper presents a summary of simulation analysis on influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Malaysia. This simulation analysis provides insightful lessons regarding how disease surveillance and simulation should be performed in the future. This paper briefly discusses the controversy over the experimental field release of genetically modified (GM) Aedes aegypti mosquito in Malaysia. Model simulations indicate that the proposed release of GM mosquitoes is neither a viable nor a sustainable control strategy. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  8. Genetic and environmental influences in Dupuytren's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren; Krogsgaard, D G; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard;

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the relative contribution of genes and environment in the aetiology of Dupuytren's disease by studying Danish twins born between 1870 and 2000. Twins with a diagnosis (n = 365) and the subgroup who also had an operation (n = 259) after 1977 were identified through linkage...... is involved. The number of concordant male twin pairs with Dupuytren's disease was 17 and 7 (monozygotic and dizygotic pairs, respectively), compared with 60 and 174 discordant monozygotic and dizygotic pairs, yielding probandwise concordance rates of 0.37 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.26 to 0.50) and 0.......07 (95% CI: 0.04 to 0.14), respectively. The heritability of Dupuytren's disease was approximately 80%. We conclude that genetic factors play a major role in the development of Dupuytren's disease....

  9. Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease: Vertebrate Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjong; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex genetic disorder that is associated with environmental risk factors and aging. Vertebrate genetic models, especially mice, have aided the study of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive PD. Mice are capable of showing a broad range of phenotypes and, coupled with their conserved genetic and anatomical structures, provide unparalleled molecular and pathological tools to model human disease. These models used in combination with aging and PD-associated toxins have expanded our understanding of PD pathogenesis. Attempts to refine PD animal models using conditional approaches have yielded in vivo nigrostriatal degeneration that is instructive in ordering pathogenic signaling and in developing therapeutic strategies to cure or halt the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the generation and characterization of transgenic and knockout mice used to study PD followed by a review of the molecular insights that have been gleaned from current PD mouse models. Finally, potential approaches to refine and improve current models are discussed. PMID:22960626

  10. [Childhood genetic renal diseases in southern Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Daniel; Shalev, Hanna

    2010-03-01

    Genetic kidney diseases (GKDs) are an important and well-known entity in pediatric nephrology. Advances in genetic and molecular approaches in the last 15 years have enabled elucidation of the underlying molecular defects in many of these disorders. Herein, the authors summarize the progress that has been made over this period in disclosing the molecular basis of several novel GKDs which were characterized in this area and include Bartter syndrome type IV, type II Bartter syndrome and transient neonatal hyperkalemia, cystinuria and mental retardation, familial hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile nephronophthisis and familial hemolytic uremic syndrome with factor H deficiency. Retrospective analysis of the authors' data reveals that GKDs are over-represented among the pediatric population in southern Israel. GKD are seen 4 times more often than end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and comprise 38% of all cases of ESRD in our area. This high rate of GKD is mainly due to the high frequency of consanguineous marriages that prevails in this area. Understanding of the genetic and molecular background of these diseases is a result of a fruitful collaboration between the pediatric nephrologists and scientists, and has a direct implication on the diagnosis and treatment of the affected families.

  11. 77 FR 63844 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Small Grants in Musculoskeletal Diseases (R03... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  12. Unifying diseases from a genetic point of view: the example of the genetic theory of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrason, Marie

    2013-08-01

    In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, Mendelian predisposition to one infection, and major gene and polygenic predispositions), they attempt to unify infectious diseases from a genetic point of view. In this article, I analyze this explicit example of a genetic theory, which relies on mechanisms and is applied only to a specific category of diseases, what we call "a regional genetic theory." I have three aims: to prove that a genetic theory of disease can be devoid of genocentrism, to consider the possibility of a genetic theory applied to every disease, and to introduce two hypotheses about the form that such a genetic theory could take by distinguishing between a genetic theory of diseases and a genetic theory of Disease. Finally, I suggest that network medicine could be an interesting framework for a genetic theory of Disease.

  13. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reflections on the Field of Human Genetics: A Call for Increased Disease Genetics Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrodi, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Development of human genetics theoretical models and the integration of those models with experiment and statistical evaluation are critical for scientific progress. This perspective argues that increased effort in disease genetics theory, complementing experimental, and statistical efforts, will escalate the unraveling of molecular etiologies of complex diseases. In particular, the development of new, realistic disease genetics models will help elucidate complex disease pathogenesis, and the predicted patterns in genetic data made by these models will enable the concurrent, more comprehensive statistical testing of multiple aspects of disease genetics predictions, thereby better identifying disease loci. By theoretical human genetics, I intend to encompass all investigations devoted to modeling the heritable architecture underlying disease traits and studies of the resulting principles and dynamics of such models. Hence, the scope of theoretical disease genetics work includes construction and analysis of models describing how disease-predisposing alleles (1) arise, (2) are transmitted across families and populations, and (3) interact with other risk and protective alleles across both the genome and environmental factors to produce disease states. Theoretical work improves insight into viable genetic models of diseases consistent with empirical results from linkage, transmission, and association studies as well as population genetics. Furthermore, understanding the patterns of genetic data expected under realistic disease models will enable more powerful approaches to discover disease-predisposing alleles and additional heritable factors important in common diseases. In spite of the pivotal role of disease genetics theory, such investigation is not particularly vibrant.

  15. Skin disease among farmers using wastewater in rice cultivation in Nam Dinh, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Thuy Trang; van der Hoek, Wim; Nguyen, Dang Tuan;

    2007-01-01

    . In each commune, 200 households were randomly selected. RESULTS: Of the 1103 individuals aged > or =15 years, 381 reported a skin problem at baseline or at any of the monthly visits, primarily dermatitis (eczema) and superficial fungal infections. Among the 874 subjects who were free from skin disease......OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of skin disease among farmers occupationally exposed to wastewater. METHODS: One-year follow-up study with monthly assessments of wastewater exposure and skin disease in Nam Dinh, northern Vietnam, in two adjacent communes with contrasting levels of wastewater use...... at baseline and who could be followed up > or =11 months, 183 developed a new skin disease (cumulative incidence 21%). Exposure to wastewater was a major risk factor for skin disease with a relative risk (RR) of 1.89 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39-2.57] in multivariable analysis. Other risk factors...

  16. Association of Environmental Arsenic Exposure, Genetic Polymorphisms of Susceptible Genes, and Skin Cancers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency in the capability of xenobiotic detoxification and arsenic methylation may be correlated with individual susceptibility to arsenic-related skin cancers. We hypothesized that glutathione S-transferase (GST M1, T1, and P1, reactive oxygen species (ROS related metabolic genes (NQO1, EPHX1, and HO-1, and DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XPD, hOGG1, and ATM together may play a role in arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis. We conducted a case-control study consisting of 70 pathologically confirmed skin cancer patients and 210 age and gender matched participants with genotyping of 12 selected polymorphisms. The skin cancer risks were estimated by odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI using logistic regression. EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTT1 null genotypes were associated with skin cancer risk (OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.01–8.83; OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 0.99–4.27; OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.00–3.02, resp.. However, none of these polymorphisms showed significant association after considering arsenic exposure status. Individuals carrying three risk polymorphisms of EPHX1 Tyr113His, XPD C156A, and GSTs presented a 400% increased skin cancer risk when compared to those with less than or equal to one polymorphism. In conclusion, GSTs, EPHX1, and XPD are potential genetic factors for arsenic-induced skin cancers. The roles of these genes for arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis need to be further evaluated.

  17. Sustained systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies by genetically modified skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, D; Pelegrin, M; Brockly, F;

    2000-01-01

    In vivo production and systemic delivery of therapeutic antibodies by engineered cells might advantageously replace injection of purified antibodies for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. We report here...... that skin fibroblasts retrovirally transduced to express immunoglobulin genes can be used for sustained long-term systemic delivery of cloned antibodies in immunocompetent mice. Importantly, no anti- idiotypic response against the ectopically expressed model antibody used in this study was observed....... This supports the notion that skin fibroblasts can potentially be used in antibody-based gene/cell therapy protocols without inducing any adverse immune response in treated individuals....

  18. Genetic Testing for Huntington's Disease in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M S; Nagai, Y; Popiel, H A; Fujikake, N; Okamoto, Y; Ahmed, M U; Islam, M A; Islam, M T; Ahmed, S; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Dey, S K; Ahmed, Q; Hossain, M A; Jahan, N; Toda, T

    2010-10-01

    The study was conducted to find out Huntington's disease (HD) by genetic analysis from those presenting with parkinsonism in the Neurology department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital. A sample of about 5ml blood was collected by veni puncture in EDTA tube with informed consent from 9 patients & 7 healthy individuals after approval of the institutional ethics committee for genetic study. The neurological disorder along with a complete history and physical findings were recorded in a prescribed questionnaire by the neurologists of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital. Extraction of genomic DNA from the venous blood using FlexiGene DNA kit (Qiagen, Japan) was performed in Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. The extracted DNA was stored and accumulated and then these DNA were sent to Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565 0871, Japan for PCR and further analysis. PCR amplification of the CAG repeat in the 1T15 gene was performed with primers HD1 and HD3. HD PCR products revealed the DNA product of about 110bp (no. of CAG repeats=21) to 150bp (no. of CAG repeats=34) in both healthy individual and suspected PD patient DNA.

  19. Large genetic animal models of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, A Jennifer; Howland, David S

    2013-01-01

    The dominant nature of the Huntington's disease gene mutation has allowed genetic models to be developed in multiple species, with the mutation causing an abnormal neurological phenotype in all animals in which it is expressed. Many different rodent models have been generated. The most widely used of these, the transgenic R6/2 mouse, carries the mutation in a fragment of the human huntingtin gene and has a rapidly progressive and fatal neurological phenotype with many relevant pathological changes. Nevertheless, their rapid decline has been frequently questioned in the context of a disease that takes years to manifest in humans, and strenuous efforts have been made to make rodent models that are genetically more 'relevant' to the human condition, including full length huntingtin gene transgenic and knock-in mice. While there is no doubt that we have learned, and continue to learn much from rodent models, their usefulness is limited by two species constraints. First, the brains of rodents differ significantly from humans in both their small size and their neuroanatomical organization. Second, rodents have much shorter lifespans than humans. Here, we review new approaches taken to these challenges in the development of models of Huntington's disease in large brained, long-lived animals. We discuss the need for such models, and how they might be used to fill specific niches in preclinical Huntington's disease research, particularly in testing gene-based therapeutics. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of animals in which the prodromal period of disease extends over a long time span. We suggest that there is considerable 'value added' for large animal models in preclinical Huntington's disease research.

  20. Quality of life assessment among patients with peristomal skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybaek, Hanne; Knudsen, Dorte Bang; Laursen, Troels Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    No data exist to describe how a skin problem may additionally affect the quality of life (QOL) in ostomates. We have studied the QOL in patients with peristomal skin problems and the variables that may affect it.......No data exist to describe how a skin problem may additionally affect the quality of life (QOL) in ostomates. We have studied the QOL in patients with peristomal skin problems and the variables that may affect it....

  1. Genetics in Ophthalmology II–Anterior Segment Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Aslı Utine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diseases are congenital or acquired hereditary diseases that result from structural/functional disorders of the human genome. Today, the genetic factors that play a role in many diseases are being highlighted with the rapid progress in the field of genetics science. It becomes increasingly important that physicians from all disciplines have knowledge about the basic principles of genetics, patterns of inheritance, etc., so that they can follow the new developments. In genetic eye diseases, ophthalmologists should know the basic clinical and recently rapidly developing genetic characteristics of these diseases in order to properly approach the diagnosis and treatment and to provide genetic counseling. In this paper, anterior segment eye diseases of genetic origin are reviewed, and aniridia, anterior segment dysgenesis, glaucoma, corneal dystrophies, cataract, ectopia lentis, myopia, and other refractive errors are covered. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 378-85

  2. Genetic risk score and acute skin toxicity after breast radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, Andrea; Vecoli, Cecilia; Mercuri, Antonella; Petruzzelli, Maria Fonte; D'Errico, Maria Patrizia; Portaluri, Maurizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    Genetic predisposition has been shown to affect the severity of skin complications in breast cancer patients after radiotherapy. Limited data exist regarding the use of a genetic risk score (GRS) for predicting risk of tissue radiosensitivity. We evaluated the impact of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms and oxidative stress response combined in a GRS on acute adverse effects induced by breast radiation therapy (RT). Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria in 59 breast cancer patients who received RT. After genotyping, a multilocus GRS was constructed by summing the number of risk alleles. The hazard ratio (HR) for GSTM1 was 2.4 (95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.1-5.3, p=0.04). The other polymorphisms were associated to an increased adverse radiosensitivity, although they did not reach statistical significance. GRS predicted roughly 40% risk for acute skin toxicity per risk allele (HR 1.37, 95% CI=1.1-1.76, pskin reaction (HR 5.1, 95% CI=1.2-22.8, p=0.03). Our findings demonstrate that the joint effect of SNPs from oxidative stress and DNA damage repair genes may be a promising approach to identify patients with a high risk of skin reaction after breast RT.

  3. Clinical implications of shared genetics and pathogenesis in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-11-01

    Many endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves disease, Addison disease and Hashimoto disease, originate as an autoimmune reaction that affects disease-specific target organs. These autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of specific autoantibodies and by the presence of autoreactive T cells. They are caused by a complex genetic predisposition that is attributable to multiple genetic variants, each with a moderate-to-low effect size. Most of the genetic variants associated with a particular autoimmune endocrine disease are shared between other systemic and organ-specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, coeliac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis. Here, we review the shared and specific genetic background of autoimmune diseases, summarize their treatment options and discuss how identifying the genetic and environmental factors that predispose patients to an autoimmune disease can help in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients, as well as the design of new treatments.

  4. Relationship of skin autofluorescence to cardiovascular disease in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Hodaka; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are significantly increased in end-stage renal disease patients and it has been suggested that AGE accumulation is related to the progression of cardiovascular disease. An autofluorescence reader non-invasively assesses AGE accumulation using skin autofluorescence under ultraviolet light. Skin autofluorescence has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether skin autofluorescence in Japanese hemodialysis patients is related to the presence of cardiovascular disease. In this cross-sectional study, patients on maintenance hemodialysis (N = 128; 59 men, 69 women) were included. AGE accumulation was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Associations between skin autofluorescence, cardiovascular disease, and other parameters were studied. Skin autofluorescence correlated with age (r = 0.32, P reader might have the potential to be a useful assessment of cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  5. Genetic architecture of skin and eye color in an African-European admixed population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Beleza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in human skin and eye color is substantial and especially apparent in admixed populations, yet the underlying genetic architecture is poorly understood because most genome-wide studies are based on individuals of European ancestry. We study pigmentary variation in 699 individuals from Cape Verde, where extensive West African/European admixture has given rise to a broad range in trait values and genomic ancestry proportions. We develop and apply a new approach for measuring eye color, and identify two major loci (HERC2[OCA2] P = 2.3 × 10(-62, SLC24A5 P = 9.6 × 10(-9 that account for both blue versus brown eye color and varying intensities of brown eye color. We identify four major loci (SLC24A5 P = 5.4 × 10(-27, TYR P = 1.1 × 10(-9, APBA2[OCA2] P = 1.5 × 10(-8, SLC45A2 P = 6 × 10(-9 for skin color that together account for 35% of the total variance, but the genetic component with the largest effect (~44% is average genomic ancestry. Our results suggest that adjacent cis-acting regulatory loci for OCA2 explain the relationship between skin and eye color, and point to an underlying genetic architecture in which several genes of moderate effect act together with many genes of small effect to explain ~70% of the estimated heritability.

  6. Genetics of Crohn disease, an archetypal inflammatory barrier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Albrecht, Mario; Hampe, Jochen; Krawczak, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn disease, atopic eczema, asthma and psoriasis are triggered by hitherto unknown environmental factors that function on the background of some polygenic susceptibility. Recent technological advances have allowed us to unravel the genetic aetiology of these and other complex diseases. Using Crohn disease as an example, we show how the discovery of susceptibility genes furthers our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and how it will, ultimately, give rise to new therapeutic developments. The long-term goal of such endeavours is to develop targeted prophylactic strategies. These will probably target the molecular interaction on the mucosal surface between the products of the genome and the microbial metagenome of a patient.

  7. Skin disorders in Parkinson’s disease: potential biomarkers and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Astrid-Helene; Thyssen, Jacob P; Egeberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by a symptom triad comprising resting tremor, rigidity, and akinesia. In addition, non-motor symptoms of PD are well recognized and often precede the overt motor manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations as markers of PD have long been discussed, and cumulative evidence shows an increased prevalence of certain dermatological disorders in PD. Seborrheic dermatitis is considered to occur as a premotor feature of PD referable to dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. Also, an increased risk of melanoma has been observed in PD. Light hair color is a known risk factor for melanoma, and interestingly the risk of PD is found to be significantly higher in individuals with light hair color and particularly with red hair. Furthermore, several studies have reported a high prevalence of PD in patients with bullous pemphigoid. Moreover, a 2-fold increase in risk of new-onset PD has been observed in patients with rosacea. Besides the association between PD and various dermatological disorders, the skin may be useful in the diagnosis of PD. Early PD pathology is found not only in the brain but also in extra-neuronal tissues. Thus, the protein α-synuclein, which is genetically associated with PD, is present not only in the CNS but also in the skin. Hence, higher values of α-synuclein have been observed in the skin of patients with PD. Furthermore, an increased risk of PD has been found in the Cys/Cys genotype, which is associated with red hair color. In this review, we summarize the current evidence of the association between PD and dermatological disorders, the cutaneous adverse effects of neurological medications, and describe the potential of skin protein expression and biomarkers in identification of risk and diagnosis of PD.

  8. Database tools in genetic diseases research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Vuch, Josef; Crovella, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    The knowledge of the human genome is in continuous progression: a large number of databases have been developed to make meaningful connections among worldwide scientific discoveries. This paper reviews bioinformatics resources and database tools specialized in disseminating information regarding genetic disorders. The databases described are useful for managing sample sequences, gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. In relation to data sets available from genome-wide association studies, we describe databases that could be the starting point for developing studies in the field of complex diseases, particularly those in which the causal genes are difficult to identify.

  9. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  10. Awareness of occupational skin disease in the service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, D L; Kudla, I; Brown, J; Miller, S

    2017-06-01

    Occupational skin disease (OSD) is a common occupational disease. Although primary prevention strategies are known, OSDs remain prevalent in a variety of work environments including the service sector (restaurant/food services, retail/wholesale, tourism/hospitality and vehicle sales and service). To obtain information about awareness and prevention of OSD in the service sector. Focus groups and a survey were conducted with two groups. The first consisted of staff of the provincial health and safety association for the service sector and the second group comprised representatives from sector employers. Focus groups highlighted key issues to inform the survey that obtained information about perceptions of awareness and prevention of OSD and barriers to awareness and prevention. Both provincial health and safety association staff and sector employer representatives highlighted low awareness and a low level of knowledge of OSD in the sector. Barriers to awareness and prevention included a low reported incidence of OSD, low priority, lack of training materials, lack of time and cost of training, lack of management support and workplace culture. A starting point for improving prevention of OSD in the service sector is increased awareness. Identification of the barriers to awareness and prevention will help to shape an awareness campaign and prevention strategies. Building on existing experience in Europe will be important.

  11. Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages display limited genetic diversity and broad killing activity against bacterial skin isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Laura J; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Hayes, Clarmyra; Bowman, Charles; Inkeles, Megan; Loncaric, Anya; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Jeff F; Hatfull, Graham F; Modlin, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the human microbiome has revealed diverse and complex microbial communities at distinct anatomic sites. The microbiome of the human sebaceous follicle provides a tractable model in which to study its dominant bacterial inhabitant, Propionibacterium acnes, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of the human disease acne. To explore the diversity of the bacteriophages that infect P. acnes, 11 P. acnes phages were isolated from the sebaceous follicles of donors with healthy skin or acne and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis of the P. acnes phage population, which spans a 30-year temporal period and a broad geographic range, reveals striking similarity in terms of genome length, percent GC content, nucleotide identity (>85%), and gene content. This was unexpected, given the far-ranging diversity observed in virtually all other phage populations. Although the P. acnes phages display a broad host range against clinical isolates of P. acnes, two bacterial isolates were resistant to many of these phages. Moreover, the patterns of phage resistance correlate closely with the presence of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat elements in the bacteria that target a specific subset of phages, conferring a system of prokaryotic innate immunity. The limited diversity of the P. acnes bacteriophages, which may relate to the unique evolutionary constraints imposed by the lipid-rich anaerobic environment in which their bacterial hosts reside, points to the potential utility of phage-based antimicrobial therapy for acne. Propionibacterium acnes is a dominant member of the skin microflora and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne; however, little is known about the bacteriophages that coexist with and infect this bacterium. Here we present the novel genome sequences of 11 P. acnes phages, thereby substantially increasing the amount of available genomic information about this phage population

  12. 78 FR 9933 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies To Large Clinical Projects Grant... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee...

  13. 77 FR 32651 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PROMIS Ancillary Studies... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory...

  14. 78 FR 29144 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Large Clinical Projects Grant... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee...

  15. 78 FR 21617 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, NIAMS Small Grant Program for New Investigators (R03..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard,...

  16. 77 FR 27470 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group;Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee....

  17. 77 FR 20646 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project Grant Review. Date: April 25, 2012. Time..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  18. 76 FR 24892 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trial Pilot Grant Review. Date: May 12, 2011..., Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  19. 78 FR 18357 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Loan Repayment Program Review. Date: April 15... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  20. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing health care resources. Purpose: Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods: Three hundred and four migrant…

  1. The efficacy of pulsed dye laser treatment for inflammatory skin diseases: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erceg, A.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Seyger, M.M.B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The position of the pulsed dye laser (PDL) in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is still unclear. Evidence-based recommendations are lacking. OBJECTIVES: We sought to systematically review all available literature concerning PDL treatment for inflammatory skin diseases and to p

  2. Non-infectious environmental antigens as a trigger for the initiation of an autoimmune skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ye; Culton, Donna A; Jeong, Joseph S; Trupiano, Nicole; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Diaz, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus represents a group of organ specific autoimmune blistering disorders of the skin mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies with well-defined antigenic targets. While most of these diseases are sporadic, endemic forms of disease do exist. The endemic form of pemphigus foliaceus (also known as fogo selvagem, FS) exhibits epidemiological features that suggest exposure to hematophagous insect bites are a possible precipitating factor of this autoimmune disease, and provides a unique opportunity to study how environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. FS patients and healthy individuals from endemic regions show an autoreactive IgM response that starts in early childhood and becomes restricted to IgG4 autoantibodies in FS patients. In searching for triggering environmental antigens, we have found that IgG4 and IgE autoantibodies from FS patients cross-react with a salivary antigen from sand flies. The presence of these cross-reactive antibodies and antibody genetic analysis confirming that these antibodies evolve from the same naïve B cells provides compelling evidence that this non-infectious environmental antigen could be the initial target of the autoantibody response in FS. Consequently, FS serves as an ideal model to study the impact of environmental antigens in the development of autoimmune disease.

  3. Periodontal disease associated to systemic genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart Grollmus, Zacy Carola; Morales Chávez, Mariana Carolina; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier

    2007-05-01

    A number of systemic disorders increase patient susceptibility to periodontal disease, which moreover evolves more rapidly and more aggressively. The underlying factors are mainly related to alterations in immune, endocrine and connective tissue status. These alterations are associated with different pathologies and syndromes that generate periodontal disease either as a primary manifestation or by aggravating a pre-existing condition attributable to local factors. This is where the role of bacterial plaque is subject to debate. In the presence of qualitative or quantitative cellular immune alterations, periodontal disease may manifest early on a severe localized or generalized basis--in some cases related to the presence of plaque and/or specific bacteria (severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, Down syndrome and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome). In the presence of humoral immune alterations, periodontal damage may result indirectly as a consequence of alterations in other systems. In connective tissue disorders, bacterial plaque and alterations of the periodontal tissues increase patient susceptibility to gingival inflammation and alveolar resorption (Marfan syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome). The management of periodontal disease focuses on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by means of mechanical and chemical methods. Periodontal surgery and even extraction of the most seriously affected teeth have also been suggested. There are variable degrees of consensus regarding the background systemic disorder, as in the case of Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, where antibiotic treatment proves ineffective; in severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, where antibiotic prophylaxis is suggested; and in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, where an established treatment protocol is available.

  4. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  5. Genetic determinants of UV-susceptibility in non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen M Welsh

    Full Text Available A milieu of cytokines and signaling molecules are involved in the induction of UV-induced immune suppression and thus the etiology of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Targeting the UV-induced immunosuppression pathway, and using a large population based study of NMSC, we have investigated the risk associated with functional variants in 10 genes (IL10, IL4, IL4R, TNF, TNFR2, HTR2A, HRH2, IL12B, PTGS2, and HAL. The most prominent single genetic effect was observed for IL10. There was increasing risk for both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC with increasing number of variant IL10 haplotypes (BCC: p(trend = 0.0048; SCC: p(trend = 0.031. Having two IL10 GC haplotypes was associated with increased odds ratios of BCC and SCC (OR(BCC = 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; OR(SCC = 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9, and these associations were largely confined to women (OR(BCC = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.4; SCC: OR(SCC = 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0. To examine how combinations of these variants contribute to risk of BCC and SCC, we used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR and classification and regression trees (CART. Results from both of these methods found that in men, a combination of skin type, burns, IL10, IL4R, and possibly TNFR2 were important in both BCC and SCC. In women, skin type, burns, and IL10 were the most critical risk factors in SCC, with risk of BCC involving these same factors plus genetic variants in HTR2A, IL12B and IL4R. These data suggest differential genetic susceptibility to UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer risk by gender.

  6. A study of skin diseases in dogs and cats. III. III. Microflora of the skin of dogs with chronic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, S; Krogh, H V

    1978-01-01

    The microflora of the skin was studied in 10 dogs with chronic eczema without clinical signs of secondary infection (Table I). The skin surface was swabbed at 7 different sites, making a total of 70 swabs, 25 of which were taken from visibly inflamed areas and 45 from apparently unaffected skin (Table II). Staph. aureus, Staph. epidermidis, micrococci, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, and Acinetobacter spp. were found consistently. Ten different Gram-negative bacteria, 3 different Gram-positive bacteria, and 2 yeasts were found to occur sporadically (Table III). Compared to a group of 10 healthy dogs a more prolific growth of aerobic microorganisms, a greater number of sites carrying Staph. aureus, and a higher recovery of Gram-negative transients were found in dogs with eczema (Table IV--VII). Within the group of dogs with eczema the growth of Staph. aureus was significantly heavier from eczematous skin areas than from clinically normal skin (Table VIII). In dogs with non-infective dermatitides the colonization of the skin by potentially pathogenic microorganisms may have to be considered in the clinical handling of these diseases.

  7. Atopic dermatitis-like disease and associated lethal myeloproliferative disorder arise from loss of Notch signaling in the murine skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Dumortier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Notch pathway is essential for proper epidermal differentiation during embryonic skin development. Moreover, skin specific loss of Notch signaling in the embryo results in skin barrier defects accompanied by a B-lymphoproliferative disease. However, much less is known about the consequences of loss of Notch signaling after birth. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the function of Notch signaling in the skin of adult mice, we made use of a series of conditional gene targeted mice that allow inactivation of several components of the Notch signaling pathway specifically in the skin. We demonstrate that skin-specific inactivation of Notch1 and Notch2 simultaneously, or RBP-J, induces the development of a severe form of atopic dermatitis (AD, characterized by acanthosis, spongiosis and hyperkeratosis, as well as a massive dermal infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells. Likewise, patients suffering from AD, but not psoriasis or lichen planus, have a marked reduction of Notch receptor expression in the skin. Loss of Notch in keratinocytes induces the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a cytokine deeply implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The AD-like associated inflammation is accompanied by a myeloproliferative disorder (MPD characterized by an increase in immature myeloid populations in the bone marrow and spleen. Transplantation studies revealed that the MPD is cell non-autonomous and caused by dramatic microenvironmental alterations. Genetic studies demontrated that G-CSF mediates the MPD as well as changes in the bone marrow microenvironment leading to osteopenia. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a critical role for Notch in repressing TSLP production in keratinocytes, thereby maintaining integrity of the skin and the hematopoietic system.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a site of injury or disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. When this has ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  9. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  10. Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

  11. Skin diseases in workers at a perfume factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the causes of skin diseases in one-third of the staff of a perfume factory, in which 10 different perfume sprays were being manufactured. Site inspection, dermatological examination and patch testing of all 26 persons at risk with 4 perfume oils and 30 ingredients of them. The results showed 6 bottlers were found suffering from allergic contact dermatitis, 2 from irritant contact dermatitis, 12 workers showed different strong reactions to various fragrances. The main causes of allergic contact dermatitis were 2 perfume oils (12 cases) and their ingredients geraniol (12 cases), benzaldehyde(9), cinnamic aldehyde (6), linalool, neroli oil, terpenes of lemon oil and orange oil (4 each). Nobody was tested positive to balsam of Peru. Job changes for office workers, packers or printers to other rooms, where they had no longer contact with fragrances, led to a settling. To conclude, automation and replacement of glass bottles by cartridges from non-fragile materials and using gloves may minimize the risk.

  12. Genetic Analyses of a Three Generation Family Segregating Hirschsprung Disease and Iris Heterochromia

    OpenAIRE

    Long Cui; Emily Hoi-Man Wong; Guo Cheng; Manoel Firmato de Almeida; Man-Ting So; Pak-Chung Sham; Stacey S Cherny; Paul Kwong-Hang Tam; Maria-Mercè Garcia-Barceló

    2013-01-01

    We present the genetic analyses conducted on a three-generation family (14 individuals) with three members affected with isolated-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) and one with HSCR and heterochromia iridum (syndromic-HSCR), a phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4). WS4 is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, eyes and/or hair, sensorineural deafness and HSCR. None of the members had sensorineural deafness. The family was screened for copy number variations (CNVs)...

  13. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a large...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: chylomicron retention disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a rare condition with approximately 40 cases described worldwide. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  15. Redox Imbalance in T Cell-Mediated Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Pastore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The skin is permanently exposed to physical, chemical, and biological aggression by the environment. In addition, acute and chronic inflammatory events taking place in the skin are accompanied by abnormal release of pro-oxidative mediators. In this paper, we will briefly overview the homeostatic systems active in the skin to maintain the redox balance and also to counteract abnormal oxidative stress. We will concentrate on the evidence that a local and/or systemic redox dysregulation accompanies the chronic inflammatory disorder events associated to psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. We will also discuss the fact that several well-established treatments for the therapy of chronic inflammatory skin disorders are based on the application of strong physical or chemical oxidants onto the skin, indicating that, in selected conditions, a further increase of the oxidative imbalance may lead to a beneficial outcome.

  16. Hyperthermia on skin immune system and its application in the treatment of HPV-infected skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xinghua; Chen Hongduo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper,the effects of hyperthermia on cells and immune system are introduced briefly. The mechanism of action of hyperthermia on human papilloma virus (HPV)-infected skin diseases was elaborated as an example in this paper. Many studies have proved that hyperthermia affects a number of cellular and molecu-lar constitutes in the skin immune system,involving both innate and adaptive immune responses;the efficacy of hyperthermia in treating some infectious and cancerous conditions has been validated and applied in clinics, while molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia affecting the immunereaction is still unclear.

  17. Hyperthermia on skin immune system and its application in the treatment of HPV-infected skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xinghua; Chen Hongduo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of hyperthermia on cells and immune system are introduced briefly. The mechanism of action of hyperthermia on human papilloma virus (HPV)-infected skin diseases was elaborated as an example in this paper. Many studies have proved that hyperthermia affects a number of cellular and molecu- lar constitutes in the skin immune system, involving both innate and adaptive immune responses; the efficacy of hyperthermia in treating some infectious and cancerous conditions has been validated and applied in clinics, while molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia affecting the immunereaction is still unclear.

  18. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchong, Julie A; Samuel, Michael D; Scribner, Kim T; Weckworth, Byron V; Langenberg, Julia A; Filcek, Kristine B

    2008-02-23

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities.

  19. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Scribner, K.T.; Weckworth, B.V.; Langenberg, J.A.; Filcek, K.B.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  20. Genetics and cardiovascular disease: the impact of molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengoechea, Jaime; McKelvey, Kent D

    2013-04-01

    Information technology is exponentially reducing the cost of genetic testing while multiple clinical applications emerge. Genetic diagnosis increasingly impacts prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. In cardiovascular medicine, the establishment of a specific genetic diagnosis may affect management of cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, connective tissue and metabolic disease. Econometric studies have determined that genetic testing is cost-effective in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and disease-specific interventions are now available for specific conditions. Identification of a specific genetic disorder now allows for more precise medicine in the affected individual and more accurate preventive care for asymptomatic family members.

  1. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  2. Microscopic Study of Skin Diseases in Horses from the Bogota Savanna, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovana Castellanos Londoño

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Horses hold third place in number of cases of skin disease after cats and dogs; however, there is little information about the demographic aspects of dermatological diseases in this species in Colombia. The purpose of this work was to carry out a preliminary study in order to determine the dermatological diseases that affect horses in the Bogota Savanna, through biopsy, skin scraping and trichogram, in order to approach the diagnosis and thus to establish therapeutic and prophylactic measures that benefit the animal’s health and productivity in commercial farms. Thirty-nine skin biopsies, thirty-nine cutaneous scraping and thirtyseven samples of hairy peel from horses with some kind of skin disease were received, all of which were processed by the Histopathology Laboratory from La Salle University. The inflammatory injuries were sorted taking into account the histological patterns of inflammatory skin disease and tumors, according to the classification by the World Health Organization (WHO. Allergic dermatitis was the most common pathology (46% and neoplasia was observed in 13% of the cases; fungal spores in ectothrix position were found in 10% of the cutaneous scrapes. Mites of the type Psoroptes spp were identified in one of the trichograms. This is the first report of microscopic diagnosis of skin diseases of horses in the country with the goal of contributing with the demographic knowledge of skin diseases in the Bogota Savanna.

  3. Genetics of skin color variation in Europeans: genome-wide association studies with functional follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Liu; M. Visser (Mijke); D.L. Duffy (David); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); K. Zhong (Kaiyin); S. Walsh (Susan); L. Chaitanya (Lakshmi); A. Wollstein (Andreas); G. Zhu (Gu); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A.K. Henders (Anjali); M. Mangino (Massimo); D. Glass (Daniel); V. Bataille (Veronique); R.A. Sturm (Richard A.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A. Hofman (Albert); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); R.-J.T.S. Palstra (Robert-Jan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn the International Visible Trait Genetics (VisiGen) Consortium, we investigated the genetics of human skin color by combining a series of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in a total of 17,262 Europeans with functional follow-up of discovered loci. Our GWAS provide the first genom

  4. A hybrid color space for skin detection using genetic algorithm heuristic search and principal component analysis technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Maktabdar Oghaz

    Full Text Available Color is one of the most prominent features of an image and used in many skin and face detection applications. Color space transformation is widely used by researchers to improve face and skin detection performance. Despite the substantial research efforts in this area, choosing a proper color space in terms of skin and face classification performance which can address issues like illumination variations, various camera characteristics and diversity in skin color tones has remained an open issue. This research proposes a new three-dimensional hybrid color space termed SKN by employing the Genetic Algorithm heuristic and Principal Component Analysis to find the optimal representation of human skin color in over seventeen existing color spaces. Genetic Algorithm heuristic is used to find the optimal color component combination setup in terms of skin detection accuracy while the Principal Component Analysis projects the optimal Genetic Algorithm solution to a less complex dimension. Pixel wise skin detection was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed color space. We have employed four classifiers including Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Multilayer Perceptron in order to generate the human skin color predictive model. The proposed color space was compared to some existing color spaces and shows superior results in terms of pixel-wise skin detection accuracy. Experimental results show that by using Random Forest classifier, the proposed SKN color space obtained an average F-score and True Positive Rate of 0.953 and False Positive Rate of 0.0482 which outperformed the existing color spaces in terms of pixel wise skin detection accuracy. The results also indicate that among the classifiers used in this study, Random Forest is the most suitable classifier for pixel wise skin detection applications.

  5. A hybrid color space for skin detection using genetic algorithm heuristic search and principal component analysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maktabdar Oghaz, Mahdi; Maarof, Mohd Aizaini; Zainal, Anazida; Rohani, Mohd Foad; Yaghoubyan, S Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Color is one of the most prominent features of an image and used in many skin and face detection applications. Color space transformation is widely used by researchers to improve face and skin detection performance. Despite the substantial research efforts in this area, choosing a proper color space in terms of skin and face classification performance which can address issues like illumination variations, various camera characteristics and diversity in skin color tones has remained an open issue. This research proposes a new three-dimensional hybrid color space termed SKN by employing the Genetic Algorithm heuristic and Principal Component Analysis to find the optimal representation of human skin color in over seventeen existing color spaces. Genetic Algorithm heuristic is used to find the optimal color component combination setup in terms of skin detection accuracy while the Principal Component Analysis projects the optimal Genetic Algorithm solution to a less complex dimension. Pixel wise skin detection was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed color space. We have employed four classifiers including Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Multilayer Perceptron in order to generate the human skin color predictive model. The proposed color space was compared to some existing color spaces and shows superior results in terms of pixel-wise skin detection accuracy. Experimental results show that by using Random Forest classifier, the proposed SKN color space obtained an average F-score and True Positive Rate of 0.953 and False Positive Rate of 0.0482 which outperformed the existing color spaces in terms of pixel wise skin detection accuracy. The results also indicate that among the classifiers used in this study, Random Forest is the most suitable classifier for pixel wise skin detection applications.

  6. Ethnomedicinal plants used in the treatment of skin diseases in Hyderabad Karnataka region, Karnataka, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shivakumar Singh Policepatel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To document traditional medicinal plants knowledge used in treating skin diseases at Hyderabad Karnataka Region.Methods:gathered from traditional herbal healers and other villagers through interviews.Results:A total of 60 plants species belonging to 57 genera and 34 families were found useful The information on the use of medicinal plants in the treatment of skin diseases was and herewith described them along with the method of drug preparation, mode of administration, probable dosage and duration of treatment. Several new findings on the traditional rural practices were reported.Conclusions:The present study revealed that the Hyderabad Karnataka rural people is primarily dependent on medicinal plants for treating skin diseases.

  7. Skin disorders in Parkinson’s disease: potential biomarkers and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravn A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Astrid-Helene Ravn, Jacob P Thyssen, Alexander Egeberg Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by a symptom triad comprising resting tremor, rigidity, and akinesia. In addition, non-motor symptoms of PD are well recognized and often precede the overt motor manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations as markers of PD have long been discussed, and cumulative evidence shows an increased prevalence of certain dermatological disorders in PD. Seborrheic dermatitis is considered to occur as a premotor feature of PD referable to dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. Also, an increased risk of melanoma has been observed in PD. Light hair color is a known risk factor for melanoma, and interestingly the risk of PD is found to be significantly higher in individuals with light hair color and particularly with red hair. Furthermore, several studies have reported a high prevalence of PD in patients with bullous pemphigoid. Moreover, a 2-fold increase in risk of new-onset PD has been observed in patients with rosacea. Besides the association between PD and various dermatological disorders, the skin may be useful in the diagnosis of PD. Early PD pathology is found not only in the brain but also in extra-neuronal tissues. Thus, the protein α-synuclein, which is genetically associated with PD, is present not only in the CNS but also in the skin. Hence, higher values of α-synuclein have been observed in the skin of patients with PD. Furthermore, an increased risk of PD has been found in the Cys/Cys genotype, which is associated with red hair color. In this review, we summarize the current evidence of the association between PD and dermatological disorders, the cutaneous adverse effects of neurological medications, and describe the potential of skin protein expression and

  8. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants in Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Vento-Tormo, Roser; Ballestar, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    The concept of autoinflammation has evolved over the past 20 years, beginning with the discovery that mutations in the Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene were causative of Familial Mediterranean Fever. Currently, autoinflammatory diseases comprise a wide range of disorders with the common features of recurrent fever attacks, prevalence of hyperreactive innate immune cells, and signs of inflammation that can be systemic or organ specific in the absence of pathogenic infection of autoimmunity. Innate immune cells from the myeloid compartment are the main effectors of uncontrolled inflammation that is caused in great extent by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18. Defects in several signaling pathways that control innate immune defense, particularly the hyperreactivity of one or more inflammasomes, are at the core of pathologic autoinflammatory phenotypes. Although many of the autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be monogenic, some of them are genetically complex and are impacted by environmental factors. Recently, epigenetic dysregulation has surfaced as an additional contributor to pathogenesis. In the present review, we discuss data that are currently available to describe the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in autoinflammatory diseases.

  9. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  10. Gap Junction Remodeling in Skin Repair Following Wounding and Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jared M. Churko; Dale W. Laird

    2013-01-01

    In the present review, we provide an overview of connexin expression during skin development and remodeling in wound healing, and reflect on how loss- or gain-of-function connexin mutations may change...

  11. Revisiting Amazonian Plants for Skin Care and Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruno Burlando; Laura Cornara

    2017-01-01

    .... and Oenocarpus bataua Mart., family Arecaceae. For each species, the general features, major constituents, overall medicinal properties, detailed dermatological and skin care applications, and possible harmful effects have been considered...

  12. Mutations in COX7B cause microphthalmia with linear skin lesions, an unconventional mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrieri, Alessia; van Rahden, Vanessa Alexandra; Tiranti, Valeria; Morleo, Manuela; Iaconis, Daniela; Tammaro, Roberta; D'Amato, Ilaria; Conte, Ivan; Maystadt, Isabelle; Demuth, Stephanie; Zvulunov, Alex; Kutsche, Kerstin; Zeviani, Massimo; Franco, Brunella

    2012-11-02

    Microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS) is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disorder associated with mutations in holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS), which encodes a crucial player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Unlike other mitochondrial diseases, MLS is characterized by a well-recognizable neurodevelopmental phenotype. Interestingly, not all clinically diagnosed MLS cases have mutations in HCCS, thus suggesting genetic heterogeneity for this disorder. Among the possible candidates, we analyzed the X-linked COX7B and found deleterious de novo mutations in two simplex cases and a nonsense mutation, which segregates with the disease, in a familial case. COX7B encodes a poorly characterized structural subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the MRC complex IV. We demonstrated that COX7B is indispensable for COX assembly, COX activity, and mitochondrial respiration. Downregulation of the COX7B ortholog (cox7B) in medaka (Oryzias latipes) resulted in microcephaly and microphthalmia that recapitulated the MLS phenotype and demonstrated an essential function of complex IV activity in vertebrate CNS development. Our results indicate an evolutionary conserved role of the MRC complexes III and IV for the proper development of the CNS in vertebrates and uncover a group of mitochondrial diseases hallmarked by a developmental phenotype.

  13. A survey of occupational skin disease in UK health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, K M

    2015-01-01

    Occupational skin disease is a common problem among health care workers (HCWs). The prevalence of occupational skin disease in HCWs has been reported in several international studies, but not in the UK. To estimate the prevalence of occupational skin disease in a population of UK HCWs and to explore possible causative factors. Clinical and non-clinical HCWs attending for an influenza vaccine during October and November 2013 were invited to complete a brief skin questionnaire. Data from staff who stated their skin had suffered as a result of work were compared with data from staff who did not, to explore differences in potential causative factors. A total of 2762 questionnaires were analysed. The estimated prevalence of occupational skin disease was 20% for clinical and 7% for non-clinical staff. In total, 424 clinical staff stated their skin had been made worse by work. There were statistically significant differences between clinical staff with and without reported skin symptoms regarding a history of eczema, frequent hand washing and moisturizer use but no statistically significant difference in the relative proportions of soap and alcohol hand gel use. Non-clinical staff reported significantly more use of soap relative to alcohol gel than clinical staff. This study demonstrated the prevalence of occupational skin disease in a population of UK HCWs. More work is indicated to explore if the ratio of soap and alcohol gel reported in this study are typical and whether this has any impact on the development of occupational skin disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wallace, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Behrens, Timothy; Cho, Judy; De Jager, Philip L.; Elder, James T.; Graham, Robert R.; Gregersen, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Worthington, Jane; Todd, John A.; Hafler, David A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Daly, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological

  15. Sex Differences in the Incidence of Skin and Skin-Related Diseases in Olmsted County, Minnesota, United States, and a Comparison With Other Rates Published Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Louise K.; Davis, Mark D. P.

    2016-01-01

    Many skin and skin-related diseases affect the sexes unequally, with attendant implications for public health and resource allocation. To better evaluate the incidence of skin and skin-related diseases affecting males versus females, we reviewed published population-based epidemiology studies of skin disorders performed utilizing Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) data. Females had a higher incidence of the following diseases: connective tissue diseases (scleroderma, morphea, dermatomyositis, primary Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus [not in all studies]), pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, condyloma acuminatum, hidradenitis suppurativa, herpes zoster (except in children), erythromelalgia, venous stasis syndrome, and venous ulcers. Males had a higher incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, basal cell carcinoma (exception, females aged ≤40 years), squamous cell carcinoma, and lentigo maligna. Incidence rates were equal in males and females for cutaneous malignant melanoma (exception, higher in females aged 18–39 years), lower-extremity cellulitis, cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, Behçet disease, delusional infestation, alopecia areata, and bullous pemphigoid. Many of the population-based sex-specific incidence rates of skin and skin-related diseases derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project are strikingly different from those estimated elsewhere. In general, females are more commonly affected by skin and skin-related diseases. The reasons for this imbalance remain to be determined and are likely multifactorial. PMID:27009931

  16. In vitro culture of skin-homing T lymphocytes from inflammatory skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Karen; C Mogensen, Søren; Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    -chain studies by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that all T lymphocytes had access to the skin compartment. Single-stranded conformational analysis showed clonally expanded T cells numbering between 40 and 60 clones. After approximately 2 months of growth, the mean CD4+ : CD8+ ratio...

  17. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayols-Baixeras S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergi Sayols-Baixeras, Carla Lluís-Ganella, Gavin Lucas, Roberto ElosuaCardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Group, Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility.Keywords: coronary artery disease, pathogenesis, genetic risk factors, genetic variants

  18. Genetic Alterations in Intervertebral Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay L. Martirosyan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD is considered a multifactorial disease. The last two decades of research strongly demonstrate that genetic factors contribute about 75% of the IVDD etiology. Recent total genome sequencing studies have shed light on the various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are associated with IVDD.Aim: This review explores and presents updated information about the diversity of genetic factors in the inflammatory, degradative, homeostatic, and structural systems involved in the IVDD.Results: SNPs in the genes coding for structural proteins linked with IVDD or disc bulging include the Sp1 polymorphism of COL1A1, Trp3 polymorphism of COL9A3, several polymorphisms of COL11A1 and COL11A2, and a variable number tandem repeat polymorphism of ACAN. The rs4148941 SNP of CHST3 coding for an aggrecan sulfation enzyme is also associated with IVDD. The FokI, TaqI, and ApaI SNPs of the vitamin D receptor gene that is involved in chondrocyte functioning are also associated with IVDD. SNPs relevant to cytokine imbalance in IVDD include 889C/T of IL1a and 15T/A, as well as other SNPs (rs1800795, rs1800796, and rs1800797, of IL6, with effects limited to certain genders and populations. SNPs in collagenase genes include -1605G/D (guanine insertion/deletion of MMP1, -1306C/T of MMP2, -1562C/T and a 5-adenosine (5A variant (in the promotor region of MMP3, -1562C/T of MMP9, and -378T/C of MMP-14. SNPs in aggrecanase genes include 1877T/U of ADAMTS-4 and rs162509 of ADAMTS-5. Among the apoptosis-mediating genes, 1595T/C of the caspase 9 gene, 1525A/G and 1595T/C of the TRAIL gene, and 626C/G of the death receptor 4 gene (DR4 are SNPs associated with IVDD. Among the growth factors involved in disc homeostasis, the rs4871857 SNP of GDF5 was associated with IVDD. VEGF SNPs -2578C/A and -634G/C could foster neovascularization observed in IVDD.Conclusion: Improved understanding of the numerous genetic variants behind various

  19. The Evolution of Genetics: Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2016-06-15

    Genetic discoveries underlie the majority of the current thinking in neurodegenerative disease. This work has been driven by the significant gains made in identifying causal mutations; however, the translation of genetic causes of disease into pathobiological understanding remains a challenge. The application of a second generation of genetics methods allows the dissection of moderate and mild genetic risk factors for disease. This requires new thinking in two key areas: what constitutes proof of pathogenicity, and how do we translate these findings to biological understanding. Here we describe the progress and ongoing evolution in genetics. We describe a view that rejects the tradition that genetic proof has to be absolute before functional characterization and centers on a multi-dimensional approach integrating genetics, reference data, and functional work. We also argue that these challenges cannot be efficiently met by traditional hypothesis-driven methods but that high content system-wide efforts are required. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Dowling-Degos disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keratin 5, which is produced in cells called keratinocytes in the outer layer of the skin ( the ... assemble into strong networks that help attach (bind) keratinocytes together and anchor the epidermis to underlying layers ...

  1. Genetic and pharmacogenetic determinants of cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jeffrey Johan Willem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis, titled ‘Genetic and pharmacogenetic determinants of cardiovascular disease’ is divided in three sections. In section one the genetic determinants of coronary restenosis are explored. In the first genome-wide association study on this condition, in the GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis

  2. Autoimmune bullous diseases with skin and eye involvement: Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and pemphigus paraneoplastica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Karen C; Leung, Theresa G; Moradi, Ahmadreza; Thorne, Jennifer E; Fine, Jo-David

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that mostly affect the skin and mucous membranes. Occasionally, other organ systems may be involved, depending on the unique pathophysiology of each disease. Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus are distinct entities, but all have the potential to have cutaneous and ocular involvement. Awareness and early recognition of ocular involvement in these diseases is important given the increased risk for vision loss and blindness with delay in management. Several skin diseases may be associated with involvement of the external eye. The most common autoimmune diseases are cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus.

  3. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes towards genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  4. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  5. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes towards genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  6. Perceived genetic knowledge, attitudes toward genetic testing, and the relationship between these among patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morren, M.; Rijken, M.; Baanders, A.N.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genetics increasingly permeate everyday medicine. When patients want to make informed decisions about genetic testing, they require genetic knowledge. This study examined the genetic knowledge and attitudes of patients with chronic diseases, and the relationship between both. In addition,

  7. [Skin diseases among workers engaged into copper-nickel and aluminium production in Far North].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, N Iu; Petrenko, O D; Isakova, T N

    2004-01-01

    The article covers materials obtained in study of skin diseases in workers engaged into non-ferrous metals production. The authors specified suggestions on prevention of metal allergies among major professions of metallurgy complex in Far North.

  8. 78 FR 76634 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  9. 75 FR 70679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  10. 78 FR 36789 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  11. 76 FR 14035 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,...

  12. 77 FR 14407 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, March...

  13. 77 FR 67824 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, November...

  14. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  15. 75 FR 54897 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  16. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... applications. Place: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH, 6701...

  17. 75 FR 34752 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical...

  18. 76 FR 6806 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  19. 77 FR 59937 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  20. 75 FR 14173 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, 6701 Democracy Blvd, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  1. 78 FR 64223 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, October...

  2. 75 FR 6046 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and... of Committee: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special...

  3. 78 FR 17679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Clinical Trial Outcome Development. Date: March 29...., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal...

  4. 77 FR 66853 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Centers. Date... Ma, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal,...

  5. 77 FR 4051 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Osteoarthritis Initiative. Date: February 14, 2012... Research Translation Review. Date: March 8-9, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda : To review and...

  6. Genetics of inflammatory bowel diseases--past, present, and future.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this review, the evidence to support the multifactorial and polygenic nature of the disease is briefly described. The past of genetics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by unfulfilled promises and is now closed with a new vision and a new promise coming from a genetic

  7. Dopaminergic Neuronal Imaging in Genetic Parkinson's Disease: Insights into Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. McNeill (Alisdair); R-M. Wu (Ruey-Meei); K.-Y. Tzen (Kai-Yuan); P.C. Aguiar (Patricia); J.M. Arbelo (Jose); P. Barone (Paolo); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); O.G. Barsottini (Orlando); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S. Bostantjopoulou (Sevasti); R.A. Bressan (Rodrigo); G. Cossu (Giovanni); P. Cortelli (Pietro); A.C. Felicio (Andre); H.B. Ferraz (Henrique); J. Herrera (Joanna); H. Houlden (Henry); M. Hoexter (Marcelo); C. Isla (Concepcion); A.J. Lees (Andrew); O. Lorenzo-Betancor (Oswaldo); N.E. Mencacci (Niccolo); P. Pastor (Pau); S. Pappata (Sabina); M.T. Pellecchia (Maria Teresa); L. Silveria-Moriyama (Laura); A. Varrone (Andrea); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.H.V. Schapira (Anthony)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease.Methods:A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated fo

  8. Dopaminergic Neuronal Imaging in Genetic Parkinson's Disease: Insights into Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. McNeill (Alisdair); R-M. Wu (Ruey-Meei); K.-Y. Tzen (Kai-Yuan); P.C. Aguiar (Patricia); J.M. Arbelo (Jose); P. Barone (Paolo); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); O.G. Barsottini (Orlando); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S. Bostantjopoulou (Sevasti); R.A. Bressan (Rodrigo); G. Cossu (Giovanni); P. Cortelli (Pietro); A.C. Felicio (Andre); H.B. Ferraz (Henrique); J. Herrera (Joanna); H. Houlden (Henry); M. Hoexter (Marcelo); C. Isla (Concepcion); A.J. Lees (Andrew); O. Lorenzo-Betancor (Oswaldo); N.E. Mencacci (Niccolo); P. Pastor (Pau); S. Pappata (Sabina); M.T. Pellecchia (Maria Teresa); L. Silveria-Moriyama (Laura); A. Varrone (Andrea); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.H.V. Schapira (Anthony)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease.Methods:A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated

  9. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease : a genetic-epidemiologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis has been motivated by the Jack of knowledge of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. It has been long recognised that genetic factors are implicated, in particular in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.4 But to what extent are genetic factors involved? Are

  10. Dopaminergic Neuronal Imaging in Genetic Parkinson's Disease: Insights into Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. McNeill (Alisdair); R-M. Wu (Ruey-Meei); K.-Y. Tzen (Kai-Yuan); P.C. Aguiar (Patricia); J.M. Arbelo (Jose); P. Barone (Paolo); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); O.G. Barsottini (Orlando); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S. Bostantjopoulou (Sevasti); R.A. Bressan (Rodrigo); G. Cossu (Giovanni); P. Cortelli (Pietro); A.C. Felicio (Andre); H.B. Ferraz (Henrique); J. Herrera (Joanna); H. Houlden (Henry); M. Hoexter (Marcelo); C. Isla (Concepcion); A.J. Lees (Andrew); O. Lorenzo-Betancor (Oswaldo); N.E. Mencacci (Niccolo); P. Pastor (Pau); S. Pappata (Sabina); M.T. Pellecchia (Maria Teresa); L. Silveria-Moriyama (Laura); A. Varrone (Andrea); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.H.V. Schapira (Anthony)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease.Methods:A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated fo

  11. Genetic testing and counselling in inherited eye disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Jensen, Hanne; Timshel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genetics have made genetic testing in patients with inherited eye disease increasingly accessible, and the initiation of clinical intervention trials makes it increasingly clinically relevant. Based on a multidisciplinary collaboration between ophthalmologists and clinical geneticists......, the extensive register of families with monogenic inherited eye diseases at the National Eye Clinic of the Kennedy Center in Denmark provides a valuable asset waiting to be exploited in the global effort to reduce blindness caused by genetic defects....

  12. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... and information on skin diseases from the Danish National Birth Cohort and Health Register, with 18 years follow-up during years 1996-2013. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively, and adjusted for physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis....... RESULTS: FLG mutations were associated with increased risk of dry skin (OR 1.9, CI 1.1-3.1), and a decreased risk of fungal skin infections at age

  13. α-Synuclein inclusions in the skin of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence in the brain of α-synuclein containing Lewy neurites, or bodies, is the histological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery of α-synuclein aggregates in nerve endings of the heart, digestive tract, and skin has lent support to the concept of PD as a systemic disease. Our goals were, first, to demonstrate the presence of α-synuclein inclusions in the skin and, second, to detect quantitative differences between patients with PD and atypical parkinsonism (AP)....

  14. Sequence analysis of attachment gene of lumpy skin disease and sheep poxviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kenawy, A A; El-Tholoth, M S

    2010-12-01

    In Egypt, protection of cattle against lumpy skin disease (LSD) was carried out using a sheep poxvirus (Kenyan strain) vaccination strategy. In the present study 15 skin nodules from LSD suspected cows and 5 scab samples from sheep pox (SP) suspected sheep were collected. Hyperimmune rabbit sera to Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV)/Ismailyia88 strain and sheep pox virus (SPV)/ Kenyan vaccinal strain were prepared. The causative agent in the collected samples was identified using immunoflourescence (IF) and immunoperoxidase techniques. Of the 15 skin nodules suspected of LSD, 10 showed a positive reaction and 3 out of 5 skin scabs suspected of sheeppox were found to be positive. An antigenic correlation between field skin isolate of LSDV, tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain, field skin isolate of SPV and SPV/Kenyan vaccinal strain was studied using prepared hyperimmune sera. Also, nucleotide sequence of the PCR amplified attachment gene fragments of field skin isolate of LSDV, tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain, field skin isolate of SPV and SPV /Kenyan vaccinal strain were compared. The results revealed that the four used viruses were antigenically identical. Sequence analysis indicated that field skin LSDV isolate is more related to tissue culture adapted LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain than to vaccinal SPV/ Kenyan strain and the skin isolate of SPV is more closely related to field skin isolate of LSDV than to SPV/Kenyan vaccinal strain. Thus, further study should be applied on the advantage of a LSD vaccine prepared from LSDV in protection of cattle against LSD compared to the commonly used sheep pox vaccine.

  15. Genetic Variation in TLR10, an Inhibitory Toll-Like Receptor, Influences Susceptibility to Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stappers, M.H.T.; Oosting, M.; Ioana, M.; Reimnitz, P.; Mouton, J.W.; Netea, M.G.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a central role in the innate immune response to complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs), with TLR10 being the first family member known to have an inhibitory function. This study assessed the role of TLR10 in recognition of cSSSI-related pa

  16. Genetic diagnosis of Huntington's disease: cases report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Ting-ting; Wu Wei; Wan Qi; Cui Yu-gui; Liu Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assess the efficiency of the PCR combined DNA sequencing to ascertain CAG repeat size of Huntington's disease(HD)gene as for gene diagnosis of HD.Method:Three patients with HD were diagnosed genetically with the technology of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by assessing the CAG repeat size of HD gene.DNA sequencing then was used as verification test for HD gene.Results:Nine members of three nuclear families were included in this study,three patients were HD proband.In those families,CAG repeats of all spouse of propositus were in normal range.CAG repeats of all propositus and their descendants with the normal allele were in normal range,while CAG copy number of the other mobigenous allele was obviously abnormal.Conclusion:PCR combined DNA sequencing can be used to effectively ascertain CAG repeat of HD gene.CAG-repeat expansion mutations were accounted for 99% of HD cases,so HD can be accurately diagnosed by this method.

  17. Spectrum of skin diseases presented at LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, Adeolu O; Mejiuni, Ayodele D; Akinlade, Mathias O; Audu, Bosede M; Ayodele, Olugbenga E

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of skin disease in developing nations are changing as frequencies of non-communicable diseases continue to increase. Appraisal of the current status of the disease profile is of utmost importance for health planning and resource allocation. A prospective analysis of 895 cases of outpatient consultation during the years 2005-2010 was conducted. The mean ± standard deviation age of patients was 31.1 ± 19.1 years. Non-infectious skin diseases accounted for 80.9% of all cases. Eczemas/dermatitis (27.0%), urticarias/erythemas (11.0%), fungal infections (9.5%), skin appendage disorders (8.9%), papulosquamous diseases (8.2%), pigmentary diseases (8.2%), viral infections (6.8%), and tumors and malignant skin lesions (5.4%) represented the most common presentations. Atopic dermatitis was the most common type of eczema (29.8%) among children (odds ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-2.13; P = 0.013), in whom cornification disorders (OR 3.90, 95% CI 1.73-8.92; P diseases (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.09-3.03; P = 0.019). The present pattern shows that non-infectious skin diseases are predominant. Occurrences of eczemas and urticarias are increasing at similar rates, whereas infectious skin diseases are decreasing in frequency. Resources and research should be directed towards the prevention of non-infectious skin diseases at this time as the campaign for a cleaner environment continues. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Neurofibromatosis type 2 appears to be a genetically homogeneous disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narod, S.A.; Parry, D.M.; Parboosingh, J.; Lenoir, G.M.; Ruttledge, M.; Fischer, G.; Eldridge, R.; Martuza, R.L.; Frontali, M.; Haines, J.; Gusella, J.F.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1992-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by the development of vestibular schwannomas and other tumors of the nervous system, including cranial and spinal meningiomos, schwannomas, and ependymomas. The presence of bilateral vestibular schwannomas is sufficient for the diagnosis. Skin manifestations are less common than in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen disease). The apparent clinical distinction between NF1 and NF2 has been confirmed at the level of the gene locus by linkage studies; the gene for NF1 maps to chromosome 17, where as the gene for NF2 has been assigned (in a single family) to chromosome 22. To increase the precision of the genetic mapping of NF2 and to determine whether additional susceptibility loci exist, the authors have performed linkage analysis on 12 families with NF2 by using four polymorphic markers from chromosome 22 and a marker at the NF1 locus on chromosome 17. The results confirm the assignment of the gene for NF2 to chromosome 22 and do not support the hypothesis of genetic heterogeneity. The authors believe that chromosome 22 markers can now be used for presymptomatic diagnosis in selected families. The NF2 gene is tightly linked to the D22S32 locus (maximum lod score 4.12; recombination fraction 0). A CA-repeat polymorphism at the CRYB2 locus was the most informative marker in the families (lod score 5.99), but because the observed recombination fraction between NF2 and CRYB2 was 10 cM, predictions using this marker will need to be interpreted with caution. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Suction blistering the lesional skin of vitiligo patients reveals useful biomarkers of disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassner, James P; Rashighi, Mehdi; Ahmed Refat, Maggi; Richmond, Jillian M; Harris, John E

    2017-05-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin with limited treatment options; there is an urgent need to identify and validate biomarkers of disease activity to support vitiligo clinical studies. To investigate potential biomarkers of disease activity directly in the skin of vitiligo subjects and healthy subjects. Patient skin was sampled via a modified suction-blister technique, allowing for minimally invasive, objective assessment of cytokines and T-cell infiltrates in the interstitial skin fluid. Potential biomarkers were first defined and later validated in separate study groups. In screening and validation, CD8(+) T-cell number and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9 protein concentration were significantly elevated in active lesional compared to nonlesional skin. CXCL9 protein concentration achieved greater sensitivity and specificity by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Suction blistering also allowed for phenotyping of the T-cell infiltrate, which overwhelmingly expresses C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3. A small number of patients were enrolled for the study, and only a single patient was used to define the treatment response. Measuring CXCL9 directly in the skin might be effective in clinical trials as an early marker of treatment response. Additionally, use of the modified suction-blister technique supports investigation of inflammatory skin diseases using powerful tools like flow cytometry and protein quantification. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: frequency of genetic subtypes and guidelines for genetic testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinead M

    2012-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with approximately 45 different causative genes described. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of different genes in a large cohort of patients with CMT and devise guidelines for genetic testing in practice.

  1. Skin autofluorescence is a predictor of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Shimura, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Motosugi, Ai; Ikegishi, Yukinobu; Haraguchi, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2015-02-01

    Accelerated formation and tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reflecting cumulative glycemic and oxidative stress, occurs in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and renal failure, and contributes to vascular damage. Skin autofluorescence (AFR), a noninvasive measurement method, reflects tissue accumulation of AGEs. AFR has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality in Caucasian hemodialysis patients. We assessed the relationship between levels of AFR and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and clarified the prognostic usefulness of skin AFR levels in Asian (non-Caucasian) hemodialysis (HD) patients. AFR was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 64 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during the 3-year follow-up. During follow-up, CVD events occurred in 21 patients. The deaths of 10 HD patients were associated with CVD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that initial AFR was an independent risk factor for de novo CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes. When patients were classified on the basis of AFR tertiles, Cochran-Armitage analysis demonstrated that the highest tertile of AFR level showed an increased odds ratio for the prevalence of CVD. These findings suggest that AFR levels can be used to detect the prevalence of CVD in HD patients with or without diabetes.

  2. Benefits of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: working out the methods of visualization of information obtained during optical coherent tomography in normal skin and in series of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. OCS1300SS (made in Thorlabs, USA was used in which the source of emission of radiation was a super-luminiscent diode with mean wavelength of 1325 nm. 12 patients with different skin conditions and 5 virtually healthy volunteers were examined with ОСТ procedure in OPD and IPD settings. High resolution USG numerical system DUB (TPM GmbH, Germany was used for comparative USG assessment. Results. ОСТ demonstrated considerably more detailed picture of the objects scanned compared to USG investigation. Image obtained with the help of ОСТ contains vital information about sizes of macro-morphological elements, status of vascular elements and their density in different depths of the skin. Conclusion. Additional results obtained from ОСТ of the skin lesions in plane section improves attraction for ОСТ in practical dermatology.

  3. Genetic variants in diseases of the extrapyramidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczkowska, Anna; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the genetics of movement disorders has advanced significantly in recent years. It is now recognized that disorders of the basal ganglia have genetic basis and it is suggested that molecular genetic data will provide clues to the pathophysiology of normal and abnormal motor control. Progress in molecular genetic studies, leading to the detection of genetic mutations and loci, has contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of neurodegeneration and has helped clarify the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases. Molecular studies have also found application in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, increasing the range of genetic counseling and enabling a more accurate diagno-sis. It seems that understanding pathogenic processes and the significant role of genetics has led to many experiments that may in the future will result in more effective treatment of such diseases as Parkinson's or Huntington's. Currently used molecular diagnostics based on DNA analysis can identify 9 neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal cerebellar ataxia inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, dentate-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy, Friedreich's disease, ataxia with ocu-lomotorapraxia, Huntington's disease, dystonia type 1, Wilson's disease, and some cases of Parkinson's disease.

  4. TRADITIONAL USES OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN TREATING SKIN DISEASES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT OF TAMILNADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Sivaranjani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present documented the traditional knowledge of Medicinal Plants species used in various type of skin diseases in Nagapattinam district. We have documented the use of 50 species belonging to 26 families. The information on plants used as traditional medicine against skin diseases was gathered and ethnomedicinal survey based on interviews with local people involved in traditional herbal medicine practices. The particulars plants are used to cure variety of skin diseases, like swelling, wound healing, psoriasis, scabies, eczema, dandruff, tinea versicularis, tinea cruris, impetigo, skin parasities, leucoderma, leucoderma, leprosy, rash, etc. the studies carried out for the time in this area, the medicinal plants used by traditional users of N agapattinam district were arranged by botanical name, family, local name, habit, mode of preparation and uses.

  5. Rapid, noninvasive quantitation of skin disease in systemic sclerosis using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Liu, Chih-Hao; Lei, Ling; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Hicks, M. John; Larin, Kirill V.; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc has a rare morbidity (276 cases per million adults in the United States), but has a 10-year survival rate of 55%. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is assessed by palpation on 17 sites on the body. However, the mRSS assessed score is subjective and may be influenced by the experience of the rheumatologists. In addition, the inherent elasticity of skin may bias the mRSS assessment in the early stage of SSc, such as oedematous. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, the OCE technique is applied to assess the mechanical properties of skin in both control and bleomycin (BLM) induced SSc-like disease noninvasively. Young's modulus of the BLM-SSc skin was found be significantly higher than that of normal skin, in both the in vivo and in vitro studies (p<0.05). Thus, OCE is able to differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin using mechanical contrast. It is a promising new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc in a rapid, unbiased, and noninvasive manner.

  6. Genetics of Common Endocrine Disease: The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mark O

    2016-03-01

    In honor of the 75th issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, the author was invited to present his perspectives on genetics in human endocrinology. This paper reviews what the field has achieved in the genetics of common endocrine disease, and offers predictions on where the field will move in the future and its impact on endocrine clinical practice. The October 2015 data release of the National Human Genome Research Institute-European Bioinformatics Institute (NHGRI-EBI) Catalog of Published Genome-wide Association Studies was queried regarding endocrinologic diseases and traits. PubMed searches were focused on genetic prediction of disease, genetic findings and drug targets, functional interrogation of genetic loci, use of genetics to subtype disease, missing heritability, systems genomics, and higher order chromatin structures as regulators of gene function. Nearly a quarter of genome wide association study findings concern endocrinologic diseases and traits. While these findings have not yet dramatically altered clinical care, genetics will have a major impact by providing the drug targets of tomorrow, facilitated by experimental and bioinformatic advances that will shorten the time from gene discovery to drug development. Use of genetic findings to subtype common endocrine disease will allow more precise prevention and treatment efforts. Future advances will allow us to move away from the common view of DNA as a string of letters, allowing exploration of higher order structure that likely explains much "missing heritability." The future will see a greater role of genetics at the bedside, with genetic epidemiologic discoveries leading not only to new treatments of endocrine disease, but also helping us prescribe the right drug to the right patients by allowing subclassification of common heterogeneous endocrine conditions. Future technological breakthroughs will reveal the heritable mysteries hidden in chromatin structure, leading to a

  7. Skin diseases among internally displaced Tawerghans living in camps in Benghazi, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfaituri, Safa S

    2016-09-01

    Benghazi has received many internally displaced persons (IDPs) from other Libyan cities as a result of the armed conflict in Libya. These groups have significant health problems associated with their displacement, including skin diseases. This study aimed to determine the spectrum and frequency of skin diseases among people living in IDP camps in Benghazi. A total of 480 IDP camp residents with complaints of skin diseases were studied over a period of 6 months. All subjects were ethnic Tawerghans; about three-quarters were female and half were adults. The disease types found to occur at the highest frequencies were skin infections (40.0%), followed by xerosis (31.3%), eczema (18.3%), acne (17.0%), hair-related diseases (6.7%), and psychosomatic diseases (3.0%). People who are resident in IDP camps have skin problems similar to those of other populations in similar circumstances. They have increased vulnerability to infections, environment-associated disorders such as xerosis cutis and eczema, and diseases of psychosomatic origin. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Reverse genetics of Newcastle disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverse genetics allows the generation of recombinant viruses or vectors used in functional studies, vaccine development, and gene therapy. This technique allows genetic manipulation and cloning of viral genomes, mutation through site-directed mutagenesis, and gene insertion or deletion, among othe...

  9. Borrelia burgdorferi genetic markers and disseminated disease in patients with early Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn L; Glickstein, Lisa J; Damle, Nitin; Sikand, Vijay K; McHugh, Gail; Steere, Allen C

    2006-12-01

    Three genetic markers of Borrelia burgdorferi have been associated with disseminated disease: the OspC type, the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer type (RST), and vlsE. Here, we modified previous methods so as to identify the three markers by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism in parallel, analyzed B. burgdorferi isolates from erythema migrans (EM) skin lesions in 91 patients, and correlated the results with evidence of dissemination. OspC type A was found approximately twice as frequently in patients with disseminated disease, whereas type K was identified approximately twice as often in those without evidence of dissemination, but these trends were not statistically significant. The remaining seven types identified were found nearly equally in patients with or without evidence of dissemination. RST 1 strains were significantly associated with dissemination (P=0.03), whereas RST 2 and RST 3 strains tended to have an inverse association with this outcome. The vlsE gene was identified in all 91 cases, using primer sets specific for an N-terminal sequence of B. burgdorferi strain B31 (vlsEB31) or strain 297 (vlsE297), but neither marker was associated with dissemination. Specific combinations of the three genetic markers usually occurred together. OspC type A was always found with RST 1 and vlsEB31, type K was always identified with RST 2 and more often with vlsE297, and types E and I were almost always found with RST 3 and equally often with vlsEB31 and vlsE297. We conclude that B. burgdorferi strains vary in their capacity to disseminate, but almost all strains isolated from EM lesions sometimes caused disseminated disease.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: microvillus inclusion disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Microvillus inclusion disease Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: Diarrhea Educational Resources (9 links) American Society for Parenteral and ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Tay-Sachs disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Tay-Sachs disease Tay-Sachs disease Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Tay-Sachs disease is a rare inherited disorder that ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  13. [Aeroallergens, skin tests and allergic diseases in 1091 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez Palomec, O; Hernández Chávez, L; Sarrazola Sanjuan, D M; Segura Méndez, N H; Hernández Colín, D D; Martínez-Cairo, S

    1997-01-01

    To know the frequency of positively of several skin tests, data cards from patients, of the Allergy and Clinic Immunology Service of the Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI (Mexico City), between January, 1989 and March, 1995, were reviewed. Aqueous extracts manufactures by our laboratory were applied, in a dilution of 1:1000 weight-volume. 1091 from 5,651 skin tests patients were positive. Asthma and rhinitis were diagnosed in 492, allergic rhinitis in 289, allergic asthma in 111, and other diagnosis in 199 cases. The most frequent inhalable aeroallergens were house dust and perennial Dermatophagoides p and f1 with predominance in the rainy season, followed by pollens from Fraxinus a. Quercus a and Capriola, with predominance in the rainy season. The most frequent fungi were Candida and Fusarium, with predominance in the dry season.

  14. Pattern of skin diseases in paediatric age group and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal S

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 300 patients from first day of life to 17 years of age were analysed for pattern of skin disorders. School going children formed majority (41.3% of cases followed by preschool children (32%. Infections formed the commonest disorder (31 % followed by eczemas (24%, papulosquamous disorders (12%, infestation (8.6% and urticaria (5.3% while vitiligo, acne vulgaris, alopecia areata and genodermatoses were seen in 2.7% cases each.

  15. Genetics in Common Liver Diseases: From Pathophysiology to Precise Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Frank

    In the past 2 decades, advances in genetics have improved our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Firstly, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for monogenic (Mendelian) liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver diseases such as fatty liver disease and drug-induced liver injury, in which environmental co-factors play critical roles. The findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and risk factors and have already pointed to new disease treatments. This is illustrated by the interaction of alcohol, overnutrition and the PNPLA3 gene, which represents an 'infernal triangle' for the liver. In the future, genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized (precision) medicine, offering novel opportunities for translational research and clinical care of our patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Motility MalaCards: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University Orphanet: Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy Patient Support and Advocacy ...

  17. Revisiting Amazonian Plants for Skin Care and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Burlando

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This review concerns five species of trees and palm trees that occur as dominant plants in different rainforest areas of the Amazon region. Due to their abundance, these species can be exploited as sustainable sources of botanical materials and include Carapa guianensis Aubl., family Meliaceae; Eperua falcata Aubl., family Fabaceae; Quassia amara L., family Simaroubaceae; and Attalea speciosa Mart. and Oenocarpus bataua Mart., family Arecaceae. For each species, the general features, major constituents, overall medicinal properties, detailed dermatological and skin care applications, and possible harmful effects have been considered. The major products include seed oils from A. speciosa and C. guianensis, fruit oil from O. bataua, and active compounds such as limonoids from C. guianensis, flavonoids from E. falcata, and quassinoids from Q. amara. The dermatologic and cosmetic applications of these plants are growing rapidly but are still widely based on empiric knowledge. Applications include skin rehydration and soothing; anti-inflammatory, antiage, and antiparasite effects; hair care; burn and wound healing; and the amelioration of rosacea and psoriasis conditions. Despite a limited knowledge about their constituents and properties, these species appear as promising sources of bioactive compounds for skin care and health applications. An improvement of knowledge about their properties will provide added value to the exploitation of these forest resources.

  18. Genetic factors associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are complex polygenic disorders, characterized by several genes together with environmental factors contributing to the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent advances in research on genetic susceptibility have allowed the identification of diverse genes at different levels: (1) Innate immunity; (2) Antigen presentation molecules; (3) Epithelial integrity; (4) Drug transporter; (5) Cell adhesion. The application of genetic testing into clinical practice is close and all genetic markers may have several clinical implications: prediction of disease phenotype, molecular classification, prevention of complications, and prognosis.

  19. Network medicine approaches to the genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Edwin K; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Complex diseases are caused by perturbations of biological networks. Genetic analysis approaches focused on individual genetic determinants are unlikely to characterize the network architecture of complex diseases comprehensively. Network medicine, which applies systems biology and network science to complex molecular networks underlying human disease, focuses on identifying the interacting genes and proteins which lead to disease pathogenesis. The long biological path between a genetic risk variant and development of a complex disease involves a range of biochemical intermediates, including coding and non-coding RNA, proteins, and metabolites. Transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other -omics technologies have the potential to provide insights into complex disease pathogenesis, especially if they are applied within a network biology framework. Most previous efforts to relate genetics to -omics data have focused on a single -omics platform; the next generation of complex disease genetics studies will require integration of multiple types of -omics data sets in a network context. Network medicine may also provide insight into complex disease heterogeneity, serve as the basis for new disease classifications that reflect underlying disease pathogenesis, and guide rational therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  20. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography of patients with skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-07-01

    We report on the first clinical study based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy. 47 patients with a variety of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art OCT systems for dermatology including multibeam swept source OCT, (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph, and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT images reflect modifications of the intratissue refractive index whereas MPT is based on nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second harmonic generation. A stack of cross-sectional OCT "wide field" images with a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm(2) gave fast information on the depth and the volume of the lesion. Multiphoton tomography provided 0.36 x 0.36 mm(2) horizontal/diagonal optical sections within seconds of a particular region of interest with superior submicron resolution down to a tissue depth of 200 mum. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases as well as for the evaluation of the efficiency of treatments.

  1. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  2. Melanocortin-1 receptor, skin cancer and phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project: study design and methods for pooling results of genetic epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For complex diseases like cancer, pooled-analysis of individual data represents a powerful tool to investigate the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors to the development of a disease. Pooled-analysis of epidemiological studies has many advantages over meta-analysis, and preliminary results may be obtained faster and with lower costs than with prospective consortia. Design and methods Based on our experience with the study design of the Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene, SKin cancer and Phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project, we describe the most important steps in planning and conducting a pooled-analysis of genetic epidemiological studies. We then present the statistical analysis plan that we are going to apply, giving particular attention to methods of analysis recently proposed to account for between-study heterogeneity and to explore the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors in the development of a disease. Within the M-SKIP project, data on 10,959 skin cancer cases and 14,785 controls from 31 international investigators were checked for quality and recoded for standardization. We first proposed to fit the aggregated data with random-effects logistic regression models. However, for the M-SKIP project, a two-stage analysis will be preferred to overcome the problem regarding the availability of different study covariates. The joint contribution of MC1R variants and phenotypic characteristics to skin cancer development will be studied via logic regression modeling. Discussion Methodological guidelines to correctly design and conduct pooled-analyses are needed to facilitate application of such methods, thus providing a better summary of the actual findings on specific fields. PMID:22862891

  3. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17.

  4. Interferon and biologic signatures in dermatomyositis skin: specificity and heterogeneity across diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatomyositis (DM is an autoimmune disease that mainly affects the skin, muscle, and lung. The pathogenesis of skin inflammation in DM is not well understood. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed genome-wide expression data in DM skin and compared them to those from healthy controls. We observed a robust upregulation of interferon (IFN-inducible genes in DM skin, as well as several other gene modules pertaining to inflammation, complement activation, and epidermal activation and differentiation. The interferon (IFN-inducible genes within the DM signature were present not only in DM and lupus, but also cutaneous herpes simplex-2 infection and to a lesser degree, psoriasis. This IFN signature was absent or weakly present in atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, acne vulgaris, systemic sclerosis, and localized scleroderma/morphea. We observed that the IFN signature in DM skin appears to be more closely related to type I than type II IFN based on in vitro IFN stimulation expression signatures. However, quantitation of IFN mRNAs in DM skin shows that the majority of known type I IFNs, as well as IFN g, are overexpressed in DM skin. In addition, both IFN-beta and IFN-gamma (but not other type I IFN transcript levels were highly correlated with the degree of the in vivo IFN transcriptional response in DM skin. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: As in the blood and muscle, DM skin is characterized by an overwhelming presence of an IFN signature, although it is difficult to conclusively define this response as type I or type II. Understanding the significance of the IFN signature in this wide array of inflammatory diseases will be furthered by identification of the nature of the cells that both produce and respond to IFN, as well as which IFN subtype is biologically active in each diseased tissue.

  5. Genetic counseling and testing for Huntington's disease: A historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Martha A

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes the ways in which genetic counseling has evolved since John Pearson and Sheldon Reed first promoted "a genetic education" in the 1950s as a voluntary, non-directive clinical tool for permitting individual decision making. It reviews how the emergence of Huntington's disease (HD) registries and patient support organizations, genetic testing, and the discovery of a disease-causing CAG repeat expansion changed the contours of genetic counseling for families with HD. It also reviews the guidelines, outcomes, ethical and laboratory challenges, and uptake of predictive, prenatal, and preimplantation testing, and it casts a vision for how clinicians can better make use of genetic counseling to reach a broader pool of families that may be affected by HD and to ensure that genetic counseling is associated with the best levels of care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Animal models for human genetic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharif Sons

    organisms are extensively used in applied research in agriculture, industry, and also in medicine, where they are ... in genetic disorder that is critical for embryonic .... by practical limitations and ethical concerns. ..... American journal of medical.

  7. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological...... and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple......-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P-CPMA...

  8. Skin and kidney histological changes in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Tadeja; Alessiani, Mario; Pleskovič, Alojz; Pleskovič, Aleš; Zorc-Pleskovič, Ruda; Milutinović, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    Kidney transplantation (Ktx) is generally performed during end stage renal disease due to a loss of the kidneys' ability to filter wastes from the circulatory system. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after Ktx is a life-threatening complication that progresses to organ failure, systemic complications, and death. The current study evaluated the significance of histologic findings of GVHD as obtained from skin biopsies following Ktx in swine. A swine model of Ktx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppression was used to assess possible correlations between acute-graft-cellular rejection and skin histological findings for prediction of GVHD. Animals were divided into a Ktx treatment group or a control group with no Ktx and skin and kidney biopsies were histologically assessed at postoperative days 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60. Skin samples were analyzed and classified from grade 1 to 4 of skin GVHD and the major histopathological changes of kidney acute cellular rejection were described using Banff's score system. We observed a significant linear correlation between the histological grading values of skin biopsy changes and the histological grading values of kidney biopsies (Kendall's tau_b=0.993) in the Ktx experimental group. No histological changes were observed in controls. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of staging skin GVHD after Ktx and suggest it's future utility for monitoring long term Ktx-induced changes.

  9. Role of Genetic Testing in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Allison L; Harris, Stephanie; Lakdawala, Neal K; Michels, Michelle; Olivotto, Iacopo; Day, Sharlene M; Abrams, Dominic J; Charron, Philippe; Caleshu, Colleen; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie; Rakowski, Harry; Judge, Daniel P; Ho, Carolyn Y

    2017-08-09

    Genetic testing is a valuable tool for managing inherited cardiovascular disease in patients and families, including hypertrophic, dilated, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies and inherited arrhythmias. By identifying the molecular etiology of disease, genetic testing can improve diagnostic accuracy and refine family management. However, unique features associated with genetic testing affect the interpretation and application of results and differentiate it from traditional laboratory-based diagnostics. Clinicians and patients must have accurate and realistic expectations about the yield of genetic testing and its role in management. Familiarity with the rationale, implications, benefits, and limitations of genetic testing is essential to achieve the best possible outcomes. Successfully incorporating genetic testing into clinical practice requires (1) recognizing when inherited cardiovascular disease may be present, (2) identifying appropriate individuals in the family for testing, (3) selecting the appropriate genetic test, (4) understanding the complexities of result interpretation, and (5) effectively communicating the results and implications to the patient and family. Obtaining a detailed family history is critical to identify families who will benefit from genetic testing, determine the best strategy, and interpret results. Instead of focusing on an individual patient, genetic testing requires consideration of the family as a unit. Consolidation of care in centers with a high level of expertise is recommended. Clinicians without expertise in genetic testing will benefit from establishing referral or consultative networks with experienced clinicans in specialized multidisciplinary clinics. Genetic testing provides a foundation for transitioning to more precise and individualized management. By distinguishing phenotypic subgroups, identifying disease mechanisms, and focusing family care, gene-based diagnosis can improve management. Successful integration of

  10. 77 FR 28397 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, P30 Rheumatic Diseases Core Center Review. Date: June 13...., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal...

  11. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Genetic Disease Diagnosis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Carol Jean; Miller, Neil Andrew; Soden, Sarah Elizabeth; Dinwiddie, Darrell Lee; Noll, Aaron; Alnadi, Noor Abu; Andraws, Nevene; Patterson, Melanie LeAnn; Krivohlavek, Lisa Ann; Fellis, Joel; Humphray, Sean; Saffrey, Peter; Kingsbury, Zoya; Weir, Jacqueline Claire; Betley, Jason; Grocock, Russell James; Margulies, Elliott Harrison; Farrow, Emily Gwendolyn; Artman, Michael; Safina, Nicole Pauline; Petrikin, Joshua Erin; Hall, Kevin Peter; Kingsmore, Stephen Francis

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are frequent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and disease presentations are often undifferentiated at birth. More than 3500 monogenic diseases have been characterized, but clinical testing is available for only some of them and many feature clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Hence, an immense unmet need exists for improved molecular diagnosis in infants. Because disease progression is extremely rapid, albeit heterogeneous, in newborns, molecular diagnoses must occur quickly to be relevant for clinical decision-making. We describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) that features automated bioinformatic analysis and is intended to be a prototype for use in neonatal intensive care units. Retrospective 50-hour WGS identified known molecular diagnoses in two children. Prospective WGS disclosed potential molecular diagnosis of a severe GJB2-related skin disease in one neonate; BRAT1-related lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome in another infant; identified BCL9L as a novel, recessive visceral heterotaxy gene (HTX6) in a pedigree; and ruled out known candidate genes in one infant. Sequencing of parents or affected siblings expedited the identification of disease genes in prospective cases. Thus, rapid WGS can potentially broaden and foreshorten differential diagnosis, resulting in fewer empirical treatments and faster progression to genetic and prognostic counseling. PMID:23035047

  12. Systems Genetics as a Tool to Identify Master Genetic Regulators in Complex Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Moral, Aida; Pesce, Francesco; Behmoaras, Jacques; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Systems genetics stems from systems biology and similarly employs integrative modeling approaches to describe the perturbations and phenotypic effects observed in a complex system. However, in the case of systems genetics the main source of perturbation is naturally occurring genetic variation, which can be analyzed at the systems-level to explain the observed variation in phenotypic traits. In contrast with conventional single-variant association approaches, the success of systems genetics has been in the identification of gene networks and molecular pathways that underlie complex disease. In addition, systems genetics has proven useful in the discovery of master trans-acting genetic regulators of functional networks and pathways, which in many cases revealed unexpected gene targets for disease. Here we detail the central components of a fully integrated systems genetics approach to complex disease, starting from assessment of genetic and gene expression variation, linking DNA sequence variation to mRNA (expression QTL mapping), gene regulatory network analysis and mapping the genetic control of regulatory networks. By summarizing a few illustrative (and successful) examples, we highlight how different data-modeling strategies can be effectively integrated in a systems genetics study.

  13. Dopaminergic neuronal imaging in genetic Parkinson's disease: insights into pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisdair McNeill

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated for bilateral caudate and putamen for each case. The right:left asymmetry index and striatal asymmetry index was calculated. RESULTS: Scans were available from 37 cases of monogenetic Parkinson's disease (7 glucocerebrosidase (GBA mutations, 8 alpha-synuclein, 3 LRRK2, 7 PINK1, 12 Parkin. The asymmetry of radioligand uptake for Parkinson's disease with GBA or LRRK2 mutations was greater than that for Parkinson's disease with alpha synuclein, PINK1 or Parkin mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The asymmetry of radioligand uptake in Parkinsons disease associated with GBA or LRRK2 mutations suggests that interactions with additional genetic or environmental factors may be associated with dopaminergic neuronal loss.

  14. Genetics and behavioral medicine: Risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogler, G.P.; McClearn, G.E.; Snieder, H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Palmer, R.; Knijff, P. de; Slagboom, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    This is the second in a series of three articles addressing the intersection of interests in behavioral genetics and behavioral medicine. In this article, we use risk factors for cardiovascular disease as a prototypical trait for which behavioral genetic approaches provide powerful tools for underst

  15. Genetics and behavioral medicine: Risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogler, G.P.; McClearn, G.E.; Snieder, H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Palmer, R.; Knijff, P. de; Slagboom, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    This is the second in a series of three articles addressing the intersection of interests in behavioral genetics and behavioral medicine. In this article, we use risk factors for cardiovascular disease as a prototypical trait for which behavioral genetic approaches provide powerful tools for

  16. Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    months 0-36) “The Data Base Manager at UTHealth in close collaboration with Mr. Tony Mattar (Computer Task Force, Inc, Troy, MI) will maintain the...patients from 19 JUN 2015 through 19 OCT 2015 QUARTERLY – 8th Quarter Proposed Sample Collection – GENISOS Patients Quarter Time/ Months Skin bx...D, Simms RW, Silver RM, Frech TM, Fessler BJ, Molitor JA, Fritzler MJ, Segal BM, Al-Kassab F, Perry M, Yang J, Zamanian S, Reveille JD, Arnett FC

  17. ESAT-6/CFP10 skin test predicts disease in M. tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldingh, Karin; Andersen, Peter

    2008-04-23

    Targeted preventive chemotherapy of individuals with progressive subclinical (incipient) disease before it becomes contagious would break the chain of tuberculosis transmission in high endemic regions. We have studied the ability of a skin test response to ESAT-6 and CFP10 (E6/C10) to predict later development of tuberculosis disease in the guinea pig model. Guinea pigs, either vaccinated with BCG or unvaccinated, were infected with a low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the aerosol route and the development of delayed type hypersensitivity responses to E6/C10 and to purified protein derivative (PPD) were followed until the onset of clinical disease. We demonstrated a negative correlation between the size of the skin test response and the time to the onset of clinical disease; a large E6/C10 skin test response correlated to a shorter survival time post skin testing, while a small E6/C10 skin test reaction correlated with a longer survival time (r = -0.6 and Pskin test based on E6/C10 that will allow the identification of individuals with incipient disease, who have the highest risk of developing active tuberculosis in the near future.

  18. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  19. Puffy skin disease (PSD) in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum): a case definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, C E; Nolan, E T; Feist, S W; Crumlish, M; Richards, R H; Williams, C F

    2015-07-01

    Puffy skin disease (PSD) is a disease that causes skin pathology in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Incidence of PSD in UK fish farms and fisheries has increased sharply in the last decade, with growing concern from both industry sectors. This paper provides the first comprehensive case definition of PSD, combining clinical and pathological observations of diseased rainbow trout from both fish farms and fisheries. The defining features of PSD, as summarized in the case definition, were focal lateral flank skin lesions that appeared as cutaneous swelling with pigment loss and petechiae. These were associated with lethargy, poor body condition, inappetance and low level mortality. Epidermal hyperplasia and spongiosis, oedema of the dermis stratum spongiosum and a mild diffuse inflammatory cellularity were typical in histopathology of skin. A specific pathogen or aetiology was not identified. Prevalence and severity of skin lesions was greatest during late summer and autumn, with the highest prevalence being 95%. Atypical lesions seen in winter and spring were suggestive of clinical resolution. PSD holds important implications for both trout aquaculture and still water trout fisheries. This case definition will aid future diagnosis, help avoid confusion with other skin conditions and promote prompt and consistent reporting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Genetic influences on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Genes that contribute to the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have been identified, but an attempt to accurately quantify the total genetic contribution to COPD has to our knowledge never been conducted.......Genes that contribute to the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have been identified, but an attempt to accurately quantify the total genetic contribution to COPD has to our knowledge never been conducted....

  1. Genetic influences on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease - a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Thomsen, Simon F; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Genes that contribute to the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have been identified, but an attempt to accurately quantify the total genetic contribution to COPD has to our knowledge never been conducted.......Genes that contribute to the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have been identified, but an attempt to accurately quantify the total genetic contribution to COPD has to our knowledge never been conducted....

  2. Views of Discrimination among Individuals Confronting Genetic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Klitzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Though the US passed the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act, many questions remain of how individuals confronting genetic disease view and experience possible discrimination. We interviewed, for 2 hours each, 64 individuals who had, or were at risk for, Huntington’s Disease, breast cancer, or Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Discrimination can be implicit, indirect and subtle, rather than explicit, direct and overt; and be hard to prove. Patients may be treated “differently” and unfair...

  3. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson′s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Chen; Bo Shen; Jia-Jia Xiao; Rong Wu; Sarah Jane Duff Canning; Xiao-Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson′s disease (WD). Data Sources: We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic, ATP7B gene, gene mutation, genotype, phenotype. Study Selection: Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected. Results: Wilson′s disease, also named hepat...

  4. Commercial Essential Oils as Potential Antimicrobials to Treat Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ané Orchard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are one of the most notorious natural products used for medical purposes. Combined with their popular use in dermatology, their availability, and the development of antimicrobial resistance, commercial essential oils are often an option for therapy. At least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1500 combinations. This review explores the fundamental knowledge available on the antimicrobial properties against pathogens responsible for dermatological infections and compares the scientific evidence to what is recommended for use in common layman’s literature. Also included is a review of combinations with other essential oils and antimicrobials. The minimum inhibitory concentration dilution method is the preferred means of determining antimicrobial activity. While dermatological skin pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have been well studied, other pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Brevibacterium species have been sorely neglected. Combination studies incorporating oil blends, as well as interactions with conventional antimicrobials, have shown that mostly synergy is reported. Very few viral studies of relevance to the skin have been made. Encouragement is made for further research into essential oil combinations with other essential oils, antimicrobials, and carrier oils.

  5. Commercial Essential Oils as Potential Antimicrobials to Treat Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Ané

    2017-01-01

    Essential oils are one of the most notorious natural products used for medical purposes. Combined with their popular use in dermatology, their availability, and the development of antimicrobial resistance, commercial essential oils are often an option for therapy. At least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1500 combinations. This review explores the fundamental knowledge available on the antimicrobial properties against pathogens responsible for dermatological infections and compares the scientific evidence to what is recommended for use in common layman's literature. Also included is a review of combinations with other essential oils and antimicrobials. The minimum inhibitory concentration dilution method is the preferred means of determining antimicrobial activity. While dermatological skin pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have been well studied, other pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Propionibacterium acnes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Brevibacterium species have been sorely neglected. Combination studies incorporating oil blends, as well as interactions with conventional antimicrobials, have shown that mostly synergy is reported. Very few viral studies of relevance to the skin have been made. Encouragement is made for further research into essential oil combinations with other essential oils, antimicrobials, and carrier oils. PMID:28546822

  6. Advances in the genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically-complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet’s disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases - namely the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically-complex autoinflammatory phenotypes. PMID:26077134

  7. [The application of genetic risk score in genetic studies of complex human diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Niu; Weili, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Complex diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, essential hypertension, asthma, obesity and cancer have spread across the globe and become the predominant cause of death. There are growing concerns over the role of genetic susceptibility in pathogenesis of complex diseases. However, the related susceptibility genes and sequence variations are still unknown. To elucidate the genetic basis of complex diseases, researchers have identified a large number of genetic variants associated with complex diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies recently. The identification of these causal and/or associated variants promotes the development of approaches for complex diseases prediction and prevention. Genetic risk score (GRS), an emerging method for exploring correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical phenotypes of complex diseases, integrates weak effects of multiple SNPs and dramatically enhances predictability of complex diseases by gene polymorphisms. This method has been applied successfully in genetic studies of many complex diseases. Here we focus on the introduction of the computational methods and evaluation criteria of GRS, enumerate a series of achievements through GRS application, discuss some limitations during application, and finally prospect the future of GRS.

  8. Prevalence of Common Skin Diseases and Their Associated Factors among Military Personnel in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Ski...

  9. Association between skin diseases and severe bacterial infections in children: case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammedamin, Robbert SA; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Koning, Sander; Willemsen, Sten P; Bernsen, Roos MD; Schellevis, François G; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette WA; Koes, Bart W

    2006-01-01

    Background Sepsis or bacteraemia, however rare, is a significant cause of high mortality and serious complications in children. In previous studies skin disease or skin infections were reported as risk factor. We hypothesize that children with sepsis or bacteraemia more often presented with skin diseases to the general practitioner (GP) than other children. If our hypothesis is true the GP could reduce the risk of sepsis or bacteraemia by managing skin diseases appropriately. Methods We performed a case-control study using data of children aged 0–17 years of the second Dutch national survey of general practice (2001) and the National Medical Registration of all hospital admissions in the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children who were hospitalized for sepsis or bacteraemia. We selected two control groups by matching each case with six controls. The first control group was randomly selected from the GP patient lists irrespective of hospital admission and GP consultation. The second control group was randomly sampled from those children who were hospitalized for other reasons than sepsis or bacteraemia. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A two-sided p-value less than 0.05 was considered significant in all tests. Results We found odds ratios for skin related GP consultations of 3.4 (95% CI: [1.1–10.8], p = 0.03) in cases versus GP controls and 1.4 (95% CI: [0.5–3.9], p = 0.44) in cases versus hospital controls. Children younger than three months had an odds ratio (cases/GP controls) of 9.2 (95% CI: [0.81–106.1], p = 0.07) and 4.0 (95% CI: [0.67–23.9], p = 0.12) among cases versus hospital controls. Although cases consulted the GP more often with skin diseases than their controls, the probability of a GP consultation for skin disease was only 5% among cases. Conclusion There is evidence that children who were admitted due to sepsis or bacteraemia consulted the GP more often for skin diseases than other children, but the

  10. Association between skin diseases and severe bacterial infections in children: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Suijlekom-Smit Lisette WA

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis or bacteraemia, however rare, is a significant cause of high mortality and serious complications in children. In previous studies skin disease or skin infections were reported as risk factor. We hypothesize that children with sepsis or bacteraemia more often presented with skin diseases to the general practitioner (GP than other children. If our hypothesis is true the GP could reduce the risk of sepsis or bacteraemia by managing skin diseases appropriately. Methods We performed a case-control study using data of children aged 0–17 years of the second Dutch national survey of general practice (2001 and the National Medical Registration of all hospital admissions in the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children who were hospitalized for sepsis or bacteraemia. We selected two control groups by matching each case with six controls. The first control group was randomly selected from the GP patient lists irrespective of hospital admission and GP consultation. The second control group was randomly sampled from those children who were hospitalized for other reasons than sepsis or bacteraemia. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI. A two-sided p-value less than 0.05 was considered significant in all tests. Results We found odds ratios for skin related GP consultations of 3.4 (95% CI: [1.1–10.8], p = 0.03 in cases versus GP controls and 1.4 (95% CI: [0.5–3.9], p = 0.44 in cases versus hospital controls. Children younger than three months had an odds ratio (cases/GP controls of 9.2 (95% CI: [0.81–106.1], p = 0.07 and 4.0 (95% CI: [0.67–23.9], p = 0.12 among cases versus hospital controls. Although cases consulted the GP more often with skin diseases than their controls, the probability of a GP consultation for skin disease was only 5% among cases. Conclusion There is evidence that children who were admitted due to sepsis or bacteraemia consulted the GP more often for skin diseases than other

  11. Optimal Trend Tests for Genetic Association Studies of Heterogeneous Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-06-09

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is a standard procedure in genetic association studies. It is a directed test with high power to detect genetic effects that follow the gene-dosage model. In this paper, the author proposes optimal trend tests for genetic association studies of heterogeneous diseases. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the power gain of the optimal trend tests over the conventional Cochran-Armitage trend test is striking when the genetic effects are heterogeneous. The easy-to-use R 3.1.2 software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) code is provided. The optimal trend tests are recommended for routine use.

  12. Nephrotic syndrome of minimal change disease following exposure to mercury-containing skin-lightening cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Sun, Lin; Chen, Chunguo

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old female suffered from nephrotic syndrome after a long-term use of mercury-containing, skin-lightening cream. The blood and urinary mercury content of this patient increased with use. Renal biopsy showed minimal change disease. Her symptoms were relieved 6 months after discontinuing use of the cream and receiving sodium dimercaptosulfonate and glucocorticosteroid treatments. Proteinuria disappeared, and blood and urinary mercury levels returned to normal. Previous reports of nephrotic syndrome caused by mercury-containing, skin-lightening creams have mostly been identified as be.ing due to membranous nephropathy. Minimal change disease has been reported in a few case reports published in the English language. Here we report a case of nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease following exposure to a mercury-containing, skin-lightening cream. We also reviewed relevant published reports to summarize clinical features and treatments and to explore the possible mechanisms involved.

  13. Biological response modifiers and their potential use in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Louise S; Skov, Lone; Baadsgaard, Ole

    2003-01-01

    and fewer side-effects than the current systemic therapies now used for severe psoriasis, contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases, the immune system plays a pivotal role, and this is where biological response modifiers such as monoclonal antibodies......In recent years, a more detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of several inflammatory skin diseases, combined with the developments within biotechnology, has made it possible to design more selective response modifiers. Biological response modifiers hold the potential for greater effectiveness......, recombinant cytokines, or fusion proteins may be effective. Several biological response modifiers have already shown positive results in phase II/III clinical trials in skin diseases, and many new biological response modifiers are in progress....

  14. A STUDY ON PATTERN OF SKIN DISEASES AMONG CHILDREN PRESENTING TO RIMS, KADAPA, A. P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamseedhar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information is available about the prevalence of skin conditions among children in the general population in India. Low socioeconomic status, malnutrition, overcrowding and poor standards of hygiene are important factors accounting for the distribut ion of skin diseases in developing countries such as India. AIM OF THE STUDY: To study prevalence of skin diseases among children presenting to paediatric OPD. METERIALS AND METHODS: A predesigned and pretested questionnaire was used to gather information about socio - demographic profile, personal history, social history and all the children were thoroughly examined by detailed clinical examination depending on signs and symptoms. Suspected cases were subjected to bacterial cultures, KoH examination was done . RESULTS: In the present study, pyoderma was the most common frequent skin disorder accounting to 11.2% followed by Scabies 10.6%, Papular urtricaria 8.8%, Impetigo 6.8% and the least prevalent were Measles 0.8%, Acanthosis nigricans 0.4% and Psoriasis 0. 2%. CONCLUSION: In the present study pyoderma, utericaria and scabies were highly prevalent among children’s. Personal hygine, health education and periodic deworming measures will prevent majority of skin diseases. KEYWORDS: S kin diseases, C hildren, P yode rma, S cabies.

  15. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2016-11-02

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  16. Genetic and bibliographic information: KRT5 [GenLibi

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available KRT5 keratin 5 human epidermolysis bullosa simplex (MeSH) Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases...genital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities (C16) > Genetic Diseases..., Inborn (C16.320) > Skin Diseases, Genetic (C16.320.850) > Epidermolysis Bullosa (C16.320.850.275) > Ep...idermolysis Bullosa Simplex (C16.320.850.275.180) Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases (C17) > Skin Diseases ....493) > Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (C17.800.804.493.180) Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases (C17) > Skin Diseases

  17. Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cotsapas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44% immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA<0.01. We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.

  18. An atlas of genetic correlations across human diseases and traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K; Anttila, Verneri;

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genetic correlations between complex traits and diseases can provide useful etiological insights and help prioritize likely causal relationships. The major challenges preventing estimation of genetic correlation from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with current methods...... are the lack of availability of individual-level genotype data and widespread sample overlap among meta-analyses. We circumvent these difficulties by introducing a technique-cross-trait LD Score regression-for estimating genetic correlation that requires only GWAS summary statistics and is not biased by sample...... overlap. We use this method to estimate 276 genetic correlations among 24 traits. The results include genetic correlations between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, anorexia and obesity, and educational attainment and several diseases. These results highlight the power of genome-wide analyses...

  19. Comparing cutaneous research funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases with 2010 Global Burden of Disease results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chante Karimkhani

    Full Text Available Disease burden data helps guide research prioritization.To determine the extent to which grants issued by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS reflect disease burden, measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs from Global Burden of Disease (GBD 2010 project.Two investigators independently assessed 15 skin conditions studied by GBD 2010 in the NIAMS database for grants issued in 2013. The 15 skin diseases were matched to their respective DALYs from GBD 2010.The United States NIAMS database and GBD 2010 skin condition disability data.Relationship of NIAMS grant database topic funding with percent total GBD 2010 DALY and DALY rank for 15 skin conditions.During fiscal year 2013, 1,443 NIAMS grants were issued at a total value of $424 million. Of these grants, 17.7% covered skin topics. Of the total skin disease funding, 82% (91 grants were categorized as "general cutaneous research." Psoriasis, leprosy, and "other skin and subcutaneous diseases" (ie; immunobullous disorders, vitiligo, and hidradenitis suppurativa were over-represented when funding was compared with disability. Conversely, cellulitis, decubitus ulcer, urticaria, acne vulgaris, viral skin diseases, fungal skin diseases, scabies, and melanoma were under-represented. Conditions for which disability and funding appeared well-matched were dermatitis, squamous and basal cell carcinoma, pruritus, bacterial skin diseases, and alopecia areata.Degree of representation in NIAMS is partly correlated with DALY metrics. Grant funding was well-matched with disability metrics for five of the 15 studied skin diseases, while two skin diseases were over-represented and seven were under-represented. Global burden estimates provide increasingly transparent and important information for investigating and prioritizing national research funding allocations.

  20. Maternal-Zygotic Epistasis and the Evolution of Genetic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K. Priest

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many birth defects and genetic diseases are expressed in individuals that do not carry the disease causing alleles. Genetic diseases observed in offspring can be caused by gene expression in mothers and by interactions between gene expression in mothers and offspring. It is not clear whether the underlying pattern of gene expression (maternal versus offspring affects the incidence of genetic disease. Here we develop a 2-locus population genetic model with epistatic interactions between a maternal gene and a zygotic gene to address this question. We show that maternal effect genes that affect disease susceptibility in offspring persist longer and at higher frequencies in a population than offspring genes with the same effects. We find that specific forms of maternal-zygotic epistasis can maintain disease causing alleles at high frequencies over a range of plausible values. Our findings suggest that the strength and form of epistasis and the underlying pattern of gene expression may greatly influence the prevalence of human genetic diseases.

  1. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients.

  2. Genetic Characterization of Insect Vectors of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    populations, and is highest of all in the a subspecies. Some variation, -I- 3 especially for HLis found in Asian and New World populations. Tables 4-7...East Africa. Evoluion 33, 287-295.. Tabaohnibk, W.J. & Powell, J.R. (1978). Genetic structure of the East African domestic populations of Aedes a

  3. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  4. Prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives.

  5. Breast disease with skin thickening: differential diagnosis with mammography and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Rok; Kim, Hak Hee; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Hye Seong; Kim, Ki Tae; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    Diffuse skin thickening of the breast is produced by lymphedema usually secondary to obstruction of the axillary lymphatics. On physical examination, the affected breast is, due to increased fluid content, larger, heavier, and of higher overall density. Mammography reveals an increased coarse reticular pattern. Thickening of the skin can have many causes. It may be a result of tumor invasion or a tumor in the dermal lymphatics ; or because of lymphatic congestion through obstruction of lymphatic drainage within the breast, in the axilla, or centrally in the mediastinum. Further causes may be congestive heart failure, benign inflammation, primary skin processes such as psoriasis, or systemic diseases which involve the skin. Mammographic appearance is known to be nonspecific. Ultrasound can demonstrate skin thickening directly, but despite some reports suggesting that the cause of skin thickening can be inferred from the results of ultrasound, this is not usually of practical importance. The purpose of this study is to review the causes of skin thickening of the breast and to use mammography and US to differentiate the causes.

  6. New IBD genetics: common pathways with other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, C W; Barrett, J C; Parkes, M; Satsangi, J

    2011-12-01

    Complex disease genetics has been revolutionised in recent years by the advent of genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have seen notable successes culminating in the discovery of 99 published susceptibility loci/genes (71 Crohn's disease; 47 ulcerative colitis) to date. Approximately one-third of loci described confer susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Amongst these are multiple genes involved in IL23/Th17 signalling (IL23R, IL12B, JAK2, TYK2 and STAT3), IL10, IL1R2, REL, CARD9, NKX2.3, ICOSLG, PRDM1, SMAD3 and ORMDL3. The evolving genetic architecture of IBD has furthered our understanding of disease pathogenesis. For Crohn's disease, defective processing of intracellular bacteria has become a central theme, following gene discoveries in autophagy and innate immunity (associations with NOD2, IRGM, ATG16L1 are specific to Crohn's disease). Genetic evidence has also demonstrated the importance of barrier function to the development of ulcerative colitis (HNF4A, LAMB1, CDH1 and GNA12). However, when the data are analysed in more detail, deeper themes emerge including the shared susceptibility seen with other diseases. Many immune-mediated diseases overlap in this respect, paralleling the reported epidemiological evidence. However, in several cases the reported shared susceptibility appears at odds with the clinical picture. Examples include both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review we will detail the presently available data on the genetic overlap between IBD and other diseases. The discussion will be informed by the epidemiological data in the published literature and the implications for pathogenesis and therapy will be outlined. This arena will move forwards very quickly in the next few years. Ultimately, we anticipate that these genetic insights will transform the landscape of common complex diseases such as IBD.

  7. Human genetics of infectious diseases: a unified theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the dominant paradigm in the human genetics of infectious diseases postulates that rare monogenic immunodeficiencies confer vulnerability to multiple infectious diseases (one gene, multiple infections), whereas common infections are associated with the polygenic inheritance of multiple susceptibility genes (one infection, multiple genes). Recent studies, since 1996 in particular, have challenged this view. A newly recognised group of primary immunodeficiencies predisposing the individual to a principal or single type of infection is emerging. In parallel, several common infections have been shown to reflect the inheritance of one major susceptibility gene, at least in some populations. This novel causal relationship (one gene, one infection) blurs the distinction between patient-based Mendelian genetics and population-based complex genetics, and provides a unified conceptual frame for exploring the molecular genetic basis of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:17255931

  8. Genetic Testing for Complex Diseases: a Simulation Study Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Vinh, Nguyen Xuan

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized nowadays that complex diseases are caused by, amongst the others, multiple genetic factors. The recent advent of genome-wide association study (GWA) has triggered a wave of research aimed at discovering genetic factors underlying common complex diseases. While the number of reported susceptible genetic variants is increasing steadily, the application of such findings into diseases prognosis for the general population is still unclear, and there are doubts about whether the size of the contribution by such factors is significant. In this respect, some recent simulation-based studies have shed more light to the prospect of genetic tests. In this report, we discuss several aspects of simulation-based studies: their parameters, their assumptions, and the information they provide.

  9. Genetics of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: An Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jharna Puppala; Siva Prasad Siddapuram; Jyothy Akka; Anjana Munshi

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world today.Its incidence in adults and children is rising rapidly due to the ongoing epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes.Hence,it has become a global public health issue.Environmental factors have been found to play a major role in the etiology of NAFLD,especially for genetically susceptible populations.Among these,one of the most important factors is junk food,especially the typical "Western-style" diet rich in simple carbohydrates,saturated fat,and highly processed food materials.Genetic predisposition to NAFLD does occur; however,a precise definition of genetic factors responsible for NAFLD is still lacking.Specific variants of different genes have been shown to present a risk for NAFLD.Genetic studies might be helpful in the management of the disease by developing novel treatment strategies based on individual's genotype.

  10. Skin-impedance in Fabry Disease: A prospective, controlled, non-randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidicker Jeffrey R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated improved sweating after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in Fabry disease using the thermo-regularity sweat and quantitative sudomotor axon reflex tests. Skin-impedance, a measure skin-moisture (sweating, has been used in the clinical evaluation of burns and pressure ulcers using the portable dynamic dermal impedance monitor (DDIM system. Methods We compared skin impedance measurements in hemizygous patients with Fabry disease (22 post 3-years of bi-weekly ERT and 5 ERT naive and 22 healthy controls. Force compensated skin-moisture values were used for statistical analysis. Outcome measures included 1 moisture reading of the 100th repetitive reading, 2 rate of change, 3 average of 60–110th reading and 4 overall average of all readings. Results All outcome measures showed a significant difference in skin-moisture between Fabry patients and control subjects (p Conclusion The instrument portability, ease of its use, a relatively short time required for the assessment, and the fact that DDIM system was able to detect the difference in skin-moisture renders the instrument a useful clinical tool.

  11. Investigation of the Genetics of Hematologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes; Erythrocyte Disorder; Leukocyte Disorder; Hemostasis; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Sickle Cell Disease; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Congenital Thrombocytopenia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Fanconi Anemia

  12. Narrowband Ultraviolet B Treatment in Skin Diseases Beyond Vitiligo, Psoriasis and Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Seçkin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Narrowband ultraviolet B, with its nonspecific immunmodulatuar actions, is a potential treatment alternative in many skin diseases. Various studies have shown its effects in psoriasis and vitiligo, treatment protocols have been developed especially for psoriasis. Apart from these, narrowband ultraviolet B is used as first-line therapy in skin conditions that are common in clinical practice. However, its efficacies in such diseases are not very well-known. The effects of narrowband ultraviolet B in atopic dermatitis, pityriasis lichenoides, lichen planus, pruritus, chronic urticaria, symptomatic dermographism and polymorphic light eruption are discussed here in light of the literature data.

  13. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  14. Psoriasis patients are enriched for genetic variants that protect against HIV-1 disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyan Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis.

  15. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Farber disease overlapping with stiff skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Background: Farber Disease (MIM 228000)1 is a rare AR disorder first de- scribed by Sidney ... Aim of the Study: Diagnosis and clarification of overlapping in the clinical .... pochromic anemia with anisocytosis, .... a new approach to treatment.

  17. Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy The sometimes deadly conditions cost $75 billion in 2013, report says To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this ...

  18. Genetic Correction of Stem Cells in the Treatment of Inherited Diseases and Focus on Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  19. Visual loss and presumed pseudoxanthoma elasticum confirmed with genetic analysis but not with skin examination and biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aerts, Carolien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report of a patient with angioid streaks, peau d’orange, comet tail lesions, choroidal neovascularisation and presumed pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE. PXE was confirmed by gene analysis but not by skin biopsies. Methods: Case report of a patient with angioid streaks identified at age 21 and follow-up till age 43 with repeated fluorescein angiography (FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Dermatologic examination, skin biopsies and genetical analysis performed to confirm suspected diagnosis of PXE. Results: At age 43, no specific skin lesions were identified and 3 biopsies could not confirm PXE. Genetic analysis showed a homozygous mutation in the ABCC6 gene and confirmed the diagnosis of PXE. Conclusions: This case illustrates that in patients with angioid streaks having strong ocular indicators of PXE, confirmation of PXE can be obtained not only with dermatologic examination and skin biopsies, but also with genetic analysis. PXE associated mutations can be detected occasionally in biopsy negative patients and for this reason are extremely helpful in confirming a suspected diagnosis.

  20. Diagnostics and genetics in coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, V.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311395724

    2009-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an auto-immune disease triggered by ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. In susceptible individuals the ingestion of gluten triggers an auto-immune reaction, giving chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, and generally resulting in

  1. Diagnostics and genetics in coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an auto-immune disease triggered by ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. In susceptible individuals the ingestion of gluten triggers an auto-immune reaction, giving chronic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa, and generally resulting in villo

  2. Genetics Home Reference: CLN6 disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CLN6 disease is an inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. The signs and symptoms of this condition typically begin between early and late childhood, but sometimes they can appear in adulthood. Most children with CLN6 disease initially experience the ...

  3. Mitochondrial proteome evolution and genetic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynen, M.A.; Hollander, M. de; Szklarczyk, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential organelle, not only to the human cell, but to all eukaryotic life. This essentiality is reflected in the large number of mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins that lead to disease. Aside from their relevance to disease, mitochondria are, given their endosym

  4. Skin-Based DNA Repair Phenotype for Cancer Risk from GCR in Genetically Diverse Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiet, Elodie; Viger, Louise; Snijders, Antoine; Costes, Sylvian V.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation remains a mission-critical challenge for NASA radiation health scientists and mission planners. Epidemiological data are lacking and risk methods do not take individual radiation sensitivity into account. In our approach we hypothesize that genetic factors strongly influence risk of cancer from space radiation and that biomarkers reflecting DNA damage and cell death are ideal tools to predict risk and monitor potential health effects post-flight. At this workshop, we will be reporting the work we have done over the first 9 months of this proposal. Skin cells from 15 different strains of mice already characterized for radiation-induced cancer sensitivity (B6C3F; BALB/cByJ, C57BL/6J, CBA/CaJ, C3H/HeMsNrsf), and 10 strains from the DOE collaborative cross-mouse model were expanded from ear biopsy and cultivated until Passage 3. On average, 3 males and 3 females for each strain were expanded and frozen for further characterization at the NSRL beam line during the NSRL16C run for three LET (350 MeV/n Si, 350 MeV/n Ar and 600 MeV/n Fe) and two ion fluences (1 and 3 particles per cell). The mice work has established new metrics for the usage of Radiation Induced Foci as a marker for various aspect of DNA repair deficiencies. In year 2, we propose to continue characterization of the mouse lines with low LET to identify loci specific to high- versus low- LET and establish genetic linkage for the various DNA repair biomarkers. Correlation with cancer risk from each animals strain and gender will also be investigated. On the human side, we will start characterizing the DNA damage response induced ex-vivo in 200 human's blood donors for radiation sensitivity with a tentative 500 donors by the end of this project. All ex-vivo phenotypic data will be correlated to genetic characterization of each individual human donors using SNP arrays characterization as done for mice. Similarly, ex-vivo phenotypic features from mice will

  5. Genetic studies of Crohn's disease: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jimmy Z; Anderson, Carl A

    2014-06-01

    The exact aetiology of Crohn's disease is unknown, though it is clear from early epidemiological studies that a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors contributes to an individual's disease susceptibility. Here, we review the history of gene-mapping studies of Crohn's disease, from the linkage-based studies that first implicated the NOD2 locus, through to modern-day genome-wide association studies that have discovered over 140 loci associated with Crohn's disease and yielded novel insights into the biological pathways underlying pathogenesis. We describe on-going and future gene-mapping studies that utilise next generation sequencing technology to pinpoint causal variants and identify rare genetic variation underlying Crohn's disease risk. We comment on the utility of genetic markers for predicting an individual's disease risk and discuss their potential for identifying novel drug targets and influencing disease management. Finally, we describe how these studies have shaped and continue to shape our understanding of the genetic architecture of Crohn's disease.

  6. Host genetics and population structure effects on parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Criscione, Charles D; VandeBerg, John L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Williams, Kimberly D; Subedi, Janardan; Kent, Jack W; Williams, Jeff; Kumar, Satish; Blangero, John

    2012-03-19

    Host genetic factors exert significant influences on differential susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In addition, population structure of both host and parasite may influence disease distribution patterns. In this study, we assess the effects of population structure on infectious disease in two populations in which host genetic factors influencing susceptibility to parasitic disease have been extensively studied. The first population is the Jirel population of eastern Nepal that has been the subject of research on the determinants of differential susceptibility to soil-transmitted helminth infections. The second group is a Brazilian population residing in an area endemic for Trypanosoma cruzi infection that has been assessed for genetic influences on differential disease progression in Chagas disease. For measures of Ascaris worm burden, within-population host genetic effects are generally more important than host population structure factors in determining patterns of infectious disease. No significant influences of population structure on measures associated with progression of cardiac disease in individuals who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were found.

  7. Studying the genetics of Hirschsprung's disease : unraveling an oligogenic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, AS; Oostra, BA; Hofstra, RMW

    2005-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease is characterized by the absence of ganglion cells in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the gastrointestinal tract. Genetic dissection was successful as nine genes and four loci for Hirschsprung's disease susceptibility were identified. Different approaches were used to

  8. A genetic-epidemiologic study of Alzheimer’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia and thus is a major public-health problem. Age and genetic predisposition to the disease are the most important risk factors. In 2001 more than 24 million people in the western world had dementia. This number is expected to

  9. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient population. Simulation was done by assigning various allele frequencies and allelic relative risks for different mode of genetic inheritance. In general, for achieving a power estimate of 80%, the sample sizes needed for dizygotic and monozygotic twin cases were one half and one fourth of the sample size of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  10. Immunofluorescence patterns in selected dermatoses, including blistering skin diseases utilizing multiple fluorochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders represent a heterogeneous group of dermatoses whose diagnosis is made based on clinical history, histologic features, and immunopathologic features. The most commonly used techniques for the diagnosis of these diseases are direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF, including salt-split processing. NaCl split skin is used to determine the level of blister formation, and the localization of autoantibodies relative to the split. Classically, immunofluorescence has been performed with one fluorochrome in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Aims: To compare DIF and IIF of the skin, using a single fluorochrome versus multiple fluorochromes. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 autoimmune skin disease cases using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC alone, in comparison to multiple fluorochromes (with or without DNA counterstaining. Results: The use of multiple fluorochromes helped to simultaneously visualize reactivity in multiple skin areas, in contrast to using FITC alone. Conclusions: Using multiple fluorochromes allows simultaneous labeling of two or more antigens within the same cell/or tissue section, assists in colocalization of unknown antigens with known molecules, and helps in ruling out "background" staining.

  11. Genetic Testing for Respiratory Disease: Are We There Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Paré

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genome project promised a revolution in health care – the development of ‘personalized medicine’, where knowledge of an individual’s genetic code enables the prediction of risk for specific diseases and the potential to alter that risk based on preventive measures and lifestyle modification. The present brief review provides a report card on the progress toward that goal with respect to respiratory disease. Should generalized population screening for genetic risk factors for respiratory disease be instituted? Or not?

  12. Diagnosis by numbers: defining skin disease pathogenesis through collated gene signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Amr; McGrath, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disease gene expression profiles can be utilized as biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and targeted therapeutic purposes, although individual data sets may be of limited generic value. To develop broader clinical relevance from disease gene signatures, Inkeles et al. demonstrate how mining publically available microarray data from a range of skin disorders can elucidate disease pathways, generate a multi-disease classifier, and identify potential therapeutic targets. This integrative molecular classification and functional analysis offers a new approach to understanding disease pathogenesis, with significant implications for diagnostics and the development of personalized medicine.

  13. Genetic basis of common diseases: the general theory of Mendelian recessive genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Michael; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Lebedev, Sergey; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Common diseases tend to appear sporadically, i.e., they appear in an individual who has no first or second degree relatives with the disease. Yet diseases are often associated with a slight but definite increase in risk to the children of an affected individual. This weak pattern of inheritability cannot be explained by conventional interpretations of Mendelian genetics, and it is therefore commonly held that there is "incomplete penetrance" of a gene, or that there are polygenic, or multifactorial modes of inheritance. However, such arguments are heuristic and lack predictive power. Here, we explore the possibility that "incomplete penetrance" means the existence of a second, disease-related, gene. By examining in detail a specific common condition, Parkinson's disease (PD), we show that the sporadic form of the disease can be fully explained by a compact fully penetrant genotype involving an interaction between two, and only two, genes. In this model, therefore PD is fundamentally genetic. Our digenic model is complementary to Mendelian recessive genetics, but taken together with the latter forms a complete description for recessive genetics on one chromosome. It explains the slight increase in risk to the children if one parent has sporadic PD, and makes strict predictions where both parents coincidentally have sporadic PD. These predictions were verified in two large and carefully selected kindred, where the data also argue against other genetic models, including oligogenic and polygenic schemes. Since the inheritance patterns of sporadic PD are reminiscent of what is seen in many common diseases, it is plausible that similar genetic forms could apply to other diseases. Seen in this light, diseases wash in and out of every family, so that in a sense, over time every human family is equally at risk for most diseases.

  14. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  15. Crohn’s Disease Localization Displays Different Predisposing Genetic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Fabrizio; Valvano, Maria Rosa; Corritore, Giuseppe; Latiano, Tiziana; Martino, Giuseppina; D’Incà, Renata; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Pastore, Maria; D’Altilia, Mario; Scimeca, Daniela; Biscaglia, Giuseppe; Andriulli, Angelo; Latiano, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease (CD) is a pathologic condition with different clinical expressions that may reflect an interplay between genetics and environmental factors. Recently, it has been highlighted that three genetic markers, NOD2, MHC and MST1, were associated to distinct CD sites, supporting the concept that genetic variations may contribute to localize CD. Genetic markers, previously shown to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), were tested in CD patients with the aim to better dissect the genetic relationship between ileal, ileocolonic and colonic CD and ascertain whether a different genetic background would support the three disease sites as independent entities. Methods A panel of 29 SNPs of 19 IBD loci were analyzed by TaqMan SNP allelic discrimination method both evaluating their distinct contribute and analyzing all markers jointly. Results Seven hundred and eight CD patients and 537 healthy controls were included in the study. Of the overall population of patients, 237 patients had an ileal involvement (L1), 171 a colonic localization (L2), and the 300 remaining an ileocolon location (L3). We confirmed the association for 23 of 29 variations (P < 0.05). Compared to healthy controls, 16 variations emerged as associated to an ileum disease, 7 with a colonic disease and 14 with an ileocolonic site (P < 0.05). Comparing ileum to colonic CD, 5 SNPs (17%) were differentially associated (P < 0.05). A genetic model score that aggregated the risks of 23 SNPs and their odds ratios (ORs), yielded an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.70 for the overall CD patients. By analyzing each CD location, the AUC remained at the same level for the ileal and ileocolonic sites (0.73 and 0.72, respectively), but dropped to a 0,66 value in patients with colon localization. Conclusions Our findings reaffirm the existence of at least three different subgroups of CD patients, with a genetic signature distinctive for the three main CD sites. PMID:28052082

  16. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chen; Bo Shen; Jia-Jia Xiao; Rong Wu; Sarah Jane Duff Canning; Xiao-Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson's disease (WD).Data Sources:We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic,ATP7B gene,gene mutation,genotype,phenotype.Study Selection:Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected.Results:Wilson's disease,also named hepatolenticular degeneration,is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by abnormal copper metabolism caused by mutations to the copper-transporting gene A TP7B.Decreased biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into apoceruloplasmin caused by defunctionalization of ATP7B protein lead to accumulation of copper in many tissues and organs,including liver,brain,and cornea,finally resulting in liver disease and extrapyramidal symptoms.It is the most common genetic neurological disorder in the onset of adolescents,second to muscular dystrophy in China.Early diagnosis and medical therapy are of great significance for improving the prognosis of WD patients.However,diagnosis of this disease is usually difficult because of its complicated phenotypes.In the last 10 years,an increasing number of clinical studies have used molecular genetics techniques.Improved diagnosis and prediction of the progression of this disease at the molecular level will aid in the development of more individualized and effective interventions,which is a key to transition from molecular genetic research to the clinical study.Conclusions:Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype.Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients.

  17. Autonomic skin responses in females with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Bach, Flemming W.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    dysfunction. This study examined peripheral autonomic nerve function in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex and age-matched controls by measuring (1) sweat production following acetylcholine challenge; (2) the sympathetically mediated vasoconstrictor responses to inspiratory gasp, stress......, and the cold pressor test; and (3) cutaneous blood flow following capsaicin. The vasoconstrictor response to inspiratory gasp was increased in Fabry patients compared to controls (p = 0.03), while the response to cold and mental stress did not change. Female patients with Fabry disease had a reduced sweat...

  18. Prospect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Genetic Repair to Cure Genetic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Adiwinata Pawitan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In genetic diseases, where the cells are already damaged, the damaged cells can be replaced by new normal cells, which can be differentiated from iPSC. To avoid immune rejection, iPSC from the patient’s own cell can be developed. However, iPSC from the patients’s cell harbors the same genetic aberration. Therefore, before differentiating the iPSCs into required cells, genetic repair should be done. This review discusses the various technologies to repair the genetic aberration in patient-derived iPSC, or to prevent the genetic aberration to cause further damage in the iPSC-derived cells, such as Zn finger and TALE nuclease genetic editing, RNA interference technology, exon skipping, and gene transfer method. In addition, the challenges in using the iPSC and the strategies to manage the hurdles are addressed.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of beta-globin; this abnormality is called beta thalassemia . In people with sickle cell disease , at least ... globin. If mutations that produce hemoglobin S and beta thalassemia occur together, individuals have hemoglobin S- beta thalassemia (HbSBetaThal) ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Unverricht-Lundborg disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saukko P, Lahtinen U, Lehesjoki AE. Loss of lysosomal association of cystatin B proteins representing progressive myoclonus ... A, Biraben A, Buresi C, Malafosse A. FOunder effect in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease on reunion ...