WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetic privacy

  1. Genetic privacy: orthodoxy or oxymoron?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, A; English, V

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we question whether the concept of "genetic privacy" is a contradiction in terms. And, if so, whether the implications of such a conclusion, inevitably impact on how society comes to perceive privacy and responsibility generally. Current law and ethical discourse place a high value on self-determination and the rights of individuals. In the medical sphere, the recognition of patient "rights" has resulted in health professionals being given clear duties of candour and frankness. Dilemmas arise, however, when patients decline to know relevant information or, knowing it, refuse to share it with others who may also need to know. This paper considers the notions of interconnectedness and responsibility to others which are brought to the fore in the genetic sphere and which challenge the primacy afforded to personal autonomy. It also explores the extent to which an individual's perceived moral obligations can or should be enforced. PMID:10226920

  2. The Genetic Privacy Act and commentary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annas, G.J.; Glantz, L.H.; Roche, P.A.

    1995-02-28

    The Genetic Privacy Act is a proposal for federal legislation. The Act is based on the premise that genetic information is different from other types of personal information in ways that require special protection. Therefore, to effectively protect genetic privacy unauthorized collection and analysis of individually identifiable DNA must be prohibited. As a result, the premise of the Act is that no stranger should have or control identifiable DNA samples or genetic information about an individual unless that individual specifically authorizes the collection of DNA samples for the purpose of genetic analysis, authorized the creation of that private information, and has access to and control over the dissemination of that information.

  3. An overview of human genetic privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinghua; Wu, Xintao

    2017-01-01

    The study of human genomics is becoming a Big Data science, owing to recent biotechnological advances leading to availability of millions of personal genome sequences, which can be combined with biometric measurements from mobile apps and fitness trackers, and of human behavior data monitored from mobile devices and social media. With increasing research opportunities for integrative genomic studies through data sharing, genetic privacy emerges as a legitimate yet challenging concern that needs to be carefully addressed, not only for individuals but also for their families. In this paper, we present potential genetic privacy risks and relevant ethics and regulations for sharing and protecting human genomics data. We also describe the techniques for protecting human genetic privacy from three broad perspectives: controlled access, differential privacy, and cryptographic solutions. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, M.A. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  5. Genetic privacy and non-discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2011-01-01

    The UN Inter-Agency Committee on Bioethics met for its tenth meeting at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris on 4-5th March 2011. Member organisations such as the WHO and UNESCO were in attendance alongside associate members such as the Council for Europe, the European Commission, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Trade Organisation. Discussion centred on the theme "genetic privacy and nondiscrimination". The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) had previously considered, from a legal and ethical perspective, the implications of increasingly sophisticated technologies for genetic privacy and non-discrimination in fields such as medicine, employment and insurance. Thus, the ECOSOC requested that UNESCO report on relevant developments in the field of genetic privacy and non-discrimination. In parallel with a consultation process with member states, UNESCO launched a consultation with the UN Interagency Committee on Bioethics. This article analyses the report presented by the author concerning the analysis of the current contentions in the field and illustrates attempts at responding on a normative level to a perceived threat to genetic privacy and non-discrimination.

  6. Genetic privacy in sports: clearing the hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Shawneequa

    2012-12-01

    As genomic medicine continues to advance and inform clinical care, knowledge gained is likely to influence sports medicine and training practices. Susceptibility to injury, sudden cardiac failure, and other serious conditions may one day be tackled on a subclinical level through genetic testing programs. In addition, athletes may increasingly consider using genetic testing services to maximize their performance potential. This paper assesses the role of privacy and genetic discrimination laws that would apply to athletes who engage in genetic testing and the limits of these protections.

  7. The Genetic Privacy Act and commentary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annas, G.J.; Glantz, L.H.; Roche, P.A.

    1995-02-28

    The Genetic Privacy Act is a proposal for federal legislation. The Act is based on the premise that genetic information is different from other types of personal information in ways that require special protection. The DNA molecule holds an extensive amount of currently indecipherable information. The major goal of the Human Genome Project is to decipher this code so that the information it contains is accessible. The privacy question is, accessible to whom? The highly personal nature of the information contained in DNA can be illustrated by thinking of DNA as containing an individual`s {open_quotes}future diary.{close_quotes} A diary is perhaps the most personal and private document a person can create. It contains a person`s innermost thoughts and perceptions, and is usually hidden and locked to assure its secrecy. Diaries describe the past. The information in one`s genetic code can be thought of as a coded probabilistic future diary because it describes an important part of a unique and personal future. This document presents an introduction to the proposal for federal legislation `the Genetic Privacy Act`; a copy of the proposed act; and comment.

  8. Disentangling privacy from property: toward a deeper understanding of genetic privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Sonia M

    2004-04-01

    With the mapping of the human genome, genetic privacy has become a concern to many. People care about genetic privacy because genes play an important role in shaping us--our genetic information is about us, and it is deeply connected to our sense of ourselves. In addition, unwanted disclosure of our genetic information, like a great deal of other personal information, makes us vulnerable to unwanted exposure, stigmatization, and discrimination. One recent approach to protecting genetic privacy is to create property rights in genetic information. This Article argues against that approach. Privacy and property are fundamentally different concepts. At heart, the term "property" connotes control within the marketplace and over something that is disaggregated or alienable from the self. "Privacy," in contrast, connotes control over access to the self as well as things close to, intimately connected to, and about the self. Given these different meanings, a regime of property rights in genetic information would impoverish our understanding of that information, ourselves, and the relationships we hope will be built around and through its disclosure. This Article explores our interests in genetic information in order to deepen our understanding of the ongoing discourse about the distinction between property and privacy. It develops a conception of genetic privacy with a strong relational component. We ordinarily share genetic information in the context of relationships in which disclosure is important to the relationship--family, intimate, doctor-patient, researcher-participant, employer-employee, and insurer-insured relationships. Such disclosure makes us vulnerable to and dependent on the person to whom we disclose it. As a result, trust is essential to the integrity of these relationships and our sharing of genetic information. Genetic privacy can protect our vulnerability in these relationships and enhance the trust we hope to have in them. Property, in contrast, by

  9. Regulating genetic privacy in the online health information era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Roger S

    2002-01-01

    As the clinical implications of the genetic components of disease come to be better understood, there is likely to be a significant increase in the volume of genetic information held within clinical records. As patient health care records, in turn, come on-line as part of broader health information networks, there is likely to be considerable pressure in favour of special laws protecting genetic privacy. This paper reviews some of the privacy challenges posed by electronic health records, some government initiatives in this area, and notes the impact that developments in genetic testing will have upon the 'genetic content' of e-health records. Despite the sensitivity of genetic information, the paper argues against a policy of 'genetic exceptionalism', and its implications for genetic privacy laws.

  10. Privacy and intra-familiy communication of genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Helena

    2004-01-01

    The new knowledge (and predictions) created by DNA tests and the family nature of genetic information has already lead to a new problem: the intra-familiar communication of genetic data. This raises questions such as the following. Is there a duty to inform in cases when treatment is possible and the patient does not permit disclosure of genetic results to relatives? Is there an obligation to warn or merely an authorization (that could be used or not)? Could privacy protection be maintain as an individual interest but with some justified violations? A balance needs to be establishes between the interest of privacy and the need to disclose secret information.

  11. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, M.A. [ed.

    1998-09-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  12. Genetic information, non-discrimination, and privacy protections in genetic counseling practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Anya E R; Roche, Myra I

    2014-12-01

    The passage of the Genetic Information Non Discrimination Act (GINA) was hailed as a pivotal achievement that was expected to calm the fears of both patients and research participants about the potential misuse of genetic information. However, 6 years later, patient and provider awareness of legal protections at both the federal and state level remains discouragingly low, thereby, limiting their potential effectiveness. The increasing demand for genetic testing will expand the number of individuals and families who could benefit from obtaining accurate information about the privacy and anti-discriminatory protections that GINA and other laws extend. In this paper we describe legal protections that are applicable to individuals seeking genetic counseling, review the literature on patient and provider fears of genetic discrimination and examine their awareness and understandings of existing laws, and summarize how genetic counselors currently discuss genetic discrimination. We then present three genetic counseling cases to illustrate issues of genetic discrimination and provide relevant information on applicable legal protections. Genetic counselors have an unprecedented opportunity, as well as the professional responsibility, to disseminate accurate knowledge about existing legal protections to their patients. They can strengthen their effectiveness in this role by achieving a greater knowledge of current protections including being able to identify specific steps that can help protect genetic information.

  13. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D.; Plis, Sergey M.; Turner, Jessica A.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the “small N” problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However, some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs) which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries—the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy. PMID:24778614

  14. Preempting genetic discrimination and assaults on privacy: report of a symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinaman, Aileen; Bain, Lisa J; Shoulson, Ira

    2003-08-01

    At a symposium in June, 2002, biomedical researchers, clinicians, legal experts, policymakers, and representatives of the insurance industry and the advocacy community gathered to address issues of genetic privacy and discrimination; and to identify research, legal, and policy gaps needing to be filled. They concluded that over the next decade, as more genetic information becomes available and the public becomes more aware of individual risks, concerns about privacy and discrimination will become increasingly important. Documented cases of genetic discrimination are rare and largely anecdotal, yet individuals with genetic conditions harbor significant fears about discrimination. Current laws enacted to protect individuals from workplace and insurance discrimination offer some measure of protection, but leave many unfilled gaps. Moreover, the use of genetic information in potentially discriminatory ways is not limited to employment and insurability. Existing laws do little to protect people seeking life, disability, or long-term care insurance. And the courts have used genetic information in a wide variety of cases including paternity, criminal, and tort (personal injury) cases. Genetic information that might jeopardize an individual's right to privacy may also be obtained in the course of research studies, including through the collection of DNA and tissue samples. The insurance industry, State and Federal agencies, and the advocacy community are all making efforts to address some of these gaps through legislation and education of clinicians, the public, and policy makers.

  15. The privacy of Tutankhamen--utilising the genetic information in stored tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, S

    2001-09-01

    Recent technical developments in genetic testing has led to a situation where the DNA in previously stored tissue samples can be extracted and used for genetic analysis. This raises the question of how to decide whether a specific use of such samples should be allowed. Using the genetic testing of ancient DNA in general, and the DNA of the pharaoh Tutankhamen in particular as examples this paper analyses the question. It investigates whether ethical frameworks based on proxy consent, cultural affiliation, ownership, or the privacy rights of the dead are appropriate and justifiable in this context. The conclusion is that frameworks based on proxy consent, cultural affiliation, and ownership are not very useful.

  16. Between personal and relational privacy: understanding the work of informed consent in cancer genetics in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldim, José Roberto; Gibbon, Sahra

    2015-07-01

    Drawing from perspectives of both bioethics and anthropology, this article explores how the boundaries between personal and relational privacy are negotiated by patients and practitioners in the context of an emerging domain of cancer genetics in Brazil. It reflects on the place of informed consent in the history of bioethics in North America in contrast to the development of bioethics in Brazil and the particular social cultural context in which consent is sought in Brazilian public health care. Making use of empirical research with families and individuals receiving genetic counselling related to increased genetic risk for cancer, in genetic clinics in southern Brazil, it examines how informed consent is linked to the necessary movement between personal and relational privacy. The paper illustrates the value of a particular tool known as a 'sociogram' to examine the complex interpersonal dynamics that arise in negotiating informed consent at the interface between the family and the individual in Brazil. The paper, therefore, points to the scope of further interdisciplinary exchanges between anthropology and bioethics, confronting the new challenges that arise in the context of medical genetics in developing country.

  17. Privacy and confidentiality measures in genetic testing and counselling: arguing on genetic exceptionalism again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Magdalena M; Witt, Michał P

    2016-11-01

    Medical confidentiality in clinical genetics poses an important question about its scope, which would be in line with professional ethics and simple honesty. It is already known that the maintenance of absolute anonymity, bearing in mind the current progress of genetic techniques, is virtually impossible. On the other hand, our insight into the information contained in the human genome is increasing. This mini-review presents the authors' standpoint regarding this complex and difficult issue.

  18. Modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Enforcement, and Breach Notification rules under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; other modifications to the HIPAA rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS or ``the Department'') is issuing this final rule to: Modify the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy, Security, and Enforcement Rules to implement statutory amendments under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (``the HITECH Act'' or ``the Act'') to strengthen the privacy and security protection for individuals' health information; modify the rule for Breach Notification for Unsecured Protected Health Information (Breach Notification Rule) under the HITECH Act to address public comment received on the interim final rule; modify the HIPAA Privacy Rule to strengthen the privacy protections for genetic information by implementing section 105 of Title I of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA); and make certain other modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Breach Notification, and Enforcement Rules (the HIPAA Rules) to improve their workability and effectiveness and to increase flexibility for and decrease burden on the regulated entities.

  19. Location Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  20. What was privacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Lew

    2008-10-01

    Why is that question in the past tense? Because individuals can no longer feel confident that the details of their lives--from identifying numbers to cultural preferences--will be treated with discretion rather than exploited. Even as Facebook users happily share the names of their favorite books, movies, songs, and brands, they often regard marketers' use of that information as an invasion of privacy. In this wide-ranging essay, McCreary, a senior editor at HBR, examines numerous facets of the privacy issue, from Google searches, public shaming on the internet, and cell phone etiquette to passenger screening devices, public surveillance cameras, and corporate chief privacy officers. He notes that IBM has been a leader on privacy; its policy forswearing the use of employees' genetic information in hiring and benefits decisions predated the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act by three years. Now IBM is involved in an open-source project known as Higgins to provide users with transportable, potentially anonymous online presences. Craigslist, whose CEO calls it "as close to 100% user driven as you can get," has taken an extremely conservative position on privacy--perhaps easier for a company with a declared lack of interest in maximizing revenue. But TJX and other corporate victims of security breaches have discovered that retaining consumers' transaction information can be both costly and risky. Companies that underestimate the importance of privacy to their customers or fail to protect it may eventually face harsh regulation, reputational damage, or both. The best thing they can do, says the author, is negotiate directly with those customers over where to draw the line.

  1. Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  2. Concentrated Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dwork, Cynthia; Rothblum, Guy N.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Concentrated Differential Privacy, a relaxation of Differential Privacy enjoying better accuracy than both pure differential privacy and its popular "(epsilon,delta)" relaxation without compromising on cumulative privacy loss over multiple computations.

  3. Fundamental right to freedom of genetic research and the protection of personal data: the principles of prevention and precaution to guarantee the right to privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Linden Ruaro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews fundamental rights of freedom of research and protection of personal data in the field of human genetics, it proposes the application of the precautionary principle of prevention. Evaluates the Brazilian legislation on the subject matter of research as to guarantee privacy measure of personal data and information collected in scientific research, a situation that worsens in the middle in digital and virtual world because it is a space virtually rapid development. Focuses on the limitation of fundamental rights, based on the conception that are not absolute. It proposes the principles of precaution and prevention among virtual environment. The deductive and dialectical methods are adopted, having premised most fundamental rights related and under Brazilian law; the dialectical method was used because the issue is the subject of constant debate is necessary confrontation of doctrinal currents and the Brazilian legislation.

  4. Privacy transparency patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljee B.I.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two privacy patterns for creating privacy transparency: the Personal Data Table pattern and the Privacy Policy Icons pattern, as well as a full overview of privacy transparency patterns. It is a first step in creating a full set of privacy design patterns, which will aid

  5. Privacy transparency patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljee B.I.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two privacy patterns for creating privacy transparency: the Personal Data Table pattern and the Privacy Policy Icons pattern, as well as a full overview of privacy transparency patterns. It is a first step in creating a full set of privacy design patterns, which will aid softwar

  6. From Data Privacy to Location Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Ling

    Over the past decade, the research on data privacy has achieved considerable advancement in the following two aspects: First, a variety of privacy threat models and privacy principles have been proposed, aiming at providing sufficient protection against different types of inference attacks; Second, a plethora of algorithms and methods have been developed to implement the proposed privacy principles, while attempting to optimize the utility of the resulting data. The first part of the chapter presents an overview of data privacy research by taking a close examination at the achievements from the above two aspects, with the objective of pinpointing individual research efforts on the grand map of data privacy protection. As a special form of data privacy, location privacy possesses its unique characteristics. In the second part of the chapter, we examine the research challenges and opportunities of location privacy protection, in a perspective analogous to data privacy. Our discussion attempts to answer the following three questions: (1) Is it sufficient to apply the data privacy models and algorithms developed to date for protecting location privacy? (2) What is the current state of the research on location privacy? (3) What are the open issues and technical challenges that demand further investigation? Through answering these questions, we intend to provide a comprehensive review of the state of the art in location privacy research.

  7. Common Privacy Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information home > privacy + phrs > common privacy myths Common Privacy Myths With the new federal laws protecting ... Here are the truths to some of the common myths: Health information cannot be faxed – FALSE Your ...

  8. Semantic Security: Privacy Definitions Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Jinfei Liu; Li Xiong; Jun Luo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate a privacy framework named Indistinguishabley Privacy. Indistinguishable privacy could be deemed as the formalization of the existing privacy definitions in privacy preserving data publishing as well as secure multi-party computation. We introduce three representative privacy notions in the literature, Bayes-optimal privacy for privacy preserving data publishing, differential privacy for statistical data release, and privacy w.r.t. semi-honest behavior in the secure...

  9. Privacy og selvbeskrivelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengaard, Hans Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    En beskrivelse af feltet for forskning i Privacy med særligt henblik på privacys betydning for muligheden for at styre sin egen selvbeskrivelse......En beskrivelse af feltet for forskning i Privacy med særligt henblik på privacys betydning for muligheden for at styre sin egen selvbeskrivelse...

  10. Privacy vs security

    CERN Document Server

    Stalla-Bourdillon, Sophie; Ryan, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Securing privacy in the current environment is one of the great challenges of today's democracies. Privacy vs. Security explores the issues of privacy and security and their complicated interplay, from a legal and a technical point of view. Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon provides a thorough account of the legal underpinnings of the European approach to privacy and examines their implementation through privacy, data protection and data retention laws. Joshua Philips and Mark D. Ryan focus on the technological aspects of privacy, in particular, on today's attacks on privacy by the simple use of today'

  11. A typology of privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Bert Jaap; Newell, Bryce; Timan, Tjerk; Skorvánek, Ivan; Chokrevski, Tomislav; Galič, Maša

    2017-01-01

    Despite the difficulty of capturing the nature and boundaries of privacy, it is important to conceptualize it. Some scholars develop unitary theories of privacy in the form of a unified conceptual core; others offer classifications of privacy that make meaningful distinctions between different types

  12. Privacy and Social Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Roessler; D. Mokrosinska

    2013-01-01

    This article joins in and extends the contemporary debate on the right to privacy. We bring together two strands of the contemporary discourse on privacy. While we endorse the prevailing claim that norms of informational privacy protect the autonomy of individual subjects, we supplement it with an a

  13. Privacy encounters in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Bøge, Ask Risom; Danholt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Privacy is a major concern when new technologies are introduced between public authorities and private citizens. What is meant by privacy, however, is often unclear and contested. Accordingly, this article utilises grounded theory to study privacy empirically in the research and design project...... Teledialogue aimed at introducing new ways for public case managers and placed children to communicate through IT. The resulting argument is that privacy can be understood as an encounter, that is, as something that arises between implicated actors and entails some degree of friction and negotiation....... An argument which is further qualified through the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. The article opens with a review of privacy literature before continuing to present privacy as an encounter with five different foci: what technologies bring into the encounter; who is related to privacy by implication; what...

  14. 75 FR 63703 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... CFR Part 261a Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal...) is issuing a final rule to amend its regulation implementing the Privacy Act of 1974 (Privacy Act..., and applicants for Board employment, for access to their records under the Privacy Act; the amendment...

  15. Choose Privacy Week: Educate Your Students (and Yourself) about Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Helen R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of "Choose Privacy Week" is to encourage a national conversation to raise awareness of the growing threats to personal privacy online and in day-to-day life. The 2016 Choose Privacy Week theme is "respecting individuals' privacy," with an emphasis on minors' privacy. A plethora of issues relating to minors' privacy…

  16. Fetal privacy and confidentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, J R

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of new and better contraceptive methods and the ability to facilitate and manipulate fertilization and gestation, couples will gain greater control over their fertility. Once a pregnancy has been established or an in vitro embryo created, the ability to evaluate the embryo and fetus will increase dramatically with progress in human genetic research. Preconception and preimplantation genetic testing and screening are now possible, and the technology to perform prenatal screening early in gestation is advancing rapidly. Nonsurgical methods facilitate induced abortion with a relatively lower degree of trauma upon the woman undergoing the procedure. These capabilities may all be used to enable and even encourage the genetic selection of future children. Despite the ethical concerns associated with prenatal testing and abortion, these services will continue to be an integral aspect of reproductive medicine. As technology advances, however, it will be possible to test and screen for conditions which do not produce serious defects. Genetic conditions which produce relatively mild impacts upon health will be identifiable in the embryo or fetus, while late-onset conditions and genetic factors which have only a probability of affecting health will also be located in the fetal genome. Prospective parents may therefore soon have the capability of selecting their most desirable embryo in vitro, or terminating all undesirable fetuses in vivo until the preferred child is delivered. The medical profession must take some responsibility for establishing guidelines on the use of reproductive technology. The standards of practice for the medical profession must reflect the results of a broad social debate over competing moral values. The author develops an argument for legal and ethical limitations on the application of prenatal testing and screening technology, suggesting that for some medical conditions, respect for the privacy and confidentiality of the fetus

  17. Participatory Privacy: Enabling Privacy in Participatory Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    De Cristofaro, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    Participatory Sensing is an emerging computing paradigm that enables the distributed collection of data by self-selected participants. It allows the increasing number of mobile phone users to share local knowledge acquired by their sensor-equipped devices, e.g., to monitor temperature, pollution level or consumer pricing information. While research initiatives and prototypes proliferate, their real-world impact is often bounded to comprehensive user participation. If users have no incentive, or feel that their privacy might be endangered, it is likely that they will not participate. In this article, we focus on privacy protection in Participatory Sensing and introduce a suitable privacy-enhanced infrastructure. First, we provide a set of definitions of privacy requirements for both data producers (i.e., users providing sensed information) and consumers (i.e., applications accessing the data). Then, we propose an efficient solution designed for mobile phone users, which incurs very low overhead. Finally, we di...

  18. Privacy, Democracy and Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Lever, Annabelle

    2013-01-01

    How should we think about our claims to privacy and their relationship to security? Must we suppose that privacy should give way before the demands of security whenever the two cannot both be fully protected? This is the position presented by Sir David Omand on numerous occasions and, most recently, in his response to the revelations of Edward Snowden. However, this article shows, Omand's reasoning and conclusions are both problematic, as the protection of privacy is necessary to a democratic...

  19. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  20. Practical Privacy Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peen, Søren; Jansen, Thejs Willem; Jensen, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes a privacy assessment model called the Operational Privacy Assessment Model that includes organizational, operational and technical factors for the protection of personal data stored in an IT system. The factors can be evaluated in a simple scale so that not only the resulting...... graphical depiction can be easily created for an IT system, but graphical comparisons across multiple IT systems are also possible. Examples of factors presented in a Kiviat graph are also presented. This assessment tool may be used to standardize privacy assessment criteria, making it less painful...... for the management to assess privacy risks on their systems....

  1. Practical Privacy Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peen, Søren; Jansen, Thejs Willem; Jensen, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes a privacy assessment model called the Operational Privacy Assessment Model that includes organizational, operational and technical factors for the protection of personal data stored in an IT system. The factors can be evaluated in a simple scale so that not only the resulting...... graphical depiction can be easily created for an IT system, but graphical comparisons across multiple IT systems are also possible. Examples of factors presented in a Kiviat graph are also presented. This assessment tool may be used to standardize privacy assessment criteria, making it less painful...... for the management to assess privacy risks on their systems....

  2. Information Privacy Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Merri Beth

    2013-01-01

    Why is Information Privacy the focus of the January-February 2013 issue of "EDUCAUSE Review" and "EDUCAUSE Review Online"? Results from the 2012 annual survey of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) indicate that "meeting regulatory compliance requirements continues to be the top perceived driver…

  3. Privacy and Publicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An account and critical discussion of the European Court of Human Right's approach to the balancing of protecting publicity and privacy......An account and critical discussion of the European Court of Human Right's approach to the balancing of protecting publicity and privacy...

  4. Privacy for Sale?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, Jannick Kirk; Khajuria, Samant

    conditions, and those who reject the idea completely. Based on the literature we identify two positions to privacy either as an instrumental good, or as an intrinsic good. The paper positions vari- ous user perceptions on privacy that are relevant for future service develop- ment....

  5. Information Privacy Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Merri Beth

    2013-01-01

    Why is Information Privacy the focus of the January-February 2013 issue of "EDUCAUSE Review" and "EDUCAUSE Review Online"? Results from the 2012 annual survey of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) indicate that "meeting regulatory compliance requirements continues to be the top perceived driver…

  6. Privacy and Publicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2013-01-01

    An account and critical discussion of the European Court of Human Right's approach to the balancing of protecting publicity and privacy......An account and critical discussion of the European Court of Human Right's approach to the balancing of protecting publicity and privacy...

  7. Privacy Metrics and Boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper aims at defining a set of privacy metrics (quantitative and qualitative) in the case of the relation between a privacy protector ,and an information gatherer .The aims with such metrics are: -to allow to assess and compare different user scenarios and their differences; for ex

  8. Identity And Privacy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Katzan, Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Personal identity and privacy are important topics in information systems in general and data analytics in particular.  Normally associated with digital security, the scope of identity and privacy is much greater and affects most aspects of everyday life.  Related subjects are behavioral tracking, personal-identifiable information (PII, privacy data relevance, data repurposing, identity theft, and homeland security.  Identity and Privacy Services is an admixture of the major issues in the area of personal identity and privacy and the security of individual rights in a complex societal environment.  This is a general paper on this important subject, intended to give exposure to the constituent topics.

  9. Privacy under construction : A developmental perspective on privacy perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijn, W.M.P.; Vedder, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a developmental perspective regarding the difference in perceptions toward privacy between young and old. Here, we introduce the notion of privacy conceptions, that is, the specific ideas that individuals have regarding what privacy actually is. The differences in privacy concerns often f

  10. Scalable privacy-preserving data sharing methodology for genome-wide association studies: an application to iDASH healthcare privacy protection challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Ji, Zhanglong

    2014-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in genome-wide association study (GWAS) data privacy, the Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization and SHaring (iDASH) center organized the iDASH Healthcare Privacy Protection Challenge, with the aim of investigating the effectiveness of applying privacy-preserving methodologies to human genetic data. This paper is based on a submission to the iDASH Healthcare Privacy Protection Challenge. We apply privacy-preserving methods that are adapted from Uhler et al. 2013 and Yu et al. 2014 to the challenge's data and analyze the data utility after the data are perturbed by the privacy-preserving methods. Major contributions of this paper include new interpretation of the χ2 statistic in a GWAS setting and new results about the Hamming distance score, a key component for one of the privacy-preserving methods.

  11. Protecting patron privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Beckstrom, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In a world where almost anyone with computer savvy can hack, track, and record the online activities of others, your library can serve as a protected haven for your visitors who rely on the Internet to conduct research-if you take the necessary steps to safeguard their privacy. This book shows you how to protect patrons' privacy while using the technology that your library provides, including public computers, Internet access, wireless networks, and other devices. Logically organized into two major sections, the first part of the book discusses why the privacy of your users is of paramount

  12. Web Security, Privacy & Commerce

    CERN Document Server

    Garfinkel, Simson

    2011-01-01

    Since the first edition of this classic reference was published, World Wide Web use has exploded and e-commerce has become a daily part of business and personal life. As Web use has grown, so have the threats to our security and privacy--from credit card fraud to routine invasions of privacy by marketers to web site defacements to attacks that shut down popular web sites. Web Security, Privacy & Commerce goes behind the headlines, examines the major security risks facing us today, and explains how we can minimize them. It describes risks for Windows and Unix, Microsoft Internet Exp

  13. Privacy in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zheleva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis lecture provides a survey of work on privacy in online social networks (OSNs). This work encompasses concerns of users as well as service providers and third parties. Our goal is to approach such concerns from a computer-science perspective, and building upon existing work on privacy, security, statistical modeling and databases to provide an overview of the technical and algorithmic issues related to privacy in OSNs. We start our survey by introducing a simple OSN data model and describe common statistical-inference techniques that can be used to infer potentially sensitive inf

  14. Public opinion about the importance of privacy in biobank research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David J; Murphy-Bollinger, Juli; Scott, Joan; Hudson, Kathy L

    2009-11-01

    Concerns about privacy may deter people from participating in genetic research. Recruitment and retention of biobank participants requires understanding the nature and magnitude of these concerns. Potential participants in a proposed biobank were asked about their willingness to participate, their privacy concerns, informed consent, and data sharing. A representative survey of 4659 U.S. adults was conducted. Ninety percent of respondents would be concerned about privacy, 56% would be concerned about researchers having their information, and 37% would worry that study data could be used against them. However, 60% would participate in the biobank if asked. Nearly half (48%) would prefer to provide consent once for all research approved by an oversight panel, whereas 42% would prefer to provide consent for each project separately. Although 92% would allow academic researchers to use study data, 80% and 75%, respectively, would grant access to government and industry researchers. Concern about privacy was related to lower willingness to participate only when respondents were told that they would receive $50 for participation and would not receive individual research results back. Among respondents who were told that they would receive $200 or individual research results, privacy concerns were not related to willingness. Survey respondents valued both privacy and participation in biomedical research. Despite pervasive privacy concerns, 60% would participate in a biobank. Assuring research participants that their privacy will be protected to the best of researchers' abilities may increase participants' acceptance of consent for broad research uses of biobank data by a wide range of researchers.

  15. National Privacy Research Strategy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — On July 1, NITRD released the National Privacy Research Strategy. Research agencies across government participated in the development of the strategy, reviewing...

  16. Privacy for Sale?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, Jannick Kirk; Khajuria, Samant

    Data brokers have become central players in the collection online of private user data. Data brokers’ activities are however not very transparent or even known by users. Many users regard privacy a central element when they use online services. Based on 12 short interviews with users, this paper...... analyses how users perceive the concept of online privacy in respect to data brokers col- lection of private data, and particularly novel services that offer users the possi- bility to sell their private data. Two groups of users are identified: Those who are considering selling their data under specific...... conditions, and those who reject the idea completely. Based on the literature we identify two positions to privacy either as an instrumental good, or as an intrinsic good. The paper positions vari- ous user perceptions on privacy that are relevant for future service develop- ment....

  17. EGRP Privacy Policy & Disclaimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program complies with requirements for privacy and security established by the Office of Management and Budget, Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Cancer Institute.

  18. Legal Protections for Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David W.

    1977-01-01

    Individual interest in privacy is a multiple legal issue, roughly divided into four parts according to different types of law: constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common law. Policy implications of this issue for institutions are discussed. (Editor/LBH)

  19. EGRP Privacy Policy & Disclaimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program complies with requirements for privacy and security established by the Office of Management and Budget, Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Cancer Institute.

  20. [From genetic privacy to the right to genetic data protection. Basic protection of genetic data in Spanish law (regarding SSTC290/2000 and 292/2000, of November 30) (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane Rodríguez, José Antonio

    2002-01-01

    In the second part the author examines the repercussions of constitutional case law on the legal protection of genetic information. He then considers the special nature of genetic information and addresses the corresponding need for special treatment thereof in law. A specific model is suggested for the legal status of such information. This model is based on the Spanish Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine. The article then casts a critical eye over data protection legislation in Spain (in particular Law 15/1999 of 13 December) concentrating on five principles, four of which are substantive and the fifth procedural: 1) consent; 2) purpose; 3) confidentiality; 4) quality; 5) proportionality. Lastly, the article gives examples of areas in which the model might be applied (for instance in employment contracts, insurance, access to information by family members).

  1. Inequalities for the quantum privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, M. A. S.; Pinto, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the asymptotic behavior related to the quantum privacy for multipartite systems. In this context, an inequality for quantum privacy was obtained by exploiting of quantum entropy properties. Subsequently, we derive a lower limit for the quantum privacy through the entanglement fidelity. In particular, we show that there is an interval where an increase in entanglement fidelity implies a decrease in quantum privacy.

  2. Privacy and Open Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Scassa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The public-oriented goals of the open government movement promise increased transparency and accountability of governments, enhanced citizen engagement and participation, improved service delivery, economic development and the stimulation of innovation. In part, these goals are to be achieved by making more and more government information public in reusable formats and under open licences. This paper identifies three broad privacy challenges raised by open government. The first is how to balance privacy with transparency and accountability in the context of “public” personal information. The second challenge flows from the disruption of traditional approaches to privacy based on a collapse of the distinctions between public and private sector actors. The third challenge is that of the potential for open government data—even if anonymized—to contribute to the big data environment in which citizens and their activities are increasingly monitored and profiled.

  3. 78 FR 73466 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... CORPORATION 22 CFR Part 707 Privacy Act AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation. ACTION: Notice of... (``OPIC'') Privacy Act (``PA'') regulations by making substantive and administrative changes. These... procedure, Privacy. For the reasons stated in the preamble the Overseas Private Investment Corporation...

  4. Privacy Expectations in Online Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pure, Rebekah Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Advances in digital networked communication technology over the last two decades have brought the issue of personal privacy into sharper focus within contemporary public discourse. In this dissertation, I explain the Fourth Amendment and the role that privacy expectations play in the constitutional protection of personal privacy generally, and…

  5. Advertising and Invasion of Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    The right of privacy as it relates to advertising and the use of a person's name or likeness is discussed in this paper. After an introduction that traces some of the history of invasion of privacy in court decisions, the paper examines cases involving issues such as public figures and newsworthy items, right of privacy waived, right of privacy…

  6. Designing Privacy-by-Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, J.H.C. van; Boonstra, D.; Everts, M.H.; Rijn, M. van; Paassen, R.J.G. van

    2014-01-01

    The proposal for a new privacy regulation d.d. January 25th 2012 introduces sanctions of up to 2% of the annual turnover of enterprises. This elevates the importance of mitigation of privacy risks. This paper makes Privacy by Design more concrete, and positions it as the mechanism to mitigate these

  7. Privacy Expectations in Online Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pure, Rebekah Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Advances in digital networked communication technology over the last two decades have brought the issue of personal privacy into sharper focus within contemporary public discourse. In this dissertation, I explain the Fourth Amendment and the role that privacy expectations play in the constitutional protection of personal privacy generally, and…

  8. Privacy preserving processing of genomic data: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Mete; Bayrak, A Osman; Ozer, Bugra; Sağıroğlu, M Şamil

    2015-08-01

    Recently, the rapid advance in genome sequencing technology has led to production of huge amount of sensitive genomic data. However, a serious privacy challenge is confronted with increasing number of genetic tests as genomic data is the ultimate source of identity for humans. Lately, privacy threats and possible solutions regarding the undesired access to genomic data are discussed, however it is challenging to apply proposed solutions to real life problems due to the complex nature of security definitions. In this review, we have categorized pre-existing problems and corresponding solutions in more understandable and convenient way. Additionally, we have also included open privacy problems coming with each genomic data processing procedure. We believe our classification of genome associated privacy problems will pave the way for linking of real-life problems with previously proposed methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Privacy in the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, Bryce; Metoyer, Cheryl A.; Moore, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Popular access to increasingly sophisticated forms of electronic surveillance technologies has altered the dynamics of family relationships. Monitoring, mediated and facilitated by practices of both covert and overt electronic surveillance, has changed the nature of privacy within the family. In thi

  10. Formal Methods for Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Shuchi Chawla, Cynthia Dwork, Frank McSherry, Adam Smith , and Hoeteck Wee. Toward privacy in public databases. In 2nd Theory of Cryptography Conference...Dwork, Frank McSherry, Kobbi Nissim, and Adam Smith . Calibrating noise to sensitivity in private data analysis. In In Proceedings of the 3rd Theory of

  11. Biometrics and privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpink, J.H.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Biometrics offers many alternatives for protecting our privacy and preventing us from falling victim to crime. Biometrics can even serve as a solid basis for safe anonymous and semi-anonymous legal transactions. In this article Jan Grijpink clarifies which concepts and practical applications this

  12. Privacy Policy | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The privacy of our users is of utmost importance to Frederick National Lab. The policy outlined below establishes how Frederick National Lab will use the information we gather about you from your visit to our website. We may collect and store

  13. 78 FR 5565 - Modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Enforcement, and Breach Notification Rules Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... adopting amendments designed to strengthen the privacy and security protections for health information... health information would also be required to comply with the applicable Privacy and Security Rule... the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act and the Genetic Information...

  14. Collaborative Privacy - A Community-Based Privacy Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Jan; Kernchen, Thomas; Pernul, Günther

    The landscape of the World Wide Web with all its versatile services heavily relies on the disclosure of private user information. Service providers collecting more and more of these personal user data pose a growing privacy threat for users. Addressing user concerns privacy-enhancing technologies emerged. One goal of these technologies is to enable users to improve the control over their personal data. A famous representative is the PRIME project that aims for a holistic privacy-enhancing identity management system. However, approaches like the PRIME privacy architecture require service providers to change their server infrastructure and add specific privacy-enhancing components. In the near future, service providers are not expected to alter internal processes. In this paper, we introduce a collaborative privacy community that allows the open exchange of privacy-related information. We lay out the privacy community’s functions and potentials within a user-centric, provider-independent privacy architecture that will help foster the usage and acceptance of privacy-enhancing technologies.

  15. Investigation of the Ethical Concepts that Inform the Laws Limiting Genetic Screening in Employment Decisions: Privacy, Human Dignity, Equality, Autonomy, Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquerella, Lynn; Rothstein, Lawrence E.

    2003-01-16

    The broad question addressed in our research is : What is the influence of ethical concepts on legislative outcomes? The research focuses on the important ethical concerns that surround the use of genetic information in employment matters and in American state legislatures. By analyzing the contents of hearings, interviews and advocacy documents involved in the legislative process, the research seeks to answer the question: How might the dominance of a particular ethical concept informing the discussion of a bill influence the legislative outcome?

  16. Privacy Awareness: A Means to Solve the Privacy Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzsch, Stefanie

    People are limited in their resources, i.e. they have limited memory capabilities, cannot pay attention to too many things at the same time, and forget much information after a while; computers do not suffer from these limitations. Thus, revealing personal data in electronic communication environments and being completely unaware of the impact of privacy might cause a lot of privacy issues later. Even if people are privacy aware in general, the so-called privacy paradox shows that they do not behave according to their stated attitudes. This paper discusses explanations for the existing dichotomy between the intentions of people towards disclosure of personal data and their behaviour. We present requirements on tools for privacy-awareness support in order to counteract the privacy paradox.

  17. Privacy and Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Comer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Social Networking is continually growing and showing more possibilities. Facebook the leading social network site is approaching 1 billion members. Facebook guarantees more than friend requests and also acts as an excellent marketing tool for businesses. Social media is a technology allowing the nation to publish instantly and economically on the internet. It encourages live discussion on a huge range of topics, with not only friends, but businesses and consumers. Facebook serves 120 billion hits per day, stored 60 billion photos and generated 150TB (Terabytes of logs every day. Privacy - or lack of it - however has provoked outrage at various times in the media. This paper seeks to examine the ramifications of poor privacy management by Facebook.

  18. Performing privacy in schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Albrechtslund, Anders; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this presentation we pursue the question: How is privacy performed and perceived in schools by children? Our aim is to investigate how the boundaries between public and private spheres are continuously performed in the formal setting of the classroom as well as in the social lives of students....... School life involves a wide range of technologies, including smartphones, online communication platforms between teachers and parents, and social media. These and other surveillance-enabling services all contribute to the tracking of and by school children and shape their perceptions of privacy (Monahan...... and Torres, 2009; Selwyn, 2010; Taylor, 2013; Taylor & Rooney, 2016). The presentation reports findings from a qualitative study in which teachers and students between 12-16 from two Danish schools are interviewed. In addition, the teachers and students participate in workshops where experiments...

  19. Approximate Privacy: Foundations and Quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Feigenbaum, Joan; Schapira, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Increasing use of computers and networks in business, government, recreation, and almost all aspects of daily life has led to a proliferation of online sensitive data about individuals and organizations. Consequently, concern about the privacy of these data has become a top priority, particularly those data that are created and used in electronic commerce. There have been many formulations of privacy and, unfortunately, many negative results about the feasibility of maintaining privacy of sensitive data in realistic networked environments. We formulate communication-complexity-based definitions, both worst-case and average-case, of a problem's privacy-approximation ratio. We use our definitions to investigate the extent to which approximate privacy is achievable in two standard problems: the second-price Vickrey auction and the millionaires problem of Yao. For both the second-price Vickrey auction and the millionaires problem, we show that not only is perfect privacy impossible or infeasibly costly to achieve...

  20. Location Privacy in RFID Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Ahmad-Reza; Visconti, Ivan; Wachsmann, Christian

    RFID-enabled systems allow fully automatic wireless identification of objects and are rapidly becoming a pervasive technology with various applications. However, despite their benefits, RFID-based systems also pose challenging risks, in particular concerning user privacy. Indeed, improvident use of RFID can disclose sensitive information about users and their locations allowing detailed user profiles. Hence, it is crucial to identify and to enforce appropriate security and privacy requirements of RFID applications (that are also compliant to legislation). This chapter first discusses security and privacy requirements for RFID-enabled systems, focusing in particular on location privacy issues. Then it explores the advances in RFID applications, stressing the security and privacy shortcomings of existing proposals. Finally, it presents new promising directions for privacy-preserving RFID systems, where as a case study we focus electronic tickets (e-tickets) for public transportation.

  1. On quantum and approximate privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Klauck, H

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies privacy in communication complexity. The focus is on quantum versions of the model and on protocols with only approximate privacy against honest players. We show that the privacy loss (the minimum divulged information) in computing a function can be decreased exponentially by using quantum protocols, while the class of privately computable functions (i.e., those with privacy loss 0) is not increased by quantum protocols. Quantum communication combined with small information leakage on the other hand makes certain functions computable (almost) privately which are not computable using quantum communication without leakage or using classical communication with leakage. We also give an example of an exponential reduction of the communication complexity of a function by allowing a privacy loss of o(1) instead of privacy loss 0.

  2. Privacy 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Papathanassopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We live in the era of change. In this world, privacy is not a static concept, but instead has a dynamic component. Overall, it becomes clear that the public and private are not defined in the same manner as in the past and as in the actual world, while our personal information has become a commodity that can raise our visibility in the social media driven world.

  3. Cognitive Privacy for Personal Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Radenkovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel Cognitive Privacy (CogPriv framework that improves privacy of data sharing between Personal Clouds for different application types and across heterogeneous networks. Depending on the behaviour of neighbouring network nodes, their estimated privacy levels, resource availability, and social network connectivity, each Personal Cloud may decide to use different transmission network for different types of data and privacy requirements. CogPriv is fully distributed, uses complex graph contacts analytics and multiple implicit novel heuristics, and combines these with smart probing to identify presence and behaviour of privacy compromising nodes in the network. Based on sensed local context and through cooperation with remote nodes in the network, CogPriv is able to transparently and on-the-fly change the network in order to avoid transmissions when privacy may be compromised. We show that CogPriv achieves higher end-to-end privacy levels compared to both noncognitive cellular network communication and state-of-the-art strategies based on privacy-aware adaptive social mobile networks routing for a range of experiment scenarios based on real-world user and network traces. CogPriv is able to adapt to varying network connectivity and maintain high quality of service while managing to keep low data exposure for a wide range of privacy leakage levels in the infrastructure.

  4. Privacy and the Connected Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Khajuria, Samant; Skouby, Knud Erik

    the society. Enabling the vision of the connected society, researchers point in the direction of security and privacy as areas to challenge the vision. By use of the Internet of Things reference model as well as the vision of the connected society, this paper identifies privacy of the individual with respect...... to three selected areas: Shopping, connected cars and online gaming. The paper concludes that privacy is a complexity within the connected society vision and that thee is a need for more privacy use cases to shed light on the challenge....

  5. Data privacy for the smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Herold, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The Smart Grid and PrivacyWhat Is the Smart Grid? Changes from Traditional Energy Delivery Smart Grid Possibilities Business Model Transformations Emerging Privacy Risks The Need for Privacy PoliciesPrivacy Laws, Regulations, and Standards Privacy-Enhancing Technologies New Privacy Challenges IOT Big Data What Is the Smart Grid?Market and Regulatory OverviewTraditional Electricity Business SectorThe Electricity Open Market Classifications of Utilities Rate-Making ProcessesElectricity Consumer

  6. Genetics and the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene: a spiral of DNA that superintends its construction out of amino acids. In recent decades, genetic ... inbox. Subscribe Now Privacy Policy × × --> © 2017 The Dana Foundation. All Rights Reserved. 505 Fifth Avenue, 6th floor ...

  7. Privacy-Preserving Trajectory Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Xuegang, Huang; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2008-01-01

    . To remedy this situation, this paper first formally defines novel location privacy requirements. Then, it briefly presents a system for privacy--preserving trajectory collection that meets these requirements. The system is composed of an untrusted server and clients communicating in a P2P network. Location...

  8. Privacy and Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Much of what constitutes Big Data is information about us. Through our online activities, we leave an easy-to-follow trail of digital footprints that reveal who we are, what we buy, where we go, and much more. This eye-opening book explores the raging privacy debate over the use of personal data, with one undeniable conclusion: once data's been collected, we have absolutely no control over who uses it or how it is used. Personal data is the hottest commodity on the market today-truly more valuable than gold. We are the asset that every company, industry, non-profit, and government wants. Pri

  9. User Privacy in RFID Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singelée, Dave; Seys, Stefaan

    Wireless RFID networks are getting deployed at a rapid pace and have already entered the public space on a massive scale: public transport cards, the biometric passport, office ID tokens, customer loyalty cards, etc. Although RFID technology offers interesting services to customers and retailers, it could also endanger the privacy of the end-users. The lack of protection mechanisms being deployed could potentially result in a privacy leakage of personal data. Furthermore, there is the emerging threat of location privacy. In this paper, we will show some practical attack scenarios and illustrates some of them with cases that have received press coverage. We will present the main challenges of enhancing privacy in RFID networks and evaluate some solutions proposed in literature. The main advantages and shortcomings will be briefly discussed. Finally, we will give an overview of some academic and industrial research initiatives on RFID privacy.

  10. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  11. A Generic Privacy Quantification Framework for Privacy-Preserving Data Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zutao

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the concerns about the privacy for the electronic data collected by government agencies, organizations, and industries are increasing. They include individual privacy and knowledge privacy. Privacy-preserving data publishing is a research branch that preserves the privacy while, at the same time, withholding useful information in…

  12. A Generic Privacy Quantification Framework for Privacy-Preserving Data Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zutao

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the concerns about the privacy for the electronic data collected by government agencies, organizations, and industries are increasing. They include individual privacy and knowledge privacy. Privacy-preserving data publishing is a research branch that preserves the privacy while, at the same time, withholding useful information in…

  13. 48 CFR 39.105 - Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Privacy. 39.105 Section 39... CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.105 Privacy. Agencies shall ensure that contracts for information technology address protection of privacy in accordance with the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C...

  14. Employee Privacy Rights: A Management Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Ira Michael; Olsen, Harry

    Employee privacy rights are considered, along with practical problems and permissible parameters of employer activity. Included is a state-by-state analysis of the status of workplace privacy. Definitions are offered of "invasion of privacy," with attention to four types of privacy invasions: (1) placing someone in a "false light," (2) the public…

  15. Advanced research in data privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Torra, Vicenç

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the research work on data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies carried by the participants of the ARES project. ARES (Advanced Research in Privacy an Security, CSD2007-00004) has been one of the most important research projects funded by the Spanish Government in the fields of computer security and privacy. It is part of the now extinct CONSOLIDER INGENIO 2010 program, a highly competitive program which aimed to advance knowledge and open new research lines among top Spanish research groups. The project started in 2007 and will finish this 2014. Composed by 6 research groups from 6 different institutions, it has gathered an important number of researchers during its lifetime. Among the work produced by the ARES project, one specific work package has been related to privacy. This books gathers works produced by members of the project related to data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies. The presented works not only summarize important research carried in the proje...

  16. Nursing professional facing patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel López Espuela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy of patients admitted to the hospital is played down in favour of other needs considered more basic by the healthcare system and more related to the disease than to patients themselves. Situations and factors where privacy is damaged are frequent, but it is known that when these are avoided by professionals’ attitude, through strategies and different mechanisms, it becomes one of the most satisfactory elements to patients.Objectives: To identify and analyze situations and factors which affect privacy in hospital environment as well as the adaptation capacity of patients to them.Methodology: Phenomenological, qualitative research. By means of discussion groups with professionals, the following questions where answered: ‘What do professionals understand by privacy? Which situations and factors jeopardize it during the hospital stay? How do they think patients get adapted?Results: The concept of privacy is complex, personal and non-transferable. Situations in which it is jeopardized were divided in 5 main areas. Numerous behaviors regarding adaptation of patients to these were collected.Discussion: Although there is little nursery research referring to privacy and its defense in the professional-patient relationship field, concern about this aspect always shown by nursery staff stands out.As a conclussion, we observe the need to complement this research with the perception patients have about these same questions, establishing the importance they give to privacy.

  17. Towards Privacy Managment of Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Drageide, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    This masters thesis provides insight into the concept of privacy. It argues why privacy is important, and why developers and system owners should keep privacy in mind when developing and maintaining systems containing personal information. Following this, a strategy for evaluating the overall level of privacy in a system is defined. The strategy is then applied to parts of the cellphone system in an attempt to evaluate the privacy of traffic and location data in this system.

  18. A Privacy Manager for Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Siani; Shen, Yun; Mowbray, Miranda

    We describe a privacy manager for cloud computing, which reduces the risk to the cloud computing user of their private data being stolen or misused, and also assists the cloud computing provider to conform to privacy law. We describe different possible architectures for privacy management in cloud computing; give an algebraic description of obfuscation, one of the features of the privacy manager; and describe how the privacy manager might be used to protect private metadata of online photos.

  19. Privacy-Preserving Trajectory Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Xuegang, Huang; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide context--aware Location--Based Services, real location data of mobile users must be collected and analyzed by spatio--temporal data mining methods. However, the data mining methods need precise location data, while the mobile users want to protect their location privacy....... To remedy this situation, this paper first formally defines novel location privacy requirements. Then, it briefly presents a system for privacy--preserving trajectory collection that meets these requirements. The system is composed of an untrusted server and clients communicating in a P2P network. Location...

  20. User Privacy and Empowerment:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhotre, Prashant Shantaram; Olesen, Henning; Khajuria, Samant

    2017-01-01

    of personal information and its manage-ment. Thus, empowering users and enhancing awareness are essential to compre-hending the value of secrecy. This paper also introduced latest advances in the domain of privacy issues like User Managed Access (UMA) can state suitable requirements for user empowerment...... and will cater to redefine the trustworthy relationship between service providers and users. Subsequently, this paper con-cludes with suggestions for providing empowerment to the user and developing user-centric, transparent business models.......Today, the service providers are capable of assembling a huge measure of user information using Big data techniques. For service providers, user infor-mation has become a vital asset. The present business models are attentive to collect extensive users’ information to extract useful knowledge...

  1. Privacy Preserving Distributed Data Mining

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distributed data mining from privacy-sensitive multi-party data is likely to play an important role in the next generation of integrated vehicle health monitoring...

  2. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This repository contains Privacy Impact Assessments (PIA) that have been vetted/approved. Section 208 of the Electronic Government Act of 2002 (E-Gov Act) requires...

  3. Preserving Privacy in Transparency Logging

    OpenAIRE

    Pulls, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the construction of privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs) for transparency logging, a technology at the intersection of privacy, transparency, and accountability. Transparency logging facilitates the transportation of data from service providers to users of services and is therefore a key enabler for ex-post transparency-enhancing tools (TETs). Ex-post transparency provides information to users about how their personal data have been processed by service pr...

  4. Security and privacy in biometrics

    CERN Document Server

    Campisi, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    This important text/reference presents the latest secure and privacy-compliant techniques in automatic human recognition. Featuring viewpoints from an international selection of experts in the field, the comprehensive coverage spans both theory and practical implementations, taking into consideration all ethical and legal issues. Topics and features: presents a unique focus on novel approaches and new architectures for unimodal and multimodal template protection; examines signal processing techniques in the encrypted domain, security and privacy leakage assessment, and aspects of standardizati

  5. Privacy in the Genomic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAVEED, MUHAMMAD; AYDAY, ERMAN; CLAYTON, ELLEN W.; FELLAY, JACQUES; GUNTER, CARL A.; HUBAUX, JEAN-PIERRE; MALIN, BRADLEY A.; WANG, XIAOFENG

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing technology has advanced at a rapid pace and it is now possible to generate highly-detailed genotypes inexpensively. The collection and analysis of such data has the potential to support various applications, including personalized medical services. While the benefits of the genomics revolution are trumpeted by the biomedical community, the increased availability of such data has major implications for personal privacy; notably because the genome has certain essential features, which include (but are not limited to) (i) an association with traits and certain diseases, (ii) identification capability (e.g., forensics), and (iii) revelation of family relationships. Moreover, direct-to-consumer DNA testing increases the likelihood that genome data will be made available in less regulated environments, such as the Internet and for-profit companies. The problem of genome data privacy thus resides at the crossroads of computer science, medicine, and public policy. While the computer scientists have addressed data privacy for various data types, there has been less attention dedicated to genomic data. Thus, the goal of this paper is to provide a systematization of knowledge for the computer science community. In doing so, we address some of the (sometimes erroneous) beliefs of this field and we report on a survey we conducted about genome data privacy with biomedical specialists. Then, after characterizing the genome privacy problem, we review the state-of-the-art regarding privacy attacks on genomic data and strategies for mitigating such attacks, as well as contextualizing these attacks from the perspective of medicine and public policy. This paper concludes with an enumeration of the challenges for genome data privacy and presents a framework to systematize the analysis of threats and the design of countermeasures as the field moves forward. PMID:26640318

  6. The benefits, risks and costs of privacy: patient preferences and willingness to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenbarg, David E; Asche, Carl; Ramsahai, Shweta; Duling, Joy; Ren, Jinma

    2017-05-01

    Multiple surveys show that patients want medical privacy; however, there are costs to maintaining privacy. There are also risks if information is not shared. A review of previous surveys found that most surveys asked questions about patient's privacy concerns and willingness to share their medical information. We found only one study that asked about sharing medical information for better care and no survey that asked patients about the risk, cost or comparison between medical privacy and privacy in other areas. To fill this gap, we designed a survey to: (1) compare medical privacy preferences to privacy preferences in other areas; (2) measure willingness to pay the cost of additional privacy measures; and (3) measure willingness to accept the risks of not sharing information. A total of 834 patients attending physician offices at 14 sites completed all or part of an anonymous questionnaire. Over 95% of patients were willing to share all their medical information with their treating physicians. There was no difference in willingness to share between primary care and specialty sites including psychiatry and an HIV clinic. In our survey, there was no difference in sharing preference between standard medical information and information with additional legal protections including genetic testing, drug/alcohol treatment and HIV results. Medical privacy was ranked lower than sharing social security and credit card numbers, but was deemed more private than other information including tax returns and handgun purchases. There was no statistical difference for any questions by site except for HIV/AIDS clinic patients ranking privacy of the medical record more important than reducing high medical costs and risk of medical errors (p privacy, but few were willing to pay more for additional medical privacy. Most patients were unwilling to take on additional risks to keep medical information hidden. Patients were very willing to share medical information with their providers

  7. 76 FR 67763 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of proposed revisions to an existing Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National...

  8. The privacy coach: Supporting customer privacy in the internet of things

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Hoepman, J.H.; Hof, C. van 't; Kranenburg, R. van; Smits, D.; Wisman, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Privacy Coach is an application running on a mobile phone that supports customers in making privacy decisions when confronted with RFID tags. The approach we take to increase customer privacy is a radical departure from the mainstream research efforts that focus on implementing privacy enhancing

  9. 78 FR 77719 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is...

  10. 76 FR 64115 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of the retirement of one Privacy Act system of records notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, NASA is giving notice that it proposes to...

  11. 75 FR 81205 - Privacy Act: Revision of Privacy Act Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Privacy Act: Revision of Privacy Act Systems of Records AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Notice to Revise Privacy Act Systems of Records. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) proposes to revise two Privacy Act Systems of...

  12. 76 FR 64114 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of proposed revisions to an existing Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National...

  13. 76 FR 64112 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records Appendices AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Revisions of NASA Appendices to Privacy Act System of... publishes with the Agency's systems of records under the Privacy Act of 1974. This notice publishes those...

  14. The privacy coach: Supporting customer privacy in the internet of things

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Hoepman, J.H.; Hof, C. van 't; Kranenburg, R. van; Smits, D.; Wisman, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Privacy Coach is an application running on a mobile phone that supports customers in making privacy decisions when confronted with RFID tags. The approach we take to increase customer privacy is a radical departure from the mainstream research efforts that focus on implementing privacy enhancing

  15. Internet privacy options for adequate realisation

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    A thorough multidisciplinary analysis of various perspectives on internet privacy was published as the first volume of a study, revealing the results of the achatech project "Internet Privacy - A Culture of Privacy and Trust on the Internet." The second publication from this project presents integrated, interdisciplinary options for improving privacy on the Internet utilising a normative, value-oriented approach. The ways in which privacy promotes and preconditions fundamental societal values and how privacy violations endanger the flourishing of said values are exemplified. The conditions which must be fulfilled in order to achieve a culture of privacy and trust on the internet are illuminated. This volume presents options for policy-makers, educators, businesses and technology experts how to facilitate solutions for more privacy on the Internet and identifies further research requirements in this area.

  16. 39 CFR 262.5 - Systems (Privacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Systems (Privacy). 262.5 Section 262.5 Postal... DEFINITIONS § 262.5 Systems (Privacy). (a) Privacy Act system of records. A Postal Service system containing... individual. (c) Computer matching program. A “matching program,” as defined in the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. 552a...

  17. On genomics, kin, and privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telenti, Amalio; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The storage of greater numbers of exomes or genomes raises the question of loss of privacy for the individual and for families if genomic data are not properly protected. Access to genome data may result from a personal decision to disclose, or from gaps in protection. In either case, revealing genome data has consequences beyond the individual, as it compromises the privacy of family members. Increasing availability of genome data linked or linkable to metadata through online social networks and services adds one additional layer of complexity to the protection of genome privacy.  The field of computer science and information technology offers solutions to secure genomic data so that individuals, medical personnel or researchers can access only the subset of genomic information required for healthcare or dedicated studies.

  18. Ethical issues in genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, T A

    1999-03-01

    The first section of the Notes on Moral Theology reviews ethical issues in genetics through the lenses of privacy-confidentiality; risk-benefit analysis in relation to prenatal diagnosis and gene therapy; and freedom-determinism/human dignity in the context of cloning. The author provides an overview of developments in genetics and highlights thematic issues common to these developments.

  19. 24 CFR 3280.107 - Interior privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interior privacy. 3280.107 Section 3280.107 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... privacy. Bathroom and toilet compartment doors shall be equipped with a privacy lock. ...

  20. 31 CFR 0.216 - Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy Act. 0.216 Section 0.216... RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.216 Privacy Act. Employees involved in the design, development, operation, or maintenance of any system of records or in maintaining records subject to the Privacy Act of...

  1. Sexiled: Privacy Acquisition Strategies of College Roommates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to understand how roommates make privacy bids in college residence halls. The results indicate that privacy for sexual activity is a problem for students living in college residence halls, as almost all participants (82%) reported having dealt with this issue. Two sets of responses were collected and analyzed: privacy acquisition…

  2. Video Surveillance: Privacy Issues and Legal Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood Rajpoot, Qasim; Jensen, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    . There is a need to balance the usage of video surveillance against its negative impact on privacy. This chapter aims to highlight the privacy issues in video surveillance and provides a model to help identify the privacy requirements in a video surveillance system. The authors make a step in the direction...

  3. Sexiled: Privacy Acquisition Strategies of College Roommates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to understand how roommates make privacy bids in college residence halls. The results indicate that privacy for sexual activity is a problem for students living in college residence halls, as almost all participants (82%) reported having dealt with this issue. Two sets of responses were collected and analyzed: privacy acquisition…

  4. Enhancing Privacy for Digital Rights Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, M.; Conrado, C.; Schrijen, G.J.; Jonker, W.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter addresses privacy issues in DRM systems. These systems provide a means of protecting digital content, but may violate the privacy of users in that the content they purchase and their actions in the system can be linked to specific users. The chapter proposes a privacy-preserving DRM sys

  5. Smartdata privacy meets evolutionary robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Inman; Tomko, George

    2013-01-01

    Privacy by Design and the Promise of SmartData.- SmartData: the Need, the Goal and the Challenge.- Perspectives on Artificial Intelligence.- Context dependent information processing entails scale-free dynamics.- Philosophy and SmartData.- Relevance Realization and the Neurodynamics and Neural Connectivity of General Intelligence.- What Matters: Real Bodies and Virtual Worlds.- The development of autonomous virtual agents.- Patterns of Attractors in the "Brain"".- A Privacy-Enabled Mobile Computing Model Using Intelligent Cloud-Based Services.- Unconstraint the Population: the Benefits of Horiz

  6. Privacy Preserving Linear Regression on Distributed Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fida K. Dankar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies that combine data from multiple sources can tremendously improve the outcome of the statistical analysis. However, combining data from these various sources for analysis poses privacy risks. A number of protocols have been proposed in the literature to address the privacy concerns; however they do not fully deliver on either privacy or complexity. In this paper, we present a (theoretical privacy preserving linear regression model for the analysis of data owned by several sources. The protocol uses a semi-trusted third party and delivers on privacy and complexity.

  7. Adding Query Privacy to Robust DHTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backes, Michael; Goldberg, Ian; Kate, Aniket

    2011-01-01

    of obtaining query privacy over robust DHTs. Finally, we compare the performance of our privacy-preserving protocols with their more privacy-invasive counterparts. We observe that there is no increase in the message complexity and only a small overhead in the computational complexity....... intermediate peers that (help to) route the queries towards their destinations. In this paper, we satisfy this requirement by presenting an approach for providing privacy for the keys in DHT queries. We use the concept of oblivious transfer (OT) in communication over DHTs to preserve query privacy without...

  8. 78 FR 46256 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 1 Privacy Act CFR Correction In Title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2012, on page 5, in Sec. 1.2, the words ``95 and 96 of the Internal Revenue Code of...

  9. The European Approach to Privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoboken, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the character of European (Union’s) privacy law and policy in the field of online media and electronic communications. Contrary to current understanding, this field of law is more fragmented and ill-developed than is often assumed, in particular by those discussing pri

  10. Panel: RFID Security and Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kevin

    The panel on RFID security and privacy included Ross Anderson, Jon Callas, Yvo Desmedt, and Kevin Fu. Topics for discussion included the "chip and PIN" EMV payment systems, e-Passports, "mafia" attacks, and RFID-enabled credit cards. Position papers by the panelists appear in the following pages, and the RFID-enabled credit card work appears separately in these proceedings.

  11. Patient privacy and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hader, Amy L; Brown, Evan D

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare providers using social media must remain mindful of professional boundaries and patients' privacy rights. Facebook and other online postings must comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), applicable facility policy, state law, and AANA's Code of Ethics.

  12. Privacy is an essentially contested concept: a multi-dimensional analytic for mapping privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Deirdre K; Koopman, Colin; Doty, Nick

    2016-12-28

    The meaning of privacy has been much disputed throughout its history in response to wave after wave of new technological capabilities and social configurations. The current round of disputes over privacy fuelled by data science has been a cause of despair for many commentators and a death knell for privacy itself for others. We argue that privacy's disputes are neither an accidental feature of the concept nor a lamentable condition of its applicability. Privacy is essentially contested. Because it is, privacy is transformable according to changing technological and social conditions. To make productive use of privacy's essential contestability, we argue for a new approach to privacy research and practical design, focused on the development of conceptual analytics that facilitate dissecting privacy's multiple uses across multiple contexts.This article is part of the themed issue 'The ethical impact of data science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  14. Location-Related Privacy in Geo-Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz Vicente, Carmen; Freni, Dario; Bettini, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    -ins." However, this ability to reveal users' locations causes new privacy threats, which in turn call for new privacy-protection methods. The authors study four privacy aspects central to these social networks - location, absence, co-location, and identity privacy - and describe possible means of protecting...... privacy in these circumstances....

  15. Information privacy fundamentals for librarians and information professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Givens, Cherie L

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces library and information professionals to information privacy, provides an overview of information privacy in the library and information science context, U.S. privacy laws by sector, information privacy policy, and key considerations when planning and creating a privacy program.

  16. Location-Related Privacy in Geo-Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz Vicente, Carmen; Freni, Dario; Bettini, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    -ins." However, this ability to reveal users' locations causes new privacy threats, which in turn call for new privacy-protection methods. The authors study four privacy aspects central to these social networks - location, absence, co-location, and identity privacy - and describe possible means of protecting...... privacy in these circumstances....

  17. Quantifying Differential Privacy under Temporal Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Xiao, Yonghui; Xiong, Li

    2017-01-01

    Differential Privacy (DP) has received increasing attention as a rigorous privacy framework. Many existing studies employ traditional DP mechanisms (e.g., the Laplace mechanism) as primitives, which assume that the data are independent, or that adversaries do not have knowledge of the data correlations. However, continuous generated data in the real world tend to be temporally correlated, and such correlations can be acquired by adversaries. In this paper, we investigate the potential privacy loss of a traditional DP mechanism under temporal correlations in the context of continuous data release. First, we model the temporal correlations using Markov model and analyze the privacy leakage of a DP mechanism when adversaries have knowledge of such temporal correlations. Our analysis reveals that the privacy loss of a DP mechanism may accumulate and increase over time. We call it temporal privacy leakage. Second, to measure such privacy loss, we design an efficient algorithm for calculating it in polynomial time. Although the temporal privacy leakage may increase over time, we also show that its supremum may exist in some cases. Third, to bound the privacy loss, we propose mechanisms that convert any existing DP mechanism into one against temporal privacy leakage. Experiments with synthetic data confirm that our approach is efficient and effective. PMID:28883711

  18. Privacy Preserving Content Protection (Privacy behoud content protection)

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Mina

    2010-01-01

    De vooruitgang van informatie- en communicatietechnologie in de laatste decennia heeft de manier waarop informatie wordt verzameld en verwerkt grondig beїnvloed. Dit roept echter ook vraagtekens op rond de manier waarop met privacy wordt omgegaan. De komst van digitale technologieën, het gemak waarmee ongeoorloofde kopieën kunnen worden geproduceerd, en de toegang tot digitale inhoud -- leidend tot commerciële inbreuken -- motiveren de nood om content protection (inhoudsbeschermende) te...

  19. Privacy im Social Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagenborg, Michael

    Der Schwerpunkt dieses Beitrages liegt auf dem Design von Infrastrukturen, welche es ermöglichen sollen, private Daten kontrolliert preiszugeben und auszutauschen. Zunächst wird daran erinnert, dass rechtliche und technische Maßnahmen zum Datenschutz stets auch dazu dienen, den Austausch von Daten zu ermöglichen. Die grundlegende Herausforderung besteht darin, der sozialen und politischen Bedeutung des Privaten Rechnung zu tragen. Privatheit wird aus der Perspektive der Informationsethik dabei als ein normatives, handlungsleitendes Konzept verstanden. Als Maßstab für die Gestaltung der entsprechenden Infrastrukturen wird auf Helen Nissenbaums Konzept der privacy as contextual integrity" zurückgegriffen, um u. a. die Ansätze der end-to-end information accountability" [38] und des Privacy Identity Management for Europe"- Projektes zu diskutieren.

  20. Privacy Implications of Surveillance Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thommesen, Jacob; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model for assessing the privacy „cost‟ of a surveillance system. Surveillance systems collect and provide personal information or observations of people by means of surveillance technologies such as databases, video or location tracking. Such systems can be designed...... by analyzing a location-based system for airport passengers developed for a Copenhagen Airport, and the dimensions are used to explain user reactions to different services offered by the system....... for various purposes, even as a service for those being observed, but in any case they will to some degree invade their privacy. The model provided here can indicate how invasive any particular system may be – and be used to compare the invasiveness of different systems. Applying a functional approach...

  1. Online Privacy as a Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollach, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Information technology and the Internet have added a new stakeholder concern to the corporate social responsibility agenda: online privacy. While theory suggests that online privacy is a corporate social responsibility, only very few studies in the business ethics literature have connected...... these two. Based on a study of corporate social responsibility disclosures, this article contributes to the existing literature by exploring whether and how the largest IT companies embrace online privacy as a corporate social responsibility. The findings indicate that only a small proportion...... of approaches to addressing privacy was found, which suggests that no institutionalization of privacy practices has taken place yet. The study therefore indicates that online privacy is rather new on the corporate social responsibility agenda, currently playing only a minor role....

  2. Privacy and security in teleradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Teleradiology is probably the most successful eHealth service available today. Its business model is based on the remote transmission of radiological images (e.g. X-ray and CT-images) over electronic networks, and on the interpretation of the transmitted images for diagnostic purpose. Two basic service models are commonly used teleradiology today. The most common approach is based on the message paradigm (off-line model), but more developed teleradiology systems are based on the interactive use of PACS/RIS systems. Modern teleradiology is also more and more cross-organisational or even cross-border service between service providers having different jurisdictions and security policies. This paper defines the requirements needed to make different teleradiology models trusted. Those requirements include a common security policy that covers all partners and entities, common security and privacy protection principles and requirements, controlled contracts between partners, and the use of security controls and tools that supporting the common security policy. The security and privacy protection of any teleradiology system must be planned in advance, and the necessary security and privacy enhancing tools should be selected (e.g. strong authentication, data encryption, non-repudiation services and audit-logs) based on the risk analysis and requirements set by the legislation. In any case the teleradiology system should fulfil ethical and regulatory requirements. Certification of the whole teleradiology service system including security and privacy is also proposed. In the future, teleradiology services will be an integrated part of pervasive eHealth. Security requirements for this environment including dynamic and context aware security services are also discussed in this paper.

  3. Privacy-preserving distributed clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkin, Zekeriya; Veugen, Thijs; Toft, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    by taking the distributed structure of the system into account and improving the efficiency in terms of computation and communication by data packing. While our construction can be easily adjusted to a centralized or a distributed computing model, we rely on a set of particular users that help the service...... provider with computations. Experimental results clearly indicate that the work we present is an efficient way of deploying a privacy-preserving clustering algorithm in a distributed manner....

  4. Fictional privacy among Facebook users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The current study involved the creation of a fictional Facebook account with limited information and was designed to assess whether participants would accept the friendship of an ambiguous, unknown person. Results indicated that 325 Facebook members (72% of the sample) willingly accepted the friendship of the unknown individual. Results are discussed in relation to privacy concerns, norms of reciprocity, and allowing access to potentially embarrassing information and/or pictures.

  5. Online Tracking Technologies and Web Privacy:Technologieën voor Online volgen en Web Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, Mustafa Gunes Can

    2017-01-01

    In my PhD thesis, I would like to study the problem of online privacy with a focus on Web and mobile applications. Key research questions to be addressed by my study are the following: How can we formalize and quantify web tracking? What are the threats presented against privacy by different tracking techniques such as browser fingerprinting and cookie based tracking? What kind of privacy enhancing technologies (PET) can be used to ensure privacy without degrading service quality? The stud...

  6. Privacy-shake”: a haptic interface for managing privacy settings in mobile location sharing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz; Price, Blaine; Bandara, Arosha; Nuseibeh, Bashar

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed We describe the ???Privacy-Shake???, a novel interface for managing coarse grained privacy settings. We built a prototype that enables users of Buddy Tracker, an example location sharing application, to change their privacy preferences by shaking their phone. Users can enable or disable location sharing and change the level of granularity of disclosed location by shaking and sweeping their phone. In this poster we present and motivate our work on Privacy-Shake and report on a...

  7. Addressing the Privacy Paradox by Expanded Privacy Awareness - The Example of Context-Aware Services

    OpenAIRE

    Deuker, André

    2010-01-01

    International audience; When interacting with applications, users are less restrictive in disclosing their personal data than if asked in an application-independent context. On a more general level this behavior is termed as privacy paradox. The creation of privacy awareness can assist users in dealing with context-aware services without harming their privacy unintentionally, thereby addressing the privacy paradox. The paper in hand provides a research approach towards the integration of priv...

  8. "I am Spartacus":Privacy Enhancing Technologies, Collaborative Obfuscation and Privacy as a Public Good

    OpenAIRE

    Kwecka, Z.; Buchanan, W.; Schafer, B; Rauhofer, J.

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces an approach to privacy enhancing technologies that sees privacy not merely as an individual right, but as a public good. This idea finds its correspondence in our approach to privacy protection through obfuscation, where everybody in a group takes a small privacy risk to protect the anonymity of fellow group members. We show how these ideas can be computationally realised in an Investigative Data Acquisition Platform (IDAP). IDAP is an efficient symmetric Private Informat...

  9. Privacy Preserving Moving KNN Queries

    CERN Document Server

    Hashem, Tanzima; Zhang, Rui

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel approach that protects trajectory privacy of users who access location-based services through a moving k nearest neighbor (MkNN) query. An MkNN query continuously returns the k nearest data objects for a moving user (query point). Simply updating a user's imprecise location such as a region instead of the exact position to a location-based service provider (LSP) cannot ensure privacy of the user for an MkNN query: continuous disclosure of regions enables the LSP to follow a user's trajectory. We identify the problem of trajectory privacy that arises from the overlap of consecutive regions while requesting an MkNN query and provide the first solution to this problem. Our approach allows a user to specify the confidence level that represents a bound of how much more the user may need to travel than the actual kth nearest data object. By hiding a user's required confidence level and the required number of nearest data objects from an LSP, we develop a technique to prevent the LSP from tracking...

  10. Distributed privacy preserving data collection

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Mingqiang

    2011-01-01

    We study the distributed privacy preserving data collection problem: an untrusted data collector (e.g., a medical research institute) wishes to collect data (e.g., medical records) from a group of respondents (e.g., patients). Each respondent owns a multi-attributed record which contains both non-sensitive (e.g., quasi-identifiers) and sensitive information (e.g., a particular disease), and submits it to the data collector. Assuming T is the table formed by all the respondent data records, we say that the data collection process is privacy preserving if it allows the data collector to obtain a k-anonymized or l-diversified version of T without revealing the original records to the adversary. We propose a distributed data collection protocol that outputs an anonymized table by generalization of quasi-identifier attributes. The protocol employs cryptographic techniques such as homomorphic encryption, private information retrieval and secure multiparty computation to ensure the privacy goal in the process of data collection. Meanwhile, the protocol is designed to leak limited but non-critical information to achieve practicability and efficiency. Experiments show that the utility of the anonymized table derived by our protocol is in par with the utility achieved by traditional anonymization techniques. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Portrait of a Privacy Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshitaishvili Yan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of online social networks has changed the way in which we share personal thoughts, political views, and pictures. Pictures have a particularly important role in the privacy of users, as they can convey substantial information (e.g., a person was attending an event, or has met with another person. Moreover, because of the nature of social networks, it has become increasingly difficult to control who has access to which content. Therefore, when a substantial amount of pictures are accessible to one party, there is a very serious potential for violations of the privacy of users. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technique that, given a large corpus of pictures shared on a social network, automatically determines who is dating whom, with reasonable precision. More specifically, our approach combines facial recognition, spatial analysis, and machine learning techniques to determine pairs that are dating. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first privacy attack of this kind performed on social networks. We implemented our approach in a tool, called Creepic, and evaluated it on two real-world datasets. The results show that it is possible to automatically extract non-obvious, and nondisclosed, relationships between people represented in a group of pictures, even when the people involved are not directly part of a connected social clique.

  12. The Infopriv model for information privacy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Phil. (Computer Science) The privacy of personal information is crucial in today's information systems. Traditional security models are mainly concerned with the protection of information inside a computer system. These models assume that the users of a computer system are trustworthy and will not disclose information to unauthorised parties. However, this assumption does not always apply to information privacy since people are the major cause of privacy violations. Alternative models ar...

  13. Trust and Privacy in Our Networked World

    OpenAIRE

    Tavani, Herman T.; Dieter Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Remarking on the relationship between the concepts of trust and privacy, Charles Fried (1990, p. 56) [1] writes: Trust is the attitude of expectation that another will behave according to the constraints of morality… There can be no trust where there is no possibility of error. More specifically, man cannot know that he is trusted unless he has the right to act without constant surveillance so that he knows he can betray the trust. Privacy confers that essential right… Without privacy and the...

  14. An Alternative View of Privacy on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The predominant analysis of privacy on Facebook focuses on personal information revelation. This paper is critical of this kind of research and introduces an alternative analytical framework for studying privacy on Facebook, social networking sites and web 2.0. This framework is connecting the phenomenon of online privacy to the political economy of capitalism—a focus that has thus far been rather neglected in research literature about Internet and web 2.0 privacy. Liberal privacy philosophy tends to ignore the political economy of privacy in capitalism that can mask socio-economic inequality and protect capital and the rich from public accountability. Facebook is in this paper analyzed with the help of an approach, in which privacy for dominant groups, in regard to the ability of keeping wealth and power secret from the public, is seen as problematic, whereas privacy at the bottom of the power pyramid for consumers and normal citizens is seen as a protection from dominant interests. Facebook’s privacy concept is based on an understanding that stresses self-regulation and on an individualistic understanding of privacy. The theoretical analysis of the political economy of privacy on Facebook in this paper is based on the political theories of Karl Marx, Hannah Arendt and Jürgen Habermas. Based on the political economist Dallas Smythe’s concept of audience commodification, the process of prosumer commodification on Facebook is analyzed. The political economy of privacy on Facebook is analyzed with the help of a theory of drives that is grounded in Herbert Marcuse’s interpretation of Sigmund Freud, which allows to analyze Facebook based on the concept of play labor (= the convergence of play and labor.

  15. Predicting Privacy Attitudes Using Phone Metadata

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing usage of smartphones, there is a corresponding increase in the phone metadata generated by individuals using these devices. Managing the privacy of personal information on these devices can be a complex task. Recent research has suggested the use of social and behavioral data for automatically recommending privacy settings. This paper is the first effort to connect users' phone use metadata with their privacy attitudes. Based on a 10-week long field study involving phone m...

  16. 77 FR 59386 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ...] Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of a Revised Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Bureau of Consumer Financial [[Page 59387

  17. 77 FR 65206 - Privacy Act of 1974; Amendment of Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... BOARD Privacy Act of 1974; Amendment of Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: Merit Systems Protection... maintains subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a). MSPB/ GOVT-1, ``Appeals and Case Records,'' is being amended to reflect that its location is in the Office of the Clerk of the Board. Also, the...

  18. Vehicular ad hoc network security and privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, X

    2015-01-01

    Unlike any other book in this area, this book provides innovative solutions to security issues, making this book a must read for anyone working with or studying security measures. Vehicular Ad Hoc Network Security and Privacy mainly focuses on security and privacy issues related to vehicular communication systems. It begins with a comprehensive introduction to vehicular ad hoc network and its unique security threats and privacy concerns and then illustrates how to address those challenges in highly dynamic and large size wireless network environments from multiple perspectives. This book is richly illustrated with detailed designs and results for approaching security and privacy threats.

  19. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality.

  20. Privacy Protection Research of Mobile RFID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification is one of the most controversial technologies at present.It is very difficult to detect who reads a tag incorporated into products owned by a person,a significant concern to privacy threats in RFID system arises from this reason.User privacy problem is prior considersion for mobile RFID service,because most mobile RFID service based on end-user service.Propose a solution for user privacy protection,which is a modification of EPC Class 1 Generation 2 protocol,and introduce a privacy protection scenario for mobile RFID service using this method.

  1. Location privacy protection in mobile networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xinxin

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBrief analyzes the potential privacy threats in wireless and mobile network environments, and reviews some existing works. It proposes multiple privacy preserving techniques against several types of privacy threats that are targeting users in a mobile network environment. Depending on the network architecture, different approaches can be adopted. The first proposed approach considers a three-party system architecture where there is a trusted central authority that can be used to protect users? privacy. The second approach considers a totally distributed environment where users per

  2. Privacy Preserving Data Publishing: A Classification Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N K Zaman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of privacy is expressed as release of information in a controlled way. Privacy could also be defined as privacy decides what type of personal information should be released and which group or person can access and use it. Privacy Preserving Data Publishing (PPDP is a way to allow one to share anonymous data to ensure protection against identity disclosure of an individual. Data anonymization is a technique for PPDP, which makes sure the published data, is practically useful for processing (mining while preserving individuals sensitive information. Most works reported in literature on privacy preserving data publishing for classification task handle numerical data. However, most real life data contains both numerical and non-numerical data. Another shortcoming is that use of distributed model called Secure Multiparty Computation (SMC. For this research, a centralized model is used for independent data publication by a single data owner. The key challenge for PPDP is to ensure privacy as well as to keep the data usable for research. Differential privacy is a technique that ensures the highest level of privacy for a record owner while providing actual information of the data set. The aim of this research is to develop a framework that satisfies differential privacy standards and to ensure maximum data usability for a classification tasks such as patient data classification in terms of blood pressure.

  3. 75 FR 22577 - Proposed Privacy Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... request for public comment on Proposed Privacy Policy Statement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) seeks public comment on the Proposed Privacy Policy Statement. OMB Memorandum M-99- 18.... These statements are intended to inform the public of government- wide policies and how each...

  4. Differential privacy in intelligent transportation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kargl, Frank; Friedman, Arik; Boreli, Roksana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the concept of differential privacy can be applied to Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), focusing on protection of Floating Car Data (FCD) stored and processed in central Traffic Data Centers (TDC). We illustrate an integration of differential privacy with

  5. Privacy-Preserving Location-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS for short) providers require users' current locations to answer their location-based queries, e.g., range and nearest-neighbor queries. Revealing personal location information to potentially untrusted service providers could create privacy risks for users. To this end, our objective is to design a privacy-preserving…

  6. Contemporary Privacy Theory Contributions to Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    With the continued adoption of learning analytics in higher education institutions, vast volumes of data are generated and "big data" related issues, including privacy, emerge. Privacy is an ill-defined concept and subject to various interpretations and perspectives, including those of philosophers, lawyers, and information systems…

  7. Just in Time Research: Privacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grama, Joanna Lyn

    2014-01-01

    The January 2014 edition of the ECAR Update subscriber newsletter included an informal poll on information privacy practices. The poll was intended to collect a quick snapshot of the higher education community's thoughts on this important topic during Data Privacy Month. Results of the poll will be used to inform EDUCAUSE research, programs,…

  8. Online privacy: overview and preliminary research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mekovec

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Over the last decade using the Internet for online shopping, information browsing and searching as well as for online communication has become part of everyday life. Although the Internet technology has a lot of benefits for users, one of the most important disadvantages is related to the increasing capacity for users’ online activity surveillance. However, the users are increasingly becoming aware of online surveillance methods, which results in their increased concern for privacy protection. Numerous factors influence the way in which individuals perceive the level of privacy protection when they are online. This article provides a review of factors that influence the privacy perception of Internet users. Previous online privacy research related to e-business was predominantly focused on the dimension of information privacy and concerned with the way users’ personal information is collected, saved and used by an online company. This article’s main aim is to provide an overview of numerous Internet users’ privacy perception elements across various privacy dimensions as well as their potential categorization. In addition, considering that e-banking and online shopping are one of the most widely used e-services, an examination of online privacy perception of e-banking/online shopping users was performed. 

  9. Privacy and Ethics in Undergraduate GIS Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, Peter; Burnett, Adam; Dolfi, Emmalee; Goldfarb, Ali; Baum, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The development of location-aware technologies, such as smartphones, raises serious questions regarding locational privacy and the ethical use of geographic data. The degree to which these concepts are taught in undergraduate geographic information science (GISci) courses is unknown. A survey of GISci educators shows that issues of privacy and…

  10. Differential privacy in intelligent transportation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kargl, Frank; Friedman, Arik; Boreli, Roksana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the concept of differential privacy can be applied to Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), focusing on protection of Floating Car Data (FCD) stored and processed in central Traffic Data Centers (TDC). We illustrate an integration of differential privacy with pr

  11. A Deontological View of the Privacy Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alan

    The mass media are at odds with the public on issues concerning privacy, i.e., issues concerning whether private information about a person should be printed in a newspaper or magazine. In a 1982 survey, one journalist/respondent said his or her newspaper "almost always" favored the public's right to know over a person's right to privacy.…

  12. Privacy-Preserving Location-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS for short) providers require users' current locations to answer their location-based queries, e.g., range and nearest-neighbor queries. Revealing personal location information to potentially untrusted service providers could create privacy risks for users. To this end, our objective is to design a privacy-preserving…

  13. The Press, Privacy, and Community Mores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Theodore L.

    Because of judicial indifference and legislative inaction, the conflict between the right of privacy and the freedom of the press is no closer to a resolution than it was a century ago. William Prosser's reduction of the common law of privacy into four separate torts has not solved the problem. The concept of "newsworthiness" has not been helpful…

  14. Virtue, Privacy and Self-Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatellos, Giannis

    2011-01-01

    The ethical problem of privacy lies at the core of computer ethics and cyber ethics discussions. The extensive use of personal data in digital networks poses a serious threat to the user’s right of privacy not only at the level of a user’s data integrity and security but also at the level of a user...

  15. Privacy Preserving Mapping Schemes Supporting Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    To cater to the privacy requirements in cloud computing, we introduce a new primitive, namely Privacy Preserving Mapping (PPM) schemes supporting comparison. An PPM scheme enables a user to map data items into images in such a way that, with a set of images, any entity can determine the $<, =, >$ re

  16. Privacy Preserving Mapping Schemes Supporting Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    To cater to the privacy requirements in cloud computing, we introduce a new primitive, namely Privacy Preserving Mapping (PPM) schemes supporting comparison. An PPM scheme enables a user to map data items into images in such a way that, with a set of images, any entity can determine the <, =, >

  17. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  18. Defining Privacy Is Supposed to Be Easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Gross, Thomas; Viganò, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Formally specifying privacy goals is not trivial. The most widely used approach in formal methods is based on the static equivalence of frames in the applied pi-calculus, basically asking whether or not the intruder is able to distinguish two given worlds. A subtle question is how we can be sure...... that we have specified all pairs of worlds to properly reflect our intuitive privacy goal. To address this problem, we introduce in this paper a novel and declarative way to specify privacy goals, called α-β privacy, and relate it to static equivalence. This new approach is based on specifying two...... formulae α and β in first-order logic with Herbrand universes, where α reflects the intentionally released information and β includes the actual cryptographic (“technical”) messages the intruder can see. Then α-β privacy means that the intruder cannot derive any “non-technical” statement from β that he...

  19. Protecting privacy in a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Guilan; Xiao, Zhichun

    2015-06-01

    Peking University has several prestigious teaching hospitals in China. To make secondary use of massive medical data for research purposes, construction of a clinical data warehouse is imperative in Peking University. However, a big concern for clinical data warehouse construction is how to protect patient privacy. In this project, we propose to use a combination of symmetric block ciphers, asymmetric ciphers, and cryptographic hashing algorithms to protect patient privacy information. The novelty of our privacy protection approach lies in message-level data encryption, the key caching system, and the cryptographic key management system. The proposed privacy protection approach is scalable to clinical data warehouse construction with any size of medical data. With the composite privacy protection approach, the clinical data warehouse can be secure enough to keep the confidential data from leaking to the outside world. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Public privacy: Reciprocity and Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kennedy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In his 1958 poem 'Dedication to my Wife' TS Eliot proclaims "these are private words addressed to you in public". Simultaneously written for his wife, Valerie Fletcher, and to the implied you of a discourse network, Eliot's poem helps to illustrate the narrative voices and silences that are constitutive of an intimate public sphere. This paper situates reciprocity as a condition of possibility for public privacy. It shows how reciprocity is enabled by systems of code operating through material and symbolic registers. Code promises to control communication, to produce neutral, systemic forms of meaning. Yet such automation is challenged by uneven and fragmented patterns of reciprocity. Moreover, examining the media of public privacy reveals historical trajectories important for understanding contemporary socio­technical platforms of reciprocity. To explore the implicit requirement of reciprocity in publicly private practices, three sites of communication are investigated framed by a media archaeology perspective: postal networks, the mail­art project PostSecret and the anonymous zine 'You'.

  1. 32 CFR 806b.4 - Privacy Act complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... unique system complaints through the respective component chain of command. (b) For Privacy Act... complaints or allegations of Privacy Act violations through the appropriate base or Major Command Privacy Act office, to the local systems manager. The base or Major Command Privacy Act officer directs the...

  2. 48 CFR 52.224-2 - Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Privacy Act. 52.224-2... AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.224-2 Privacy... agency function: Privacy Act (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor agrees to— (1) Comply with the Privacy Act of...

  3. 45 CFR 503.2 - General policies-Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General policies-Privacy Act. 503.2 Section 503.2... THE UNITED STATES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RULES OF PRACTICE PRIVACY ACT AND GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE REGULATIONS Privacy Act Regulations § 503.2 General policies—Privacy Act. The Commission will protect the...

  4. 45 CFR 503.1 - Definitions-Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions-Privacy Act. 503.1 Section 503.1... THE UNITED STATES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RULES OF PRACTICE PRIVACY ACT AND GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE REGULATIONS Privacy Act Regulations § 503.1 Definitions—Privacy Act. For the purpose of this part: Agency...

  5. 75 FR 28051 - Public Workshop: Pieces of Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Pieces of Privacy AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice announcing public workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Pieces of Privacy.'' DATES: The workshop will be held on June 10, 2010, from 8...

  6. 43 CFR 2.47 - Records subject to Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records subject to Privacy Act. 2.47 Section 2.47 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Privacy Act § 2.47 Records subject to Privacy Act. The Privacy Act applies to all...

  7. Privacy Issues of a National Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Graveman, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the right to privacy of communications focuses on privacy expectations within a National Research and Education Network (NREN). Highlights include privacy needs in scientific and education communications; academic and research networks; network security and privacy concerns; protection strategies; and consequences of privacy…

  8. 25 CFR 700.259 - Records subject to Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records subject to Privacy Act. 700.259 Section 700.259 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 700.259 Records subject to Privacy Act. The Privacy Act applies to all “records” as...

  9. Digital Privacy: Toward a New Politics and Discursive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Philip

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of privacy focuses on digital environments and a more inclusive understanding of privacy. Highlights include legal and policy conceptions; legislation protecting privacy; relevant Supreme Court cases; torts and privacy; European and other efforts; surveillance and social control; information entrepreneurialism; Jurgen Habermas; free…

  10. Data privacy foundations, new developments and the big data challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Torra, Vicenç

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a broad, cohesive overview of the field of data privacy. It discusses, from a technological perspective, the problems and solutions of the three main communities working on data privacy: statistical disclosure control (those with a statistical background), privacy-preserving data mining (those working with data bases and data mining), and privacy-enhancing technologies (those involved in communications and security) communities. Presenting different approaches, the book describes alternative privacy models and disclosure risk measures as well as data protection procedures for respondent, holder and user privacy. It also discusses specific data privacy problems and solutions for readers who need to deal with big data.

  11. Digital privacy in the marketplace perspectives on the information exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, George

    2015-01-01

    Digital Privacy in the Marketplace focuses on the data ex-changes between marketers and consumers, with special ttention to the privacy challenges that are brought about by new information technologies. The purpose of this book is to provide a background source to help the reader think more deeply about the impact of privacy issues on both consumers and marketers. It covers topics such as: why privacy is needed, the technological, historical and academic theories of privacy, how market exchange af-fects privacy, what are the privacy harms and protections available, and what is the likely futur

  12. Privacy by design in personal health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Anders

    2015-06-01

    The concept of privacy by design is becoming increasingly popular among regulators of information and communications technologies. This paper aims at analysing and discussing the ethical implications of this concept for personal health monitoring. I assume a privacy theory of restricted access and limited control. On the basis of this theory, I suggest a version of the concept of privacy by design that constitutes a middle road between what I call broad privacy by design and narrow privacy by design. The key feature of this approach is that it attempts to balance automated privacy protection and autonomously chosen privacy protection in a way that is context-sensitive. In personal health monitoring, this approach implies that in some contexts like medication assistance and monitoring of specific health parameters one single automatic option is legitimate, while in some other contexts, for example monitoring in which relatives are receivers of health-relevant information rather than health care professionals, a multi-choice approach stressing autonomy is warranted.

  13. Privacy-preserving heterogeneous health data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Noman; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Rui; Fung, Benjamin C M; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-05-01

    Privacy-preserving data publishing addresses the problem of disclosing sensitive data when mining for useful information. Among existing privacy models, ε-differential privacy provides one of the strongest privacy guarantees and makes no assumptions about an adversary's background knowledge. All existing solutions that ensure ε-differential privacy handle the problem of disclosing relational and set-valued data in a privacy-preserving manner separately. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that considers both relational and set-valued data in differentially private disclosure of healthcare data. The proposed approach makes a simple yet fundamental switch in differentially private algorithm design: instead of listing all possible records (ie, a contingency table) for noise addition, records are generalized before noise addition. The algorithm first generalizes the raw data in a probabilistic way, and then adds noise to guarantee ε-differential privacy. We showed that the disclosed data could be used effectively to build a decision tree induction classifier. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is scalable and performs better than existing solutions for classification analysis. The resulting utility may degrade when the output domain size is very large, making it potentially inappropriate to generate synthetic data for large health databases. Unlike existing techniques, the proposed algorithm allows the disclosure of health data containing both relational and set-valued data in a differentially private manner, and can retain essential information for discriminative analysis.

  14. New threats to health data privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjun; Zou, Xukai; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jake Y

    2011-11-24

    Along with the rapid digitalization of health data (e.g. Electronic Health Records), there is an increasing concern on maintaining data privacy while garnering the benefits, especially when the data are required to be published for secondary use. Most of the current research on protecting health data privacy is centered around data de-identification and data anonymization, which removes the identifiable information from the published health data to prevent an adversary from reasoning about the privacy of the patients. However, published health data is not the only source that the adversaries can count on: with a large amount of information that people voluntarily share on the Web, sophisticated attacks that join disparate information pieces from multiple sources against health data privacy become practical. Limited efforts have been devoted to studying these attacks yet. We study how patient privacy could be compromised with the help of today's information technologies. In particular, we show that private healthcare information could be collected by aggregating and associating disparate pieces of information from multiple online data sources including online social networks, public records and search engine results. We demonstrate a real-world case study to show user identity and privacy are highly vulnerable to the attribution, inference and aggregation attacks. We also show that people are highly identifiable to adversaries even with inaccurate information pieces about the target, with real data analysis. We claim that too much information has been made available electronic and available online that people are very vulnerable without effective privacy protection.

  15. Kids Sell: Celebrity Kids’ Right to Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Choul Hong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The lives of celebrities are often spotlighted in the media because of their newsworthiness; however, many celebrities argue that their right to privacy is often infringed upon. Concerns about celebrity privacy are not limited to the celebrities themselves and often expand to their children. As a result of their popularity, public interest has pushed paparazzi and journalists to pursue trivial and private details about the lives of both celebrities and their children. This paper investigates conflicting areas where the right to privacy and the right to know collide when dealing with the children of celebrities. In general, the courts have been unsympathetic to celebrity privacy claims, noting their newsworthiness and self-promoted characteristic. Unless the press violates news-gathering ethics or torts, the courts will often rule in favor of the media. However, the story becomes quite different when related to an infringement on the privacy of celebrities’ children. This paper argues that all children have a right to protect their privacy regardless of their parents’ social status. Children of celebrities should not be exempt to principles of privacy just because their parents are a celebrity. Furthermore, they should not be exposed by the media without the voluntary consent of their legal patrons. That is, the right of the media to publish and the newsworthiness of children of celebrities must be restrictedly acknowledged.

  16. Anonymising the Sparse Dataset: A New Privacy Preservation Approach while Predicting Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shyamala Susan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Data mining techniques analyze the medical dataset with the intention of enhancing patient’s health and privacy. Most of the existing techniques are properly suited for low dimensional medical dataset. The proposed methodology designs a model for the representation of sparse high dimensional medical dataset with the attitude of protecting the patient’s privacy from an adversary and additionally to predict the disease’s threat degree. In a sparse data set many non-zero values are randomly spread in the entire data space. Hence, the challenge is to cluster the correlated patient’s record to predict the risk degree of the disease earlier than they occur in patients and to keep privacy. The first phase converts the sparse dataset right into a band matrix through the Genetic algorithm along with Cuckoo Search (GCS.This groups the correlated patient’s record together and arranges them close to the diagonal. The next segment dissociates the patient’s disease, which is a sensitive value (SA with the parameters that determine the disease normally Quasi Identifier (QI.Finally, density based clustering technique is used over the underlying data to  create anonymized groups to maintain privacy and to predict the risk level of disease. Empirical assessments on actual health care data corresponding to V.A.Medical Centre heart disease dataset reveal the efficiency of this model pertaining to information loss, utility and privacy.

  17. Security and privacy threats in RFID traceability network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu; Chao-Hsien

    2008-01-01

    To address security and privacy issues in radio frequency identification (RFID) traceability networks, a multi-layer privacy and security framework is proposed, which includes four facets: a security model, a communication protocol, access permission and privacy preservation. According to the security requirements that are needed in an RFID system, a security model that incorporates security requirements that include privacy of tag data, privacy of ownership, and availability of tag identity is introduced. ...

  18. Privacy-Preserving Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM). The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model. PMID:25101139

  19. 5G Visions of User Privacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Khajuria, Samant; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the discussions are going on the elements and definition of 5G networks. One of the elements in this discussion is how to provide for user controlled privacy for securing users' digital interaction. The purpose of this paper is to present elements of user controlled privacy needed...... for the future 5G networks. The paper concludes that an ecosystem consisting of Trusted Third Party between the end user and the service providers as a distributed system could be integrated to secure the perspective of user controlled privacy for future systems...

  20. Privacy and Intercultural Communication——Causes Behind Different Privacy of the Chinese and the American

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯彩虹; 潘建虎

    2012-01-01

    Chinese culture is featured by its “togethemess”,collectivism,and its agricultural tradition;while American culture is featured by its “apartness”,individualism and its industrial tradition.The three dominant features determine the two cultures' different privacy rules.This paper puts the focus on the analysis of the causes behind the two different privacy.What's more,the globalization influences the privacy rules of the two cultures,people are more adaptive and have changed a lot.

  1. Privacy issues in mobile advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleff, Evelyne Beatrix

    The emergence of the wired Internet and mobile telecommunication networks is creating new opportunities for advertisers to generate new revenue streams through mobile users. As consumer adoption of mobile technology continues to increase, it is only a question of time when mobile advertising...... becomes an important part of marketing strategies. The development of mobile advertising, however, will be dependent on acceptance and usability issues in order to ensure permission-based advertising. Growing concerns about the protection of the users' privacy have been raised since mobile advertising may...... become extremely intrusive practices in an intimate personal space. This article focuses on the evaluation of legal problems raised by this novel form of advertising. It is assumed that a technological design, which is in line with the legal framework, will ensure that the benefits of mobile advertising...

  2. Privacy issues in mobile advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleff, Evelyne Beatrix

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of the wired Internet and mobile telecommunication networks is creating new opportunities for advertisers to generate new revenue streams through mobile users. As consumer adoption of mobile technology continues to increase, it is only a question of time when mobile advertising...... becomes an important part of marketing strategies. The development of mobile advertising, however, will be dependent on acceptance and usability issues in order to ensure permission-based advertising. Growing concerns about the protection of the users' privacy have been raised since mobile advertising may...... become extremely intrusive practices in an intimate personal space. This article focuses on the evaluation of legal problems raised by this novel form of advertising. It is assumed that a technological design, which is in line with the legal framework, will ensure that the benefits of mobile advertising...

  3. Privacy issues in mobile advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleff, Evelyne Beatrix

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of the wired Internet and mobile telecommunication networks is creating new opportunities for advertisers to generate new revenue streams through mobile users. As consumer adoption of mobile technology continues to increase, it is only a question of time when mobile advertising...... become extremely intrusive practices in an intimate personal space. This article focuses on the evaluation of legal problems raised by this novel form of advertising. It is assumed that a technological design, which is in line with the legal framework, will ensure that the benefits of mobile advertising...... becomes an important part of marketing strategies. The development of mobile advertising, however, will be dependent on acceptance and usability issues in order to ensure permission-based advertising. Growing concerns about the protection of the users' privacy have been raised since mobile advertising may...

  4. Privacy issues in mobile advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleff, Evelyne Beatrix

    The emergence of the wired Internet and mobile telecommunication networks is creating new opportunities for advertisers to generate new revenue streams through mobile users. As consumer adoption of mobile technology continues to increase, it is only a question of time when mobile advertising...... become extremely intrusive practices in an intimate personal space. This article focuses on the evaluation of legal problems raised by this novel form of advertising. It is assumed that a technological design, which is in line with the legal framework, will ensure that the benefits of mobile advertising...... becomes an important part of marketing strategies. The development of mobile advertising, however, will be dependent on acceptance and usability issues in order to ensure permission-based advertising. Growing concerns about the protection of the users' privacy have been raised since mobile advertising may...

  5. 78 FR 8538 - Privacy Act of 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... information outside the agency, and how individual record subjects can exercise their rights under the Privacy... subject individual's name (woman's maiden name, if applicable), and SSN (furnishing the SSN is voluntary...

  6. Cybersecurity and Privacy - bridging the gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    he huge potential in future connected services has as a precondition that privacy and security needs are dealt with in order for new services to be accepted. This issue is increasingly on the agenda both at the company and at individual level. Cybersecurity and Privacy – bridging the gap addresses...... two very complex fields of the digital world, i.e., Cybersecurity and Privacy. These multifaceted, multidisciplinary and complex issues are usually understood and valued differently by different individuals, data holders and legal bodies. But a change in one field immediately affects the others....... Policies, frameworks, strategies, laws, tools, techniques, and technologies – all of these are tightly interwoven when it comes to security and privacy. This book is another attempt to bridge the gap between the industry and academia. The book addresses the views from academia and industry on the subject...

  7. SWIFT Privacy: Data Processor Becomes Data Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jacobs

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Last month, SWIFT emphasised the urgent need for a solution to compliance with US Treasury subpoenas that provides legal certainty for the financial industry as well as for SWIFT. SWIFT will continue its activities to adhere to the Safe Harbor framework of the European data privacy legislation. Safe Harbor is a framework negotiated by the EU and US in 2000 to provide a way for companies in Europe, with operations in the US, to conform to EU data privacy regulations. This seems to conclude a complex privacy case, widely covered by the US and European media. A fundamental question in this case was who is a data controller and who is a mere data processor. Both the Belgian and the European privacy authorities considered SWIFT, jointly with the banks, as a data controller whereas SWIFT had considered itself as a mere data processor that processed financial data for banks. The difference between controller and processor has far reaching consequences.

  8. Security with Privacy - Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Bertino, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes opportunities and challenges concerning how we can achieve security while still ensuring privacy. It identifies research directions and includes a number of questions that have been debated by the panel.

  9. Data Security and Privacy in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Yunchuan Sun; Junsheng Zhang; Yongping Xiong; Guangyu Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Data security has consistently been a major issue in information technology. In the cloud computing environment, it becomes particularly serious because the data is located in different places even in all the globe. Data security and privacy protection are the two main factors of user’s concerns about the cloud technology. Though many techniques on the topics in cloud computing have been investigated in both academics and industries, data security and privacy protection are becoming more impo...

  10. Privacy: The Small and Large of It

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

    1999-10-22

    The topic of Privacy is complex, multi-faceted, and often emotionally laden. This paper will cover the following topics, in an effort to further understanding of federal regulations and activities, the balancing act that necessarily occurs in business, and what role a records manager can play. The topics are: Definitions; The Privacy Act; ''Private'' companies; Potential areas of concern; Expectations; Corporate responsibilities; Case studies; and Records Manager's role.

  11. Privacy Preserving Recommendation System Based on Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Shang; Hui, Yuk; Hui, Pan; Cuff, Paul; Kulkarni, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Recommendation systems have received considerable attention in the recent decades. Yet with the development of information technology and social media, the risk in revealing private data to service providers has been a growing concern to more and more users. Trade-offs between quality and privacy in recommendation systems naturally arise. In this paper, we present a privacy preserving recommendation framework based on groups. The main idea is to use groups as a natural middleware to preserve ...

  12. Privacy policies for health social networking sites

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Health social networking sites (HSNS), virtual communities where users connect with each other around common problems and share relevant health data, have been increasingly adopted by medical professionals and patients. The growing use of HSNS like Sermo and PatientsLikeMe has prompted public concerns about the risks that such online data-sharing platforms pose to the privacy and security of personal health data. This paper articulates a set of privacy risks introduced by social networking in...

  13. Privacy and legal issues in cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Rolf H

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multi-disciplinary and comparative approach, this book focuses on emerging and innovative attempts to tackle privacy and legal issues in cloud computing, such as personal data privacy, security and intellectual property protection. Leading international academics and practitioners in the fields of law and computer science examine the specific legal implications of cloud computing pertaining to jurisdiction, biomedical practice and information ownership. This collection offers original and critical responses to the rising challenges posed by cloud computing.

  14. Location Privacy Issues in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kůr, Jiří; Stetsko, Andriy

    We discuss location privacy issues in wireless sensor networks. We consider sensor nodes with more responsible roles and the need to protect locations of such nodes. Available countermeasures against various types of traffic analysis attacks are examined and their problems are identified. We do not propose new traffic analysis resistance technique. Instead, we draw attention to blanks in current situation and identify several open questions, which should be answered in order to ensure location privacy of nodes.

  15. Game Theory Meets Network Security and Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Manshaei, Mohammadhossein; Zhu, Quanyan; Alpcan, Tansu; Basar, Tamer; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This survey provides a structured and comprehensive overview of the research contributions that analyze and solve security and privacy problems in computer networks by game-theoretic approaches. A selected set of works are presented to highlight the application of game theory in order to address different forms of security and privacy problems in computer networks and mobile applications. The presented works are classified into six main categories based on their topics: security of the physic...

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Google+'s Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide a preliminary analysis of Google+ privacy. We identified that Google+ shares photo metadata with users who can access the photograph and discuss its potential impact on privacy. We also identified that Google+ encourages the provision of other names including maiden name, which may help criminals performing identity theft. We show that Facebook lists are a superset of Google+ circles, both functionally and logically, even though Google+ provides a better user interfac...

  17. Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Privacy protections against government surveillance are often scoped to communications content and exclude communications metadata. In the United States, the National Security Agency operated a particularly controversial program, collecting bulk telephone metadata nationwide. We investigate the privacy properties of telephone metadata to assess the impact of policies that distinguish between content and metadata. We find that telephone metadata is densely interconnected, can trivially be reid...

  18. Trust and Privacy in Our Networked World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman T. Tavani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Remarking on the relationship between the concepts of trust and privacy, Charles Fried (1990, p. 56 [1] writes: Trust is the attitude of expectation that another will behave according to the constraints of morality… There can be no trust where there is no possibility of error. More specifically, man cannot know that he is trusted unless he has the right to act without constant surveillance so that he knows he can betray the trust. Privacy confers that essential right… Without privacy and the possibility of error which it protects that aspect of his humanity is denied to him. The important relationship between trust and privacy that Fried describes is often overlooked in the contemporary literature on privacy, as well in the recent publications that focus on trust and trust-related topics. The six essays included in this special issue of Information, however, give us some additional insights into certain conceptual and practical connections involving the notions of trust and privacy. In this respect, the contributing authors expand upon the insight in Fried’s classic work on the interconnection between the two concepts.[...

  19. Privacy in Online Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Ida Evones

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are more than 192 act ive social networking websites. Bringing every kind of social group together in one place and letting them interact is really a big thing indeed .Huge amount of information process in the sites each day, end up making it vulnerable to attack. There is no systematic framework taking into account the importance of privacy. Increased privacy settings don’t always guarantee privacy when there is a loop hole in the applications. Lack of user education results is over sharing. Privacy settings to limit access to some data are available, but these settings are never the default. Only a tiny minority make use of these. Online social network does not provide any demarcation line between private and public information. The personal informat ion shared in online social networks can harm the user in often unexpected ways. Private data is available in plenty. The major privacy problems are due to complicated privacy model, implementation errors and economic pressure. Until recently, not much work was done in this area. The recent papers, which I have collected is a Testimony to state that lot of work needs to be done in this area.

  20. Social networking and privacy attitudes among

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A. Carruth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Daily use of social networking sites (SNS such as Facebook has become routine for millions of Internet users. Facebook is currently still the most popular social media site. Social networking has been rapidly adopted by societies around the world. In particular, social media like Facebook provide sites where users can personalize a profile with their information, pictures, and videos that can be shared with other users. This information can be used in ways that may violate users’ privacy with or without their knowledge. The hypotheses were that use of Facebook, user self-efficacy for social media and users’ general attitudes about privacy expectations are predictors of specific attitudes towards Facebook social media privacy, among a sample of 284, mostly white female, undergraduate college students in their twenties. Facebook self-efficacy and Facebook personal privacy violations were significant determinants of general Internet social media privacy concerns. However, Facebook use was not a significant factor for general Internet social media privacy concerns. Perceived benefits of Facebook generally appear to outweigh risks of disclosing personal information.

  1. Users or Students? Privacy in University MOOCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meg Leta; Regner, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Two terms, student privacy and Massive Open Online Courses, have received a significant amount of attention recently. Both represent interesting sites of change in entrenched structures, one educational and one legal. MOOCs represent something college courses have never been able to provide: universal access. Universities not wanting to miss the MOOC wave have started to build MOOC courses and integrate them into the university system in various ways. However, the design and scale of university MOOCs create tension for privacy laws intended to regulate information practices exercised by educational institutions. Are MOOCs part of the educational institutions these laws and policies aim to regulate? Are MOOC users students whose data are protected by aforementioned laws and policies? Many university researchers and faculty members are asked to participate as designers and instructors in MOOCs but may not know how to approach the issues proposed. While recent scholarship has addressed the disruptive nature of MOOCs, student privacy generally, and data privacy in the K-12 system, we provide an in-depth description and analysis of the MOOC phenomenon and the privacy laws and policies that guide and regulate educational institutions today. We offer privacy case studies of three major MOOC providers active in the market today to reveal inconsistencies among MOOC platform and the level and type of legal uncertainty surrounding them. Finally, we provide a list of organizational questions to pose internally to navigate the uncertainty presented to university MOOC teams.

  2. The Privacy Problem: Although School Librarians Seldom Discuss It, Students' Privacy Rights Are under Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Helen R.

    2011-01-01

    Every day in school libraries nationwide, students' privacy rights are under attack, but many principals, teachers, parents, and community members do not know much about these rights. Even though school librarians are among the strongest proponents of privacy, the subject is rarely discussed, probably because state and federal laws can be…

  3. The Preference for Privacy: In Search of the Social Locations of Privacy Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Oscar H., Jr.

    A study was conducted to develop some understanding of how social experience might be related to public expectations of rights to privacy. A telephone questionnaire was developed which sought information about respondent knowledge, attitudes, and behavior regarding privacy and personal information. A national survey of adults over the age of 18…

  4. The Privacy Problem: Although School Librarians Seldom Discuss It, Students' Privacy Rights Are under Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Helen R.

    2011-01-01

    Every day in school libraries nationwide, students' privacy rights are under attack, but many principals, teachers, parents, and community members do not know much about these rights. Even though school librarians are among the strongest proponents of privacy, the subject is rarely discussed, probably because state and federal laws can be…

  5. Privacy by Design: An alternative to existing practice in safeguarding privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, M.J. van; Kool, L.; Schoonhoven, B. van; Jonge, M. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework. Design/methodology/approach: Attention for alternative concepts, such as PbD, which might offer surplus value in safeguarding privacy, is growing. Using

  6. Privacy and Security of Criminal History Information. An Analysis of Privacy Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubow, George B.

    Policies and issues associated with the privacy and security of criminal history information are presented. The first chapter discusses general concepts regarding privacy and security of criminal justice information, including definitions of basic terms, considerations of interests requiring attention when developing policy, relevance of fair…

  7. Privacy Issues: Journalists Should Balance Need for Privacy with Need to Cover News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plopper, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Notes that journalists have to balance their desire to print the news with personal rights to privacy. Argues that a working knowledge of ethics and law helps journalism students resolve such issues. Discusses ethical issues; legal aspects of privacy; and "training" administrators. Offers a list of questions to ask, six notable court cases and…

  8. Privacy-Enhanced and Multifunctional Health Data Aggregation under Differential Privacy Guarantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Li, Hongwei; Liang, Xiaohui; He, Shibo; Dai, Yuanshun; Zhao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid growth of the health data scale, the limited storage and computation resources of wireless body area sensor networks (WBANs) is becoming a barrier to their development. Therefore, outsourcing the encrypted health data to the cloud has been an appealing strategy. However, date aggregation will become difficult. Some recently-proposed schemes try to address this problem. However, there are still some functions and privacy issues that are not discussed. In this paper, we propose a privacy-enhanced and multifunctional health data aggregation scheme (PMHA-DP) under differential privacy. Specifically, we achieve a new aggregation function, weighted average (WAAS), and design a privacy-enhanced aggregation scheme (PAAS) to protect the aggregated data from cloud servers. Besides, a histogram aggregation scheme with high accuracy is proposed. PMHA-DP supports fault tolerance while preserving data privacy. The performance evaluation shows that the proposal leads to less communication overhead than the existing one. PMID:27626417

  9. Privacy-Enhanced and Multifunctional Health Data Aggregation under Differential Privacy Guarantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Li, Hongwei; Liang, Xiaohui; He, Shibo; Dai, Yuanshun; Zhao, Lian

    2016-09-10

    With the rapid growth of the health data scale, the limited storage and computation resources of wireless body area sensor networks (WBANs) is becoming a barrier to their development. Therefore, outsourcing the encrypted health data to the cloud has been an appealing strategy. However, date aggregation will become difficult. Some recently-proposed schemes try to address this problem. However, there are still some functions and privacy issues that are not discussed. In this paper, we propose a privacy-enhanced and multifunctional health data aggregation scheme (PMHA-DP) under differential privacy. Specifically, we achieve a new aggregation function, weighted average (WAAS), and design a privacy-enhanced aggregation scheme (PAAS) to protect the aggregated data from cloud servers. Besides, a histogram aggregation scheme with high accuracy is proposed. PMHA-DP supports fault tolerance while preserving data privacy. The performance evaluation shows that the proposal leads to less communication overhead than the existing one.

  10. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations.

  11. Complete Bipartite Anonymity for Location Privacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董恺; 顾涛; 陶先平; 吕建

    2014-01-01

    Users are vulnerable to privacy risks when providing their location information to location-based services (LBS). Existing work sacrifices the quality of LBS by degrading spatial and temporal accuracy for ensuring user privacy. In this paper, we propose a novel approach, Complete Bipartite Anonymity (CBA), aiming to achieve both user privacy and quality of service. The theoretical basis of CBA is that: if the bipartite graph of k nearby users’ paths can be transformed into a complete bipartite graph, then these users achieve k-anonymity since the set of “end points connecting to a specific start point in a graph”is an equivalence class. To achieve CBA, we design a Collaborative Path Confusion (CPC) protocol which enables nearby users to discover and authenticate each other without knowing their real identities or accurate locations, predict the encounter location using users’ moving pattern information, and generate fake traces obfuscating the real ones. We evaluate CBA using a real-world dataset, and compare its privacy performance with existing path confusion approach. The results show that CBA enhances location privacy by increasing the chance for a user confusing his/her path with others by 4 to 16 times in low user density areas. We also demonstrate that CBA is secure under the trace identification attack.

  12. Fuzzy Privacy Decision for Context-Aware Access Personal Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qingsheng; QI Yong; ZHAO Jizhong; HOU Di; NIU Yujie

    2007-01-01

    A context-aware privacy protection framework was designed for context-aware services and privacy control methods about access personal information in pervasive environment. In the process of user's privacy decision, it can produce fuzzy privacy decision as the change of personal information sensitivity and personal information receiver trust. The uncertain privacy decision model was proposed about personal information disclosure based on the change of personal information receiver trust and personal information sensitivity. A fuzzy privacy decision information system was designed according to this model. Personal privacy control policies can be extracted from this information system by using rough set theory. It also solves the problem about learning privacy control policies of personal information disclosure.

  13. Differences in Privacy Between Chinese and Western Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶爽

    2015-01-01

    Privacy means different in both cultures.In modern information society,it deverses more attention from us.Privacy in oriental culture is quite distinctive from that in western culture. And the reasons are also not the same.

  14. Differences in Privacy Between Chinese and Western Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶爽

    2015-01-01

    Privacy means different in both cultures.In modern information society,it deverses more attention from us.Privacy in oriental culture is quite distinctive from that in western culture.And the reasons are also not the same.

  15. Will the new Australian health privacy law provide adequate protection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, David; Hallit, George

    2002-01-01

    Amendments to the original Privacy Act (1988) come at a key point in time, as a national medical record system looms on the Australian horizon. Changes to The Privacy Act have the potential to define a level of information privacy prior to the implementation of such a system. We have therefore collected expert opinions on the ability of the Health Privacy Guidelines (enacted in December 2001 under The Privacy Act and hereafter more specifically known as Health Privacy Legislation) to ensure the privacy and security of patient information. We conclude that the legislation is flawed in its capacity to withstand an increasingly corporatised health sector. Deficiencies in consent requirements, together with feeble enforcement capabilities, mean The Legislation cannot effectively ensure that personally identifiable information will not end up in corporate third party hands. To significantly bolster the new legislation, we argue that it should be supplemented with explicit health data legislation and privacy auditing.

  16. Data Privacy in Electronic Commerce: Analysing Legal Provisions in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan KH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the legal protection of data privacy in electronic commerce in Iran. Currently, there is a gap in respect of data privacy protection in Iran as there is no specific privacy legislation in force. Consequently, e-consumers dealing in internet commerce are less protected. However there are rules and regulations in the laws in Iran such as the Islamic Republic (IR of Iran Constitution, Computer Crimes Act, Penal Code, and Civil Liability Act which relate to privacy in general, although not directly related to data privacy in e-commerce. The Electronic Commerce Law (ECL is the main legislation in Iran which contains some provisions on personal data privacy. This article discusses the relevant provisions in the ECL pertaining to data messages and privacy and interprets its various meanings to determine whether they are in line with well-established principles found in good data privacy protection measures.

  17. Big data privacy: The datafication of personal information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    In the age of big data we need to think differently about privacy. We need to shift our thinking from definitions of privacy (characteristics of privacy) to models of privacy (how privacy works). Moreover, in addition to the existing models of privacy—the surveillance model and capture model......—we need to also consider a new model: the datafication model presented in this article, wherein new personal information is deduced by employing predictive analytics on already-gathered data. These three models of privacy supplement each other; they are not competing understandings of privacy....... This broadened approach will take our thinking beyond current preoccupation with whether or not individuals’ consent was secured for data collection to privacy issues arising from the development of new information on individuals' likely behavior through analysis of already collected data—this new information...

  18. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy compliance life cycle. A learning lunch..., with both the training rooms and restrooms situated on the ground floor. Mary Ellen Callahan,...

  19. Social Networking and Online Privacy: Facebook Users' Perceptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deirdre O'Brien; Ann M Torres

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates Facebook users' perceptions of online privacy, exploring their awareness of privacy issues and how their behaviour is influenced by this awareness, as well as the role of trust...

  20. PREDICT: Privacy and Security Enhancing Dynamic Information Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0217 PREDICT Privacy and Security Enhancing Dynamic Information Monitoring VAIDY S SUNDERAM EMORY UNIVERSITY Final Report 08/03...TITLE AND SUBTITLE PREDICT: Privacy and Security Enhancing Dynamic Information Monitoring 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0240 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The PREDICT project incorporates security and privacy in DDDAS systems to deliver provable guarantees of privacy and

  1. A Secure and Privacy-Preserving Targeted Ad-System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulaki, Elli; Bellovin, Steven M.

    Thanks to its low product-promotion cost and its efficiency, targeted online advertising has become very popular. Unfortunately, being profile-based, online advertising methods violate consumers' privacy, which has engendered resistance to the ads. However, protecting privacy through anonymity seems to encourage click-fraud. In this paper, we define consumer's privacy and present a privacy-preserving, targeted ad system (PPOAd) which is resistant towards click fraud. Our scheme is structured to provide financial incentives to all entities involved.

  2. The Privacy Attitude Questionnaire (PAQ): Initial Development and Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Chignell, Mark H; Quan-Haase, Anabel; Gwizdka, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    Privacy has been identified as a key issue in a variety of domains, including electronic commerce and public policy. While there are many discussions of privacy issues from a legal and policy perspective, there is little information on the structure of privacy as a psychometric construct. Our goal is to develop a method for measuring attitudes towards privacy that can guide the design and personalization of services. This paper reports on the development of an initial version of the PAQ. Four...

  3. Towards Self-Organized Location Privacy in Mobile Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Freudiger, Julien; Raya, Maxim; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Pervasive communications bring along new privacy challenges, fueled by the capability of mobile devices to communicate with, and thus ``sniff on", each other directly. We design a new mechanism to achieve location privacy in these forthcoming mobile networks, whereby mobile nodes collect the pseudonyms of the nodes they encounter to generate their own privacy cloaks. Thus, privacy emerges from the mobile network and users gain control over the disclosure of their locations. We call this new p...

  4. Universally Optimal Privacy Mechanisms for Minimax Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Gupte, Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    A scheme that publishes aggregate information about sensitive data must resolve the trade-off between utility to information consumers and privacy of the database participants. Differential privacy is a well-established definition of privacy--this is a universal guarantee against all attackers, whatever their side-information or intent. In this paper, we present a universal treatment of utility based on the standard minimax rule from decision theory (in contrast to the utility model in, which is Bayesian). In our model, information consumers are minimax (risk-averse) agents, each possessing some side-information about the query, and each endowed with a loss-function which models their tolerance to inaccuracies. Further, information consumers are rational in the sense that they actively combine information from the mechanism with their side-information in a way that minimizes their loss. Under this assumption of rational behavior, we show that for every fixed count query, a certain geometric mechanism is unive...

  5. Privacy policies for health social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    Health social networking sites (HSNS), virtual communities where users connect with each other around common problems and share relevant health data, have been increasingly adopted by medical professionals and patients. The growing use of HSNS like Sermo and PatientsLikeMe has prompted public concerns about the risks that such online data-sharing platforms pose to the privacy and security of personal health data. This paper articulates a set of privacy risks introduced by social networking in health care and presents a practical example that demonstrates how the risks might be intrinsic to some HSNS. The aim of this study is to identify and sketch the policy implications of using HSNS and how policy makers and stakeholders should elaborate upon them to protect the privacy of online health data.

  6. Control use of data to protect privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Susan

    2015-01-30

    Massive data collection by businesses and governments calls into question traditional methods for protecting privacy, underpinned by two core principles: (i) notice, that there should be no data collection system whose existence is secret, and (ii) consent, that data collected for one purpose not be used for another without user permission. But notice, designated as a fundamental privacy principle in a different era, makes little sense in situations where collection consists of lots and lots of small amounts of information, whereas consent is no longer realistic, given the complexity and number of decisions that must be made. Thus, efforts to protect privacy by controlling use of data are gaining more attention. I discuss relevant technology, policy, and law, as well as some examples that can illuminate the way. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. PRIVACY IN CLOUD COMPUTING: A SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arockiam L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Various cloud computing models are used to increase the profit of an organization. Cloud provides a convenient environment and more advantages to business organizations to run their business. But, it has some issues related to the privacy of data. User’s data are stored and maintained out of user’s premises. The failure of data protection causes many issues like data theft which affects the individual organization. The cloud users may be satisfied, if their data are protected properly from unauthorized access. This paper presents a survey on different privacy issues involved in the cloud service. It also provides some suggestions to the cloud users to select their suitable cloud services by knowing their privacy policies.

  8. Privacy Analysis in Mobile Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, mobile social networks are capable of promoting social networking benefits during physical meetings, in order to leverage interpersonal affinities not only among acquaintances, but also between strangers. Due to their foundation on automated sharing of personal data in the physical...... factors: inquirer, purpose of disclosure, access & control of the disclosed information, location familiarity and current activity of the user. This research can serve as relevant input for the design of privacy management models in mobile social networks....... surroundings of the user, these networks are subject to crucial privacy threats. Privacy management systems must be capable of accurate selection of data disclosure according to human data sensitivity evaluation. Therefore, it is crucial to research and comprehend an individual's personal information...

  9. Non-Interactive Differential Privacy: a Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Leoni, David

    2012-01-01

    OpenData movement around the globe is demanding more access to information which lies locked in public or private servers. As recently reported by a McKinsey publication, this data has significant economic value, yet its release has potential to blatantly conflict with people privacy. Recent UK government inquires have shown concern from various parties about publication of anonymized databases, as there is concrete possibility of user identification by means of linkage attacks. Differential privacy stands out as a model that provides strong formal guarantees about the anonymity of the participants in a sanitized database. Only recent results demonstrated its applicability on real-life datasets, though. This paper covers such breakthrough discoveries, by reviewing applications of differential privacy for non-interactive publication of anonymized real-life datasets. Theory, utility and a data-aware comparison are discussed on a variety of principles and concrete applications.

  10. Patient privacy in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisaro, Jean Louis; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-05-07

    According to many scientists and clinicians, genomics is taking on a key role in the field of medicine. Impressive advances in genome sequencing have opened the way to a variety of revolutionary applications in modern healthcare. In particular, the increasing understanding of the human genome, and of its relation to diseases and response to treatments brings promise of improvements in better preventive and personalized medicine. However, this progress raises important privacy and ethical concerns that need to be addressed. Indeed, each genome is the ultimate identifier of its owner and, due to its nature, it contains highly personal and privacy-sensitive data. In this article, after summarizing recent advances in genomics, we discuss some important privacy issues associated with human genomic information and methods put in place to address them.

  11. Valuating Privacy with Option Pricing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Stefan; Böhme, Rainer

    One of the key challenges in the information society is responsible handling of personal data. An often-cited reason why people fail to make rational decisions regarding their own informational privacy is the high uncertainty about future consequences of information disclosures today. This chapter builds an analogy to financial options and draws on principles of option pricing to account for this uncertainty in the valuation of privacy. For this purpose, the development of a data subject's personal attributes over time and the development of the attribute distribution in the population are modeled as two stochastic processes, which fit into the Binomial Option Pricing Model (BOPM). Possible applications of such valuation methods to guide decision support in future privacy-enhancing technologies (PETs) are sketched.

  12. Effective Privacy-Preserving Online Route Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Assent, Ira; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    An online Route Planning Service (RPS) computes a route from one location to another. Current RPSs such as Google Maps require the use of precise locations. However, some users may not want to disclose their source and destination locations due to privacy concerns. An approach that supplies fake...... privacy. The solution re-uses a standard online RPS rather than replicate this functionality, and it needs no trusted third party. The solution is able to compute the exact results without leaking of the exact locations to the RPS or un-trusted parties. In addition, we provide heuristics that reduce...... the number of times that the RPS needs to be queried, and we also describe how the accuracy and privacy requirements can be relaxed to achieve better performance. An empirical study offers insight into key properties of the approach....

  13. 36 CFR 902.56 - Protection of personal privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... privacy. 902.56 Section 902.56 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT... Protection of personal privacy. (a) Any of the following personnel, medical, or similar records is within the... invasion of his personal privacy: (1) Personnel and background records personal to any officer or employee...

  14. 49 CFR 801.56 - Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. 801.56... Unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(6), any personal, medical, or similar... a clearly unwarranted invasion of the person's personal privacy. ...

  15. Privacy Concerns: The Effects of the Latest FERPA Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossler, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Privacy, something once taken for granted, has again become top-of-mind for public school districts thanks to technology's increasing reach, as well as new changes to privacy laws governing student information. Recently, educators have had to face important changes to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), originally signed into…

  16. 37 CFR 251.23 - FOIA and Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false FOIA and Privacy Act. 251.23 Section 251.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... Access to and Inspection of Records § 251.23 FOIA and Privacy Act. Freedom of Information Act and Privacy...

  17. 22 CFR 212.22 - Protection of personal privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protection of personal privacy. 212.22 Section... Information for Public Inspection and Copying § 212.22 Protection of personal privacy. To the extent required to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, USAID may delete identifying details...

  18. 48 CFR 352.224-70 - Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Privacy Act. 352.224-70... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 352.224-70 Privacy Act. As prescribed in 324.103(b)(2), the Contracting Officer shall insert the following clause: Privacy Act (January...

  19. Privacy Management Contracts And Economics, Using Service Level Agreements (Sla)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecognizing the importance of privacy management as a business process and a business support process, this paper proposes the use of service level agreements around privacy features, including qualitative and quantitative ones. It also casts privacy management into a business

  20. 76 FR 77472 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... PROTECTION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, hereinto referred to as the Consumer Financial...

  1. 77 FR 35359 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... PROTECTION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of proposed Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, hereinto referred to as the Consumer Financial...

  2. Somali asylum seekers' perceptions of privacy in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Niina; Abdulkarim, Hibag; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Privacy has been recognized as a basic human right and a part of quality of care. However, little is known about the privacy of Somali asylum seekers in healthcare, even though they are one of the largest asylum seeker groups in the world. The aim of the study was to describe the content and importance of privacy and its importance in healthcare from the perspective of Somali asylum seekers. The data of this explorative qualitative study were collected by four focus group interviews with 18 Somali asylum seekers with the help of an interpreter. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. Research permissions were obtained from the director of the reception centre and from the Department of Social Services. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Turku University. The content of privacy includes visual privacy, physical privacy and informational privacy. All contents can be shared with healthcare professionals. The importance of privacy includes respect, dignity and freedom. Privacy is strongly connected to the collectivism of Somali culture and religion. Unlike the Western cultures, privacy is not important only for the individual; most of all, it is seen to support collectivism. Even though all contents of privacy can be shared with healthcare professionals, it is important to recognize the cultural aspect of privacy especially when using interpreters with Somali background. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. 12 CFR 332.2 - Model privacy form and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Model privacy form and examples. 332.2 Section 332.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY PRIVACY OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL INFORMATION § 332.2 Model privacy form and examples. (a)...

  4. Privacy Management Contracts And Economics, Using Service Level Agreements (Sla)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecognizing the importance of privacy management as a business process and a business support process, this paper proposes the use of service level agreements around privacy features, including qualitative and quantitative ones. It also casts privacy management into a business perspectiv

  5. 77 FR 46653 - Defense Logistics Agency Privacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 323 RIN 0790-AI86 Defense Logistics Agency Privacy Program AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule with request for comments. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) is proposing to amend the DLA Privacy Program Regulation. The DLA Privacy...

  6. Private -- Keep Out: Preliminary Notes on Biosocial Functions of Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Lauren; Natalini, Adrian

    This report presents and evaluates a simple thesis: that privacy, a manifestation of human territoriality, is a fundamental bio-social need. Aggression can serve to insure privacy. Privacy, then, allows one the freedom to explore the environment. It permits intimacy with others, and it fosters access to one's own inner feelings and experiences, a…

  7. 78 FR 74122 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Department of the Air Force Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DoD... inventory of records systems subject to the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. This system will be used to... notices for systems of records subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a(r)), as amended,...

  8. 78 FR 63458 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Office of the Secretary of Defense... Research Approval Process'', in its inventory of record systems subject to the Privacy Act of 1974, as... of the Secretary of Defense notices for systems of records subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5...

  9. 78 FR 66803 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... AFFAIRS Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION: Notice of Amendment to System of Records. SUMMARY: As required by the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a(e... systems or programs. The Privacy Act permits VA to disclose information about individuals without...

  10. How Should Privacy Be Protected in the Electronic Library?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Janet L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses privacy issues related to electronic libraries. Highlights include finding guidance and information on the Web, including the American Library Association, Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Electronic Privacy Information Center; legal responsibilities in maintaining privacy rights of patrons who access the Internet; and…

  11. Towards context adaptive privacy decisions in ubiquitous computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, Florian; Könings, Bastian; Weber, Michael; Kargl, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In ubiquitous systems control of privacy settings will be increasingly difficult due to the pervasive nature of sensing and communication capabilities. We identify challenges for privacy decisions in ubiquitous systems and propose a system for in situ privacy decision support. When context changes o

  12. 76 FR 45767 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... PROTECTION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, hereinto referred to as the Consumer Financial...

  13. 76 FR 45763 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... PROTECTION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, hereinto referred to as the Consumer Financial...

  14. 32 CFR 701.119 - Privacy and the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy and the web. 701.119 Section 701.119... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.119 Privacy and the web. DON activities shall consult SECNAVINST 5720.47B for guidance on what may be posted on a Navy Web site....

  15. 78 FR 14286 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899...

  16. 75 FR 2114 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... Service, Corporate Communications and Legislative Liaison, Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Program..., Corporate Communications and Legislative Liaison, Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Program Manager..., Corporate Communications and Legislative Liaison, Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act Program...

  17. 78 FR 14285 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899...

  18. 78 FR 41918 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    .../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN... of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899...

  19. 77 FR 58106 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street.../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN.../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS- ] HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street,...

  20. How Does the Family Rights and Privacy Act Affect You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toglia, Thomas V.

    2007-01-01

    Enacted in 1974 to oversee the privacy, discharge, and accuracy of educational records, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) has significant implications for teachers and administrators, who should stay informed regarding its current policies and practices, and when in doubt seek legal advice regarding the privacy and disclosure…

  1. Privacy, Personhood, and Property in the Age of Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Bonython

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Revolutions in genetic technology have heralded the age of population-scale genomic metadata. This article analyzes the tensions and gaps between traditional conceptions of personhood and international legal responses to a person’s right over disembodied data obtained from his/her body. The opportunities for breakthroughs in healthcare by interrogating population-scale genomic databases are accompanied by questions about privacy, property, dignity, and the nature of information regulation in a global economy. This article highlights instances where law and policy makers have grappled with these challenges, and foreshadows some emerging future challenges. It also highlights differences between jurisdictions, and calls for greater global participation in the development of a coherent framework, rather than continued reliance on a small number of stakeholders, to develop that framework.

  2. Security, privacy and trust in cloud systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nepal, Surya

    2013-01-01

    The book compiles technologies for enhancing and provisioning security, privacy and trust in cloud systems based on Quality of Service requirements. It is a timely contribution to a field that is gaining considerable research interest, momentum, and provides a comprehensive coverage of technologies related to cloud security, privacy and trust. In particular, the book includes - Cloud security fundamentals and related technologies to-date, with a comprehensive coverage of evolution, current landscape, and future roadmap. - A smooth organization with introductory, advanced and specialist content

  3. Security and privacy in smart grids

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Presenting the work of prominent researchers working on smart grids and related fields around the world, Security and Privacy in Smart Grids identifies state-of-the-art approaches and novel technologies for smart grid communication and security. It investigates the fundamental aspects and applications of smart grid security and privacy and reports on the latest advances in the range of related areas-making it an ideal reference for students, researchers, and engineers in these fields. The book explains grid security development and deployment and introduces novel approaches for securing today'

  4. Privacy-Preserving Data Publishing An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Raymond Chi-Wing

    2010-01-01

    Privacy preservation has become a major issue in many data analysis applications. When a data set is released to other parties for data analysis, privacy-preserving techniques are often required to reduce the possibility of identifying sensitive information about individuals. For example, in medical data, sensitive information can be the fact that a particular patient suffers from HIV. In spatial data, sensitive information can be a specific location of an individual. In web surfing data, the information that a user browses certain websites may be considered sensitive. Consider a dataset conta

  5. Privacy Protection in Cloud Using Rsa Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Kaur

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The cloud computing architecture has been on high demand nowadays. The cloud has been successful over grid and distributed environment due to its cost and high reliability along with high security. However in the area of research it is observed that cloud computing still has some issues in security regarding privacy. The cloud broker provide services of cloud to general public and ensures that data is protected however they sometimes lag security and privacy. Thus in this work of research an architecture is developed to preserve the security in two phases that is by RSA algorithm and auto-backup policy. Keywords:-

  6. Data security breaches and privacy in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Data Security Breaches and Privacy in Europe aims to consider data protection and cybersecurity issues; more specifically, it aims to provide a fruitful discussion on data security breaches. A detailed analysis of the European Data Protection framework will be examined. In particular, the Data Protection Directive 95/45/EC, the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications and the proposed changes under the Data Protection Regulation (data breach notifications) and its implications are considered. This is followed by an examination of the Directive on Attacks against information systems a

  7. Privacy in the Internet: Myth or reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikarić Bratislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present time, unthinkable without using Internet - from e-mail, through social networks, cloud services, GPS, to YouTube and mobile computing in business, as well as on a private level, poses a question: Is there a way to protect data and their privacy on the Internet? What are the ways to control what personal information we will publicly share with others and is there a safe way to protect privacy on the world's global computer network? The paper gives an overview of the situation in the field, as well as tips for achieving the desired level of data protection.

  8. Economics of Information Security and Privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Tyler; Ioannidis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary research and scholarship on information security and privacy, combining ideas, techniques, and expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, law, policy, and computer science. In 2009, WEIS was held in London, at UCL, a constituent college of the University of London. "Economics of Information Security and Privacy" includes chapters presented at WEIS 2009, having been carefully reviewed by a program committee composed of leading researchers. Topics covered inclu

  9. Effective Privacy Amplification for Secure Classical Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, Tamas; Scheuer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We study the effectiveness of privacy amplification for classical key-distribution schemes. We find that, unlike quantum key distribution schemes, the high fidelity of the raw key in classical systems allow the users to always sift a secure shorter key, given that they have an upper bound of eavesdropper probability to correctly guess the exchanged key-bits. We establish the number of privacy amplification iterations needed to achieve information leak of 10^-8 in several classical systems and highlight the inherent tradeoff between the number of iterations and the security of the raw key.

  10. Location Privacy Protection on Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

    Location information is considered as private in many scenarios. Protecting location information on mobile ad-hoc networks has attracted much research in past years. However, location information protection on social networks has not been paid much attention. In this paper, we present a novel location privacy protection approach on the basis of user messages in social networks. Our approach grants flexibility to users by offering them multiple protecting options. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to protect social network users' location information via text messages. We propose five algorithms for location privacy protection on social networks.

  11. Governing the internet in the privacy arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Ochs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The surveillance disclosures triggered by Snowden have fueled the public re-negotiation of privacy. To follow resulting controversies we present a methodology that links social worlds theory to approaches asking for the democratic governance character of issue-centred arenas. After having outlined this approach it is put to the test. We analyse and compare two cases: the Schengen/National Routing, and the Parliamentary Committee investigating the NSA surveillance disclosures. The analysis reveals two oscillating governance modes at work in the privacy arena; their interplay results in an obstruction. Based on this observation we finally provide a diagnosis of possible future arena trajectories.

  12. Privacy Preservation over Untrusted Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardagna, Claudio A.; Jajodia, Sushil; Samarati, Pierangela; Stavrou, Angelos

    The proliferation of mobile devices has given rise to novel user-centric applications and services. In current mobile systems, users gain access to remote servers over mobile network operators. These operators are typically assumed to be trusted and to manage the information they collect in a privacy-preserving way. Such information, however, is extremely sensitive and coveted by many companies, which may use it to improve their business. In this context, safeguarding the users’ privacy against the prying eyes of the network operators is an emerging requirement.

  13. Privacy for location-based services

    CERN Document Server

    Ghinita, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Sharing of location data enables numerous exciting applications, such as location-based queries, location-based social recommendations, monitoring of traffic and air pollution levels, etc. Disclosing exact user locations raises serious privacy concerns, as locations may give away sensitive information about individuals' health status, alternative lifestyles, political and religious affiliations, etc. Preserving location privacy is an essential requirement towards the successful deployment of location-based applications. These lecture notes provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in locatio

  14. Couldn't or wouldn't? The influence of privacy concerns and self-efficacy in privacy management on privacy protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan-Ting; Chen, Wenghong

    2015-01-01

    Sampling 515 college students, this study investigates how privacy protection, including profile visibility, self-disclosure, and friending, are influenced by privacy concerns and efficacy regarding one's own ability to manage privacy settings, a factor that researchers have yet to give a great deal of attention to in the context of social networking sites (SNSs). The results of this study indicate an inconsistency in adopting strategies to protect privacy, a disconnect from limiting profile visibility and friending to self-disclosure. More specifically, privacy concerns lead SNS users to limit their profile visibility and discourage them from expanding their network. However, they do not constrain self-disclosure. Similarly, while self-efficacy in privacy management encourages SNS users to limit their profile visibility, it facilitates self-disclosure. This suggests that if users are limiting their profile visibility and constraining their friending behaviors, it does not necessarily mean they will reduce self-disclosure on SNSs because these behaviors are predicted by different factors. In addition, the study finds an interaction effect between privacy concerns and self-efficacy in privacy management on friending. It points to the potential problem of increased risk-taking behaviors resulting from high self-efficacy in privacy management and low privacy concerns.

  15. 78 FR 39021 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board; System of Records Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Request Files''. DATES: Written comments should be submitted on or before July 29, 2013. This new system... proposed creation of a system of records for FOIA and Privacy Act case files. SYSTEM OF RECORDS PCLOB--1, Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act Files. SYSTEM NAME: Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight...

  16. 75 FR 55335 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act of 1974: Department of Homeland Security/ALL-031 Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... private sector. Additionally, the Department of Homeland Security is issuing a Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act of 1974: Department of Homeland Security... the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to establish a new Department...

  17. Older and Wiser? Facebook Use, Privacy Concern, and Privacy Protection in the Life Stages of Emerging, Young, and Middle Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert Van den Broeck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A large part of research conducted on privacy concern and protection on social networking sites (SNSs concentrates on children and adolescents. Individuals in these developmental stages are often described as vulnerable Internet users. But how vulnerable are adults in terms of online informational privacy? This study applied a privacy boundary management approach and investigated Facebook use, privacy concern, and the application of privacy settings on Facebook by linking the results to Erikson’s three stages of adulthood: emerging, young, and middle adulthood. An online survey was distributed among 18- to 65-year-old Dutch-speaking adults (N = 508, 51.8% females. Analyses revealed clear differences between the three adult age groups in terms of privacy concern, Facebook use, and privacy protection. Results indicated that respondents in young adulthood and middle adulthood were more vulnerable in terms of privacy protection than emerging adults. Clear discrepancies were found between privacy concern and protection for these age groups. More particularly, the middle adulthood group was more concerned about their privacy in comparison to the emerging adulthood and young adulthood group. Yet, they reported to use privacy settings less frequently than the younger age groups. Emerging adults were found to be pragmatic and privacy conscious SNS users. Young adults occupied the intermediate position, suggesting a developmental shift. The impact of generational differences is discussed, as well as implications for education and governmental action.

  18. Health in exchange for privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezowska, A.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent disease and optimise health, nutrition advice is personalised based on an individuals’ lifestyle, health status and/or genetics. Although due to its high degree of personal relevance personalised nutrition advice is highly beneficial, the adoption of such advice may be hindered by

  19. 77 FR 26027 - Privacy Act: Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Veterans Homelessness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ...: Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Veterans Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Evaluation... Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Evaluation Data Files (VHPD Data Files) system. The VHPD Data Files system will involve collaborative efforts needed to evaluate certain HUD homelessness prevention...

  20. Privacy and human behavior in the age of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquisti, Alessandro; Brandimarte, Laura; Loewenstein, George

    2015-01-30

    This Review summarizes and draws connections between diverse streams of empirical research on privacy behavior. We use three themes to connect insights from social and behavioral sciences: people's uncertainty about the consequences of privacy-related behaviors and their own preferences over those consequences; the context-dependence of people's concern, or lack thereof, about privacy; and the degree to which privacy concerns are malleable—manipulable by commercial and governmental interests. Organizing our discussion by these themes, we offer observations concerning the role of public policy in the protection of privacy in the information age. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Enhancing Privacy Education with a Technical Emphasis in IT Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Peltsverger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the development of four learning modules that focus on technical details of how a person’s privacy might be compromised in real-world scenarios. The paper shows how students benefited from the addition of hands-on learning experiences of privacy and data protection to the existing information technology courses. These learning modules raised students’ awareness of potential breaches of privacy as a user as well as a developer. The demonstration of a privacy breach in action helped students to design, configure, and implement technical solutions to prevent privacy violations. The assessment results demonstrate the strength of the technical approach.

  2. Differential Privacy Preserving in Big Data Analytics for Connected Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi; Song, Zihao; Song, Houbing; Zhou, Yanhong; Wang, Yi; Wu, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    In Body Area Networks (BANs), big data collected by wearable sensors usually contain sensitive information, which is compulsory to be appropriately protected. Previous methods neglected privacy protection issue, leading to privacy exposure. In this paper, a differential privacy protection scheme for big data in body sensor network is developed. Compared with previous methods, this scheme will provide privacy protection with higher availability and reliability. We introduce the concept of dynamic noise thresholds, which makes our scheme more suitable to process big data. Experimental results demonstrate that, even when the attacker has full background knowledge, the proposed scheme can still provide enough interference to big sensitive data so as to preserve the privacy.

  3. Partitioning-based mechanisms under personalized differential privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; Xiong, Li; Ji, Zhanglong; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2017-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged in private statistical aggregate analysis as one of the strongest privacy guarantees. A limitation of the model is that it provides the same privacy protection for all individuals in the database. However, it is common that data owners may have different privacy preferences for their data. Consequently, a global differential privacy parameter may provide excessive privacy protection for some users, while insufficient for others. In this paper, we propose two partitioning-based mechanisms, privacy-aware and utility-based partitioning, to handle personalized differential privacy parameters for each individual in a dataset while maximizing utility of the differentially private computation. The privacy-aware partitioning is to minimize the privacy budget waste, while utility-based partitioning is to maximize the utility for a given aggregate analysis. We also develop a t-round partitioning to take full advantage of remaining privacy budgets. Extensive experiments using real datasets show the effectiveness of our partitioning mechanisms. PMID:28932827

  4. Disclosure Management on Social Network Sites: Individual Privacy Perceptions and User-Directed Privacy Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp K. Masur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The social web and specifically social network sites (SNS have offered new opportunities for interaction and communication, but have also increased the risk of privacy violations. In this study, we investigated how far users imply different disclosure management strategies in status updates and chat conversations. We hypothesized that users perceive specific information as differently private depending on their personal privacy preference, but generally show the same disclosure management pattern: the higher the perceived privacy level of an information, the less frequently it will be shared. We tested the hypothesis using an online survey with 316 German SNS users. The findings suggest that respondents engaged in disclosure management taking both communication channel and type of information into account. We further found that trust toward SNS contacts and use of privacy settings significantly influenced disclosure management in one-to-many (status updates but not in one-to-one communications situations (chat conversations. The results complement existing research by showing the pivotal role of individual privacy perceptions in explaining users’ privacy management in the social web.

  5. When Differential Privacy Meets Randomized Perturbation: A Hybrid Approach for Privacy-Preserving Recommender System

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiao

    2017-03-21

    Privacy risks of recommender systems have caused increasing attention. Users’ private data is often collected by probably untrusted recommender system in order to provide high-quality recommendation. Meanwhile, malicious attackers may utilize recommendation results to make inferences about other users’ private data. Existing approaches focus either on keeping users’ private data protected during recommendation computation or on preventing the inference of any single user’s data from the recommendation result. However, none is designed for both hiding users’ private data and preventing privacy inference. To achieve this goal, we propose in this paper a hybrid approach for privacy-preserving recommender systems by combining differential privacy (DP) with randomized perturbation (RP). We theoretically show the noise added by RP has limited effect on recommendation accuracy and the noise added by DP can be well controlled based on the sensitivity analysis of functions on the perturbed data. Extensive experiments on three large-scale real world datasets show that the hybrid approach generally provides more privacy protection with acceptable recommendation accuracy loss, and surprisingly sometimes achieves better privacy without sacrificing accuracy, thus validating its feasibility in practice.

  6. The Different View of Privacy between China and the West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴洁君

    2013-01-01

    As a kind of cultural phenomena, privacy has different meaning in different culture. In the intercultural communica⁃tion, it is very important to have a correct view of privacy. This thesis compares and analyzes the privacy between China and the west in diverse angles. Based on the western scholar, privacy is a selective control of access to self or to one ’s group. Knowing the concept of privacy and the way to face the culture shock which followed by different view of privacy, we find some important things. That is, with the globalization of modern society, the common understanding on privacy will be more and the problems in the intercultural communication will be fewer if we understand and respect the other culture.

  7. Information Privacy: Culture, Legislation and User Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Cockcroft

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Information privacy has received much public and research interest in recent years. Globally this has arisen from public anxiety following the September 11 attacks and within Australia a progressive tightening of privacy legislation in particular the privacy amendment (private sector Act of 2000 which became operative in 2001. This paper presents the results of a study into attitudes towards information privacy. Based on an instrument developed and validated by Smith et al (1996a this study sets out to measure individual concerns regarding organisational use of information along four dimensions: collection, errors, unauthorised secondary use, and improper access. The survey was completed by 67 undergraduate and postgraduate students enrolled in an e-commerce security subject at the University of Queensland. Comparisons are drawn between the results of this study and an identical one carried out at the University of North Alabama. Whilst it is too early to draw conclusions about the impact of these attitudes on the success of e-commerce in general, the results should be of interest to those within universities seeking to expand the use of networking technologies for handling sensitive information such as enrolment and fee processing (Vanscoy & Oakleaf 2003

  8. Negotiating privacy in surveillant welfare relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Bøge, Ask Risom

    the analytical capacity of the concept by rendering it a situated and relational concept. The argument is developed through a research and design project called Teledialogue meant to improve the relation between case managers and children placed at institutions or in foster families. Privacy in Teledialogue...

  9. A Location Privacy Aware Friend Locator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Thomsen, Jeppe Rishede; Saltenis, Simonas

    2009-01-01

    to trade their location privacy for quality of service, limiting the attractiveness of the services. The challenge is to develop a communication-efficient solution such that (i) it detects proximity between a user and the user’s friends, (ii) any other party is not allowed to infer the location of the user...

  10. Discovering Privacy--or the Lack Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomykalski, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Many IS courses address the issues of ethical decision making and privacy through full course or section of a larger course. In this paper, the author discusses the development of a series of activities in an IS2010.07 course. The primary purpose of these activities is to raise awareness by the students of issues dealing with the collection,…

  11. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  12. 75 FR 4454 - Privacy Act of 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... nursing care, clinic appointments, survey, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Data may also be used to.... 552a(r) (Privacy Act) and guidelines issued by OMB (61 FR 6428), February 20, 1996. Approved: January 8..., consultations, radiology, laboratory and other diagnostic and therapeutic examinations); results entered; items...

  13. Privacy protection schemes for fingerprint recognition systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emanuela; Cukic, Bojan

    2015-05-01

    The deployment of fingerprint recognition systems has always raised concerns related to personal privacy. A fingerprint is permanently associated with an individual and, generally, it cannot be reset if compromised in one application. Given that fingerprints are not a secret, potential misuses besides personal recognition represent privacy threats and may lead to public distrust. Privacy mechanisms control access to personal information and limit the likelihood of intrusions. In this paper, image- and feature-level schemes for privacy protection in fingerprint recognition systems are reviewed. Storing only key features of a biometric signature can reduce the likelihood of biometric data being used for unintended purposes. In biometric cryptosystems and biometric-based key release, the biometric component verifies the identity of the user, while the cryptographic key protects the communication channel. Transformation-based approaches only a transformed version of the original biometric signature is stored. Different applications can use different transforms. Matching is performed in the transformed domain which enable the preservation of low error rates. Since such templates do not reveal information about individuals, they are referred to as cancelable templates. A compromised template can be re-issued using a different transform. At image-level, de-identification schemes can remove identifiers disclosed for objectives unrelated to the original purpose, while permitting other authorized uses of personal information. Fingerprint images can be de-identified by, for example, mixing fingerprints or removing gender signature. In both cases, degradation of matching performance is minimized.

  14. Privacy Issues and Personnel Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenard, Nancy C.

    1982-01-01

    Records management policy and clear guidelines, communicated campus-wide, are needed so that requests for personnel information are handled consistently and with respect for the privacy of employees. Suggestions for policy formation and current efforts on campuses are outlined. (MSE)

  15. Human Flesh Search Engine and Online Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Human flesh search engine can be a double-edged sword, bringing convenience on the one hand and leading to infringement of personal privacy on the other hand. This paper discusses the ethical problems brought about by the human flesh search engine, as well as possible solutions.

  16. Ethical aspects of information security and privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip; Petkovic, Milan; Jonker, Willem

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reviews ethical aspects of computer and information security and privacy. After an introduction to ethical approaches to information technology, the focus is first on ethical aspects of computer security. These include the moral importance of computer security, the relation between comp

  17. Computational social networks security and privacy

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Presents the latest advances in security and privacy issues in computational social networks, and illustrates how both organizations and individuals can be protected from real-world threats Discusses the design and use of a wide range of computational tools and software for social network analysis Provides experience reports, survey articles, and intelligence techniques and theories relating to specific problems in network technology

  18. Stratospheric Transparency: Perspectives on Internet Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Rita M.

    2009-01-01

    As a parent of teenagers in the 1980s, I recall a concern of the intrusion by MTV into our home. After futile attempts to block the program, my spouse and I set out to convince our sons of its intrusion. Our challenge was miniscule when compared to the Internet privacy issues of today. This paper addresses such challenges and proposes some…

  19. Surveillance, Privacy and Trans-Atlantic Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    together some of the leading experts in the fields of constitutional law, criminal law and human rights from the US and the EU to examine the protection of privacy in the digital era, as well as the challenges that counter-terrorism cooperation between governments pose to human rights. It examines...

  20. Privacy Enhanced Fraud Resistant Road Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoepman, J.H.; Huitema, G.B.

    2010-01-01

    A naive implementation of a road pricing system will collect an enormous amount of personal location data. In this paper we present a sophisticated system that is privacy friendly, i.e. where the invoices contain aggregated pricing information and where only the driver has insight into all the under

  1. Randomization Based Privacy Preserving Categorical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling

    2010-01-01

    The success of data mining relies on the availability of high quality data. To ensure quality data mining, effective information sharing between organizations becomes a vital requirement in today's society. Since data mining often involves sensitive information of individuals, the public has expressed a deep concern about their privacy.…

  2. 78 FR 32554 - Privacy Act; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 320 Privacy Act; Implementation AGENCY: National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), DoD. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is... describe the basis for exempting the records in the system of records notice NGA-004, NGA Threat...

  3. 76 FR 22615 - Privacy Act; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... the Privacy Act. This will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of DoD's program by preserving the... requirements on the public under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Section 202, Public Law 104-4, ``Unfunded..., Stat. 1896 (5 U.S.C. 552a). 0 2. In Sec. 322.7, remove and reserve paragraph (l) and add paragraph (u...

  4. Security, Privacy, and Applied Cryptography Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on Security, Privacy and Applied Cryptography Engineering held in Chennai, India, in November 2012. The 11 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized...... and applications, high-performance computing in cryptology and cryptography in ubiquitous devices....

  5. 78 FR 69551 - Privacy Act; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 319 Privacy Act; Implementation AGENCY: Defense Intelligence Agency, DoD. ACTION: Direct final rule with request for comments. SUMMARY: Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is..., Safety, Health, and Environmental Management Records. This direct final rule makes...

  6. Ethical and Privacy Principles for Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Abelardo; Siemens, George

    2014-01-01

    The massive adoption of technology in learning processes comes with an equally large capacity to track learners. Learning analytics aims at using the collected information to understand and improve the quality of a learning experience. The privacy and ethical issues that emerge in this context are tightly interconnected with other aspects such as…

  7. Privacy and security disclosures on telecardiology websites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeld, L.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses telemedicine providers¿ online privacy and security disclosures. It presents the results of an exploratory study of a number of telecardiology companies¿ Web sites, providing insight in some of the current strategies towards data protection and information security in the

  8. Privacy beleving op het internet in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosendaal, A.P.C.; Nieuwenhuis, O.A.; Ooms, M.; Bouman-Eijs, J.M.; Huijboom, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Dit rapport bevat de bevindingen van een survey onder een representatieve steekproef van de Nederlandse bevolking over de beleving van privacy op het internet. Deze beleving hebben we onderzocht aan de hand van een zevental factoren: persoonskenmerken, ervaringen, feitelijk gedrag, context, technolo

  9. 77 FR 15585 - Privacy Act; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... the ] objectivity or fairness of the test if the correct or incorrect answers are released. DATES... answer keys should be at the discretion of the test taker, i.e., U.S. citizens.'' The Privacy Act exemption rule addresses an individual's answers to the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery...

  10. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  11. Security, Privacy, and Applied Cryptography Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on Security, Privacy and Applied Cryptography Engineering held in Chennai, India, in November 2012. The 11 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized...

  12. Randomization Based Privacy Preserving Categorical Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling

    2010-01-01

    The success of data mining relies on the availability of high quality data. To ensure quality data mining, effective information sharing between organizations becomes a vital requirement in today's society. Since data mining often involves sensitive information of individuals, the public has expressed a deep concern about their privacy.…

  13. Clinical genomics, big data, and electronic medical records: reconciling patient rights with research when privacy and science collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greely, Henry T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Widespread use of medical records for research, without consent, attracts little scrutiny compared to biospecimen research, where concerns about genomic privacy prompted recent federal proposals to mandate consent. This paper explores an important consequence of the proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs) in this permissive atmosphere: with the advent of clinical gene sequencing, EHR-based secondary research poses genetic privacy risks akin to those of biospecimen research, yet regulators still permit researchers to call gene sequence data ‘de-identified’, removing such data from the protection of the federal Privacy Rule and federal human subjects regulations. Medical centers and other providers seeking to offer genomic ‘personalized medicine’ now confront the problem of governing the secondary use of clinical genomic data as privacy risks escalate. We argue that regulators should no longer permit HIPAA-covered entities to treat dense genomic data as de-identified health information. Even with this step, the Privacy Rule would still permit disclosure of clinical genomic data for research, without consent, under a data use agreement, so we also urge that providers give patients specific notice before disclosing clinical genomic data for research, permitting (where possible) some degree of choice and control. To aid providers who offer clinical gene sequencing, we suggest both general approaches and specific actions to reconcile patients’ rights and interests with genomic research. PMID:28852559

  14. More Than Defense in Daily Experience of Privacy: The Functions of Privacy in Digital and Physical Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Debora Benedetta; Ciceri, Maria Rita

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the experience of privacy, focusing on its functional role in personal well-being. A sample (N = 180) comprised subjects between 18 and 50 years of age were asked to spontaneously provide accounts of their experiences with privacy and answer close-ended questions to acquire a description of a daily experience of privacy. The results showed the importance attributed to the function of privacy related to the "defense from social threats", and the twofold function of privacy related to an "achieved state of privacy", in the terms of both "system maintenance" and "system development". The results also shed light on the role of the environment in shaping one's experience of privacy. Specifically, the participants recognized more easily the function of defense from threats related to seeking privacy while interacting in digital environments, whereas they seemed to benefit from positive functions related to an achieved state of privacy in physical environments. The findings sustain the notion of privacy as a supportive condition for some psychological processes involved in the positive human functioning and confirm previous studies conducted on the role of privacy in human well-being.

  15. Biohistorical materials and contemporary privacy concerns-the forensic case of King Albert I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Bekaert, Bram; Baumers, Maarten; Wenseleers, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Borry, Pascal; Decorte, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomic analysis increasingly allows researchers to study human biohistorical materials. Nevertheless, little attention has been paid to the privacy of the donor's living relatives and the negative impact they might experience from the (public) availability of genetic results, even in cases of scientific, forensic or historical relevance. This issue has become clear during a cold case investigation of a relic attributed to Belgian King and World War I-hero Albert I who died, according to the official version, in a solo climbing accident in 1934. Authentication of the relic with blood stains assigned to the King and collected on the place where his body was discovered is recognised as one of the final opportunities to test the plausibility of various conspiracy theories on the King's demise. While the historical value and current technological developments allow the genomic analysis of this relic, publication of genetic data would immediately lead to privacy concerns for living descendants and relatives of the King, including the Belgian and British royal families, even after more than 80 years. Therefore, the authentication study of the relic of King Albert I has been a difficult exercise towards balancing public research interests and privacy interests. The identification of the relic was realised by using a strict genetic genealogical approach including Y-chromosome and mitochondrial genome comparison with living relatives, thereby limiting the analysis to genomic regions relevant for identification. The genetic results combined with all available historical elements concerning the relic, provide strong evidence that King Albert I was indeed the donor of the blood stains, which is in line with the official climbing accident hypothesis and contradicts widespread 'mise-en-scène' scenarios. Since publication of the haploid data of the blood stains has the potential to violate the privacy of living relatives, we opted for

  16. EsPRESSo: Efficient Privacy-Preserving Evaluation of Sample Set Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Blundo, Carlo; Gasti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first practical construction for privacy-preserving evaluation of sample set similarity, based on the well-known Jaccard index measure. In this problem, two mutually distrustful entities determine how similar their sets are, without disclosing their content to each other. We propose two efficient protocols: the first securely computes the Jaccard index of two sets; the second approximates it using MinHash techniques, at a significantly lower cost and with same privacy guarantees. This building block is attractive in many relevant applications, including document similarity, biometric authentication, multimedia file retrieval, and genetic tests. We demonstrate, both analytically and experimentally, that our constructions -- while not bounded to any specific application -- are appreciably more efficient than prior specialized techniques.

  17. 45 CFR 5.4 - Relationship between the FOIA and the Privacy Act of 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relationship between the FOIA and the Privacy Act... Privacy Act of 1974. (a) Coverage. The FOIA and this rule apply to all HHS records. The Privacy Act, 5 U.S... records. “Individuals” and “system of records” are defined in the Privacy Act and in our Privacy...

  18. Attribute association based privacy preservation for multi trust level environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Praveena Priyadarsini; M L Valarmathi; S Sivakumari

    2015-09-01

    Enormous amount of e-data is collected world-wide by organizations for the purpose of their research and decision making. The availability of this heterogeneous, sensitive information in e-databases poses a threat to the privacy of the individual or organization on which the data is collected. Privacy Preserving Data Mining [PPDM] is a field of research which concentrates on preserving data privacy during the process of data mining. This paper proposes a two level partition and perturbation frame work to release multiple copies of privacy preserved datasets in Multi Trust Level [MTL] scenario that can prevent linking and diversity attack. The framework proposes two methods namely, Entropy based Attribute Privacy Preservation [EAPP] and Information Gain based Attribute Privacy Preservation [IGAPP] for privacy preservation in MTL environment. The two methods perform vertical and horizontal partitioning of data for privacy preservation. Simple K-Means clustering algorithm with cluster size 2 using both Euclidean and Manhattan distance functions are used for horizontal partitioning. The vertical partitioning of attributes within the cluster is performed based on their entropy value that indicates its one way association with its class in EAPP method and Information Gain [IG] value of the attributes that indicates the two way associations with class in IGAPP method. The attributes in the clusters are subjected to privacy preservation technique based on their entropy and IG values in EAPP and IGAPP methods, respectively. The effect of distance in clustering the data points on privacy preservation and the ability of the privacy preserved datasets generated using the proposed methods to prevent privacy attacks are studied using variance, rank distortion and utility metrics. Real life medical and bench mark adult data sets have been used here for experimentation. The results show that the generated datasets exhibit good variance and rank distortion values and hence can

  19. 隐私观念与隐私权%Thoughts of Privacy and the Privacy Right

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐晋

    2011-01-01

    隐私观念与隐私权之间存在着很多必然的联系,是研究现代隐私权的基础。从隐私观念的产生到隐私事实的出现再到隐私权利的产生过程,是历史证明了的人类社会发展的一个缩影,也是我们每个人与生俱来的基本权利,应该得到人们的重视,并得到法律的保护。%Thoughts of privacy and the Privacy Right are interrelated, which is the very basis of modem privacy right research. It is a reflection of human society development based on the birth and development of the thoughts and the right of privacy. Both of aspects of privacy are the essentials of human beings and should be protected by laws and paid attention to.

  20. Enhancing Privacy for Biometric Identification Cards

    CERN Document Server

    Balanoiu, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Most developed countries have started the implementation of biometric electronic identification cards, especially passports. The European Union and the United States of America struggle to introduce and standardize these electronic documents. Due to the personal nature of the biometric elements used for the generation of these cards, privacy issues were raised on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, leading to civilian protests and concerns. The lack of transparency from the public authorities responsible with the implementation of such identification systems, and the poor technological approaches chosen by these authorities, are the main reasons for the negative popularity of the new identification methods. The following article shows an approach that provides all the benefits of modern technological advances in the fields of biometrics and cryptography, without sacrificing the privacy of those that will be the beneficiaries of the new system.

  1. Designing for Privacy in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Figueiras, Joao

    2015-01-01

    , automatically exchanging personal user data. The main goal of these services is to facilitate the initialisation of relationships between people who do not know each other, but they probably should. Given that sharing of personal information is an intrinsic part of ubiquitous social networking, these services......Improving human communication during face–to–face meetings is nowadays possible by transferring online social networking benefits to the physical world. This is enabled by the ubiquitous social networking services that became available by means of wirelessly interconnected smart devices...... are subject to crucial privacy threats. Inspired by the usability and privacy limitations of existing design solutions, we identify, describe and qualitatively evaluate four drawbacks to be avoided when designing ubiquitous social networking applications. By addressing these drawbacks, services become more...

  2. Privacy Preserving Location Proof Updating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhinesh Kumar S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Location-sensitive service broadcasting on user’s mobile devices to discover the current location. A privacy preserving Location proof updating system(APPLAUS,which does not rely on the wide deployement of network infrastructure or the expensive trusted computing module.In APPLAUS, Bluetooth enabled mobile devices in range mutually generate location proofs,which are uploaded to a untrusted location proof. An authorized verifier can query and retrieve location proofs from the server.Moreover,our location proof system guarantees user location privacy from every party.Bluetooth enabled mobile devices in range mutually generate location proofs.CA used to be the bridges between the verifier and the location proof server.

  3. Privacy Preserving Location Proof Updating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhinesh Kumar S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Location-sensitive service broadcasting on user’s mobile devices to discover the current location. A privacy preserving Location proof updating system(APPLAUS,which does not rely on the wide deployement of network infrastructure or the expensive trusted computing module.In APPLAUS, Bluetooth enabled mobile devices in range mutually generate location proofs,which are uploaded to a untrusted location proof. An authorized verifier can query and retrieve location proofs from the server.Moreover,our location proof system guarantees user location privacy from every party.Bluetooth enabled mobile devices in range mutually generate location proofs.CA used to be the bridges between the verifier and the location proof server..

  4. Security and privacy for implantable medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2014-01-01

     This book presents a systematic approach to analyzing the challenging engineering problems posed by the need for security and privacy in implantable medical devices (IMD).  It describes in detail new issues termed as lightweight security, due to the associated constraints on metrics such as available power, energy, computing ability, area, execution time, and memory requirements. Coverage includes vulnerabilities and defense across multiple levels, with basic abstractions of cryptographic services and primitives such as public key cryptography, block ciphers and digital signatures. Experts from engineering introduce to some IMD systems that have  recently been proposed and developed. Experts from Computer Security and Cryptography present new research, which shows vulnerabilities in existing IMDs and proposes solutions. Experts from Privacy Technology and Policy will discuss the societal, legal and ethical challenges surrounding IMD security as well as technological solutions that build on the latest in C...

  5. Adding Query Privacy to Robust DHTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backes, Michael; Goldberg, Ian; Kate, Aniket

    2011-01-01

    Interest in anonymous communication over distributed hash tables (DHTs) has increased in recent years. However, almost all known solutions solely aim at achieving sender or requestor anonymity in DHT queries. In many application scenarios, it is crucial that the queried key remains secret from...... intermediate peers that (help to) route the queries towards their destinations. In this paper, we satisfy this requirement by presenting an approach for providing privacy for the keys in DHT queries. We use the concept of oblivious transfer (OT) in communication over DHTs to preserve query privacy without...... compromising spam resistance. Although our OT-based approach can work over any DHT, we concentrate on communication over robust DHTs that can tolerate Byzantine faults and resist spam. We choose the best-known robust DHT construction, and employ an efficient OT protocol well-suited for achieving our goal...

  6. Adding query privacy to robust DHTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backes, Michael; Goldberg, Ian; Kate, Aniket

    2012-01-01

    Interest in anonymous communication over distributed hash tables (DHTs) has increased in recent years. However, almost all known solutions solely aim at achieving sender or requestor anonymity in DHT queries. In many application scenarios, it is crucial that the queried key remains secret from...... intermediate peers that (help to) route the queries towards their destinations. In this paper, we satisfy this requirement by presenting an approach for providing privacy for the keys in DHT queries. We use the concept of oblivious transfer (OT) in communication over DHTs to preserve query privacy without...... compromising spam resistance. Although our OT-based approach can work over any DHT, we concentrate on robust DHTs that can tolerate Byzantine faults and resist spam. We choose the best-known robust DHT construction, and employ an efficient OT protocol well-suited for achieving our goal of obtaining query...

  7. Guaranteeing Privacy-Observing Data Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    the entity that receives data is living up to its own policy specification. In this work we present our initial work on an approach that empowers data owners to specify their privacy preferences, and data consumers to specify their data needs. Using a static analysis of the two specifications, our approach...... then finds a communication scheme that complies with these preferences and needs. While applicable to online transactions, the same techniques can be used in development of IT systems dealing with sensitive data. To the best of our knowledge, no existing privacy policy languages supports negotiation...... of policies, but only yes/no answers. We also discuss how the same approach can be used to identify a qualitative level of sharing, where data may be shared according to, e.g., the level of trust to another entity....

  8. Enhancing Privacy for Biometric Identification Cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Most developed countries have started the implementation of biometric electronic identification cards, especially passports. The European Union and the United States of America struggle to introduce and standardize these electronic documents. Due to the personal nature of the biometric elements used for the generation of these cards, privacy issues were raised on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, leading to civilian protests and concerns. The lack of transparency from the public authorities responsible with the implementation of such identification systems, and the poor technological approaches chosen by these authorities, are the main reasons for the negative popularity of the new identification methods. The following article shows an approach that provides all the benefits of modern technological advances in the fields of biometrics and cryptography, without sacrificing the privacy of those that will be the beneficiaries of the new system

  9. Guaranteeing Privacy-Observing Data Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    then finds a communication scheme that complies with these preferences and needs. While applicable to online transactions, the same techniques can be used in development of IT systems dealing with sensitive data. To the best of our knowledge, no existing privacy policy languages supports negotiation...... the entity that receives data is living up to its own policy specification. In this work we present our initial work on an approach that empowers data owners to specify their privacy preferences, and data consumers to specify their data needs. Using a static analysis of the two specifications, our approach...... of policies, but only yes/no answers. We also discuss how the same approach can be used to identify a qualitative level of sharing, where data may be shared according to, e.g., the level of trust to another entity....

  10. Privacy problems in the small sample selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Cerbara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The side of social research that uses small samples for the production of micro data, today finds some operating difficulties due to the privacy law. The privacy code is a really important and necessary law because it guarantees the Italian citizen’s rights, as already happens in other Countries of the world. However it does not seem appropriate to limit once more the possibilities of the data production of the national centres of research. That possibilities are already moreover compromised due to insufficient founds is a common problem becoming more and more frequent in the research field. It would be necessary, therefore, to include in the law the possibility to use telephonic lists to select samples useful for activities directly of interest and importance to the citizen, such as the collection of the data carried out on the basis of opinion polls by the centres of research of the Italian CNR and some universities.

  11. Security and Privacy of Electronic Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Bosire Omariba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The internet has played a key role in changing how we interact with other people and how we do business today. As a result of the internet, electronic commerce has emerged, allowing business to more effectively interact with their customers and other corporations inside and outside their industries. One industry that is using this new communication channel to reach its customers is the banking industry. The e-banking system addresses several emerging trends: customers demand for anytime, anywhere service, product time-to-market imperatives and increasingly complex back-office integration challenges. The challenges that oppose electronic banking are concerns of security and privacy of information. This paper will first discuss the drivers of e-banking; secondly, it will talk about the concerns about e-banking from various perspectives. Thirdly, the security and privacy issues will also be discussed, and fourthly the attacks of e-banking with their solutions are discussed.

  12. Modelling information dissemination under privacy concerns in social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Rongxing; Li, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Social media has recently become an important platform for users to share news, express views, and post messages. However, due to user privacy preservation in social media, many privacy setting tools are employed, which inevitably change the patterns and dynamics of information dissemination. In this study, a general stochastic model using dynamic evolution equations was introduced to illustrate how privacy concerns impact the process of information dissemination. Extensive simulations and analyzes involving the privacy settings of general users, privileged users, and pure observers were conducted on real-world networks, and the results demonstrated that user privacy settings affect information differently. Finally, we also studied the process of information diffusion analytically and numerically with different privacy settings using two classic networks.

  13. Composition Attacks and Auxiliary Information in Data Privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Ganta, Srivatsava Ranjit; Smith, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Privacy is an increasingly important aspect of data publishing. Reasoning about privacy, however, is fraught with pitfalls. One of the most significant is the auxiliary information (also called external knowledge, background knowledge, or side information) that an adversary gleans from other channels such as the web, public records, or domain knowledge. This paper explores how one can reason about privacy in the face of rich, realistic sources of auxiliary information. Specifically, we investigate the effectiveness of current anonymization schemes in preserving privacy when multiple organizations independently release anonymized data about overlapping populations. 1. We investigate composition attacks, in which an adversary uses independent anonymized releases to breach privacy. We explain why recently proposed models of limited auxiliary information fail to capture composition attacks. Our experiments demonstrate that even a simple instance of a composition attack can breach privacy in practice, for a large ...

  14. A Privacy Model for RFID Tag Ownership Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingchun Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ownership of RFID tag is often transferred from one owner to another in its life cycle. To address the privacy problem caused by tag ownership transfer, we propose a tag privacy model which captures the adversary’s abilities to get secret information inside readers, to corrupt tags, to authenticate tags, and to observe tag ownership transfer processes. This model gives formal definitions for tag forward privacy and backward privacy and can be used to measure the privacy property of tag ownership transfer scheme. We also present a tag ownership transfer scheme, which is privacy-preserving under the proposed model and satisfies the other common security requirements, in addition to achieving better performance.

  15. Achieving network level privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Riaz Ahmed; Jameel, Hassan; d'Auriol, Brian J; Lee, Heejo; Lee, Sungyoung; Song, Young-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Full network level privacy has often been categorized into four sub-categories: Identity, Route, Location and Data privacy. Achieving full network level privacy is a critical and challenging problem due to the constraints imposed by the sensor nodes (e.g., energy, memory and computation power), sensor networks (e.g., mobility and topology) and QoS issues (e.g., packet reach-ability and timeliness). In this paper, we proposed two new identity, route and location privacy algorithms and data privacy mechanism that addresses this problem. The proposed solutions provide additional trustworthiness and reliability at modest cost of memory and energy. Also, we proved that our proposed solutions provide protection against various privacy disclosure attacks, such as eavesdropping and hop-by-hop trace back attacks.

  16. Achieving Network Level Privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyoung Lee

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Full network level privacy has often been categorized into four sub-categories: Identity, Route, Location and Data privacy. Achieving full network level privacy is a critical and challenging problem due to the constraints imposed by the sensor nodes (e.g., energy, memory and computation power, sensor networks (e.g., mobility and topology and QoS issues (e.g., packet reach-ability and timeliness. In this paper, we proposed two new identity, route and location privacy algorithms and data privacy mechanism that addresses this problem. The proposed solutions provide additional trustworthiness and reliability at modest cost of memory and energy. Also, we proved that our proposed solutions provide protection against various privacy disclosure attacks, such as eavesdropping and hop-by-hop trace back attacks.

  17. Preserving Location and Absence Privacy in Geo-Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freni, Dario; Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Mascetti, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    . The resulting geo-aware social networks (GeoSNs) pose privacy threats beyond those found in location-based services. Con- tent published in a GeoSN is often associated with references to multiple users, without the publisher being aware of the privacy preferences of those users. Moreover, this content is often...... accessible to multiple users. This renders it dicult for GeoSN users to control which information about them is available and to whom it is available. This paper addresses two privacy threats that occur in GeoSNs: location privacy and absence privacy. The former concerns the availability of information about...... the presence of users in specic locations at given times, while the latter concerns the availability of information about the absence of an individual from spe- cic locations during given periods of time. The challenge addressed is that of supporting privacy while still enabling useful services. We believe...

  18. Unveiling consumer's privacy paradox behaviour in an economic exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiwalla, Luvai F; Li, Xiao-Bai

    2016-01-01

    Privacy paradox is of great interest to IS researchers and firms gathering personal information. It has been studied from social, behavioural, and economic perspectives independently. However, prior research has not examined the degrees of influence these perspectives contribute to the privacy paradox problem. We combine both economic and behavioural perspectives in our study of the privacy paradox with a price valuation of personal information through an economic experiment combined with a behavioural study on privacy paradox. Our goal is to reveal more insights on the privacy paradox through economic valuation on personal information. Results indicate that general privacy concerns or individual disclosure concerns do not have a significant influence on the price valuation of personal information. Instead, prior disclosure behaviour in specific scenario, like with healthcare providers or social networks, is a better indicator of consumer price valuations.

  19. Practicing Differential Privacy in Health Care: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fida K. Dankar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Differential privacy has gained a lot of attention in recent years as a general model for the protection of personal information when used and disclosed for secondary purposes. It has also been proposed as an appropriate model for protecting health data. In this paper we review the current literature on differential privacy and highlight important general limitations to the model and the proposed mechanisms. We then examine some practical challenges to the application of differential privacy to health data. The most severe limitation is the theoretical nature of the privacy parameter epsilon. It has implications on our ability to quantify the level of anonymization that would be guaranteed to patients, as well as assessing responsibilities when a privacy breach occurs. The review concludes by identifying the areas that researchers and practitioners need to address to increase the adoption of differential privacy for health data.

  20. Security and privacy preserving in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chbeir, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This volume aims at assessing the current approaches and technologies, as well as to outline the major challenges and future perspectives related to the security and privacy protection of social networks. It provides the reader with an overview of the state-of-the art techniques, studies, and approaches as well as outlining future directions in this field. A wide range of interdisciplinary contributions from various research groups ensures for a balanced and complete perspective.

  1. Workplace surveillance, privacy protection, and efficiency wages

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Patrick W.

    2005-01-01

    Consider an employer who wants her employee to work hard. As is well known from the efficiency wage literature, the employer must pay the (wealth-constrained) employee a positive rent to provide incentives for exerting unobservable effort. Alternatively, the employer could make effort observable by costly workplace surveillance. It is argued that a privacy protection law preventing surveillance may increase the total surplus. While such a law reduces the employer?s profit, this loss can be ov...

  2. Privacy and Security: Online Social Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akriti Verma, Deepak Kshirsagar, Sana Khan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Online Social Networking (OSN sites such asFacebook, Twitter, Google+ attract hundreds andmillions of users. Such social networks have acentralized architecture wherein user's private dataand user generated content are centrally owned by asingle administrative domain that managescommunication between its users. As a result,centralized social networks have gatheredunprecedented amounts of data about the behaviorsand personalities of individuals, raising majorprivacy and security concerns. This has put indemand for a decentralized social networking sitethat addresses the privacy and security issues.

  3. Governing the internet in the privacy arena

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten Ochs; Fabian Pittroff; Barbara Büttner; Jörn Lamla

    2016-01-01

    The surveillance disclosures triggered by Snowden have fueled the public re-negotiation of privacy. To follow resulting controversies we present a methodology that links social worlds theory to approaches asking for the democratic governance character of issue-centred arenas. After having outlined this approach it is put to the test. We analyse and compare two cases: the Schengen/National Routing, and the Parliamentary Committee investigating the NSA surveillance disclosures. The analysis rev...

  4. The ultimate physical limits of privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Artur; Renner, Renato

    2014-03-01

    Among those who make a living from the science of secrecy, worry and paranoia are just signs of professionalism. Can we protect our secrets against those who wield superior technological powers? Can we trust those who provide us with tools for protection? Can we even trust ourselves, our own freedom of choice? Recent developments in quantum cryptography show that some of these questions can be addressed and discussed in precise and operational terms, suggesting that privacy is indeed possible under surprisingly weak assumptions.

  5. Differential Privacy versus Quantitative Information Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Alvim, Mário S; Degano, Pierpaolo; Palamidessi, Catuscia

    2010-01-01

    Differential privacy is a notion of privacy that has become very popular in the database community. Roughly, the idea is that a randomized query mechanism provides sufficient privacy protection if the ratio between the probabilities of two different entries to originate a certain answer is bound by e^\\epsilon. In the fields of anonymity and information flow there is a similar concern for controlling information leakage, i.e. limiting the possibility of inferring the secret information from the observables. In recent years, researchers have proposed to quantify the leakage in terms of the information-theoretic notion of mutual information. There are two main approaches that fall in this category: One based on Shannon entropy, and one based on R\\'enyi's min entropy. The latter has connection with the so-called Bayes risk, which expresses the probability of guessing the secret. In this paper, we show how to model the query system in terms of an information-theoretic channel, and we compare the notion of differen...

  6. Medical information and the right to privacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drell, D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of papers presented at the DOE-supported workshop on medical information and the right to privacy held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on June 9 and 10, 1994. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to discuss the legal, ethical and practical issues related to the computerization and use of medical data, as well as the potential impact the use of these data may have on an individual`s privacy. Topical areas include an overview of the Federal and legal requirements to collect medical data, historical experiences with worker screening programs, currently available medical surveillance technologies (both biomedical and computer technologies) and their limitations. In addition, an-depth assessment of the needs and interests of a wide spectrum of parties as they relate to the use of medical data from both a legal and privacy perspective is provided. The needs of the individual, the public (e.g., blood and tissue banks), private enterprises (e.g., industry and insurance carriers), and the government (e.g., FBI) are discussed. Finally, the practical and legal issues relating to the use of computers to carry, store and transmit this information are also examined. The abstracts are presented in the intended order of presentation as indicated in the agenda for the meeting.

  7. Medical information and the right to privacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drell, D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of papers presented at the DOE-supported workshop on medical information and the right to privacy held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on June 9 and 10, 1994. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to discuss the legal, ethical and practical issues related to the computerization and use of medical data, as well as the potential impact the use of these data may have on an individual`s privacy. Topical areas include an overview of the Federal and legal requirements to collect medical data, historical experiences with worker screening programs, currently available medical surveillance technologies (both biomedical and computer technologies) and their limitations. In addition, an-depth assessment of the needs and interests of a wide spectrum of parties as they relate to the use of medical data from both a legal and privacy perspective is provided. The needs of the individual, the public (e.g., blood and tissue banks), private enterprises (e.g., industry and insurance carriers), and the government (e.g., FBI) are discussed. Finally, the practical and legal issues relating to the use of computers to carry, store and transmit this information are also examined. The abstracts are presented in the intended order of presentation as indicated in the agenda for the meeting.

  8. Universally Utility-Maximizing Privacy Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arpita; Sundararajan, Mukund

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for releasing information about a statistical database with sensitive data must resolve a trade-off between utility and privacy. Privacy can be rigorously quantified using the framework of {\\em differential privacy}, which requires that a mechanism's output distribution is nearly the same (in a strong sense) whether or not a given database row is included or excluded. In this paper, we pursue much strong and general utility guarantees. We seek a mechanism that guarantees near-optimal utility to every potential user, independent of its side information. Formally, we model the side information of a potential user as a prior distribution over query results. An interaction between a user and a mechanism induces a posterior distribution, and we define the utility of the mechanism for this user as the accuracy of this posterior, as quantified via a user-specific loss function. A differentially private mechanism $M$ is (near-)optimal for a given user $u$ if $u$ derives (almost) as much utility from $M$ a...

  9. Information privacy, the right to receive information and (mobile ICTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litska Strikwerda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper is about the notion of (information privacy and its grounding in law. It discusses the tension between the right to privacy and the right to receive information. The second part of this paper explores how (mobile ICTs challenge and complicate privacy claims and satisfy the right to receive information.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v4i2.1761

  10. Anonymous communication networks protecting privacy on the web

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    In today's interactive network environment, where various types of organizations are eager to monitor and track Internet use, anonymity is one of the most powerful resources available to counterbalance the threat of unknown spectators and to ensure Internet privacy.Addressing the demand for authoritative information on anonymous Internet usage, Anonymous Communication Networks: Protecting Privacy on the Web examines anonymous communication networks as a solution to Internet privacy concerns. It explains how anonymous communication networks make it possible for participants to communicate with

  11. Developing Privacy Solutions for Sharing and Analyzing Healthcare Data

    OpenAIRE

    Motiwalla, Luvai; Li, Xiao-Bai

    2013-01-01

    The extensive use of electronic health data has increased privacy concerns. While most healthcare organizations are conscientious in protecting their data in their databases, very few organizations take enough precautions to protect data that is shared with third party organizations. Recently the regulatory environment has tightened the laws to enforce privacy protection. The goal of this research is to explore the application of data masking solutions for protecting patient privacy when data...

  12. Millennial dissonance: an analysis of the privacy generational gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sher, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    The young Millennial generation has adopted social media and internet technology to an unprecedented degree. But this generation’s extensive usage of online services leaves Millennials open to various privacy vulnerabilities that have emerged with the new technology. Older generations hold concern that Millennials are ignoring the value of privacy when disclosing their personal information in exchange for online connectivity. This paper investigates the generational privacy concern through di...

  13. Facial expression preserving privacy protection using image melding

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Yuta; Koyama, Tetsuya; Yokoya, Naokazu; Babaguchi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    An enormous number of images are currently shared through social networking services such as Facebook. These images usually contain appearance of people and may violate the people's privacy if they are published without permission from each person. To remedy this privacy concern, visual privacy protection, such as blurring, is applied to facial regions of people without permission. However, in addition to image quality degradation, this may spoil the context of the image: If some people are f...

  14. Standards for health information technology to ensure adolescent privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Margaret J; Del Beccaro, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Privacy and security of health information is a basic expectation of patients. Despite the existence of federal and state laws safeguarding the privacy of health information, health information systems currently lack the capability to allow for protection of this information for minors. This policy statement reviews the challenges to privacy for adolescents posed by commercial health information technology systems and recommends basic principles for ideal electronic health record systems. This policy statement has been endorsed by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

  15. Unraveling an Old Cloak: k-anonymity for Location Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Reza; Troncoso, Carmela; Diaz, Claudia; Freudiger, Julien; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    There is a rich collection of literature that aims at protecting the privacy of users querying location-based services. One of the most popular location privacy techniques consists in cloaking users' locations such that k users appear as potential senders of a query, thus achieving k-anonymity. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of k-anonymity approaches for protecting location privacy in the presence of various types of adversaries. The unraveling of the scheme unfolds the inconsistency b...

  16. Location Privacy Techniques in Client-Server Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian S.; Lu, Hua; Yiu, Man Lung

    A typical location-based service returns nearby points of interest in response to a user location. As such services are becoming increasingly available and popular, location privacy emerges as an important issue. In a system that does not offer location privacy, users must disclose their exact locations in order to receive the desired services. We view location privacy as an enabling technology that may lead to increased use of location-based services.

  17. Protecting Locations with Differential Privacy under Temporal Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yonghui; Xiong, Li

    2014-01-01

    Concerns on location privacy frequently arise with the rapid development of GPS enabled devices and location-based applications. While spatial transformation techniques such as location perturbation or generalization have been studied extensively, most techniques rely on syntactic privacy models without rigorous privacy guarantee. Many of them only consider static scenarios or perturb the location at single timestamps without considering temporal correlations of a moving user's locations, and...

  18. Millennial dissonance: an analysis of the privacy generational gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sher, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    The young Millennial generation has adopted social media and internet technology to an unprecedented degree. But this generation’s extensive usage of online services leaves Millennials open to various privacy vulnerabilities that have emerged with the new technology. Older generations hold concern that Millennials are ignoring the value of privacy when disclosing their personal information in exchange for online connectivity. This paper investigates the generational privacy concern through di...

  19. The Clean Privacy Ecosystem of the Future Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Lothar Fritsch

    2013-01-01

    This article speculates on the future of privacy and electronic identities on the Internet. Based on a short review of security models and the development of privacy-enhancing technology, privacy and electronic identities will be discussed as parts of a larger context—an ecosystem of personal information and electronic identities. The article argues for an ecosystem view of personal information and electronic identities, as both personal information and identity information are basi...

  20. Factors and Predictors of Online Security and Privacy Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Bubaš; Tihomir Orehovački; Mario Konecki

    2008-01-01

    Assumptions and habits regarding computer and Internet use are among the major factors which influence online privacy and security of Internet users. In our study a survey was performed on 312 subjects (college students who are Internet users with IT skills) that investigated how assumptions and habits of Internet users are related to their online security and privacy. The following four factors of online security and privacy related behaviors were revealed in factor analysis: F1 – conscienti...

  1. Data Security and Privacy in Apps for Dementia: An Analysis of Existing Privacy Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Lisa; Torous, John; Vahia, Ipsit V

    2017-08-01

    Despite tremendous growth in the number of health applications (apps), little is known about how well these apps protect their users' health-related data. This gap in knowledge is of particular concern for apps targeting people with dementia, whose cognitive impairment puts them at increased risk of privacy breaches. In this article, we determine how many dementia apps have privacy policies and how well they protect user data. Our analysis included all iPhone apps that matched the search terms "medical + dementia" or "health & fitness + dementia" and collected user-generated content. We evaluated all available privacy policies for these apps based on criteria that systematically measure how individual user data is handled. Seventy-two apps met the above search teams and collected user data. Of these, only 33 (46%) had an available privacy policy. Nineteen of the 33 with policies (58%) were specific to the app in question, and 25 (76%) specified how individual-user as opposed to aggregate data would be handled. Among these, there was a preponderance of missing information, the majority acknowledged collecting individual data for internal purposes, and most admitted to instances in which they would share user data with outside parties. At present, the majority of health apps focused on dementia lack a privacy policy, and those that do exist lack clarity. Bolstering safeguards and improving communication about privacy protections will help facilitate consumer trust in apps, thereby enabling more widespread and meaningful use by people with dementia and those involved in their care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Space Partitioning for Privacy Enabled 3D City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippovska, Y.; Wichmann, A.; Kada, M.

    2016-10-01

    Due to recent technological progress, data capturing and processing of highly detailed (3D) data has become extensive. And despite all prospects of potential uses, data that includes personal living spaces and public buildings can also be considered as a serious intrusion into people's privacy and a threat to security. It becomes especially critical if data is visible by the general public. Thus, a compromise is needed between open access to data and privacy requirements which can be very different for each application. As privacy is a complex and versatile topic, the focus of this work particularly lies on the visualization of 3D urban data sets. For the purpose of privacy enabled visualizations of 3D city models, we propose to partition the (living) spaces into privacy regions, each featuring its own level of anonymity. Within each region, the depicted 2D and 3D geometry and imagery is anonymized with cartographic generalization techniques. The underlying spatial partitioning is realized as a 2D map generated as a straight skeleton of the open space between buildings. The resulting privacy cells are then merged according to the privacy requirements associated with each building to form larger regions, their borderlines smoothed, and transition zones established between privacy regions to have a harmonious visual appearance. It is exemplarily demonstrated how the proposed method generates privacy enabled 3D city models.

  3. 76 FR 58857 - Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... also noted below. Aircraft descriptions, including: Aircraft engine quality. Aircraft fuselage color.... Mile marker text. Municipality name. Postal code. State name. Street name. Street number (privacy field...

  4. Challenges and Opportunities for Enhancing User Privacy and User Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhotre, Prashant Shantaram; Olesen, Henning; Khajuria, Samant

    2015-01-01

    Big data techniques allow service providers to collect data on a massive scale. User data has turned into an important asset to service providers. The current business model of service providers gathers too much information for knowledge extraction. In the era of Google and Facebook, privacy...... information and current business models as privacy issues. The important identified issues include that users are missing privacy awareness tools and unavailability to visualize of personal information flow. We also present some recent advances in these areas to address concern privacy issues like User...

  5. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  6. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  7. Rethinking Privacy Decisions: Pre-Existing Attitudes, Pre-Existing Emotional States, and a Situational Privacy Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Kehr, Flavius; Wentzel, Daniel; Kowatsch, Tobias; Fleisch, Elgar

    2015-01-01

    As a potential explanation to measured inconsistencies between stated privacy concerns and actual disclosing behavior, denoted as the "privacy paradox", scholars have proposed a systematic distinction between situational privacy considerations and pre-existing, superordinate factors that shape the decisive situation without being directly connected to the situation itself. Deploying an experimental approach, we explored the dynamics of two types of such pre-existing factors, namely (1) pre-ex...

  8. Privacy Concerns and Online Behavior - Not so Paradoxical After All? : Viewing the Privacy Paradox through Different Theoretical Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, Christoph; Strathoff, Pepe

    2013-01-01

    This contribution provides a new avenue to the privacy paradox - the divergence between attitudes and behavior when it comes to online privacy. Our approach rests on research in online trust and on the theory of public value as well as Tönnies' duality of "Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft". We show with representative data from 2012 that the very providers of Internet and mobile services - web companies and telecommunication providers - enjoy very low levels of trust in terms of privacy protect...

  9. Privacy-preserving genome-wide association studies on cloud environment using fully homomorphic encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Jie; Yamada, Yoshiji; Sakuma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Developed sequencing techniques are yielding large-scale genomic data at low cost. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) targeting genetic variations that are significantly associated with a particular disease offers great potential for medical improvement. However, subjects who volunteer their genomic data expose themselves to the risk of privacy invasion; these privacy concerns prevent efficient genomic data sharing. Our goal is to presents a cryptographic solution to this problem. To maintain the privacy of subjects, we propose encryption of all genotype and phenotype data. To allow the cloud to perform meaningful computation in relation to the encrypted data, we use a fully homomorphic encryption scheme. Noting that we can evaluate typical statistics for GWAS from a frequency table, our solution evaluates frequency tables with encrypted genomic and clinical data as input. We propose to use a packing technique for efficient evaluation of these frequency tables. Our solution supports evaluation of the D' measure of linkage disequilibrium, the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, the χ2 test, etc. In this paper, we take χ2 test and linkage disequilibrium as examples and demonstrate how we can conduct these algorithms securely and efficiently in an outsourcing setting. We demonstrate with experimentation that secure outsourcing computation of one χ2 test with 10, 000 subjects requires about 35 ms and evaluation of one linkage disequilibrium with 10, 000 subjects requires about 80 ms. With appropriate encoding and packing technique, cryptographic solutions based on fully homomorphic encryption for secure computations of GWAS can be practical.

  10. The Impact of Privacy Concerns and Perceived Vulnerability to Risks on Users Privacy Protection Behaviors on SNS: A Structural Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noora Sami Al-Saqer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research paper investigates Saudi users’ awareness levels about privacy policies in Social Networking Sites (SNSs, their privacy concerns and their privacy protection measures. For this purpose, a research model that consists of five main constructs namely information privacy concern, awareness level of privacy policies of social networking sites, perceived vulnerability to privacy risks, perceived response efficacy, and privacy protecting behavior was developed. An online survey questionnaire was used to collect responses from a sample of (108 Saudi SNSs users. The study found that Saudi users of social networking sites are concerned about their information privacy, but they do not have enough awareness of the importance of privacy protecting behaviors to safeguard their privacy online. The research results also showed that there is a lack of awareness of privacy policies of Social networking sites among Saudi users. Testing hypothesis results using the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM showed that information privacy concern positively affects privacy protection behaviors in SNSs and perceived vulnerability to privacy risks positively affects information privacy concern.

  11. 76 FR 62035 - Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ...In accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Departmental Management (DM), Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Coordination (OHSEC), is giving notice of a system of records that is maintained for the purpose of the Radiation Safety Management System (RSMS). The RSMS was developed by the Radiation Safety Division, a......

  12. Real world privacy expectations in VANETs real world privacy expectations in VANETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feiri, Michael; Petit, Jonathan; Kargl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Vehicular communication technology is nearing de- ployment in the market. We see initial plug tests in 2013 to con- firm interoperability of multiple independent implementations. As the entrance into the market is coming closer it is time to consider the privacy expectations of the relevant standard

  13. The Privacy Calculus: Mobile Apps and User Perceptions of Privacy and Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fife

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A continuing stream of new mobile data services are being released that rely upon the collection of personal data to support a business model. New technologies including facial recognition, sensors and Near Field Communications (NFC will increasingly become a part of everyday services and applications that challenge traditional concepts of individual privacy. The average person as well as the “tech‐savvy” mobile phone user may not yet be fully aware of the extent to which their privacy and security are being affected through their mobile activities and how comparable this situation is to personal computer usage. We investigate perceptions and usage of mobile data services that appear to have specific privacy and security sensitivities, specifically social networking,\tbanking/payments\tand\thealth‐related activities. Our annual survey of smartphone users in the U.S. and Japan is presented from 2011. This nationally representative survey data is used to show demographic and cultural differences, and substantiate our hypotheses about the links between use and privacy concerns

  14. Learning from experience: privacy and the secondary use of data in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William W

    2003-01-01

    In this fast-moving age of data banking, data are a currency, and often a commodity. Electronic health records are being developed everywhere. Increasingly, data collected for various primary purposes are being re-used for research. With personal mobility, contracting of services, and telemedicine, health care data are crossing national borders, and therefore so are genetic information, biological materials, and reimbursement data. There is much public and legal concern about the implications. This article addresses the question: Under what conditions may data not collected specifically for research, such as primary medical data, be re-used for health research without compromising the privacy of the data-subjects?

  15. 78 FR 15730 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program AGENCY: U.S. Citizenship...: Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program between the Department of Homeland Security, U.S... notice of the existence of a computer matching program between the Department of Homeland Security,...

  16. 46 CFR 14.105 - Disclosure and privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disclosure and privacy. 14.105 Section 14.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN SHIPMENT AND DISCHARGE OF MERCHANT MARINERS General § 14.105 Disclosure and privacy. The Coast Guard makes information...

  17. Location privacy and national security: contradiction in terminus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Location based services (LBS) potentially put the privacy of individuals at risk. The increased possibility to know people’s whereabouts is posing the question of possibility versus desirability with regard to location privacy. The central question that this article aims to answer is how location pr

  18. E-Commerce and Privacy: Conflict and Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Badie N.; Higby, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic commerce has intensified conflict between businesses' need to collect data and customers' desire to protect privacy. Web-based privacy tools and legislation could add to the costs of e-commerce and reduce profitability. Business models not based on profiling customers may be needed. (SK)

  19. 76 FR 54190 - Proposed Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Officer (OCIO), Departmental Management (DM). ACTION: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records... of Agriculture (USDA), OCIO gives notice of a new Privacy Act System of Records. DATES: This notice... Section (e)(4)(A). Purpose(s): The purpose of this system of records is to permit the USDA's OCIO...

  20. 78 FR 15407 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... Internal Revenue Service Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service, Treasury. ACTION... requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Department of the Treasury, Internal... violation of security policy. The records will include items such as suspected and actual policy...

  1. Privacy in a cyber age policy and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Etzioni, Amitai

    2015-01-01

    This book lays out the foundation of a privacy doctrine suitable to the cyber age. It limits the volume, sensitivity, and secondary analysis that can be carried out. In studying these matters, the book examines the privacy issues raised by the NSA, publication of state secrets, and DNA usage.

  2. 75 FR 17978 - Privacy Act of 1974: Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...'') proposes to revise a Privacy Act system of records: ``Pay and Leave System (SEC-15)''. The revisions.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission proposes to revise the Privacy Act system of records ``Pay and Leave..., Attendance, Retirement and Leave Records. SYSTEM LOCATION: 1. Payroll files, retirement case files, time...

  3. Can privacy concerns for insurance of connected cars be compensated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, S.; De Reuver, G.A.; Kroesen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Internet-of-things technologies enable service providers such as insurance companies to collect vast amounts of privacy-sensitive data on car drivers. This paper studies whether and how privacy concerns of car owners can be compensated by offering monetary benefits. We study the case of usage based

  4. Availability and quality of mobile health app privacy policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyaev, Ali; Dehling, Tobias; Taylor, Patrick L; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) customers shopping for applications (apps) should be aware of app privacy practices so they can make informed decisions about purchase and use. We sought to assess the availability, scope, and transparency of mHealth app privacy policies on iOS and Android. Over 35,000 mHealth apps are available for iOS and Android. Of the 600 most commonly used apps, only 183 (30.5%) had privacy policies. Average policy length was 1755 (SD 1301) words with a reading grade level of 16 (SD 2.9). Two thirds (66.1%) of privacy policies did not specifically address the app itself. Our findings show that currently mHealth developers often fail to provide app privacy policies. The privacy policies that are available do not make information privacy practices transparent to users, require college-level literacy, and are often not focused on the app itself. Further research is warranted to address why privacy policies are often absent, opaque, or irrelevant, and to find a remedy.

  5. 75 FR 81454 - Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... OF ACTUARIES 20 CFR Part 903 Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: In accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries (Joint Board) is...

  6. Role Management in a Privacy-Enhanced Collaborative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Anja; Borcea-Pfitzmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly flexible role management integrated in a privacy-enhanced collaborative environment (PECE). Design/methodology/approach: The general framework was provided by former findings…

  7. 78 FR 25853 - Defense Logistics Agency Privacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 323 RIN 0790-AI86 Defense Logistics Agency Privacy Program AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) is revising... Defense Logistics Agency's implementation of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. In addition, DLA...

  8. Role Management in a Privacy-Enhanced Collaborative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Anja; Borcea-Pfitzmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly flexible role management integrated in a privacy-enhanced collaborative environment (PECE). Design/methodology/approach: The general framework was provided by former findings…

  9. E-Commerce and Privacy: Conflict and Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Badie N.; Higby, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic commerce has intensified conflict between businesses' need to collect data and customers' desire to protect privacy. Web-based privacy tools and legislation could add to the costs of e-commerce and reduce profitability. Business models not based on profiling customers may be needed. (SK)

  10. Preserving Differential Privacy in Degree-Correlation based Graph Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enabling accurate analysis of social network data while preserving differential privacy has been challenging since graph features such as cluster coefficient often have high sensitivity, which is different from traditional aggregate functions (e.g., count and sum on tabular data. In this paper, we study the problem of enforcing edge differential privacy in graph generation. The idea is to enforce differential privacy on graph model parameters learned from the original network and then generate the graphs for releasing using the graph model with the private parameters. In particular, we develop a differential privacy preserving graph generator based on the dK-graph generation model. We first derive from the original graph various parameters (i.e., degree correlations used in the dK-graph model, then enforce edge differential privacy on the learned parameters, and finally use the dKgraph model with the perturbed parameters to generate graphs. For the 2K-graph model, we enforce the edge differential privacy by calibrating noise based on the smooth sensitivity, rather than the global sensitivity. By doing this, we achieve the strict differential privacy guarantee with smaller magnitude noise. We conduct experiments on four real networks and compare the performance of our private dK-graph models with the stochastic Kronecker graph generation model in terms of utility and privacy tradeoff. Empirical evaluations show the developed private dK-graph generation models significantly outperform the approach based on the stochastic Kronecker generation model.

  11. Secure signal processing: Privacy preserving cryptographic protocols for multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in technology provided a suitable environment for the people in which they can benefit from online services in their daily lives. Despite several advantages, online services also constitute serious privacy risks for their users as the main input to algorithms are privacy sensitive su

  12. 75 FR 70365 - Privacy Act Of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... AFFAIRS Privacy Act Of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION: Notice of Amendment to System of Records. SUMMARY: As required by the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a(e... System and the Categories of Records in the System, Location, and Purpose. VA is republishing the...

  13. Location privacy online : China, the Netherlands and South Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore cross-cultural differences in users’ location privacy behaviour on LBSNs (location-based social networks) in China, the Netherlands and Korea. The study suggests evidence that Chinese, Dutch and Korean users exhibit different location privacy concerns, attitudes to

  14. 75 FR 27051 - Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... records under the Privacy Act of 1974. The system is FMCSA's National Consumer Complaint Database (NCCDB), which is being modified to reflect: (1) The new name; (2) changes to the system location; (3)...

  15. 77 FR 24982 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Prisons, Department of Justice. ACTION: Modified System of Records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), notice is given... the ``System Location'' section that the records contained in this system may be located at...

  16. 78 FR 25414 - Privacy Act of 1974, System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act of 1974, System of Records AGENCY: United States Agency... of records maintained in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, (5 U.S.C. 552a), as amended... of record for a non-significant change, to reflect the address change for the location of the...

  17. 76 FR 79216 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Prisons, Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice of Modification of a System of Records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C... Bureau clarifies that the records contained in this system may be located at any authorized location,...

  18. Can privacy concerns for insurance of connected cars be compensated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, S.; De Reuver, G.A.; Kroesen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Internet-of-things technologies enable service providers such as insurance companies to collect vast amounts of privacy-sensitive data on car drivers. This paper studies whether and how privacy concerns of car owners can be compensated by offering monetary benefits. We study the case of usage based

  19. On Limitations of Existing Methods for Location Privacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Schaarup

    This paper argues that there are some limitations when applying location privacy methods developed for point-ofinterest services to newer classes of location based services. We support the argument by categorizing methods for location privacy and identifying the issues. It is hypothesized...

  20. Cryptographic framework for analyzing the privacy of recommender algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Recommender algorithms are widely used, ranging from traditional Video on Demand to a wide variety of Web 2.0 services. Unfortunately, the related privacy concerns have not received much attention. In this paper, we study the privacy concerns associated with recommender algorithms and present a cryp

  1. Student Perceptions of Privacy Principles for Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifenthaler, Dirk; Schumacher, Clara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student perceptions of privacy principles related to learning analytics. Privacy issues for learning analytics include how personal data are collected and stored as well as how they are analyzed and presented to different stakeholders. A total of 330 university students participated in an exploratory study…

  2. On Differences between Chinese and Western Privacy Views

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙耕梅

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of globalization and China hosting 2022 winter Olympics,cross-cultural communication is being eagerly required to strengthen.Further understanding of different privacy views between China and the west is key to consciousness of privacy protection and smooth intercultural communication.

  3. Enhancing Privacy Education with a Technical Emphasis in IT Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltsverger, Svetlana; Zheng, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the development of four learning modules that focus on technical details of how a person's privacy might be compromised in real-world scenarios. The paper shows how students benefited from the addition of hands-on learning experiences of privacy and data protection to the existing information technology courses. These learning…

  4. Data Privacy Laws Follow Lead of Oklahoma and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Oklahoma's Student Data Accessibility, Transparency, and Accountability Act (known as the Student DATA Act) arose just as privacy concerns about student data were beginning to surface. According to Linnette Attai, founder of education technology compliance consultancy PlayWell LLC, "When this climate of data privacy first emerged in its…

  5. Location privacy and national security: contradiction in terminus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Location based services (LBS) potentially put the privacy of individuals at risk. The increased possibility to know people’s whereabouts is posing the question of possibility versus desirability with regard to location privacy. The central question that this article aims to answer is how location

  6. 32 CFR 806b.51 - Privacy and the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy and the Web. 806b.51 Section 806b.51... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.51 Privacy and the Web. Do not post personal information on publicly accessible DoD web sites unless clearly authorized by law and implementing...

  7. 75 FR 61450 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... are available from the FOIA/PA Program Manager, Corporate Communications, Defense Finance and... Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, 8899 East... Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager,...

  8. 78 FR 47309 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    .../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN.../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN... Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN...

  9. 78 FR 41919 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46249-0150 or at... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E..., Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E....

  10. 78 FR 41916 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46249-0150 or at..., Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th.../Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis,...

  11. 77 FR 69444 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46249-0150 or at... Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E... Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th...

  12. 78 FR 52518 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN..., Corporate Communications, DFAS-ZCF/IN, 8899 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46249-0150.'' * * * * * BILLING... Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager,...

  13. Preserving Differential Privacy in Degree-Correlation based Graph Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Xintao

    2013-08-01

    Enabling accurate analysis of social network data while preserving differential privacy has been challenging since graph features such as cluster coefficient often have high sensitivity, which is different from traditional aggregate functions (e.g., count and sum) on tabular data. In this paper, we study the problem of enforcing edge differential privacy in graph generation. The idea is to enforce differential privacy on graph model parameters learned from the original network and then generate the graphs for releasing using the graph model with the private parameters. In particular, we develop a differential privacy preserving graph generator based on the dK-graph generation model. We first derive from the original graph various parameters (i.e., degree correlations) used in the dK-graph model, then enforce edge differential privacy on the learned parameters, and finally use the dK-graph model with the perturbed parameters to generate graphs. For the 2K-graph model, we enforce the edge differential privacy by calibrating noise based on the smooth sensitivity, rather than the global sensitivity. By doing this, we achieve the strict differential privacy guarantee with smaller magnitude noise. We conduct experiments on four real networks and compare the performance of our private dK-graph models with the stochastic Kronecker graph generation model in terms of utility and privacy tradeoff. Empirical evaluations show the developed private dK-graph generation models significantly outperform the approach based on the stochastic Kronecker generation model.

  14. 76 FR 1409 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... system of records notice from its existing inventory of record systems subject to the Privacy Act of 1974... delete one system of records notice from its inventory of record systems subject to the Privacy Act of... system are also covered by Defense Finance and Accounting Service records notice T7332, Defense...

  15. Target-Based Maintenance of Privacy Preserving Association Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Madhu V.

    2011-01-01

    In the context of association rule mining, the state-of-the-art in privacy preserving data mining provides solutions for categorical and Boolean association rules but not for quantitative association rules. This research fills this gap by describing a method based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to protect input data privacy while preserving…

  16. 76 FR 75603 - Family Educational Rights and Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... privacy. Protecting student privacy helps achieve a number of important goals, including avoiding... adopted in these final regulations provide clarification on many important issues that have arisen over... School Breakfast Programs (School Meals Programs or SMPs) in connection with an audit or evaluation...

  17. 77 FR 56676 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Service is modifying a system of records to account for the previous omission of an accounting of... Financial Disclosure Reports. USPS 800.000 System Name: Address Change, Mail Forwarding, and Related... records, or who contest a record, subject to the provisions of the Privacy Act and privacy complaints....

  18. Secure signal processing: Privacy preserving cryptographic protocols for multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in technology provided a suitable environment for the people in which they can benefit from online services in their daily lives. Despite several advantages, online services also constitute serious privacy risks for their users as the main input to algorithms are privacy sensitive

  19. Privacy-Related Context Information for Ubiquitous Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health has been defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems. A system is composed of one or more information systems, their stakeholders, and the environment. These systems offer health services to individuals and thus implement ubiquitous computing. Privacy is the key challenge for ubiquitous health because of autonomous processing, rich contextual metadata, lack of predefined trust among participants, and the business objectives. Additionally, regulations and policies of stakeholders may be unknown to the individual. Context-sensitive privacy policies are needed to regulate information processing. Objective Our goal was to analyze privacy-related context information and to define the corresponding components and their properties that support privacy management in ubiquitous health. These properties should describe the privacy issues of information processing. With components and their properties, individuals can define context-aware privacy policies and set their privacy preferences that can change in different information-processing situations. Methods Scenarios and user stories are used to analyze typical activities in ubiquitous health to identify main actors, goals, tasks, and stakeholders. Context arises from an activity and, therefore, we can determine different situations, services, and systems to identify properties for privacy-related context information in information-processing situations. Results Privacy-related context information components are situation, environment, individual, information technology system, service, and stakeholder. Combining our analyses and previously identified characteristics of ubiquitous health, more detailed properties for the components are defined. Properties define explicitly what context information for different components is needed to create context-aware privacy policies that can control, limit, and constrain information processing. With properties, we can define, for example, how

  20. Privacy and security in e-commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mandić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumer distrust and concerns, mainly in regards to the protection of their private information and risk of being exposed to online frauds, have been the main obstacles in online commerce. This paper analyzes some of the most significant aspects of trust in e-commerce, with a focus on online security and privacy issues. With all the potential that e-commerce provides to both companies and consumers, it is in the interest of the company to increase trust among its online users. Some of the most common online crimes are analyzed and practical guidelines to achieving trust in the online environment are provided.

  1. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with guiding policy and current technology, an electronic medical record may offer better security than a traditional paper record. PMID:8653450

  2. Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jonathan; Mutchler, Patrick; Mitchell, John C

    2016-05-17

    Since 2013, a stream of disclosures has prompted reconsideration of surveillance law and policy. One of the most controversial principles, both in the United States and abroad, is that communications metadata receives substantially less protection than communications content. Several nations currently collect telephone metadata in bulk, including on their own citizens. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the privacy properties of telephone metadata. Using a crowdsourcing methodology, we demonstrate that telephone metadata is densely interconnected, can trivially be reidentified, and can be used to draw sensitive inferences.

  3. Privacy, technology, and norms: the case of Smart Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christine; Darras, Brice; Bean, Elyse; Srivastava, Anurag; Frickel, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Norms shift and emerge in response to technological innovation. One such innovation is Smart Meters - components of Smart Grid energy systems capable of minute-to-minute transmission of consumer electricity use information. We integrate theory from sociological research on social norms and privacy to examine how privacy threats affect the demand for and expectations of norms that emerge in response to new technologies, using Smart Meters as a test case. Results from three vignette experiments suggest that increased threats to privacy created by Smart Meters are likely to provoke strong demand for and expectations of norms opposing the technology and that the strength of these normative rules is at least partly conditional on the context. Privacy concerns vary little with actors' demographic characteristics. These findings contribute to theoretical understanding of norm emergence and have practical implications for implementing privacy protections that effectively address concerns of electricity users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gain-Based Relief for Invasion of Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirko Harder

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many common law jurisdictions, some or all instances of invasion of privacy constitute a privacy-specific wrong either at common law (including equity or under statute. A remedy invariably available for such a wrong is compensation for loss. However, the plaintiff may instead seek to claim the profit the defendant has made from the invasion. This article examines when a plaintiff is, and should be, entitled to claim that profit, provided that invasion of privacy is actionable as such. After a brief overview of the relevant law in major common law jurisdictions, the article investigates how invasion of privacy fits into a general concept of what is called ‘restitution for wrongs’. It will be argued that the right to privacy is a right against the whole world and as such forms a proper basis of awarding gain-based relief for the unauthorised use of that right.

  5. How do patients respond to violation of their information privacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kuang-Ming; Ma, Chen-Chung; Alexander, Judith W

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of electronic medical records (EMRs) can expose patients to the risk of infringement of their privacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between patients' concerns about information privacy and their protective responses. A questionnaire survey conducted in a Taiwanese hospital revealed that, regarding information privacy, patients' concerns about the collection of information about themselves, the secondary use of this information and the possibility of errors in the recorded information were associated with their information privacy-protective responses, while concern for unauthorised access to their information by other staff in the medical facility was not. Medical facilities should devote every effort to alleviate patients' concerns about the invasion of their information privacy to avoid eroding the reputation of medical facilities and impeding the promotion of EMRs.

  6. The privacy role of information intermediaries through self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatevik Sargsyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Through qualitative analysis of the policies of two major global information intermediaries — Google and Microsoft — and related case studies, this paper demonstrates a that intermediaries’ participation in self-regulatory programmes and implementation of privacy principles does not necessarily translate into meaningful privacy safeguards for users in the face of growing private surveillance capacity; and b that within the EU and US self-regulatory frameworks, information intermediaries have discretionary power to set their policies and practices prioritising strategic interests over privacy commitments. Discussions in this paper complement existing studies on the implementation of privacy principles stipulated in Fair Information Practices (FIPs by enhancing understanding about the role of information intermediaries in defining privacy conditions of users within self-regulation.

  7. "Everybody Knows Everybody Else's Business"-Privacy in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janni; Smith, Annetta; Atherton, Iain; McLaughlin, Deirdre

    2016-12-01

    Patients have a right to privacy in a health care setting. This involves conversational discretion, security of medical records and physical privacy of remaining unnoticed or unidentified when using health care services other than by those who need to know or whom the patient wishes to know. However, the privacy of cancer patients who live in rural areas is more difficult to protect due to the characteristics of rural communities. The purpose of this article is to reflect on concerns relating to the lack of privacy experienced by cancer patients and health care professionals in the rural health care setting. In addition, this article suggests future research directions to provide much needed evidence for educating health care providers and guiding health care policies that can lead to better protection of privacy among cancer patients living in rural communities.

  8. Privacy Policies with Modal Logic: The Dynamic Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucher, Guillaume; Boella, Guido; van der Torre, Leendert

    Privacy policies are often defined in terms of permitted messages. Instead, in this paper we derive dynamically the permitted messages from static privacy policies defined in terms of permitted and obligatory knowledge. With this new approach, we do not have to specify the permissions and prohibitions of all message combinations explicitly. To specify and reason about such privacy policies, we extend a multi-modal logic introduced by Cuppens and Demolombe with update operators modeling the dynamics of both knowledge and privacy policies. We show also how to determine the obligatory messages, how to express epistemic norms, and how to check whether a situation is compliant with respect to a privacy policy.We axiomatize and prove the decidability of our logic.

  9. Not All Adware Is Badware: Towards Privacy-Aware Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Guha, Saikat; Francis, Paul

    Online advertising is a major economic force in the Internet today. A basic goal of any advertising system is to accurately target the ad to the recipient audience. While Internet technology brings the promise of extremely well-targeted ad placement, there have always been serious privacy concerns surrounding personalization. Today there is a constant battle between privacy advocates and advertisers, where advertisers try to push new personalization technologies, and privacy advocates try to stop them. As long as privacy advocates, however, are unable to propose an alternative personalization system that is private, this is a battle they are destined to lose. This paper presents the framework for such an alternative system, the Private Verifiable Advertising (Privad). We describe the privacy issues associated with today’s advertising systems, describe Privad, and discuss its pros and cons and the challenges that remain.

  10. BIG DATA SECURITY AND PRIVACY ISSUES IN THE CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gholami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations demand efficient solutions to store and analyze huge amount of information. Cloud computing as an enabler provides scalable resources and significant economic benefits in the form of reduced operational costs. This paradigm raises a broad range of security and privacy issues that must be taken into consideration. Multi-tenancy, loss of control, and trust are key challenges in cloud computing environments. This paper reviews the existing technologies and a wide array of both earlier and state-ofthe-art projects on cloud security and privacy. We categorize the existing research according to the cloud reference architecture orchestration, resource control, physical resource, and cloud service management layers, in addition to reviewing the recent developments for enhancing the Apache Hadoop security as one of the most deployed big data infrastructures. We also outline the frontier research on privacy-preserving data-intensive applications in cloud computing such as privacy threat modeling and privacy enhancing solutions.

  11. The new ethical trilemma: Security, privacy and transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganascia, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-09-01

    Numerous ethical and societal issues are related to the development of nanotechnology. Among them, the risk for privacy has long been discussed. Some people say that technology is neutral and that it does not really change the nature of problems, which are mainly political, while others state that its contemporary developments considerably amplify them; there are even persons who assert that it will make privacy protection obsolete. This article discusses those different positions by making reference to the classical Panopticon that is an architecture for surveillance, which characterizes the total absence of privacy. It envisages the possible evolutions of the Panopticon due to the development of nanotechnologies. It shows that the influence of nanotechnology on privacy concerns cannot be dissociated from the influence of computers and biotechnologies, i.e. from what is currently called the NBIC convergence. Lastly, it concludes on the new ethical trade-off that has to be made between three contradictory requirements that are security, transparency and privacy.

  12. Computer-Aided Identification and Validation of Privacy Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Meis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy is a software quality that is closely related to security. The main difference is that security properties aim at the protection of assets that are crucial for the considered system, and privacy aims at the protection of personal data that are processed by the system. The identification of privacy protection needs in complex systems is a hard and error prone task. Stakeholders whose personal data are processed might be overlooked, or the sensitivity and the need of protection of the personal data might be underestimated. The later personal data and the needs to protect them are identified during the development process, the more expensive it is to fix these issues, because the needed changes of the system-to-be often affect many functionalities. In this paper, we present a systematic method to identify the privacy needs of a software system based on a set of functional requirements by extending the problem-based privacy analysis (ProPAn method. Our method is tool-supported and automated where possible to reduce the effort that has to be spent for the privacy analysis, which is especially important when considering complex systems. The contribution of this paper is a semi-automatic method to identify the relevant privacy requirements for a software-to-be based on its functional requirements. The considered privacy requirements address all dimensions of privacy that are relevant for software development. As our method is solely based on the functional requirements of the system to be, we enable users of our method to identify the privacy protection needs that have to be addressed by the software-to-be at an early stage of the development. As initial evaluation of our method, we show its applicability on a small electronic health system scenario.

  13. 75 FR 80034 - Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records Revision and Proposed New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ...) and certain provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (AMA). GIPSA's Federal Grain... meal, as well as other agricultural commodities. Records in this system may be disclosed as follows to...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records Revision...

  14. Development and Analyses of Privacy Management Models in Online Social Networks Based on Communication Privacy Management Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Jung

    2013-01-01

    Online social networks (OSNs), while serving as an emerging means of communication, promote various issues of privacy. Users of OSNs encounter diverse occasions that lead to invasion of their privacy, e.g., published conversation, public revelation of their personally identifiable information, and open boundary of distinct social groups within…

  15. Privacy as human flourishing: could a shift towards virtue ethics strengthen privacy protection in the age of Big Data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, B.

    2014-01-01

    Privacy is commonly seen as an instrumental value in relation to negative freedom, human dignity and personal autonomy. Article 8 ECHR, protecting the right to privacy, was originally coined as a doctrine protecting the negative freedom of citizens in vertical relations, that is between citizen and

  16. Development and Analyses of Privacy Management Models in Online Social Networks Based on Communication Privacy Management Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Jung

    2013-01-01

    Online social networks (OSNs), while serving as an emerging means of communication, promote various issues of privacy. Users of OSNs encounter diverse occasions that lead to invasion of their privacy, e.g., published conversation, public revelation of their personally identifiable information, and open boundary of distinct social groups within…

  17. Disassociation for electronic health record privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukides, Grigorios; Liagouris, John; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data, beyond the originating healthcare institutions, can enable large-scale, low-cost medical studies that have the potential to improve public health. Thus, funding bodies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S., encourage or require the dissemination of EHR data, and a growing number of innovative medical investigations are being performed using such data. However, simply disseminating EHR data, after removing identifying information, may risk privacy, as patients can still be linked with their record, based on diagnosis codes. This paper proposes the first approach that prevents this type of data linkage using disassociation, an operation that transforms records by splitting them into carefully selected subsets. Our approach preserves privacy with significantly lower data utility loss than existing methods and does not require data owners to specify diagnosis codes that may lead to identity disclosure, as these methods do. Consequently, it can be employed when data need to be shared broadly and be used in studies, beyond the intended ones. Through extensive experiments using EHR data, we demonstrate that our method can construct data that are highly useful for supporting various types of clinical case count studies and general medical analysis tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An information theoretic approach for privacy metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bezzi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizations often need to release microdata without revealing sensitive information. To this scope, data are anonymized and, to assess the quality of the process, various privacy metrics have been proposed, such as k-anonymity, l-diversity, and t-closeness. These metrics are able to capture different aspects of the disclosure risk, imposing minimal requirements on the association of an individual with the sensitive attributes. If we want to combine them in a optimization problem, we need a common framework able to express all these privacy conditions. Previous studies proposed the notion of mutual information to measure the different kinds of disclosure risks and the utility, but, since mutual information is an average quantity, it is not able to completely express these conditions on single records. We introduce here the notion of one-symbol information (i.e., the contribution to mutual information by a single record that allows to express and compare the disclosure risk metrics. In addition, we obtain a relation between the risk values t and l, which can be used for parameter setting. We also show, by numerical experiments, how l-diversity and t-closeness can be represented in terms of two different, but equally acceptable, conditions on the information gain..

  19. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Deborah; Paradiso, Angelo; Hansson, Matts

    2014-06-01

    Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  20. Designing for Privacy in Ubiquitous Social Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Figueiras, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Improving human communication during face–to–face meetings is nowadays possible by transferring online social networking benefits to the physical world. This is enabled by the ubiquitous social networking services that became available by means of wirelessly interconnected smart devices, automati......Improving human communication during face–to–face meetings is nowadays possible by transferring online social networking benefits to the physical world. This is enabled by the ubiquitous social networking services that became available by means of wirelessly interconnected smart devices......, automatically exchanging personal user data. The main goal of these services is to facilitate the initialisation of relationships between people who do not know each other, but they probably should. Given that sharing of personal information is an intrinsic part of ubiquitous social networking, these services...... are subject to crucial privacy threats. Inspired by the usability and privacy limitations of existing design solutions, we identify, describe and qualitatively evaluate four drawbacks to be avoided when designing ubiquitous social networking applications. By addressing these drawbacks, services become more...

  1. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Mascalzoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  2. The development of the patient privacy scale in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Havva; Bahçecik, Nefise; Ozçelik, Kumral Semanur

    2014-11-01

    The developments in technology and communication channels, increasing workload, and carelessness cause problems regarding patient privacy and confidentiality in nursing services. The study was conducted to develop a patient privacy scale to identify whether nurses observe or violate patient privacy at workplace. This research was a methodological and descriptive study. Participants were 354 nurses working at private hospitals and hospitals affiliated with the Ministry of Health in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were collected with a questionnaire about the demographic characteristics of nurses and their opinions about patient privacy and with patient privacy scale. After getting permission from the top management of hospitals, information about the study was given to nurses. Those willing to participate were informed that participation was voluntary and invited to give written consent before data collection. The content validity index of scale was 0.91, Cronbach's alpha was 0.93, Spearman-Brown and Guttman coefficients were 0.85, the upper and lower 27% test was -29.65, and item-total correlation values ranged from 0.47 to 0.71. The scale had five subscales. In addition, 49% of the nurses stated that patient privacy was always observed in their services/units. They appraised with a mean score of 4.51 ± 0.49 for the total scale, 4.39 ± 0.61 for confidentiality of personal information and private life, 4.39 ± 0.70 for sexual privacy, 4.56 ± 0.57 for the privacy of those unable to protect themselves, 4.60 ± 0.59 for physical privacy, and 4.60 ± 0.52 for ensuring a favorable environment. The findings of this study were in contrast with the results of some international studies which determined the violation of the patient privacy. The patient privacy scale is a valid and reliable tool to collect data on whether nurses observe or violate patient privacy, and the nurses generally reported observing or paying attention to patient privacy in all hospitals and especially

  3. Perspectives on Privacy and Terrorism: All Is not Lost--Yet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellman, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discusses implications of the U.S.A. Patriot Act, antiterrorism legislation that was passed after the September 11 attacks, regarding privacy issues. Highlights include information privacy; privacy and government, including increases in the surveillance powers of government; privacy and the private sector; and future possibilities. (Author/LRW)

  4. 10 CFR 727.4 - Is there any expectation of privacy applicable to a DOE computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Is there any expectation of privacy applicable to a DOE... OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.4 Is there any expectation of privacy applicable to a DOE computer... Communications Privacy Act of 1986), no user of a DOE computer shall have any expectation of privacy in the...

  5. 32 CFR 806b.30 - Evaluating information systems for Privacy Act compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluating information systems for Privacy Act... systems for Privacy Act compliance. Information system owners and developers must address Privacy Act... cycle of the information system. This is accomplished with a Privacy Impact Assessment. (a) The...

  6. 78 FR 69861 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency...: Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to update and reissue...

  7. 78 FR 69753 - Exemption of Records Systems Under the Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Part 16 Exemption of Records Systems Under the Privacy Act AGENCY: Executive Office for Organized Crime... Department of Justice (the Department or DOJ) amends its Privacy Act regulations for two Privacy Act systems... Criminal Division, these systems were exempted from certain provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974...

  8. 29 CFR 4902.9 - Privacy Act provisions for which PBGC claims an exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy Act provisions for which PBGC claims an exemption... INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT § 4902.9 Privacy Act provisions for which PBGC claims an exemption... criteria from various other subsections of section 552a. This section contains a summary of the Privacy...

  9. 38 CFR 20.1200 - Rule 1200. Privacy Act request-appeal pending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 1200. Privacy Act... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Privacy Act § 20.1200 Rule 1200. Privacy Act request—appeal pending. When a Privacy Act request is filed under § 1.577 of this chapter...

  10. Space in Space: Designing for Privacy in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Jonie

    2015-01-01

    Privacy is cultural, socially embedded in the spatial, temporal, and material aspects of the lived experience. Definitions of privacy are as varied among scholars as they are among those who fight for their personal rights in the home and the workplace. Privacy in the workplace has become a topic of interest in recent years, as evident in discussions on Big Data as well as the shrinking office spaces in which people work. An article in The New York Times published in February of this year noted that "many companies are looking to cut costs, and one way to do that is by trimming personal space". Increasingly, organizations ranging from tech start-ups to large corporations are downsizing square footage and opting for open-office floorplans hoping to trim the budget and spark creative, productive communication among their employees. The question of how much is too much to trim when it comes to privacy, is one that is being actively addressed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as they explore habitat designs for future space missions. NASA recognizes privacy as a design-related stressor impacting human health and performance. Given the challenges of sustaining life in an isolated, confined, and extreme environment such as Mars, NASA deems it necessary to determine the acceptable minimal amount for habitable volume for activities requiring at least some level of privacy in order to support optimal crew performance. Ethnographic research was conducted in 2013 to explore perceptions of privacy and privacy needs among astronauts living and working in space as part of a long-distance, long-duration mission. The allocation of space, or habitable volume, becomes an increasingly complex issue in outer space due to the costs associated with maintaining an artificial, confined environment bounded by limitations of mass while located in an extreme environment. Privacy in space, or space in space, provides a unique case study of the complex notions of

  11. Privacy Management and Networked PPD Systems - Challenges Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Pharow, Peter; Petersen, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Modern personal portable health devices (PPDs) become increasingly part of a larger, inhomogeneous information system. Information collected by sensors are stored and processed in global clouds. Services are often free of charge, but at the same time service providers' business model is based on the disclosure of users' intimate health information. Health data processed in PPD networks is not regulated by health care specific legislation. In PPD networks, there is no guarantee that stakeholders share same ethical principles with the user. Often service providers have own security and privacy policies and they rarely offer to the user possibilities to define own, or adapt existing privacy policies. This all raises huge ethical and privacy concerns. In this paper, the authors have analyzed privacy challenges in PPD networks from users' viewpoint using system modeling method and propose the principle "Personal Health Data under Personal Control" must generally be accepted at global level. Among possible implementation of this principle, the authors propose encryption, computer understandable privacy policies, and privacy labels or trust based privacy management methods. The latter can be realized using infrastructural trust calculation and monitoring service. A first step is to require the protection of personal health information and the principle proposed being internationally mandatory. This requires both regulatory and standardization activities, and the availability of open and certified software application which all service providers can implement. One of those applications should be the independent Trust verifier.

  12. Incentivizing Verifiable Privacy-Protection Mechanisms for Offline Crowdsensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajun Sun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Incentive mechanisms of crowdsensing have recently been intensively explored. Most of these mechanisms mainly focus on the standard economical goals like truthfulness and utility maximization. However, enormous privacy and security challenges need to be faced directly in real-life environments, such as cost privacies. In this paper, we investigate offline verifiable privacy-protection crowdsensing issues. We firstly present a general verifiable privacy-protection incentive mechanism for the offline homogeneous and heterogeneous sensing job model. In addition, we also propose a more complex verifiable privacy-protection incentive mechanism for the offline submodular sensing job model. The two mechanisms not only explore the private protection issues of users and platform, but also ensure the verifiable correctness of payments between platform and users. Finally, we demonstrate that the two mechanisms satisfy privacy-protection, verifiable correctness of payments and the same revenue as the generic one without privacy protection. Our experiments also validate that the two mechanisms are both scalable and efficient, and applicable for mobile devices in crowdsensing applications based on auctions, where the main incentive for the user is the remuneration.

  13. Incentivizing Verifiable Privacy-Protection Mechanisms for Offline Crowdsensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiajun; Liu, Ningzhong

    2017-09-04

    Incentive mechanisms of crowdsensing have recently been intensively explored. Most of these mechanisms mainly focus on the standard economical goals like truthfulness and utility maximization. However, enormous privacy and security challenges need to be faced directly in real-life environments, such as cost privacies. In this paper, we investigate offline verifiable privacy-protection crowdsensing issues. We firstly present a general verifiable privacy-protection incentive mechanism for the offline homogeneous and heterogeneous sensing job model. In addition, we also propose a more complex verifiable privacy-protection incentive mechanism for the offline submodular sensing job model. The two mechanisms not only explore the private protection issues of users and platform, but also ensure the verifiable correctness of payments between platform and users. Finally, we demonstrate that the two mechanisms satisfy privacy-protection, verifiable correctness of payments and the same revenue as the generic one without privacy protection. Our experiments also validate that the two mechanisms are both scalable and efficient, and applicable for mobile devices in crowdsensing applications based on auctions, where the main incentive for the user is the remuneration.

  14. Analysis of User Identity Privacy in LTE and Proposed Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A. Muthana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms adopted by cellular technologies for user identification allow an adversary to collect information about individuals and track their movements within the network; and thus exposing privacy of the users to unknown risks. Efforts have been made toward enhancing privacy preserving capabilities in cellular technologies, culminating in Long Term Evolution LTE technology. LTE security architecture is substantially enhanced comparing with its predecessors 2G and 3G; however, LTE does not eliminate the possibility of user privacy attacks. LTE is still vulnerable to user identity privacy attacks. This paper includes an evaluation of LTE security architecture and proposes a security solution for the enhancement of user identity privacy in LTE. The solution is based on introducing of pseudonyms that replace the user permanent identifier (IMSI used for identification. The scheme provides secure and effective identity management in respect to the protection of user privacy in LTE. The scheme is formally verified using proVerif and proved to provide an adequate assurance of user identity privacy protection.

  15. Overview of Privacy in Social Networking Sites (SNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powale, Pallavi I.; Bhutkar, Ganesh D.

    2013-07-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have become an integral part of communication and life style of people in today's world. Because of the wide range of services offered by SNSs mostly for free of cost, these sites are attracting the attention of all possible Internet users. Most importantly, users from all age groups have become members of SNSs. Since many of the users are not aware of the data thefts associated with information sharing, they freely share their personal information with SNSs. Therefore, SNSs may be used for investigating users' character and social habits by familiar or even unknown persons and agencies. Such commercial and social scenario, has led to number of privacy and security threats. Though, all major issues in SNSs need to be addressed, by SNS providers, privacy of SNS users is the most crucial. And therefore, in this paper, we have focused our discussion on "privacy in SNSs". We have discussed different ways of Personally Identifiable Information (PII) leakages from SNSs, information revelation to third-party domains without user consent and privacy related threats associated with such information sharing. We expect that this comprehensive overview on privacy in SNSs will definitely help in raising user awareness about sharing data and managing their privacy with SNSs. It will also help SNS providers to rethink about their privacy policies.

  16. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on the Privacy Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Trepte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The “privacy calculus” approach to studying online privacy implies that willingness to engage in disclosures on social network sites (SNSs depends on evaluation of the resulting risks and benefits. In this article, we propose that cultural factors influence the perception of privacy risks and social gratifications. Based on survey data collected from participants from five countries (Germany [n = 740], the Netherlands [n = 89], the United Kingdom [n = 67], the United States [n = 489], and China [n = 165], we successfully replicated the privacy calculus. Furthermore, we found that culture plays an important role: As expected, people from cultures ranking high in individualism found it less important to generate social gratifications on SNSs as compared to people from collectivist-oriented countries. However, the latter placed greater emphasis on privacy risks—presumably to safeguard the collective. Furthermore, we identified uncertainty avoidance to be a cultural dimension crucially influencing the perception of SNS risks and benefits. As expected, people from cultures ranking high in uncertainty avoidance found privacy risks to be more important when making privacy-related disclosure decisions. At the same time, these participants ascribed lower importance to social gratifications—possibly because social encounters are perceived to be less controllable in the social media environment.

  17. On privacy-preserving protocols for smart metering systems security and privacy in smart grids

    CERN Document Server

    Borges de Oliveira, Fábio

    2017-01-01

    This book presents current research in privacy-preserving protocols for smart grids. It contains several approaches and compares them analytically and by means of simulation. In particular, the book introduces asymmetric DC-Nets, which offer an ideal combination of performance and features in comparison with homomorphic encryption; data anonymization via cryptographic protocols; and data obfuscation by means of noise injection or by means of the installation of storage banks. The author shows that this theory can be leveraged into several application scenarios, and how asymmetric DC-Nets are generalizations of additive homomorphic encryption schemes and abstractions of symmetric DC-Nets. The book provides the reader with an understanding about smart grid scenarios, the privacy problem, and the mathematics and algorithms used to solve it.

  18. Anonymity versus privacy: selective information sharing in online cancer communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jeana; Vermeulen, Ivar E; Beekers, Nienke

    2014-05-14

    Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients approach online information sharing instrumentally, weighing privacy costs against participation benefits when deciding whether to share certain information. Consequently, we argue that patients prefer sharing clinical information over daily life and identity information that potentially compromises anonymity. Furthermore, we explore whether patients' prior experiences, age, health, and gender affect perceived privacy costs and thus willingness to share information. The goal of the present study is to document patient preferences for sharing information within online health platforms. A total of 115 cancer patients reported sharing intentions for 15 different types of information, demographics, health status, prior privacy experiences, expected community utility, and privacy concerns. Factor analysis on the 15 information types revealed 3 factors coinciding with 3 proposed information categories: clinical, daily life, and identity information. A within-subject ANOVA showed a strong preference for sharing clinical information compared to daily life and identity information (F1,114=135.59, P=.001, η(2)=.93). Also, adverse online privacy experiences, age, and health status negatively affected information-sharing intentions. Female patients shared information less willingly. Respondents' information-sharing intentions depend on dispositional and situational factors. Patients share medical details more willingly than daily life or identity information. The results suggest the need to focus on

  19. Anonymity Versus Privacy: Selective Information Sharing in Online Cancer Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Ivar E; Beekers, Nienke

    2014-01-01

    Background Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients approach online information sharing instrumentally, weighing privacy costs against participation benefits when deciding whether to share certain information. Consequently, we argue that patients prefer sharing clinical information over daily life and identity information that potentially compromises anonymity. Furthermore, we explore whether patients’ prior experiences, age, health, and gender affect perceived privacy costs and thus willingness to share information. Objective The goal of the present study is to document patient preferences for sharing information within online health platforms. Methods A total of 115 cancer patients reported sharing intentions for 15 different types of information, demographics, health status, prior privacy experiences, expected community utility, and privacy concerns. Results Factor analysis on the 15 information types revealed 3 factors coinciding with 3 proposed information categories: clinical, daily life, and identity information. A within-subject ANOVA showed a strong preference for sharing clinical information compared to daily life and identity information (F 1,114=135.59, P=.001, η2=.93). Also, adverse online privacy experiences, age, and health status negatively affected information-sharing intentions. Female patients shared information less willingly. Conclusions Respondents’ information-sharing intentions depend on dispositional and situational factors. Patients share medical details more willingly than daily life or identity

  20. Privacy Issues of the W3C Geolocation API

    CERN Document Server

    Doty, Nick; Wilde, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The W3C's Geolocation API may rapidly standardize the transmission of location information on the Web, but, in dealing with such sensitive information, it also raises serious privacy concerns. We analyze the manner and extent to which the current W3C Geolocation API provides mechanisms to support privacy. We propose a privacy framework for the consideration of location information and use it to evaluate the W3C Geolocation API, both the specification and its use in the wild, and recommend some modifications to the API as a result of our analysis.

  1. Research on Privacy Protection in Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Now big data has become a hot topic in academia and industry, it is affecting the mode of thinking and working, daily life. But there are many security risks in data collection, storage and use. Privacy leakage caused serious problems to the user, false data will lead to error results of big data analysis. This paper first introduces the security problems faced by big data,analyzes the causes of privacy problems,discussesthe principle to solve the problem. Finally,discusses technical means for privacy protection.

  2. Enabling secure and privacy preserving communications in smart grids

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    This brief focuses on the current research on security and privacy preservation in smart grids. Along with a review of the existing works, this brief includes fundamental system models, possible frameworks, useful performance, and future research directions. It explores privacy preservation demand response with adaptive key evolution, secure and efficient Merkle tree based authentication, and fine-grained keywords comparison in the smart grid auction market. By examining the current and potential security and privacy threats, the author equips readers to understand the developing issues in sma

  3. Privacy-aware knowledge discovery novel applications and new techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bonchi, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Covering research at the frontier of this field, Privacy-Aware Knowledge Discovery: Novel Applications and New Techniques presents state-of-the-art privacy-preserving data mining techniques for application domains, such as medicine and social networks, that face the increasing heterogeneity and complexity of new forms of data. Renowned authorities from prominent organizations not only cover well-established results-they also explore complex domains where privacy issues are generally clear and well defined, but the solutions are still preliminary and in continuous development. Divided into seve

  4. Privacy Preservation in Role-based Access Control Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Privacy preservation is a crucial problem in resource sharing and collaborating among multi-domains. Based on this problem, we propose a role-based access control model for privacy preservation. This scheme avoided the privacy leakage of resources while implementing access control, and it has the advantage of lower communication overhead. We demonstrate this scheme meets the IND-CCA2 semantic security by using random oracle. The simulation result shows this scheme has better execution efficiency and application effects.

  5. A review paper on Privacy-Preserving Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohnish Patel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Data mining technology help us in extraction of useful knowledge from large data sets. The process of data collection and data dissemination may, however, result in an inherent risk of privacy threats. Some private information about individuals, businesses and organizations has to be suppressed before it is shared or published. The privacy-preserving data mining (PPDM has thus become an important issue in current years. This paper we propose an evolutionary privacy-preserving data mining technology to find appropriate method to perform secure transactions into a database.

  6. Privacy Enforcement in a Cost-Effective Smart Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren Aagaard

    In this technical report we present the current state of the research conducted during the first part of the PhD period. The PhD thesis “Privacy Enforcement in a Cost-Effective Smart Grid” focuses on ensuring privacy when generating market for energy service providers that develop web services...... and privacy challenges that emerge when designing a system architecture and infrastructure. The resulting architecture is a consumer-centric and agent-based design and uses open Internet-based communication protocols for enabling interoperability while being cost-effective. Finally, the PhD report present...

  7. [A genetic ID for tomorrow?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Dozens of private companies have emerged in 2005, with the commercial purpose of offering the public a wide variety of personal genetic tests - direct-to-consumer personal genome tests. Simultaneously, a collaborative research initiative on individual sequencing - the Personal Genome Project - was born in Harvard University, then online. This text provides an analysis of the promises and limits of the proposed individual sequencing. First, the scope and quality of individual predictive genetic sequencing are still far from being acquired. Moreover, it is necessary to question the ethical standards of confidentiality and respect for privacy in the connected information era.

  8. Investigating the Privacy Policy Adoption among Malaysia E-Government Websites: Towards Conceptualizing the E-Privacy Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Asiakin Hasbullah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia E-government had improved the government services and overcome barriers faced by the public in the offline environment. The government initiatives to safeguard the interest of the public had transcended to include privacy protection. The Personal Data Protection Act 2009 is considered as  one of the initiatives that had been  successfully  passed by  the  Malaysia Government  by April 2010. However, the implementation and governance of the Act is still subjected to minister’s  decision. This study  aims in parallel with the government initiatives by investigating the  adoption of  privacy policy  among the  Malaysia's  egovernment  websites. This study is importance towards examining the  current  level of awareness for the importance for privacy protection being provided for the  public,  before the full  enforcement of the  Act. Samples of 154 websites were selected by using convenient sampling from Malaysia government portal (http://www.malaysia.gov.my, which comprises  of federal and state governments. The evaluation process was done by using personal observation through an adopted indicators of privacy policies from Jamal Maier and Sunder in 2002 by observing the links provided for 'privacy policy statements', 'privacy policy notice' and 'privacy policy'. The study revealed several issues pertaining privacy policy adoption among Malaysia e-government site and highlights few recommendations and future works towards conceptualization of e-privacy assessment framework in Malaysia e-government context.

  9. Privacy and Security issues in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari Nanda , Brojo Kishore Mishra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available “Cloud computing” – a relatively recent term, defines the paths ahead in computer science world. Being built on decades of research it utilizes all recent achievements in virtualization, distributed computing, utility computing, and networking. It implies a service oriented architecture through offering software and platforms as services, reduced information technology overhead for the end-user, great flexibility, reduced total cost of ownership, on demand services and many other things. Security concerns the confidentiality, availability and integrity of data or information. Security may also include authentication and non-repudiation. This paper is a brief survey based on readings of “cloud” computing and it tries to address related research topics, privacy and security issues ahead and possible solution.

  10. Privacy-Enhancing Auctions Using Rational Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Triandopoulos, Nikolaos

    2009-01-01

    We consider enhancing with privacy concerns a large class of auctions, which include sealed-bid single-item auctions but also general multi-item multi-winner auctions, our assumption being that bidders primarily care about monetary payoff and secondarily worry about exposing information about...... show how to use rational cryptography to approximately implement any given ex interim individually strictly rational equilibrium of such an auction without a trusted mediator through a cryptographic protocol that uses only point-to-point authenticated channels between the players. By “ex interim...... close to the original equilibrium.Supported by the Center for Algorithmic Game Theory, funded by The Carlsberg Foundation....

  11. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Regarding Genetic Testing and Genetic Counselors in Jordan: A Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahram, Mamoun; Soubani, Majd; Abu Salem, Lana; Saker, Haneen; Ahmad, Muayyad

    2015-12-01

    Genetic testing has a potential in the prevention of genetic diseases, particularly in communities with high rates of consanguineous marriage. Therefore, knowledge, practice, and attitudes of the public in Jordan regarding genetic testing were investigated. Individuals (N = 3,196) were questioned about the concepts of genetic testing and genetic counselors, if they underwent any genetic tests, the type of test, the method of consenting to the test, as well as their level of satisfaction with the privacy of the genetic testing service. The likelihood of pursuing predictive genetic testing for cancer was also investigated. Although almost 70 % of respondents knew the term "genetic testing," only 18 % had undergone genetic testing, primarily the mandatory premarital test. In addition, there was a lack of general knowledge about genetic counselors. Many of those who had genetic testing (45 %) indicated they did not go through a consent process, and a lack of consent was significantly related to dissatisfaction with the privacy of the service. Approximately 55 % of respondents indicated they would potentially pursue predictive genetic testing for cancer. Going for routine health checkups was not significantly correlated with either actual or potential uptake of genetic testing, suggesting health care providers do not play an influential role in patients' testing decisions. Our results show a gap between the knowledge and uptake of genetic testing and may help to guide the design of effective strategies to initiate successful genetic counseling and testing services.

  12. Your privacy using Google tools. Can you preserve it ?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Google has made some progress in preserving your privacy towards third parties. But do we really understand what Google knows about their users? My short investigation has given me some surprising results.

  13. An Update on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Despite its prominence, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is often misinterpreted and misapplied. This chapter clarifies historical developments, common misconceptions, and modern applications of the law.

  14. The cloud understanding the security, privacy and trust challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Neil; Cave, Jonathan; Starkey, Tony; Graux, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This report discusses how policy-makers might address the challenges and risks in respect of the security, privacy and trust aspects of cloud computing that could undermine the attainment of broader economic and societal objectives across Europe.

  15. Privacy protection for patients with substance use problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianne Lian; Sparenborg, Steven; Tai, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Many Americans with substance use problems will have opportunities to receive coordinated health care through the integration of primary care and specialty care for substance use disorders under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Sharing of patient health records among care providers is essential to realize the benefits of electronic health records. Health information exchange through meaningful use of electronic health records can improve health care safety, quality, and efficiency. Implementation of electronic health records and health information exchange presents great opportunities for health care integration, but also makes patient privacy potentially vulnerable. Privacy issues are paramount for patients with substance use problems. This paper discusses major differences between two federal privacy laws associated with health care for substance use disorders, identifies health care problems created by privacy policies, and describes potential solutions to these problems through technology innovation and policy improvement.

  16. 77 FR 31606 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Office of English Language Acquisition, Language..., Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement for Limited English..., Assistant Deputy Secretary and Director for English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic...

  17. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 216 - Model Privacy Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... translated into languages other than English. C. Information Required in the Model Privacy Form The... bulleted list: income; account balances; payment history; transaction history; transaction or loss history; credit history; credit scores; assets; investment experience; credit-based insurance scores;...

  18. Preserving Differential Privacy for Similarity Measurement in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Seng Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in both sensor technologies and network infrastructures have encouraged the development of smart environments to enhance people’s life and living styles. However, collecting and storing user’s data in the smart environments pose severe privacy concerns because these data may contain sensitive information about the subject. Hence, privacy protection is now an emerging issue that we need to consider especially when data sharing is essential for analysis purpose. In this paper, we consider the case where two agents in the smart environment want to measure the similarity of their collected or stored data. We use similarity coefficient function FSC as the measurement metric for the comparison with differential privacy model. Unlike the existing solutions, our protocol can facilitate more than one request to compute FSC without modifying the protocol. Our solution ensures privacy protection for both the inputs and the computed FSC results.

  19. Incorporation of privacy elements in space station design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Caldwell, Barrett; Struthers, Nancy J.

    1988-01-01

    Privacy exists to the extent that individuals can control the degree of social contact that they have with one another. The opportunity to withdraw from other people serves a number of important psychological and social functions, and is in the interests of safety, high performance, and high quality of human life. Privacy requirements for Space Station crew members are reviewed, and architectual and other guidelines for helping astronauts achieve desired levels of privacy are suggested. In turn, four dimensions of privacy are discussed: the separation of activities by areas within the Space Station, controlling the extent to which astronauts have visual contact with one another, controlling the extent to which astronauts have auditory contact with one another, and odor control. Each section presents a statement of the problem, a review of general solutions, and specific recommendations. The report is concluded with a brief consideration of how selection, training, and other procedures can also help Space Station occupants achieve satisfactory levels of seclusion.

  20. Information privacy in organizations: empowering creative and extrarole performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alge, Bradley J; Ballinger, Gary A; Tangirala, Subrahmaniam; Oakley, James L

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the relationship of employee perceptions of information privacy in their work organizations and important psychological and behavioral outcomes. A model is presented in which information privacy predicts psychological empowerment, which in turn predicts discretionary behaviors on the job, including creative performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Results from 2 studies (Study 1: single organization, N=310; Study 2: multiple organizations, N=303) confirm that information privacy entails judgments of information gathering control, information handling control, and legitimacy. Moreover, a model linking information privacy to empowerment and empowerment to creative performance and OCBs was supported. Findings are discussed in light of organizational attempts to control employees through the gathering and handling of their personal information. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.