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Sample records for genetic polymorphism modifies

  1. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoke-Kqueen, Cheah; Radu, Son

    2006-12-15

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to analyzed 78 samples comprises of certified reference materials (soya and maize powder), raw seeds (soybean and maize), processed food and animal feed. Combination assay of two arbitrary primers in the RAPD analysis enable to distinguish genetically modified organism (GMO) reference materials from the samples tested. Dendrogram analysis revealed 13 clusters at 45% similarity from the RAPD. RAPD analysis showed that the maize and soybean samples were clustered differently besides the GMO and non-GMO products.

  2. Genetic modifiers of chromatin acetylation antagonize the reprogramming of epi-polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Abraham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural populations are known to differ not only in DNA but also in their chromatin-associated epigenetic marks. When such inter-individual epigenomic differences (or "epi-polymorphisms" are observed, their stability is usually not known: they may or may not be reprogrammed over time or upon environmental changes. In addition, their origin may be purely epigenetic, or they may result from regulatory variation encoded in the DNA. Studying epi-polymorphisms requires, therefore, an assessment of their nature and stability. Here we estimate the stability of yeast epi-polymorphisms of chromatin acetylation, and we provide a genome-by-epigenome map of their genetic control. A transient epi-drug treatment was able to reprogram acetylation variation at more than one thousand nucleosomes, whereas a similar amount of variation persisted, distinguishing "labile" from "persistent" epi-polymorphisms. Hundreds of genetic loci underlied acetylation variation at 2,418 nucleosomes either locally (in cis or distantly (in trans, and this genetic control overlapped only partially with the genetic control of gene expression. Trans-acting regulators were not necessarily associated with genes coding for chromatin modifying enzymes. Strikingly, "labile" and "persistent" epi-polymorphisms were associated with poor and strong genetic control, respectively, showing that genetic modifiers contribute to persistence. These results estimate the amount of natural epigenomic variation that can be lost after transient environmental exposures, and they reveal the complex genetic architecture of the DNA-encoded determinism of chromatin epi-polymorphisms. Our observations provide a basis for the development of population epigenetics.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in MMP 2, 9 and 3 genes modify lung cancer risk and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Arriaga Patricia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs are proteolytic enzymes that contribute to all stages of tumour progression, including the later stages of invasion and metastasis. Genetic variants in the MMP genes may influence the biological function of these enzymes and change their role in carcinogenesis and progression. We have investigated the association between the -735 C/T, the -1171 5A/6A, and the -1562 C/T polymorphisms in the MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 genes, respectively, and the risk and survival of lung cancer. Methods The case-control study includes 879 lung cancer patients and 803 controls from a Caucasian population in Spain (CAPUA study. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method, long-rank test and Cox's were used for the survival analysis. Results The MMP9 -1562 T/T genotype was associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.06-0.85, whereas no association was found for the MMP2 -735 C/T and MMP3 -1171 5A/6A polymorphisms. The MMP2 -735 T/T genotype was statistically significantly associated with a decreased survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, identified as an independent prognosis factor of survival (hazard ratio (HR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.00-3.20. In contrast, no association was found between the MMP3 -1171 5A/6A and the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms and survival. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphism is associated with a protective effect against the development of lung cancer and suggest that the MMP2 -735 C/T polymorphism modify the length of survival in NSCLC patients.

  4. Histo-blood group gene polymorphisms as potential genetic modifiers of infection and cystic fibrosis lung disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Taylor-Cousar

    Full Text Available The pulmonary phenotype in cystic fibrosis (CF is variable; thus, environmental and genetic factors likely contribute to clinical heterogeneity. We hypothesized that genetically determined ABO histo-blood group antigen (ABH differences in glycosylation may lead to differences in microbial binding by airway mucus, and thus predispose to early lung infection and more severe lung disease in a subset of patients with CF.Clinical information and DNA was collected on >800 patients with the DeltaF508/DeltaF508 genotype. Patients in the most severe and mildest quartiles for lung phenotype were enrolled. Blood samples underwent lymphocyte transformation and DNA extraction using standard methods. PCR and sequencing were performed using standard techniques to identify the 9 SNPs required to determine ABO blood type, and to identify the four SNPs that account for 90-95% of Lewis status in Caucasians. Allele identification of the one nonsynonymous SNP in FUT2 that accounts for >95% of the incidence of nonsecretor phenotype in Caucasians was completed using an ABI Taqman assay. The overall prevalence of ABO types, and of FUT2 (secretor and FUT 3 (Lewis alleles was consistent with that found in the Caucasian population. There was no difference in distribution of ABH type in the severe versus mild patients, or the age of onset of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the severe or mild groups. Multivariate analyses of other clinical phenotypes, including gender, asthma, and meconium ileus demonstrated no differences between groups based on ABH type.Polymorphisms in the genes encoding ABO blood type, secretor or Lewis genotypes were not shown to associate with severity of CF lung disease, or age of onset of P. aeruginosa infection, nor was there any association with other clinical phenotypes in a group of 808 patients homozygous for the DeltaF508 mutation.

  5. Histo-blood group gene polymorphisms as potential genetic modifiers of infection and cystic fibrosis lung disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Burch, Lauranell H; Pace, Rhonda G; Drumm, Mitchell L; Calloway, Hollin; Fan, Haiying; Weston, Brent W; Wright, Fred A; Knowles, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    The pulmonary phenotype in cystic fibrosis (CF) is variable; thus, environmental and genetic factors likely contribute to clinical heterogeneity. We hypothesized that genetically determined ABO histo-blood group antigen (ABH) differences in glycosylation may lead to differences in microbial binding by airway mucus, and thus predispose to early lung infection and more severe lung disease in a subset of patients with CF. Clinical information and DNA was collected on >800 patients with the DeltaF508/DeltaF508 genotype. Patients in the most severe and mildest quartiles for lung phenotype were enrolled. Blood samples underwent lymphocyte transformation and DNA extraction using standard methods. PCR and sequencing were performed using standard techniques to identify the 9 SNPs required to determine ABO blood type, and to identify the four SNPs that account for 90-95% of Lewis status in Caucasians. Allele identification of the one nonsynonymous SNP in FUT2 that accounts for >95% of the incidence of nonsecretor phenotype in Caucasians was completed using an ABI Taqman assay. The overall prevalence of ABO types, and of FUT2 (secretor) and FUT 3 (Lewis) alleles was consistent with that found in the Caucasian population. There was no difference in distribution of ABH type in the severe versus mild patients, or the age of onset of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the severe or mild groups. Multivariate analyses of other clinical phenotypes, including gender, asthma, and meconium ileus demonstrated no differences between groups based on ABH type. Polymorphisms in the genes encoding ABO blood type, secretor or Lewis genotypes were not shown to associate with severity of CF lung disease, or age of onset of P. aeruginosa infection, nor was there any association with other clinical phenotypes in a group of 808 patients homozygous for the DeltaF508 mutation.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair and oxidative stress pathways may modify the association between body size and postmenopausal breast cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McCullough, L. E.; Eng, S. M.; Bradshaw, P. T.; Cleveland, R. J.; Steck, S. E.; Terry, M. B.; Shen, J.; Crew, K.D.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Ahn, J.; Ambrosone, Ch.B.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.; Gammon, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2015), s. 263-269 ISSN 1047-2797 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : breast cancer * body mass index * oxidative stress * DNA repair * Epidemiology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2015

  7. Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO defined as "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology". This includes seeds, live fish, and other organisms intentionally obtained for release to the environment. It would seem that the common understanding about GMOs as referring to farm-to-table products is perforce expanded to embrace genetically modified farm animals and aquatic resources. Being a trade agreement, the Montreal accord primarily deals with the safety issues related to the transboundary movement of LMOs around the globe. The OECD conference on the other hand, called for an international body "to address all sides of the GM debate" in response to the public outcry, particularly in Western Europe, regarding the risks the new products pose to human health and the environment. Some points of contention, which remain unresolved, include issues such as whether countries should be allowed to develop their own GM food based on their needs, and whether a global moratorium on GMOs and mandatory labeling should be enforced worldwide.

  8. The CALHM1 P86L polymorphism is a genetic modifier of age at onset in Alzheimer’s disease: a meta-analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles; Sleegers, Kristel; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ingelsson, Martin; Beecham, Gary W; Hiltunen, Mikko; Combarros, Onofre; Bullido, Maria J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Bettens, Karolien; Berr, Claudine; Pasquier, Florence; Richard, Florence; DeKosky, Steven T; Hannequin, Didier; Haines, Jonathan L; Tognoni, Gloria; Fiévet, Nathalie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Tzourio, Christophe; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Arosio, Beatrice; Coto, Elicer; De Deyn, Peter; Zompo, Maria Del; Mateo, Ignacio; Boada, Merce; Antunez, Carmen; Lopez-Arrieta, Jesus; Epelbaum, Jacques; Schjeide, Brit-Maren Michaud; Frank-Garcia, Ana; Giedraitis, Vilmentas; Helisalmi, Seppo; Porcellini, Elisa; Pilotto, Alberto; Forti, Paola; Ferri, Raffaele; Delepine, Marc; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Scarpini, Elio; Siciliano, Gabriele; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sorbi, Sandro; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Ravaglia, Giovanni; Valdivieso, Fernando; Vepsäläinen, Saila; Alvarez, Victoria; Bosco, Paolo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Panza, Francesco; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bossù, Paola; Hanon, Olivier; Piccardi, Paola; Annoni, Giorgio; Mann, David; Marambaud, Philippe; Seripa, Davide; Galimberti, Daniela; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Bertram, Lars; Lendon, Corinne; Lannfelt, Lars; Licastro, Federico; Campion, Dominique; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Soininen, Hilkka; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Alpérovitch, Annick; Ruiz, Agustin; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Amouyel, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The only established genetic determinant of non-Mendelian forms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). Recently, it has been reported that the P86L polymorphism of the calcium homeostasis modulator 1 gene (CALHM1) is associated with the risk of developing AD. In order to independently assess this association, we performed a meta-analysis of 7,873 AD cases and 13,274 controls of Caucasian origin (from a total of 24 centres in Belgium, Finland, France, Italy, Spain, Sweden, the UK and the USA). Our results indicate that the CALHM1 P86L polymorphism is likely not a genetic determinant of AD but may modulate age at onset by interacting with the effect of the ε4 allele of the APOE gene. PMID:20847397

  9. Genetically modified foods and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Ho, H K; Leung, T F

    2017-06-01

    2015 marked the 25th anniversary of the commercial use and availability of genetically modified crops. The area of planted biotech crops cultivated globally occupies a cumulative two billion hectares, equivalent to twice the land size of China or the United States. Foods derived from genetically modified plants are widely consumed in many countries and genetically modified soybean protein is extensively used in processed foods throughout the industrialised countries. Genetically modified food technology offers a possible solution to meet current and future challenges in food and medicine. Yet there is a strong undercurrent of anxiety that genetically modified foods are unsafe for human consumption, sometimes fuelled by criticisms based on little or no firm evidence. This has resulted in some countries turning away food destined for famine relief because of the perceived health risks of genetically modified foods. The major concerns include their possible allergenicity and toxicity despite the vigorous testing of genetically modified foods prior to marketing approval. It is imperative that scientists engage the public in a constructive evidence-based dialogue to address these concerns. At the same time, improved validated ways to test the safety of new foods should be developed. A post-launch strategy should be established routinely to allay concerns. Mandatory labelling of genetically modified ingredients should be adopted for the sake of transparency. Such ingredient listing and information facilitate tracing and recall if required.

  10. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5 - flanking promoter region (5-HTTLPR). This gene has received considerable atten- tion in attempts to understand the molecular determinants of smoking. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter in smoking behaviour is ...

  11. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ues to be the second major cause of death in the world. (WHO 2002) and it is associated with economic losses to ..... polymorphism with smoking behavior among adolescents. Am. J. Med. Genet. B. Neuropsychiatr. Genet. 135, 73–78. ... for the treatment of obesity. Curr. Drug Targets 6, 201–213. Heils A., Teufel A., Petri S., ...

  12. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 90; Issue 1. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR: involvement in smoking behaviour ... The present review examines the role of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) in smoking behaviour and investigating studies that showed association of 5-HTT gene ...

  13. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... A. V., Lemesh V. A. and Muravenko O. V. 2014 Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers. J. Genet. ...... Howell E. C., Kearsey M. J., Jones G. H., King G. J. and Armstrong. S. J. 2008 A and C genome distinction and ...

  14. Risk assessment: the importance of genetic polymorphisms in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Loft, S H; Autrup, H

    2001-01-01

    of 2. Some polymorphisms are effect modifiers, i.e. without exposure they have no consequence and the effect of exposure can appear independent of the genotype. Genetic polymorphisms in metabolism of environmental toxicants plays a significant role in exposures to traffic generated air pollution...... in Copenhagen, revealing statistically significant higher levels of chromosomal aberrations in non-smoking bus drivers with glutathion-S-transferase M1, GSTM1 null and N-acetyltransferase 2, NAT2 slow genotypes. Combined with cohort studies showing positive associations between high chromosomal levels...

  15. Genetically Modified Agrifood Trade: Necessity Or Concerns?

    OpenAIRE

    Nurliza, Nurliza

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified agri-foods are genetically modified using biotechnology. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) advantages are the focus of much attention in world food markets. Genetically modified crop technology is claimed also to have great potential for the world€™s farmers and ultimately consumers, following initial success with genetically modified cotton varieties. Benefits for farmers could include greater productivity and less occupational health and environmental damage (e.g., ...

  16. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are playing an important role in molecular breeding. This investigation was undertaken to study the genetic diversity among local sorghum accessions from two different agro-ecological zones of Burkina Faso and to assess the polymorphism within local improved varieties ...

  17. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization of four important species of Bamboo, found in Raigad district, Maharashtra State, India. ... Bambusoideae are differentiated from other members of the family by the presence of petiolate blades with parallel venation and stamens are three, four, six or more, ...

  18. Alzheimer disease risk associated with APOE4 is modified by STH gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seripa, D; Matera, M G; D'Andrea, R P; Gravina, C; Masullo, C; Daniele, A; Bizzarro, A; Rinaldi, M; Antuono, P; Wekstein, D R; Dal Forno, G; Fazio, V M

    2004-05-11

    The association of the STH gene polymorphism with Alzheimer disease (AD) is debated. In the analysis of two genetically and diagnostically distinct groups of Alzheimer patients from the USA and Italy, the authors did not find an association with the STH polymorphism. However, the APOE-4-associated risk of AD greatly increased if the STH-G allele was also present. The STH-G allele appears to be a risk modifier for AD.

  19. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  20. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-10-20

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  1. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  2. Genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that directly affects more than 1 in 10,000 persons in Western societies but, as a family disorder with a long, costly, debilitating course, it has an indirect impact on a far greater proportion of the population. Although some palliative treatments are used, no effective treatment exists for preventing clinical onset of the disorder or for delaying its inevitable progression toward premature death, approximately 15 years after diagnosis. Huntington's disease involves a movement disorder characterized by chorea, as well as a variety of psychiatric disturbances and intellectual decline, with a gradual loss of independence. A dire need exists for effective HD therapies to alleviate the suffering and costs to the individual, family, and health care system. In past decades, genetics, the study of DNA sequence variation and its consequences, provided the tools to map the HD gene to chromosome 4 and ultimately to identify its mutation as an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the coding sequence of a large protein, dubbed huntingtin. Now, advances in genetic technology offer an unbiased route to the identification of genetic factors that are disease-modifying agents in human patients. Such genetic modifiers are expected to highlight processes capable of altering the course of HD and therefore to provide new, human-validated targets for traditional drug development, with the goal of developing rational treatments to delay or prevent onset of HD clinical signs. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. PON1Q192R genetic polymorphism modifies organophosphorous pesticide effects on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers from southern Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Herrera, N.; Polanco-Minaya, H.; Salazar-Arredondo, E.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Rojas-Garcia, E.; Alvarado-Mejia, J.; Borja-Aburto, V.H.; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pesticide exposure, including organophosphorous (OP) insecticides, has been associated with poor semen quality, and paraoxonase (PON1), an enzyme involved in OP deactivation, may have a role on their susceptibility, due to PON1 polymorphisms. Our objective was to evaluate the role of PON1Q192R polymorphism on the susceptibility to OP toxicity on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in farmers with Mayan ascendancy from southeastern Mexico chronically exposed to pesticides; mostly OP. Fifty four agricultural workers (18-55 years old) were included, who provided semen and blood samples. Semen quality was evaluated according to WHO, sperm DNA damage by in situ-nick translation (NT-positive cells), PON1Q192R polymorphism by real-time PCR and serum PON1 activity by using phenylacetate and paraoxon. Two OP exposure indexes were created: at the month of sampling and during 3 months before sampling, representing the exposure to spermatids-spermatozoa and to cells at one spermatogenic cycle, respectively. PON1 192R and 192Q allele frequencies were 0.54 and 0.46, respectively. Significant associations were found between OP exposure at the month of sampling and NT-positive cells and sperm viability in homozygote 192RR subjects, and dose-effect relationships were observed between OP exposure during 3 months before sampling and sperm quality parameters and NT-positive cells in homozygote 192RR farmers. This suggests that cells at all stages of spermatogenesis are target of OP, and that there exists an interaction between OP exposure and PON1Q192R polymorphism on these effects; farmers featuring the 192RR genotype were more susceptible to develop reproductive toxic effects by OP exposure

  4. Phenotypic evolution from genetic polymorphisms in a radial network architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegel Paul B

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic architecture of a quantitative trait influences the phenotypic response to natural or artificial selection. One of the main objectives of genetic mapping studies is to identify the genetic factors underlying complex traits and understand how they contribute to phenotypic expression. Presently, we are good at identifying and locating individual loci with large effects, but there is a void in describing more complex genetic architectures. Although large networks of connected genes have been reported, there is an almost complete lack of information on how polymorphisms in these networks contribute to phenotypic variation and change. To date, most of our understanding comes from theoretical, model-based studies, and it remains difficult to assess how realistic their conclusions are as they lack empirical support. Results A previous study provided evidence that nearly half of the difference in eight-week body weight between two divergently selected lines of chickens was a result of four loci organized in a 'radial' network (one central locus interacting with three 'radial' loci that, in turn, only interacted with the central locus. Here, we study the relationship between phenotypic change and genetic polymorphism in this empirically detected network. We use a model-free approach to study, through individual-based simulations, the dynamic properties of this polymorphic and epistatic genetic architecture. The study provides new insights to how epistasis can modify the selection response, buffer and reveal effects of major loci leading to a progressive release of genetic variation. We also illustrate the difficulty of predicting genetic architecture from observed selection response, and discuss mechanisms that might lead to misleading conclusions on underlying genetic architectures from quantitative trait locus (QTL experiments in selected populations. Conclusion Considering both molecular (QTL and phenotypic (selection

  5. Analysis of three genetic polymorphisms in Malaysian essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of three genetic polymorphisms in Malaysian essential hypertensive and type 2 diabetic subjects. ... Genotyping of all the three polymorphisms was performed by PCR-RFLP method with the respective primers and restriction enzymes. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of the respective polymorphisms of the ...

  6. Genetically Modified Foods and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci MESERI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available To consume a balanced diet may prevent many illnesses. After the Second World War the “Green Revolution” was conducted to increase efficiency in agriculture. After its harmful effects on environment were understood genetically modified foods (GMO were served to combat hunger in the world. Today insufficiency in food product is not the main problem; imbalanced food distribution is the problem. In addition, GMO’s might be harmful for health and environment. Moreover economical dependency to industrialized countries will carry on. If the community tends to use up all the sources and the population increases steadily hunger will not be the only scarcity that the human population would face. There will also be shortage in energy and clean water resources. In conclusion combating just with hunger using high technology will only postpone the problems for a short period of time. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(5.000: 455-460

  7. Drug-Gene Interactions between Genetic Polymorphisms and Antihypertensive Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, Hedi; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; De Boer, Anthonius; Kroon, Abraham A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Psaty, Bruce M; Klungel, Olaf H

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors may influence the response to antihypertensive medication. A number of studies have investigated genetic polymorphisms as determinants of cardiovascular response to antihypertensive drug therapy. In most candidate gene studies, no such drug-gene interactions were found. However,

  8. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for multinational companies this is a potential source of huge profits, and for certain governments they represent an instrument for strategic control of food production within their countries as well as internationally. By taking into account the views of both advocates and opponents of this "revolutionary" method, authors believe that we should not a priori reject new and insufficiently studied technologies, but that in this particular it is necessary to be extremely cautious, in other words that from (bioethical point of view only those GMO investigations limited to scientific purposes are justified, provided that all required precautions have been taken. Also, authors are of the opinion that in this region as well as in Europe as a whole, at this moment, transgenic organisms are not necessery, neither in agricultural production nor in the food chain. Arguments for such a statement are found primarily in the potential issues that intentional breeding of GMOs might inflict upon the human health and environment. Namely, if borders of individual species are not overstepped and if their endogenous traits are made stronger, the potential risk of causing irreparable damage for both present and future generations which may be brought by changed biological succession will be reduced, i.e. one of the four fundamental bioethical principles will be applied and that is the nonmaleficence. Further intentional decreasing of biodiversity should not be allowed, which means

  9. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for multinational companies this is a potential source of huge profits, and for certain governments they represent an instrument for strategic control of food production within their countries as well as internationally. By taking into account the views of both advocates and opponents of this "revolutionary" method, authors believe that we should not a priori reject new and insufficiently studied technologies, but that in this particular it is necessary to be extremely cautious, in other words that from (bioethical point of view only those GMO investigations limited to scientific purposes are justified, provided that all required precautions have been taken. Also, authors are of the opinion that in this region as well as in Europe as a whole, at this moment, transgenic organisms are not necessery, neither in agricultural production nor in the food chain. Arguments for such a statement are found primarily in the potential issues that intentional breeding of GMOs might inflict upon the human health and environment. Namely, if borders of individual species are not overstepped and if their endogenous traits are made stronger, the potential risk of causing irreparable damage for both present and future generations which may be brought by changed biological succession will be reduced, i.e. one of the four fundamental bioethical principles will be applied and that is the nonmaleficence. Further intentional decreasing of biodiversity should not be allowed, which means

  10. Genetically Modified Products – Contradictions and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Rodica Pamfilie; Lavinia-Alexandra Cristescu

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the perception that consumers have about GM products, also taking into consideration the evolution of consumption and production of products based on genetically modified organisms. Therefore, the paper presents both aspects to clarify the concept of genetically modified organism (GMO issues such as typology, national or international regulations regarding this area) and global market development of genetically modified organisms, evolution which is presented by st...

  11. [Therapeutic approaches using genetically modified cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliker, Brigitte; Renner, Matthias; Schweizer, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Medicinal products containing genetically modified cells are, in most cases, classified as gene therapy and cell therapy medicinal products. Although no medicinal product containing genetically modified cells has been licensed in Europe yet, a variety of therapeutic strategies using genetically modified cells are in different stages of clinical development for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. In this chapter, several examples of promising approaches are presented, with an emphasis on gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiencies and on tumour immunotherapy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor or a recombinant T-cell receptor.

  12. Disseminating genetically modified (GM) maize technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disseminating genetically modified (GM) maize technology to smallholder farmers in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa: extension personnel's awareness of stewardship requirements and dissemination practices.

  13. Association of genetic polymorphism in GH gene with milk ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Association of genetic polymorphism in GH gene with milk production traits in Beijing Holstein cows ... Keywords. Beijing Holstein cows; growth hormone gene; genetic polymorphism; milk production traits ... I, II, and III). The A/A cows produced milk of higher protein content than of A/B individuals ( < 0.05 only in lactation II).

  14. Traceability of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Henk J M; van Rie, Jean-Paul P F; Kok, Esther J

    2002-01-01

    EU regulations stipulate the labeling of food products containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) unless the GMO content is due to adventitious and unintended 'contamination' and not exceeding the 1% level at ingredient basis. In addition, member states have to ensure full traceability at all stages of the placing on the market of GMOs. Both requirements ensure consumers 'right to know', facilitate enforcement of regulatory requirements and are of importance for environmental monitoring and postmarket surveillance. Besides administrative procedures, such as used in quality certification systems, the significance of adequate molecular methods becomes more and more apparent. During the last decade a considerable number of molecular methods have been developed and validated that enable the detection, identification and quantification of GMO impurities. Most of them rely on the PCR technology and can only detect one specific stretch of DNA. It can, however, be anticipated that in the near future the situation will become more complex. The number of GMO varieties, including 'stacked-gene' varieties, which will enter the European Market will increase and it is likely that these varieties will harbor more variable constructs. New tools will be necessary to keep up with these developments. One of the most promising techniques is microarray analysis. This technique enables the screening for a large number of different GMOs within a single experiment.

  15. Detection of Genetically Modified Food: Has Your Food Been Genetically Modified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Diana L.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the benefits and risks of genetically-modified foods and describes methods for genetically modifying food. Presents a laboratory experiment using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to detect foreign DNA in genetically-modified food. (Contains 18 references.) (YDS)

  16. Public attitudes towards genetically-modified food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, S.; Ueland, O.; Frewer, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose - This study aimed to investigate the impact of information about traceability and new detection methods for identifying genetically-modified organisms in food, on consumer attitudes towards genetically-modified food and consumer trust in regulators in Italy, Norway and England. It

  17. Modified AFLP technique for rapid genetic characterization in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, D G; Kane, M E; Guy, C L; Li, Q B

    2000-10-01

    The standard amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technique was modified to develop a convenient and reliable technique for rapid genetic characterization of plants. Modifications included (i) using one restriction enzyme, one adapter molecule and primer, (ii) incorporating formamide to generate more intense and uniform bands and (iii) using agarose gel electrophoresis. Sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.), pickerel-weed (Pontederia cordata L.), Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) and Penstemon heterophyllus Lindl. were used to determine the ability to generate adequate resolution power with both self- and cross-pollinated plant species including cultivars, ecotypes and individuals within populations. Reproducibility of bands was higher in all the AFLP experiments compared to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Formamide with or without bovine serum albumin improved band intensities compared to dimethyl sulfoxide and the standard reaction mixture with no organic solvents. Comparison between RAPD and modified AFLP using sea-oats population samples proved that modified AFLP exhibits (i) a low number of faint bands with increased specificity of amplified bands, (ii) a significantly higher number of polymorphic loci per primer, (iii) less primer screening time, (iv) easy scoring associated with fewer faint bands and (v) greatly enhanced reproducibility. The technique described here can be applied with a high degree of accuracy for plant genetic characterization.

  18. Genetic polymorphism of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, diet and cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka, Edyta; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Gromadzinska, Jolanta

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing evidence identifying the crucial role of numerous dietary components in modifying the process of carcinogenesis. The varied effects exerted by nutrient and non-nutrient dietary compounds on human health and cancer risk are one of the new challenges for nutritional sciences. In the present paper, an attempt is made to review the most recent epidemiological data on interactions between dietary factors and metabolic gene variants in terms of cancer risk. The majority of case-control studies indicate the significant relationship between cancer risk and polymorphic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in relation to dietary components. The risk of colorectal cancer is associated not only with CYP2E1 high-activity alleles, but also GSTA1 low-activity alleles, among consumers of red or processed meat. Genetic polymorphisms of NAT1 and NAT2 may be also a breast-cancer susceptibility factor among postmenopausal women with a high intake of well-done meat. On the other hand, phytochemicals, especially isothiocyanates, have a protective effect against colorectal and lung cancers in individuals lacking GST genes. Moreover, polymorphism of GSTM1 seems to be involved in the dietary regulation of DNA damage. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study shows a significant inverse association between the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct level and dietary antioxidants only among GSTM1-null individuals. However, the absence of a modulatory effect of polymorphic xenobiotic metabolising enzymes and diet on the development of cancer has been indicated by some epidemiological investigations. Studies of interactions between nutrients and genes may have great potential for exploring mechanisms, identifying susceptible populations/individuals and making practical use of study results to develop preventive strategies beneficial to human health.

  19. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    unselected for family history : a combined analysis of 22 studies. Am J Hum Genet 72:1117–1130. Antoniou AC, Beesley J, McGuffog L, Sinilnikova OM, Healey S...unselected for family history : a combined analysis of 22 studies. Am J Hum Genet 72: 1117–1130. 2. Antoniou AC, Chenevix-Trench G (2010) Common genetic ...variants and cancer risk in Mendelian cancer syndromes. Curr Opin Genet Dev 20: 299–307. S0959-437X(10)00044-4 [pii];10.1016/j.gde.2010.03.010 [doi]. 3

  20. Impact of genetic polymorphisms of four cytokine genes on treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many factors contribute for viral clearance and response to antiviral therapy. Genetic polymorphisms of cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors can alter the immune response against Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Aim of the study: The aim of the current study is to assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in ...

  1. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Collaborative. J. Genet. 90, 165–177. Table 1. Summary of polymorphisms involving innate immune receptors and mediators of the immune response. Minor allele. Systemic. BMI/fat Lean mass/ Cancer. Repeat. Gene. Polymorphism frequency. Functional significance inflammation mass strength survival studies.

  2. AquAdvantage Salmon Genetically modified organism

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Saurí, Ester

    2014-01-01

    Póster AquAdvantage Salmon is a genetically modified organism developed by AquBounty Technologies. The objective of this transgenic organism is to increase the growth rate to obtain the same of conventional salmon faster.

  3. Philosophical Research on Genetically Modified Food

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    This study mainly analyzes the essential features of transgenic technology from the angle of philosophy, explaining the essential characteristics of transgenic technology, so as to promote the better development of genetically modified food. With the technical improvement, genetically modified food is no longer strange, which has been applied in the production of our life. Compared with the traditional biological breeding, transgenic food has changed significantly in nature. Trying to meet th...

  4. Consumer Perceptions of Genetically Modified Food

    OpenAIRE

    Hallman, William K.; Aquino, Helen L.

    2003-01-01

    Phone surveys were conducted with 1200 American adults in 2001 and in 2003 designed to track the strength, extent and persistence of consumers' attitudes toward genetically modified food. The results suggest that most Americans remain largely uninformed about GM foods and the topic is not often the subject of social discourse. Only 20% of Americans report having had more than one or two conversations about genetically modified foods. However, the results also suggest that support for GM foods...

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms, Estrogens, and Breast Density

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2003-01-01

    .... We have completed two investigations that addressed the following specific aims: 1. To examine the association between polymorphism in genes coding for metabolism and biosynthesis of estrogens...

  6. Amplified restriction fragment length polymorphism in parasite genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiga, D K; Tait, A; Turner, C M

    2000-08-01

    The amplified restriction fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique is a relatively new method for the analysis of polymorphism that has not yet been widely used in parasitology. In this article, Dan Masiga, Andy Tait and Mike Turner provide a brief introduction to AFLP and illustrate how it can be used in the investigation of marker inheritance in genetic crosses and in the analysis of polymorphism of field populations. They also briefly highlight the strengths and weaknesses of AFLP in comparison with other methods for detecting polymorphism and conclude that AFLP is a very useful addition to the range of techniques available.

  7. Genetically modified soybean plants and their ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic plants are developed by introgressing new genes using methods of molecular genetics and genetic engineering. The presence of these genes in plant genome is identified on the basis of specific oligonucleotides primers, and the use of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction and DNA fragments multiplication. Genetically modified plants such as soybean constitute a newly created bioenergetic potential whose gene expression can cause disturbance of the biological balance ecosystem, soil structure and soil microbiological activity. Genetically modified plants may acquire monogenic or polygenic traits causing genetic and physiological changes in these plants, which may elicit a certain reaction of the environment including changes of microbiological composition of soil rhizosphere. The aim of introgressing genes for certain traits into a cultivated plant is to enhance its yield and intensify food production. There are more and more genetically modified plant species such as soybean, corn, potato, rice and others and there is a pressure to use them as human food and animal feed. Genetically modified soybean plants with introgressed gene for resistance to total herbicides, such as Round-up, are more productive than non-modified herbicide-sensitive soybeans.

  8. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  9. Genetic Modifiers of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with unusual clinical heterogeneity for a Mendelian disorder. Fetal hemoglobin concentration and coincident ∝ thalassemia, both which directly affect the sickle erythrocyte, are the major modulators of the phenotype of disease. Understanding the genetics underlying the heritable subphenotypes of sickle cell anemia would be prognostically useful, could inform personalized therapeutics, and might help the discovery of new “druggable” pathophysiologic targets. Genotype-phenotype association studies have been used to identify novel genetic modifiers. In the future, whole genome sequencing with its promise of discovering hitherto unsuspected variants could add to our understanding of the genetic modifiers of this disease. PMID:22641398

  10. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Athens, Greece (Yannoukakos, Fostira); Instituto de Genética Humana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia (Torres); Molecular Genetics of...education support from Succinct Health Communications and Janssen Pharmaceuticals . Dr Davidson reported having received funding from from Cancer

  11. Modifying Knowledge, Emotions, and Attitudes Regarding Genetically Modified Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddy, Benjamin C.; Danielson, Robert W.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Graham, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether conceptual change predicted emotional and attitudinal change while learning about genetically modified foods (GMFs). Participants were 322 college students; half read a refutation text designed to shift conceptual knowledge, emotions, and attitudes, while the other half served as a control group.…

  12. Head and neck cancer: genetic polymorphisms and folate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiatti, Ana Lívia Silva; Ruiz, Mariangela Torreglosa; Maniglia, José Victor; Raposo, Luis Sérgio; Pavarino-Bertelli, Erika Cristina; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that genetic variants encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism may modulate HNSCC risk by altering DNA methylation synthesis and genomic estability. A review of the literature on genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and risk of head and neck cancer was carried out. An electronic search was made on the Medline database to select papers on head and neck cancer and polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism. The association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the risk of this tumor type was evaluated in nine studies; there was an association with this disease in three papers. The MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G and RFC1 A80G polymorphisms were also associated with increased risk for HNSCC. MTHFD1 G1958A polymorphism was not associated with increased risk of this disease; the evaluation results of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism in this neoplasm were contradictory. Other polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism were not studied for this neoplasm. We conclude that polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of head and neck cancer, however, these results need to be demonstrated in different populations.

  13. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 1. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T-cell role and development of human diseases. Julie Massayo Maeda Oda Bruna Karina Banin Hirata Roberta Losi Guembarovski Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe. Review Article Volume 92 Issue 1 ...

  14. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response to clopidogrel in Chinese Han patients with acute coronary syndrome. Xu Liu, Yu Luo, Yan Lai, Yian Yao, Jimin Li, Yunkai Wang, S. Lilly Zheng, Jianfeng Xu and Xuebo Liu. J. Genet. 95, 231–237. Table 1. Association for coexisting SNPs and PRU/HPR.

  15. Estrogens, Genetic Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okobia, Michael N; Bunker, Clareann H; Kuller, Lewis; Ferrell, Robert E; Anyanwu, Stanley N; Ezeome, Emmanuel R; Uche, Emmanuel E

    2004-01-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the role of polymorphisms in the genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis and degradation of estrogens and its metabolites in susceptibility to breast...

  16. [Genetically modified food--unnecessary controversy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchórz, Michał; Radoniewicz-Chagowska, Anna; Lewandowska-Stanek, Hanna; Szponar, Elzbieta; Szponar, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Fast development of genetic engineering and biotechnology allows use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) more and more in different branches of science and economy. Every year we can see an increase of food amount produced with the use of modification of genetic material. In our supermarkets we can find brand new types of plants, products including genetically modified ingredients or meat from animals fed with food containing GMO. This article presents general information about genetically modified organisms, it also explains the range of genetic manipulation, use of newly developed products and current field area for GMO in the world. Based on scientific data the article presents benefits from development of biotechnology in reference to modified food. It also presents the voice of skeptics who are extremely concerned about the impact of those organisms on human health and natural environment. Problems that appear or can appear as a result of an increase of GMO are very important not only from a toxicologist's or a doctor's point of view but first of all from the point of view of ordinary consumers--all of us.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms and sepsis in premature neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    Full Text Available Identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the genes involved in sepsis may help to clarify the pathophysiology of neonatal sepsis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between sepsis in pre-term neonates and genes potentially involved in the response to invasion by infectious agents. The study involved 101 pre-term neonates born between June 2008 and May 2012 with a diagnosis of microbiologically confirmed sepsis, 98 pre-term neonates with clinical sepsis and 100 randomly selected, otherwise healthy pre-term neonates born during the study period. During the study, 47 SNPs in 18 candidate genes were genotyped on Guthrie cards using an ABI PRISM 7900 HT Fast real-time and MAssARRAY for nucleic acids instruments. Genotypes CT and TT of rs1143643 (the IL1β gene and genotype GG of rs2664349GG (the MMP-16 gene were associated with a significantly increased overall risk of developing sepsis (p = 0.03, p = 0.05 and p = 0.03, whereas genotypes AG of rs4358188 (the BPI gene and CT of rs1799946 (the DEFβ1 gene were associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing sepsis (p = 0.05 for both. Among the patients with bacteriologically confirmed sepsis, only genotype GG of rs2664349 (the MMP-16 gene showed a significant association with an increased risk (p = 0.02. Genotypes GG of rs2569190 (the CD14 gene and AT of rs4073 (the IL8 gene were associated with a significantly increased risk of developing severe sepsis (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01. Genotype AG of rs1800629 (the LTA gene and genotypes CC and CT of rs1341023 (the BPI gene were associated with a significantly increased risk of developing Gram-negative sepsis (p = 0.04, p = 0.04 and p = 0.03. These results show that genetic variability seems to play a role in sepsis in pre-term neonates by influencing susceptibility to and the severity of the disease, as well as the risk of having disease due to specific pathogens.

  18. [Genetically modified food and allergies - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Birgit; Pöting, Annette; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    Approval by the European Commission is mandatory for placing genetically modified plants as food or feed on the market in member states of the European Union (EU). The approval is preceded by a safety assessment based on the guidance of the European Food Safety Authority EFSA. The assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified plants and their newly expressed proteins is an integral part of this assessment process. Guidance documents for the assessment of allergenicity are currently under revision. For this purpose, an expert workshop was conducted in Brussels on June 17, 2015. There, methodological improvements for the assessment of coeliac disease-causing properties of proteins, as well as the use of complex models for in vitro digestion of proteins were discussed. Using such techniques a refinement of the current, proven system of allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants can be achieved.

  19. Genetically Modified Foods and Consumer Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Flavio; Sarnacchiaro, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified food is able to oppose the world's hunger and preserve the environment, even if the patents in this matter are symptomatic of several doubts. And also, transgenic consumption causes problems and skepticism among consumers in several European countries, but above all in Italy, where there is a strong opposition over recent years. So, the present study conducted a research to study the consumption of genetically modified food products by Italian young generation. This research presented the following purposes: firstly, to analyze genetically modified products' consumption among a particular category of consumers; secondly, to implement a quantitative model to understand behaviour about this particular kind of consumption and identify the factors that determine their purchase. The proposed model shows that transgenic consumption is especially linked to knowledge and impact on environment and mankind's health.

  20. Societal aspects of genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frewer, L.J.; Lassen, J.; Kettlitz, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some of the reasons behind public controversy associated with the introduction of genetically modified foods in Europe the 1990s. The historical background to the controversy is provided to give context. The issue of public acceptance of genetically modified foods......, and indeed the emerging biosciences more generally, is considered in the context of risk perceptions and attitudes, public trust in regulatory institutions, scientists and industry, and the need to develop communication strategies that explicitly include public concerns rather than exclude them. Increased...

  1. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Genetically modified plants: the stakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, G; Chupeau, Y

    2001-12-01

    Generically modified plants (GMP) are massively used on the American continent in Australia and in China, since they represent an unquestionable potential for progress. New attributes are therefore devoted to the human and animal diet, to the facilitating of culture management, to the reducing of the chemical fertilizer and pesticide usage, and to the conquest of new cultural spaces. Considering itself to be flawed by a too hasty plunge into the market, concomitant with sagging evaluations of other innovations, Europe is confronted by a strong societal debate which blocks GMP cultures and orientates the research towards an evaluation of the environmental and public health risks and an evaluation of their economical and sociological impacts. The authors encourage this societal debate in order to arbitrate the presence of transgenes in conventional productions and products, to define the accepted rules of responsibility, to decide what is not acceptable, and to involve the more upstream actors and operators of the innovation process, all that keeping in mind the agronomical, ecological and economical repercussions of their decisions.

  3. [Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    2015-01-01

    To present the main results of the literature on genetic polymorphisms in Turner Syndrome and their association with the clinical signs and the etiology of this chromosomal disorder. The review was conducted in the PubMed database without any time limit, using the terms Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism. A total of 116 articles were found, and based on the established inclusion and exclusion criteria 17 were selected for the review. The polymorphisms investigated in patients with Turner Syndrome were associated with growth deficit, causing short stature, low bone mineral density, autoimmunity and cardiac abnormalities, which are frequently found in patients with Turner Syndrome. The role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the etiology of Turner syndrome, i.e., in chromosomal nondisjunction, was also confirmed. Genetic polymorphisms appear to be associated with Turner Syndrome. However, in view of the small number of published studies and their contradictory findings, further studies in different populations are needed in order to clarify the role of genetic variants in the clinical signs and etiology of the Turner Syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms of Osteopontin in Association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the association of osteopontin (OPN) polymorphisms with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: A total of 120 cases diagnosed with AS and 106 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. All the patients were human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 positive. Three single nucleotide ...

  5. Safety assessment of genetically modified foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Noordam, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops has steadily increased since their introduction to the market in the mid-1990s. Before these crops can be grown and sold they have to obtain regulatory approval in many countries, the process of which includes a pre-market safety assessment. The

  6. Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. L.; Wilcks, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    the industry, national administration and research institutions were gathered to discuss which elements should be considered in a risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms used as food or food ingredients. The existing EU and national regulations were presented, together with the experiences...

  7. Addressing the Socioeconomic Impacts of Genetically Modified ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Mercosur (Mercado Común del Sur) countries of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay rank fifth in cotton production after China, India, the United Sates and Pakistan. But despite rapid diffusion of genetically modified (GM) cotton - and subsequent yield increases - most small-scale farmers continue to live in poverty. This is ...

  8. Genetically Modified Organisms : Public Knowledge, Attitudes and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While proponents argue that genetically modified crops can contribute to food security in developing countries, opponents maintain that their social and economic impacts are unknown and their long-term safety is not fully understood. ... Connaissances, attitudes et perceptions de la population à l'égard des OGM en Inde.

  9. Unpacking attitudes towards genetically modified food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liver, Y. de; Pligt, J. van der; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the structure of attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) food. A total of 431 respondents completed a questionnaire measuring their overall attitude, cognition and affect towards GM food. A model with distinct positive and negative, affective and cognitive

  10. Genetically modified plants: Decade of commercial cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Drinić Snežana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2005 marks the beginning of the 10th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified plants all around the world. The first GM variety of crops appeared on market during 1995 year and from that global area of biotech crops increased to 81 mil hectares in 2004. Genetically modified plant tolerant to herbicides, resistant to insects, improved quality have been developed. The use of GMO, their release into environment cultivation, utilization as food and feed is regulated in the EU by set of directives: 90/220, 2001/18, 2002/53, 1830/2003. Informer Yugoslavia the low about GMO was adopted in may 2001. That law consist of common regulation and it is in accordinance with EU regulation. Detection of genetic modification in seed and food could be done by PCR or ELISA methods.

  11. Alu polymorphic insertions reveal genetic structure of north Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manorama; Tripathi, Piyush; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari; Herrera, Rene J; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2008-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent is characterized by the ancestral and cultural diversity of its people. Genetic input from several unique source populations and from the unique social architecture provided by the caste system has shaped the current genetic landscape of India. In the present study 200 individuals each from three upper-caste and four middle-caste Hindu groups and from two Muslim populations in North India were examined for 10 polymorphic Alu insertions (PAIs). The investigated PAIs exhibit high levels of polymorphism and average heterozygosity. Limited interpopulation variance and genetic flow in the present study suggest admixture. The results of this study demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the caste system has not provided an impermeable barrier to genetic exchange among Indian groups.

  12. Risk assessment: the importance of genetic polymorphisms in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Loft, S H; Autrup, H

    2001-01-01

    Many genetic polymorphisms in metabolism enzymes are important for the risk of cancer as shown in a large number of case-control studies. The relative risk estimates have shown large variations between such population studies. However, in most studies the relative risk estimates are in the range...... and increased cancer risk, such results indicate effect modification regarding cancer risk. In risk assessment the safety 'factor' of 10 is generally accepted to allow for variation in individual susceptibility. Reviewing the literature justifies the factor of 10 when considering single polymorphisms. However...... in an individual with several susceptible metabolism genotypes as well as other determinants of susceptibility, e.g. defective DNA repair, poor-nutritional state, etc. the risk may increase far above a safety of 10.Historically, genetic polymorphisms have been taken into consideration in employment and currently...

  13. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers reveal genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study evaluated genetic variability of superior bael genotypes collected from different parts of Andaman Islands, India using fruit characters and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Genomic DNA extracted from leaf material using cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method was ...

  14. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) genetic polymorphisms and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sensitivity analysis of the summary odds ratio coefficients on the association between TNF-α-308G/A polymorphism and AILD risk using a random effects model. (A allele vs G allele). Results were computed by omitting each study in turn. Error bars are 95% confidence interval. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 92, No. 3, December ...

  15. Risk assessment: the importance of genetic polymorphisms in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Knudsen, Lisbeth; Loft, Steffen; Autrup, Herman

    2001-01-01

    Many genetic polymorphisms in metabolism enzymes are important for the risk of cancer as shown in a large number of case-control studies. The relative risk estimates have shown large variations between such population studies. However, in most studies the relative risk estimates are in the range...... the application in insurance situations is criticised....

  16. Impact of genetic polymorphisms of four cytokine genes on treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manar Obada

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... TGF-b. Abstract Background: Many factors contribute for viral clearance and response to antiviral therapy. Genetic polymorphisms of cytokines, ... (HCC) [2]. Interferon had been the cornerstone of HCV ther- apy for almost two decades [3]. Direct-acting anti-viral (DAA) drugs active against different targets of ...

  17. Enzymatic and genetic polymorphisms of paraoxonase- 1 in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... concentrations of total high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein B100, the latency time of oxidation of small and dense LDL, arylesterase activity and genetic polymorphism ...

  18. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amino acid polymorphism in insulin receptor substrate-1 causes impaired insulin signaling. Evidence from .... phosphate dehydrogenase interact to cause cortisone reductase deficiency. Nat. Genet. 34, 434–439. ..... with rheumatic fever and correlates with increased TNF-alpha production. J. Autoimmun. 25, 150–154.

  19. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Russia; Institute of Genetics and Cytology of NAS of Belarus, Academichnaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072, Belarus; Scientific and Practical Centre of NAS of Belarus for Arable Farming, Timiryazev Str. 1, Zhodino 222160, Belarus; All-Russian ...

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and transcobalamin genetic polymorphisms in human spontaneous abortion: biological and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetterberg Henrik

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of human spontaneous abortion involves a complex interaction of several genetic and environmental factors. The firm association between increased homocysteine concentration and neural tube defects (NTD has led to the hypothesis that high concentrations of homocysteine might be embryotoxic and lead to decreased fetal viability. There are several genetic polymorphisms that are associated with defects in folate- and vitamin B12-dependent homocysteine metabolism. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T and 1298A>C polymorphisms cause elevated homocysteine concentration and are associated with an increased risk of NTD. Additionally, low concentration of vitamin B12 (cobalamin or transcobalamin that delivers vitamin B12 to the cells of the body leads to hyperhomocysteinemia and is associated with NTD. This effect involves the transcobalamin (TC 776C>G polymorphism. Importantly, the biochemical consequences of these polymorphisms can be modified by folate and vitamin B12 supplementation. In this review, I focus on recent studies on the role of hyperhomocysteinemia-associated polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of human spontaneous abortion and discuss the possibility that periconceptional supplementation with folate and vitamin B12 might lower the incidence of miscarriage in women planning a pregnancy.

  1. [Genetically modified food--great unknown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, G; Wiackowski, S K

    2012-08-01

    Genetically modified food (GMF) creates evident threat to consumers' health. In spite of assurances of biotechnologists, DNA of transgenic plants is instable, so, synthesis of foreign, allergenic proteins is possible. Due to high trypsin inhibitor content the GMF is digested much more slowly what, alike Bt toxin presence, increases probability of alimentary canal diseases. Next threats are bound to the presence of fitoestrogens and residues of Roundup pesticide, that can diminish reproductiveness; and even lead to cancerogenic transformation through disturbance of human hormonal metabolism. In spite of food producers and distributors assurances that food made of GMF raw materials is marked, de facto consumers have no choice. Moreover, along the food law products containing less than 0.9% of GMF protein are not included into genetically modified food.

  2. Genetically Modified Crops and Food Security

    OpenAIRE

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers’ income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the firs...

  3. Globalisation, Powerty and Genetically Modified Agricultural Product

    OpenAIRE

    Aktas, Erkan

    2006-01-01

    Poverty and income equality have become to stand in the forefront of the world that globalised through neo-classical policies after 1980. Besides technological dependence, globalisation wave has also led to a commercial dependence of surrounding countries to the central countries as well. The purpose of this study is to evaluate globalisation process in the world through its results of technological development and poverty. Production of genetically modified products which were justified as a...

  4. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm.

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms of Osteopontin in Association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: SNP at -443 of OPN gene can serve as a candidate genetic marker to evaluate the risk of. AS, thus indicating that subjects who carry T ... first symptoms of AS younger than 30 years of age [2]. More recent studies have shown ..... prognosis of ischemic stroke in Chinese patients.Cell. Physiol Biochem 2013; 32: ...

  6. Determination of genetic polymorphism among indigenous and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bullseye

    1Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. 2Centre for Plant ... are currently considered as the molecular markers of choice and are rapidly being adapted by plant researchers for ... rate of photosynthetic activity because of its C4 pathway, leading to higher ...

  7. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... Due to the unusually long sexual cycle and unavaila- bility of any other diagnostic tool, identification of bamboo .... To our knowledge, nothing along these lines has been done. Some approaches are use- .... (Dipterocarpaceae), in Malaysia: Implications for conservation of genetic resources and tree.

  8. Genetically Modified Products in Lithuania: Situational Analysis and Consumers’ Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Dainora Grundey; Indre Rimkiene

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyses the genetically modified organism products (GMP) in relation to genetically modified organisms (GMO) from two perspectives: 1) from the theoretical standpoint, discussing the GMO and GMP trade conditions and 2) from the practical perspective, namely analysing the availability of GMP in the Lithuanian market. With the growing of genetically modified products (GMP) levels, it becomes important to examine the situation of genetically modified products. According to various stu...

  9. Genetics of primary hypertension: the clinical impact of adducin polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Lorena; Lanzani, Chiara; Manunta, Paolo; Bianchi, Giuseppe

    2010-12-01

    The usefulness of the results so far published on genetics of primary hypertension for establishing the clinical impact of candidate gene polymorphisms is weakened by the scanty information regarding: a) the functional effect of the gene variants of interest in humans; b) the regulatory genetic network (RGN) where the gene is operating with all the interacting environmental-biological factors and the respective hierarchical organization; c) the consistency between the natural history of the established pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypertension and the new molecular mechanism detected with genetics; d) the limitations regarding the translation of animal data to human due to the differences among species of the genetic molecular mechanisms underlying similar organ function changes in the different species. Of course, not all these information are available for adducin polymorphisms. In this review, being aware of their importance, the evaluation of the clinical impact of adducin has been focused on data obtained together with the interacting genetic-environmental or biological factors. Adducin polymorphisms and endogenous ouabain (EO) were detected by a top-down approach in rodents after having demonstrated, at cellular and kidney level, that an increase in tubular Na reabsorption could underlies the transition from normotension to hypertension both in rodents and humans. Therefore, we hypothesized that adducin polymorphisms and EO may operate within the triggering RGN that initiates the increase in blood pressure in both species. The distinction between triggering RGN and the secondary RGN is important both to limit the level of genetic complexity arising from secondary changes, and to detect the molecular target to develop tailored therapeutic approach. The pharmacogenomic approach, both in rodents or humans, with newly discovered and never treated hypertension, may be useful to strengthen the "causation" of genetic mechanism. Mutant adducin increases

  10. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods and Ethical Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Francis; Costa, Sarah; Rock, Cheryl; Harris, Amanda; Husk, Cierra; Mei, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The ability to manipulate and customize the genetic code of living organisms has brought forth the production of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and consumption of genetically modified (GM) foods. The potential for GM foods to improve the efficiency of food production, increase customer satisfaction, and provide potential health benefits has contributed to the rapid incorporation of GM foods into the American diet. However, GM foods and GMOs are also a topic of ethical debate. The use of GM foods and GM technology is surrounded by ethical concerns and situational judgment, and should ideally adhere to the ethical standards placed upon food and nutrition professionals, such as: beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice and autonomy. The future of GM foods involves many aspects and trends, including enhanced nutritional value in foods, strict labeling laws, and potential beneficial economic conditions in developing nations. This paper briefly reviews the origin and background of GM foods, while delving thoroughly into 3 areas: (1) GMO labeling, (2) ethical concerns, and (3) health and industry applications. This paper also examines the relationship between the various applications of GM foods and their corresponding ethical issues. Ethical concerns were evaluated in the context of the code of ethics developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) that govern the work of food and nutrition professionals. Overall, there is a need to stay vigilant about the many ethical implications of producing and consuming GM foods and GMOs. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Analysis of genetic polymorphism and genetic distance among four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... The genomes of 4 sheep populations {Yuanqu white Tan sheep (YWT), Baozhongchang white Tan sheep. (BWT), black Tan sheep (BT) and small-tailed Han sheep (Han)} were screened using 10 microsatellite. DNA markers to estimate the genetic diversities and genetic distances among these ...

  12. Association of DNA adducts and genetic polymorphisms with birth weight

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Binková, Blanka; Dejmek, Jan; Chvátalová, Irena; Solanský, I.; Topinka, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 608, - (2006), s. 121-128 ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03; GA MŽP(CZ) SI/340/2/00 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : pregnancy outcomes * birth weight * genetic polymorphism Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.122, year: 2006

  13. CD209 genetic polymorphism and tuberculosis disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik O Vannberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. DC-SIGN, encoded by CD209, is a receptor capable of binding and internalizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Previous studies have reported that the CD209 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-336A/G exerts an effect on CD209 expression and is associated with human susceptibility to dengue, HIV-1 and tuberculosis in humans. The present study investigates the role of the CD209 -336A/G variant in susceptibility to tuberculosis in a large sample of individuals from sub-Saharan Africa.A total of 2,176 individuals enrolled in tuberculosis case-control studies from four sub-Saharan Africa countries were genotyped for the CD209 -336A/G SNP (rs4804803. Significant overall protection against pulmonary tuberculosis was observed with the -336G allele when the study groups were combined (n = 914 controls vs. 1262 cases, Mantel-Haenszel 2 x 2 chi(2 = 7.47, P = 0.006, odds ratio = 0.86, 95%CI 0.77-0.96. In addition, the patients with -336GG were associated with a decreased risk of cavitory tuberculosis, a severe form of tuberculosis disease (n = 557, Pearson's 2x2 chi(2 = 17.34, P = 0.00003, odds ratio = 0.42, 95%CI 0.27-0.65. This direction of association is opposite to a previously observed result in a smaller study of susceptibility to tuberculosis in a South African Coloured population, but entirely in keeping with the previously observed protective effect of the -336G allele.This study finds that the CD209 -336G variant allele is associated with significant protection against tuberculosis in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and, furthermore, cases with -336GG were significantly less likely to develop tuberculosis-induced lung cavitation. Previous in vitro work demonstrated that the promoter variant -336G allele causes down-regulation of CD209 mRNA expression. Our present work suggests that decreased levels of the DC-SIGN receptor may therefore be

  14. Safety assessment of genetically modified crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, Keith T.

    2002-01-01

    The development of genetically modified (GM) crops has prompted widespread debate regarding both human safety and environmental issues. Food crops produced by modern biotechnology using recombinant techniques usually differ from their conventional counterparts only in respect of one or a few desirable genes, as opposed to the use of traditional breeding methods which mix thousands of genes and require considerable efforts to select acceptable and robust hybrid offspring. The difficulties of applying traditional toxicological testing and risk assessment procedures to whole foods are discussed along with the evaluation strategies that are used for these new food products to ensure the safety of these products for the consumer

  15. Legal regulation of the disposal of genetically modified organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Podubníčková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Legislation of genetically modified organisms treatment This thesis deals with the problems of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), especially with the legislation that governs handling them, including international conventions, community law as well as Czech law. At first, an outline of the term GMO is sketched, continued by the description of its use, possible risks and their mitigation. A genetically modified organism (GMO) is a viable organism whose genetic material has been altered usi...

  16. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD CROPS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chaparro Giraldo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in plant biotechnology has provided an opportunity to new food crops being developed having desirable traits for improving crop yield, reducing the use of agrochemicals and adding nutritional properties to staple crops. However, genetically modified (GM crops have become a subject of intense debate in which opponents argue that GM crops represent a threat to individual freedom, the environment, public health and traditional economies. Despite the advances in food crop agriculture, the current world situation is still characterised by massive hunger and chronic malnutrition, representing a major public health problem. Biofortified GM crops have been considered an important and complementary strategy for delivering naturally-fortified staple foods to malnourished populations. Expert advice and public concern have led to designing strategies for assessing the potential risks involved in cultivating and consuming GM crops. The present critical review was aimed at expressing some conflicting points of view about the potential risks of GM crops for public health. It was concluded that GM food crops are no more risky than those genetically modified by conventional methods and that these GM crops might contribute towards reducing the amount of malnourished people around the world. However, all this needs to be complemented by effective political action aimed at increasing the income of people living below the poverty-line.

  17. Biotechnology: Two Decades of Experimentation with Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Ajami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Over the recent years, genetically modified food in varieties of corn, soybeans, canola and cotton have been introduced to the global market. This study reviews the health and nutritional value of genetically modified foods in the past two decades.Results and Conclusions: Contrary to the present biotechnological claims, transgenic products did not prove to be so flawless, and actually failed to maintain social satisfaction. Genetically modified foods could not gain an increase in the yield potential. Planting natural products and genetically modified products in parallel lines will absolutely result in genetic infection from the side of genetically modified foods. One of the major anxieties of the anti- genetically modified foods activism is the claim that genetically modified crops would alter the consumable parts of the plant quality and safety. Genetically modified foods have shown to have inadequate efficiency and potential adverse effects in both fields of health and biodiversity. This review has presented studies of genetically modified foods performances in the past two decades, and concludes that the wide application and the over generalization of genetically modified foods are not fundamentally recommended.Conflict of interest: Authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  18. Medical Doctors Perceptions of Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Savas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recombinant DNA and with similar technical changes made on genes or transferred isolated gene the living organisms have been named genetically modified organisms (GMOs. Thanks to advances in genetic technology, the advancement of enzyme and fermentation techniques result obtained by the use of GMOs in food industry products of genetically modified (GM foods are named. In this study, GM foods about the possible harmful effects have information and community advice on this matter to be medical doctors on this issue perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors aimed to measure.Material and Method: The study was made on including 200 medical doctors aged 23-65, 118 men (59%, 82 women (41%. In the statistical analysis based on the responses of medical doctors, against GM food risk perception, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Results: 80.5% of the participants’ think that GM foods are harmful. 22% of the participants were expressed that their knowledge are ‘’good’’ and ‘’very good’’ about GM food. While 38% of the participants use internet and 23.5% of the participants  use media, only 4.5% of the participants use medical schools as a source of sufficient information about GM foods. Discussion: While the risk perception of medical doctors about GM foods is high, the knowledge on this issue is observed low. Though the consumption and the prevelance of GM foods are increasing, medical doctors should have more information about this issue to enlighten and guide the community.

  19. Do European Union Farmers Reject Genetically Modified Maize? Farmer preferences for Genetically Modified Maize in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevas, T.; Kikulwe, E.M.; Papadopoulou, E.; Skevas, I.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2012-01-01

    The new EU proposal (IP/10/921) states that bans on genetically modified (GM) crops should not be based on environmental and health grounds, and it proposes a set of alternative reasons—including public order and morals—that can be cited by member states. This reveals the increasing importance of

  20. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  1. Genetic Modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barp

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a major complication and leading cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. DCM onset is variable, suggesting modifier effects of genetic or environmental factors. We aimed to determine if polymorphisms previously associated with age at loss of independent ambulation (LoA in DMD (rs28357094 in the SPP1 promoter, rs10880 and the VTTT/IAAM haplotype in LTBP4 also modify DCM onset.A multicentric cohort of 178 DMD patients was genotyped by TaqMan assays. We performed a time-to-event analysis of DCM onset, with age as time variable, and finding of left ventricular ejection fraction 70 mL/m2 as event (confirmed by a previous normal exam < 12 months prior; DCM-free patients were censored at the age of last echocardiographic follow-up.Patients were followed up to an average age of 15.9 ± 6.7 years. Seventy-one/178 patients developed DCM, and median age at onset was 20.0 years. Glucocorticoid corticosteroid treatment (n = 88 untreated; n = 75 treated; n = 15 unknown did not have a significant independent effect on DCM onset. Cardiological medications were not administered before DCM onset in this population. We observed trends towards a protective effect of the dominant G allele at SPP1 rs28357094 and recessive T allele at LTBP4 rs10880, which was statistically significant in steroid-treated patients for LTBP4 rs10880 (< 50% T/T patients developing DCM during follow-up [n = 13]; median DCM onset 17.6 years for C/C-C/T, log-rank p = 0.027.We report a putative protective effect of DMD genetic modifiers on the development of cardiac complications, that might aid in risk stratification if confirmed in independent cohorts.

  2. Genetic Association Study of KCNQ5 Polymorphisms with High Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Maurice K. H.; Leung, Kim Hung; Kao, Patrick Y. P.; Liu, Long Qian

    2017-01-01

    Identification of genetic variations related to high myopia may advance our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of refractive error. This study investigated the role of potassium channel gene (KCNQ5) polymorphisms in high myopia. We performed a case-control study of 1563 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (809 cases of high myopia and 754 emmetropic controls). Five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNQ5 were genotyped, and association testing with high myopia was conducted using logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age to give Pasym values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give Pemp values. All five noncoding SNPs were associated with high myopia. The SNP rs7744813, previously shown to be associated with refractive error and myopia in two GWAS, showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.63–0.90; Pemp = 0.0058) for the minor allele. The top SNP rs9342979 showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64–0.89; Pemp = 0.0045) for the minor allele. Both SNPs are located within enhancer histone marks and DNase-hypersensitive sites. Our data support the involvement of KCNQ5 gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia and further exploration of KCNQ5 as a risk factor for high myopia. PMID:28884119

  3. Genetic Association Study of KCNQ5 Polymorphisms with High Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of genetic variations related to high myopia may advance our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of refractive error. This study investigated the role of potassium channel gene (KCNQ5 polymorphisms in high myopia. We performed a case-control study of 1563 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (809 cases of high myopia and 754 emmetropic controls. Five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of KCNQ5 were genotyped, and association testing with high myopia was conducted using logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age to give Pasym values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give Pemp values. All five noncoding SNPs were associated with high myopia. The SNP rs7744813, previously shown to be associated with refractive error and myopia in two GWAS, showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.63–0.90; Pemp = 0.0058 for the minor allele. The top SNP rs9342979 showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64–0.89; Pemp = 0.0045 for the minor allele. Both SNPs are located within enhancer histone marks and DNase-hypersensitive sites. Our data support the involvement of KCNQ5 gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia and further exploration of KCNQ5 as a risk factor for high myopia.

  4. We tasted a genetically modified cheese - and we like it!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a conjoint study of 750 Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish consumers´ preferences for genetically modified and conventional cheese with different types of benefits. The results showed homogeneity in preferences within as well as across countries....... In general, the genetically modified cheese was rejected, but this was modified somewhat by health and taste benefits....

  5. CYTOKINES GENETIC POLYMORPHISM: THE PAST AND THE FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Puzyryova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular genetics opens the new horizons in modern medicine, especially now when many diseases are given huge value in a type of their prevalence among various groups of population. Extremely high interleukin genes polymorphism degrees are studied well especially genetic polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor. Patients with HIV infection in the territory of Russia cause now the highest degree of mortality that is the most actual and socially significant problem of healthcare. This problems studying attracts many researchers. Works in respect of genetic immunity to a virus and influence of cytokines production on the disease forecast are especially interesting. One of the HIV replication influencing factors are cytokines, some of which, including the tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 can promote replication of HIV, raising an expression of virus regulatory genes. During disease progress in parallel of anti-inflammatory cytokines level increase (causing in this case rather ineffective antibodies level increase there is an T-helpers suppression stimulating a strong cellular component. Cytokine network functioning during HIV infection depends on many reasons which the individual variation in cytokine production caused by a number of genetic features, as well as an existence of opportunistic infection. Cytokines polymorphism determination in HIV infected patients is necessary in clinical practice for disease progression forecast to adverse fast transition to AIDS that it is important to consider in a choice of tactics of the supporting therapy of HIV-positive patients. Considering insufficient efficiency of modern methods of treatment, restoration and modulation of cytokines balance will increase anti-virus activity of immune system, influencing the factors blocking replication of a HIV.

  6. Integrative genetic analysis suggests that skin color modifies the genetic architecture of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulur, Imge; Skol, Andrew D; Gamazon, Eric R; Cox, Nancy J; Onel, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and presents a significant health care burden in many countries. In addition to ultraviolet radiation in sunlight, the main causal factor for melanoma, genetic factors also play an important role in melanoma susceptibility. Although genome-wide association studies have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with melanoma, little is known about the proportion of disease risk attributable to these loci and their distribution throughout the genome. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of melanoma in 1,888 cases and 990 controls of European non-Hispanic ancestry. We estimated the overall narrow-sense heritability of melanoma to be 0.18 (P < 0.03), indicating that genetics contributes significantly to the risk of sporadically-occurring melanoma. We then demonstrated that only a small proportion of this risk is attributable to known risk variants, suggesting that much remains unknown of the role of genetics in melanoma. To investigate further the genetic architecture of melanoma, we partitioned the heritability by chromosome, minor allele frequency, and functional annotations. We showed that common genetic variation contributes significantly to melanoma risk, with a risk model defined by a handful of genomic regions rather than many risk loci distributed throughout the genome. We also demonstrated that variants affecting gene expression in skin account for a significant proportion of the heritability, and are enriched among melanoma risk loci. Finally, by incorporating skin color into our analyses, we observed both a shift in significance for melanoma-associated loci and an enrichment of expression quantitative trait loci among melanoma susceptibility variants. These findings suggest that skin color may be an important modifier of melanoma risk. We speculate that incorporating skin color and other non-genetic factors into genetic studies may allow for an improved understanding of melanoma

  7. Genetic polymorphisms and metabolism of endocrine disruptors in cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatagima Ana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have estimated that approximately 80% of all cancers are related to environmental factors. Individual cancer susceptibility can be the result of several host factors, including differences in metabolism, DNA repair, altered expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, and nutritional status. Xenobiotic metabolism is the principal mechanism for maintaining homeostasis during the body's exposure to xenobiotics. The balance of xenobiotic absorption and elimination rates in metabolism can be important in the prevention of DNA damage by chemical carcinogens. Thus the ability to metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics can be considered one of the body's first protective mechanisms. Variability in individual metabolism has been related to the enzymatic polymorphisms involved in activation and detoxification of chemical carcinogens. This paper is a contemporary literature review on genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of endocrine disruptors potentially related to cancer development.

  8. Genotyping technologies: application to biotransformation enzyme genetic polymorphism screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romkes, Marjorie; Buch, Shama C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics encompasses several major areas: the study of polymorphic variations to drug response and disease susceptibility, identification of the effects of drugs/xenobiotics at the genomic level, and genotype/phenotype associations. The most common type of human genetic variations is single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Several novel approaches to detection of SNPs are currently available. The range of new methods includes modifications of several conventional techniques such as PCR, mass spectrometry, and sequencing as well as more innovative technologies such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microarrays. The application of each of these techniques is largely dependent on the number of SNPs to be screened and sample size. The current chapter presents an overview of the general concepts of a variety of genotyping technologies with an emphasis on the recently developed methodologies, including a comparison of the advantages, applicability, cost efficiency, and limitations of these methods.

  9. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  10. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  11. ENZYME RESISTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED STARCH POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Mannapova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here in this article the justification of expediency of enzyme resistant starch use in therapeutic food products is presented . Enzyme resistant starch is capable to resist to enzymatic hydrolysis in a small intestine of a person, has a low glycemic index, leads to decrease of postprandial concentration of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides in blood and insulin reaction, to improvement of sensitivity of all organism to insulin, to increase in sense of fulness and to reduction of adjournment of fats. Resistant starch makes bifidogenшс impact on microflora of a intestine of the person, leads to increase of a quantity of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium and to increased production of butyric acid in a large intestine. In this regard the enzyme resistant starch is an important component in food for prevention and curing of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, colitis, a cancer of large and direct intestine. One method is specified by authors for imitation of starch digestion in a human body. This method is based on the definition of an enzyme resistance of starch in vitro by its hydrolysis to glucose with application of a glucoamylase and digestive enzyme preparation Pancreatin. This method is used in researches of an enzyme resistance of starch, of genetically modified potato, high amylose corn starch Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII (National Starch Food Innovation, USA, amylopectin and amylose. It is shown that the enzyme resistance of the starch emitted from genetically modified potatoes conforms to the enzyme resistance of the high amylose corn starch “Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII starch”, (National Starch Food Innovation, the USA relating to the II type of enzyme resistant starch. It is established that amylopectin doesn't have the enzyme resistant properties. The results of researches are presented. They allow us to make the following conclusion: amylose in comparison with amylopectin possesses higher enzyme resistance and gives to

  12. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of some Thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustaiee, Ali Reza; Yavari, Alireza; Nazeri, Vahideh; Shokrpour, Majid; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Rasouli, Musa

    2013-06-01

    To ascertain whether there are chemical and genetic relationships among some Thymus species and also to determine correlation between these two sets of data, the essential-oil composition and genetic variability of six populations of Thymus including: T. daenensis ČELAK. (two populations), T. fallax FISCH. & C.A.MEY., T. fedtschenkoi RONNIGER, T. migricus KLOKOV & DES.-SHOST., and T. vulgaris L. were analyzed by GC and GC/MS, and also by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Thus, 27 individuals were analyzed using 16 RAPD primers, which generated 264 polymorphic scorable bands and volatiles isolated by distillation extraction were subjected to GC and GC/MS analyses. The yields of oils ranged from 2.1 to 3.8% (v/w), and 34 components were identified, amounting to a total percentage of 97.8-99.9%. RAPD Markers allowed a perfect distinction between the different species based on their distinctive genetic background. However, they did not show identical clustering with the volatile-oil profiles. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  13. Genetic polymorphism of milk protein loci in Argentinian Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonvillani Adriana Gloria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Some alleles of milk protein loci are associated with superior cheese production characteristics. The genetic polymorphism of the milk protein loci alphas1-casein, beta-casein, k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin was examined in Argentinian Holstein cattle. Samples from 12 herds of four regions of Córdoba were analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis. The chi² test was used to assess whether the populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genotypic diversity was analyzed by the Shannon-Weaver index. The observed genotypic frequencies were analyzed by Hedrick's genetic identity and the genetic distance of Balakrishnan and Sanghvi. The allelic and genotypic frequencies were similar to those of other Holstein populations. The genotypic frequencies of the alphas1-casein and beta-casein loci were in equilibrium, whereas in some populations the k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin loci were not. According to the Shannon-Weaver index the total genetic diversity within each herd was greater than 96%. The high values of identity agreed with the low genetic distances among populations. We conclude that there is extensive genetic homogeneity in Holstein cattle in Córdoba Province and that it would be feasible to select for B alleles at the k-casein and b-lactoglobulin loci in order to improve the quality of milk available for cheese manufacturing.

  14. Genetically modified plants for law enforcement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Plants are ubiquitous in the environment and have the unique ability to respond to their environment physiologically and through altered gene expression profiles (they cannot walk away). In addition, plant genetic transformation techniques and genomic information in plants are becoming increasingly advanced. We have been performing research to express the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants. GFP emits green light when excited by blue or UV light. In addition, my group and collaborators have developed methods to detect GFP in plants by contact instruments and at a standoff. There are several law enforcement applications for this technology. One involves using tagging and perhaps modifying drug plants genetically. In one instance, we could tag them for destruction. In another, we could adulterate them directly. Another application is one that falls into the chemical terrorism and bioterrorism countermeasures category. We are developing plants to sense toxins and whole organisms covertly. Plants are well adapted to monitor large geographic areas; biosurveillance. Some examples of research being performed focus on plants with plant pathogen inducible promoters fused to GFP for disease sensing, and algae biosensors for chemicals.

  15. [Nutrition and health--genetically modified food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, H A; Kleter, G A; Kok, E J

    2003-01-11

    The genetically modified (GM) crops cultivated at present have new properties of benefit to agriculture. It is expected that in the future GM crops will also be cultivated with more complex genetic modifications that are aimed at improving the nutritional and health value to the consumer. The safety assessment of GM foods before market approval is based on a comparison of the characteristics of the GM food with those of the conventional counterpart. Identified differences are thoroughly tested for their toxicological and nutritional consequences. Supplementary modern analytical techniques are being developed for the assessment of future complex GM foods. No cases of adverse health or nutritional effects in consumers have been reported for the existing generation of GM foods. The feasibility of post-market surveillance of (GM) foods, in order to identify small or chronic effects that have not been noticed in the pre-market phase, is being investigated, yet its value should not be overestimated. Surveillance can be informative in case of specific questions concerning certain products as long as the consumer intake is well documented. To this end traceability and labelling systems must be set up.

  16. Genetically modified microorganisms having improved tolerance towards l-serine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine or L-serine derivatives using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes...... tolerant towards higher concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  17. II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus through traditional and modern breeding methods: II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign DNA into fish gonads.

  18. Meat, vegetables and genetic polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjelbred, Camilla F; Sæbø, Mona; Hjartåker, Anette; Grotmol, Tom; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Tveit, Kjell M; Hoff, Geir; Kure, Elin H

    2007-01-01

    The risk of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is mainly associated with lifestyle factors, particularly dietary factors. Diets high in red meat and fat and low in fruit and vegetables are associated with an increased risk of CRC. The dietary effects may be modulated by genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of dietary factors in combination with genetic factors in the different stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in a Norwegian population. We used a case-control study design (234 carcinomas, 229 high-risk adenomas, 762 low-risk adenomas and 400 controls) to test the association between dietary factors (meat versus fruit, berries and vegetables) genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile 105 Val, EPHX1 Tyr 113 His and EPHX1 His 139 Arg), and risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. A higher ratio of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake was positively associated with both high and low-risk adenomas, with approximately twice the higher risk in the 2 nd quartile compared to the lowest quartile. For the high-risk adenomas this positive association was more obvious for the common allele (Tyr allele) of the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism. An association was also observed for the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism in the low-risk adenomas, although not as obvious. Although, the majority of the comparison groups are not significant, our results suggest an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in individuals for some of the higher ratios of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake. In addition the study supports the notion that the biotransformation enzymes GSTM1, GSTP1 and EPHX1 may modify the effect of dietary factors on the risk of developing colorectal carcinoma and adenoma

  19. Genetic maps of polymorphic DNA loci on rat chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yan-Ping; Remmers, E.F.; Longman, R.E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Genetic linkage maps of loci defined by polymorphic DNA markers on rat chromosome 1 were constructed by genotyping F2 progeny of F344/N x LEW/N, BN/SsN x LEW/N, and DA/Bkl x F344/Hsd inbred rat strains. In total, 43 markers were mapped, of which 3 were restriction fragment length polymorphisms and the others were simple sequence length polymorphisms. Nineteen of these markers were associated with genes. Six markers for five genes, {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}3 (Gabrb3), syntaxin 2 (Stx2), adrenergic receptor {beta}1 (Adrb1), carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 1 (Cgm1), and lipogenic protein S14 (Lpgp), and 20 anonymous loci were not previously reported. Thirteen gene loci (Myl2, Aldoa, Tnt, Igf2, Prkcg, Cgm4, Calm3, Cgm3, Psbp1, Sa, Hbb, Ins1, and Tcp1) were previously mapped. Comparative mapping analysis indicated that the large portion of rat chromosome 1 is homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologous to mouse chromosome 7, although the homologs of two rat genes are located on mouse chromosomes 17 and 19. Homologs of the rat chromosome 1 genes that we mapped are located on human chromosomes 6, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, and 19. 38 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Genetically modified and non-genetically modified food supply chains : co-existence and traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Bertheau, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In the European Union nations, and other countries including Japan, Australia and Malaysia, it is a legal requirement that food products containing genetically modified organism (GMO) materials are labelled as such in order that customers may make informed purchasing decisions. For manufacturers and consumers to be confident about these assertions, systems must be in place along the entire food chain which support the co-existence of GM and non GM materials whilst maintaining a strict segrega...

  1. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  2. Genetically modified organisms and visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  3. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  4. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Qaim

    Full Text Available The role of genetically modified (GM crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  5. Genetically modified plants and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Suzie; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal MW

    2008-01-01

    Summary Genetically modified (or GM) plants have attracted a large amount of media attention in recent years and continue to do so. Despite this, the general public remains largely unaware of what a GM plant actually is or what advantages and disadvantages the technology has to offer, particularly with regard to the range of applications for which they can be used. From the first generation of GM crops, two main areas of concern have emerged, namely risk to the environment and risk to human health. As GM plants are gradually being introduced into the European Union there is likely to be increasing public concern regarding potential health issues. Although it is now commonplace for the press to adopt ‘health campaigns’, the information they publish is often unreliable and unrepresentative of the available scientific evidence. We consider it important that the medical profession should be aware of the state of the art, and, as they are often the first port of call for a concerned patient, be in a position to provide an informed opinion. This review will examine how GM plants may impact on human health both directly – through applications targeted at nutrition and enhancement of recombinant medicine production – but also indirectly, through potential effects on the environment. Finally, it will examine the most important opposition currently facing the worldwide adoption of this technology: public opinion. PMID:18515776

  6. Genetically Modified Organisms and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAHID eALI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniases namely cutaneous (CL, mucocutaneous (ML and visceral (VL, caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  7. Genetically modified foods as global public goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Herrero Olarte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available "Genetically modified (GM food has become very important in the field of research, as a result of its expansion in recent decades. As the right to food is a human right, it cannot be left in the hands of private sector developments exclusively, due to the capacity of the public sector to limit or drive it, and in any case, contributing to food safety. To achieve this, and for its cross-border development, GM needs to be treated as Global Public Goods (GPG, defined as pure or impure public goods that cannot be provided or regulated from a national or regional level, but from a global perspective. Its definition as GPG, and the fact of being public goods, assumes greater involvement by the public sector for its supply or regulation. It is therefore necessary to analyze the positive and negative externalities generated by transgenic foods becoming public goods, but from a global perspective. The difficulty is, that according to the author, GMs are positive or negative, so that there is no consensus to restrict and even prevent them or encourage them. But, there is a consensus on some key issues of GM food, such as improving productivity, contributing to the reduction of the species, the dependence of farmers, or monopoly companies with the patent. Identifying these issues can serve to initiate the appropriate regulation."

  8. Genetic variability of cultivated cowpea in Benin assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Kossou, D.K.; Ahanchédé, A.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Agbicodo, E.; Struik, P.C.; Sanni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of genetic diversity among cultivated cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] varieties is important to optimize the use of available genetic resources by farmers, local communities, researchers and breeders. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to evaluate the

  9. Genetic structure of Balearic honeybee populations based on microsatellite polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Robin FA

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic variation of honeybee colonies collected in 22 localities on the Balearic Islands (Spain was analysed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Previous studies have demonstrated that these colonies belong either to the African or west European evolutionary lineages. These populations display low variability estimated from both the number of alleles and heterozygosity values, as expected for the honeybee island populations. Although genetic differentiation within the islands is low, significant heterozygote deficiency is present, indicating a subpopulation genetic structure. According to the genetic differentiation test, the honeybee populations of the Balearic Islands cluster into two groups: Gimnesias (Mallorca and Menorca and Pitiusas (Ibiza and Formentera, which agrees with the biogeography postulated for this archipelago. The phylogenetic analysis suggests an Iberian origin of the Balearic honeybees, thus confirming the postulated evolutionary scenario for Apis mellifera in the Mediterranean basin. The microsatellite data from Formentera, Ibiza and Menorca show that ancestral populations are threatened by queen importations, indicating that adequate conservation measures should be developed for protecting Balearic bees.

  10. Prospects of genetic modified maize crop in Africa | Mwamahonje ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic modified maize crop increases annually as a result of food insecurity and limited land caused by rapid population increase of over seven billion in the world. Scientists have been playing their role to address this food insecurity problem. The use of genetically modified (GM) maize crop to feed people is one of the ...

  11. Proposal for a Test Protocol for Genetically Modified Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.

    1999-01-01

    The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998......The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998...

  12. Screening for genetically modified organisms sequences in food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the Allin 2.0 GMO screening system from Biosmart, Switzerland to screen for the presence of genetically modified food sequences in maize meal samples, fresh fruit and vegetables from some retailers around Gaborone, Botswana. The Allin 2.0 is a multiplex PCR system for the detection of genetically modified ...

  13. Genetically modified crops: Brazilian law and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, C D; Martins, F J O; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; dos Santos, O J A P; Alves, D P; Brasileiro, B P; Peternelli, L A

    2014-07-07

    In Brazil, the first genetically modified (GM) crop was released in 1998, and it is estimated that 84, 78, and 50% of crop areas containing soybean, corn, and cotton, respectively, were transgenic in 2012. This intense and rapid adoption rate confirms that the choice to use technology has been the main factor in developing national agriculture. Thus, this review focuses on understanding these dynamics in the context of farmers, trade relations, and legislation. To accomplish this goal, a survey was conducted using the database of the National Cultivar Registry and the National Service for Plant Variety Protection of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply [Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento (MAPA)] between 1998 and October 13, 2013. To date, 36 events have been released: five for soybeans, 18 for corn, 12 for cotton, and one for beans. From these events, 1395 cultivars have been developed and registered: 582 for soybean, 783 for corn and 30 for cotton. Monsanto owns 73.05% of the technologies used to develop these cultivars, while the Dow AgroScience - DuPont partnership and Syngenta have 16.34 and 4.37% ownership, respectively. Thus, the provision of transgenic seeds by these companies is an oligopoly supported by legislation. Moreover, there has been a rapid replacement of conventional crops by GM crops, whose technologies belong almost exclusively to four multinational companies, with the major ownership by Monsanto. These results reflect a warning to the government of the increased dependence on multinational corporations for key agricultural commodities.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by bento(a)pyrene ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schults, Marten A.; Chiu, Roland K.; Nagle, Peter; Kleinjans, J C; van Schooten, Frederik Jan; Godschalk, Roger W.

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification

  15. Impact of genetic polymorphisms on clinical response to antithrombotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kena J Lanham

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Kena J Lanham1,2, Julie H Oestreich3, Steven P Dunn1,2, Steven R Steinhubl41Pharmacy Services, UK HealthCare, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, USA; 4The Medicines Company, Zurich, Switzerland and The Geisinger Clinic, Danville, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Antithrombotic therapy, including anticoagulants as well as antiplatelet drugs, is an important component in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Variability in response to such medications, of which pharmacogenetic response is a major source, can decrease or enhance the benefits expected. This review is a comprehensive assessment of the literature published to date on the effects of genetic polymorphisms on the actions of a variety of antithrombotic medications, including warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and aspirin. Literature evaluating surrogate markers in addition to the impact of pharmacogenetics on clinical outcomes has been reviewed. The results of the studies are conflicting as to what degree pharmacogenetics will affect medication management in cardiovascular disease. Additional research is necessary to discover, characterize, and prospectively evaluate genetic and non-genetic factors that impact antithrombotic treatment in order to maximize the effectiveness and limit the harmful effects of these valuable agents.Keywords: aspirin, warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, pharmacogenetic, antithrombotic, antiplatelet

  16. Genetic polymorphism of horse serum protein 3 (SP3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, R K; Sandberg, K; Kuryl, J; Gahne, B

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional agarose gel (pH 8.6)-horizontal polyacrylamide gel (pH 9.0) electrophoresis of horse serum samples, followed by general protein staining, revealed genetic polymorphism of an unidentified protein tentatively designated serum protein 3 (SP3). The SP3 fractions appeared distinctly when a 14% concentration of acrylamide was used in the separation gels. The 2-D mobilities of SP3 fractions were quite similar to that of albumin. Family data were consistent with the hypothesis that the observed SP3 phenotypes were controlled by four co-dominant, autosomal alleles (D, F, I, S). Evidence was provided that the F allele can be further divided into two alleles (F1 and F2); the mobilities of F1 and F2 variants were very similar. Each of the SP3 alleles gave rise to one fraction and each of the heterozygous types showed two fractions. More than 600 horses representing five different breeds (Swedish Trotter, North-Swedish Trotter, Thoroughbred, Arab and Polish Tarpan) were typed for SP3, and allele frequency estimates were calculated. SP3 was highly polymorphic in all breeds studied.

  17. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  18. Genetic polymorphism of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Loreto, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijar, Gisely; Padilla, Carlos; Marquiño, Wilmer; Falconi, Eduardo; Montoya, Ysabel

    2002-04-01

    Eight genotypes of Plasmodium falciparum were detected after analysing blood samples obtained from 30 Peruvian jungle-dwelling patients in Loreto, a high transmission area for P. falciparum, using amplification of the polymorphic marker gene GLURP (glutamate-rich protein). Genotypes I (GLURP450) and VIII (GLURP800) were the most common (15/30 and 13/30, respectively). This single copy gene showed 15 patients to be infected with a single genotype of P. falciparum; the other 15 were infected with mixed genotypes, one of them with 4 genotypes. These findings are compatible with a high genetic complexity of P. falciparum. Further investigations are needed, using this and other markers, in order to design malaria control measures in Peru.

  19. Habitual coffee intake, genetic polymorphisms, and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyung; Kim, Kyunga; Ahn, Younjhin; Yang, Mihi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-05-01

    The association between coffee intake and type 2 diabetes may be modulated by common genetic variation. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between habitual coffee intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes and to determine whether this association varied by genetic polymorphisms related to type 2 diabetes in Korean adults. A population-based cohort study over a follow-up of 4 years was conducted. A total of 4077 Korean men and women aged 40-69 years with a normal glucose level at baseline were included. Coffee intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and incident type 2 diabetes or prediabetes was defined by oral glucose tolerance test or fasting blood glucose test. The genomic DNA samples were genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0, and nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to type 2 diabetes in East Asian populations were extracted. A total of 120 cases of type 2 diabetes and 1128 cases of prediabetes were identified. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, we observed an inverse association, but without any clear linear trend, between coffee intake and the combined risk of type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. We found that inverse associations between habitual coffee intake and the combined risk of type 2 diabetes and prediabetes were limited to those with the T-allele (GT/TT) of rs4402960 in IGF2BP2, those with the G-allele (GG/GC) of rs7754840 in CDKAL1, or those with CC of rs5215 in KCNJ11. We found a lower risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes combined with coffee intake among individuals with the GT/TT of IGF2BP2 rs4402960, GG/GC of CDKAL1 rs7754840, or CC of KCNJ11 rs5215, which are known to be related to type 2 diabetes in East Asians. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Rylie M; Alexander, Matthew S

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is defined as the progressive wasting of skeletal muscles that is caused by inherited or spontaneous genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing has greatly improved the accuracy and speed of diagnosis for different types of muscular dystrophy. Advancements in depth of coverage, convenience, and overall reduced cost have led to the identification of genetic modifiers that are responsible for phenotypic variability in affected patients. These genetic modifiers have been postulated to explain key differences in disease phenotypes, including age of loss of ambulation, steroid responsiveness, and the presence or absence of cardiac defects in patients with the same form of muscular dystrophy. This review highlights recent findings on genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies based on animal and clinical studies. These genetic modifiers hold great promise to be developed into novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Muscle Nerve 57: 6-15, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... and they may be of great value in forensic science and human population genetics. Key words: short tandem repeat, repeat motif, genetic polymorphism, Han population, forensic genetics. INTRODUCTION. Short tandem repeat (STR) is widely used today for gene mapping, genetic linkage analysis, and ...

  2. [Assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified food crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauzu, M; Pöting, A; Rubin, D; Lampen, A

    2012-03-01

    The placing on the European Union's market of genetically modified crops requires authorization by the European Commission which is based on the proof that the derived foods are as safe as their conventional counterparts. The assessment of potential allergenicity is part of the necessary investigations recommended in the updated Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. All genetically modified crops which so far have been authorized in the European Union were evaluated by the EFSA GMO Panel which considered it unlikely that their overall allergenicity has been altered.

  3. The V471A polymorphism in autophagy-related gene ATG7 modifies age at onset specifically in Italian Huntington disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Silke; Walter, Carolin; Riess, Olaf; Roos, Raymund A C; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Craufurd, David; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-01-01

    The cause of Huntington disease (HD) is a polyglutamine repeat expansion of more than 36 units in the huntingtin protein, which is inversely correlated with the age at onset of the disease. However, additional genetic factors are believed to modify the course and the age at onset of HD. Recently, we identified the V471A polymorphism in the autophagy-related gene ATG7, a key component of the autophagy pathway that plays an important role in HD pathogenesis, to be associated with the age at onset in a large group of European Huntington disease patients. To confirm this association in a second independent patient cohort, we analysed the ATG7 V471A polymorphism in additional 1,464 European HD patients of the "REGISTRY" cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). In the entire REGISTRY cohort we could not confirm a modifying effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism. However, analysing a modifying effect of ATG7 in these REGISTRY patients and in patients of our previous HD cohort according to their ethnic origin, we identified a significant effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism on the HD age at onset only in the Italian population (327 patients). In these Italian patients, the polymorphism is associated with a 6-years earlier disease onset and thus seems to have an aggravating effect. We could specify the role of ATG7 as a genetic modifier for HD particularly in the Italian population. This result affirms the modifying influence of the autophagic pathway on the course of HD, but also suggests population-specific modifying mechanisms in HD pathogenesis.

  4. The V471A polymorphism in autophagy-related gene ATG7 modifies age at onset specifically in Italian Huntington disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger, Silke; Walter, Carolin; Riess, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    The cause of Huntington disease (HD) is a polyglutamine repeat expansion of more than 36 units in the huntingtin protein, which is inversely correlated with the age at onset of the disease. However, additional genetic factors are believed to modify the course and the age at onset of HD. Recently......, we identified the V471A polymorphism in the autophagy-related gene ATG7, a key component of the autophagy pathway that plays an important role in HD pathogenesis, to be associated with the age at onset in a large group of European Huntington disease patients. To confirm this association in a second...... a modifying effect of ATG7 in these REGISTRY patients and in patients of our previous HD cohort according to their ethnic origin, we identified a significant effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism on the HD age at onset only in the Italian population (327 patients). In these Italian patients, the polymorphism...

  5. Risks and benefits of genetically modified foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... modified food (GMF) related issues available in an online database. In order to achieve this, ... However, the production of gene- tically modified foods (GMF) and crops has also raised ethical questions. Opposing parties question the possible ... local journalists on the issue of agricultural biotechnology.

  6. GENETICALLY MODIFIED ATHLETES: BIOMEDICAL ETHICS, GENE DOPING AND SPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Miah

    2004-01-01

    The author discusses the extremely important issue of modifying athletes genetically in order to develop elite sportsmen. He sheds light on various aspects of bioethics and their implications for the practices and management of sport in general.

  7. GENETICALLY MODIFIED ATHLETES: BIOMEDICAL ETHICS, GENE DOPING AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Miah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the extremely important issue of modifying athletes genetically in order to develop elite sportsmen. He sheds light on various aspects of bioethics and their implications for the practices and management of sport in general.

  8. Renal Function and Genetic Polymorphisms in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Brooks, Maria M; Zeevi, Adriana; Ohmann, Erin L.; Burckart, Gilbert J.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Chinnock, Richard; Canter, Charles; Addonizio, Linda; Bernstein, Daniel; Kirklin, James K.; Naftel, David C.; Webber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Common genetic variations influence rejection, infection, drug metabolism, and side effect profiles after pediatric heart transplantation. Reports in adults suggest that genetic background may influence post-transplant renal function. In this multicenter study we investigated the association of genetic polymorphisms (GP) in a panel of candidate genes on renal function in 453 pediatric heart transplant recipients. Methods We performed genotyping for functional GPs in 19 candidate genes. Renal function was determined annually after transplantation by calculation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Mixed effects and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess recipient characteristics and the effect of GPs on longitudinal eGFR and time to eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Results Mean age at transplantation was 6.2 ± 6.1 years and mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years. Older age at transplant and black race were independently associated with post-transplant renal dysfunction. In univariate analyses, FASL (C-843T) T allele (p=0.014) and HO-1 (A326G) G allele (p=0.0017) were associated with decreased renal function. After adjusting for age and race, these associations were attenuated [FASL (p=0.075), HO-1 (p=0.053)]. We found no associations of other GPs, including GPs in TGFβ1, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and ACE, with post-transplant renal function. Conclusions In this multicenter, large sample of pediatric heart transplant recipients we found no strong associations between GPs in 19 candidate genes and post-transplant renal function. Our findings contradict reported associations of CYP3A5 and TGFβ1 with renal function and suggest that genotyping for these GPs will not facilitate individualized immunosuppression for the purpose of protecting renal function after pediatric heart transplantation. PMID:22789135

  9. [Monitoring of food products from genetically modified sources in Moscow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutel'ian, V A; Filatov, N N; Sorokina, E Iu; Chernysheva, O N; Salova, N Ia; Sizykh, E V; Anisimova, O V

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of a detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in food from the shops of Moscow. The screening methods and event-specific assay based on the polymerase chain reaction is used. Transgenic DNA from genetically modified soybeans line 40-3-2 is detected in 17.2% samples of studied foods. Soybeans line 40-3-2 is allowed in Russian food supply.

  10. Genetic polymorphism and natural selection in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    OpenAIRE

    Escalante, A A; Lal, A A; Ayala, F J

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the genetic polymorphism at 10 Plasmodium falciparum loci that are considered potential targets for specific antimalarial vaccines. The polymorphism is unevenly distributed among the loci; loci encoding proteins expressed on the surface of the sporozoite or the merozoite (AMA-1, CSP, LSA-1, MSP-1, MSP-2, and MSP-3) are more polymorphic than those expressed during the sexual stages or inside the parasite (EBA-175, Pfs25, PF48/45, and RAP-1). Comparison of synonymous and nonsyno...

  11. Ecological aspects for application of genetically modified mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Scott, T.W.; Rogers, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The idea of using genetically modified mosquitoes (GMM) to reduce vector-borne diseases is founded on the notion that genetic constructs that will render mosquitoes incapable of pathogen transmission can be driven into vector populations. Conceptually, this is an exciting and novel approach to

  12. Stress-induced evolution and the biosafety of genetically modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    This article is focused on the problems of reduction of the risk associated with the deliberate release of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) into the environment. Special attention is given to overview the most probable physiological and genetic processes which could be induced in the released GMMs by adverse.

  13. Stress-induced evolution and the biosafety of genetically modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) into the environment. Special attention is given to overview the most probable physiological and genetic processes which could be induced in the released GMMs by adverse environmental conditions, namely: activation of quorum sensing and the functions associated with it, ...

  14. Prospects of genetic modified maize crop in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-04-13

    Apr 13, 2016 ... Farmers have rapidly adopted genetically modified organism (GMO) technology including GM maize crops. (Lawson et al., 2009). GMO technology involves the incorporation of genetic engineering to improve crop productivity since over one billion people in the world face starvation and two billion people ...

  15. Stress-induced evolution and the biosafety of genetically modified

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This article is focused on the problems of reduction of the risk associated with the deliberate release of genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) into the environment. Special attention is given to overview the most probable physiological and genetic processes which could be induced in the released GMMs by adverse ...

  16. A genetic polymorphism of the osteoprotegerin gene is associated with an increased risk of advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikawa Yohei

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of osteoprotegerin gene (OPG polymorphisms as genetic modifiers in the etiology of prostate cancer (PCa and disease progression. Methods Three hundred and sixty one patients with PCa and 195 normal controls were enrolled in the study, and two genetic polymorphisms, 149 T/C and 950 T/C in the putative promoter region of OPG, were genotyped. Results There was no significant difference in the genotype frequencies between PCa patients and controls (P = 0.939 and 0.294 for 149 T/C and 950 T/C polymorphisms, respectively. However, those patients with TC and TT genotypes in the 950 T/C polymorphism had a significantly increased risk of extraprostatic (age-adjusted odds ratio; aOR = 1.74 and 2.03 for TC and TT genotypes compared with the CC genotype, P = 0.028 and metastatic disease (aOR = 1.72 and 2.76 for TC and TT genotypes compared with the CC genotype, P = 0.009 compared with those with the CC genotype. In addition, analysis of the metastatic PCa patients (Stage D showed that the presence of the T allele of the OPG 950 T/C polymorphism was an independent risk factor predicting survival by Cox proportional hazard regression analyses (P = 0.031. Conclusion Progression of PCa may be influenced by an intrinsic genetic factor of the host's bone metabolism. The variant C allele of 950 T/C in the OPG promoter may play a major role as a genetic safe guard against progression in patients with PCa.

  17. Association between the IFN-γ and IL-1 genetic polymorphisms and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-24

    Apr 24, 2014 ... RESEARCH NOTE. Association between the IFN-γ and IL-1 genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer in the Chinese Han population. BAO-YING FEI1∗, HUO-XIANG LV2, ... and immune regulation, such as antiviral, antimicrobal, and ... Some studies reported that cytokines polymorphisms af- fected the ...

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of T-1131C APOA5 and ALOX5AP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ischaemic stroke is a multifactorial disease. Genetic polymorphisms involved in lipid, inflammatory and thrombotic metabolisms play an important role in the development of ischaemic stroke. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between T1131C APOA5 and SG13S114 ALOX5AP polymorphisms and ...

  19. ASPECTS ON CONSUMERS ATTITUDE TOWARD GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS AMONG YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina, SÎRBU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in food biotechnology and food science in the early 1990s have opened the gates of new markets for genetically modified foods. A broad dispute over the use of foods derived from genetically modified organisms and other uses of genetic engineering in food production in terms of key scientific researches, their impact on health and eco-systems, food safety and food security, labelling and regulations, traceability is still lasting. Beside the scientifically, technical, ethical and regulators arguments, the economical aspects of the genetically modified food market is influenced by the social acceptance of it. Consumers' perception and their attitudes are different and depending on many factors. A survey of youth as undergraduate students of Constantin Brancoveanu University from Romania revealed certain differences in attitudes regarding the genetically modified foods that may be partially explained by the consumers' information. Referring the consumer behaviour, this study showed rather a tacit attitude of acceptance of the genetically modified food goods than a vehement rejection.

  20. KCNJ11: Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polin Haghvirdizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major worldwide health problem and its prevalence has been rapidly increasing in the last century. It is caused by defects in insulin secretion or insulin action or both, leading to hyperglycemia. Of the various types of DM, type 2 occurs most frequently. Multiple genes and their interactions are involved in the insulin secretion pathway. Insulin secretion is mediated through the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel in pancreatic beta cells. This channel is a heteromeric protein, composed of four inward-rectifier potassium ion channel (Kir6.2 tetramers, which form the pore of the KATP channel, as well as sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits surrounding the pore. Kir6.2 is encoded by the potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11 gene, a member of the potassium channel genes. Numerous studies have reported the involvement of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KCNJ11 gene and their interactions in the susceptibility to DM. This review discusses the current evidence for the contribution of common KCNJ11 genetic variants to the development of DM. Future studies should concentrate on understanding the exact role played by these risk variants in the development of DM.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms and non-small-cell lung cancer: future paradigms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Ramon Andrade Bezerra de [Serviço de Oncologia Médica, Instituto Português de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve, Faro (Portugal)

    2014-07-01

    This article addresses some current issues about genetic polymorphisms studied in the non-small-cell lung cancer translational field. Furthermore, it discusses about new potential biomarkers regarding lung cancer risk and prognosis.

  2. Microarray Technology to Study the Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study we took the candidate gene approach to study the association of 19 different genetic polymorphisms with breast cancer risk in a population-based sample using a high-throughput genotyping technology...

  3. Thumbs down for genetically modified foodstuffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone

    1999-01-01

    GM food products is causedlargely by a general concern regarding health and environmental consequences. Genetic modification is to a much higher degree linked with risks than with advantages. Risks are not perceived only as risks to oneself but also to close family and future generations....... The perceived risks also influence how possible advantages that have been built into the products by means of genetic modification, are perceived. In general, advantages therefore cannot counterbalance risks in the mind of consumers. Consumers' aversion towards GM food products can also be explained through...... picture is the same, but there are some differences. For instance the aversion towards GM food products is most pronounced in Denmark and Germany. The importance of perceived risks is lower in Italy than in the other three countries....

  4. Genetically Modified GMDH Method with Cloning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2007), s. 29-37 ISSN 1870-4069. [NNAM 2007. International Conference on Neural Networks and Associative Memories /2./. Mexico City, 04.11.2007-09.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : GMDH neural network * genetic selection * cloning * Machine Learning Repository Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  5. Cross-fertilization between genetically modified and non-genetically modified maize crops in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Debat, Claudio Martínez; Ruibal, Fabiana; Fraguas, Laura Franco; Galván, Guillermo A

    2010-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) Bt maize (Zea mays L.) events MON810 and Bt11 is permitted in Uruguay. Local regulations specify that 10% of the crop should be a non-GM cultivar as refuge area for biodiversity, and the distance from other non-GM maize crops should be more than 250 m in order to avoid cross-pollination. However, the degree of cross-fertilization between maize crops in Uruguay is unknown. The level of adventitious presence of GM material in non-GM crops is a relevant issue for organic farming, in situ conservation of genetic resources and seed production. In the research reported here, the occurrence and frequency of cross-fertilization between commercial GM and non-GM maize crops in Uruguay was assessed. The methodology comprised field sampling and detection using DAS-ELISA and PCR. Five field-pair cases where GM maize crops were grown near non-GM maize crops were identified. These cases had the potential to cross-fertilize considering the distance between crops and the similarity of the sowing dates. Adventitious presence of GM material in the offspring of non-GM crops was found in three of the five cases. Adventitious presence of event MON810 or Bt11 in non-GM maize, which were distinguished using specific primers, matched the events in the putative sources of transgenic pollen. Percentages of transgenic seedlings in the offspring of the non-GM crops were estimated as 0.56%, 0.83% and 0.13% for three sampling sites with distances of respectively 40, 100 and 330 m from the GM crops. This is a first indication that adventitious presence of transgenes in non-GM maize crops will occur in Uruguay if isolation by distance and/or time is not provided. These findings contribute to the evaluation of the applicability of the "regulated coexistence policy" in Uruguay. © ISBR, EDP Sciences, 2011.

  6. Stratification for smoking in case-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; López, Ana García; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2009-01-01

    The risk estimates obtained in studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer differ markedly between studies, which might be due to chance or differences in study design, in particular the stratification/match of comparison group. The effect of different strategies for stratification......-cohort studies of genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer....... and adjustment for smoking on the estimated effect of polymorphisms on lung cancer risk was explored in the case-cohort design. We used an empirical and a statistical simulation approach. The stratification strategies were: no smoking stratification, stratification for smoking status and stratification...

  7. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Polymorphisms of CYP2C19 are associated with platelet response to clopidogrel. This study was conducted to evaluate the contribution of the previously identified polymorphisms to the response of clopidogrel in a cohort of Chinese Han patients. A total of 222 acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing ...

  8. Association of genetic polymorphism in GH gene with milk ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associations were analysed between polymorphisms of the growth hormone gene (GH-MspI) (localized in intron 3) and milk production traits of Beijing Holstein cows (a total of 543 cows). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method was used for identification of various ...

  9. Contrasting genetic influence of PON 1 coding gene polymorphisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Paraoxonase (PON1) is an A-esterase capable of hydrolyzing the active metabolites (oxons) of many organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. Human PON1 displays two polymorphisms in the coding region (Q192R and L55M) and several polymorphisms in the promoter and the 30-UTR regions. Animal studies ...

  10. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Gidalevitz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles.

  11. Genetic analysis of polymorphisms in the kalirin gene for association with age-at-onset in European Huntington disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Yu-Chun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington disease (HD is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HD gene. Although the length of the CAG repeat strongly correlates with the age-at-onset (AAO, AAO in HD individuals may differ dramatically in spite of similar expanded CAG repeat lengths. Additional genetic or environmental factors are thought to influence the disease onset. Several modifier genes have been discovered so far but they do not fully explain the variability of AAO in HD. To potentially identify a novel genetic modifier, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the kalirin (KALRN gene. Kalirin is a protein crucially involved in spine plasticity and its interaction with huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP-1 and a potential protein dysfunction might contribute to spine pathogenesis in HD. Methods The selected SNPs were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and association of SNPs with AAO was investigated with the framework of linear models in an analysis of variance and covariance. Results Eleven SNPs in the kalirin gene were examined in an association study in European HD patients. The ten coding SNPs under investigation were monomorphic, whereas SNP rs10934657 in the promoter region showed a minor allele frequency >1%. An analysis of covariance together with the influence of the expanded HD allele was applied in 680 HD patients. SNP rs10934657 did not affect the AAO of the examined HD population. Conclusions The results did not reveal an association between the analyzed kalirin polymorphisms and the AAO in HD. However, it does not exclude other SNPs of the kalirin gene as susceptible genetic modifiers.

  12. Presence of genetically modified soya in products on the market

    OpenAIRE

    Spanish Agency for Consumer Affairs, Food Safety and Nutrition

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of events of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) authorised in the European Union to be used as food or feed has notably increased, particularly in the case of genetically modified soya. The number has grown from September 2008, when t here was only one authorisation, Mons anto Company's Roundup Ready® soya, to seven different events currently authorised: 40- 3-2 soya, MON89788 soya, MON87701 soya, A2704-12 soya, A5547-127 soya,...

  13. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  14. MS-based analytical methodologies to characterize genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Simó, Carolina; León, Carlos; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The development of genetically modified crops has had a great impact on the agriculture and food industries. However, the development of any genetically modified organism (GMO) requires the application of analytical procedures to confirm the equivalence of the GMO compared to its isogenic non-transgenic counterpart. Moreover, the use of GMOs in foods and agriculture faces numerous criticisms from consumers and ecological organizations that have led some countries to regulate their production, growth, and commercialization. These regulations have brought about the need of new and more powerful analytical methods to face the complexity of this topic. In this regard, MS-based technologies are increasingly used for GMOs analysis to provide very useful information on GMO composition (e.g., metabolites, proteins). This review focuses on the MS-based analytical methodologies used to characterize genetically modified crops (also called transgenic crops). First, an overview on genetically modified crops development is provided, together with the main difficulties of their analysis. Next, the different MS-based analytical approaches applied to characterize GM crops are critically discussed, and include "-omics" approaches and target-based approaches. These methodologies allow the study of intended and unintended effects that result from the genetic transformation. This information is considered to be essential to corroborate (or not) the equivalence of the GM crop with its isogenic non-transgenic counterpart. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-10-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly expanding technology, genetic engineering, to food production. The results indicated significant difference in understanding of concepts related with genetically engineered food stuffs between teachers and students. The most common ideas about genetically modified food were that cross bred plants and genetically modified plants are not same, GM organisms are produced by inserting a foreign gene into a plant or animal and are high yielding. More teachers thought that genetically engineered food stuffs were unsafe for the environment. Both teachers and students showed number of misconceptions, for example, the pesticidal proteins produced by GM organisms have indirect effects through bioaccumulation, induces production of allergic proteins, genetic engineering is production of new genes, GM plants are leaky sieves and that transgenes are more likely to introgress into wild species than mutated species. In general, more students saw benefits while teachers were cautious about the advantages of genetically engineered food stuffs.

  16. Genetically modified organisms in light of domestic and world regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Zorica; Milošević Mirjana; Vujaković Milka; Ignjatov Maja

    2007-01-01

    At the same time as development and registration of new genetic modification of plant species have intensified, the number of countries in which they are grown has also increased considerably. Genetically modified crops were grown in 22 countries in 2006, six of which were in European Union. Protocol on Biosafety, known as Cartagena protocol was adopted at the international level in February, 2000. Presence, but not growing of GMO in food is allowed in many countries, while in some others lab...

  17. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms and Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Nielsen, Lecia M; Feddersen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors such as age, gender, and genetic polymorphisms may explain individual differences in pain phenotype. Genetic associations with pain sensitivity have previously been investigated in osteoarthritis patients, with a focus on the P2X7, TRPV1, and TACR1 genes. However, other genes ...

  19. Genetic polymorphism within the Leishmania donovani complex: correlation with geographic origin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemanová, Eva; Jirků, Milan; Mauricio, I. L.; Miles, M. A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2004), s. 613-617 ISSN 0002-9637 Grant - others:European Community(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-01810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : genetic polymorphism * Leishmania donovani * RAPD Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.013, year: 2004

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of T-1131C APOA5 and ALOX5AP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy 14, Department of Genetics and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (LGPM),. Hassan II University, 9154 Casablanca, Morocco. Abstract. Ischaemic stroke is a multifactorial disease. Genetic polymorphisms involved in lipid, inflammatory and thrombotic metabolisms play an important role in ...

  1. Genetically Modified Crops: Risks and Promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Conway

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available GM foods have the potential to provide significant benefits for developing countries. Over 800 million people are chronically undernourished, and 180 million children are severely underweight for their age. By 2020, there will be an extra two billion mouths to feed. Ecological approaches that underpin sustainable agriculture (e.g., integrated pest management and participatory approaches that strengthen farmers' own experimentation and decision making are key. Biotechnology will be an essential partner, if yield ceilings are to be raised, if crops are to be grown without excessive reliance on pesticides, and if farmers on less favored lands are to be provided with crops that are resistant to drought and salinity, and that can use nitrogen and other nutrients more efficiently. Over the past 10 years, in addition supporting ecological approaches, the Rockefeller Foundation has funded the training of some 400 developing-country scientists in the techniques of biotechnology. Most of the new crop varieties are the result of tissue culture and marker-aided selection. The Foundation also supports the production of genetically engineered rices, including a new rice engineered for beta carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A in the grain. Some specific steps can be taken by Monsanto that would improve acceptance of plant biotechnology in both the developing and the industrialized worlds: label; disavow gene protection (terminator systems; phase out the use of antibiotic resistance markers; agree (with big seed companies to use the plant variety protection system, rather than patents, in developing countries; establish an independently administered fellowship program to train developing-country scientists in crop biotechnology, biosafety, and intellectual property; donate useful technologies to developing countries; agree to share financial rewards from intellectual property rights on varieties such as basmati or jasmine rice with the countries of origin; and

  2. Huntingtin interacting proteins are genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Kaltenbach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea, we identified a comprehensive set of Htt interactors using two complementary approaches: high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening and affinity pull down followed by mass spectrometry. This effort led to the identification of 234 high-confidence Htt-associated proteins, 104 of which were found with the yeast method and 130 with the pull downs. We then tested an arbitrary set of 60 genes encoding interacting proteins for their ability to behave as genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of HD. This high-content validation assay showed that 27 of 60 orthologs tested were high-confidence genetic modifiers, as modification was observed with more than one allele. The 45% hit rate for genetic modifiers seen among the interactors is an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-4% typically observed in unbiased genetic screens. Genetic modifiers were similarly represented among proteins discovered using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down/mass spectrometry methods, supporting the notion that these complementary technologies are equally useful in identifying biologically relevant proteins. Interacting proteins confirmed as modifiers of the neurodegeneration phenotype represent a diverse array of biological functions, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal organization, signal transduction, and transcription. Among the modifiers were 17 loss-of-function suppressors of neurodegeneration, which can be considered potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we show that seven interacting proteins from among 11 tested were able to

  3. Early Prediction of Sepsis Incidence in Critically Ill Patients Using Specific Genetic Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Vlad Laurentiu; Ercisli, Muhammed Furkan; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Boia, Eugen S; Horhat, Razvan; Nitu, Razvan; Diaconu, Mircea M; Pirtea, Laurentiu; Ciuca, Ioana; Horhat, Delia; Horhat, Florin George; Licker, Monica; Popovici, Sonia Elena; Tanasescu, Sonia; Tataru, Calin

    2017-06-01

    Several diagnostic methods for the evaluation and monitoring were used to find out the pro-inflammatory status, as well as incidence of sepsis in critically ill patients. One such recent method is based on investigating the genetic polymorphisms and determining the molecular and genetic links between them, as well as other sepsis-associated pathophysiologies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms in critical patients with sepsis can become a revolutionary method for evaluating and monitoring these patients. Similarly, the complications, as well as the high costs associated with the management of patients with sepsis, can be significantly reduced by early initiation of intensive care.

  4. Serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms modify the association between paroxetine serotonin transporter occupancy and clinical response in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Ooteman, Wendy; Booij, Jan; Michel, Martin C.; Moeton, Martina; Baas, Frank; Schene, Aart H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In major depressive disorder, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors target the serotonin transporter (SERT). Their response rates (30-50%) are modified by SERT promotor polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR). OBJECTIVES: To quantify the relationship between SERT occupancy and response, and whether

  5. RAGE genetic polymorphisms are associated with risk, chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE and susceptibility, chemotherapy response rate and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. METHOD: This is a prospective study in which 562 patients with NSCLC and 764 healthy controls were enrolled. Three RAGE genetic polymorphisms, namely, -429T/C, -374T/A and 82G/S were genotyped. Platinum-based chemotherapy was given to 432 subjects with advanced inoperable NSCLC and their responses to chemotherapy were evaluated. RESULTS: All the polymorphic genotypes of RAGE polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility for NSCLC. Only the 82G/S polymorphisms denoted a significant difference between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy. The 82SS genotype and 82S allele distribution not only increased the NSCLC risk, but also was associated with a lower chemotherapy response rate and poor prognosis, indicated by overall survival and progression free survival. CONCLUSION: The 82G/S genetic polymorphism of RAGE gene might be used as a genetic marker to screen for patients sensitive to thermotherapy and to predict the prognosis of NSCLC.

  6. The Synergistic Effect of TNFA and IL10 Promoter Polymorphisms on Genetic Predisposition to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolova, Irena; Miteva, Lyuba; Ivanova, Mariana; Kundurzhiev, Todor; Stoilov, Rumen; Stanilova, Spaska

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the individual and combined effect of functional TNFA -308G/A and IL10 -1082G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their genotypes on the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a Bulgarian population. Genotyping for -1082A/G IL10 (rs1800896) and -308G/A TNFA (rs1800629) polymorphisms was performed for 154 SLE patients and 224 healthy controls. An association between SLE and the rs1800629 polymorphism was established under the allelic model (allele A vs. allele G; odds ratios [OR] = 2.317), the dominant model (GA+AA vs. GG; OR = 3.214), and the overdominant model (GA vs. AA+GG; OR = 3.494). There was no association between rs1800896 and SLE, although a tendency for genetic predisposition to SLE was observed for the IL10 -1082 GG genotype under the recessive genetic model (OR = 1.454). When analyzing the influence of the combined TNFA/IL10 genotypes on SLE occurrence, we found that the carriage of both high cytokine-producing genotypes of two SNPs (TNFA -308AA/GA and IL10 -1082GG) significantly increased the risk of developing SLE with OR of 9.026 (p = 0.006). Our findings suggest that the combinatorial complexity of TNFA and IL10 promoter polymorphisms impacts SLE susceptibility. Notably, we found that a TNFA promoter polymorphism is a leading risk factor for SLE susceptibility in a Bulgarian population, while the IL10 -1082 locus appears to act as a significant modifier.

  7. PGC-1alpha downstream transcription factors NRF-1 and TFAM are genetic modifiers of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghikia Aiden

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin HTT (HD gene. The primary genetic determinant of the age at onset (AO is the length of the HTT CAG repeat; however, the remaining genetic contribution to the AO of HD has largely not been elucidated. Recent studies showed that impaired functioning of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1a (PGC-1alpha contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and appears to play an important role in HD pathogenesis. Further genetic evidence for involvement of PGC-1alpha in HD pathogenesis was generated by the findings that sequence variations in the PPARGC1A gene encoding PGC-1alpha exert modifying effects on the AO in HD. In this study, we hypothesised that polymorphisms in PGC-1alpha downstream targets might also contribute to the variation in the AO. Results In over 400 German HD patients, polymorphisms in the nuclear respiratory factor 1 gene, NRF-1, and the mitochondrial transcription factor A, encoded by TFAM showed nominally significant association with AO of HD. When combining these results with the previously described modifiers rs7665116 in PPARGC1A and C7028T in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CO1, mt haplogroup H in a multivariable model, a substantial proportion of the variation in AO can be explained by the joint effect of significant modifiers and their interactions, respectively. Conclusions These results underscore that impairment of mitochondrial function plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD and that upstream transcriptional activators of PGC-1alpha may be useful targets in the treatment of HD.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of MDM2 and TP53 genes are associated with risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a Chinese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Mang; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xinhua; Huang, Jun; Jiang, Huifen; Hu, Sunhong; Liu, Yuehui

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor TP53 and its negative regulator MDM2 play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. Previous case-control studies also revealed TP53 72Arg>Pro and MDM2 309T>G polymorphisms contribute to the risk of common cancers. However, the relationship between these two functional polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) susceptibility has not been explored. In this study, we performed a case-control study between 522 NPC patients and 722 healthy controls in a Chinese population by using PCR-RFLP. We found an increased NPC risk associated with the MDM2 GG (odds ratio [OR] = 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.08-3.96) and TG (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.16-2.06) genotypes. An increased risk was also associated with the TP53 Pro/Pro genotype (OR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.58-3.10) compared to the Arg/Arg genotype. The gene-gene interaction of MDM2 and TP53 polymorphisms increased adult NPC risk in a more than multiplicative manner (OR for the presence of both MDM2 GG and TP53 Pro/Pro genotypes = 7.75, 95% CI = 3.53-17.58). The findings suggest that polymorphisms of MDM2 and TP53 genes may be genetic modifier for developing NPC

  9. Consumer Preference for Genetically Modified Halal Yogurt Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hasnah Hassan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Consumers worldwide have reacted negatively to food products made from genetically modified (GM ingredients. This study strives to understand the importance placed by consumers on the features of a product when purchasing halal yogurt drinks with GM or non GM ingredient along with the level of antioxidants, price, flavor and Halal certification from JAKIM. In addition, their attitudes towards genetically modified foods, in general, and their purchase intention towards genetically modified yo- gurt drinks, in particular, were also determined. Experimental design using a convenience sampling was used; 120 eligible responses were received from the study using three types of yogurt drinks. The research findings showed that nutrition was deemed as being the most important product feature that influenced the decision in purchasing yogurt drinks, followed by freshness, price, flavor, variety, and origin. Furthermore, it was found that respondents presented a neutral attitude and purchase intention towards genetically modified yogurt drinks. The recommendations to market practitioners, research limitations, as well as suggestions for future studies are also discussed.

  10. Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.R.; Bryan Endres, A.

    2000-01-01

    To be successful, laws that regulate genetically modified organisms (GMOs) must help society decide rationally when to pause and when to proceed in adopting new biotechnological developments. In the context of European Union (EU) institutions and lawmaking procedures, this article examines European

  11. Inadvertent presence of genetically modified elements in maize food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenya has a biosafety law and has tested genetically modified (GM) maize under confinement and containment, but has neither released nor commercialized any GM crop. This study assessed various maize food products from the Kenyan farms and markets for the inadvertent presence of GMOs. It assessed the possibility ...

  12. The Environmental Benefits and Costs of Genetically Modified (GM) Crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseler, J.H.H.; Scatasta, S.; Fall, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    The widespread introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops may change the effect of agriculture on the environment. The magnitude and direction of expected effects are still being hotly debated, and the interests served in this discussion arena are often far from those of science and social

  13. The Coexistence of Genetically Modified, Organic and Conventional Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalaitzandonakes, N.; Phillips, P.W.B.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Smyth, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Since their commercial introduction in 1996, genetically modified (GM) crops have been adopted by farmers around the world at impressive rates. In 2011, 180 million hectares of GM crops were cultivated by more than 15 million farmers in 29 countries. In the next decade, global adoption is expected

  14. Investigating an Ethical Approach to Genetically Modified Crops in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetically modified (GM) crops gained attention in southern Africa in the context of broader debates about the struggle for food security and poverty alleviation to achieve sustainable development. The prospects of GM crops as a technological innovation have provoked numerous debates and environmental concern ...

  15. Inadvertent presence of genetically modified elements in maize food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... such as corn flakes, corn puffs and corn syrup. These results suggest that high temperatures or other factors involved in the processing of the cornflakes degraded the. cry1Ab DNA. PCR is very efficient in detecting genetically modified genes in Bt maize seed and grains because it was able to amplify the ...

  16. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Gould, M.; Cuppen, E.; Smits, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach

  17. Identification of Genetically Modified Foods - problems and unsolved questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan W.; Eriksen, Folmer Damsted

    2007-01-01

    One of the points in the discussion of genetically modified organisms (GMO) is the consumers’ right to choose between foods from GMO (GM-foods) and traditionally produced foods. This discussion has led to the EU regulation requiring labelling of GM food products made from GM plants. However, since...

  18. Competition with mandatory labeling of genetically modified products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2005-01-01

    In April 2004, the European Union adopted a new legislative framework for genetically modified (GM) organisms. This framework regulates the placing on the market of GM products, and demands these products to be labeled as such. We present a duopoly model with vertical differentiation and mandatory

  19. An analytical approach to the implementation of genetically modified crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, K.; Rasmussen, B.

    2000-01-01

    Public scepticism towards genetically modified (GM) crops is increasing. To address this, the risks and benefits of GM crops must be examined across scientific disciplines, and be discussed with the authorities, the agricultural industry and the consumers. In a feasibility study we have...

  20. Competition with mandatory labeling of genetically modified products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    A vertical differentiation model is analyzed to study the placing on the market of genetically modified (GM) products in a context where labeling of such products is mandatory, as it is in the European Union. The model has two stages: firms first choose their technology (either GM or conventional)

  1. Investigating an Ethical Approach to Genetically Modified Crops in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4carolinebell@gmail.com

    Genetically modified (GM) crops gained attention in southern Africa in the context of broader debates about the struggle for food security and poverty alleviation to achieve sustainable development. The prospects of GM crops as a technological innovation have provoked numerous debates and environmental concern.

  2. Risks and benefits of genetically modified foods | Amin | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are claims that fear towards new technology has been caused by the lack of information and education on the subject to the public. Modern biotechnology and its applications have been receiving the same criticism. Thus, the objective of this study is to analyze the trends and coverage of genetically modified food ...

  3. Class Teacher Candidates' Opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural Keles, Pinar; Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the Class teacher candidates' opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms. The study was carried out with 101 teacher candidates who were studying in the 3rd grade of Agri Ibrahim Çeçen University Classroom Teacher Department in 2016-2017 academic year. Of the students who participated in the survey, 56 were…

  4. Biosafety Management of Genetically Modified Crops (China) | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Since 1990, China's agricultural biotechnology sector has experienced tremendous growth. A recent survey shows that the country is developing the largest plant biotechnology capacity outside North America. Public investment in the sector, as well as the number of genetically modified (GM) crops commercialized, ...

  5. Detection of genetically modified maize ( Zea mays L.) in seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize is the second major cereal in Nepal; its food biosafety and ecological conservation is an important concern. To address this issue, it is necessary to detect genetically modified (GM) maize and establish a monitoring and regulatory system in Nepal. Currently, Nepal does not have legal regulations or labeling directives ...

  6. Techniques for detecting genetically modified crops and products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cultivation of genetically modified crops is becoming increasingly important; more traits are emerging and more acres than ever before are being planted with GM varieties. The release of GM crops and products in the markets worldwide has increased the regulatory need to monitor and verify the presence and the ...

  7. Effects of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) rice on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Effects of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant. (GMHT) rice on biodiversity of weed in paddy fields. Xianbin Jiang1,2,3, Xingrong Wu4 and Guoying Xiao1*. 1Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, Hunan, China. 2Rice Research Institute, Guangxi Academy ...

  8. Field testing genetically modified organisms: framework for decisions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1989-01-01

    ... on Scientific Evaluation of the Introduction of Genetically Modified Microoganisms and Plants into the Environment Board on Biology Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1989 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-s...

  9. What we should know about genetically modified foods | Akromah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All we care about is that our food should be wholesome, nutritious and tasty. Critics of crop biotechnology are of the opinion that potential ecological and food safety disasters are looming on the horizon because genetically modified (GM) crops have entered the food chain. Alarmists have introduced emotionally charged ...

  10. Safety aspects of genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Prins, T.W.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Kok, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress, such as drought, salinity, and temperature extremes, significantly reduce crop yields. Hence, development of abiotic stress-tolerant crops by modern biotechnology may contribute to global food security. Prior to introducing genetically modified crops with abiotic stress tolerance to

  11. Attitudes towards genetically modified animals in food production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.; Coles, D.; Houdebine, L.M.; Kleter, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Food products developed using genetically modified (GM) animals may soon be introduced in Europe and beyond. Their successful commercialisation depends on consumer acceptance, and so it is timely to review the existing literature in this respect. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

  12. From pesticides to genetically modified plants : history, economics and politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadoks, J.C.; Waibel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Two technologies of crop protection are compared, crop protection by pesticides and by Genetically Modified Plants (GMPs). The history of pesticides provides lessons relevant to the future of GMPs; (1) high pesticide usage is counter-productive, (2) the technology requires intensive regulation and

  13. Assessing ecological risks and benefits of genetically modified crops

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Jelena V.; Isajev Vasilije V.; Prijić Željana S.; Zečević Veselinka M.; Hojka Zdravko M.; Dozet Gordana K.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops and biotechnology are providing new opportunities for increasing crop productivity and tackling agriculture problems, such as diseases, pests and weeds, abiotic stress and nutritional limitations of staple food crops. As GM crops are being adopted in various locations with different ecosystems, a scientifically based understanding of the environmental effects of cultivations of GM crops would assist decision makers worldwide ...

  14. Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) | Amin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk assessment is a procedure normally carried out prior to decision-making on the release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment. ... biosafety laws of more developed countries and to ensure adequate level of protection for the Malaysian people against any adverse effects of GMOs and products.

  15. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Implementing precision medicine for complex diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD will require extensive use of biomarkers and an in-depth understanding of how genetic, epigenetic, and environmental variations contribute to phenotypic diversity and disease progression. A meta-analysis from two large cohorts of current and former smokers with and without COPD [SPIROMICS (N = 750; COPDGene (N = 590] was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with measurement of 88 blood proteins (protein quantitative trait loci; pQTLs. PQTLs consistently replicated between the two cohorts. Features of pQTLs were compared to previously reported expression QTLs (eQTLs. Inference of causal relations of pQTL genotypes, biomarker measurements, and four clinical COPD phenotypes (airflow obstruction, emphysema, exacerbation history, and chronic bronchitis were explored using conditional independence tests. We identified 527 highly significant (p 10% of measured variation in 13 protein biomarkers, with a single SNP (rs7041; p = 10-392 explaining 71%-75% of the measured variation in vitamin D binding protein (gene = GC. Some of these pQTLs [e.g., pQTLs for VDBP, sRAGE (gene = AGER, surfactant protein D (gene = SFTPD, and TNFRSF10C] have been previously associated with COPD phenotypes. Most pQTLs were local (cis, but distant (trans pQTL SNPs in the ABO blood group locus were the top pQTL SNPs for five proteins. The inclusion of pQTL SNPs improved the clinical predictive value for the established association of sRAGE and emphysema, and the explanation of variance (R2 for emphysema improved from 0.3 to 0.4 when the pQTL SNP was included in the model along with clinical covariates. Causal modeling provided insight into specific pQTL-disease relationships for airflow obstruction and emphysema. In conclusion, given the frequency of highly significant local pQTLs, the large amount of variance potentially explained by pQTL, and the

  16. Genetic diversity for restriction fragment length polymorphisms and heterosis for two diallel sets of maize inbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchinger, A E; Lee, M; Lamkey, K R; Hallauer, A R; Woodman, W L

    1990-10-01

    Changes that may have occurred over the past 50 years of hybrid breeding in maize (Zea maize L.) with respect to heterosis for yield and heterozygosity at the molecular level are of interest to both maize breeders and quantitative geneticists. The objectives of this study were twofold: The first, to compare two diallels produced from six older maize inbreds released in the 1950's and earlier and six newer inbreds released during the 1970's with respect to (a) genetic variation for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and (b) the size of heterosis and epistatic effects, and the second, to evaluate the usefulness of RFLP-based genetic distance measures in predicting heterosis and performance of single-cross hybrids. Five generations (parents, F1; F2, and backcrosses) from the 15 crosses in each diallel were evaluated for grain yield and yield components in four Iowa environments. Genetic effects were estimated from generation means by ordinary diallel analyses and by the Eberhart-Gardner model. Newer lines showed significantly greater yield for inbred generations than did older lines but smaller heterosis estimates. In most cases, estimates of additive x additive epistatic effects for yield and yield components were significantly positive for both groups of lines. RFLP analyses of inbred lines included two restriction enzymes and 82 genomic DNA clones distributed over the maize genome. Eighty-one clones revealed polymorphisms with at least one enzyme. In each set, about three different RFLP variants were typically found per RFLP locus. Genetic distances between inbred lines were estimated from RFLP data as Rogers' distance (RD), which was subdivided into general (GRD) and specific (SRD) Rogers' distances within each diallel. The mean and range of RDs were similar for the older and newer lines, suggesting that the level of heterozygosity at the molecular level had not changed. GRD explained about 50% of the variation among RD values in both sets. Cluster

  17. Genetic modifiers of carcinogen DNA adducts in target lung and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Su, Li; Mark, Eugene J; Wain, John C; Christiani, David C

    2010-12-01

    Measurement of carcinogen DNA adducts in blood has been used as a surrogate for the target lung tissue. We aimed to examine whether genetic polymorphisms in several metabolic pathway genes modify the relation between DNA adducts in target lung and blood. One hundred and thirty-five early-stage lung cancer patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital were studied. DNA adducts were measured by the (32)P-postlabeling assay in lung and blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) in a subset of 53 who had paired blood samples. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed in genes involved in phase II (GSTs, NAT2, EPHX and NQO1), DNA repair (ERCC1, ERCC2 and XRCC1) and DNA methylation (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) pathways. There was a significant correlation between DNA adduct levels in lung and blood within the different genotypes, with one exception. Significant modifications in adducts were found by variants in genes for phase II metabolism [NAT2 (1.51 for rapid versus 0.76 for slow, P = 0.022)], DNA repair [ERCC1 C118T (P = 0.014), ERCC2 (P = 0.003) and XRCC1 (P = 0.025)] and MTHFR [C677T (P = 0.005) and A1298C (P = 0.005)]. The relation between DNA adducts in blood MNCs and target lung tissue was significantly modified by the single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the three main pathways. Despite the relatively small sample size, our results suggest that genetic factors may need to be considered when assessing the association of DNA adducts using surrogate tissue in studies of lung cancer. Further studies are needed to better understand their role and the mechanisms.

  18. Review: Genetically modified plants for the promotion of human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Saito, Kazuki

    2006-12-01

    Plants are attractive biological resources because of their ability to produce a huge variety of chemical compounds, and the familiarity of production in even the most rural settings. Genetic engineering gives plants additional characteristics and value for cultivation and post-harvest. Genetically modified (GM) plants of the "first generation" were conferred with traits beneficial to producers, whereas GM plants in subsequent "generations" are intended to provide beneficial traits for consumers. Golden Rice is a promising example of a GM plant in the second generation, and has overcome a number of obstacles for practical use. Furthermore, consumer-acceptable plants with health-promoting properties that are genetically modified using native genes are being developed. The emerging technology of metabolomics will also support the commercial realization of GM plants by providing comprehensive analyzes of plant biochemical components.

  19. [Genetically modified organisms in food--production, detection and risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeljezić, Davor

    2004-11-01

    The first genetically modified plant (GMP) was a tobacco resistant to antibiotics in 1983. In 1996, the first genetically altered crop, a delayed-ripening tomato was commercially released. In the year 2003, the estimated global area of GM crops for was 67.7 million hectares. To produce such a plant a gene of interest has to be isolated from the donor. Together with a promoter, terminator sequence and marker gene it has to be introduced into the plant cell which is then stimulated to generate a whole GMP expressing new characteristics (herbicide/insect resistance, delayed ripening). The last few months have seen a strong public debate over genetically modified organisms which has raised scientific, economic, political, and ethical issues. Some questions concerning the safety of GMPs are still to be answered, and decisions about their future should be based on scientifically validated information.

  20. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-Ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-09-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs.

  1. Association between frequency of chromosomal aberrations and cancer risk is not influenced by genetic polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Anna Maria; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Skjelbred, Camilla Furu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals has been associated with cancer risk. It is presently unclear whether this association is influenced by individual susceptibility factors such as genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic......-metabolizing enzymes. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 (GSTM1) and theta 1 (GSTT1) as effect modifiers of the association between CA and cancer risk. METHODS: A case-control study was performed pooling data from cytogenetic studies carried out in 1974...... information about cancer risk by CA frequency. RESULTS: The association between CA frequency and cancer risk was confirmed [OR(medium) (odds ratio)(medium) = 1.5, 95% credibility interval (CrI), 0.9-2.5; OR(high) = 2.8, 95% CrI, 1.6-4.6], whereas no effect of the genetic polymorphism was observed. A much...

  2. Genetic polymorphism of vitamin D receptor determines its metabolism and efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    O.A. Yakovleva; O.M. Nikolova; I.A. Doroshkevych; N.V. Shcherbeniuk

    2017-01-01

    The review represents the results of researches of vitamin D receptor characteristics and its genetic polymorphism, which is variable in different populations, and also depends on age and gender. This polymorphism determines the association of vitamin D different concentration with the probability of bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease development, and therefore the different efficacy of drug correction of vitamin D deficiency. However, the scientific data are contradict...

  3. Genetic analysis of Apuleia leiocarpa as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA markers: prospects for population genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencina, K H; Konzen, E R; Tsai, S M; Bisognin, D A

    2016-12-19

    Apuleia leiocarpa (Vogel) J.F. MacBride is a hardwood species native to South America, which is at serious risk of extinction. Therefore, it is of prime importance to examine the genetic diversity of this species, information required for developing conservation, sustainable management, and breeding strategies. Although scarcely used in recent years, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers are useful resources for the analysis of genetic diversity and structure of tree species. This study represents the first genetic analysis based on DNA markers in A. leiocarpa that aimed to investigate the levels of polymorphism and to select markers for the precise characterization of its genetic structure. We adapted the original DNA extraction protocol based on cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, and describe a simple procedure that can be used to obtain high-quality samples from leaf tissues of this tree. Eighteen primers were selected, revealing 92 bands, from which 75 were polymorphic and 61 were sufficient to represent the overall genetic structure of the population without compromising the precision of the analysis. Some fragments were conserved among individuals, which can be sequenced and used to analyze nucleotide diversity parameters through a wider set of A. leiocarpa individuals and populations. The individuals were separated into 11 distinct groups with variable levels of genetic diversity, which is important for selecting desirable genotypes and for the development of a conservation and sustainable management program. Our results are of prime importance for further investigations concerning the genetic characterization of this important, but vulnerable species.

  4. HYBRIDIZATION STUDY BETWEEN GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA NAPUS AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED B. NAPUS AND B. RAPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene exchange between cultivated crops and wild species has gained significance in recent years because of concerns regarding the potential for gene flow between genetically modified (GM) crops and their domesticated and wild relatives. As part of our ecological effects of gene ...

  5. Use of multi-dose activated charcoal in phenytoin toxicity secondary to genetic polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Betty S H; Sellors, Kate; Chiew, Angela L; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2015-02-01

    Phenytoin is metabolised in the liver by cytochrome (CYP)2C9 and 2C19 enzymes. Due to saturation of enzyme capacity, the elimination half-life is prolonged at supratherapeutic levels. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C9 and 2C19 are reasonably common and further prolong the elimination of phenytoin. There are conflicting reports regarding whether multiple-dose activated charcoal (MDAC) significantly increases the clearance of phenytoin in poisoning. We present 3 patients with phenytoin toxicity and very slow elimination secondary to reduced CYP enzyme function from genetic polymorphisms. MDAC was used in two patients and led to rapid and large reductions in the measured elimination half-lives. This is contrasted with very prolonged elimination in a third patient who did not receive MDAC. MDAC may play a role in the management of chronic phenytoin toxicity, especially in those with very slow endogenous elimination secondary to genetic polymorphisms.

  6. [Advances in tumor-therapy using genetically modified Salmonella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kang; Zhao, Xinxin; Yi, Jie; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2016-05-25

    Tumor is a neoplasm formed by the abnormal proliferation of local tissue cells under the effects of different tumorigenic factors. Tumor-therapy has always been a difficult clinical issue, while regular cancer treatments, such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery, have obvious limitations. Earlier studies have shown that some obligate anaerobes or facultative anaerobes have anti-tumor effects, for example, Salmonella typhymurium as facultative anaerobic bacteria can selectively colonize tumors and inhibit their growth. Besides, Salmonella has many advantages in tumor-therapy. In the past decade or two, many researchers have carried out genetic manipulation to attenuate the virulence of Salmonella, to improve their specificity of tumor colonization and specially to use attenuated Salmonella as carriers to deliver a variety of anti-tumor therapeutic molecules, and these genetically modified Salmonella have shown good anti-tumor effects in many animal experiments. Along with further research of Salmonella-mediated antitumor treatment, applications of genetically modified Salmonella for more effective tumor-therapy are promising. We reviewed the anti-tumor mechanisms of Salmonella, the research progress in tumor-therapy using genetically modified Salmonella, and current problems and possible solutions.

  7. Genetic polymorphism of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Indonesian fat-tailed sheep (IFTS) is a local sheep that has been long time raised and well adapted to the extreme environments of Lombok Island. The present study was conducted to determine the polymorphism of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B (BMPR-1B) gene and its association with litter size in the IFTS ...

  8. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atotal of 222 acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention treated with clopidogrel were enrolled from September 2012 to June 2013. Residual platelet aggregations for all patients were measured by the Verify Now P2Y12 system. Sixteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms among nine ...

  9. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in inflammatory…

  10. Genetic polymorphism in FOXP3 gene: imbalance in regulatory T ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-02

    Apr 2, 2013 ... (van der Vliet and Nieuwenhuis 2007), type 1 diabetes (T1D). (Bassuny et al. 2003) and autoimmune thyroid diseases (Ban et al. 2007). In this context, FOXP3 polymorphisms that occur with high frequency in the general population have been studied in common multifactorial human diseases, and some of ...

  11. Analysis of three genetic polymorphisms in Malaysian essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... In addition, a large study of 933 Hong Kong Chinese with various aspects of the metabolic syndrome, the ... gene and C825T polymorphism of GNβ3 gene in Malay- sian essential hypertensive and type 2 ... Socio-demographic factors were assessed by both Malay and. English language questionnaires.

  12. Homocysteine and Stroke Risk: Modifying Effect of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism and Folic Acid Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Wang, Xiaobin; He, Mingli; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Huo, Yong; Li, Jianping; Fu, Jia; Huang, Xiao; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Wang, Binyan; Hou, Fan Fan; Sun, Ningling; Cai, Yefeng

    2017-05-01

    Elevated blood homocysteine concentration increases the risk of stroke, especially among hypertensive individuals. Homocysteine is largely affected by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and folate status. Among hypertensive patients, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the association between homocysteine and stroke can be modified by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and folic acid intervention. We analyzed the data of 20 424 hypertensive adults enrolled in the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. The participants, first stratified by methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, were randomly assigned to receive double-blind treatments of 10-mg enalapril and 0.8-mg folic acid or 10-mg enalapril only. The participants were followed up for a median of 4.5 years. In the control group, baseline log-transformed homocysteine was associated with an increased risk of first stroke among participants with the CC/CT genotype (hazard ratio, 3.1; 1.1-9.2), but not among participants with the TT genotype (hazard ratio, 0.7; 0.2-2.1), indicating a significant gene-homocysteine interaction ( P =0.008). In the folic acid intervention group, homocysteine showed no significant effect on stroke regardless of genotype. Consistently, folic acid intervention significantly reduced stroke risk in participants with CC/CT genotypes and high homocysteine levels (tertile 3; hazard ratio, 0.73; 0.55-0.97). In Chinese hypertensive patients, the effect of homocysteine on the first stroke was significantly modified by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype and folic acid supplementation. Such information may help to more precisely predict stroke risk and develop folic acid interventions tailored to individual genetic background and nutritional status. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00794885. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Associations of renin-angiotensin system genetic polymorphisms and clinical course after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; Tubbs, R Shane; Foreman, Paul M; Chua, Michelle H; Vyas, Nilesh A; Lipsky, Robert H; Lin, Mingkuan; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Haridas, Rishikesh; Walters, Beverly C; Chaudry, Salman; Malieva, Aisana; Wilkins, Samantha; Harrigan, Mark R; Fisher, Winfield S; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genetic polymorphisms are thought to play a role in cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture. The Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System (CARAS) study prospectively evaluated associations of common RAS polymorphisms and clinical course after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). METHODS The CARAS study prospectively enrolled aSAH patients at 2 academic centers in the United States. A blood sample was obtained from all patients for genetic evaluation and measurement of plasma angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) concentration. Common RAS polymorphisms were detected using 5'exonuclease genotyping assays and pyrosequencing. Analysis of associations of RAS polymorphisms and clinical course after aSAH were performed. RESULTS A total of 166 patients were screened, and 149 aSAH patients were included for analysis. A recessive effect of allele I (insertion) of the ACE I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism was identified for Hunt and Hess grade in all patients (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.17-6.50; p = 0.0206) with subsequent poor functional outcome. There was a similar effect on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients 55 years or younger (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.04-12.7; p = 0.0439). In patients older than 55 years, there was a recessive effect of allele A of the angiotensin II receptor Type 2 (AT2) A/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on DCI (OR 4.70, 95% CI 1.43-15.4; p = 0.0111). CONCLUSIONS Both the ACE I/D polymorphism and the AT2 A/C single nucleotide polymorphism were associated with an age-dependent risk of delayed cerebral ischemia, whereas only the ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with poor clinical grade at presentation. Further studies are required to elucidate the relevant pathophysiology and its potential implication in the treatment of patients with aSAH.

  14. Genetic Diversity Revealed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Luo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid wheat. Genetic structure was greatly impacted by multiple factors, such as environmental conditions, breeding methods reflected by release periods of varieties, and gene flows via human activities. A loss of genetic diversity was observed from landraces and old cultivars to the modern cultivars released during periods of the Early Green Revolution, but an increase in cultivars released during the Post Green Revolution. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity among the 10 mega ecogeographical regions indicated that South America, North America, and Europe possessed the richest genetic variability, while the Middle East showed moderate levels of genetic diversity.

  15. Use of genetically modified viruses and genetically engineered virus-vector vaccines: environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivian S W

    2006-11-01

    Despite major therapeutic advances, infectious diseases remain highly problematic. Recent advancements in technology in producing DNA-based vaccines, together with the growing knowledge of the immune system, have provided new insights into the identification of the epitopes needed to target the development of highly targeted vaccines. Genetically modified (GM) viruses and genetically engineered virus-vector vaccines possess significant unpredictability and a number of inherent harmful potential hazards. For all these vaccines, safety assessment concerning unintended and unwanted side effects with regard to targeted vaccinees has always been the main focus. Important questions concerning effects on nontargeted individuals within the same species or other species remain unknown. Horizontal transfer of genes, though lacking supportive experimental or epidemiological investigations, is well established. New hybrid virus progenies resulting from genetic recombination between genetically engineered vaccine viruses and their naturally occurring relatives may possess totally unpredictable characteristics with regard to host preferences and disease-causing potentials. Furthermore, when genetically modified or engineered virus particles break down in the environment, their nuclei acids are released. Appropriate risk management is the key to minimizing any potential risks to humans and environment resulting from the use of these GM vaccines. There is inadequate knowledge to define either the probability of unintended events or the consequences of genetic modifications. The objective of this article is to highlight the limitations in environmental risk assessment and raise awareness of the potential risks involving the use of genetically modified viruses and genetically engineered virus-vector vaccines.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change--the DiOGenes study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Huaidong; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2011-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects.......Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects....

  17. Mediterranean Dietary Pattern Adherence Modify the Association between FTO Genetic Variations and Obesity Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Hosseini-Esfahani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest of which dietary patterns can modify the association of fat mass and obesity associated (FTO variants with obesity. This study was aimed at investigating the interaction of the Mediterranean dietary pattern (Med Diet with FTO polymorphisms in relation to obesity phenotypes. Subjects of this nested case-control study were selected from the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study participants. Each case was individually matched with a normal weight control (n = 1254. Selected polymorphisms (rs1421085, rs1121980, rs17817449, rs8050136, rs9939973, and rs3751812 were genotyped. Genetic risk score (GRS were calculated using the weighted method. The Mediterranean dietary score (MDS was computed. Individuals with minor allele carriers of rs9939973, rs8050136, rs1781749, and rs3751812 had lower risk of obesity when they had higher MDS, compared to wild-type homozygote genotype carriers. The obesity risk was decreased across quartiles of MDS in participants with high GRS (OR: 1, 0.8, 0.79, 0.67 compared to individuals with low GRS (OR: 1.33, 1.06, 0.97, 1.12 (Pinteraction < 0.05. No significant interaction between the GRS and MDS on abdominal obesity was found. A higher Med Diet adherence was associated with lower obesity risk in subjects with more genetic predisposition to obesity, compared to those with lower adherence to the Med Diet and lower GRS.

  18. Guidance on the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartsch, Detlef; Chueca, Cristina; De-Schrijver, Adinda

    relatives, including plant-to-plant gene transfer ; (2) plant-to-micro-organism gene transfer; (3) interaction of the GM plant with target organisms and (4) interaction of the GM plant with non-target organisms, including criteria for selection of appropriate species and relevant functional groups for risk......This document provides guidance for the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified (GM) plants submitted within the framework of Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003 on GM food and feed or under Directive 2001/18/EC on the deliberate release into the environment of genetically modified...... organisms (GMOs). This document provides guidance for assessing potential effects of GM plants on the environment and the rationales for the data requirements for a comprehensive ERA of GM plants. The ERA should be carried out on a case-by-case basis, following a step-by-step assessment approach...

  19. Detection of genetically modified organisms by electrochemiluminescence PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Zhu, Debin

    2004-10-15

    With the development of biotechnology, more and more genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have entered commercial market. Because of the safety concerns, detection and characterization of GMOs have attracted much attention recently. In this study, electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction (ECL-PCR) combined with hybridization technique was applied to detect the GMOs in genetically modified (GM) soybeans and papayas for the first time. Whether the soybeans and the papayas contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM soybeans and papayas. The technique may provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its simplicity and high efficiency.

  20. Discrimination of genetically modified sugar beets based on terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Li, Zhi; Yin, Xianhua; Hu, Fangrong; Hu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to apply terahertz (THz) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics techniques for discrimination of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM sugar beets. In this paper, the THz spectra of 84 sugar beet samples (36 GM sugar beets and 48 non-GM ones) were obtained by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.2 THz. Three chemometrics methods, principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS), were employed to classify sugar beet samples into two groups: genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The DPLS method yielded the best classification result, and the percentages of successful classification for GM and non-GM sugar beets were both 100%. Results of the present study demonstrate the usefulness of THz spectroscopy together with chemometrics methods as a powerful tool to distinguish GM and non-GM sugar beets.

  1. Regulatory science requirements of labeling of genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghissi, A Alan; Jaeger, Lisa M; Shafei, Dania; Bloom, Lindsey L

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the evolution of food labeling in the USA. It briefly describes the three phases of agricultural development consisting of naturally occurring, cross-bred, and genetically engineered, edited or modified crops, otherwise known as Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO). It uses the Best Available Regulatory Science (BARS) and Metrics for Evaluation of Regulatory Science Claims (MERSC) to evaluate the scientific validity of claims applicable to GMO and the Best Available Public Information (BAPI) to evaluate the pronouncements by public media and others. Subsequently claims on health risk, ecological risk, consumer choice, and corporate greed are evaluated based on BARS/MERSC and BAPI. The paper concludes by suggesting that labeling of food containing GMO should consider the consumer's choice, such as the food used by those who desire kosher and halal food. Furthermore, the consumer choice is already met by the exclusion of GMO in organic food.

  2. Acceptability of genetically modified cheese presented as real product alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Ueland, Øydis

    2002-01-01

    European consumers, in general, have negative attitudes towards the use of gene technology in food production. The objective of this study was to examine whether taste and health benefits influence the acceptability of genetically modified (gm) products when they are presented as real product....... Labelling decreased consumers' intentions to buy the originally preferred gm-labelled cheese, but still the intentions were at the same level with the conventionally labelled buy gm cheese could best be explained by respondents' attitudes towards gene technology and perceived taste benefits. General health...... alternatives. Consumers in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden (n=738) assessed two cheeses: one was labelled as genetically modified (preferred in an earlier product test) and the other as conventional (neutral in an ealier product test). A smaller control group received two cheeses with blind codes...

  3. Will Genetically Modified Canola be Adopted in WA?

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Bronwyn; Pluske, Johanna M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite approval being given by the Gene Technology Regulator to plant genetically modified (GM) canola varieties in Australia, the question as to whether farmers would be prepared to grow GM canola is still being explored. The purpose of this paper is to establish not only if producers would grow GM canola in south Western Australia but how they make this decision. Results from a survey aimed at canola producers found that adoption of GM canola will ultimately depend upon price premiums for ...

  4. GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TRADE POLICY EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    George Frisvold; Jeanne Reeves

    2015-01-01

    Where approved, producers have adopted genetically modified (GM) crops extensively. Yet, areas not adopting GM crops account for large shares of production and consumption. GM crops differ from previous agricultural innovations because consumers may perceive them as fundamentally different from (and potentially inferior to) conventionally grown crops. Many countries maintain restrictions on production and importation of GM crops. GM crop adoption affects producers and consumers, not only thro...

  5. Global Status of Genetically Modified Crops: Current Trends and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Hautea, Randy A.

    2002-01-01

    Modern biotechnology-facilitated crop improvement is undoubtedly one of the most significant technological developments in agriculture. The first wave of genetically-modified (GM) or transgenic crops include cultivars with important input traits such as herbicide tolerance and insect resistance. Future products are expected to provide benefits that could include tolerance to environmental stresses and enhanced nutritional content, which can be particularly valuable in crops that are important...

  6. A survey of genetically modified maize in the Portuguese market

    OpenAIRE

    Mafra, I.; Amaral, J.S.; Costa, J.; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the development of biotechnology has revolutionised agriculture by the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMO) with characteristics of agronomic interest. Despite the controversies surrounding GMO, the production of transgenic crops is increasing, especially in developing countries [1]. Maize, the second most important GM crop, has the highest number of authorised transgenic events for food and feed in EU. Since the GMO entered the food chain, the EU has d...

  7. Stakeholders' Attitude to Genetically Modified Foods and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Latifah; Md Jahi, Jamaluddin; Md Nor, Abd Rahim

    2013-01-01

    Public acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods has to be adequately addressed in order for their potential economic and social benefits to be realized. The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of the Malaysian public toward GM foods (GM soybean and GM palm oil) and GM medicine (GM insulin). A survey was carried out using self-constructed multidimensional instrument measuring attitudes towards GM products. The respondents (n = 1017) were stratified according to stakeholders'...

  8. Rejecting New Technology: The Case of Genetically Modified Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Derek Berwald; Colin A. Carter; Guillaume P. Gruère

    2006-01-01

    Canada has stringent regulations covering the release of new wheat varieties, but the United States has virtually no regulations in this area. Monsanto Co. developed genetically modified (GM) spring wheat for North America, and made a commitment to the U.S. industry to release this new technology simultaneously in both Canada and the United States, or not at all. The Canadian regulatory bias against new varieties acted as a veto against GM wheat and caused Monsanto to shelve the technology in...

  9. A particular case of novel food: Genetically modified organisms

    OpenAIRE

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The rapid progress of recombinant DNA technology has opened up new prospects in the development of novel foods and food ingredients, including those containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). These new transgenic products have brought about a considerable demand for analytical methods able to detect, characterize, and/or quantify GMOs along the food chain. The current status and future challenges in the development, characterization, and detection of GMOs in foods are discussed in this...

  10. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: CONSUMERS' ATTITUDES AND LABELING ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Veeman, Michele M.; Adamowicz, Wiktor L.

    2004-01-01

    Consumers' attitudes to genetically modified (GM) food ingredients and their reactions to and preferences for labeling of GM food are topical issues for Canadian food policy and are the subjects of this study. This project included several components. The first of these was an assessment of public attitudes to biotechnology and to GM food based on evidence from polls and other studies. These show increasing awareness and some increase in wariness of GM food, in Canada and elsewhere. In the se...

  11. Genetically modified products from feed in livers of broilers

    OpenAIRE

    BUCKOVÁ, Pavlína

    2008-01-01

    Aim of this thesis is to manage detection of genetically modified products (GMP) from feed in liver of chicken, which diet contained GMP feed. Two GMO crops were used for feed, insect-resistant Bt-maize and herbicide - tolerant Roundup Ready soybean . Both crops are important components of chicken feed. The detection will be practise by molecular biological methods. The possible dangers for consument should by evaluated in conclusion.

  12. Genetic Polymorphism at Acaca Locus and Its Relationship With Productive Performances in Ettawa Crossbred Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucik Maylinda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research with aim to estimate genetic polymorphism at ACACA (Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase locus in Ettawa Crossbred goat wan its relationship with production traits was done at goat population in Batu, Lawang and Ampel Gading. 46 female goats were taken it’s blood sample to isolate the DNA and continue with PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction and RFLP (Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism. PCR was used to amplify ACACA gene fragment in intron 3’ about 200 bp with primer F : 5’ – AGT GTA GAA GGG ACA GCC CAG C – 3’ and R : 5’ – GTG GAA TGA CAC ATG GAG AGG G – 3’; RFLP was used to test mutation of that fragment in particular place (point using restriction enzyme RSA1. Variables were alelles and genotypes composition in population, milk and fat content, and birth weight of kid. Result showed that (a genetic polymorphism at locus ACACA in three location was high that is 44,22 %, with allele frequency of G (p = 33 % and allele T (q = 67 %; (b no relationship between the high polymorphism with productive performance of goat in fat and protein content, and birth weight of kid. It was concluded that in goat population there was a high polymorphism at ACACA gene, and that polymorphism was not related to production.

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic Mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that recently have revolutionized human, mouse, and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila by using a sequence tagged site-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that sp...

  14. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Michaela; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies. PMID:26035842

  15. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Sharpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  16. Paraoxonase1 Genetic Polymorphisms in a Mixed Ancestry African Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Macharia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase 1 (PON1 activity is markedly influenced by coding polymorphisms, Q/R at position 192 and M/L at position 55 of the PON1 gene. We investigated the frequencies of these polymorphisms and their effects on PON1 and antioxidant activities in 844 South African mixed ancestry individuals. Genotyping was done using allele-specific TaqMan technology, PON1 activities were measured using paraoxon and phenylacetate, oxidative status was determined by measuring the antioxidant activities of ferric reducing antioxidant power and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation markers included malondialdehyde and oxidized LDL. The frequencies of Q192R and L55M were 47.6% and 28.8%, respectively, and the most common corresponding alleles were 192R (60.4% and 55M (82.6%. The Q192 was significantly associated with 5.8 units’ increase in PON1 concentration and 15.4 units’ decrease in PONase activity after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and diabetes, with suggestion of differential effects by diabetes status. The PON1 L55 variant was associated with none of the measured indices. In conclusion, we have shown that the Q192R polymorphism is a determinant of both PON1 concentration and activity and this association appeared to be enhanced in subjects with diabetes.

  17. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2017-09-12

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  18. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2016-08-09

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  19. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  20. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2014-01-07

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  1. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-05-14

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  2. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  3. The Case of the "Tainted" Taco Shells: A Case Study on Genetically Modified Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann T. S.

    2004-01-01

    This case study introduces students to the use of genetically modified foods. Students learn how genetically modified plants are made, and then they read primary literature papers to evaluate the environmental, economic, and health issues. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Detection and traceability of genetically modified organisms in the food production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miraglia, M.; Berdal, K.G.; Brera, C.; Corbisier, P.; Holst - Jensen, A.; Kok, E.J.; Marvin, H.J.P.; Schimmel, H.; Rentsch, J.; Rie, van J.P.P.F.; Zagon, J.

    2004-01-01

    Both labelling and traceability of genetically modified organisms are current issues that are considered in trade and regulation. Currently, labelling of genetically modified foods containing detectable transgenic material is required by EU legislation. A proposed package of legislation would extend

  5. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    After more than 50 years of treating Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA, there are still no guidelines on setting the optimal dose for a given patient. The dopamine transporter type 1, now known as solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 3 (SLC6A3) is the most powerful determinant of dopamine neurotransmission and might therefore influence the treatment response. We recently demonstrated that methylphenidate (a dopamine transporter inhibitor) is effective in patients with Parkinson's disease with motor and gait disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether genetic variants of the dopamine transporter type 1-encoding gene (SLC6A3) are associated with differences in the response to treatment of motor symptoms and gait disorders with l-DOPA and methylphenidate (with respect to the demographic, the disease and the treatment parameters and the other genes involved in the dopaminergic neurotransmission). This analysis was part of a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease (Protocol ID:2008-005801-20; ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00914095). We scored the motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Stand-Walk-Sit Test before and after a standardized acute l-DOPA challenge before randomization and then after 3 months of methylphenidate treatment. Patients were screened for variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism: rs28363170 and rs3836790 polymorphisms in the SLC6A3 gene, rs921451 and rs3837091 in the DDC gene (encoding the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase involved in the synthesis of dopamine from l-DOPA), rs1799836 in the MAOB gene (coding for monoamine oxidase B) and rs4680 in the COMT gene (coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase). Investigators and patients were blinded to the genotyping data throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects were genotyped and 61 were analysed for their acute motor response to l-DOPA. The SLC6A3

  6. Application of sequence-related amplified polymorphism to genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (2001). It has been effective for genetic analysis in different species (Li and Quiros 2001; Song et al. 2010; Soleimani et al. 2012). In the present study, SRAP markers were used to investigate genetic diversity and population structure within and among six natural populations of L. sinense, which could provide further insight ...

  7. Application of sequence-related amplified polymorphism to genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Locations of six populations of L. sinense in China. BZ,. Binzhou; QD, Qingdao; BH, Binhai; SY, Sheyang; DF, Dafeng; JX,. Jiaxing. are selfincompatible (Baker 1966; Palop-Esteban et al. 2011), which is an important factor in maintaining the high genetic variability of species (Eduardo et al. 2001). Genetic distances and ...

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for genetic studies of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many wild animal species lack informative genetic markers for analysing genetic variation and structure, which is essential for effective long term conservation and management. We present heterologous microsatellite markers in six Tanzanian antelope species including: grant's gazelle, hartebeest, eland, roan, impala and ...

  9. Functional characterization of genetic polymorphisms identified in the promoter region of the bovine PEPS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhihua; Zheng, Xue; Huang, Jinming; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianbin; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2012-06-01

    Peptidase S (PEPS) is a metallopeptidase that cleaves N-terminal residues from proteins and peptides. PEPS is used as a cell maintenance enzyme with critical roles in peptide turnover. The promoter region located upstream of the initiation site plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Polymorphism in the promoter region can alter gene expression and lead to biological changes. In the current study, polymorphisms in the promoter region of the PEPS gene were investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods were used to screen sequence variations in the promoter region of DNA samples from 743 Chinese Holstein cattle. Two polymorphisms (g. -534 T>C and g. -2545 G>A) were identified and eight haplotypes were classified by haplotype analysis. The two genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes were associated with fat percentage and somatic cell score in Chinese Holstein cattle. The results of real-time PCR showed that cow kidneys exhibit the highest PEPS expression level. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the single-nucleotide polymorphism g. -534 T>C is located in the core promoter region and in the transcription factor binding sites. The promoter activities of the polymorphism of -543 T>C were measured by luciferase assay in the human kidney epithelial cell line 293T. Transcriptional activity is significantly lower in cell lines transfected with the reporter construct containing 2.5 kb upstream fragments with -543 C than in those with wild-type -543 T. The results indicated that genetic variation at locus -543 influences PEPS promoter activity. The genetic variation in the promoter region of PEPS gene may regulate PEPS gene transcription and might have consequences at a regulatory level.

  10. Genetic diversity and relationship of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X Y; Zhang, X Q; Bai, S Q; Huang, L K; Luo, X M; Ji, Y; Jiang, L F

    2014-09-26

    Chicory is a crop with economically important roles and is cultivated worldwide. The genetic diversity and relationship of 80 accessions of chicories and endives were evaluated by sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers to provide a theoretical basis for future breeding programs in China. The polymorphic rate was 96.83%, and the average polymorphic information content was 0.323, suggesting the rich genetic diversity of chicory. The genetic diversity degree of chicory was higher (GS = 0.677) than that of endive (GS = 0.701). The accessions with the highest genetic diversity (effective number of alleles, NE = 1.609; Nei's genetic diversity, H = 0.372; Shannon information index, I = 0.556) were from Italy. The richest genetic diversity was revealed in a chicory line (NE = 1.478, H = 0.289, I = 0.443) among the 3 types (line, wild, and cultivar). The chicory genetic structure of 8 geographical groups showed that the genetic differentiation coefficient (GST) was 14.20% and the number of immigrants per generation (Nm) was 3.020. A GST of 6.80% and an Nm of 6.853 were obtained from different types. This observation suggests that these chicory lines, especially those from the Mediterranean region, have potential for providing rich genetic resources for further breeding programs, that the chicory genetic structure among different countries obviously differs with a certain amount of gene flow, and that SRAP markers could be applied to analyze genetic relationships and classifications of Cichorium intybus and C. endivia.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Nor Bahirah; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Ibrahim, Luqman; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2016-01-01

    Generally, obese and overweight individuals display higher free fatty acid levels, which stimulate insulin resistance. The combination of overweight or obesity with insulin resistance can trigger Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are primary contributing factors to the development of uncontrolled T2DM. Genetic polymorphisms also play an important role as they can impact a population's susceptibility to becoming overweight or obese and developing related chronic complications, such as uncontrolled T2DM. This review specifically examines the genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in patients with uncontrolled T2DM. Particularly, gene polymorphisms in ADIPOQ (rs1501299 and rs17300539), LepR (rs1137101 and rs1045895), IRS2 (rs1805092), GRB14 (rs10195252 and rs3923113) and PPARG (rs1801282) have been associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled T2DM.

  12. Spatiotemporal patterns of non-genetically modified crops in the era of expansion of genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Wu, Wenbin; Tang, Huajun; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-09-18

    Despite heated debates over the safety of genetically modified (GM) food, GM crops have been expanding rapidly. Much research has focused on the expansion of GM crops. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of non-genetically modified (non-GM) crops are not clear, although they may have significant environmental and agronomic impacts and important policy implications. To understand the dynamics of non-GM crops and to inform the debates among relevant stakeholders, we conducted spatiotemporal analyses of China's major non-GM soybean production region, the Heilongjiang Province. Even though the total soybean planting area decreased from 2005 to 2010, surprisingly, there were hotspots of increase. The results also showed hotspots of loss as well as a large decline in the number and continuity of soybean plots. Since China is the largest non-GM soybean producer in the world, the decline of its major production region may signal the continual decline of global non-GM soybeans.

  13. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize ...

  14. Genetic analysis of glucosinolate variability in broccoli florets using genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allan F; Yousef, Gad G; Reid, Robert W; Chebrolu, Kranthi K; Thomas, Aswathy; Krueger, Christopher; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Jackson, Eric; Juvik, John A

    2015-07-01

    The identification of genetic factors influencing the accumulation of individual glucosinolates in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of glucosinolate levels in Brassica vegetables and will accelerate the development of vegetables with glucosinolate profiles tailored to promote human health. Quantitative trait loci analysis of glucosinolate (GSL) variability was conducted with a B. oleracea (broccoli) mapping population, saturated with single nucleotide polymorphism markers from a high-density array designed for rapeseed (Brassica napus). In 4 years of analysis, 14 QTLs were associated with the accumulation of aliphatic, indolic, or aromatic GSLs in floret tissue. The accumulation of 3-carbon aliphatic GSLs (2-propenyl and 3-methylsulfinylpropyl) was primarily associated with a single QTL on C05, but common regulation of 4-carbon aliphatic GSLs was not observed. A single locus on C09, associated with up to 40 % of the phenotypic variability of 2-hydroxy-3-butenyl GSL over multiple years, was not associated with the variability of precursor compounds. Similarly, QTLs on C02, C04, and C09 were associated with 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GSL concentration over multiple years but were not significantly associated with downstream compounds. Genome-specific SNP markers were used to identify candidate genes that co-localized to marker intervals and previously sequenced Brassica oleracea BAC clones containing known GSL genes (GSL-ALK, GSL-PRO, and GSL-ELONG) were aligned to the genomic sequence, providing support that at least three of our 14 QTLs likely correspond to previously identified GSL loci. The results demonstrate that previously identified loci do not fully explain GSL variation in broccoli. The identification of additional genetic factors influencing the accumulation of GSL in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of GSL levels in Brassicaceae and will accelerate development of vegetables with modified or enhanced GSL

  15. Genetic polymorphism of CSN1S2 in South African dairy goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rulien

    2016-12-24

    Dec 24, 2016 ... useful for improved cheese making. The aim of this study was to investigate the polymorphism and genetic variation of CSN1S2 in South African dairy goats, using DNA sequencing technology. Sixty dairy goats (20. Saanes, 20 British Alpine, and 20 Toggenburg) and 20 meat-type goats were sequenced ...

  16. Genetic polymorphism of CSN1S2 in South African dairy goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymorphism and genetic variation of CSN1S2 in South African dairy goats, using DNA sequencing technology. Sixty dairy goats (20 Saanes, 20 British Alpine, and 20 Toggenburg) and 20 meat-type goats were sequenced with four primers to distinguish among the seven known ...

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of T-1131C APOA5 and ALOX5AP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ischaemic stroke is a multifactorial disease. Genetic polymorphisms involved in lipid, inflammatory and thromboticmetabolisms play an important role in the development of ischaemic stroke. The present study aimed to assess the relationshipbetweenT1131C APOA5andSG13S114 ALOX5APpolymorphisms and the risk of ...

  18. Genotyping and genetic diversity of Arcobacter butzleri by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Atabay, H.I.; Amisu, K.O.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the potential of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiling for genotyping Arcobacter butzleri and to obtain further data on the genetic diversity of this organism. Methods and Results: Seventy-three isolates of Danish, British, Turkish, Swedish, Nigerian and Nor...

  19. Differential diagnosis of genetic disease by DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, P. A.; Defesche, J. C.; van der Helm, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) are used for diagnosis of genetic disease in families known to be affected by specific disorders, but RFLPs can be also useful for the differential diagnosis of hereditary disease. An RFLP pattern represents the inheritance of chromosomal markers

  20. Genetic predisposition of IL-10 promoter polymorphisms with risk of multiple sclerosis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, V; Akram Husain, R S; Ahmed, Shiek Ssj

    2017-05-15

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a anti-inflammatory cytokine, which controls inflammation by inhibiting the synthesis of several cytokines produced by Th1 cells and macrophages. The association between Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphisms with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains inconclusive. In this study, a meta-analysis has been performed to assess the relationship between IL-10 gene polymorphisms rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 with the risk of MS. Nine case-control studies were selected involving 2755 participants. The association between the polymorphisms and MS was examined by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in allelic, homozygote, heterozygote, dominant and recessive genetic models. Of analyzed genetic models, the pooled ORs and CIs of each SNPs calculated based on random (I 2 >50) or fixed effects (I 2 0.05) of genetic predisposition with MS susceptibility across Asian and Caucasian populations. In addition, assessment based on funnel plot and Egger's linear regression test suggests no publication bias in all analyzed genetic models. Overall, our results demonstrated that rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 polymorphisms may not be the risk factor for the development of MS in both the populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Detection of the genetically modified organisms in genetically modified soybean and maize by polymerase chain reaction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Deqian; Mu, Weipeng; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2002-06-01

    A method for the detection of the (genetically modified organism GMOs) in genetically modified soybean (Round-up Ready soybean, RR soybean) and maize(Bt-176 maize) is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is discussed with the genetically modified soybean and maize whose contents are known. The detection limit can be 0.1%, that is to say, we can detect the GMO in the food whose content is only 0.1%, the detection method is just a screening method. The procedure includes: (1) extraction of genomic DNA of maize and soybean, (2) amplification of the inserted genes, CaMV35S promoter and the NOS terminator inserted by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, (3) amplification of the specific genes of maize and soybean in order to determine that the samples are maize and soybean, (4) characterization and confirmation of the PCR products by restriction enzyme analysis and the electrophoresis on agarose gel. The RR soybean contains CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator, and the Bt-176 maize contains only CaMV35S promoter. Due to the high content of the starch in maize, the effect of the electrophororesis is not so good as of the soybean's.

  2. Current perspectives on genetically modified crops and detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamle, Madhu; Kumar, Pradeep; Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Bajpai, Vivek K

    2017-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are the fastest adopted commodities in the agribiotech industry. This market penetration should provide a sustainable basis for ensuring food supply for growing global populations. The successful completion of two decades of commercial GM crop production (1996-2015) is underscored by the increasing rate of adoption of genetic engineering technology by farmers worldwide. With the advent of introduction of multiple traits stacked together in GM crops for combined herbicide tolerance, insect resistance, drought tolerance or disease resistance, the requirement of reliable and sensitive detection methods for tracing and labeling genetically modified organisms in the food/feed chain has become increasingly important. In addition, several countries have established threshold levels for GM content which trigger legally binding labeling schemes. The labeling of GM crops is mandatory in many countries (such as China, EU, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Korea, Chile, Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand), whereas in Canada, Hong Kong, USA, South Africa, and Argentina voluntary labeling schemes operate. The rapid adoption of GM crops has increased controversies, and mitigating these issues pertaining to the implementation of effective regulatory measures for the detection of GM crops is essential. DNA-based detection methods have been successfully employed, while the whole genome sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provides an advanced means for detecting genetically modified organisms and foods/feeds in GM crops. This review article describes the current status of GM crop commercialization and discusses the benefits and shortcomings of common and advanced detection systems for GMs in foods and animal feeds.

  3. The Analysis of Genetic Polymorphism. The Relationship between Interleukin – 4 Polymorphisms and Intraepithelial Cervical Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin STAMATIAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Interleukin 4 plays a critical role in T helper 2 responses to HPV infection and angiogenesis. The present study aim to study the association between the IL4 promoter polymorphism – 590 C>T, respectively VNTR intron 2 polymorphism and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Material and method: We have realized a prospective case controls study that included 128 cases of intraepithelial neoplasia positive for HPV HR testing and 111 controls negative for intraepithelial lesion and also negative for HPV HR. Clinical examination was performed on each patient; blood and cervical sample were obtained. Cervical probes were analyzed regarding cytology and HPV HR testing. From peripheral blood DNA sample was obtain followed by genotype analysis for IL4 -590 C>T using PCR RFLP, respectively IL4 70 bp VNTR determined by PCR. Results: The absolute frequency of genotypes for IL4 -590 C>T was T/T-5, C/T-42, C/C-81 in the cases group respectively T/T-2, C/T-32, C/C-77 in the control group. The chi-square test had a value of 0.983 (p=0.321 while considering the presence of a minimum one single variant allele as a risk factor for cervical cancer, respectively 0.926 (p=0.336 for homozygous variant genotype. Odds ratio was 0.761 (95%CI [0.443-1.306] while considering C/T+T/T respectively 2R/3R, 2R/2R as a risk factor, and 0.451 (95%CI 95% [0.086-2.374] - TT respectively 2R/2R as a risk factor. Conclusion: No linear statistical significant association has been found between IL4 polymorphism and cervical neoplasia (p = 0.322.

  4. Genetic Evidence for Modifying Oceanic Boundaries Relative to Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Gerhard P; Taylor, Diana A; N'Yeurt, Antoine D R; Tyagi, Anand; Tiwari, Geetanjali; Redd, Alan J

    2016-07-01

    We present the most comprehensive genetic characterization to date of five Fijian island populations: Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Kadavu, the Lau Islands, and Rotuma, including nonrecombinant Y (NRY) chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and haplogroups. As a whole, Fijians are genetically intermediate between Melanesians and Polynesians, but the individual Fijian island populations exhibit significant genetic structure reflecting different settlement experiences in which the Rotumans and the Lau Islanders were more influenced by Polynesians, and the other Fijian island populations were more influenced by Melanesians. In particular, Rotuman and Lau Islander NRY chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroup frequencies and Rotuman mtDNA hypervariable segment 1 region haplotypes more closely resemble those of Polynesians, while genetic markers of the other populations more closely resemble those of the Near Oceanic Melanesians. Our findings provide genetic evidence supportive of modifying regional boundaries relative to Fiji, as has been suggested by others based on a variety of nongenetic evidence. Specifically, for the traditional Melanesia/Polynesia/Micronesia scheme, our findings support moving the Melanesia-Polynesia boundary to include Rotuma and the Lau Islands in Polynesia. For the newer Near/Remote Oceania scheme, our findings support keeping Rotuma and the Lau Islands in Remote Oceania and locating the other Fijian island populations in an intermediate or "Central Oceania" region to better reflect the great diversity of Oceania.

  5. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of PPAR gamma, arsenic methylation capacity and breast cancer risk in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Belmontes, Cristina P; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Hernández-Alcaraz, César; Cebrián, Mariano E; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether the presence of polymorphisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma PPARγ (Pro 1 2Ala) and PPARGC1B (Ala203Pro) modifies the association between the inorganic arsenic (iAs) methylation capacity and breast cancer (BC). Mexican women were interviewed, and blood and urine samples were collected from them (cases/controls= 197/220). The concentration of urinary arsenic species and the polymorphisms of interest were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. In women with a high %MMA (urinary monomethyl arsenic) and high primary methylation ratio (PM = MMA/iAs), the risk of BC was increased (odds ratio [OR]%MMA T3 vs.T1= 3.60: 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02-6.41, ORPMI T3 vs.T1= 3.47: 95%CI 1.95-6.17), which was maintained after adjusting for polymorphisms. No significant interactions were observed between the polymorphisms and the arsenic variables on the risk of BC. Pro 12Ala and Ala203Pro polymorphisms did not modify the association between the iAs methylation capacity and BC.

  7. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs.

  8. Automated DNA extraction from genetically modified maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroyuki; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-18

    A novel, automated system, PNE-1080, equipped with eight automated pestle units and a spectrophotometer was developed for genomic DNA extraction from maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). The use of aminosilane-modified BMPs allowed highly accurate DNA recovery. The (A(260)-A(320)):(A(280)-A(320)) ratio of the extracted DNA was 1.9+/-0.1. The DNA quality was sufficiently pure for PCR analysis. The PNE-1080 offered rapid assay completion (30 min) with high accuracy. Furthermore, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that our proposed method permitted the accurate determination of genetically modified DNA composition and correlated well with results obtained by conventional cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based methods.

  9. Analysis of genetic diversity identified by amplified fragment length polymorphism marker in hybrid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, M; Qidi, Z; Gaisheng, Z; Na, N; Huiyan, Z; Qunzhu, W

    2015-08-07

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism markers were used to assess genetic diversity in 10 male sterile wheat crop lines (hetero-cytoplasm with the same nucleus) in relation to a restorer wheat line. These male sterile lines were evaluated using 64 amplified fragment length polymorphism primer combinations, and 13 primers produced polymorphic bands, generating a total 682 fragments. Of the 682 fragments, 113 were polymorphic. The polymorphic information content and marker index values demonstrated the utility of the primer combinations used in the present study. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean and principal coordinate analysis of the genotypic data revealed clustering of accessions based on genetic relationships, and accessions were separated into 2 groups with their restorer line. Jaccard's similarity coefficient values suggested good variability among the male sterile lines, indicating their utility in breeding programs. The fallouts of analysis of molecular variance showed large within-group population variation, accounting for 77% of variation, while among-group comparison accounted for 23% of the total molecular variation, which was statistically significant. The molecular diversity observed in this study will be useful for selecting appropriate accessions for plant improvement and hybridization through molecular-breeding approaches and for developing suitable conservation strategies.

  10. Glucagon gene polymorphism modifies the effects of smoking and physical activity on risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Gao, Kaiping; Zhao, Jingzhi; Feng, Tianping; Yin, Lei; Wang, Jinjin; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Chunyang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhai, Yujia; You, Haifei; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Hu, Dongsheng

    2014-01-25

    Few genome-wide association studies have considered interactions between multiple genetic variants and environmental factors associated with disease. The interaction was examined between a glucagon gene (GCG) polymorphism and smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity and the association with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a case-control study of Chinese Han subjects. The rs12104705 polymorphism of GCG and interactions with environmental variables were analyzed for 9619 participants by binary multiple logistic regression. Smoking with the C-C haplotype of rs12104705 was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR=1.174, 95% CI=1.013-1.361). Moderate and high physical activity with the C-C genotype was associated with decreased risk of T2DM as compared with low physical activity with the genotype (OR=0.251, 95% CI=0.206-0.306 and OR=0.190, 95% CI=0.164-0.220). However, the interaction of drinking and genotype was not associated with risk of T2DM. Genetic polymorphism in rs12104705 of GCG may interact with smoking and physical activity to modify the risk of T2DM. © 2013.

  11. The Role of Dopamine in Anticipatory Pursuit Eye Movements: Insights from Genetic Polymorphisms in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billino, Jutta; Hennig, Jürgen; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of eye movement research in patients with psychiatric diseases for which dysfunctions of neurotransmission are considered to be the major pathologic mechanism. However, neuromodulation of oculomotor control is still hardly understood. We aimed to investigate in particular the impact of dopamine on smooth pursuit eye movements. Systematic variability in dopaminergic transmission due to genetic polymorphisms in healthy subjects offers a noninvasive opportunity to determine functional associations. We measured smooth pursuit in 110 healthy subjects genotyped for two well-documented polymorphisms, the COMT Val 158 Met polymorphism and the SLC6A3 3'-UTR-VNTR polymorphism. Pursuit paradigms were chosen to particularly assess the ability of the pursuit system to initiate tracking when target motion onset is blanked, reflecting the impact of extraretinal signals. In contrast, when following a fully visible target sensory, retinal signals are available. Our results highlight the crucial functional role of dopamine for anticipatory, but not for sensory-driven, pursuit processes. We found the COMT Val 158 Met polymorphism specifically associated with anticipatory pursuit parameters, emphasizing the dominant impact of prefrontal dopamine activity on complex oculomotor control. In contrast, modulation of striatal dopamine activity by the SLC6A3 3'-UTR-VNTR polymorphism had no significant functional effect. Though often neglected so far, individual differences in healthy subjects provide a promising approach to uncovering functional mechanisms and can be used as a bridge to understanding deficits in patients.

  12. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwon Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  13. ORAI1 genetic polymorphisms associated with the susceptibility of atopic dermatitis in Japanese and Taiwanese populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chiao Chang

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for susceptibility to AD. In this study, we collected 2,478 DNA samples including 209 AD patients and 729 control subjects from Taiwanese population and 513 AD patients and 1027 control subject from Japanese population for sequencing and genotyping ORAI1. A total of 14 genetic variants including 3 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the ORAI1 gene were identified. Our results indicated that a non-synonymous SNP (rs3741596, Ser218Gly associated with the susceptibility of AD in the Japanese population but not in the Taiwanese population. However, there is another SNP of ORAI1 (rs3741595 associated with the risk of AD in the Taiwanese population but not in the Japanese population. Taken together, our results indicated that genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1 are very likely to be involved in the susceptibility of AD.

  14. Genetic polymorphism in eight Chilean strains of the carotenogenic microalga Dunaliella salina Teodoresco (Chlorophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA I GOMEZ

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eight Chilean strains of Dunaliella salina obtained within a restricted geographic range, but exhibiting a high variability in their morphology, rate of growth and carotenogenic capacity, were analyzed by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR. Twenty of the 50 random primers (D, P, OPA and OPD series that were tested amplified reproducible bands and were useful for comparative analysis of the strains. Of 107 polymorphic genetic markers, 49 were strain-specific. A great genetic variability was found among the strains in spite of their geographic proximity. In addition, phenetic analysis of the data showed close agreement between the morpho-physiological attributes and the genetic diversity of the strains

  15. Genetic Polymorphism of Secretoglobin SCGB1A1 and Development of Lung Pathology in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Malaya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of investigation — to study of A(38G genetic polymorphism of the first exon of secretoglobin SCGB1A1 in Crimean children and to identify the possible correlation between the degree of polymorphism and development of lung pathology (bronchial asthma and recurrent bronchitis. There were investigated DNA samples from children with bronchial asthma (75 persons, recurrent bronchitis (19 persons and healthy children (20 persons aged from 6 to 16 years. The genetic polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction with method of allele discrimination with registration the results by electrophoresis. Frequency of allele combinations of genetic variants of studied polymorphism was different in patients with bronchial asthma, recurrent bronchitis and in control group. Thus, among patients with bronchial asthma the frequency of homozygous allele AA carriers is lower, and among patients with recurrent bronchitis it is higher then in control group. Contrary, the frequency of AG heterozygotes was higher among patients with bronchial asthma then in patients with recurrent bronchitis and in control group. Also the frequency of AG heterozygotes in patients with recurrent bronchitis is much lower than homozygotes. The obtained results can be used for prognostic purpose to evaluate the prospects of the obstructive syndrome development.

  16. Genetic polymorphism and immune response to tuberculosis in indigenous populations: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maronna Praça Longhi

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed studies of the immune response to tuberculosis and the genetic polymorphisms associated with Th1-or Th2-mediated cytokine expression in indigenous populations. A bibliographic search was performed on the Medline and ISI databases and included studies published between January 1980 and October 2011. The search terms were tuberculosis, American Indians, Amerindian, indigenous, Indians, native people, aboriginal, immun*, host immune, immune response, cytokine*, polymorphism*, and gene. Regardless of their design, studies that evaluated immunoglobulin, cytokine levels and genetic polymorphisms that altered cytokine expression were included. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies were performed in Latin America, and five investigated the Warao ethnic group of Venezuela. Most of the investigations indirectly evaluated the immune response. Higher anergy to the tuberculin skin test, higher IgG4 and IgM levels, higher IL-5 production and lower TNF-a, IL-12p40 and IFN-I production were found in the indigenous populations. The studies also reported a predominantly Th2-type response in these populations and a possibly higher susceptibility to tuberculosis. A better understanding of the relevant genetic polymorphisms and their role in immune regulation would help to clarify the immunogenetic mechanisms of TB infection in these populations. This information would be useful for identifying new treatments and preventing infection and progression to active disease.

  17. Insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels as genetic markers in natural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Malin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We introduce the use of short insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels for genetic analysis of natural populations. Results Sequence reads from light shot-gun sequencing efforts of different dog breeds were aligned to the dog genome reference sequence and gaps corresponding to indels were identified. One hundred candidate markers (4-bp indels were selected and genotyped in unrelated dogs (n = 7 and wolves (n = 18. Eighty-one and 76 out of 94 could be validated as polymorphic loci in the respective sample. Mean indel heterozygosity in a diverse set of wolves was 19%, and 74% of the loci had a minor allele frequency of >10%. Indels found to be polymorphic in wolves were subsequently genotyped in a highly bottlenecked Scandinavian wolf population. Fifty-one loci turned out to be polymorphic, showing their utility even in a population with low genetic diversity. In this population, individual heterozygosity measured at indel and microsatellite loci were highly correlated. Conclusion With an increasing amount of sequence information gathered from non-model organisms, we suggest that indels will come to form an important source of genetic markers, easy and cheap to genotype, for studies of natural populations.

  18. Association between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition to gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Ming; Wang, Lan; Yuan, Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify a molecular marker for gastric cancer, and to investigate the relationship between the polymorphism of pepsinogen C (PGC) gene and the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 289 cases were involved in this study. 115 cases came from Shenyang area, a low risk area of gastric cancer, including 42 unrelated controls and 73 patients with gastric cancer. 174 cases came from Zhuanghe area, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, including 113 unrelated controls, and 61 cases from gastric cancer kindred families. The polymorphism of PGC gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the relation between the genetic polymorphism of PGC and gastric cancer was examined. RESULTS: Four alleles, 310 bp (allele 1), 400 bp (allele 2), 450 bp (allele 3), and 480 bp (allele 4) were detected by PCR. The frequency of allele 1 was higher in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls. Genotypes containing homogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls (0.33, 0.14, χ2 = 3.86, P genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. The distribution of pepsinogen C gene polymorphism in Zhuanghe, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, is different from that in Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. PMID:12508350

  19. Genetic variation in an endemic salamander, Salamandra atra, using amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riberon, Alexandre; Miaud, Claude; Guyetant, R; Taberlet, P

    2004-06-01

    The pattern of genetic differentiation of the endemic alpine salamander, Salamandra atra, has been studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) from 11 populations throughout the range of the two currently recognized subspecies, atra and aurorae. Five different primer combinations produced 706 bands and were analyzed by constructing a phylogenetic tree using NJ and principal component analysis. Significant genetic variation was revealed by AFLP between and within populations but, our results show a lack of genetic structure. AFLP markers seems to be unsuitable to investigate complex and recent diversification.

  20. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled “Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants” was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 s...

  1. Genetically Modified Foods: Promises, Challenges and Safety Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Dadgarnejad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Application of genetically modified organisms in the agriculture sector and food industry began since last years of 20th century. Since then this technology has become a central part of the broader public controversy about the advantages and safety of these products. This article has tried to review aspects of these types of organisms and foods.Results and Conclusion: Genetically modified technology has potential to overcome agricultural problems, such as biotic and abiotic issues by enhancing pests and herbicides resistance, drought tolerance, fast ripening, and finally enhancing yield and nutritional quality. Besides these revolutionary advantages, during the last decades some potential human, animal and environmental risks have been taken in account for these organisms or foods. However, no scientific evidence exists adequately about their harmful human or animal effects, and also, some new scientific and management methodologies (new technologies and regulations have been developed to mitigate the environmental risks. Some challenges such as pest adaptation are being solved by refuge technology, gene pyramiding and insertion of best-coupled primers through the known conditions reducing unintended outcomes including silencing, activation or rearrangement of non-target genome pieces. However, it does not mean that no harmful effect will happen in the future. Therefore, it is required that before release of any genetically modified crop, all requested risk assessments be performed, and then post release monitoring be done to follow the possible gene flow and prevent any potential disastrous contaminations to the food chain. Finally, it could be concluded that the safe usage of this technology, by considering all nationally and internationally accepted environmental and health safety assessment protocols, can help us to use advantages of this technology in agriculture, medicine and industry. However, more safety

  2. Genetic polymorphism of vitamin D receptor determines its metabolism and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Yakovleva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The review represents the results of researches of vitamin D receptor characteristics and its genetic polymorphism, which is variable in different populations, and also depends on age and gender. This polymorphism determines the association of vitamin D different concentration with the probability of bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease development, and therefore the different efficacy of drug correction of vitamin D deficiency. However, the scientific data are contradictory, the molecular mechanisms of connection between vitamin D and bronchial tonus or allergic reactions remain unclear, which emphasizes the importance of studies to clarify the role of vitamin D in inflammatory, immune disorders in bronchial obstructive syndrome.

  3. No interactions between genetic polymorphisms and stressful life events on outcome of antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2009-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms seem to influence the response on antidepressant treatment and moderate the impact of stress on depression. The present study aimed to assess, whether allelic variants and stressful life events interact on the clinical outcome of depression. In a sample of 290 systematically...... recruited patients diagnosed with a single depressive episode according to ICD-10, we assessed the outcome of antidepressant treatment and the presence of stressful life events in a 6-month period preceding onset of depression by means of structured interviews. Further, we genotyped nine polymorphisms...... dependent on stressful life events experienced by the individual prior to onset of depression....

  4. Genetic polymorphisms and skin aging: the identification of population genotypic groups holds potential for personalized treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval, Jordi; Alonso, Vicente; Herranz, Miquel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Skin changes are among the most visible signs of aging. Skin properties such as hydration, elasticity, and antioxidant capacity play a key role in the skin aging process. Skin aging is a complex process influenced by heritable and environmental factors. Recent studies on twins have revealed that up to 60% of the skin aging variation between individuals can be attributed to genetic factors, while the remaining 40% is due to non-genetic factors. Recent advances in genomics and bioinformatics approaches have led to the association of certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to skin properties. Our aim was to classify individuals based on an ensemble of multiple polymorphisms associated with certain properties of the skin for providing personalized skin care and anti-aging therapies. We identified the key proteins and SNPs associated with certain properties of the skin that contribute to skin aging. We selected a set of 13 SNPs in gene coding for these proteins which are potentially associated with skin aging. Finally, we classified a sample of 120 female volunteers into ten clusters exhibiting different skin properties according to their genotypic signature. This is the first study that describes the actual frequency of genetic polymorphisms and their distribution in clusters involved in skin aging in a Caucasian population. Individuals can be divided into genetic clusters defined by genotypic variables. These genotypic variables are linked with polymorphisms in one or more genes associated with certain properties of the skin that contribute to a person's perceived age. Therefore, by using this classification, it is possible to characterize human skin care and anti-aging needs on the basis of an individual's genetic signature, thus opening the door to personalized treatments addressed at specific populations. This is part of an ongoing effort towards personalized anti-aging therapies combining genetic signatures with environmental and life style evaluations.

  5. [The lack of information on genetically modified organisms in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Isabelle Geoffroy; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a review about the labeling of products that have Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO), also called transgenic elements in their composition. It addresses the conventions, laws and regulations relating to such products currently governing the market, the adequacy of these existing standards and their acceptance by society. It also examines the importance of the cautionary principle when assessing the application of new technologies or technologies where little is known or where there is no relevant scientific knowledge about the potential risks to the environment, human health and society.

  6. Safety assessment and detection methods of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Zheng, Zhe; Jiao, Guanglian

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are gaining importance in agriculture as well as the production of food and feed. Along with the development of GMOs, health and food safety concerns have been raised. These concerns for these new GMOs make it necessary to set up strict system on food safety assessment of GMOs. The food safety assessment of GMOs, current development status of safety and precise transgenic technologies and GMOs detection have been discussed in this review. The recent patents about GMOs and their detection methods are also reviewed. This review can provide elementary introduction on how to assess and detect GMOs.

  7. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kramkowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed ‘modified organisms’, which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  8. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers.

  9. A functional TNFAIP2 3'-UTR rs8126 genetic polymorphism contributes to risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulated evidences demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR may impact microRNAs (miRNAs-mediated expression regulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. There is a TNFAIP2 3'-UTR rs8126 T>C genetic variant which has been proved to be associated with head and neck cancer susceptibility. This SNP could disturb binding of miR-184 with TNFAIP2 mRNA and influence TNFAIP2 regulation. However, it is still unclear how this polymorphism is involved in development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Therefore, we hypothesized that the functional TNFAIP2 rs8126 SNP may affect TNFAIP2 expression and, thus, ESCC risk. METHODS: We investigated the association between the TNFAIP2 rs8126 variant and ESCC risk as well as the functional relevance on TNFAIP2 expression in vivo. Genotypes were determined in a case-control set consisted of 588 ESCC patients and 600 controls. The allele-specific regulation on TNFAIP2 expression by the rs8126 SNP was examined in normal and cancerous tissue specimens of esophagus. RESULTS: We found that individuals carrying the rs8126 CC or CT genotype had an OR of 1.89 (95%CI  = 1.23-2.85, P = 0.003 or 1.38 (95%CI  = 1.05-1.73, P = 0.017 for developing ESCC in Chinese compared with individual carrying the TT genotype. Carriers of the rs8126 CC and CT genotypes had significantly lower TNFAIP2 mRNA levels than those with the TT genotypes in normal esophagus tissues (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that functional TNFAIP2 rs8126 genetic variant is a ESCC susceptibility SNP. These results support the hypothesis that genetic variants interrupting miRNA-mediated gene regulation might be important genetic modifiers of cancer risk.

  10. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of Tunisian Lavandula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population differentiation performed on combined data yielded similar to that shown using each marker separately. Conservation strategies should take into account the levels of genetic diversity and chemical variation in relation to population and bioclimate. Keywords: Lavandula multifida, Tunisia, natural populations, ...

  11. Genetic Polymorphism Of Glutathione-S-Transferase And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic tobacoo smoking is a major risk factor in the development of. COPD. However, it is estimated that only 10-20% of chronic heavy smokers will develop symptomatic COPD. This indicates the possible contribution of environmental or genetic cofactors to the development of COPD in smokers. The present work aimed ...

  12. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer cachexia is a polygenic and complex syndrome. Genetic variations in regulation of the inflammatory response, muscle and fat metabolic pathways, and pathways in appetite regulation are likely to contribute to the susceptibility or resistance to developing cancer cachexia. A systematic search of Medline and EmBase ...

  13. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Genetics,Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), Lucknow 226 014, India; Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), Lucknow 226 014, India; Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Sanjay Gandhi ...

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of 17 Y-chromosome STRs in Han ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... important tool in the study of human evolution, forensics and population genetics. The peculiar characteristics of the Y-chromosome markers such as paternal inheritance and haploidy make it possible to infer about population histories of paternal lineages and the contribution of these lineages to the gene ...

  15. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Cancer cachexia is a polygenic and complex syndrome. Genetic variations in regulation of the inflammatory response, muscle and fat metabolic pathways, and pathways in appetite regulation are likely to contribute to the susceptibility or resistance to developing cancer cachexia. A systematic search of Medline ...

  16. Identification of possible genetic polymorphisms involved in cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vival in colorectal cancer patients. Neoplasia 9, 716–722. Rosen C. J., Kurland E. S., Vereault D., Adler R. A., Rackoff P. J.,. Craig W. Y. et al. 1998 Association between serum insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I) and a simple sequence repeat in IGF-I gene: implications for genetic studies of bone mineral density. J. Clin. Endocrinol.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayor-Olea Alvaro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development. In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes variations and diet, is directly involved in genetic and epigenetic variations that can influence the changes of last growing period of development in human and the appearance of the TMD. Methods A case-control study was designed to evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms above described on TMD. A total of 229 individuals (69% women were included at the study; 86 were patients with TMD and 143 were healthy control subjects. Subjects underwent to a clinical examination following the guidelines by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD. Genotyping of 20 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs, divided in two groups, was performed by multiplex minisequencing preceded by multiplex PCR. Other seven genetic polymorphisms different from SNPs (deletions, insertions, tandem repeat, null genotype were achieved by a multiplex-PCR. A chi-square test was performed to determine the differences in genotype and allelic frequencies between TMD patients and healthy subjects. To estimate TMD risk, in those polymorphisms that shown significant differences, odds ratio (OR with a 95% of confidence interval were calculated. Results Six of the polymorphisms showed statistical associations with TMD. Four of them are related to enzymes of folates metabolism: Allele G of Serine Hydoxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1 rs1979277 (OR = 3.99; 95%CI 1.72, 9.25; p = 0.002, allele G of SHMT1 rs638416 (OR = 2.80; 95%CI 1.51, 5.21; p = 0.013, allele T of Methylentetrahydrofolate

  18. Short communication: Development of a new polymorphic genetic marker in Araucaria araucana (Mol) K. Koch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, F.; Martin, M. A.; Alvarez, A.; Molina, J. R.; Alvarez, J. B.; Herrera, M. A.; Martin, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Seed storage proteins have been used as genetic marker in forest species to evaluate genetic variability, demonstrating its effectiveness both in conifers and broad-leaved. In conifers, megagametophyte storage proteins are particularly useful because of their haploid nature. The aim of this study was to determine whether these proteins could be used as a new marker of genetic diversity in Araucaria araucana, one of the oldest conifers of South America and a representative symbol of Chilean forest biodiversity. For this, megagametophytes from two A. araucana populations were assessed to identify polymorphic bands and to obtain a preliminary estimation of the genetic diversity. The results revealed that globulin is the best fraction for measuring the variability in the species, due to their high level of variation (20 identified bands, 11 of them polymorphic). Both populations showed high genetic diversity, with more than 92% of the variation within populations. The study highlighted that these proteins can be used to measure the genetic diversity in A. araucana, providing good information to ensure the preservation of the species genetic resources. (Author) 29 refs.

  19. Genetic diversity and structure analysis based on hordein protein polymorphism in barley landrace populations from jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, A.W.; Ali, M.; Baloch, A.M.; Mangan, B.U.N.; Song, W

    2014-01-01

    Jordan is unanimously considered to be one of the centers of genetic diversity for barley, where wild and landraces of barley has been grown under different climatic conditions. The genetic diversity and genetic structure based on hordein polymorphism was assessed in 90 different accessions collected from four different sites of Jordan. A-PAGE was used to reveal hordein polymorphism among the genotypes. A total of 29 distinct bands were identified, out of them 9 bands were distinguished for D, 11 for C, and 9 for the B hordein regions. The observed genetic similarity was an exceptionally high between the populations than expected, which is probably due to high gene flow estimated between them. The genetic diversity parameters were not differ largely among the populations, indicating that local selection of a particular site did not play a key role in shaping genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant population structure when accessions were structured according to population site. There was 94% of hordein variation resided within the populations and only 8% present among the populations. Both Bayesian and Principale Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) concordantly demonstrated admixture genotypes of the landraces barley populations. Consequently, none of the population found to be clustered separately according to its population site. It is concluded that this approach can be useful to explore the germplasm for genetic diversity but perhaps is not suitable for determining phylogenic relations in barley. (author)

  20. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms in Huntington's disease are modified by polymorphisms in catecholamine regulating enzyme genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Budtz-Jørgensen, E

    2016-01-01

    -described cohort of Danish HD gene-expansion carriers. We show that cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms in HD are modified by polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes and by the 4p16.3 B haplotype. These results support the theory of dopamine imbalance......Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations. HD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene but the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Dopamine imbalance has...... previously been shown in HD, and furthermore dopamine is thought to be implicated in cognition, behavioral and motor disturbances. A substantiated inverse correlation between motor onset and the elongated CAG repeat in the HTT has been established. This relation does not account for the full variability...

  1. Emotional attitudes of young people completing secondary schools towards genetic modification of organisms (GMO) and genetically modified foods (GMF)

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Jurkiewicz; Jerzy Zagórski; Franciszek Bujak; Stanisław Lachowski; Magdalena Florek - Łuszczki

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was recognition of the opinions of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms and genetically modified food, especially the respondents’ emotional attitude towards scientific achievements in the area of live genetically modified organisms. Material and method. The study covered a group of 500 school adolescents completing secondary school at the level of maturity examination. The study was conducted by the method...

  2. Tanaman Genetically Modified Organism (GMO dan Perspektif Hukumnya di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwono Prianto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Genetically modified organism (GMO merupakan organisme yang gen-gennya telah diubah dengan menggunakan teknik rekayasa genetika. Produk rekayasa genetika diklasifikasikan menjadi 4 macam, yaitu generasi pertama: satu sifat; generasi kedua: kumpulan sifat; generasi ketiga dan keempat: near-intragenic, intragenic, dan cisgenic. Adapun produk rekayasa genetika pada tanaman di Indonesia di antaranya adalah padi, tomat, tebu, singkong, dan kentang. Regulasi tanaman hasil rekayasa genetika diatur oleh beberapa lembaga, di antaranya Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup, Kementerian Pertanian, Komisi Keamanan Hayati, Tim Teknis Keamanan Hayati, dan Biosafety Clearing House, berdasarkan peraturan pemerintah No. 21 tahun 2005. Pengujian yang dilakukan pada produk rekayasa genetika meliputi analisis sumber gen penyebab alergi, sekuens homolog asam amino, resistensi pepsin, skrining serum, serta penggunaan hewan uji. Berbagai produk GMO di Indonesia sejauh ini merupakan produk yang dibutuhkan dalam memenuhi kebutuhan hidup sehari-hari, yang perlu diawasi secara ketat dari segi dampaknya terhadap lingkungan melalui ketentuan hukum yang berlaku, yang diwakili oleh instansi-instansi terkait tersebut.Abstract Genetically modified organism (GMO is an organism whose genes that have been altered by using genetic engineering techniques. Genetic engineering products are classified into 4 types, which are the first generation: one trait; the second generation: a collection of properties; the third and fourth generation: near-intragenic, intragenic, and cisgenic. The genetic engineering products in plants in Indonesia include rice, tomatoes, sugar cane, cassava, and potatoes. The application of the genetically engineered crops is regulated by several institutions, including the Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Biosafety Commission, the Biosafety Technical Team and the Biosafety Clearing House, under government regulation No. 21 of the year

  3. An Investigation of Modifying Effects of Metallothionein Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms on the Association between Mercury Exposure and Biomarker Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Gillespie, Brenda; Werner, Robert; Basu, Niladri

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested that several genes that mediate mercury metabolism are polymorphic in humans. Objective: We hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in metallothionein (MT) genes may underlie interindividual differences in mercury biomarker levels. We studied the potential modifying effects of MT SNPs on mercury exposure–biomarker relationships. Methods: We measured total mercury in urine and hair samples of 515 dental professionals. We also surveyed occupational and personal exposures to dental amalgam and dietary fish consumption, from which daily methylmercury (MeHg) intake was estimated. Log-transformed urine and hair levels were modeled in multivariable linear regression separately against respective exposure surrogates, and the effect modification of 13 MT SNPs on exposure was investigated. Results: The mean mercury levels in urine (1.06 μg/L) and hair (0.51 μg/g) were not significantly different from the U.S. general population (0.95 μg/L and 0.47 μg/g, respectively). The mean estimated daily MeHg intake was 0.084 μg/kg/day (range, 0–0.98 μg/kg/day), with 25% of study population intakes exceeding the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose of 0.1 μg/kg/day. Multivariate regression analysis showed that subjects with the MT1M (rs2270837) AA genotype (n = 10) or the MT2A (rs10636) CC genotype (n = 42) had lower urinary mercury levels than did those with the MT1M or MT2A GG genotype (n = 329 and 251, respectively) after controlling for exposure and potential confounders. After controlling for MeHg intake, subjects with MT1A (rs8052394) GA and GG genotypes (n = 24) or the MT1M (rs9936741) TT genotype (n = 459) had lower hair mercury levels than did subjects with MT1A AA (n = 113) or MT1M TC and CC genotypes (n = 15), respectively. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that some MT genetic polymorphisms may influence mercury biomarker concentrations at levels of exposure relevant to the general

  4. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  5. Multiple sclerosis in families: risk factors beyond known genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkad, Denis A; Lee, De-Hyung; Bruch, Kathrin; Haghikia, Aiden; Epplen, Jörg T; Hoffjan, Sabine; Linker, Ralf A

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that predominantly affects young adults. The genetic contributions to this multifactorial disease were underscored by genome wide association studies and independent replication studies. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was recently established using the identified MS risk loci in order to predict MS outcome including clinical and paraclinical features. Here, we present the results on a family with several affected siblings including a monozygotic triplet. The individuals were genotyped for 57 non-MHC risk loci as well as the HLA DRB1*1501 tagging SNP rs3135388 with subsequent calculation of the wGRS. Additionally, SNP array based analyses for aberrant chromosomal regions were performed for all individuals.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms associated with lipid metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Flauzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disorder that results from the interaction between the individual genetic components and environmental factors. Previous studies have established hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, elevated body mass index, disturbances of coagulation and increasing age as predictors of stroke risk factors. The stroke is a more crippling than deadly disease that requires long-term institutionalization, as it decreases the quality of life of patients, resulting in higher costs to social and economic levels. It thus becomes increasingly important to emphasize the Preventive Medicine strategies. Dyslipidemia has been associated with pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and genetic polymorphisms that occur in the metabolic pathway, such as lipids metabolism, has been one of the hereditary factors related to ischemic stroke. The identification of the genetic component in the cause of dyslipidemia has been intensively investigated in recent years. Among the several genetic polymorphisms, the gene of the low-density lipoprotein receptor has been the object of many studies in the population worldwide. Data on lipid profile and study of polymorphisms of genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes related to lipid metabolism may reveal the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a population, enabling a targeted intervention for the control and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases such as ischemic stroke.

  7. Bee genera, diversity and abundance in genetically modified canola fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Colton; Arathi, H S

    2018-03-12

    Intensive agricultural practices resulting in large scale habitat loss ranks as the top contributing factors in the global bee decline. Growing Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops as large monocultures has resulted extensive applications of herbicides leading to the degradation of natural habitats surrounding farmlands. Herbicide tolerance trait is beneficial for crops such as Canola (Brassica napus) that are extremely vulnerable to weed competition. While the trait in itself does not harm pollinators, growing genetically modified herbicide tolerant cultivars indirectly contributes towards pollinator declines through habitat loss. Canola, a mass-flowering crop is highly attractive to bee pollinators and the extensive adoption of the herbicide tolerant trait has led to depletion of non-crop floral resources. Extensive use of herbicide in and near fields with herbicide tolerant cultivars systematically eliminates semi-natural habitats around agricultural fields which consist of non-crop flowering plants. Planting pollinator strips provides floral resources for bees after crop flowering. We document the bee genera in canola and the adjoining pollinator strip. The overlap in bee genera reinforces the importance of pollinator habitats in agricultural landscape.

  8. Discrimination of genetically modified sugar beets based on terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Li, Zhi; Yin, Xianhua; Hu, Fangrong; Hu, Cong

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this paper was to apply terahertz (THz) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics techniques for discrimination of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM sugar beets. In this paper, the THz spectra of 84 sugar beet samples (36 GM sugar beets and 48 non-GM ones) were obtained by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.2 THz. Three chemometrics methods, principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS), were employed to classify sugar beet samples into two groups: genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The DPLS method yielded the best classification result, and the percentages of successful classification for GM and non-GM sugar beets were both 100%. Results of the present study demonstrate the usefulness of THz spectroscopy together with chemometrics methods as a powerful tool to distinguish GM and non-GM sugar beets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrospun fiber membranes enable proliferation of genetically modified cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjigin, Mandula; Eskridge, Chris; Niamat, Rohina; Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Kmiec, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) and its blended composites (chitosan, gelatin, and lecithin) are well-established biomaterials that can enrich cell growth and enable tissue engineering. However, their application in the recovery and proliferation of genetically modified cells has not been studied. In the study reported here, we fabricated PCL-biomaterial blended fiber membranes, characterized them using physicochemical techniques, and used them as templates for the growth of genetically modified HCT116-19 colon cancer cells. Our data show that the blended polymers are highly miscible and form homogenous electrospun fiber membranes of uniform texture. The aligned PCL nanofibers support robust cell growth, yielding a 2.5-fold higher proliferation rate than cells plated on standard plastic plate surfaces. PCL-lecithin fiber membranes yielded a 2.7-fold higher rate of proliferation, while PCL-chitosan supported a more modest growth rate (1.5-fold higher). Surprisingly, PCL-gelatin did not enhance cell proliferation when compared to the rate of cell growth on plastic surfaces. PMID:23467983

  10. EVALUATION OF LITHUANIAN CONSUMERS’ ATTITUDES TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrida Lukošiut&#

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to present the results obtained during the survey of Lithuanian consumers in order to identify their attitudes towards food with genetically modified organisms (GMO. Investigating the consumers approach to genetically modified (GM food, the following were considered: consumers’ opinions on GMO were analyzed, their knowledge about the presence of food containing GMO on the Lithuanian market, the mandatory GM food labelling, the behavior to a transgenic product while shopping, as well as consumers’ willingness to purchase such products. Data were gathered through a survey of 1000 Lithuanian residents. The empirical results indicated that the majority of the respondents’ attitudes towards food containing GMO are negative. The older consumers with less income are more against GM food compared to younger, wealthier households. 72% of consumers know that if the food contains GMO it must be indicated on the label. However, many consumers who oppose GMO do not try to avoid paying attention to the components of the product listed on its label. Only about a quarter of consumers while buying a product look for such information. This indicates that consumers are not really interested in whether or not the product contains GMO

  11. Effects of Soy Product Intake and Interleukin Genetic Polymorphisms on Early Gastric Cancer Risk in Korea: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sarah; Park, Yoon; Lee, Jeonghee; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Young Woo; Ryu, Keun Won; Sung, Joohon; Kim, Jeongseon

    2017-10-01

    The current study investigated whether the combined effects of soy intake and genetic polymorphisms of interleukin (IL) genes modify gastric cancer risk. A total of 377 cases and 754 controls of Korean origin were included in the analysis. Soy consumption was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Seven variants of IL10 (rs1800871), IL2 (rs2069763 and rs2069762), IL13 (rs6596090 and rs20541), and IL4R (rs7205663 and rs1805010) were genetically analyzed. To analyze the combined effect of soy intake and genetic polymorphisms, a low-intake group and high-intake group of each type of soy were categorized based on the intake level of the control group. Interactions between soy products and these genetic variants were analyzed by a likelihood ratio test, in which a multiplicative interaction term was added to the logistic regression model. A higher intake of nonfermented soy products was associated with a reduced cancer risk (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43 to 0.90), and the reduced risk was only apparent in males (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.71). None of the IL genetic polymorphisms examined were independently associated with gastric cancer risk. Individuals with a minor allele of IL2 rs2069762 and a higher intake of nonfermented soy food had a decreased risk of gastric cancer (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.68) compared to those with a lower intake (p interaction =0.039). Based on the genetic characteristics of the studied individuals, the interaction between IL2 rs2069762 and nonfermented soy intake may modify the risk of gastric cancer.

  12. Genetic modifiers of nutritional status in cystic fibrosis1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Gia M; Blackman, Scott M; Watson, Christopher P; Doshi, Vishal K; Cutting, Garry R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Improved nutrition early in life is associated with better pulmonary function for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, nutritional status is poorly correlated with the CFTR genotype. Objective: We investigated the extent to which modifier genes influence nutrition in children with CF. Design: BMI data were longitudinally collected from the CF Twin-Sibling Study and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry for twins and siblings from 2000 to 2010. A nutritional phenotype was derived for 1124 subjects by calculating the average BMI z score from 5–10 y of age (BMI-z5to10). The genetic contribution to the variation in BMI-z5to10 (ie, heritability) was estimated by comparing the similarity of the phenotype in monozygous twins to that in dizygous twins and siblings. Linkage analysis identified potential modifier-gene loci. Results: The median BMI-z5to10 was −0.07 (range: −3.89 to 2.30), which corresponded to the 47th CDC percentile. BMI-z5to10 was negatively correlated with pancreatic insufficiency, history of meconium ileus, and female sex but positively correlated with later birth cohorts and lung function. Monozygous twins showed greater concordance for BMI-z5to10 than did dizygous twins and siblings; heritability estimates from same-sex twin-only analyses ranged from 0.54 to 0.82. For 1010 subjects with pancreatic insufficiency, genome-wide significant linkage was identified on chromosomes 1p36.1 [log of odds (LOD): 5.3] and 5q14 (LOD: 5.1). These loci explained ≥16% and ≥15%, respectively, of the BMI variance. Conclusions: The analysis of twins and siblings with CF indicates a prominent role for genes other than CFTR to BMI variation. Specifically, regions on chromosomes 1 and 5 appear to harbor genetic modifiers of substantial effect. PMID:23134884

  13. Genetic modifiers of nutritional status in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Gia M; Blackman, Scott M; Watson, Christopher P; Doshi, Vishal K; Cutting, Garry R

    2012-12-01

    Improved nutrition early in life is associated with better pulmonary function for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, nutritional status is poorly correlated with the CFTR genotype. We investigated the extent to which modifier genes influence nutrition in children with CF. BMI data were longitudinally collected from the CF Twin-Sibling Study and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry for twins and siblings from 2000 to 2010. A nutritional phenotype was derived for 1124 subjects by calculating the average BMI z score from 5-10 y of age (BMI-z(5to10)). The genetic contribution to the variation in BMI-z(5to10) (ie, heritability) was estimated by comparing the similarity of the phenotype in monozygous twins to that in dizygous twins and siblings. Linkage analysis identified potential modifier-gene loci. The median BMI-z(5to10) was -0.07 (range: -3.89 to 2.30), which corresponded to the 47th CDC percentile. BMI-z(5to10) was negatively correlated with pancreatic insufficiency, history of meconium ileus, and female sex but positively correlated with later birth cohorts and lung function. Monozygous twins showed greater concordance for BMI-z(5to10) than did dizygous twins and siblings; heritability estimates from same-sex twin-only analyses ranged from 0.54 to 0.82. For 1010 subjects with pancreatic insufficiency, genome-wide significant linkage was identified on chromosomes 1p36.1 [log of odds (LOD): 5.3] and 5q14 (LOD: 5.1). These loci explained ≥16% and ≥15%, respectively, of the BMI variance. The analysis of twins and siblings with CF indicates a prominent role for genes other than CFTR to BMI variation. Specifically, regions on chromosomes 1 and 5 appear to harbor genetic modifiers of substantial effect.

  14. Proliferation of Genetically Modified Human Cells on Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandula Borjigin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing is a process by which single base mutations can be corrected, in the context of the chromosome, using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs. The survival and proliferation of the corrected cells bearing modified genes, however, are impeded by a phenomenon known as reduced proliferation phenotype (RPP; this is a barrier to practical implementation. To overcome the RPP problem, we utilized nanofiber scaffolds as templates on which modified cells were allowed to recover, grow, and expand after gene editing. Here, we present evidence that some HCT116-19, bearing an integrated, mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene and corrected by gene editing, proliferate on polylysine or fibronectin-coated polycaprolactone (PCL nanofiber scaffolds. In contrast, no cells from the same reaction protocol plated on both regular dish surfaces and polylysine (or fibronectin-coated dish surfaces proliferate. Therefore, growing genetically modified (edited cells on electrospun nanofiber scaffolds promotes the reversal of the RPP and increases the potential of gene editing as an ex vivo gene therapy application.

  15. Genetic Polymorphism of Folate and Methionine Metabolizing Enzymes and their Susceptibility to Malignant Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, E.E.; Aziz, M.; Kotb, M.

    2005-01-01

    Folate and methionine metabolism is involved in DNA synthesis and methylation. Polymorphisms in the genes of folate metabolism enzymes have been associated with some forms of cancer. In the present study, 2 polymorphisms were evaluated for a folate metabolic enzyme, methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and one was evaluated for methionine synthase (MS). The 2 polymorphisms MTHFR 677 C-7T and MTHFR 1298 A-7C, are reported to reduce the enzyme activity, which causes intracellular accumulation of 5, 10 vm ethylene-tetrahydrofolate and results in a reduced incidence of DNA double strand breakage. The MS 2756 A-7G polymorphism also reduces the enzyme activity and results in the hypo methylation of DNA. Patients and Methods: To test this hypothesis, genetic polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway were investigated using the DNA from a case-control study on 31 patients having malignant lymphoma from the Oncology Outpatient Clinic of the New Children's Hospital, Cairo University and 30 controls who were actually normal children attending for vaccination to the same hospital. We found that there is a higher susceptibility with the MTHFR 677CC and MTHFR 1298 AA genotypes (OR=4.3, 95% CI 1.12-16). When those harbor at least one variant allele in either polymorphism of MTHFR they were defined as reference. For the MS 2756 AG genotype polymorphism there was also a higher susceptibility to developing malignant lymphoma (OR=2.6; 95% CI 1.16.4). Results suggest that folate and methionine metabolism may play an important role in the pathogenesis of malignant lymphoma. Further studies to confirm this association and detailed biologic mechanisms are now required

  16. Association of BSG genetic polymorphisms with atherosclerotic cerebral infarction in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Song, Bingxin; Duan, Xiaomei; Long, Yuming; Lu, Jinfeng; Li, Zhibin; Zeng, Sian; Zhan, Qiong; Yuan, Mei; Yang, Qidong; Xia, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The Basigin (BSG, also known as CD147/extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer) belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). It is a cellular receptor for cyclophilin A (CypA), and is originally known as tumor cell collagenase stimulatory factor (TCSF), which could abundantly expressed on the surface of tumor cells, haematopoietic, monocytes, epithelial endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Accumulating evidence showed that BSG played an important role in stimulating the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which has been reported to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Since atherosclerosis is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cerebral infarction (ACI), we speculate that BSG genetic polymorphisms may influence formation of atherosclerosis and then development of ACI. This study aimed to detect the potential association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, -631 G > T, -318 G > C, 10141 G > A and 10826 G > A) of BSG gene in Hunan Han Chinese population with ACI. We genotyped 199 ACI patients and 188 matched healthy controls for the four BSG SNP by method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-offlight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Our results suggested that all the polymorphisms were observed in the subjects from Changsha area of Hunan Province. However, no significant difference was observed between the distribution of these SNP in cases and controls. Therefore, we speculate that BSG genetic polymorphisms might not be an important factor in the development of ACI in our Chinese Han population.

  17. Genetic polymorphism of the OPG gene associated with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, Jasmin Teresa; Juhasz-Boess, Ingolf; Gruenhage, Frank; Graeber, Stefan; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Solomayer, Erich Franz; Assmann, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    The receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), its ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been reported to play a role in the pathophysiological bone turnover and in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Based on this we investigated the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within RANK, RANKL and OPG and their possible association to breast cancer risk. Genomic DNA was obtained from Caucasian participants consisting of 307 female breast cancer patients and 396 gender-matched healthy controls. We studied seven SNPs in the genes of OPG (rs3102735, rs2073618), RANK (rs1805034, rs35211496) and RANKL (rs9533156, rs2277438, rs1054016) using TaqMan genotyping assays. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ 2 -tests for 2 x 2 and 2 x 3 tables. The allelic frequencies (OR: 1.508 CI: 1.127-2.018, p=0.006) and the genotype distribution (p=0.019) of the OPG SNP rs3102735 differed significantly between breast cancer patients and healthy controls. The minor allele C and the corresponding homo- and heterozygous genotypes are more common in breast cancer patients (minor allele C: 18.4% vs. 13.0%; genotype CC: 3.3% vs. 1.3%; genotype CT: 30.3% vs. 23.5%). No significantly changed risk was detected in the other investigated SNPs. Additional analysis showed significant differences when comparing patients with invasive vs. non-invasive tumors (OPG rs2073618) as well as in terms of tumor localization (RANK rs35211496) and body mass index (RANKL rs9533156 and rs1054016). This is the first study reporting a significant association of the SNP rs3102735 (OPG) with the susceptibility to develop breast cancer in the Caucasian population

  18. Production and characterization of genetically modified human IL-11 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Emiko; Takei, Toshiaki; Ueda, Takuya; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2017-02-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) has been expected as a drug on severe thrombocytopenia caused by myelo-suppressive chemotherapy. Whereas, development of IL-11 inhibitor is also expected for a treatment against IL-11 related cancer progression. Here, we will demonstrate the creation of various kinds of genetically modified hIL-11s. Modified vectors were constructed by introducing N- or O-glycosylation site on the region of hIL-11 that does not belong to the core α-helical motif based on the predicted secondary structure. N-terminal (N: between 22 to 23 aa), the first loop (M1:70 to 71 aa), the second loop (M2:114-115 aa), the third loop (M3:160-161 aa) and C-terminal (C: 200- aa) were selected for modification. A large scale production system was established and the characteristics of modified hIL-11s were evaluated. The structure was analyzed by amino acid sequence and composition analysis and CD-spectra. Glycan was assessed by monosaccharide composition analysis. Growth promoting activity and biological stability were analyzed by proliferation of T1165 cells. N-terminal modified proteins were well glycosylated and produced. Growth activity of 3NN with NASNASNAS sequence on N-terminal was about tenfold higher than wild type (WT). Structural and biological stabilities of 3NN were also better than WT and residence time in mouse blood was longer than WT. M1 variants lacked growth activity though they are well glycosylated and secondary structure is very stable. Both of 3NN and OM1 with AAATPAPG on M1 associated with hIL-11R strongly. These results indicate N-terminal and M1 variants will be expected for practical use as potent agonists or antagonists of hIL-11. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic relatedness of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) hybrids using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf-Eldin, M A; Al-Tamimi, A; Alam, P; Elkholy, S F; Jordan, J R

    2015-12-28

    The artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) is an important food and medicinal crop that is cultivated in Mediterranean countries. Morphological characteristics, such as head shape and diameter, leaf shape, and bract shape, are mainly affected by environmental conditions. A molecular marker approach was used to analyze the degree of polymorphism between artichoke hybrid lines. The degree of genetic difference among three artichoke hybrids was evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). In this study, the DNA fingerprints of three artichoke lines (A13-010, A11-018, and A12-179) were generated, and a total of 10 decamer primers were applied for RAPD-PCR analyses. Polymorphism  (16.66 to 62.50%) was identified using eight arbitrary decamers and total genomic DNA extracted from the hybrids. Of the 59 loci detected, there were 25 polymorphic and 34 monomorphic loci. Jaccard's similarity index (JSI) ranged between 1.0 and 0.84. Based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) similarity matrix and dendrogram, the results indicated that two hybrids (A13-010 and A11-018) were closely related to each other, and the A12-179 line showed more divergence. When identifying correct accessions, consideration of the genetic variation and genetic relationships among the genotypes are required. The RAPD-PCR fingerprinting of artichoke lines clearly showed that it is possible to analyze the RAPD patterns for correlation between genetic means and differences or resemblance between close accessions (A13-010 and A11- 018) at the genomic level.

  20. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci including D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364 and D22GATA198B05 in Chinese Han population of Henan province and to assess its value in forensic science.

  1. Detection of genetically modified maize and soybean in feed samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, S; Cakır, O; Turgut-Kara, N; Arı, S

    2014-02-25

    Despite the controversy about genetically modified (GM) plants, they are still incrementally cultivated. In recent years, many food and feed products produced by genetic engineering technology have appeared on store shelves. Controlling the production and legal presentation of GM crops are very important for the environment and human health, especially in terms of long-term consumption. In this study, 11 kinds of feed obtained from different regions of Turkey were used for genetic analysis based on foreign gene determination. All samples were screened by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for widely used genetic elements; cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S promoter), and nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS) sequences for GM plants. After determination of GM plant-containing samples, nested PCR and conventional PCR analysis were performed to find out whether the samples contained Bt176 or GTS-40-3-2 for maize and soy, respectively. As a result of PCR-based GM plant analysis, all samples were found to be transgenic. Both 35S- and NOS-containing feed samples or potentially Bt176-containing samples, in other words, were analyzed with Bt176 insect resistant cryIAb gene-specific primers via nested PCR. Eventually, none of them were found Bt176-positive. On the other hand, when we applied conventional PCR to the same samples with the herbicide resistance CTP4-EPSPS construct-specific primers for transgenic soy variety GTS-40-3-2, we found that all samples were positive for GTS-40-3-2.

  2. 4P: fast computing of population genetics statistics from large DNA polymorphism panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzo, Andrea; Panziera, Alex; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Massive DNA sequencing has significantly increased the amount of data available for population genetics and molecular ecology studies. However, the parallel computation of simple statistics within and between populations from large panels of polymorphic sites is not yet available, making the exploratory analyses of a set or subset of data a very laborious task. Here, we present 4P (parallel processing of polymorphism panels), a stand-alone software program for the rapid computation of genetic variation statistics (including the joint frequency spectrum) from millions of DNA variants in multiple individuals and multiple populations. It handles a standard input file format commonly used to store DNA variation from empirical or simulation experiments. The computational performance of 4P was evaluated using large SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) datasets from human genomes or obtained by simulations. 4P was faster or much faster than other comparable programs, and the impact of parallel computing using multicore computers or servers was evident. 4P is a useful tool for biologists who need a simple and rapid computer program to run exploratory population genetics analyses in large panels of genomic data. It is also particularly suitable to analyze multiple data sets produced in simulation studies. Unix, Windows, and MacOs versions are provided, as well as the source code for easier pipeline implementations.

  3. Genetic polymorphism of β-lactoglobulin and κ-casein of cattle breeds in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ante Ivanković

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Profitable milk production respects the interests of producers, processing industries, consumer requirements and welfare of animals. Development of new methods of direct gene analysis responsible for milk proteins polymorphism provide new tools to raise the profitability of milk production and dairy products through implementation of breed genetic profile in breeding program. Because of necessity to determinate genetic profiles of cattle breeds in Croatia using new analytical methods, the ratio of dominant allelic polymorphic variants of beta-lactoglobulin (β-Lg and kappa-casein (κ-CN is defined. The share of beta-lactoglobulin B variant is dominant in all investigated cattle breeds (>52.9 %. Kappa- casein allelic variant A is dominant in selected cattle breeds (60.7-76.4 %, while the share of B variant is significantly more presented in autochthonous cattle breeds (48.2-84.1 %. Knowledge about genetic profile of breeds due to studied polymorphic variants of milk proteins is useful in further breeding development and economic reaffirmation of cattle breeds, especially autochthonous ones.

  4. Study of the Association between ITPKC Genetic Polymorphisms and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chih Kan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, hormonal, and genetic factors. Genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1, which codes for the main subunit of the store-operated calcium (SOC channel, were reported to be associated with the risk and recurrence of calcium nephrolithiasis. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 3-kinase C (ITPKC is a negative regulator of the SOC channel-mediated signaling pathway. We investigated the association between calcium containing nephrolithiasis and genetic variants of ITPKC gene in Taiwanese patients. 365 patients were recruited in this study. Eight tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms of ITPKC were selected for genotyping. ITPKC genotypes were determined by TaqMan assay. ITPKC plasmids were transfected into cells to evaluate the intracellular calcium mobilization. Our results indicated that rs2607420 CC genotype in the intron region of the ITPKC gene is associated with a lower eGFR by both Modification of Diet in Renal Diseases (P=0.0405 and Cockcroft-Gault (P=0.0215 equations in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Our results identify a novel polymorphism for renal function and highlight the importance of ITPKC as a key molecule to regulate calcium signaling.

  5. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Sandra; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Swem, Ted; Brimm, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency.

  6. Genetic polymorphism in Taenia solium metacestodes from different Brazilian geographic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanildes Solange da Costa Barcelos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate genetic polymorphisms in Taenia solium metacestodes from different Brazilian geographical areas and to relate them to antibody recognition in serum samples of neurocysticercosis (NC patients. Metacestodes were obtained from the Distrito Federal (DF, Bahia, Minas Gerais (MG and São Paulo (SP regions of Brazil. Samples of human sera from 49 individuals with NC, 68 individuals with other helminthiasis and 40 healthy volunteers were analysed (157 individuals in total. Antigens were prepared and used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting assays to detect specific immunoglobulin G antibodies. Genetic distances between metacestode populations were analysed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Our results show that there was a higher frequency of reactivity in the DF region in the sera from NC patients (p < 0.05, while discrimination between active and inactive NC was seen only in extracts from the MG and SP regions (p < 0.05. Using RAPD, the sample from the DF region presented a greater increase compared to the other regions. A relationship between genetic polymorphisms among T. solium metacestodes from different areas in Brazil and the differences in antibody detection in patients with NC were established.

  7. Outcrossing and coexistence of genetically modified with (genetically) unmodified crops: a case study of the situation in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Lotz, L.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops the EU has demanded that individual member states enact measures to prevent inadvertent admixture ¿ through outcrossing ¿ of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) with products from conventional and organic farming. A literature review on

  8. Optimal control strategy of malaria vector using genetically modified mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, M; Bevilacqua, L; Wyse, A P P

    2009-06-07

    The development of transgenic mosquitoes that are resistant to diseases may provide a new and effective weapon of diseases control. Such an approach relies on transgenic mosquitoes being able to survive and compete with wild-type populations. These transgenic mosquitoes carry a specific code that inhibits the plasmodium evolution in its organism. It is said that this characteristic is hereditary and consequently the disease fades away after some time. Once transgenic mosquitoes are released, interactions between the two populations and inter-specific mating between the two types of mosquitoes take place. We present a mathematical model that considers the generation overlapping and variable environment factors. Based on this continuous model, the malaria vector control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how genetically modified mosquitoes should be introduced in the environment. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed control.

  9. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J

    2016-07-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will generally be available. PCR-based methods are available to detect and quantify known UGMOs in specific cases. If this approach is not feasible, DNA enrichment of the unknown adjacent sequences of known GMO elements is one way to detect the presence of UGMOs in a food or feed product. These enrichment approaches are also known as chromosome walking or gene walking (GW). In recent years, enrichment approaches have been coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and implemented in, amongst others, the medical and microbiological fields. The present review will provide an overview of these approaches and an evaluation of their applicability in the identification of UGMOs in complex food or feed samples.

  10. Disease-threat model explains acceptance of genetically modified products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokop Pavol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favoured survival of individuals who were able to avoid disease. The behavioural immune system is activated especially when our sensory system comes into contact with disease-connoting cues and/or when these cues resemble disease threat. We investigated whether or not perception of modern risky technologies, risky behaviour, expected reproductive goals and food neophobia are associated with the behavioural immune system related to specific attitudes toward genetically modified (GM products. We found that respondents who felt themselves more vulnerable to infectious diseases had significantly more negative attitudes toward GM products. Females had less positive attitudes toward GM products, but engaging in risky behaviours, the expected reproductive goals of females and food neophobia did not predict attitudes toward GM products. Our results suggest that evolved psychological mechanisms primarily designed to protect us against pathogen threat are activated by modern technologies possessing potential health risks.

  11. The state of genetically modified crop regulation in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first commercialized in Canada in 1995 and the 2014 crop represents the 20th year of successful production. Prior to the first commercialization of GM crops, Canada reviewed its existing science-based regulatory framework and adapted the existing framework to allow for risk assessments on the new technology to be undertaken in a timely and efficient manner. The result has been the rapid and widespread adoption of GM varieties of canola, corn and soybeans. The first decade of GM crop production precipitated 2 landmark legal cases relating to patent infringement and economic liability, while the second decade witnessed increased political efforts to have GM crops labeled in Canada as well as significant challenges from the low level comingling of GM crops with non-GM commodities. This article reviews the 20 y of GM crop production in Canada from a social science perspective that includes intellectual property, consumer acceptance and low level presence. PMID:25437238

  12. Proteomic evaluation of genetically modified crops: current status and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yan Gong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hectares of genetically modified (GM crops have increased exponentially since 1996, when such crops began to be commercialized. GM biotechnology, together with conventional breeding, has become the main approach to improving agronomic traits of crops. However, people are concerned about the safety of GM crops, especially GM-derived food and feed. Many efforts have been made to evaluate the unintended effects caused by the introduction of exogenous genes. Omics techniques have advantages over targeted analysis in evaluating such crops because of their use of high-throughput screening. Proteins are key players in gene function and are directly involved in metabolism and cellular development or have roles as toxins, antinutrients or allergens, which are essential for human health. Thus, proteomics can be expected to become one of the most useful tools in safety assessment. This review assesses the potential of proteomics in evaluating various GM crops. We further describe the challenges in ensuring homogeneity and sensitivity in detection techniques.

  13. GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TRADE POLICY EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Frisvold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Where approved, producers have adopted genetically modified (GM crops extensively. Yet, areas not adopting GM crops account for large shares of production and consumption. GM crops differ from previous agricultural innovations because consumers may perceive them as fundamentally different from (and potentially inferior to conventionally grown crops. Many countries maintain restrictions on production and importation of GM crops. GM crop adoption affects producers and consumers, not only through technological change, but also through trade policy responses. This article reviews open economy analyses of impacts of GM crops. To varying degrees, commodities are segmented into GM, conventionally grown, and organic product markets. Recent advances in trade modeling consider the consequences of market segmentation, along with consequences of GM crop import restrictions, product segregation requirements, and coexistence policies.

  14. Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.; Hindar, K.

    of genetically modified plants. This chapter describes both the legislation within the EU and the state of the technology (existing and coming cases). Furthermore, a presentation of the ecological concerns discussed in the report, i.e. invasion, introgression and adverse effects on non-target organisms...... for annual plants, trees and fish, respectively, and suggests a structural/hierarchical decision system for information requirements. The latter should aid to eliminate the 'high-risk' products at an early stage and to improve the design of tests at higher tiers. The second section works with specific...... requirements for the ecological risk assessment of long-lived species like tree species and fish. The third and last section characterises the specific conditions and requirements prevailing in the Nordic region. It is recommended that new field releases and applications for marketing are accompanied...

  15. Electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction detection of genetically modified organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinfeng; Xing Da; Shen Xingyan; Zhu Debin

    2005-01-01

    With the development of biotechnology, more and more genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have entered commercial market. Because of the safety concerns, detection and characterization of GMOs have attracted much attention recently. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) method is a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction of species generated electrochemically on an electrode surface. It is a highly efficient and accurate detection method. In this paper, ECL polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with two types of nucleic acid probes hybridization was applied to detect GMOs for the first time. Whether the organisms contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator. The experiment results show that the detection limit is 100 fmol of PCR products. The promoter and the terminator can be clearly detected in GMOs. The method may provide a new means for the detection of GMOs due to its simplicity and high efficiency

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Toona Ciliata Roem. Based on Sequence-Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Zhan, Xin; Que, Qingmin; Qu, Wenting; Liu, Mingqian; Ouyang, Kunxi; Li, Juncheng; Deng, Xiaomei; Zhang, Junjie; Liao, Boyong; Pian, Ruiqi; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity among 30 populations of Toona ciliata Roem. sampled from the species’ distribution area in China. To analyze the polymorphism in the SRAP profiles, 1505 primer pairs were screened and 24 selected. A total of 656 SRAP bands ranging from 100 to 1500 bp were acquired, of these 505 bands (77%) were polymorphic. The polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.32 to 0.45, with an av...

  17. Genetically modified crops: detection strategies and biosafety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamle, Suchitra; Ali, Sher

    2013-06-15

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are increasingly gaining acceptance but concurrently consumers' concerns are also increasing. The introduction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes into the plants has raised issues related to its risk assessment and biosafety. The International Regulations and the Codex guidelines regulate the biosafety requirements of the GM crops. In addition, these bodies synergize and harmonize the ethical issues related to the release and use of GM products. The labeling of GM crops and their products are mandatory if the genetically modified organism (GMO) content exceeds the levels of a recommended threshold. The new and upcoming GM crops carrying multiple stacked traits likely to be commercialized soon warrant sensitive detection methods both at the DNA and protein levels. Therefore, traceability of the transgene and its protein expression in GM crops is an important issue that needs to be addressed on a priority basis. The advancement in the area of molecular biology has made available several bioanalytical options for the detection of GM crops based on DNA and protein markers. Since the insertion of a gene into the host genome may even cause copy number variation, this may be uncovered using real time PCR. Besides, assessing the exact number of mRNA transcripts of a gene, correlation between the template activity and expressed protein may be established. Here, we present an overview on the production of GM crops, their acceptabilities, detection strategies, biosafety issues and potential impact on society. Further, overall future prospects are also highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. QUANTIFICATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED MAIZE MON 810 IN PROCESSED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Siekel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Maize MON 810 (Zea mays L. represents the majority of genetically modified food crops. It is the only transgenic cultivar grown in the EU (European Union countries and food products with its content higher than 0.9 % must be labelled. This study was aimed at impact of food processing (temperature, pH and pressure on DNA degradation and quantification of the genetically modified maize MON 810. The transgenic DNA was quantified by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Processing as is high temperature (121 °C, elevated pressure (0.1 MPa and low pH 2.25 fragmented DNA. A consequence of two order difference in the species specific gene content compared to the transgenic DNA content in plant materials used has led to false negative results in the quantification of transgenic DNA. The maize containing 4.2 % of the transgene after processing appeared to be as low as 3.0 % (100 °C and 1.9 % (121 °C, 0.1 MPa. The 2.1 % amount of transgene dropped at 100 °C to 1.0 % and at 121 °C, 0.1 MPa to 0.6 %. Under such make up the DNA degradation of transgenic content showed up 2 or 3 time higher decrease a consequence of unequal gene presence. Such genes disparity is expressed as considerable decrease of transgenic content while the decrease of species specific gene content remains unnoticed. Based on our findings we conclude that high degree of processing might have led to false negative results of the transgenic constituent quantification. Determination of GMO content in processed foods may leads to incorrect statement and labelling in these cases could misleads consumers.doi:10.5219/212

  19. The frequency of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms in Russian patients with peptic ulcers treated with proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, D A; Denisenko, N P; Sizova, Z M; Grachev, A V; Velikolug, K A

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors, which are widely used as acid-inhibitory agents for the treatment of peptic ulcers, are mainly metabolized by 2C19 isoenzyme of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C19). CYP2C19 has genetic polymorphisms, associated with extensive, poor, intermediate or ultra-rapid metabolism of proton pump inhibitors. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C19 could be of clinical concern in the treatment of peptic ulcers with proton pump inhibitors. To investigate the frequencies of CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3, and CYP2C19*17 alleles and genotypes in Russian patients with peptic ulcers. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 971 patients of Caucasian origin with Russian nationality from Moscow region with endoscopically and histologically proven ulcers, 428 males (44%) and 543 females (56%). The mean age was 44.6±11.9 years (range: 15-88 years). DNA was extracted from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid whole blood samples (10 mL). The polymorphisms CYP2C19 681G.A (CYP2C19*2, rs4244285), CYP2C19 636 G.A (CYP2C19*3, rs4986893) and CYP2C19 -806 C.T (CYP2C19*17, rs12248560) were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Regarding CYP2C19 genotype, 317 patients (32.65%) out of 971 were CYP2C19*1/*1 carriers classified as extensive metabolizers. Three hundred and eighty-six (39.75%) with CYP2C19*1/*17 or CYP2C19*17/*17 genotype were ultra-rapid metabolizers. Two hundred and fifty-one people (25.85%) were intermediate metabolizers with CYP2C19*1/*2, CYP2C19*2/*17, CYP2C19*1/*3, CYP2C19*3/*17 genotypes. Seventeen patients (1.75%) with CYP2C19*2/*2, CYP2C19*3/*3, CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes were poor metabolizers. The allele frequencies were the following: CYP2C19*2 - 0.140, CYP2C19*3 - 0.006, CYP2C19*17 - 0.274. There is a high frequency of CYP2C19 genotypes associated with modified response to proton pump inhibitors in Russian patients with peptic ulcers. Genotyping for CYP2C19 polymorphisms is suggested to be a useful tool for personalized dosing of proton pump inhibitors.

  20. Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Reveal Genetic Differentiation between Two Sympatric Types of Galaxea fascicularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nakajima

    Full Text Available The reef-building, scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis, is classified into soft and hard types, based on nematocyst morphology. This character is correlated with the length of the mitochondrial non-coding region (mt-Long: soft colony type, and nematocysts with wide capsules and long shafts; mt-Short: hard colony type, and nematocysts with thin capsules and short shafts. We isolated and characterized novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for G. fascicularis using next-generation sequencing. Based upon the mitochondrial non-coding region, 53 of the 97 colonies collected were mt-Long (mt-L and 44 were mt-Short (mt-S. Among the 53 mt-L colonies, 27 loci were identified as amplifiable, polymorphic microsatellite loci, devoid of somatic mutations and free of scoring errors. Eleven of those 27 loci were also amplifiable and polymorphic in the 44 mt-S colonies; these 11 are cross-type microsatellite loci. The other 16 loci were considered useful only for mt-L colonies. These 27 loci identified 10 multilocus lineages (MLLs among the 53 mt-L colonies (NMLL/N = 0.189, and the 11 cross-type loci identified 7 MLLs in 44 mt-S colonies (NMLL/N = 0.159. Significant genetic differentiation between the two types was detected based on the genetic differentiation index (FST = 0.080, P = 0.001. Bayesian clustering also indicated that these two types are genetically isolated. While nuclear microsatellite genotypes also showed genetic differentiation between mitochondrial types, the mechanism of divergence is not yet clear. These markers will be useful to estimate genetic diversity, differentiation, and connectivity among populations, and to understand evolutionary processes, including divergence of types in G. fascicularis.

  1. Detection method for genetically modified papaya using duplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shimizu, Kaori; Mishima, Takashi; Aoki, Nobutaro; Hattori, Hideki; Sato, Hidetaka; Ueda, Nobuo; Watanabe, Takahiro; Hino, Akihiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2006-08-01

    A simple and rapid method for the identification of genetically modified (GM) papaya, derived from Line 55-1, was developed by modifying the Japanese official PCR method. Genomic DNA was directly extracted from the fresh fruit without the lyophilization step, using a commercial silica-based kit. To develop a duplex PCR method which simultaneously detects the GM papaya-specific gene and the intrinsic papain gene, the papain 2-5'/3' (amplicon size; 184 bp) primer pair for the detection of the papain gene was newly designed within the region of the products (211 bp) amplified using the papain 1-5'/-3' primer pair adopted in the Japanese official PCR method. To detect the GM papaya-specific gene, the primer pair Nos C-5'/CaM N-3' described in the Japanese official method was used. The DNA sequences of the GM papaya gene and the intrinsic papain gene were co-amplified using the PCR method in a single tube. The developed duplex PCR method allows the simultaneous detection of the products by means of agarose gel electrophoresis or microchip electrophoresis. The proposed method for GM papaya identification is simple and rapid.

  2. [Detection of genetically modified organisms obtained from food samples ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monma, Kimio; Araki, Rie; Ichikawa, Hisatsugu; Sato, Masaki; Uno, Naomichi; Sato, Kazue; Tobe, Takashi; Kuribara, Hideo; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Hino, Akihiro; Saito, Kazuo

    2004-08-01

    Genetially modified organisms (GMOs) were explored in food samples obtained from November 2000 to March 2003 in the Tokyo area by using PCR and real-time PCR techniques. The existence of Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS) was surveyed in processed foods derived from soybeans, such as tofu, boiled soybean, kinako, nama-age, abura-age, natto, miso, soymilk and yuba. RRS was detected in 3 of 37 tofu, 2 of 3 nama-age, 2 of 3 yuba and 3 of 3 abura-age samples. The CBH351 in 70 processed corn foods, NewLeaf Plus and NewLeaf Y in 50 processed potato foods, and 55-1 papaya in 16 papayas were surveyed. These GMOs were not detected among the samples. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of RRS and genetically modified (GM) corn were performed in soybean, corn and semi-processed corn products such as corn meal, corn flour and corn grits. RRS was detected in 42 of 178 soybean samples, and the amount of RRS in RRS-positive samples was determined. The content was in the range of 0.1-1.4% in identity-preserved soybeans (non-GMO), and 49.8-78.8% in non-segregated soybeans. On the other hand, GM corns were detected in 8 of 26 samples. The amount of GM corn in GM corn-positive samples was in the range of 0.1-2.0%.

  3. Acceptance of genetically modified foods: the relation between technology and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbült, Petra; De Vries, Nanne K; van Breukelen, Gerard; Dreezens, Ellen; Martijn, Carolien

    2008-07-01

    This study investigates why consumers accept different genetically modified food products to different extents. The study shows that whether food products are genetically modified or not and whether they are processed or not are the two important features that affect the acceptance of food products and their evaluation (in terms of perceived healthiness, naturalness, necessity and tastiness). The extent to which these evaluation attributes and acceptance of a product are affected by genetic modification or processing depends on whether the product is negatively affected by the other technology: Any technological change to a 'natural' product (when nonprocessed products are genetically modified or when non-genetically modified products are processed) affect evaluation and acceptance stronger than a change to an technologically adapted product (when processed products are also genetically modified or vice versa). Furthermore, evaluation attributes appear to mediate the effects of genetic modification and processing on acceptance.

  4. The Discussion around the agricultural Products Genetically Modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez H, Andres

    2003-01-01

    The transgenic products or genetically modified have been product of the vertiginous technological developments related with the sciences of the life and mainly of the genetics. The Introduction of these products to the market has generated big expectations and discussions. It is undoubtedly intention of this paper to provide the reader a conceptual mark that identifies the main arguments exposed by the parts in debate, to identify the most relevant aspects in the international legislation and to describe shortly how the topic is approached in Colombia. They are gathered this way then and the so much arguments of defenders like opponents contain regarding the topic, among those that the improvement, of the productivity and the yields can be included by cultivated meter, the decrease of the malnutrition at world level, environmental risks for possible reductions of the biodiversity and of development of resistant plagues to pesticides or herbicides, among others. At international level the first steps are giving to unify a clear legislation in this respect, although at the moment it is not articulate with other legislations like the World Trade Organization WTO)

  5. Genetically modified organisms in light of domestic and world regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available At the same time as development and registration of new genetic modification of plant species have intensified, the number of countries in which they are grown has also increased considerably. Genetically modified crops were grown in 22 countries in 2006, six of which were in European Union. Protocol on Biosafety, known as Cartagena protocol was adopted at the international level in February, 2000. Presence, but not growing of GMO in food is allowed in many countries, while in some others labeling of food origination from GMO is obligatory. Labeling is obligatory in European Union, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Norway, Switzerland and some others. In our country the Law on GMO and sub-law acts were conceived according to EU regulative. The terms for limited use, production, trade of GMO and GMO products have been prescribed. Validation and standardization of GMO testing methods are now being implemented. It is expected that the analytical GMO methods will soon be harmonized at the international level. .

  6. Genetic variability of the stable fly assessed on a global scale using amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, Kathleen M; Skoda, Steven R; Foster, John E

    2016-10-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is a blood-feeding, economically important pest of animals and humans worldwide. Improved management strategies are essential and their development would benefit from studies on genetic diversity of stable flies. Especially if done on a global scale, such research could generate information necessary for the development and application of more efficient control methods. Herein we report on a genetic study of stable flies using amplified fragment length polymorphism, with samples of 10-40 individuals acquired from a total of 25 locations in the Nearctic, Neotropic, Palearctic, Afrotropic and Australasian biogeographical regions. We hypothesized that genetic differentiation would exist across geographical barriers. Although FST (0.33) was moderately high, the GST (0.05; representing genetic diversity between individuals) was very low; Nm values (representing gene flow) were high (9.36). The mismatch distribution and tests of neutrality suggested population expansion, with no genetic differentiation between locations. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results showed the majority of genetic diversity was within groups. The mantel test showed no correlation between geographic and genetic distance; this strongly supports the AMOVA results. These results suggest that stable flies did not show genetic differentiation but are panmictic, with no evidence of isolation by distance or across geographical barriers. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  8. Genetic polymorphism of enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, C

    2000-09-01

    Environmental factors such as smoking cigarette, diets and alcohol may interact with genetic factors, which put one individual at a greater or lesser risk of a particular cancer than another. Advances in molecular biology have allowed many allelic variants of several drug metabolizing enzymes so that individuals with the susceptible genotypes can be determined easily. Many pieces of research have focused on the relationship between the distribution of polymorphic variants of different forms of the metabolic enzymes and colorectal cancer susceptibility because of importance roles of the metabolic enzymes in the activation of many procarcinogens or chemicals. In this respect five groups of the metabolic enzymes, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/CYP1A2, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), N-acetyltransferases (NATs), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), have been discussed here. A positive association between development of colorectal cancer and the mutant homozygous genotype in Msp1 polymorphism of CYP1A1 gene has been reported in Japanese in Hawaii. The relation between genetic polymorphisms in GSTs and cancer risk has also taken an interest. At least nine studies have demonstrated the relation between the GST polymorphisms and colorectal cancer. Two of these studies suggested an increased risk of approximately 2-fold among those with the GSTM1 null genotype, while others found no risk increase. None of these studies examined the combined effect of CYP1A1 and GST polymorphisms. Either NAT2 or CYP1A2 alone have been slightly associated with colorectal cancer. When CYP1A2 and NAT2 phenotype were combined, a significant increased risk (odds ratio of 2.8) was seen among well done meat consumers with the rapid-rapid phenotype. Two published studies have found that the risk of colorectal cancer can be enhanced (2-3 fold) in alcohol drinkers with heterozygous genotype of ALDH2 in two Japanese populations recently. Findings from three

  9. Genetic polymorphism among 14 elite Coffea arabica L. cultivars using RAPD markers associated with restriction digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sera Tumoru

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the genetic variability among genotypes is important for the transfer of useful genes and to maximize the use of available germplasm resources. This study was carried out to assess the genetic variability of 14 elite Coffea arabica cultivars using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD associated with a prior digestion of genomic DNA with restriction endonucleases. The accessions were obtained from the Coffea collection maintained at the Instituto Agronômico do Paraná (IAPAR, located in Londrina, Paraná, Brazil. Twenty-four informative RAPD primers, used in association with restriction enzymes, yielded 330 reproducible and scorable DNA bands, of which 224 (68% were polymorphic. The amplified products were used to estimate the genetic variability using Dice's similarity coefficient. The data matrix was converted to a dendrogram and a three-dimensional plot using principal coordinate analysis. The accessions studied were separated into clusters in a manner that was consistent with the known pedigree. The associations obtained in the dendrogram and in the principal coordinate analysis plot suggest the probable origin of the Kattimor cultivar. The RAPD technique associated with restriction digestion was proved to be a useful tool for genetic characterization of C. arabica genotypes making an important contribution to the application of molecular markers to coffee breeding.

  10. Individual Variations in Inorganic Arsenic Metabolism Associated with AS3MT Genetic Polymorphisms

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    Haruo Takeshita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual variations in inorganic arsenic metabolism may influence the toxic effects. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (AS3MT that can catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet to trivalent arsenical, may play a role in arsenic metabolism in humans. Since the genetic polymorphisms of AS3MT gene may be associated with the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic toxicity, relationships of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in AS3MT with inorganic arsenic metabolism have been investigated. Here, we summarize our recent findings and other previous studies on the inorganic arsenic metabolism and AS3MT genetic polymorphisms in humans. Results of genotype dependent differences in arsenic metabolism for most of SNPs in AS3MT were Inconsistent throughout the studies. Nevertheless, two SNPs, AS3MT 12390 (rs3740393 and 14458 (rs11191439 were consistently related to arsenic methylation regardless of the populations examined for the analysis. Thus, these SNPs may be useful indicators to predict the arsenic metabolism via methylation pathways.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms and valproic acid plasma concentration in children with epilepsy on valproic acid monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shenghui; Feng, Weixing; Zhu, Leting; Yu, Yazhen; Yang, Weili; Gao, Baoqin; Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Zhigang; Fang, Fang

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the association between genetic polymorphisms and valproic acid (VPA) concentration to dose ratio in children with epilepsy on VPA monotherapy. A total of 137 children, aged 3.5-18 years, (89 males and 48 females) with epilepsy on sustained-release VPA monotherapy were enrolled. Trough plasma concentrations of VPA at steady-state were measured using an AXSYM automatic immunity analyzer. The values were divided by body weight and total daily dose to calculate concentration to dose ratio of VPA (CDRV). Forty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in the pharmacokinetics of VPA were identified by MassARRAY system. The logarithmic transformed CDRV (lnCDRV) was normally distributed, and PLINK software was used to evaluate the association between genetic polymorphisms and lnCDRV using linear regression adjusted for gender and seizure type. rs28898617 (UGT1A3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10, BETA=0.32, P=0.0089) was significantly associated with higher lnCDRV. No other associations were found. In pediatric patients taking VPA monotherapy, rs28898617 was associated with a higher normalized VPA plasma concentration. Further studies are warranted to confirm the results. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of association of cathepsin D genetic polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Park, Woong Yang; Kim, Ki Woong; Lee, Kwang Hyuk; Lee, Dong Young; Youn, Jong Chul; Choo, Il Han; Seo, Jeong Sun; Woo, Jong Inn

    2005-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a good candidate susceptibility marker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), since it was found to be involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein and the formation of the hyperphosphorylated tau. And recently, a CatD genetic polymorphism was found to be associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a German population. However, the CatD T-AD association has not been replicated in a series of the successive independent studies in other races. Therefore, we determined CatD genotypes to examine the possible association of the CatD polymorphism with AD in Koreans. We failed to find significant association between the CatD T allele and AD. In addition, the CatD T--AD association was not significant regardless of the age at onset or the occurrence of the apolipoprotein epsilon4 allele. However, we cannot exclude the possible contribution of the CatD in the development of AD, since the power of the present study was not high enough because of low allelic frequency of the CatD T in Koreans and small sample size. In conclusion, the association between the CatD genetic polymorphism and AD was not found in Koreans, although it waits for further replication in an extended sample.

  13. Do Organic Consumers Oppose Genetically Modified Food Stronger than Others? Results of a Consumer Research in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Wirthgen, Antje

    2007-01-01

    The majority of consumers, in particular European consumers oppose genetic modifi-cation of food. Although consumers oppose strongly genetic modification of food, genetically modified food production increases world wide. The co-existence of both, genetically modified food production and food production free of genetic modification cannot be ensured. There is always a risk that non-genetically modified food gets contaminated despite safety regulations. Thus, even organic production, which is ...

  14. Aminolevulinate dehydrogenase polymorphisms did not modified lead serum and memory relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantip Rujito

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lead accumulation in the blood widely known affecting the formation of heme and oxygen transport processes in vital organs, Leading to organ failure including the brain synapses. Lead affinity has been recognized influenced by constitutional genotype of aminolevulinate dehydrogenase (ALAD, which encodes for heme synthesis. This research aimed to determine the relationship between plumbum (Pb and short term memory on each ALAD gene genotyping (ALAD 1-1, ALAD 1-2 or ALAD 2-2 in gas station workers. METHODS Seventy six probands from gas station workers were recruited to participate in this research. Each probands was carried out ALAD genotyping using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCRRFLP method, lead serum level using atomic absorbent spectrophotometer (AAS, and short term memory was measurement by intelligence structure test (IST. RESULTS Proportion of δ ALAD 1-1, 1-2, and 2-2 were 91.8%, 8.2% and 0% respectively. Lead serum showed 15.84 ppb in homozygous 1-1, and 20.79 ppb in heterozygous. Short term memory in the probands varied from 85 until 117, with average in 99.71. There was significant negative relationship between lead serum and short term memory (r=-0.24; p=0.038. However, we could not find any significant correlation in each δ ALAD genotypes. CONCLUSION The δ ALAD genotypes did not modified the relationship between serum lead level and short term memory in gas station workers.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms associated with fatty liver disease and fibrosis in HIV positive patients receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Dold

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis can occur with any antiretroviral therapy (cART. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified to predispose to alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, their role for treatment-associated steatosis in HIV-positive patients remains unclear. We determined the frequency of PNPLA3 (rs738409, CSPG3/NCAN (rs2228603, GCKR (rs780094, PPP1R3B (rs4240624, TM6SF (rs8542926, LYPLAL1 (rs12137855 and MBOAT7 (rs626283 by RT-PCR in 117 HIV-positive patients on cART and stratified participants based on their "controlled attenuation parameter" (CAP into probable (CAP: 215-300 dB/m and definite (CAP >300 dB/m hepatic steatosis. We analyzed CAP values and routine metabolic parameters according to the allele frequencies. Sixty-five (55.6% and 13 (11.1% patients were allocated to probable and definite steatosis. CAP values (p = 0.012 and serum triglycerides (p = 0.043 were increased in carriers of the GCKR (rs780094 A allele. Cox logistic regression identified triglycerides (p = 0.006, bilirubin (p = 0.021 and BMI (p = 0.068, but not the genetic parameters as risk factors for the occurrence of hepatic steatosis. Taken together, according to the limited sample size, this exploratory study generates the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms seem to exert minor effects on the risk for fatty liver disease in HIV-positive patients on cART. Nevertheless, SNPs may modify metabolic complications once metabolic abnormalities have developed. Hence, subsequent analysis of a larger cohort is needed.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms associated with fatty liver disease and fibrosis in HIV positive patients receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Carolin; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Boesecke, Christoph; Hansel, Cordula; Nischalke, Hans-Dieter; Lutz, Philipp; Mohr, Raphael; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Strassburg, Christian P.; Trebicka, Jonel; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Spengler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis can occur with any antiretroviral therapy (cART). Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified to predispose to alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, their role for treatment-associated steatosis in HIV-positive patients remains unclear. We determined the frequency of PNPLA3 (rs738409), CSPG3/NCAN (rs2228603), GCKR (rs780094), PPP1R3B (rs4240624), TM6SF (rs8542926), LYPLAL1 (rs12137855) and MBOAT7 (rs626283) by RT-PCR in 117 HIV-positive patients on cART and stratified participants based on their “controlled attenuation parameter” (CAP) into probable (CAP: 215–300 dB/m) and definite (CAP >300 dB/m) hepatic steatosis. We analyzed CAP values and routine metabolic parameters according to the allele frequencies. Sixty-five (55.6%) and 13 (11.1%) patients were allocated to probable and definite steatosis. CAP values (p = 0.012) and serum triglycerides (p = 0.043) were increased in carriers of the GCKR (rs780094) A allele. Cox logistic regression identified triglycerides (p = 0.006), bilirubin (p = 0.021) and BMI (p = 0.068), but not the genetic parameters as risk factors for the occurrence of hepatic steatosis. Taken together, according to the limited sample size, this exploratory study generates the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms seem to exert minor effects on the risk for fatty liver disease in HIV-positive patients on cART. Nevertheless, SNPs may modify metabolic complications once metabolic abnormalities have developed. Hence, subsequent analysis of a larger cohort is needed. PMID:28594920

  17. [The role of genetic polymorphisms of interleukins in chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients of different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotina, S S; Tikunova, T S; Proshchaev, K I; Efremova, O A; Batlutskaia, I V; Iakunchenko, T I; Sobianin, F I; Churnosov, M I; Alekseev, S M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a multifactorial disease, in which development the important role played the cytokine genes, in particular interleukins. This type of leukemia is more common in the elderly. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of genetic polymorphisms of interleukin with the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia among residents of the Central Chernozem region of Russia. Genotyping of the -889C/T IL-1A, -590C/T IL-4 and VNTR IL-1 Ra was conducted in 206 patients with CLL and 307 individuals of the control group. The study found that the genetic risk factor for the development of CLL is allele -590T IL-4 (OR=-1,45). The development of thrombocytopenia in patients with CLL is associated with genetic variants -889T IL-1A (OR=1,95), -889TT IL-1A (OR=6,2) and IL-1Ra*1 (OR=-2,32).

  18. Genetic variation in hemp and marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) according to amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datwyler, Shannon L; Weiblen, George D

    2006-03-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae) is one of the earliest known cultivated plants and is important in the global economy today as a licit and an illicit crop. Molecular markers distinguishing licit and illicit cultivars have forensic utility, but no direct comparison of hemp and marijuana amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) has been made to date. Genetic variation was surveyed in three populations of fiber hemp and a potent cultivar of marijuana using AFLP markers. Ten primer pairs yielded 1206 bands, of which 88% were polymorphic. Eighteen bands represented fixed differences between all fiber populations and the drug cultivar. These markers have practical utility for (1) establishing conspiracy in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana, (2) identifying geographic sources of seized drugs, and (3) discriminating illegal, potent marijuana cultivars from hemp where the cultivation of industrial hemp is permitted.

  19. SNP genetic polymorphisms of MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYPB11 genes in four canine breeds upon toxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics have become increasingly promising regarding the clinical application of genetic data to aid in prevention of adverse reactions. Specific screening tests can predict which animals express modified proteins or genetic sequences responsible for adverse effects associated with a drug. Among the genetic variations that have been investigated in dogs, the multidrug resistance gene (MDR) is the best studied. However, other genes such as CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 control the protein syntheses involved in the metabolism of many drugs. In the present study, the MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes were examined to identify SNP polymorphisms associated with these genes in the following four canine breeds: Uruguayan Cimarron, Border Collie, Labrador Retriever and German Shepherd. The results revealed that several SNPs of the CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes are potential targets for drug sensitivity investigations.

  20. Conventional agricultural land use and immissions of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ownership rights do not provide the owner with full freedom of use over the owned thing anymore, especially when it comes to such valuable resources as agricultural land. Ownership rigths are privilegia odiosa these days. Highest legal acts of several countries, as well as decisions of the Court of Justice of the European Union, stress the fact that it is not absolute and that it has a particular social function. The owner is obliged to use the land, and to do so in a conventional manner. Conventional should, with respect to logical reasoning, relate only to what has been accepted, by a broader community, as useful and reasonable. However, that is not always the case in modern world. Agriculture is considered conventional when it is directed towards intensive plant production, while making use of artificial fertilizers, growth hormones, pesticides, fungicides, insecticides, and other chemical products. In USA and some other countries, production of plants which have a DNA modified by use of techniques of genetic engineering (GMO, are treated under the same legal regime. On the other hand, traditional, organic agriculture is treated as an exception, and special, more restrictive rules are applied to it. Civilization obviously found itself in an absurd situation. Something for which it is undoubtedly clear that it is bad in many aspects, and long term unsustainable (conventional agriculture is considered normal, something for which it is not known whether and to which extent it is harmful (GMO agriculture is being tolerated, and something for which we confidently know that it is not harmful, or at least not as nearly as harmful as the previously mentioned is considered an exception (organic agriculture. The difference between GMO immissions and emissions from a certain property being allowed or prohibited, i.e. whether the owner of a particular property will be held responsible for disturbance and possible damage, as a result of contamination of

  1. Genetic polymorphism of toll-like receptors 4 gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms, polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism to correlate with mastitic cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja H. Gupta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An attempt has been made to study the toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4 gene polymorphism from cattle DNA to correlate with mastitis cows. Materials and Methods: In present investigation, two fragments of TLR4 gene named T4CRBR1 and T4CRBR2 of a 316 bp and 382 bp were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, respectively from Kankrej (22 and Triple cross (24 cattle. The genetic polymorphisms in the two populations were detected by a single-strand conformational polymorphism in the first locus and by digesting the fragments with restriction endonuclease Alu I in the second one. Results: Results showed that both alleles (A and B of two loci were found in all the two populations and the value of polymorphism information content indicated that these were highly polymorphic. Statistical results of χ2 test indicated that two polymorphism sites in the two populations fit with Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (p˂0.05. Meanwhile, the effect of polymorphism of TLR4 gene on the somatic cell score (SCS indicated the cattle with allele a in T4CRBR1 showed lower SCS than that of allele B (p<0.05. Thus, the allele A might play an important role in mastitis resistance in cows. Conclusion: The relationship between the bovine mastitis trait and the polymorphism of TLR4 gene indicated that the bovine TLR4 gene may play an important role in mastitis resistance.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms and possible gene-gene interactions in metabolic and DNA repair genes: Effects on DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Souček, P.; Štětina, R.; Haufroid, V.; Kumar, R.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Trtková, K.; Dušinská, M.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, 1-2 (2006), s. 22-31 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Single-strand breaks * Genetic polymorphisms * Metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  3. An application of CART algorithm in genetics: IGFs and cGH polymorphisms in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Selçuk

    2017-04-01

    The avian insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGFs) and avian growth hormone (cGH) genes are the most important genes that can affect bird performance traits because of its important function in growth and metabolism. Understanding the molecular genetic basis of variation in growth-related traits is of importance for continued improvement and increased rates of genetic gain. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of cGH and IGFs genes in Japanese quail using conventional least square method (LSM) and CART algorithm. Therefore, this study was aimed to demonstrate at determining the polymorphisms of two genes related growth characteristics via CART algorithm. A simulated data set was generated to analyze by adhering the results of some poultry genetic studies which it includes live weights at 5 weeks of age, 3 alleles and 6 genotypes of cGH and 2 alleles and 3 genotypes of IGFs. As a result, it has been determined that the CART algorithm has some advantages as for that LSM.

  4. Maintenance of a genetic polymorphism with disruptive natural selection in stickleback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchinko, Kerry B; Matthews, Blake; Arnegard, Matthew E; Rogers, Sean M; Schluter, Dolph

    2014-06-02

    The role of natural selection in the maintenance of genetic variation in wild populations remains a major problem in evolution. The influence of disruptive natural selection on genetic variation is especially interesting because it might lead to the evolution of assortative mating or dominance [1, 2]. In theory, variation can persist at a gene under disruptive natural selection, but the process is little studied and there are few examples [3, 4]. We report a stable polymorphism in the bony armor of threespine stickleback maintained with a deficit of heterozygotes at the major underlying gene, Ectodysplasin (Eda) [5]. The deficit vanishes at the embryo life stage only to re-emerge in adults, indicating that disruptive natural selection, rather than nonrandom mating, is the cause. The mechanism enabling long-term persistence of the polymorphism is unknown, but disruptive selection is predicted to be frequency dependent, favoring homozygous genotypes when they become rare. Further research on the ecological and evolutionary processes affecting individual genes will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causes of genetic variation in populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner; Gniadecki, Robert; Dam, Tomas Norman; Brandslund, Ivan; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Andersen, Malene Rohr; Dessau, Ram Benny; Bergmann, Ann Christina; Andersen, Niels Møller; Abildtoft, Mikkel Kramme; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hetland, Merete Lund; Glintborg, Bente; Bank, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Andersen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share common immunology, but with different heredity that might in part be explained by genetic variables. Using a candidate gene approach, we studied 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 genes that regulate inflammation. In total, we assessed 480 patients with PsO from DERMBIO, of whom 151 had PsC for 10 years or more (PsC10), 459 patients with PsA from DANBIO, and 795 healthy controls. Using logistic regression analysis, crude and adjusted for age and gender, we assessed associations between genetic variants and PsO, PsC10, and PsA, as well as associations between genetic variants and development of PsA in PsO. Eleven polymorphisms in 10 genes were nominally associated with PsO and/or PsC and/or PsA (P psoriasis, two SNPs in the IL12B and TNF genes were associated with susceptibility of psoriasis. None of the SNPs were specifically associated with isolated cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

  6. Modeling genetic imprinting effects of DNA sequences with multilocus polymorphism data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staud Roland

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs represent the most widespread type of DNA sequence variation in the human genome and they have recently emerged as valuable genetic markers for revealing the genetic architecture of complex traits in terms of nucleotide combination and sequence. Here, we extend an algorithmic model for the haplotype analysis of SNPs to estimate the effects of genetic imprinting expressed at the DNA sequence level. The model provides a general procedure for identifying the number and types of optimal DNA sequence variants that are expressed differently due to their parental origin. The model is used to analyze a genetic data set collected from a pain genetics project. We find that DNA haplotype GAC from three SNPs, OPRKG36T (with two alleles G and T, OPRKA843G (with alleles A and G, and OPRKC846T (with alleles C and T, at the kappa-opioid receptor, triggers a significant effect on pain sensitivity, but with expression significantly depending on the parent from which it is inherited (p = 0.008. With a tremendous advance in SNP identification and automated screening, the model founded on haplotype discovery and statistical inference may provide a useful tool for genetic analysis of any quantitative trait with complex inheritance.

  7. Examining consumer behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Alexa; Townsend, Ellen

    2006-06-01

    This study examined behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in a British community-based sample. We used an equivalent gain task in which participants actually received the options they chose to encourage truthful responding. In conjunction with this, theory of planned behavior (TPB) components were evaluated so as to examine the relative importance of behavioral influences in this domain. Here, the TPB was extended to include additional components to measure self-identity, moral norms, and emotional involvement. Results indicated that the monetary amounts participants accepted in preference to GM food were significantly lower than those accepted in preference to non-GM food. However, the vast majority of participants were indifferent between GM and non-GM food options. All TPB components significantly predicted behavioral intentions to try GM food, with attitudes toward GM being the strongest predictor. Self-identity and emotional involvement were also found to be significant predictors of behavioral intentions but moral norms were not. In addition, behavioral intentions significantly predicted behavior; however, PBC did not. An additional measure of participants' propensity to respond in a socially desirable manner indicated that our results were not influenced by self-presentation issues, giving confidence to our findings. Overall, it appears that the majority of participants (74.5%) would purchase GM food at some price.

  8. Determinants of Public Attitudes to Genetically Modified Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Gausmian, Mohd Hanafy; Zulkifli, Faizah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM) salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country. PMID:24489695

  9. [Detection of recombinant DNA from genetically modified papaya].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Y; Asano, T; Shibuya, M; Hino, A; Toyoda, M

    2001-08-01

    A method using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to detect the genetically modified (GM) papaya (55-1 line), of which the mandatory safety assessment has not been finished in Japan because of insufficient data. The papaya intrinsic papain gene was used as an internal control. The results of PCR amplification of the papain gene segment indicated that a commercial silica membrane type kit (QIAGEN DNeasy plant mini) was useful for extraction of DNA from papaya fruit, but not for extraction from canned papaya fruit. On the other hand, a commercial ion-exchange type kit (QIAGEN Genomic-tip) provided enough purified DNA for PCR from canned papaya fruit. Compared with the parental line and other commercial non-GM papayas, the DNA from GM papaya fruit provided specific amplification bands in PCR with five primer pairs (Nos. 2-6) including beta-glucuronidase and neomycin phosphotransferase II gene-specific ones. On the other hand, the primer pairs recognizing these genes showed false-positive results when we used DNAs from canned papaya. Therefore, we recommend that the primer pairs (Nos. 5 and 6) recognizing the sequences derived from two different species of organism should be used in order to detect specifically the GM papaya in canned fruits.

  10. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  11. Perspectives on genetically modified crops and food detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hui Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM crops are a major product of the global food industry. From 1996 to 2014, 357 GM crops were approved and the global value of the GM crop market reached 35% of the global commercial seed market in 2014. However, the rapid growth of the GM crop-based industry has also created controversies in many regions, including the European Union, Egypt, and Taiwan. The effective detection and regulation of GM crops/foods are necessary to reduce the impact of these controversies. In this review, the status of GM crops and the technology for their detection are discussed. As the primary gap in GM crop regulation exists in the application of detection technology to field regulation, efforts should be made to develop an integrated, standardized, and high-throughput GM crop detection system. We propose the development of an integrated GM crop detection system, to be used in combination with a standardized international database, a decision support system, high-throughput DNA analysis, and automated sample processing. By integrating these technologies, we hope that the proposed GM crop detection system will provide a method to facilitate comprehensive GM crop regulation.

  12. Proteomic evaluation of genetically modified crops: current status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chun Yan; Wang, Tai

    2013-01-01

    Hectares of genetically modified (GM) crops have increased exponentially since 1996, when such crops began to be commercialized. GM biotechnology, together with conventional breeding, has become the main approach to improving agronomic traits of crops. However, people are concerned about the safety of GM crops, especially GM-derived food and feed. Many efforts have been made to evaluate the unintended effects caused by the introduction of exogenous genes. “Omics” techniques have advantages over targeted analysis in evaluating such crops because of their use of high-throughput screening. Proteins are key players in gene function and are directly involved in metabolism and cellular development or have roles as toxins, antinutrients, or allergens, which are essential for human health. Thus, proteomics can be expected to become one of the most useful tools in safety assessment. This review assesses the potential of proteomics in evaluating various GM crops. We further describe the challenges in ensuring homogeneity and sensitivity in detection techniques. PMID:23471542

  13. Perspectives on genetically modified crops and food detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are a major product of the global food industry. From 1996 to 2014, 357 GM crops were approved and the global value of the GM crop market reached 35% of the global commercial seed market in 2014. However, the rapid growth of the GM crop-based industry has also created controversies in many regions, including the European Union, Egypt, and Taiwan. The effective detection and regulation of GM crops/foods are necessary to reduce the impact of these controversies. In this review, the status of GM crops and the technology for their detection are discussed. As the primary gap in GM crop regulation exists in the application of detection technology to field regulation, efforts should be made to develop an integrated, standardized, and high-throughput GM crop detection system. We propose the development of an integrated GM crop detection system, to be used in combination with a standardized international database, a decision support system, high-throughput DNA analysis, and automated sample processing. By integrating these technologies, we hope that the proposed GM crop detection system will provide a method to facilitate comprehensive GM crop regulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Stakeholders' attitude to genetically modified foods and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Jahi, Jamaluddin Md; Nor, Abd Rahim Md

    2013-01-01

    Public acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods has to be adequately addressed in order for their potential economic and social benefits to be realized. The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of the Malaysian public toward GM foods (GM soybean and GM palm oil) and GM medicine (GM insulin). A survey was carried out using self-constructed multidimensional instrument measuring attitudes towards GM products. The respondents (n = 1017) were stratified according to stakeholders' groups in the Klang Valley region. Results of the survey show that the overall attitude of the Malaysian stakeholders towards GM products was cautious. Although they acknowledged the presence of moderate perceived benefits associated with GM products surveyed and were moderately encouraging of them, they were also moderately concerned about the risks and moral aspects of the three GM products as well as moderately accepting the risks. Attitudes towards GM products among the stakeholders were found to vary not according to the type of all GM applications but rather depend on the intricate relationships between the attitudinal factors and the type of gene transfers involved. Analyses of variance showed significant differences in the six dimensions of attitude towards GM products across stakeholders' groups.

  15. Recombinant biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose in genetically modified Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldum, Gizem; Bismarck, Alexander; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) exhibits unique properties such as high purity compared to plant-based cellulose; however, commercial production of BC has remained a challenge, primarily due to the strain properties of cellulose-producing bacteria. Herein, we developed a functional and stable BC production system in genetically modified (GM) Escherichia coli by recombinant expression of both the BC synthase operon (bcsABCD) and the upstream operon (cmcax, ccp Ax). BC production was achieved in GM HMS174 (DE3) and in GM C41 (DE3) by optimization of the culture temperature (22 °C, 30 °C, and 37 °C) and IPTG concentration. BC biosynthesis was detected much earlier in GM C41 (DE3) cultures (3 h after IPTG induction) than those of Gluconacetobacter hansenii. GM HMS174 (DE3) produced dense fibres having a length of approximately 1000-3000 μm and a diameter of 10-20 μm, which were remarkably larger than the fibres of BC typically produced by G. hansenii.

  16. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Primo, Cecilia; Elbaz-Younes, Ismail; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potential food safety issues if harmful miRNAs are absorbed and bioactive. For these reasons, it is necessary to evaluate the bioavailability of transgenic miRNAs in genetically modified crops. As a pilot study, two transgenic Arabidopsis lines ectopically expressing unique miRNAs were compared and contrasted with the plant bioavailable small RNA MIR2911 for digestive stability and serum bioavailability. The expression levels of these transgenic miRNAs in Arabidopsis were found to be comparable to that of MIR2911 in fresh tissues. Assays of digestive stability in vitro and in vivo suggested the transgenic miRNAs and MIR2911 had comparable resistance to degradation. Healthy mice consuming diets rich in Arabidopsis lines expressing these miRNAs displayed MIR2911 in the bloodstream but no detectable levels of the transgenic miRNAs. These preliminary results imply digestive stability and high expression levels of miRNAs in plants do not readily equate to bioavailability. This initial work suggests novel engineering strategies be employed to enhance miRNA bioavailability when attempting to use transgenic foods as a delivery platform.

  17. Detection methods and performance criteria for genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Yves; Diolez, Annick; Kobilinsky, André; Magin, Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are necessary for many applications, from seed purity assessment to compliance of food labeling in several countries. Numerous analytical methods are currently used or under development to support these needs. The currently used methods are bioassays and protein- and DNA-based detection protocols. To avoid discrepancy of results between such largely different methods and, for instance, the potential resulting legal actions, compatibility of the methods is urgently needed. Performance criteria of methods allow evaluation against a common standard. The more-common performance criteria for detection methods are precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, which together specifically address other terms used to describe the performance of a method, such as applicability, selectivity, calibration, trueness, precision, recovery, operating range, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, and ruggedness. Performance criteria should provide objective tools to accept or reject specific methods, to validate them, to ensure compatibility between validated methods, and be used on a routine basis to reject data outside an acceptable range of variability. When selecting a method of detection, it is also important to consider its applicability, its field of applications, and its limitations, by including factors such as its ability to detect the target analyte in a given matrix, the duration of the analyses, its cost effectiveness, and the necessary sample sizes for testing. Thus, the current GMO detection methods should be evaluated against a common set of performance criteria.

  18. Consumer perception of genetically modified organisms and sources of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Shahla; Gatto, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been available for commercial purchase since the 1990s, allowing producers to increase crop yields through bioengineering that creates herbicide-resistant and insect-resistant varieties. However, consumer knowledge about GMOs has not increased at the same rate as the adoption of GMO crops. Consumers worldwide are displaying limited understanding, misconceptions, and even unfamiliarity with GMO food products. Many consumers report that they receive information about GMO food products from the media, Internet, and other news sources. These sources may be less reliable than scientific experts whom consumers trust more to present the facts. Although many in the United States support mandatory GMO labeling (similar to current European standards), consumer awareness of current GMO labeling is low. A distinction must also be made between GMO familiarity and scientific understanding, because those who are more familiar with it tend to be more resistant to bioengineering, whereas those with higher scientific knowledge scores tend to have less negative attitudes toward GMOs. This brings to question the relation between scientific literacy, sources of information, and overall consumer knowledge and perception of GMO foods. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Biodegradation of genetically modified seeds and plant tissues during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tim; Alexander, Trevor W; Xu, Weiping; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2010-03-15

    The increasing global market of genetically modified (GM) crops amplifies the potential for unintentional contamination of food and feed with GM plants. Methods proposed for disposal of crop residues should be assessed to prevent unintended distribution of GM materials. Composting of organic material is inexpensive and location-independent. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of composting for disposal of GM plants in terms of reducing seed viability and promoting the degradation of endogenous as well as transgenic DNA. Duplicate samples of corn kernels, alfalfa leaves, and GM canola seeds, meal and pellets were sealed in porous nylon bags and implanted in duplicate 85,000 kg (initial weight) feedlot manure compost piles. Samples were collected at intervals over 230 days of composing. Canola seeds and corn kernels were not viable after 14 days of composting with temperatures in the piles exceeding 50 degrees C. In all samples, PCR analyses revealed that plant endogenous and transgenic fragments were substantially degraded after 230 days of composting. Southern blotting of genomic DNA isolated from canola seeds identified differences in the persistence of endogenous, transgenic, and bacterial DNA. Composting GM and non-GM plant materials with manure rendered seeds non-viable, and resulted in substantial, although not complete, degradation of endogenous and transgenic plant DNA. This study demonstrates that composting could be effective for disposing of GM crops in the event of their inadvertent entry into the food or feed chain.

  20. Monitoring of genetically modified Escherichia coli in laboratory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Fabienne; Wyrsch, Ines; Frank, Jörg; Müller, Matthias; Bertschi, Nicole; Brodmann, Peter; Bagutti, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    Containment of genetically modified (GM) microorganisms such as Escherichia coli is a legal requirement to protect the environment from an unintended release and to avoid horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of recombinant DNA to native bacteria. In this study, we sampled the laboratory wastewater (LWW) at a large Swiss university from three sources over 2 years and cultured ampicillin-resistant, presumptive GM E. coli. From a total of 285 samples, 127 contained presumptive GM E. coli (45%) at a mean concentration of 2.8 × 10 2  CFU/ml. Plasmid DNA of 11 unique clones was partially or entirely sequenced. All consisted of cloning vectors harboring research-specific inserts. To estimate the chance of HGT between GM E. coli and native bacteria in LWW, we identified taxa representative for the bacterial community in LWW using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and measured conjugation frequencies of E. coli with five LWW isolates. At optimal conjugation conditions, frequencies were between 3.4 × 10 -3 and 2.4 × 10 -5 . Given the absence of transferable broad-host range plasmids and suboptimal conjugation conditions in the LWW system, we conclude that the chance of HGT is relatively low. Still, this study shows that the implementation of robust containment measures is key to avoid the escape of GM microorganisms.

  1. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arehart Eric

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194. We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database (n = 29967 and a control set of sequences (coding region not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967. We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in

  2. The consumer and the right to information against the uncertainties surrounding genetically modified foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Michelle da Silva Godoy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Verifies the need for consumer information on the divergênciascientíficas regarding the risks of genetically modified foods . Concludes access to information is inherent in the exercise of the right of choice doconsumidor front of genetically modified foods , as the same were entered the market without the existence of scientific consensus related to risk.

  3. A design for the control of apoptosis in genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Nao; Noguchi, Misa; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have engineered a system that holds potential for use as a safety switch in genetically modified yeasts. Human apoptotic factor BAX (no homolog in yeast), under the control of the FBP1 (gluconeogenesis enzyme) promoter, was conditionally expressed to induce yeast cell apoptosis after glucose depletion. Such systems might prove useful for the safe use of genetically modified organisms.

  4. "Mendel in the Kitchen: A Scientist's View of Genetically Modified Foods".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Benjamin

    2005-06-01

    Is genetically modified food safe? Are concerns over genetically modified food warranted? What is the difference between introducing genes into plants by grafting and by molecular engineering? These and other questions are answered in the book "Mendel in the Kitchen" written by plant biology expert Dr. Nina Fedoroff.

  5. Can health benefits break down Nordic consumers' rejection of genetically modified foods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    ' preferences for genetically modified and conventional cheese with different types of health benefits. Before implementing the conjoint task, two thirds of the respondents were asked to taste a cheese, which was supposedly genetically modified. The results showed homogeneity in preferences within as well...

  6. Health considerations regarding horizontal transfer of microbial transgenes present in genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The potential effects of horizontal gene transfer on human health are an important item in the safety assessment of genetically modified organisms. Horizontal gene transfer from genetically modified crops to gut microflora most likely occurs with transgenes of microbial origin. The characteristics

  7. Novel surface display system for proteins on non-genetically modified gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, T; Kanninga, R; Neef, J; Audouy, SAL; van Roosmalen, ML; Steen, A; Buist, G; Kok, J; Kuipers, OP; Robillard, G; Leenhouts, K

    A novel display system is described that allows highly efficient immobilization of heterologous proteins on bacterial surfaces in applications for which the use of genetically modified bacteria is less desirable. This system is based on nonliving and non-genetically modified gram-positive bacterial

  8. Assessing and monitoring impacts of genetically modified plants on agro-ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpaia, S.; Messéan, A.; Birch, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    effects of genetically modified (GM) plants, tests the efficacy of the EFSA Guidance Document for the Environmental Risk Assessment, explores new strategies for post market monitoring, and provides a systematic analysis of economic aspects of Genetically Modified crops cultivation in the EU. Research...

  9. [Genetic polymorphisms of fifteen short tandem repeat loci in Guilin Han population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Tang, Jian-pin

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the genetic polymorphisms of 15 short tandem repeat (STRs) in Guilin Han population. DNA was extracted by Chelex method, and 15 STRs were analyzed using AmpFISTR Identifiler kit. Four rare alleles, namely FGA * 10, D2S1338 * 10, D3S1358 * 16.2 and D3S1358 * 17.2, were observed. The combined match probability and exclusion probability for the 15 STRs were 2.89 x 10(-17) and 0.9999993, respectively. These STRs have good discrimination power and exclusion probability in Guilin Han population.

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of Capsicum spp germplasm bank accessions based on α/β-esterase polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, E R; Bronzato, A R; Orasmo, G R; Lopes, A C A; Gomes, R L F; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2013-04-12

    Genetic diversity and structure were analyzed in 10 accessions belonging to Banco Ativo de Germoplasma de Capsicum located at Federal University of Piauí in northwestern Brazil that receives pepper samples grown in community gardens in various regions and Brazilian states. Selections were made from seeds of C. chinense (4 accessions), C. annuum (5 accessions), and C. baccatum (1 accession). Samples consisting of leaves were collected from 4-10 plants of each accession (a total of 85 plants). Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify α- and β-esterase polymorphisms. Polymorphism was clearly detected in 5 loci. Sixteen alleles were found at 5 α/β-esterase loci of the three Capsicum species. In the C. chinense samples, the highest HO and HE values were 0.3625 and 0.4395, respectively, whereas in C. annuum samples, HO and HE values were 0.2980 and 0.3310, respectively; the estimated HO and HE values in C. chinense samples were higher than those detected in C. annuum samples. A deficit of homozygous individuals was found in C. chinense (FIS = -0.6978) and C. annuum (FIS = 0.7750). Genetic differentiation between C. chinense and C. annuum at these loci was high (FST = 0.1867) indicating that C. chinense and C. annuum are genetically structured species for α/β- esterase isozymes. The esterase analysis showed high genetic diversity among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and very high genetic differentiation (FST = 0.6321) among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and the C. baccatum accession.

  11. [Genetic polymorphisms and lung cancer risk: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Massa, Ana E; Alonso-Sardón, Montserrat; Menacho-Miguel, José Antonio; Mirón-Canelo, José Antonio; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio

    2014-08-04

    The smoke fume, principal factor in the development of lung cancer, causes the expression of certain cytokines, including interleukin 4, 6, 8 and 10, which may act by inhibiting apoptosis and interfere cellular repair mechanisms and angiogenesis. To determine the possible relationship between gene polymorphisms of these cytokines and lung cancer. To achieve this objective we designed a case-control study, which included 400 patients who had come to the consultation for rapid diagnosis of lung cancer at the Pneumology Department, University Hospital of Salamanca, and whose main criterion exclusion was the lack of active contact with smoke fume. Patients were divided into 2 groups, each consisting of 200 patients: cases (patients diagnosed with lung cancer) and controls (patients without lung cancer). A percentage of 62.8 of men were former smokers at diagnosis compared with 55.5% of women, although the former still had a greater cumulative consumption. Squamous cell carcinoma predominated in diagnosis (48.9% of patients) and more than half were in advanced stages (28.5% in stage iiiB and 25.5% in stage iv). No statistical significance was observed by linking the existence of tumor to the prevalence of any of the analyzed polymorphisms. Polymorphisms in the study did not modify the risk of developing lung cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic Effects of Polymorphisms in Myogenic Regulatory Factors on Chicken Muscle Fiber Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qin Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range. The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p0.05. Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens.

  13. [Consumer reaction to information on the labels of genetically modified food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian-Ponce, Miren Itxaso; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2014-02-01

    To analyze consumer opinion on genetically modified foods and the information included on the label. A systematic review of the scientific literature on genetically modified food labeling was conducted consulting bibliographic databases (Medline - via PubMed -, EMBASE, ISI-Web of knowledge, Cochrane Library Plus, FSTA, LILACS, CINAHL and AGRICOLA) using the descriptors "organisms, genetically modified" and "food labeling". The search covered the first available date, up to June 2012, selecting relevant articles written in English, Portuguese or Spanish. Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All of them should have conducted a population-based intervention focused on consumer awareness of genetically modified foods and their need or not, to include this on the label. The consumers expressed a preference for non-genetically modified products, and added that they were prepared to pay more for this but, ultimately, the product bought was that with the best price, in a market which welcomes new technologies. In 18 of the articles, the population was in favor of obligatory labelling, and in six, in favor of this being voluntary; seven studies showed the consumer knew little about genetically modified food, and in three, the population underestimated the quantity they consumed. Price was an influencing factor in all cases. Label should be homogeneous and clarify the degree of tolerance of genetically modified products in humans, in comparison with those non-genetically modified. Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information. Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modified products and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes new technologies.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing genetic diversity in castor bean (Ricinus communis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabinowicz Pablo D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castor bean (Ricinus communis is an agricultural crop and garden ornamental that is widely cultivated and has been introduced worldwide. Understanding population structure and the distribution of castor bean cultivars has been challenging because of limited genetic variability. We analyzed the population genetics of R. communis in a worldwide collection of plants from germplasm and from naturalized populations in Florida, U.S. To assess genetic diversity we conducted survey sequencing of the genomes of seven diverse cultivars and compared the data to a reference genome assembly of a widespread cultivar (Hale. We determined the population genetic structure of 676 samples using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 48 loci. Results Bayesian clustering indicated five main groups worldwide and a repeated pattern of mixed genotypes in most countries. High levels of population differentiation occurred between most populations but this structure was not geographically based. Most molecular variance occurred within populations (74% followed by 22% among populations, and 4% among continents. Samples from naturalized populations in Florida indicated significant population structuring consistent with local demes. There was significant population differentiation for 56 of 78 comparisons in Florida (pairwise population ϕPT values, p Conclusion Low levels of genetic diversity and mixing of genotypes have led to minimal geographic structuring of castor bean populations worldwide. Relatively few lineages occur and these are widely distributed. Our approach of determining population genetic structure using SNPs from genome-wide comparisons constitutes a framework for high-throughput analyses of genetic diversity in plants, particularly in species with limited genetic diversity.

  15. The influence of tasting experience and health benefits on Nordic consumers' rejection of genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a conjoint study of 750 Danish, Swedish, Nor-wegian and Finnish consumers' preferences for genetically modified and conventional cheese with different types of health benefits. The results showed homogeneity in preferences within as well as across co...... countries. In general, the genetically modified cheese was rejected, but this was modified somewhat by health benefits and tasting experience....

  16. Association between 11 genetic polymorphisms in folate-metabolising genes and head and neck cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiatti, Ana Lívia Silva; da Silva, Lidia Maria Rebolho Batista; Ruiz-Cintra, Mariangela Torreglosa; Raposo, Luis Sérgio; Maníglia, José Victor; Pavarino, Erika Cristina; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria

    2012-07-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in folate metabolism may affect the risk of head and neck cancer (HNSCC) due to its involvement in DNA methylation and synthesis. We conducted a case-control study (265 HNSCC cases and 466 non-cancer controls) to investigate associations of MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, RFC1 A80G, MTHFD1 G1958A, CBS 844ins68, TC2 C776G and A67G, SHMT C1420T and BHMT G742A polymorphisms with HNSCC risk. Interactions between polymorphisms and survival time, tobacco and alcohol habits, age, gender and tumour staging (TNM classification) were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. We found that age ≥ 49 years (P<0.001), male gender (P=0.03), tobacco habit (P<0.001), MTHFR 1298AC/CC (P=0.028), MTR 2756AG/GG (P=0.010) and RFC1 80AG/GG (P=0.015) genotypes were associated with an increased risk of HNSCC. There were interactions between lower survival and CBS 844ins68 (P=0.005); age ≥ 49 years and MTR 2756 AG/GG (P=0.004) and RFC1 80AG/GG (P=0.006) genotypes; male gender and MTHFR 1298 AC/CC (P=0.030), MTR 2756 AG/GG (P=0.006) and RFC1 80 AG/GG (P=0.009); tobacco non-habit and MTHFD1 1958GA/AA (P=0.040); tobacco and MTHFR 1298 AC/CC (P=0.054) and MTR 2756 AG/GG (P=0.010); alcohol non-consume and RFC1 80 AG/GG (P=0.008) with HNSCC increased risk. MTHFR C677CT/TT genotypes were less frequently in advanced tumours (P=0.04). In conclusion, our data provide evidence that folate metabolism genetic polymorphisms associated with variables as advanced age, male gender, tobacco and alcohol increase HNSCC development; CBS 844ins68 and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms are associated with less survival time and advanced stage tumours, respectively. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene-based single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic and association mapping in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carlos H; Cortés, Andrés J; Fernández, Andrea C; Soler, Álvaro; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Makunde, Godwill; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W

    2012-06-26

    In common bean, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are an underestimated source of gene-based markers such as insertion-deletions (Indels) or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, due to the nature of these conserved sequences, detection of markers is difficult and portrays low levels of polymorphism. Therefore, development of intron-spanning EST-SNP markers can be a valuable resource for genetic experiments such as genetic mapping and association studies. In this study, a total of 313 new gene-based markers were developed at target genes. Intronic variation was deeply explored in order to capture more polymorphism. Introns were putatively identified after comparing the common bean ESTs with the soybean genome, and the primers were designed over intron-flanking regions. The intronic regions were evaluated for parental polymorphisms using the single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique and Sequenom MassARRAY system. A total of 53 new marker loci were placed on an integrated molecular map in the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. The new linkage map was used to build a consensus map, merging the linkage maps of the BAT93 × JALO EEP558 and DOR364 × BAT477 populations. A total of 1,060 markers were mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. As a second application of the generated resource, a diversity panel with 93 genotypes was evaluated with 173 SNP markers using the MassARRAY-platform and KASPar technology. These results were coupled with previous SSR evaluations and drought tolerance assays carried out on the same individuals. This agglomerative dataset was examined, in order to discover marker-trait associations, using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM). Some significant associations with yield components were identified, and were consistent with previous findings. In short, this study illustrates the power of intron-based markers for linkage and association mapping in

  18. Identification of genetic polymorphism in Mystus cavasius (Hamilton-Buchanan, 1822 from Gandhisagar reservoir and Bansagar reservoir, Madhya Pradesh, India

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    R.K. Garg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic relatedness was estimated among 30 genotypes of two populations of Mystus cavasius i.e., Gandhisagar reservoir (n = 15 and Bansagar reservoir (n = 15 using 5 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR markers. Ten primers were primarily scored of which, 05 primers showed polymorphism and these were selected for polymerase chain reaction (PCR to be used in the final molecular analyses. 64 scorable loci were generated in genotypes from Gandhisagar reservoir of which 62 loci (70.45% were polymorphic; whereas, 108 loci were obtained in genotypes from Bansagar reservoir out of which 87 (98.86% were polymorphic. RAPD analysis showed that the Bansagar reservoir population had higher genetic polymorphism than the Gandhisagar reservoir population. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA indicated low genetic diversity (Hpop = 0.2017 ± 0.1836; I = 0.312 ± 0.2599 and relative genetic differentiation among the populations (Gst = 0.2052 and restricted gene flow (Nm = 1.9369. The phylogenetic tree constructed by un-weighted pair-group method of analysis (UPGMA showed that all genotypes formed two major clusters representing their respective geographical locations i.e., Gandhisagar reservoir population and Bansagar reservoir population. Present investigation elucidates effectiveness of balancing approaches to make polymorphism as descriptive and determined for optimum genetic amelioration and successful conservation of its genotypic variability. This study also showed high levels of morphometric and genetic variation in Bansagar reservoir population indicated dynamic evolution as revealed by genetic variations in genotypes.

  19. Relationships between genetic polymorphisms and transcriptional profiles for outcome prediction in anticancer agent treatment.

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    Paik, Hyojung; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Doheon

    2010-12-01

    In the era of personal genomics, predicting the individual response to drug-treatment is a challenge of biomedical research. The aim of this study was to validate whether interaction information between genetic and transcriptional signatures are promising features to predict a drug response. Because drug resistance/susceptibilities result from the complex associations of genetic and transcriptional activities, we predicted the inter-relationships between genetic and transcriptional signatures. With this concept, captured genetic polymorphisms and transcriptional profiles were prepared in cancer samples. By splitting ninety-nine samples into a trial set (n = 30) and a test set (n = 69), the outperformance of relationship-focused model (0.84 of area under the curve in trial set, P = 2.90 x 10⁻⁴) was presented in the trial set and validated in the test set, respectively. The prediction results of modeling show that considering the relationships between genetic and transcriptional features is an effective approach to determine outcome predictions of drug-treatment.

  20. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

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    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  1. Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    09-1-0029 TITLE: Exploring the role of genetic modifiers in DNA repair and breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian D...1 September 2009 - 31 August 2013Annual SummarySeptember 2013 Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer Brian D...cause sensitivity to DNA damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an attempt to identify genetic factors which cause predisposition to breast

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of pharmacogenomic VIP variants in the Yi population from China.

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    Yan, Mengdan; Li, Dianzhen; Zhao, Guige; Li, Jing; Niu, Fanglin; Li, Bin; Chen, Peng; Jin, Tianbo

    2018-03-30

    Drug response and target therapeutic dosage are different among individuals. The variability is largely genetically determined. With the development of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, widespread research have provided us a wealth of information on drug-related genetic polymorphisms, and the very important pharmacogenetic (VIP) variants have been identified for the major populations around the world whereas less is known regarding minorities in China, including the Yi ethnic group. Our research aims to screen the potential genetic variants in Yi population on pharmacogenomics and provide a theoretical basis for future medication guidance. In the present study, 80 VIP variants (selected from the PharmGKB database) were genotyped in 100 unrelated and healthy Yi adults recruited for our research. Through statistical analysis, we made a comparison between the Yi and other 11 populations listed in the HapMap database for significant SNPs detection. Two specific SNPs were subsequently enrolled in an observation on global allele distribution with the frequencies downloaded from ALlele FREquency Database. Moreover, F-statistics (Fst), genetic structure and phylogenetic tree analyses were conducted for determination of genetic similarity between the 12 ethnic groups. Using the χ2 tests, rs1128503 (ABCB1), rs7294 (VKORC1), rs9934438 (VKORC1), rs1540339 (VDR) and rs689466 (PTGS2) were identified as the significantly different loci for further analysis. The global allele distribution revealed that the allele "A" of rs1540339 and rs9934438 were more frequent in Yi people, which was consistent with the most populations in East Asia. F-statistics (Fst), genetic structure and phylogenetic tree analyses demonstrated that the Yi and CHD shared a closest relationship on their genetic backgrounds. Additionally, Yi was considered similar to the Han people from Shaanxi province among the domestic ethnic populations in China. Our results demonstrated significant differences on

  3. Genetically modified and wild soybeans: an immunologic comparison.

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    Yum, Hye-Yung; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Sohn, Myung-Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    Most traits introduced into genetically engineered crops result from the expression of new proteins. As the first step toward assessing the allergenic potential of genetically modified organism (GMO) food, immunologic and physicochemical characterizations are needed. We prepared crude extract from GMO soybeans, wild soybeans, curd, and soy milk and then performed sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). After acidification with HCl, the samples were separated to globulin and whey. To evaluate changes in protein composition, either the samples were heated or pepsin was added. Polymerase chain reaction with primer encoding the 35S-promotor and the 3-enol-pyruvyl-shikimat-5-phosphat-synthase gene were performed, respectively, to detect the GMO component. SDS-PAGE results showed definite protein bands at 80 kDa in GMO soybean, 50 kDa in wild soybean, and a similar distribution of protein bands was noticed below 40 kDa. It was difficult to observe protein distribution because of modifications that occurred during processing in soybean-processed products. After heating, proteins of GMO and wild soybeans showed similar distributions and no distinct bands were detected at 50 and 80 kDa. Although SDS-PAGE analyses of raw GMO and wild soybeans differed, the same protein bands of 68, 37, and 20 kDa were observed in the globulin fraction after acidification. After adding pepsin, 20- and 68-kDa bands were found preserved in GMO and wild soybeans. The polymerase chain reaction procedures with primers specific to GMO soybeans showed that GMO soybeans and some curd samples included a GMO component. The skin test results of 49 patients showed 13 positive results to wild soybeans and 8 positive results to GMO soybeans. One patient had a positive skin test result to GMO soybeans only. Sera from nine patients with positive skin tests to the crude extract and a positive capsulated allergen product test to the soybean antigen were used for the immunoblotting

  4. Genetic polymorphisms associated with adverse reactions of molecular-targeted therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

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    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yano, Ikuko

    2018-01-04

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has drastically improved due to the development of molecular-targeted drugs and their use in clinical practice. However, these drugs cause some diverse adverse reactions in patients and sometimes affect clinical outcomes of cancer therapy. Therefore, predictive markers are necessary to avoid severe adverse reactions, to establish novel and effective prevention methods, and to improve treatment outcomes. Some genetic factors involved in these adverse reactions have been reported; however, perspectives on each adverse response have not been integrated yet. In this review, genetic polymorphisms relating to molecular-targeted therapy-induced adverse reactions in patients with renal cell carcinoma are summarized in the points of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. We also discuss about the relationship between systemic drug exposure and adverse drug reactions.

  5. The danger within: the role of genetic, behavioural and ecological factors in population persistence of colour polymorphic species.

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    Bolton, Peri E; Rollins, Lee A; Griffith, Simon C

    2015-06-01

    Polymorphic species have been the focus of important work in evolutionary biology. It has been suggested that colour polymorphic species have specific evolutionary and population dynamics that enable them to persist through environmental changes better than less variable species. We suggest that recent empirical and theoretical work indicates that polymorphic species may be more vulnerable to extinction than previously thought. This vulnerability arises because these species often have a number of correlated sexual, behavioural, life history and ecological traits, which can have a simple genetic underpinning. When exacerbated by environmental change, these alternate strategies can lead to conflict between morphs at the genomic and population levels, which can directly or indirectly affect population and evolutionary dynamics. In this perspective, we identify a number of ways in which the nature of the correlated traits, their underpinning genetic architecture, and the inevitable interactions between colour morphs can result in a reduction in population fitness. The principles illustrated here apply to all kinds of discrete polymorphism (e.g. behavioural syndromes), but we focus primarily on colour polymorphism because they are well studied. We urge further empirical investigation of the genetic architecture and interactions in polymorphic species to elucidate the impact on population fitness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors: no association with genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR and MTR.

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    Tao, Meng Hua; Shields, Peter G; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B; McCann, Susan E; Platek, Mary; Krishnan, Shiva S; Xie, Bin; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Vito, Dominica; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2009-03-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation is recognized as an important feature of breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation of genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MTR), two critical enzymes in the one-carbon metabolism, may alter DNA methylation levels and thus influence DNA methylation in breast cancer. We evaluated case-control association of MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms for cases strata-defined by promoter methylation status for each of three genes, E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 in breast cancer; in addition, we evaluated case-case comparisons of the likelihood of promoter methylation in relation to genotypes using a population-based case-control study conducted in Western New York State. Methylation was evaluated with real-time methylation-specific PCRs for 803 paraffin-embedded breast tumor tissues from women with primary, incident breast cancer. We applied unordered polytomous regression and unconditional logistic regression to derive adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We did not find any association of MTHFR and MTR polymorphisms with breast cancer risk stratified by methylation status nor between polymorphisms and likelihood of promoter methylation of any of the genes. There was no evidence of difference within strata defined by menopausal status, estrogen receptor status, folate intake, and lifetime alcohol consumption. Overall, we found no evidence that these common polymorphisms of the MTHFR and MTR genes are associated with promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 genes in breast cancer.

  7. A Genetic Polymorphism in RBP4 Is Associated with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Ke Wan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance and obesity is influenced by the retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4 adipokine. This study aims to determine if genetic polymorphisms in RBP4 are associated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD in Chinese patients. RBP4 polymorphisms were analyzed by high resolution melting (HRM analysis in a case-control study of 392 unrelated CAD patients and 368 controls from China. The Gensini score was used to determine the severity of CAD. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of RBP4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated for associations with CAD and severity of disease. The A allele frequency was significantly higher in CAD case groups compared to control groups (16.7% vs. 8.8% at the RBP4 rs7094671 locus. Compared to the G allele, this allele was associated with a higher risk of CAD (OR = 2.07 (1.50–2.84. Polymorphisms at rs7094671 were found to associate with CAD using either a dominant or recessive model (OR, 95% CI: 1.97, 1.38–2.81; 3.81, 1.53–9.51, respectively. Adjusting for sex, history of smoking, serum TC, TG, LDL-c, and HDL-c, the risk of CAD for carriers remained significantly higher in both dominant and recessive models (OR, 95% CI: 1.68, 1.12–2.51; 2.74, 1.00–7.52, respectively. However, this SNP was not significantly associated with severity of CAD using angiographic scores in multivariable linear regression models (p = 0.373. The RBP4 rs7094671 SNP is associated with CAD; however, our results do not indicate that this locus is associated with clinical severity of CAD or the extent of coronary lesions.

  8. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF CYTOCHROMES P450 2C9 AND 2C19 IN SLOVENIAN POPULATION

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    Darja Herman

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9 and 2C19 (CYP2C19 participate in metabolism of many clinically important drugs. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are described which may affect drug treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies of polymorphic CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 alleles in Slovenian population in order to estimate the proportion of the population that might experience adverse drug reaction.Methods. The polymorphism of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 was analysed by a genotyping technique, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis. DNA samples from 129 unrelated healthy subjects were obtained from the Blood Transfusion Centre of Slovenia and University Children’s Hospital in Ljubljana.Results. In the analysed group of samples one-third of individuals carried at least one of the defective CYP2C9 alleles while among them 3.2% of individuals had both alleles affected. The frequencies of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 were 0.122 and 0.063, respectively. Almost one-third of Slovenian individuals analysed carried at least one of the CYP2C19 polymorphic allele. The frequencies of CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 were 0.159 and 0.004, respectively.Conclusions. The results of our study indicate that approximately one-third of the patients from Slovenian population may require either adjustments of dose or increased monitoring when initiating treatment with CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 substrates having a narrow therapeutic index. High risk of adverse drug reaction may be expected in 1–3% of eventual patients.

  9. FOXP3 polymorphisms in interstitial lung disease among Chinese Han population: A genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyu; Zhang, Tianze; Zhang, Lili; Han, Kaiyu; Zhang, Linyou

    2018-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXP3 genes were implicated in the causation of some autoimmune diseases; however, association of these genes and ILD has not been reported. To investigate whether FOXP3 polymorphisms are associated with ILD in a representative Chinese population. One hundred and fifty-seven ILD patients and 170 healthy controls were recruited; SNPs were genotyped by the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and SHEsis was used to estimate the haplotype frequencies of SNPs. The CC and TC genotypes of FOXP3 rs2280883 were associated with a significantly higher risk of connective tissue disease-associated ILD (CTP-ILD) than the TT genotype (P = .006). Patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) showed a significantly higher frequency of rs3761547 (GG genotype) and rs3761549 (CC genotype) polymorphisms of FOXP3 as compared to that in controls (P = .038 and P = .026, respectively). The rs2294021 (TC genotype) was less frequently observed among IIP patients as compared to that in controls (P = 0.029). In addition, the FOXP3 CAATC haplotype was associated with a greater risk for CTD-ILD (P =.048) as compared to controls, and the FOXP3 TCCCC haplotype showed an increased IIP risk (P = .001); however, patients with the FOXP3 TACTT haplotype showed a significant protective effect against IIP (P = .036). FOXP3 polymorphisms may be important markers to determine susceptibility to IIP or CTP-ILD in Chinese population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transgene x environment interactions in genetically modified wheat.

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    Simon L Zeller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The introduction of transgenes into plants may cause unintended phenotypic effects which could have an impact on the plant itself and the environment. Little is published in the scientific literature about the interrelation of environmental factors and possible unintended effects in genetically modified (GM plants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied transgenic bread wheat Triticum aestivum lines expressing the wheat Pm3b gene against the fungus powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici. Four independent offspring pairs, each consisting of a GM line and its corresponding non-GM control line, were grown under different soil nutrient conditions and with and without fungicide treatment in the glasshouse. Furthermore, we performed a field experiment with a similar design to validate our glasshouse results. The transgene increased the resistance to powdery mildew in all environments. However, GM plants reacted sensitive to fungicide spraying in the glasshouse. Without fungicide treatment, in the glasshouse GM lines had increased vegetative biomass and seed number and a twofold yield compared with control lines. In the field these results were reversed. Fertilization generally increased GM/control differences in the glasshouse but not in the field. Two of four GM lines showed up to 56% yield reduction and a 40-fold increase of infection with ergot disease Claviceps purpurea compared with their control lines in the field experiment; one GM line was very similar to its control. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that, depending on the insertion event, a particular transgene can have large effects on the entire phenotype of a plant and that these effects can sometimes be reversed when plants are moved from the glasshouse to the field. However, it remains unclear which mechanisms underlie these effects and how they may affect concepts in molecular plant breeding and plant evolutionary ecology.

  11. Molecular toolbox for the identification of unknown genetically modified organisms.

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    Ruttink, Tom; Demeyer, Rolinde; Van Gulck, Elke; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Querci, Maddalena; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Competent laboratories monitor genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and products derived thereof in the food and feed chain in the framework of labeling and traceability legislation. In addition, screening is performed to detect the unauthorized presence of GMOs including asynchronously authorized GMOs or GMOs that are not officially registered for commercialization (unknown GMOs). Currently, unauthorized or unknown events are detected by screening blind samples for commonly used transgenic elements, such as p35S or t-nos. If (1) positive detection of such screening elements shows the presence of transgenic material and (2) all known GMOs are tested by event-specific methods but are not detected, then the presence of an unknown GMO is inferred. However, such evidence is indirect because it is based on negative observations and inconclusive because the procedure does not identify the causative event per se. In addition, detection of unknown events is hampered in products that also contain known authorized events. Here, we outline alternative approaches for analytical detection and GMO identification and develop new methods to complement the existing routine screening procedure. We developed a fluorescent anchor-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the identification of the sequences flanking the p35S and t-nos screening elements. Thus, anchor-PCR fingerprinting allows the detection of unique discriminative signals per event. In addition, we established a collection of in silico calculated fingerprints of known events to support interpretation of experimentally generated anchor-PCR GM fingerprints of blind samples. Here, we first describe the molecular characterization of a novel GMO, which expresses recombinant human intrinsic factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. Next, we purposefully treated the novel GMO as a blind sample to simulate how the new methods lead to the molecular identification of a novel unknown event without prior knowledge of its transgene

  12. Detection of Unlabeled Genetically Modified Soybean in the Omani Market

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    Nabila Al-Sadqi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to screen for products containing Genetically Modified (GM food in the Omani market using detection methods for the presence of Roundup Ready Soybean, Bt176 and MON810 maize in food products and to quantify it in positive samples using real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. A total of 100 food samples were collected randomly from markets in Oman. Out of 59 samples, 8  (13.5% were successfully amplified with the maize plant specific PCR. GM screening showed negative for all samples, which indicated low or no GM maize in the samples tested. Out of 57 soy containing samples, 40 (70% were successfully amplified by the soybean plant specific PCR. Six samples out of the 40 (15% were found positive for GM using P35S-cf3/P35S-cr4 and HA-nos118-f/HA-nos118-r, primer pairs and using GMO5/GMO9 and GMO7/GMO8 primer pairs for specific detection of Roundup Ready Soybean. Real time PCR (TaqMan™ system was carried out for the positive Roundup Ready Soybean samples and results showed that 2 out of the positive GM soy samples contained more than 5%; a Soy Formula for Infants (imported sample contained 21% GM soybean and raw soybean seeds (imported in bulk amounts and packed in Oman  contained 88% GM soybean. The results demonstrate for the first time the presence of GM-soy in food products in the Omani market, reinforcing the need for the use of qualitative and quantitative methods for GM detection in food products.

  13. Genetic association analysis of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and obesity-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Rodríguez, M; Carrillo-Ávila, J A; Schmidt-RioValle, J; González-Jiménez, E; Vargas, S; Martín, J; Rueda-Medina, B

    2018-01-15

    Vitamin D has been established as a key factor in the development of obesity through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of the VDR gene to obesity-related phenotypes in a population of Caucasian young adults. The study population consisted of 701 healthy Spanish young adults (mean age 20.41±2.48). Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VDR (TaqI, BsmI and FokI) were selected as genetic markers. Body composition measurements including weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass (FM), percentage of fat mass (PFM), fat-free mass (FFM) and visceral fat level (VFL) were analysed. Differences in obesity traits across the genotypes were determined using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The FokI polymorphism showed a significant association with PFM across the whole population after adjusting for age and sex (p=0.022). Age-adjusted analysis revealed an association between body weight and the TaqI and BsmI SNPs in males (p=0.033 and p=0.028, respectively). However, these positive findings did not remain significant after applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Our findings suggest that VDR genetic variants are unlikely to play a major role in obesity-related phenotypes in a population of Caucasian young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity of targeted therapy: Implications for response and impact of genetic polymorphisms.

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    Liu, Sariah; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-08-01

    Targeted therapies have unique toxicity profiles. Common adverse events include rash, diarrhea, hypertension, hypothyroidism, proteinuria, depigmentation, and hepatotoxicity. Some of these toxicities are caused by on-target, mechanism-associated effects, which can be stratified as to whether or not the targets are relevant to response. Other toxicities are off-target and may be caused by the class of agent, e.g. antibody vs small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or by immune reactions or toxic metabolites. Both on- and off-target toxicities may be due to higher drug concentrations or altered end-organ sensitivity, which in turn can be a consequence of genetic polymorphisms controlling metabolism or tissue responsiveness. On-target toxicities are important to identify as some correlate with response and, hence, amelioration of these side effects is preferable to dose reduction or stopping drug. Toxicities secondary to relevant target impact may be recognized when distinct types of agents, such as antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors, with the same target have a similar side effect. For example, both bevacizumab and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinase inhibitors cause hypertension; both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies and kinase inhibitors cause rash; and these toxicities correlate with response. Herein we review common targeted agent-related toxicities, relevant genetic polymorphisms, and implications for response and patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic polymorphism of six DNA loci in six population groups of India.

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    Ahmad, Shazia; Seshadri, M

    2007-08-01

    The genetic profile based on autosomal markers, four microsatellite DNA markers (D8S315, FES, D8S592, and D2S1328) and two minisatellite DNA markers (TPMT and PDGFA), were analyzed in six endogamous populations to examine the effect of geographic and linguistic affiliation on the genetic affinities among the groups. The six populations are from three different states of India and are linguistically different. Marathas from western India speak Marathi, an Indo-European language. Arayas, Muslims, Ezhavas, and Nairs from Kerala state of South India speak Malayalam, and Iyers from Tamil Nadu state speak Tamil. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of random, normal, healthy individuals. Locus-specific PCR amplification was carried out, followed by electrophoresis of the amplicons and genotyping. All the loci were highly polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except for loci D8S315 and PDGFA in Iyers and Marathas, respectively. All six loci had high heterozygosity (average heterozygosity ranged from 0.73 to 0.76) and high polymorphism information content (0.57-0.90). The extent of gene differentiation among the six populations (G(ST) = 0.030) was greater than that for four Kerala populations (G(ST) = 0.011), suggesting proximity between the four Kerala populations. This result conforms with the cultural and linguistic background of the populations. The extent of diversity found among the populations probably resulted from the strict endogamous practices that they follow.

  16. Genetic polymorphism at 15 STR loci among three important subpopulation of Bihar, India.

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    Ashma, R; Kashyap, V K

    2002-11-05

    Genotype polymorphism studies at 15 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci were carried out in three genetically important minor caste groups (Yadav, Kurmi and Baniya) of Bihar, a eastern state of India to evaluate their significance in human identification and population genetics study. The selected communities practice endogamy. Despite of same geographical area, the physical features of Yadavs and Baniyas resemble North Indian Indo-Caucasoids whereas Kurmis resemble more to Indo-Austroloids. Among the chosen 15 loci, two are penta-nucleotide repeat: Penta-D and Penta-E, and 13 are tetra-nucleotide repeat: vWA D8S1179, TPOX, FGA, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, THO1, CSF1PO, D21S11, D18S51 and are validated for other population of India and world for forensic testing and human population study. Thirteen of these STR loci are present in the combined DNA index system (CODIS) [J. Forensic Sci. 44 (1999) 1277] and world-wide data is available.

  17. Start codon targeted (scot polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in european old maize (zea mays l. Genotypes

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    Martin Vivodík

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maize (Zea mays L. is one of the world's most important crop plants following wheat and rice, which provides staple food to large number of human population in the world. It is cultivated in a wider range of environments than wheat and rice because of its greater adaptability. Molecular characterization is frequently used by maize breeders as an alternative method for selecting more promising genotypes and reducing the cost and time needed to develop hybrid combinations. In the present investigation 40 genotypes of maize from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Slovakia and Yugoslavia were analysed using 20 Start codon targeted (SCoT markers. These primers produced total 114 fragments across 40 maize genotypes, of which 86 (76.43% were polymorphic with an average of 4.30 polymorphic fragments per primer and number of amplified fragments ranged from 2 (SCoT 45 to 8 (SCoT 28 and SCoT 63. The polymorphic information content (PIC value ranged from 0.374 (ScoT 45 to 0.846 (SCoT 28 with an average of 0.739. The dendrogram based on hierarchical cluster analysis using UPGMA algorithm was prepared. The hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the maize genotypes were divided into two main clusters. Unique maize genotype (cluster 1, Zuta Brzica, originating from Yugoslavia separated from others. Cluster 2 was divided into two main clusters (2a and 2b. Subcluster 2a contained one Yugoslavian genotype Juhoslavanska and subcluster 2b was divided in two subclusters 2ba and 2bb. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in analysis of maize, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and genotypes improvement.

  18. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovel, Irina T; Mejía, Rosa E; Banegas, Engels; Piedade, Rita; Alger, Jackeline; Fontecha, Gustavo; Ferreira, Pedro E; Veiga, Maria I; Enamorado, Irma G; Bjorkman, Anders; Ursing, Johan

    2011-12-19

    In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospitals, two health centres and one regional laboratory during 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt), multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1), dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes and in P. vivax multidrug resistance 1 (pvmdr1) and dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) genes were detected using PCR based methods. Thirty seven P. falciparum and 64 P. vivax samples were collected. All P. falciparum infections acquired in Honduras carried pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr alleles associated with chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity only. One patient with parasites acquired on a Pacific Island had pfcrt 76 T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles. That patient and a patient infected in West Africa had pfdhfr 51I, 59 R and 108 N alleles. Pvmdr1 976 F was found in 7/37 and two copies of pvmdr1 were found in 1/37 samples. Pvdhfr 57 L + 58 R was observed in 2/57 samples. The results indicate that P. falciparum from Honduras remain sensitive to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. This suggests that chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine should be efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, supporting current national treatment guidelines. However, genetic polymorphisms associated with chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine tolerance were detected in local P. vivax and imported P. falciparum infections. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence of drug resistant/tolerant P

  19. Impact of Genetic Polymorphisms on the Smoking-related Risk of Periodontal Disease: the Population-based Study SHIP

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    Schwahn C

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Periodontitis is a bacterial inflammatory disease leading to attachment loss with the consequence of tooth loss. There exists a multifactorial risk pattern including bacterial challenge, smoking, age, sex, diabetes, socio-economic and genetic factors. Smoking has the highest impact on the course of the disease modulated by all the other factors. Here, we report the relationship between smoking and the polymorphisms of genetic polymorphisms inflicted in the pathogenesis. In a randomly selected population-based study, 1083 subjects were typed for the polymorphisms of the IL-1 genotype, Fcγ RIIIb receptor gene, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyltransferase (NAT2 and related to their periodontal state. Smoking behavior was assessed including present and past quality and quantity of smoking. There is a significant dose-effect relationship between the exposure to tobacco smoke and the extent of periodontal disease assessed as attachment loss and tooth loss. Moreover, there are gene-environmental interactions as subjects bearing variant genotypes show an enhanced smoking-associated risk of the disease modulated by these genotypes. In non-smokers, the impact of these genetic polymorphisms is mostly negligible. This study provides support for the hypothesis that subjects bearing genetic variants of polymorphically expressed phenotypes are at an increased risk of periodontitis when smoking. Mostly, this may be accomplished via the influence of smoking-related impairment on defense mechanisms rather than on the pathogenic pathways.

  20. The role of genetic (PON1 polymorphism and environmental factors, especially physical activity, in antioxidant function of paraoxonase*

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    Aneta Otocka-Kmiecik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase 1 ([i]PON1[/i] is a member of a three-gene family ([i]PON1, PON2[/i], and [i]PON3[/i]. PON1 activity dominates in human plasma. It is secreted from hepatic cells and is found in the circulation bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDLs. For many years it has been known only for its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate derivatives. More recently, PON1’s antioxidant activity draws attention as the enzyme was described to prevent oxidation of lipoproteins by reactive oxygen species formed during oxidative stress. PON1 was also shown to hydrolyze atherogenic products of oxidative lipid modification such as phospholipid peroxides and cholesterol ester hydroperoxides. Some studies indicate that the enzyme presents a lipolactonase activity and hydrolyzes homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL. There is growing evidence as to PON1’s protective role in atherosclerosis. Genetic (PON1 polymorphism and environmental factors and lifestyle may influence PON1 blood concentration and biological activity. Among the many recognized factors accounting for lifestyle, physical activity plays an important role. Various, often opposite, effects on PON1 status are observed in regular training and single physical activities. The results of different studies are often contradictory. It may depend on the time, intensity, and frequency of physical activity. Additionally, it seems that the effects of physical activity on [i]PON1[/i] blood concentration and activity are modified by environmental and lifestyle factors as well as [i]PON1[/i] polymorphism.

  1. Pharmacodynamic genetic polymorphisms affect adverse drug reactions of haloperidol in patients with alcohol-use disorder

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    Zastrozhin MS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mikhail Sergeevich Zastrozhin,1,2 Vadim Markovich Brodyansky,3 Valentin Yurievich Skryabin,4 Elena Anatolievna Grishina,5 Dmitry Vladimirovich Ivashchenko,5 Kristina Anatolievna Ryzhikova,5 Ludmila Mikhaylovna Savchenko,1 Alexander Olegovich Kibitov,3 Evgeny Alekseevich Bryun,1,4 Dmitry Alekseevich Sychev6 1Department of Addictology, Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia; 2Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Center for the Prevention of Dependent Behavior, Moscow, Russia; 3Federal Medical Research Centre of Psychiatry and Addictology, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Moscow, Russia; 4Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Department of Addictology, Moscow, Russia; 5Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Centre, Moscow, Russia; 6Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapy, Moscow, Russia Background: Antipsychotic action of haloperidol is due to blockade of D2 receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway, while the adverse drug reactions are associated with striatal D2 receptor blockade. Contradictory data concerning the effects of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding these receptors and associated structures (catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT], glycine transporter and gene encoding the density of D2 receptors on the neuronal membrane are described.Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between DRD2, SLC6A3 (DAT and COMT genetic polymorphisms and to investigate their effect on the development of adverse drug reactions in patients with alcohol-use disorder who received haloperidol.Patients and methods: The study

  2. Genetic polymorphisms associated with smoking behaviour predict the risk of surgery in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, B M; Biedermann, L; van Haaften, W T; de Vallière, C; Schuurmans, M; Begré, S; Zeitz, J; Scharl, M; Turina, M; Greuter, T; Schreiner, P; Heinrich, H; Kuntzen, T; Vavricka, S R; Rogler, G; Beerenwinkel, N; Misselwitz, B

    2018-01-01

    Smoking is a strong environmental factor leading to adverse outcomes in Crohn's disease, but a more benign course in ulcerative colitis. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with smoking quantity and behaviour. To assess whether smoking-associated SNPs interact with smoking to influence the clinical course of inflammatory bowel diseases. Genetic and prospectively obtained clinical data from 1434 Swiss inflammatory bowel disease cohort patients (821 Crohn's disease and 613 ulcerative colitis) were analysed. Six SNPs associated with smoking quantity and behaviour (rs588765, rs1051730, rs1329650, rs4105144, rs6474412 and rs3733829) were combined to form a risk score (range: 0-12) by adding the number of risk alleles. We calculated multivariate models for smoking, risk of surgery, fistula, Crohn's disease location and ulcerative colitis disease extent. In Crohn's disease patients who smoke, the number of surgeries was associated with the genetic risk score. This translates to a predicted 3.5-fold (95% confidence interval: 2.4- to 5.7-fold, Prisk alleles than individuals with the lowest risk. Patients with a risk score >7 had a significantly shorter time to first intestinal surgery. The genetic risk score did not predict surgery in ulcerative colitis or occurrence of fistulae in Crohn's disease. SNP rs6265 was associated with ileal disease in Crohn's disease (Prisk for surgery in Crohn's disease patients who smoke. Our data provide an example of genetics interacting with the environment to influence the disease course of inflammatory bowel disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Aging and a genetic KIBRA polymorphism interactively affect feedback- and observation-based probabilistic classification learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Nicolas W; Petok, Jessica R; Meeter, Martijn; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M; Schröder, Julia; Bertram, Lars; Gluck, Mark A; Li, Shu-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Probabilistic category learning involves complex interactions between the hippocampus and striatum that may depend on whether acquisition occurs via feedback or observation. Little is known about how healthy aging affects these processes. We tested whether age-related behavioral differences in probabilistic category learning from feedback or observation depend on a genetic factor known to influence individual differences in hippocampal function, the KIBRA gene (single nucleotide polymorphism rs17070145). Results showed comparable age-related performance impairments in observational as well as feedback-based learning. Moreover, genetic analyses indicated an age-related interactive effect of KIBRA on learning: among older adults, the beneficial T-allele was positively associated with learning from feedback, but negatively with learning from observation. In younger adults, no effects of KIBRA were found. Our results add behavioral genetic evidence to emerging data showing age-related differences in how neural resources relate to memory functions, namely that hippocampal and striatal contributions to probabilistic category learning may vary with age. Our findings highlight the effects genetic factors can have on differential age-related decline of different memory functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. One Novel Multiple-Target Plasmid Reference Molecule Targeting Eight Genetically Modified Canola Events for Genetically Modified Canola Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuqing; Li, Xiang; Wang, Canhua; Song, Guiwen; Pi, Liqun; Zheng, Lan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2017-09-27

    Multiple-target plasmid DNA reference materials have been generated and utilized as good substitutes of matrix-based reference materials in the analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Herein, we report the construction of one multiple-target plasmid reference molecule, pCAN, which harbors eight GM canola event-specific sequences (RF1, RF2, MS1, MS8, Topas 19/2, Oxy235, RT73, and T45) and a partial sequence of the canola endogenous reference gene PEP. The applicability of this plasmid reference material in qualitative and quantitative PCR assays of the eight GM canola events was evaluated, including the analysis of specificity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and performance of pCAN in the analysis of various canola samples, etc. The LODs are 15 copies for RF2, MS1, and RT73 assays using pCAN as the calibrator and 10 genome copies for the other events. The LOQ in each event-specific real-time PCR assay is 20 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and PEP assays are between 91% and 97%, and the squared regression coefficients (R 2 ) are all higher than 0.99. The quantification bias values varied from 0.47% to 20.68% with relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1.06% to 24.61% in the quantification of simulated samples. Furthermore, 10 practical canola samples sampled from imported shipments in the port of Shanghai, China, were analyzed employing pCAN as the calibrator, and the results were comparable with those assays using commercial certified materials as the calibrator. Concluding from these results, we believe that this newly developed pCAN plasmid is one good candidate for being a plasmid DNA reference material in the detection and quantification of the eight GM canola events in routine analysis.

  5. Consumer reaction to information on the labels of genetically modified food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian-Ponce, Miren Itxaso; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze consumer opinion on genetically modified foods and the information included on the label. METHODS A systematic review of the scientific literature on genetically modified food labeling was conducted consulting bibliographic databases (Medline – via PubMed –, EMBASE, ISI-Web of knowledge, Cochrane Library Plus, FSTA, LILACS, CINAHL and AGRICOLA) using the descriptors “organisms, genetically modified” and “food labeling”. The search covered the first available date, up to June 2012, selecting relevant articles written in English, Portuguese or Spanish. RESULTS Forty articles were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All of them should have conducted a population-based intervention focused on consumer awareness of genetically modified foods and their need or not, to include this on the label. The consumers expressed a preference for non-genetically modified products, and added that they were prepared to pay more for this but, ultimately, the product bought was that with the best price, in a market which welcomes new technologies. In 18 of the articles, the population was in favor of obligatory labelling, and in six, in favor of this being voluntary; seven studies showed the consumer knew little about genetically modified food, and in three, the population underestimated the quantity they consumed. Price was an influencing factor in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Label should be homogeneous and clarify the degree of tolerance of genetically modified products in humans, in comparison with those non-genetically modified. Label should also present the content or not of genetically modified products and how these commodities are produced and should be accompanied by the certifying entity and contact information. Consumers express their preference for non-genetically modifiedproducts and they even notice that they are willing to pay more for it, but eventually they buy the item with the best price, in a market that welcomes

  6. Preventing the spread of malaria and dengue fever using genetically modified mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    In this candid interview, Anthony A. James explains how mosquito genetics can be exploited to control malaria and dengue transmission. Population replacement strategy, the idea that transgenic mosquitoes can be released into the wild to control disease transmission, is introduced, as well as the concept of genetic drive and the design criterion for an effective genetic drive system. The ethical considerations of releasing genetically-modified organisms into the wild are also discussed.

  7. Correlation study between genetic polymorphisms of melanocortin receptors and adrenocorticotropic hormone responsiveness in infantile spasms

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    SHI Xiu-yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the possible correlation between the genetic variations of the melanocortin receptors (MCRs, including MC2R, MC3R and MC4R and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH responsiveness in patients with infantile spasms, and to investigate the function of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP found in this study. Methods Direct sequencing method was used to test variations and polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions of the MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene. Haplotypes were structured by using SHEsis and Haploview3.32 programs to analyze the distribution frequencies of polymorphism genotypes, alleles and structured haplotypes in Chinese patients with infantile spasms and normal controls. The association between ACTH responsiveness and genetic variations was also assessed. Results Four SNPs were identified in the MC2R promoter region, one of which was new -found locus named-2T > C. Three SNPs (rs1893220, rs2186944 and -2T > C showed a significant difference between the cases and controls (P = 0.04, 0.02, 0.01. The common haplotype TCCT may give protection against the development of infantile spasms (P = 0.00. Besides, TCCT carriers were more sensitive to ACTH therapy than non-carriers (P = 0.00. The in vitro study proved that the translational efficiency of TCCT promoter in MC2R gene was four times higher than that of TCCC promoter (P = 0.00. MC2R expression assay showed a 5-fold increase in the TCCT promoter in presence of ACTH, compared with that in absence of ACTH (P = 0.00. However, responsiveness to ACTH in expression by TCCC promoter showed only 1.50-fold increase after ACTH stimulation (P > 0.05. The SNP rs11872992 in MC4R gene was related to the development of infantile spasms, as the efficiency of TC genotype in cases was lower than that of normal controls (P = 0.00. The ACTH therapy results of T-allele-carriers were better than that of non-T-allele-carriers (P = 0.01. The difference of SNP distribution frequencies in MC3R gene

  8. Genetic polymorphisms in DPF3 associated with risk of breast cancer and lymph node metastases

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    Hoyal Carolyn R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified rare genetic variations responsible for many cases of familial breast cancer but their contribution to total breast cancer incidence is relatively small. More common genetic variations with low penetrance have been postulated to account for a higher proportion of the population risk of breast cancer. Methods and Results In an effort to identify genes that influence non-familial breast cancer risk, we tested over 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within approximately 14,000 genes in a large-scale case-control study in 254 German women with breast cancer and 268 age-matched women without malignant disease. We identified a marker on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.1 that was marginally associated with breast cancer status (OR = 1.5, P = 0.07. Genotypes for this SNP were also significantly associated with indicators of breast cancer severity, including presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.006 and earlier age of onset (P = 0.01. The association with breast cancer status was replicated in two independent samples (OR = 1.35, P = 0.05. High-density association fine mapping showed that the association spanned about 80 kb of the zinc-finger gene DPF3 (also known as CERD4. One SNP in intron 1 was found to be more strongly associated with breast cancer status in all three sample collections (OR = 1.6, P = 0.003 as well as with increased lymph node metastases (P = 0.01 and tumor size (P = 0.01. Conclusion Polymorphisms in the 5' region of DPF3 were associated with increased risk of breast cancer development, lymph node metastases, age of onset, and tumor size in women of European ancestry. This large-scale association study suggests that genetic variation in DPF3 contributes to breast cancer susceptibility and severity.

  9. Characterization of genetic polymorphism of novel MHC B-LB II alleles in Chinese indigenous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rifu; Li, Kui; Chen, Guohong; Xu, Hui; Qiang, Bayangzong; Li, Changchun; Liu, Bang

    2007-02-01

    Genetic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) B-LB II gene was studied by amplification of exon 2 using PCR, followed by cloning and DNA sequencing in eight indigenous Chinese chicken populations. To reveal the genetic variation of the B-LB II gene, 37 types of patterns detected by PCR-SSCP were investigated first, which would be used to screen novel B-LB II sequences within the breeds. The types of PCR-SSCP patterns and final sequencing allowed for the identification of 31 novel MHC B-LB II alleles from 30 unrelated individuals of Chinese chickens that were sampled. These are the first designators for the alleles of chicken MHC B-LB II gene based on the rule of assignment for novel mammalian alleles. Sequence alignment of the 31 B-LB II alleles revealed a total of 68 variable sites in the fragment of exon 2, of which 51 parsimony informative and 17 singleton variable sites were observed. Among the polymorphic sites, the nucleotide substitutions in the first and second positions of the codons accounted for 36.76% and 35.29%, respectively. The sequence similarities between the alleles were estimated to be 90.6%-99.5%. The relative frequencies of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions within the region were 2.92%+/-0.94% and 14.64%+/-2.67%, respectively. These results indicated that the genetic variation within exon 2 appeared to have largely arisen by gene recombination and balancing selection. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of the beta1 domain coded by exon 2 revealed 6 synonymous mutations and 27 nonsynonymous substitutions at the 33 disparate sites. In particular, the nonsynonymous substitutions at the putative peptide-binding sites are considered to be associated with immunological specificity of MHC B-LB II molecule in Chinese native chickens. These results can provide a molecular biological basis for the study of disease resistance in chicken breeding.

  10. Genetic Structure of the Polymorphic Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) Complex in the Hawaiian Islands Using Nuclear Microsatellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Danica T.; Wagner, Warren L.; Percy, Diana M.; James, Helen F.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands. Methodology/Principal Findings Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data. PMID:19259272

  11. Genetic structure of the polymorphic metrosideros (Myrtaceae) complex in the Hwaiian islands using nuclear microsatellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Danica T; Wagner, Warren L; Percy, Diana M; James, Helen F; Fleischer, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands. Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically. The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data.

  12. Genetic structure of the polymorphic metrosideros (Myrtaceae complex in the Hwaiian islands using nuclear microsatellite data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica T Harbaugh

    Full Text Available Five species of Metrosideros (Myrtaceae are recognized in the Hawaiian Islands, including the widespread M. polymorpha, and are characterized by a multitude of distinctive, yet overlapping, habit, ecological, and morphological forms. It remains unclear, despite several previous studies, whether the morphological variation within Hawaiian Metrosideros is due to hybridization, genetic polymorphism, phenotypic plasticity, or some combination of these processes. The Hawaiian Metrosideros complex has become a model system to study ecology and evolution; however this is the first study to use microsatellite data for addressing inter-island patterns of variation from across the Hawaiian Islands.Ten nuclear microsatellite loci were genotyped from 143 individuals of Metrosideros. We took advantage of the bi-parental inheritance and rapid mutation rate of these data to examine the validity of the current taxonomy and to investigate whether Metrosideros plants from the same island are more genetically similar than plants that are morphologically similar. The Bayesian algorithm of the program structure was used to define genetic groups within Hawaiian Metrosideros and the closely related taxon M. collina from the Marquesas and Austral Islands. Several standard and nested AMOVAs were conducted to test whether the genetic diversity is structured geographically or taxonomically.The results suggest that Hawaiian Metrosideros have dynamic gene flow, with genetic and morphological diversity structured not simply by geography or taxonomy, but as a result of parallel evolution on islands following rampant island-island dispersal, in addition to ancient chloroplast capture. Results also suggest that the current taxonomy requires major revisions in order to reflect the genetic structure revealed in the microsatellite data.

  13. Genetic contributions to age-related decline in executive function: a 10-year longitudinal study of COMT and BDNF polymorphisms

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    Kirk I Erickson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability in the dopaminergic and neurotrophic systems could contribute to age-related impairments in executive control and memory function. In this study we examined whether genetic polymorphisms for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were related to the trajectory of cognitive decline occurring over a 10-year period in older adults. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the COMT (Val158/108Met gene affects the concentration of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, a Val/Met substitution in the pro-domain for BDNF (Val66Met affects the regulated secretion and trafficking of BDNF with Met carriers showing reduced secretion and poorer cognitive function. We found that impairments over the 10-year span on a task-switching paradigm did not vary as a function of the COMT polymorphism. However, for the BDNF polymorphism the Met carriers performed worse than Val homozygotes at the first testing session but only the Val homozygotes demonstrated a significant reduction in performance over the 10-year span. Our results argue that the COMT polymorphism does not affect the trajectory of age-related executive control decline, whereas the Val/Val polymorphism for BDNF may promote faster rates of cognitive decay in old age. These results are discussed in relation to the role of BDNF in senescence and the transforming impact of the Met allele on cognitive function in old age.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of the TYMS gene are not associated with congenital cardiac septal defects in a Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Sun, Jing-Wei; Gu, Zhuo-Ya; Wang, Jue; Wang, Er-Li; Yang, Xue-Yan; Qiao, Bin; Duan, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Guo-Ying; Wang, Hong-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research indicates that periconceptional administration of folic acid can reduce the occurrence of congenital cardiac septal defects (CCSDs). The vital roles of folate exhibits in three ways: the unique methyl donor for DNA expression regulation, the de novo biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine for DNA construction, and the serum homocysteine removal. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is the solo catalysis enzyme for the de novo synthesis of dTMP, which is the essential precursor of DNA biosynthesis and repair process. To examine the role of TYMS in Congenital Cardiac Septal Defects (CCSDs) risk, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS gene associated with the CCSDs in a Han Chinese population. Polymorphisms in the noncoding region of TYMS were identified via direct sequencing in 32 unrelated individuals composed of half CCSDs and half control subjects. Nine SNPs and two insertion/deletion polymorphisms were genotyped from two independent case-control studies involving a total of 529 CCSDs patients and 876 healthy control participants. The associations were examined by both single polymorphism and haplotype tests using logistic regression. We found that TYMS polymorphisms were not related to the altered CCSDs risk, and even to the changed risk of VSDs subgroup, when tested in both studied groups separately or in combination. In the haplotype analysis, there were no haplotypes significantly associated with risks for CCSDs either. Our results show no association between common genetic polymorphisms of the regulatory region of the TYMS gene and CCSDs in the Han Chinese population.

  15. Nationwide French Study of RET Variants Detected from 2003 to 2013 Suggests a Possible Influence of Polymorphisms as Modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeault, Maylis; Pinson, Stéphane; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Carrie, Alain; Barbu, Véronique; Pigny, Pascal; Bezieau, Stéphane; Rey, Jean-Marc; Delvincourt, Chantal; Giraud, Sophie; Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Saulnier, Patrick; Bouzamondo, Nathalie; Chabbert, Marie; Blin, Julien; Mohamed, Amira; Romanet, Pauline; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Rohmer, Vincent; Barlier, Anne; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine

    2017-12-01

    The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the REarranged during Transfection (RET) gene has been investigated with regard to their potential role in the development or progression of medullary thyroid cancer or pheochromocytomas (PHEO) in patients with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spectrum of RET variants in France between 2003 and 2013, and to evaluate the impact of SNPs on the MEN2 A phenotype. In this retrospective cohort study, RET variants were screened in 5109 index cases, and RET pathogenic variants were screened in 2214 relatives. Exons 5, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, and 16 were characterized by Sanger sequencing. RET pathogenic variants, RET variants with unknown functional significance (VUS), and four RET SNP variants-G691S (rs1799939), L769L (rs1800861), S836S (rs1800862), and S904S (rs1800863)-were characterized and are reported in index cases. In silico analysis and classification following the recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics was performed for RET VUS. Each patient's age at the time of diagnosis, sex, and the endocrine neoplasias present at molecular diagnosis were recorded. Twenty-six single VUS in RET without any well-defined risk profiles were found in 33 patients. Nine of these were considered probably pathogenic, 11 of uncertain significance, and six as probably benign. Three double pathogenic variants found in three patients were classified as pathogenic. A study of the entire cohort showed that patients carrying pathogenic variants or VUS in RET together with PHEO were diagnosed earlier than the others. The presence of the G691S SNP, or a combination of SNPs, increased the risk of developing PHEO but did not modify the date of the diagnosis. No association was found between SNPs and medullary thyroid cancer or hyperparathyroidism. The findings propose a classification of 15 of the 26 VUS in RET without any well-defined risk

  16. A genetic polymorphism evolving in parallel in two cell compartments and in two clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Ward B; Hudson, Richard R; Wang, Baiqing; Wang, Eddie

    2013-01-12

    The enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PEPCK, occurs in its guanosine-nucleotide-using form in animals and a few prokaryotes. We study its natural genetic variation in Colias (Lepidoptera, Pieridae). PEPCK offers a route, alternative to pyruvate kinase, for carbon skeletons to move between cytosolic glycolysis and mitochondrial Krebs cycle reactions. PEPCK is expressed in both cytosol and mitochondrion, but differently in diverse animal clades. In vertebrates and independently in Drosophila, compartment-specific paralogous genes occur. In a contrasting expression strategy, compartment-specific PEPCKs of Colias and of the silkmoth, Bombyx, differ only in their first, 5', exons; these are alternatively spliced onto a common series of following exons. In two Colias species from distinct clades, PEPCK sequence is highly variable at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, mainly in its common exons. Three major amino acid polymorphisms, Gly 335 ↔ Ser, Asp 503 ↔ Glu, and Ile 629 ↔ Val occur in both species, and in the first two cases are similar in frequency between species. Homology-based structural modelling shows that the variants can alter hydrogen bonding, salt bridging, or van der Waals interactions of amino acid side chains, locally or at one another's sites which are distant in PEPCK's structure, and thus may affect its enzyme function. We ask, using coalescent simulations, if these polymorphisms' cross-species similarities are compatible with neutral evolution by genetic drift, but find the probability of this null hypothesis is 0.001 ≤ P ≤ 0.006 under differing scenarios. Our results make the null hypothesis of neutrality of these PEPCK polymorphisms quite unlikely, but support an alternative hypothesis that they are maintained by natural selection in parallel in the two species. This alternative can now be justifiably tested further via studies of PEPCK genotypes' effects on function, organismal performance, and fitness. This case

  17. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194). We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database (n = 29967) and a control set of sequences (coding region) not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967). We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p << 0.001) were detected for each SNP type examined in the larger NCBI dataset. Importantly, the flanking region models were elongated or truncated depending on the nucleotide change. Additionally, nucleotide distributions differed significantly at motif sites relative to the type of variation observed. The MDR approach effectively discerned specific sites within the flanking regions of observed SNPs and their respective identities, supporting the collective

  18. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-03-30

    The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194). We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database (n = 29967) and a control set of sequences (coding region) not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967). We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p

  19. Gender differences in consumers' acceptance of genetically modified foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerbeek, H.; Casimir, G.

    2005-01-01

    Research has shown that women are less accepting of genetically engineered products than men. We expect two mechanisms to be at work here. First, in consumer behaviour theory, more knowledge is assumed to lead to more acceptance. We assumed that for genetically engineered foods, this general

  20. Multiple organ histopathological changes in broiler chickens fed on genetically modified organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cîrnatu, Daniela; Jompan, A; Sin, Anca Ileana; Zugravu, Cornelia Aurelia

    2011-01-01

    Diet can influence the structural characteristics of internal organs. An experiment involving 130 meat broilers was conducted during 42 days (life term for a meat broiler) to study the effect of feed with protein from genetically modified soy. The 1-day-old birds were randomly allocated to five study groups, fed with soy, sunflower, wheat, fish flour, PC starter. In the diet of each group, an amount of protein from soy was replaced with genetically modified soy (I - 0%, II - 25%, III - 50%, IV - 75%, V - 100% protein from genetically modified soy). The level of protein in soy, either modified, or non-modified, was the same. Organs and carcass weights were measured at about 42 days of age of the birds and histopathology exams were performed during May-June 2009. No statistically significant differences were observed in mortality, growth performance variables or carcass and organ yields between broilers consuming diets produced with genetically modified soybean fractions and those consuming diets produced with near-isoline control soybean fractions. Inflammatory and degenerative liver lesions, muscle hypertrophy, hemorrhagic necrosis of bursa, kidney focal tubular necrosis, necrosis and superficial ulceration of bowel and pancreatic dystrophies were found in tissues from broilers fed on protein from genetically modified soy. Different types of lesions found in our study might be due to other causes (parasites, viral) superimposed but their presence exclusively in groups fed with modified soy raises some serious questions about the consequences of use of this type of feed.

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms Might Predict Suicide Attempts in Mental Disorder Patients: A Systematic Review And Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros Alves, Veronica; Bezerra, Daniele Goncalves; de Andrade, Tiago Gomes; de Melo Neto, Valfrido Leao; Nardi, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze if the genetic polymorphisms might predict suicide attempts in mental disorder patients. The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted using the PubMed/Medline, Web of science and Scopus database using the terms: "5-HTT or SLC6A4 or 5-SERT and suicide, suicidal ideation or suicidal behavior or suicidal attempt". Thirty articles were analyzed. We found 17 articles that showed association and 13 articles that showed no association between LPR serotonin transporter polymorphism and suicide. A higher study of suicide identified the serotonin transporter polymorphism in patients with schizophrenia, mental disorder, major depression and bipolar disorder. There is an association between the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region and suicidal behavior. The mental disorders with greater relationship with the suicide were the bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia. The L allele had higher risk for suicide.

  2. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the Serotonergic System and Comorbid Personality Disorders Among Patients with First-Episode Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens D; Bock, Camilla; Kessing, Lars V

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the association between genetic polymorphisms and personality disorders have provided inconsistent results. Using the "enriched sample method," the authors of the present study aimed to assess the association between polymorphisms in the serotonergic transmitter system and comorbid...... personality disorders in patients recently diagnosed with first-episode depression. A total of 290 participants were systematically recruited via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. Diagnoses of personality disorders were assessed by a SCID-II interview, and polymorphisms in the genes encoding...... the serotonin transporter, serotonin receptors 1A, 2A, 2C, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were genotyped. The authors found a significant effect of the length polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) on cluster B personality disorder (mainly borderline disorder), but no influence on cluster C...

  3. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Zsofia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680 and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days, repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles, and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using

  4. Genetic polymorphisms of the enzymes involved in DNA methylation and synthesis in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terruzzi, Ileana; Senesi, Pamela; Montesano, Anna; La Torre, Antonio; Alberti, Giampietro; Benedini, Stefano; Caumo, Andrea; Fermo, Isabella; Luzi, Livio

    2011-08-24

    Physical exercise induces adaptive changes leading to a muscle phenotype with enhanced performance. We first investigated whether genetic polymorphisms altering enzymes involved in DNA methylation, probably responsible of DNA methylation deficiency, are present in athletes' DNA. We determined the polymorphic variants C667T/A1298C of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), A2756G of methionine synthase (MTR), A66G of methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), G742A of betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), and 68-bp ins of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) genes in 77 athletes and 54 control subjects. The frequency of MTHFR (AC), MTR (AG), and MTRR (AG) heterozygous genotypes was found statistically different in the athletes compared with the control group (P=0.0001, P=0.018, and P=0.0001), suggesting a reduced DNA methylating capacity. We therefore assessed whether DNA hypomethylation might increase the expression of myogenic proteins expressed during early (Myf-5 and MyoD), intermediate (Myf-6), and late-phase (MHC) of myogenesis in a cellular model of hypomethylated or unhypomethylated C2C12 myoblasts. Myogenic proteins are largely induced in hypomethylated cells [fold change (FC)=Myf-5: 1.21, 1.35; MyoD: 0.9, 1.47; Myf-6: 1.39, 1.66; MHC: 1.35, 3.10 in GMA, DMA, respectively] compared with the control groups (FC=Myf-5: 1.0, 1.38; MyoD: 1.0, 1.14; Myf-6: 1.0, 1.44; MHC: 1.0, 2.20 in GM, DM, respectively). Diameters and length of hypomethylated myotubes were greater then their respective controls. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation due to lesser efficiency of polymorphic MTHFR, MS, and MSR enzymes induces the activation of factors determining proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts promoting muscle growth and increase of muscle mass.

  5. Relationship between HLA-DQA1 polymorphism and genetic susceptibility to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Wei-min; Sun, Ning-ling

    2004-10-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms are likely to participate in the pathogenesis of subgroup of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), and components of the major histocompatibility complex may serve as markers for the propensity to develop immune-mediated myocardial damage. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially highly polymorphic HLA-DQ genes, play an important role in the activation of immune responses, and thus control the predisposition for or protect from IDC. This study was conducted to investigate the HLA-DQA1 allele polymorphisms in IDC patients and to explore the underlying immunological mechanism and the hereditary susceptibility to IDC. The polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) technique was used to analyze the polymorphisms in the second exon of DQA1 in three groups: 72 IDC patients diagnosed according to the criteria of World Health Organization (IDC group); 100 end-stage heart failure patients suffering from a disease of known etiology (HF group); and 100 healthy subjects enrolled for the study during a routine health survey (control group). Patients in the IDC group were stratified according to ejection fraction (EF). Those with EF values were higher than 35% were placed into subgroup 1; subgroup 2 included patients with an EF value of 15% - 35%; and subgroup 3 consisted of those whose EF values less than 15%. The frequency of HLA-DQA1 *0501 alleles was significantly higher in the IDC group (0.39) than that in the HF group (0.12) and the control group (0.09) (both P HLA-DQA1 *0501 allele confers susceptibility to IDC, while the DQA1 *0201 allele confers protection against it, which indicates that genetic background involved in IDC and heart failure is different. HLA-DQA1 genes are involved in the regulation of specific immune responses by auto- or foreign anti-myocardium antibody.

  6. Genetic susceptibility to chronic otitis media with effusion: candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Carol J; Wilmot, Beth; Wang, Linda; Schuller, Michael; Lighthall, Jessyka; Trune, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    The genetic factors leading to a predisposition to otitis media are not well understood. The objective of the current study was to develop a tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel to determine if there is an association between candidate gene polymorphisms and the development of chronic otitis media with effusion. A 1:1 case/control design of 100 cases and 100 controls was used. The study was limited to the chronic otitis media with effusion phenotype to increase the population homogeneity. A panel of 192 tag-SNPs was selected. Saliva for DNA extraction was collected from 100 chronic otitis media with effusion cases and 100 controls. After quality control, 100 case and 79 control samples were available for hybridization. Genomic DNA from each subject was hybridized to the SNP probes, and genotypes were generated. Quality control across all samples and SNPs reduced the final SNPs used for analysis to 170. Each SNP was then analyzed for statistical association with chronic otitis media with effusion. Eight SNPs from four genes had an unadjusted P value of otitis media with effusion phenotype (TLR4, MUC5B, SMAD2, SMAD4); five of these polymorphisms were in the TLR4 gene. Even though these results need to be replicated in a novel population, the presence of five SNPs in the TLR4 gene having association with chronic otitis media with effusion in our study population lends evidence for the possible role of this gene in the susceptibility to otitis media. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Development of a set of SSR markers for genetic polymorphism detection and interspecific hybrid jute breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipnarayan Saha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corchorus capsularis (white jute and C. olitorius (dark jute are the two principal cultivated species of jute that produce natural bast fiber of commercial importance. We have identified 4509 simple sequence repeat (SSR loci from 34,163 unigene sequences of C. capsularis to develop a non-redundant set of 2079 flanking primer pairs. Among the SSRs, trinucleotide repeats were most frequent (60% followed by dinucleotide repeats (37.6%. Annotation of the SSR-containing unigenes revealed their putative functions in various biological and molecular processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic signals. Eighteen expressed gene-derived SSR (eSSR markers were successfully mapped to the existing single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP linkage map of jute, providing additional anchor points. Amplification of 72% of the 74 randomly selected primer pairs was successful in a panel of 24 jute accessions, comprising five and twelve accessions of C. capsularis and C. olitorius, respectively, and seven wild jute species. Forty-three primer pairs produced an average of 2.7 alleles and 58.1% polymorphism in a panel of 24 jute accessions. The mean PIC value was 0.34 but some markers showed PIC values higher than 0.5, suggesting that these markers can efficiently measure genetic diversity and serve for mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs in jute. A primer polymorphism survey with parents of a wide-hybridized population between a cultivated jute and its wild relative revealed their efficacy for interspecific hybrid identification. For ready accessibility of jute eSSR primers, we compiled all information in a user-friendly web database, JuteMarkerdb (http://jutemarkerdb.icar.gov.in/ for the first time in jute. This eSSR resource in jute is expected to be of use in characterization of germplasm, interspecific hybrid and variety identification, and marker-assisted breeding of superior-quality jute.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  9. The frequency of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms in Russian patients with peptic ulcers treated with proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychev DA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DA Sychev,1,2 NP Denisenko,1,2 ZM Sizova,2 AV Grachev,3 KA Velikolug4 1Russian Medical Academy of Post-Graduate Education, 2I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, 3SM-Clinic, 4Out-patient department Number 51 branch 3, Moscow, Russia Introduction: Proton pump inhibitors, which are widely used as acid-inhibitory agents for the treatment of peptic ulcers, are mainly metabolized by 2C19 isoenzyme of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C19. CYP2C19 has genetic polymorphisms, associated with extensive, poor, intermediate or ultra-rapid metabolism of proton pump inhibitors. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C19 could be of clinical concern in the treatment of peptic ulcers with proton pump inhibitors. Aim: To investigate the frequencies of CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3, and CYP2C19*17 alleles and genotypes in Russian patients with peptic ulcers. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 971 patients of Caucasian origin with Russian nationality from Moscow region with endoscopically and histologically proven ulcers, 428 males (44% and 543 females (56%. The mean age was 44.6±11.9 years (range: 15–88 years. DNA was extracted from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid whole blood samples (10 mL. The polymorphisms CYP2C19 681G>A (CYP2C19*2, rs4244285, CYP2C19 636 G>A (CYP2C19*3, rs4986893 and CYP2C19 -806 C>T (CYP2C19*17, rs12248560 were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Regarding CYP2C19 genotype, 317 patients (32.65% out of 971 were CYP2C19*1/*1 carriers classified as extensive metabolizers. Three hundred and eighty-six (39.75% with CYP2C19*1/*17 or CYP2C19*17/*17 genotype were ultra-rapid metabolizers. Two hundred and fifty-one people (25.85% were intermediate metabolizers with CYP2C19*1/*2, CYP2C19*2/*17, CYP2C19*1/*3, CYP2C19*3/*17 genotypes. Seventeen patients (1.75% with CYP2C19*2/*2, CYP2C19*3/*3, CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes were poor metabolizers. The allele frequencies were the following: CYP2C19*2 – 0.140, CYP2C19*3 – 0.006, CYP

  10. Music genetics research: Association with musicality of a polymorphism in the AVPR1A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariath, Luiza Monteavaro; Silva, Alexandre Mauat da; Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Gattino, Gustavo Schulz; Araujo, Gustavo Andrade de; Figueiredo, Felipe Grahl; Tagliani-Ribeiro, Alice; Roman, Tatiana; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Schuch, Jaqueline Bohrer

    2017-01-01

    Musicality is defined as a natural tendency, sensibility, knowledge, or talent to create, perceive, and play music. Musical abilities involve a great range of social and cognitive behaviors, which are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Although a number of studies have yielded insights into music genetics research, genes and biological pathways related to these traits are not fully understood. Our hypothesis in the current study is that genes associated with different behaviors could also influence the musical phenotype. Our aim was to investigate whether polymorphisms in six genes (AVPR1A, SLC6A4, ITGB3, COMT, DRD2 and DRD4) related to social and cognitive traits are associated with musicality in a sample of children. Musicality was assessed through an individualized music therapy assessment profile (IMTAP) which has been validated in Brazil to measure musical ability. We show here that the RS1 microsatellite of the AVPR1A gene is nominally associated with musicality, corroborating previous results linking AVPR1A with musical activity. This study is one of the first to investigate musicality in a comprehensive way, and it contributes to better understand the genetic basis underlying musical ability.

  11. Music genetics research: Association with musicality of a polymorphism in the AVPR1A gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Monteavaro Mariath

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Musicality is defined as a natural tendency, sensibility, knowledge, or talent to create, perceive, and play music. Musical abilities involve a great range of social and cognitive behaviors, which are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Although a number of studies have yielded insights into music genetics research, genes and biological pathways related to these traits are not fully understood. Our hypothesis in the current study is that genes associated with different behaviors could also influence the musical phenotype. Our aim was to investigate whether polymorphisms in six genes (AVPR1A, SLC6A4, ITGB3, COMT, DRD2 and DRD4 related to social and cognitive traits are associated with musicality in a sample of children. Musicality was assessed through an individualized music therapy assessment profile (IMTAP which has been validated in Brazil to measure musical ability. We show here that the RS1 microsatellite of the AVPR1A gene is nominally associated with musicality, corroborating previous results linking AVPR1A with musical activity. This study is one of the first to investigate musicality in a comprehensive way, and it contributes to better understand the genetic basis underlying musical ability.

  12. Prospects for genetically modified non-human primate models, including the common marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Genetically modified mice have contributed much to studies in the life sciences. In some research fields, however, mouse models are insufficient for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of pathology or as disease models. Often, genetically modified non-human primate (NHP) models are desired, as they are more similar to human physiology, morphology, and anatomy. Recent progress in studies of the reproductive biology in NHPs has enabled the introduction of exogenous genes into NHP genomes or the alteration of endogenous NHP genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the production of genetically modified NHPs, including the common marmoset, and future perspectives for realizing genetically modified NHP models for use in life sciences research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo investigations of genetically modified microorganisms using germ-free rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund jacobsen, Bodil

    Risk evaluation of genetically modified microorganism (GMMO) in relation to human health effects brings into consideration the ability of the microorganism to survive and colonise the gastrointestinal tract and the potential gene transfer to the resident microbiota. Different biological containment...

  14. How scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Vera; Frisio, Dario G; Ferrazzi, Giovanni; Siletti, Elena

    2017-07-01

    Several studies provide evidence of the role of written communication in influencing public perception towards genetically modified organisms, whereas visual communication has been sparsely investigated. This article aims to evaluate the exposure of the Italian population to scary genetically modified organism-related images. A set of 517 images collected through Google are classified considering fearful attributes, and an index that accounts for the scary impact of these images is built. Then, through an ordinary least-squares regression, we estimate the relationship between the Scary Impact Index and a set of variables that describes the context in which the images appear. The results reveal that the first (and most viewed) Google result images contain the most frightful contents. In addition, the agri-food sector in Italy is strongly oriented towards offering a negative representation of genetically modified organisms. Exposure to scary images could be a factor that affects the negative perception of genetically modified organisms in Italy.

  15. A statistical assessment of differences and equivalences between genetically modified and reference plant varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Perry, J.N.; Amzal, B.; Paoletti, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Safety assessment of genetically modified organisms is currently often performed by comparative evaluation. However, natural variation of plant characteristics between commercial varieties is usually not considered explicitly in the statistical computations underlying the assessment.

  16. [Progress on biosafety assessment of marker genes in genetically modified foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2003-05-01

    Marker genes are useful in facilitating the detection of genetically modified organisms(GMO). These genes play an important role during the early identification stage of GMO development, but they exist in the mature genetically modified crops. So the safety assessment of these genes could not be neglected. In this paper, all the study on the biosafety assessment of marker genes were reviewed, their possible hazards and risks were appraised, and the marker genes proved safe were list too. GMO Labeling the is one important regulations for the development of genetically modified foods in the market. The accurate detecting techniques for GMO are the basis for setting up labeling regulation. In addition, some methods used to remove marker genes in genetically modified foods were introduced in the paper, which can eliminate their biosafety concern thoroughly.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of Bcl-2 promoter in cancer susceptibility and prognosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongqiang; Yang, Binhui; Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Wei; He, Qihua; Peng, Xingchun

    2017-04-11

    Bcl-2 is critical for tumorigenesis. However, previous studies on the association of Bcl-2 promoter polymorphisms with predisposition to different cancer types are somewhat contradictory. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis regarding the relationship between Bcl-2 promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cancer susceptibility and prognosis. Up to August 2016, 32 original publications were identified covering two Bcl-2 promoter SNPs (rs2279115 and rs1801018). Our results showed statistically significant association between rs2279115 and cancer susceptibility and prognosis in all four genetic models but not in rs1801018. Subgroups analysis indicated that rs2279115 was associated with a significantly higher risk of cancer susceptibility in Asia but not in Caucasian. Furthermore, rs2279115 was associated with a significantly higher risk in digestive system cancer and endocrine system cancer but not in breast cancer, respiratory cancer and hematopoietic cancer. Simultaneously, rs2279115 was correlated with a significantly higher risk of cancer prognosis in Asia but not in Caucasian. Considering these promising results, rs2279115 may be a tumor marker for cancertherapy in Asia. Sensitivity analysis show four gene model were stable, and no publication bias was observed in all four gene model. Large sample size, different ethnic population and different cancer type are warranted to validate this association.

  18. Genetic Polymorphisms ofIL17and Chagas Disease in the South and Southeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Ayo, Christiane Maria; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara de Cássia; Sakita, Karina Mayumi; de Moraes, Amarilis Giaretta; Muller, Larissa Pires; Aquino, Julimary Suematsu; Conci Macedo, Luciana; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Sell, Ana Maria; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between genetic polymorphisms of IL17A G197A (rs2275913) and IL17F T7488C (rs763780) with Chagas Disease (CD) and/or the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). The study with 260 patients and 150 controls was conducted in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil. The genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP. The A allele and A/A genotype of IL17A were significantly increased in patients and their subgroups (patients with CCC; patients with CCC and LVSD; and patients with CCC and severe LVSD) when compared to the control group. The analysis according to the gender showed that the A/A genotype of IL17A was more frequent in female with LVSD and mild to moderate LVSD and also in male patients with LVSD. The frequency of IL17F T/C genotype was higher in male patients with CCC and severe LVSD and in female with mild to moderate LVSD. The results suggest the possible involvement of the polymorphisms of IL17A and IL17F in the susceptibility to chronic Chagas disease and in development and progression of cardiomyopathy.

  19. The use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to evaluate the genetic variability of Ponkan mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coletta Filho Helvécio Della

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD analysis of 19 Ponkan mandarin accessions was performed using 25 random primers. Of 112 amplification products selected, only 32 were polymorphic across five accessions. The absence of genetic variability among the other 14 accessions suggested that they were either clonal propagations with different local names, or that they had undetectable genetic variability, such as point mutations which cannot be detected by RAPD.

  20. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thein, S.L.; Weatherall, D.J. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sampietro, M.; Rohde, K.; Rochette, J.; Lathrop, G.M.; Demenais, F.

    1994-02-01

    [open quotes]Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin[close quotes] (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the [beta]-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. The authors have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with [beta]-thalassemia and/or [alpha]-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. The results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably [beta]-thalassemia and the XmnI-[sup G][gamma] polymorphism, are accounted for in this analysis. Linkage with the [beta]-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. 39 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for conservation genetic studies of the coral reef fish Centropyge bicolor

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Sarrias, Marcela

    2015-08-14

    A total of 23 novel polymorphic microsatellite marker loci were developed for the angelfish Centropyge bicolor through 454 sequencing, and further tested on two spatially separated populations (90 individuals each) from Kimbe Bay in Papua New Guinea. The mean ± s.e. number of alleles per locus was 14·65 ± 1·05, and mean ± s.e. observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosity frequencies were 0·676 ± 0·021 and 0·749 ± 0·018, respectively. The markers reported here constitute the first specific set for this genus and will be useful for future conservation genetic studies in the Indo-Pacific region. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Determination of genetic polymorphism in Guney Karaman local Turkish sheep breed by using STR markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karslı, Taki; Balcıoǧlu, Murat Soner

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess genetic diversity of Güney Karaman Turkish local sheep breed. A total of 29 samples were genotyped by using 14 STR markers. All markers were polymorphic. The number of alleles in Güney Karaman sheep breed ranged from 3 to 11 per locus, with a mean of 7.42. The average observed and expected heterozygosity was 0.659 and 0.794, respectively. Mean inbreeding coefficient (Fis) value was found 0.175. The PIC values ranged from 0.569 to 0.860 with a mean of 0.743. The findings of this research demonstrate at moderate level gene diversity and heterozygosity with lower inbreeding in Güney Karaman sheep breed.

  3. CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF FOOD BIOTECHNOLOGY: WILLINGNESS TO BUY GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Ferdaus; Onyango, Benjamin M.; Adelaja, Adesoji O.; Schilling, Brian J.; Hallman, William K.

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnology is often viewed as the defining technology for the future of food and agriculture with the potential to deliver a wide range of economic and health benefits. Public acceptance of genetically modified food products is a critical factor for this emerging technology. Using data from a national survey, this study examines public acceptance of food biotechnology by modeling consumers' willingness to buy genetically modified foods. Empirical results suggest that younger, white, male a...

  4. Deliberate release of genetically modified plants into the environment in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Zlata LUTHAR

    2015-01-01

    Deliberate release of genetically modified higher plants (GMHPs) into the environment in Slovenia is regulated by the Law on the Management of Genetically Modified Organisms (ZRGSO) Ur. l. RS 23/2005 and 21/2010, III chapter. For each deliberate release of GMPs into the environment a license issued by the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning (MESP) must be acquired. The application or notification should contain a very accurate and complex description of the GMP, of the field where it...

  5. Genetically modified animals in the food and pharmaceutical chains: economics, public perception and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Cristina; Menozzi, Davide; Aramyan, Lusine H.; Valeeva, Natasha I.; Pakky, R.; Zimmermann, Karin L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents ongoing results of the EU project PEGASUS (Public Perception of Genetically modified Animals – Science, Utility and Society, 7th FP).The overall objective is to provide support for future policy regarding the development, implementation and commercialisation of genetically modified (GM) animals, both terrestrial and aquatic, together with the foods and pharmaceutical products derived from them. Food products derived from GM animals have not yet entered the market. Nonethel...

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus-related genetic polymorphisms in microRNAs and microRNA target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weijing; Xiao, Di; Ming, Guangfeng; Yin, Jiye; Zhou, Honghao; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous regulators in eukaryotic gene expression and a broad range of biological processes. MiRNA-related genetic variations have been proved to be associated with human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Polymorphisms in miRNA genes (primary miRNAs, precursor miRNAs, mature miRNAs, and miRNA regulatory regions) may be involved in the development of T2DM by changing the expression and structure of miRNAs and target gene expression. Genetic polymorphisms of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in miRNA target genes may destroy putative miRNA binding sites or create new miRNA binding sites, which affects the binding of UTRs with miRNAs, finally resulting in susceptibility to and development of T2DM. Therefore, focusing on studies into genetic polymorphisms in miRNAs or miRNA binding sites will help our understanding of the pathophysiology of T2DM development and lead to better health management. Herein, we review the association of genetic polymorphisms in miRNA and miRNA targets genes with T2DM development. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Genetic variability in yam cultivars from Guinea-Sudan of Benin assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Agbicodo, E.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Struik, P.C.; Ahanchédé, A.; Kossou, D.K.; Sanni, A.

    2009-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is an important food and cash crop in the Guinea-Sudan zone of Benin. The genetic diversity of about 70 cultivars of Dioscorea cayenensis/Dioscorea rotundata (Guinea yam) and about 20 cultivars of Dioscorea alata (water yam) was analysed using random amplified polymorphic DNA

  8. Effects of C2ta genetic polymorphisms on MHC class II expression and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Anthony C Y; Piehl, Fredrik; Olsson, Tomas; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2017-04-01

    Antigen presentation by the MHC-II to CD4 + T cells is important in adaptive immune responses. The class II transactivator (CIITA in human and C2TA in mouse) is the master regulator of MHC-II gene expression. It coordinates the transcription factors necessary for the transcription of MHC-II molecules. In humans, genetic variations in CIITA have been associated with differential expression of MHC-II and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Here we made use of a C2ta congenic mouse strain (expressing MHC-II haplotype H-2 q ) to investigate the effect of the natural genetic polymorphisms in type I promoter of C2ta on MHC-II expression and function. We demonstrate that an allelic variant in the type I promoter of C2ta resulted in an increased expression of MHC-II on macrophages (72-151% higher mean florescence intensity) and conventional dendritic cells (13-65% higher mean florescence intensity) in both spleen and peripheral blood. The increase in MHC-II expression resulted in an increase in antigen presentation to T cells in vitro and increased T-cell activation. The differential MHC-II expression in B6Q.C2ta, however, did not alter the disease development in models of rheumatoid arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis and human glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase 325-339 -peptide-induced arthritis), or multiple sclerosis (MOG 1-125 protein-induced and MOG 79-96 peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis). This is the first study to address the role of an allelic variant in type I promoter of C2ta in MHC-II expression and autoimmune diseases; and shows that C2ta polymorphisms regulate MHC-II expression and T-cell responses but do not necessarily have a strong impact on autoimmune diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanis Z A NurWaliyuddin

    Full Text Available The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA, comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159 observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73 and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations.

  10. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Norazmi, Mohd N; Edinur, Hisham A; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations.

  11. The role of genetic polymorphisms in metabolism of carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesky, R J

    2004-04-01

    More than twenty heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) have been identified in grilled meats, fish, poultry, and tobacco smoke condensate. HAAs are carcinogens and induce tumors at multiple sites in experimental laboratory animals. Because of the widespread occurrence of HAAs in foods, these chemicals may contribute to the etiology of several common human cancers that are associated with frequent consumption of grilled meats including colon, rectum, prostate, and breast. HAAs require metabolism in order to exert their genotoxic effects. Metabolic activation occurs by N-hydroxylation, a reaction catalyzed by cytochromes p450 (CYP). Some N-hydroxy-HAA metabolites may directly react with DNA, but further metabolism by N-acetyltransferases (NATs) or sulfotransferases (SULTs) may occur to form highly reactive N-acetoxy or N-sulfonyloxy esters that readily react with DNA bases. The N-acetoxy ester of the HAA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is detoxified by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which catalyze the reduction of the reactive intermediate back to the parent amine. Some HAAs also undergo detoxification through conjugation reactions with the phase II enzymes such as UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) or SULTs to form stable, polar products that are readily eliminated. All of these xenobiotic metabolism enzyme systems (XMEs) display common genetic polymorphisms, which may affect protein expression, protein stability, catalytic activity, and thus, the biological potency of these procarcinogens. In this review, the roles of common genetic polymorphisms of XMEs involved in HAA metabolism and cancer risk are discussed.

  12. Education modifies genetic and environmental influences on BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Wendy; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    , and education data. Body mass index (BMI = kg weight/ m height(2)) was used to measure degree of obesity. We used quantitative genetic modeling to examine how genetic and shared and nonshared environmental variance in BMI differed by level of education and to estimate how genetic and shared and nonshared...... environmental correlations between education and BMI differed by level of education, analyzing women and men separately. Correlations between education and BMI were -.13 in women, -.15 in men. High BMI's were less frequent among well-educated participants, generating less variance. In women, this was due...... to restriction of all forms of variance, overall by a factor of about 2. In men, genetic variance did not vary with education, but results for shared and nonshared environmental variance were similar to those for women. The contributions of the shared environment to the correlations between education and BMI...

  13. An igf-I gene polymorphism modifies the risk of diabetic retinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Ingrid; Ikram, M. Kamran; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert A. P.; Lamberts, Steven W. J.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Janssen, Joop A. M. J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The role of IGF-I in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is unclear. We studied, prospectively, the relationship between an IGF-I gene polymorphism, retinal vessel diameters, and incident diabetic retinopathy in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes. In all 5,505

  14. Detection and traceability of genetically modified organisms in the food production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, M; Berdal, K G; Brera, C; Corbisier, P; Holst-Jensen, A; Kok, E J; Marvin, H J P; Schimmel, H; Rentsch, J; van Rie, J P P F; Zagon, J

    2004-07-01

    Both labelling and traceability of genetically modified organisms are current issues that are considered in trade and regulation. Currently, labelling of genetically modified foods containing detectable transgenic material is required by EU legislation. A proposed package of legislation would extend this labelling to foods without any traces of transgenics. These new legislations would also impose labelling and a traceability system based on documentation throughout the food and feed manufacture system. The regulatory issues of risk analysis and labelling are currently harmonised by Codex Alimentarius. The implementation and maintenance of the regulations necessitates sampling protocols and analytical methodologies that allow for accurate determination of the content of genetically modified organisms within a food and feed sample. Current methodologies for the analysis of genetically modified organisms are focused on either one of two targets, the transgenic DNA inserted- or the novel protein(s) expressed- in a genetically modified product. For most DNA-based detection methods, the polymerase chain reaction is employed. Items that need consideration in the use of DNA-based detection methods include the specificity, sensitivity, matrix effects, internal reference DNA, availability of external reference materials, hemizygosity versus homozygosity, extrachromosomal DNA, and international harmonisation. For most protein-based methods, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with antibodies binding the novel protein are employed. Consideration should be given to the selection of the antigen bound by the antibody, accuracy, validation, and matrix effects. Currently, validation of detection methods for analysis of genetically modified organisms is taking place. In addition, new methodologies are developed, including the use of microarrays, mass spectrometry, and surface plasmon resonance. Challenges for GMO detection include the detection of transgenic material in materials

  15. Genetic Variations as Modifying Factors to Dietary Zinc Requirements—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin J. Day

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to reduced cost and accessibility, the use of genetic testing has appealed to health professionals for personalising nutrition advice. However, translation of the evidence linking polymorphisms, dietary requirements, and pathology risk proves to be challenging for nutrition and dietetic practitioners. Zinc status and polymorphisms of genes coding for zinc-transporters have been associated with chronic diseases. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature to assess whether recommendations for zinc intake could be made according to genotype. Eighteen studies investigating 31 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in relation to zinc intake and/or status were identified. Five studies examined type 2 diabetes; zinc intake was found to interact independently with two polymorphisms in the zinc-transporter gene SLC30A8 to affect glucose metabolism indicators. While the outcomes were statistically significant, the small size of the effect and lack of replication raises issues regarding translation into nutrition and dietetic practice. Two studies assessed the relationship of polymorphisms and cognitive performance; seven studies assessed the association between a range of outcomes linked to chronic conditions in aging population; two papers described the analysis of the genetic contribution in determining zinc concentration in human milk; and two papers assessed zinc concentration in plasma without linking to clinical outcomes. The data extracted confirmed a connection between genetics and zinc requirements, although the direction and magnitude of the dietary modification for carriers of specific genotypes could not be defined. This study highlights the need to summarise nutrigenetics studies to enable health professionals to translate scientific evidence into dietary recommendations.

  16. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism as an important modifier of positive family history related breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Pia; Hirvonen, Ari; Kataja, Vesa; Eskelinen, Matti; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Uusitupa, Matti; Vainio, Harri; Mitrunen, Katja

    2004-04-01

    The association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer and osteoporosis has been extensively investigated during recent years. To date, several polymorphisms have been found in the VDR gene. In this Finnish case-control study, comprising 483 breast cancer patients and 482 healthy population controls, we investigated the association between altered breast cancer risk and two polymorphisms in the 3' end of the gene detectable with ApaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. A statistically significant difference was observed in the ApaI genotype distribution between cases and controls. Women with the VDR variant a allele containing genotypes showed a decreased risk for breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.98] compared to women with the AA genotype. This association was especially strong among women with a positive family history of breast cancer (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.76). Moreover, there was a trend (P for trend = 0.0007) for decreased risk with increasing number of variant alleles. The lowest risk of breast cancer was seen for the women with the aa genotype (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.003-0.31) compared to women with the AA genotype. A tendency of decreased risk of breast cancer was also observed for the TaqI T allele containing genotypes (Tt and TT) (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.12), but because the distribution of Taql alleles in the controls missed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P = 0.01), we were unable to properly assess the potential impact of the TaqI polymorphism in breast cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, our results suggest that the VDR ApaI genotype may be an important modifier of individual breast cancer risk among Finnish women, especially if they have a positive family history of breast cancer.

  17. Toxicity assessment of modified Cry1Ac1 proteins and genetically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... Key words: Modified Cry1Ac1, food safety assessment, toxicity, insect- resistant rice Agb0101. INTRODUCTION. Genetically modified (GM) crops are becoming an increasingly important feature of the agricultural land- scapes. In 2013, approximately 175 million hectares of. GM crops were planted by 18 ...

  18. Genome-based polymorphic microsatellite development and validation in the mosquito Aedes aegypti and application to population genetics in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit Thomas G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellite markers have proven useful in genetic studies in many organisms, yet microsatellite-based studies of the dengue and yellow fever vector mosquito Aedes aegypti have been limited by the number of assayable and polymorphic loci available, despite multiple independent efforts to identify them. Here we present strategies for efficient identification and development of useful microsatellites with broad coverage across the Aedes aegypti genome, development of multiplex-ready PCR groups of microsatellite loci, and validation of their utility for population analysis with field collections from Haiti. Results From 79 putative microsatellite loci representing 31 motifs identified in 42 whole genome sequence supercontig assemblies in the Aedes aegypti genome, 33 microsatellites providing genome-wide coverage amplified as single copy sequences in four lab strains, with a range of 2-6 alleles per locus. The tri-nucleotide motifs represented the majority (51% of the polymorphic single copy loci, and none of these was located within a putative open reading frame. Seven groups of 4-5 microsatellite loci each were developed for multiplex-ready PCR. Four multiplex-ready groups were used to investigate population genetics of Aedes aegypti populations sampled in Haiti. Of the 23 loci represented in these groups, 20 were polymorphic with a range of 3-24 alleles per locus (mean = 8.75. Allelic polymorphic information content varied from 0.171 to 0.867 (mean = 0.545. Most loci met Hardy-Weinberg expectations across populations and pairwise FST comparisons identified significant genetic differentiation between some populations. No evidence for genetic isolation by distance was observed. Conclusion Despite limited success in previous reports, we demonstrate that the Aedes aegypti genome is well-populated with single copy, polymorphic microsatellite loci that can be uncovered using the strategy developed here for rapid and efficient

  19. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Nijman, I.J.; Kuijpers, S.; Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain

  20. Genetically Modified Crops and Nuisance: Exploring the Role of Precaution in Private Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Neil; Culver, Keith; Siebrasse, Norman

    2007-01-01

    This article critically considers calls for the precautionary principle to inform judicial decision making in a private law context in light of the Hoffman litigation, where it is alleged that the potential for genetic contamination from genetically modified (GM) crops causes an unreasonable interference with the rights of organic farmers to use…