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Sample records for genetic pathways leading

  1. GENETIC PATHWAYS LEADING TO THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS

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    Angela Stoddart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN is a distinctive clinical syndrome occurring after exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.  t-MN arises in most cases from a multipotential hematopoietic stem cell or, less commonly, in a lineage committed progenitor cell.  The prognosis for patients with t-MN is poor, as current forms of therapy are largely ineffective.  Cytogenetic analysis, molecular analysis and gene expression profiling analysis of t-MN has revealed that there are distinct subtypes of the disease; however, our understanding of the genetic basis of t-MN is incomplete.  Elucidating the genetic pathways and molecular networks that are perturbed in t-MNs, may facilitate the identification of therapeutic targets that can be exploited for the development of urgently-needed targeted therapies.

  2. The Socioeconomic Pathways Leading to Romantic Relationship Outcomes: A Genetically Informed Early Life Course Investigation.

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    Wickrama, Kandauda K A S; O'Neal, Catherine W

    2016-09-01

    The present study tests a multilevel comprehensive model incorporating both life course processes and genetic influences leading to young adults' romantic relationship quality using data from 1,560 adolescents over 13 years in the nationally representative Add Health sample. Results provided evidence of a socioeconomic mediating pathway linking early family and community contexts to young adults' romantic relationship quality, and novel evidence for both direct and interactive genetic associations that relate to these mediating pathways. A cumulative genetic index showed (a) direct associations with young adults' socioeconomic attainment and (b) interactions with community adversity and mothers' marital stability on young adults' achieved socioeconomic context and relationship quality. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2015 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  3. Under the influence of genetics: how transdisciplinarity leads us to rethink social pathways to illness.

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    Pescosolido, Bernice A; Perry, Brea L; Long, J Scott; Martin, Jack K; Nurnberger, John I; Hesselbrock, Victor

    2008-01-01

    This article describes both sociological and genetic theories of illness causation and derives propositions expected under each and under a transdisciplinary theoretical frame. The authors draw propositions from three theories -- fundamental causes, social stress processes, and social safety net theories -- and tailor hypotheses to the case of alcohol dependence. Analyses of a later wave of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism reveal a complex interplay of the GABRA2 gene with social structural factors to produce cases meeting DSM/ICD diagnoses. Only modest evidence suggests that genetic influence works through social conditions and experiences. Further, women are largely unaffected in their risk for alcohol dependence by allele status at this candidate gene; family support attenuates genetic influence; and childhood deprivation exacerbates genetic predispositions. These findings highlight the essential intradisciplinary tension in the role of proximal and distal influences in social processes and point to the promise of focusing directly on dynamic, networked sequences that produce different pathways to health and illness.

  4. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Kacprzyk; Aoife Devine; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy an...

  5. The root hair assay facilitates the use of genetic and pharmacological tools in order to dissect multiple signalling pathways that lead to programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kacprzyk

    Full Text Available The activation of programmed cell death (PCD is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to

  6. Genetic Pathways to Insomnia

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    Mackenzie J. Lind

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes current research on the genetics of insomnia, as genetic contributions are thought to be important for insomnia etiology. We begin by providing an overview of genetic methods (both quantitative and measured gene, followed by a discussion of the insomnia genetics literature with regard to each of the following common methodologies: twin and family studies, candidate gene studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Next, we summarize the most recent gene identification efforts (primarily GWAS results and propose several potential mechanisms through which identified genes may contribute to the disorder. Finally, we discuss new genetic approaches and how these may prove useful for insomnia, proposing an agenda for future insomnia genetics research.

  7. Different Pathways Leading to Integrase Inhibitors Resistance

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    Thierry, Eloïse; Deprez, Eric; Delelis, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), such as raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir, or dolutegravir (DTG), are efficient antiretroviral agents used in HIV treatment in order to inhibit retroviral integration. By contrast to RAL treatments leading to well-identified mutation resistance pathways at the integrase level, recent clinical studies report several cases of patients failing DTG treatment without clearly identified resistance mutation in the integrase gene raising questions for the mechanism behind the resistance. These compounds, by impairing the integration of HIV-1 viral DNA into the host DNA, lead to an accumulation of unintegrated circular viral DNA forms. This viral DNA could be at the origin of the INSTI resistance by two different ways. The first one, sustained by a recent report, involves 2-long terminal repeat circles integration and the second one involves expression of accumulated unintegrated viral DNA leading to a basal production of viral particles maintaining the viral information. PMID:28123383

  8. Proatherogenic pathways leading to vascular calcification

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    Mazzini, Michael J. [Department of Cardiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Schulze, P. Christian [Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: christian.schulze@bmc.org

    2006-03-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and atherosclerosis is the major common underlying disease. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves local vascular injury, inflammation and oxidative stress as well as vascular calcification. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as a degenerative process leading to mineral deposition in the vascular wall characteristic for late stages of atherosclerosis. However, recent studies identified vascular calcification in early stages of atherosclerosis and its occurrence has been linked to clinical events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its degree correlates with local vascular inflammation and with the overall impact and the progression of atherosclerosis. Over the last decade, diverse and highly regulated molecular signaling cascades controlling vascular calcification have been described. Local and circulating molecules such as osteopontin, osteoprogerin, leptin and matrix Gla protein were identified as critical regulators of vascular calcification. We here review the current knowledge on molecular pathways of vascular calcification and their relevance for the progression of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  10. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  11. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

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    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-06-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder.

  12. Conserved genetic pathways associated with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma.

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    Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2015-06-01

    The human eye is a complex organ whose development requires extraordinary coordination of developmental processes. The conservation of ocular developmental steps in vertebrates suggests possible common genetic mechanisms. Genetic diseases involving the eye represent a leading cause of blindness in children and adults. During the last decades, there has been an exponential increase in genetic studies of ocular disorders. In this review, we summarize current success in identification of genes responsible for microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) phenotypes, which are associated with early defects in embryonic eye development. Studies in animal models for the orthologous genes identified overlapping phenotypes for most factors, confirming the conservation of their function in vertebrate development. These animal models allow for further investigation of the mechanisms of MAC, integration of various identified genes into common developmental pathways and finally, provide an avenue for the development and testing of therapeutic interventions.

  13. Programmable genetic circuits for pathway engineering.

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    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic biology has the potential to provide decisive advances in genetic control of metabolic pathways. However, there are several challenges that synthetic biologists must overcome before this vision becomes a reality. First, a library of diverse and well-characterized sensors, such as metabolite-sensing or condition-sensing promoters, must be constructed. Second, robust programmable circuits that link input conditions with a specific gene regulation response must be developed. Finally, multi-gene targeting strategies must be integrated with metabolically relevant sensors and complex, robust logic. Achievements in each of these areas, which employ the CRISPR/Cas system, in silico modeling, and dynamic sensor-regulators, among other tools, provide a strong basis for future research. Overall, the future for synthetic biology approaches in metabolic engineering holds immense promise.

  14. Systems genetics : From GWAS to disease pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Ng, Aylwin; Fu, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Most common diseases are complex, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. In the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified thousands of genetic variants underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. However, the results fro

  15. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

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    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility.

  16. An Interactive, Integrated, Instructional Pathway to the LEAD Science Gateway

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    Yalda, S.; Clark, R.; Davis, L.; Wiziecki, E. N.

    2008-12-01

    Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) is a bold and revolutionary paradigm that through a Web-based Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) exposes the user to a rich environment of data, models, data mining and visualization and analysis tools, enabling the user to ask science questions of applications while the complexity of the software and middleware managing these applications is hidden from the user. From its inception in 2003, LEAD has championed goals that have context for the future of weather and related research and education. LEAD espouses to lowering the barrier for using complex end-to-end weather technologies by a) democratizing the availability of advanced weather technologies, b) empowering the user of these technologies to tackle a variety of problems, and c) facilitating learning and understanding. LEAD, as it exists today, is poised to enable a diverse community of scientists, educators, students, and operational practitioners. The project has been informed by atmospheric and computer scientists, educators, and educational consultants who, in search of new knowledge, understanding, ideas, and learning methodologies, seek easy access to new capabilities that allow for user-directed and interactive query and acquisition, simulation, assimilation, data mining, computational modeling, and visualization. As one component of the total LEAD effort, the LEAD education team has designed interactive, integrated, instructional pathways within a set of learning modules (LEAD-to-Learn) to facilitate, enhance, and enable the use of the LEAD gateway in the classroom. The LEAD education initiative focuses on the means to integrate data, tools, and services used by researchers into undergraduate meteorology education in order to provide an authentic and contextualized environment for teaching and learning. Educators, educational specialists, and students from meteorology and computer science backgrounds have collaborated on the design and development

  17. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

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    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  18. Elucidating novel dysfunctional pathways in Alzheimer's disease by integrating loci identified in genetic and epigenetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder. A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed, which have been supplemented more recently by the first epigenome-wide association studies, leading to the identification of a number of novel loci altered in disease. Twin studies have shown monozygotic twin discordance for Alzheimer's disease (Gatz et al., 2006, leading to the conclusion that a combination of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms is likely to be involved in disease etiology (Lunnon & Mill, 2013. This review focuses on identifying overlapping pathways between published genome-wide association studies and epigenome-wide association studies, highlighting dysfunctional synaptic, lipid metabolism, plasma membrane/cytoskeleton, mitochondrial, and immune cell activation pathways. Identifying common pathways altered in genetic and epigenetic studies will aid our understanding of disease mechanisms and identify potential novel targets for pharmacological intervention.

  19. The pathways of genetic transformation in cholangiocarcinogenesis.

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    Serafini, Francesco M; Radvinsky, David

    2016-12-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy that originates from the epithelial cells of the biliary duct system. Depending on the anatomical location, CCA can be considered extrahepatic (eCCA) or intrahepatic (iCCA) (1). Two thirds of CCAs involve the extrahepatic biliary system, whereas the rest are confined within the liver parenchyma, beyond the secondary biliary radicals (2). Due to its biological aggressiveness and difficulty in diagnosis, the majority of patients with CCA are unresectable at presentation and the overall 5-year survival is approximately five percent (4). This article focuses on the genetic and epigenetic alterations present in cholangiocarcinomas, their occasional relationship to external stimuli, and with an emphasis on those unanswered questions about cholangiocarcinogenesis and future directions in the comprehension of epigenetic DNA methylation in patients with CCA.

  20. A molecular pathway analysis informs the genetic background at risk for schizophrenia.

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    Crisafulli, Concetta; Drago, Antonio; Calabrò, Marco; Spina, Edoardo; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-06-03

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder marked by severely impaired thinking, delusional thoughts, hallucinations and poor emotional responsiveness. The biological mechanisms that lead to schizophrenia may be related to the genetic background of patients. Thus, a genetic perspective may help to unravel the molecular pathways disrupted in schizophrenia. In the present work, we used a molecular pathway analysis to identify the molecular pathways associated with schizophrenia. We collected data of genetic loci previously associated with schizophrenia, identified the genes located in those positions and created the metabolic pathways that are related to those genes' products. These pathways were tested for enrichment (a number of SNPs associated with the phenotype significantly higher than expected by chance) in a sample of schizophrenic patients and controls (4486 and 4477, respectively). The molecular pathway that resulted from the identification of all the genes located in the loci previously found to be associated with schizophrenia was found to be enriched, as expected (permutated p(10(6))=9.9999e-06).We found 60 SNPs amongst 30 different genes with a strong association with schizophrenia. The genes are related to the pathways related to neurodevelopment, apoptosis, vesicle traffic, immune response and MAPK cascade. The pathway related to the toll-like receptor family seemed to play a central role in the modulation/connection of various pathways whose disruption leads to schizophrenia. This pathway is related to the innate immune system, further stressing the role of immunological-related events in increasing the risk to schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cooperativity Leads to Temporally-Correlated Fluctuations in the Bacteriophage Lambda Genetic Switch

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    Jacob Quinn Shenker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative interactions are widespread in biochemical networks, providing the nonlinear response that underlies behavior such as ultrasensitivity and robust switching. We introduce a temporal correlation function—the conditional activity—to study the behavior of these phenomena. Applying it to the bistable genetic switch in bacteriophage lambda, we find that cooperative binding between binding sites on the prophage DNA lead to non-Markovian behavior, as quantified by the conditional activity. Previously, the conditional activity has been used to predict allosteric pathways in proteins; here, we show that it identifies the rare unbinding events which underlie induction from lysogeny to lysis.

  2. Reverse Pathway Genetic Approach Identifies Epistasis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Traglia, Michela; Tsang, Kathryn; Bearden, Carrie E.; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-gene interaction, or epistasis, plays a large role in complex traits in model organisms, genome-wide by genome-wide searches for two-way interaction have limited power in human studies. We thus used knowledge of a biological pathway in order to identify a contribution of epistasis to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans, a reverse-pathway genetic approach. Based on previous observation of increased ASD symptoms in Mendelian disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway (RASopathies), we showed that common SNPs in RASopathy genes show enrichment for association signal in GWAS (P = 0.02). We then screened genome-wide for interactors with RASopathy gene SNPs and showed strong enrichment in ASD-affected individuals (P < 2.2 x 10−16), with a number of pairwise interactions meeting genome-wide criteria for significance. Finally, we utilized quantitative measures of ASD symptoms in RASopathy-affected individuals to perform modifier mapping via GWAS. One top region overlapped between these independent approaches, and we showed dysregulation of a gene in this region, GPR141, in a RASopathy neural cell line. We thus used orthogonal approaches to provide strong evidence for a contribution of epistasis to ASDs, confirm a role for the Ras/MAPK pathway in idiopathic ASDs, and to identify a convergent candidate gene that may interact with the Ras/MAPK pathway. PMID:28076348

  3. [Lead compound optimization strategy (1)--changing metabolic pathways and optimizing metabolism stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Liu, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Lead compound optimization plays an important role in new drug discovery and development. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways can modulate pharmacokinetic properties, prolong the half life, improve metabolism stability and bioavailability of lead compounds. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways and improving metabolism stability are reviewed. These methods include blocking metabolic site, reduing lipophilicity, changing ring size, bioisosterism, and prodrug.

  4. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

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    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  5. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

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    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine).

  6. Automated identification of pathways from quantitative genetic interaction data

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    Battle, Alexis; Jonikas, Martin C; Walter, Peter; Weissman, Jonathan S; Koller, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput quantitative genetic interaction (GI) measurements provide detailed information regarding the structure of the underlying biological pathways by reporting on functional dependencies between genes. However, the analytical tools for fully exploiting such information lag behind the ability to collect these data. We present a novel Bayesian learning method that uses quantitative phenotypes of double knockout organisms to automatically reconstruct detailed pathway structures. We applied our method to a recent data set that measures GIs for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) genes, using the unfolded protein response as a quantitative phenotype. The results provided reconstructions of known functional pathways including N-linked glycosylation and ER-associated protein degradation. It also contained novel relationships, such as the placement of SGT2 in the tail-anchored biogenesis pathway, a finding that we experimentally validated. Our approach should be readily applicable to the next generation of quantitative GI data sets, as assays become available for additional phenotypes and eventually higher-level organisms. PMID:20531408

  7. A delta-catenin signaling pathway leading to dendritic protrusions.

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    Abu-Elneel, Kawther; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Medina, Miguel; Remedi, Monica; Gastaldi, Laura; Caceres, Alfredo; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2008-11-21

    Delta-catenin is a synaptic adherens junction protein pivotally positioned to serve as a signaling sensor and integrator. Expression of delta-catenin induces filopodia-like protrusions in neurons. Here we show that the small GTPases of the Rho family act coordinately as downstream effectors of delta-catenin. A dominant negative Rac prevented delta-catenin-induced protrusions, and Cdc42 activity was dramatically increased by delta-catenin expression. A kinase dead LIMK (LIM kinase) and a mutant Cofilin also prevented delta-catenin-induced protrusions. To link the effects of delta-catenin to a physiological pathway, we noted that (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors induced dendritic protrusions that are very similar to those induced by delta-catenin. Furthermore, delta-catenin RNA-mediated interference can block the induction of dendritic protrusions by DHPG. Interestingly, DHPG dissociated PSD-95 and N-cadherin from the delta-catenin complex, increased the association of delta-catenin with Cortactin, and induced the phosphorylation of delta-catenin within the sites that bind to these protein partners.

  8. Genetic variation in the dopamine pathway and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sean P; Munafò, Marcus R

    2008-09-01

    Twin and family studies have established that genetic factors account for much of the variation in tobacco dependence. Therefore, identification of genetic variants predictive of successful smoking cessation has implications for the future prospect of personalized smoking cessation therapies. Converging data implicate the dopamine pathway as an important neural substrate for tobacco dependence. Several candidate genes within the dopamine pathway (e.g., DRD2 and COMT) have been reported to be associated with the efficacy of bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy, and others (e.g., SLC6A3 and DRD4) have been reported to be associated with smoking cessation independent of pharmacotherapy. However, few of these candidate genes are present within regions of suggestive or significant linkage or overlap with genome-wide linkage or association studies of tobacco dependence or smoking cessation. Future studies should seek to replicate genome-wide association analyses with individual-level genotyping, and use better-defined smoking cessation phenotypes. Once robust evidence for association is established, which may take several more years, further research into the likely cost-effectiveness, feasibility and acceptability of personalized medicine for smoking cessation will be necessary before it can be translated into practice.

  9. Quantum control via a genetic algorithm of the field ionization pathway of a Rydberg electron

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    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Kang, Xinyue; Liu, Zhimin Cheryl; Rowley, Zoe A.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum control of the pathway along which a Rydberg electron field ionizes is experimentally and computationally demonstrated. Selective field ionization is typically done with a slowly rising electric field pulse. The (1/n*)4 scaling of the classical ionization threshold leads to a rough mapping between arrival time of the electron signal and principal quantum number of the Rydberg electron. This is complicated by the many avoided level crossings that the electron must traverse on the way to ionization, which in general leads to broadening of the time-resolved field ionization signal. In order to control the ionization pathway, thus directing the signal to the desired arrival time, a perturbing electric field produced by an arbitrary wave-form generator is added to a slowly rising electric field. A genetic algorithm evolves the perturbing field in an effort to achieve the target time-resolved field ionization signal.

  10. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher, E-mail: yllars@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Andrea [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, María Jesús [Dept. of Biochemistry, Physiology and Molecular Genetics, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón (Spain); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitória-EMESCAM, Vitória, ES CEP 29045-402 (Brazil); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  11. Importance of monitoring family members in establishing sources and pathways of lead in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulson, B L; Mizon, K J; Korsch, M J; Howarth, D

    1996-10-11

    High precision lead isotope measurements were undertaken to establish the sources and pathways in blood and environmental samples of five families from the Broken Hill lead mining community, New South Wales, Australia. The five families were selected from 27 families investigated to illustrate the different sources and pathways of lead into blood and the importance of monitoring the whole family. The results illustrate that although the major source of lead is from the orebody, paint and petrol can be significant contributors to both house dust and blood leads. The results also show that the sources and pathways can be from the father's occupation and hence monitoring of families is important, especially in high risk locations. In two cases, the elevated blood leads in the children did not derive from their current residence but from other residences in the community.

  12. Integrated GWAS and Pathway profiling for feed efficiency traits in pigs leads to novel genes and their molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Ostersen, Tage; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    is an important step where we firstly detect genes located near GWAS-detected SNPs and subsequently we detect enrichment of these genes in various biological processes and pathways. The objective of this study was to apply these steps to identify relevant pathways involved in residual feed intake (RFI) in pigs....... Residual feed intake is a feed efficiency measure and is highly economically important in animal production. In our study, a total of 596 Yorkshire boars had phenotypic and genotypic records. After quality control, 37,915 SNPs were available for GWAS which was implemented in the DMU software package...... pathway are known to be involved in biological processes closely related to regulation of feed intake or residual feed intake. These results provide insights into the genetic architecture as well as the systems biological mechanisms of this complex trait in pigs....

  13. Integrated GWAS and Pathway profiling for feed efficiency traits in pigs leads to novel genes and their molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Ostersen, Tage; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    is an important step where we firstly detect genes located near GWAS-detected SNPs and subsequently we detect enrichment of these genes in various biological processes and pathways. The objective of this study was to apply these steps to identify relevant pathways involved in residual feed intake (RFI) in pigs....... Residual feed intake is a feed efficiency measure and is highly economically important in animal production. In our study, a total of 596 Yorkshire boars had phenotypic and genotypic records. After quality control, 37,915 SNPs were available for GWAS which was implemented in the DMU software package...... pathway are known to be involved in biological processes closely related to regulation of feed intake or residual feed intake. These results provide insights into the genetic architecture as well as the systems biological mechanisms of this complex trait in pigs....

  14. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for chemical binding to tubulin in oocytes leading to aneuploid offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Massarotti, Alberto; Yauk, Carole L; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Russo, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has launched the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Programme to advance knowledge of pathways of toxicity and improve the use of mechanistic information in risk assessment. An AOP links a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome (AO) through intermediate key events (KE). Here, we present the scientific evidence in support of an AOP whereby chemicals that bind to tubulin cause microtubule depolymerization resulting in spindle disorganization followed by altered chromosome alignment and segregation and the generation of aneuploidy in female germ cells, ultimately leading to aneuploidy in the offspring. Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes that is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, is a well-known cause of human disease and represents a major cause of infertility, pregnancy failure, and serious genetic disorders in the offspring. Among chemicals that induce aneuploidy in female germ cells, a large majority impairs microtubule dynamics and spindle function. Colchicine, a prototypical chemical that binds to tubulin and causes microtubule depolymerization, is used here to illustrate the AOP. This AOP is specific to female germ cells exposed during the periovulation period. Although the majority of the data come from rodent studies, the available evidence suggests that the MIE and KEs are conserved across species and would occur in human oocytes. The development of AOPs related to mutagenicity in germ cells is expected to aid the identification of potential hazards to germ cell genomic integrity and support regulatory efforts to protect population health. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  16. Lead-Related Genetic Loci, Cumulative Lead Exposure and Incident Coronary Heart Disease: The Normative Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Marc G.; Sparrow, David; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Park, Sung Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cumulative exposure to lead is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Polymorphisms in the δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), hemochromatosis (HFE), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family (GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1), apolipoprotein E (APOE),angiotensin II receptor-1 (AGTR1) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes, are believed to alter toxicokinetics and/or toxicodynamics of lead. Objectives We assessed possible effect modification by genetic polymorphisms in ALAD, HFE, HMOX1, VDR, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTM1, APOE, AGTR1 and AGT individually and as the genetic risk score (GRS) on the association between cumulative lead exposure and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods We used K-shell-X-ray fluorescence to measure bone lead levels. GRS was calculated on the basis of 22 lead-related loci. We constructed Cox proportional hazard models to compute adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident CHD. We applied inverse probability weighting to account for potential selection bias due to recruitment into the bone lead sub-study. Results Significant effect modification was found by VDR, HMOX1, GSTP1, APOE, and AGT genetic polymorphisms when evaluated individually. Further, the bone lead-CHD associations became larger as GRS increases. After adjusting for potential confounders, a HR of CHD was 2.27 (95%CI: 1.50–3.42) with 2-fold increase in patella lead levels, among participants in the top tertile of GRS. We also detected an increasing trend in HRs across tertiles of GRS (p-trend = 0.0063). Conclusions Our findings suggest that lead-related loci as a whole may play an important role in susceptibility to lead-related CHD risk. These findings need to be validated in a separate cohort containing bone lead, lead-related genetic loci and incident CHD data. PMID:27584680

  17. Pathways of Genetic Code Evolution in Ancient and Modern Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Higgs, Paul G

    2015-06-01

    There have been two distinct phases of evolution of the genetic code: an ancient phase--prior to the divergence of the three domains of life, during which the standard genetic code was established--and a modern phase, in which many alternative codes have arisen in specific groups of genomes that differ only slightly from the standard code. Here we discuss the factors that are most important in these two phases, and we argue that these are substantially different. In the modern phase, changes are driven by chance events such as tRNA gene deletions and codon disappearance events. Selection acts as a barrier to prevent changes in the code. In contrast, in the ancient phase, selection for increased diversity of amino acids in the code can be a driving force for addition of new amino acids. The pathway of code evolution is constrained by avoiding disruption of genes that are already encoded by earlier versions of the code. The current arrangement of the standard code suggests that it evolved from a four-column code in which Gly, Ala, Asp, and Val were the earliest encoded amino acids.

  18. A genetic screen in Drosophila reveals novel cytoprotective functions of the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Arsham

    Full Text Available The highly conserved autophagy-lysosome pathway is the primary mechanism for breakdown and recycling of macromolecular and organellar cargo in the eukaryotic cell. Autophagy has recently been implicated in protection against cancer, neurodegeneration, and infection, and interest is increasing in additional roles of autophagy in human health, disease, and aging. To search for novel cytoprotective features of this pathway, we carried out a genetic mosaic screen for mutations causing increased lysosomal and/or autophagic activity in the Drosophila melanogaster larval fat body. By combining Drosophila genetics with live-cell imaging of the fluorescent dye LysoTracker Red and fixed-cell imaging of autophagy-specific fluorescent protein markers, the screen was designed to identify essential metazoan genes whose disruption causes increased flux through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. The screen identified a large number of genes associated with the protein synthesis and ER-secretory pathways (e.g. aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, Oligosaccharyl transferase, Sec61alpha, and with mitochondrial function and dynamics (e.g. Rieske iron-sulfur protein, Dynamin-related protein 1. We also observed that increased lysosomal and autophagic activity were consistently associated with decreased cell size. Our work demonstrates that disruption of the synthesis, transport, folding, or glycosylation of ER-targeted proteins at any of multiple steps leads to autophagy induction. In addition to illuminating cytoprotective features of autophagy in response to cellular damage, this screen establishes a genetic methodology for investigating cell biological phenotypes in live cells, in the context of viable wild type organisms.

  19. Pathway-based Analysis of the Hidden Genetic Heterogeneities in Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers apparently showing similar phenotypes are actually distinct at the molecular level, leading to very different responses to the same treatment. It has been recently demonstrated that pathway-based approaches are robust and reliable for genetic analysis of cancers. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether such function-based approaches are useful in deciphering molecular heterogeneities in cancers. Therefore, we aimed to test this possibility in the present study. First, we used a NCI60 dataset to validate the ability of pathways to correctly partition samples. Next, we applied the proposed method to identify the hidden subtypes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Finally, the clinical significance of the identified subtypes was verified using survival analysis. For the NCI60 dataset, we achieved highly accurate partitions that best fit the clinical cancer phenotypes. Subsequently, for a DLBCL dataset, we identified three hidden subtypes that showed very different 10-year overall survival rates (90%, 46% and 20% and were highly significantly (P = 0.008 correlated with the clinical survival rate. This study demonstrated that the pathway-based approach is promising for unveiling genetic heterogeneities in complex human diseases.

  20. Multi-Omics Reveals that Lead Exposure Disturbs Gut Microbiome Development, Key Metabolites and Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bei; Chi, Liang; Mahbub, Ridwan; Bian, Xiaoming; Tu, Pengcheng; Ru, Hongyu; Lu, Kun

    2017-02-24

    Lead exposure remains as a global public health issue and recent Flint water crisis has again raised concern about lead toxicity in the public. The toxicity of lead has been well established in a variety of systems and organs. It has been increasingly appreciated that gut microbiome is highly involved in many critical physiological processes, such as food digestion, immune system development, and metabolic homeostasis, etc. However, despite the key role of gut microbiome in human health, the functional impact of lead exposure on gut microbiome has not been studied yet. This study aims at defining gut microbiome toxicity induced by lead exposure in C57BL/6 mice by multi-omics approaches including 16S rRNA sequencing, whole genome metagenomics sequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics profiling. 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that lead exposure altered the gut microbiome trajectory and phylogenetic diversity. Metagenomics sequencing and metabolomics profiling showed that numerous metabolic pathways, including vitamin E and bile acids, nitrogen metabolism, energy metabolism, oxidative stress and defense/detoxification mechanism, were significantly disturbed by lead exposure. These perturbed molecules and pathways may have important implications in lead toxicity in the host. Taken together, we have demonstrated that lead exposure not only alters the gut microbiome community structures/diversity, but also largely affects its metabolic functions, leading to gut microbiome toxicity.

  1. OptForce: an optimization procedure for identifying all genetic manipulations leading to targeted overproductions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Ranganathan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational procedures for predicting metabolic interventions leading to the overproduction of biochemicals in microbial strains are widely in use. However, these methods rely on surrogate biological objectives (e.g., maximize growth rate or minimize metabolic adjustments and do not make use of flux measurements often available for the wild-type strain. In this work, we introduce the OptForce procedure that identifies all possible engineering interventions by classifying reactions in the metabolic model depending upon whether their flux values must increase, decrease or become equal to zero to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. We hierarchically apply this classification rule for pairs, triples, quadruples, etc. of reactions. This leads to the identification of a sufficient and non-redundant set of fluxes that must change (i.e., MUST set to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. Starting with this set we subsequently extract a minimal set of fluxes that must actively be forced through genetic manipulations (i.e., FORCE set to ensure that all fluxes in the network are consistent with the overproduction objective. We demonstrate our OptForce framework for succinate production in Escherichia coli using the most recent in silico E. coli model, iAF1260. The method not only recapitulates existing engineering strategies but also reveals non-intuitive ones that boost succinate production by performing coordinated changes on pathways distant from the last steps of succinate synthesis.

  2. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Coull, Brent; Suh, Helen; Wright, Robert; Baccarelli, Andrea; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing) modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011). To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing) to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction) = 0.04). Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction) = 0.12), CRP (p(interaction) = 0.02), and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08). This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  3. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Abele Bind

    Full Text Available Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011. To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction = 0.04. Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction = 0.12, CRP (p(interaction = 0.02, and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08. This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  4. Relative importance of dissolved and food pathways for lead contamination in shrimp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisson, F.; Cotret, O.; Teyssie, J.-L.; El-Baradeie, M.; Fowler, S.W

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of dissolved and food pathways and the influence of food type in the bioaccumulation and retention of lead in the shrimp Palaemonetes varians were examined using a radiotracer method. Shrimp were exposed to {sup 210}Pb-labelled seawater or fed two types of {sup 210}Pb-labelled food, viz. mussels or worms. The amount of radiotracer accumulated by shrimp was examined over a 7-day period, followed by a 1-month and a 7-day depuration period for the dissolved and food source, respectively. Steady state in the uptake was reached after 2 days exposure to dissolved lead, with a resultant estimated concentration factor of 98 {+-} 3. Transfer factors following ingestion of contaminated mussels and worms were lower than unity for both food types, with lead transfer from worms being significantly higher than that from mussels. Accumulation of dissolved Pb by shrimp was found to occur mainly through adsorption on the exoskeleton with a minor accumulation in the internal tissues probably resulting from the intake of seawater for osmoregulation. In contrast, lead taken up from contaminated food was readily absorbed and bound in the internal tissues of P. varians. Although the transfer of lead to P. varians through the ingestion of contaminated food was low (TF < 1%), it still represented 4 to 8% of the lead content in the prey which is a significant additional contribution of lead to the shrimp body burden. Independent of food type, following ingestion of contaminated food, approximately 23-27% of total lead accumulated in shrimp was located in the edible parts (e.g. muscle). Therefore, the food pathway is suggested to be a significant contributor to the lead transfer to humans through ingestion of contaminated shrimp. After exposure to contaminated food, lead loss kinetics were described by a two-component model, whereas Pb loss following direct uptake from seawater was best described by a three-component model. The additional compartment representing 64

  5. The importance of p53 pathway genetics in inherited and somatic cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Wang, Xuting; Wallace, Marsha D; Grawenda, Anna M; Zhang, Ping; Hewitt, Juliet; Zeron-Medina, Jorge; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Tomlinson, Ian P; Goding, Colin R; Cygan, Kamil J; Fairbrother, William G; Thomas, Laurent F; Sætrom, Pål; Gemignani, Federica; Landi, Stefano; Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bell, Douglas A; Bond, Gareth L

    2016-04-01

    Decades of research have shown that mutations in the p53 stress response pathway affect the incidence of diverse cancers more than mutations in other pathways. However, most evidence is limited to somatic mutations and rare inherited mutations. Using newly abundant genomic data, we demonstrate that commonly inherited genetic variants in the p53 pathway also affect the incidence of a broad range of cancers more than variants in other pathways. The cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the p53 pathway have strikingly similar genetic characteristics to well-studied p53 pathway cancer-causing somatic mutations. Our results enable insights into p53-mediated tumour suppression in humans and into p53 pathway-based cancer surveillance and treatment strategies.

  6. Genetic Variation in Dopamine Pathways Differentially Associated with Smoking Progression in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucht, Manfred; Becker, Katja; Frank, Josef; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Treutlein, Jens; Skowronek, Markus H.; Schumann, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    A study examines whether genetic variation in dopamine pathways differentially associate with smoking progression in adolescence. Results indicate the influence of specific dopamine genes in different stages of smoking progression in adolescents.

  7. Genetic Variation in Dopamine Pathways Differentially Associated with Smoking Progression in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucht, Manfred; Becker, Katja; Frank, Josef; Schmidt, Martin H.; Esser, Gunter; Treutlein, Jens; Skowronek, Markus H.; Schumann, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    A study examines whether genetic variation in dopamine pathways differentially associate with smoking progression in adolescence. Results indicate the influence of specific dopamine genes in different stages of smoking progression in adolescents.

  8. Academic provenance: Investigation of pathways that lead students into the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, Heather R.

    Pathways that lead students into the geosciences as a college major have not been fully explored in the current literature, despite the recent studies on the "geoscience pipeline model." Anecdotal evidence suggests low quality geoscience curriculum in K-12 education, lack of visibility of the discipline and lack of knowledge about geoscience careers contribute to low geoscience enrollments at universities. This study investigated the reasons why college students decided to major in the geosciences. Students' interests, experiences, motivations and desired future careers were examined to develop a pathway model. In addition, self-efficacy was used to inform pathway analyses, as it is an influential factor in academic major and career choice. These results and interpretations have strong implications for recruitment and retention in academia and industry. A semi-structured interview protocol was developed, which was informed by John Flanagan's critical incident theory. The responses to this interview were used to identify common experiences that diverse students shared for reasons they became geoscience majors. Researchers used self-efficacy theory by Alfred Bandura to assess students' pathways. Seventeen undergraduate geoscience majors from two U.S. Midwest research universities were sampled for cross-comparison and analysis. Qualitative analyses led to the development of six categorical steps for the geoscience pathway. The six pathway steps are: innate attributes/interest sources, pre-college critical incidents, college critical incidents, current/near future goals, expected career attributes and desired future careers. Although, how students traversed through each step was unique for individuals, similar patterns were identified between different populations in our participants: Natives, Immigrants and Refugees. In addition, critical incidents were found to act on behavior in two different ways: to support and confirm decision-making behavior (supportive critical

  9. Synergistic defects of different molecules in the cytotoxic pathway lead to clinical familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejian; Chandrakasan, Shanmuganathan; Chapman, Heather; Valencia, C Alexander; Husami, Ammar; Kissell, Diane; Johnson, Judith A; Filipovich, Alexandra H

    2014-08-21

    Several molecules (LYST, AP3, RAB27A, STX11, STXBP2, MUNC13-4, and PRF1) have been associated with the function of cytotoxic lymphocytes. Biallelic defects in all of these molecules have been associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). We retrospectively reviewed the genetic and immunology test results from 2701 patients with a clinically suspected diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and found 28 patients with single heterozygous mutations in 2 FHL-associated genes. Of these patients, 21 had mutations within PRF1 and a degranulation gene, and 7 were found to have mutations within 2 genes involved in the degranulation pathway. In patients with combination defects involving 2 genes in the degranulation pathway, CD107a degranulation was decreased, comparable to patients with biallelic mutations in one of the genes in the degranulation pathway. This suggests a potential digenic mode of inheritance of FHL as a result of a synergistic function effect within genes involved in cytotoxic lymphocyte degranulation. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Mutations in ligands and receptors of the leptin-melanocortin pathway that lead to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2008-10-01

    Obesity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and certain cancers. The prevalence of obesity is increasing rapidly throughout the world and is now recognized as a major global public-health concern. Although the increased prevalence of obesity is undoubtedly driven by environmental factors, the evidence that inherited factors profoundly influence human fat mass is equally compelling. Twin and adoption studies indicate that up to 70% of the interindividual variance in fat mass is determined by genetic factors. Genetic strategies can, therefore, provide a useful tool with which to dissect the complex (and often heterogeneous) molecular and physiologic mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight. In this Review, we have focused our attention on monogenic disorders, which primarily result in severe, early-onset obesity. The study of these genetic disorders has provided a framework for our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight in humans and how these mechanisms are disrupted in obesity. The genes affected in these monogenic disorders all encode ligands and receptors of the highly conserved leptin-melanocortin pathway, which is critical for the regulation of food intake and body weight.

  11. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  12. Elucidating the early signal transduction pathways leading to fetal brain injury in preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovitz, Michal A; Mrinalini, Conjeevaram; Sammel, Mary D

    2006-01-01

    Adverse neurologic outcome, including cerebral palsy, is a significant contributor to long-term morbidity in preterm neonates. However, the mechanisms leading to brain injury in the setting of a preterm birth are poorly understood. In the last decade, there has been a growing body of evidence correlating infection or inflammation with preterm birth. The presence of intrauterine inflammation significantly increases the risk for adverse neurologic outcome in the neonate. These studies were performed to elucidate the early signal transduction pathways activated in the fetal brain that may result in long-term neurologic injury. Using our mouse model of localized intrauterine inflammation, the activation of TH1/TH2 pathways in the placenta, fetus corpus, fetal liver, and fetal brain was investigated. Additional studies determined whether activation of TH1/TH2 pathways could promote cell death and alter glial development. Real-time PCR studies demonstrated that a robust TH1/TH2 response occurs rapidly in the fetal brain after exposure to intrauterine inflammation. The cytokine response in the fetus and placenta was not significantly correlated with the response in the fetal brain. Along with an immune response, cell death pathways were activated early in the fetal brain in response to intrauterine LPS. Implicating TH1/TH2 and cell death pathways in permanent brain injury are our findings of an increase in GFAP mRNA and protein as well as a loss of pro-oligodendrocytes. With increased understanding of the mechanisms by which inflammation promotes brain injury in the preterm neonate, identification of potential targets to limit adverse neonatal outcomes becomes possible.

  13. Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Variation in RNA Editing Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tongjun; Gatti, Daniel M; Srivastava, Anuj; Snyder, Elizabeth M; Raghupathy, Narayanan; Simecek, Petr; Svenson, Karen L; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Braun, Robert E; Churchill, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    RNA editing refers to post-transcriptional processes that alter the base sequence of RNA. Recently, hundreds of new RNA editing targets have been reported. However, the mechanisms that determine the specificity and degree of editing are not well understood. We examined quantitative variation of site-specific editing in a genetically diverse multiparent population, Diversity Outbred mice, and mapped polymorphic loci that alter editing ratios globally for C-to-U editing and at specific sites for A-to-I editing. An allelic series in the C-to-U editing enzyme Apobec1 influences the editing efficiency of Apob and 58 additional C-to-U editing targets. We identified 49 A-to-I editing sites with polymorphisms in the edited transcript that alter editing efficiency. In contrast to the shared genetic control of C-to-U editing, most of the variable A-to-I editing sites were determined by local nucleotide polymorphisms in proximity to the editing site in the RNA secondary structure. Our results indicate that RNA editing is a quantitative trait subject to genetic variation and that evolutionary constraints have given rise to distinct genetic architectures in the two canonical types of RNA editing.

  14. New IBD genetics: common pathways with other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, C W; Barrett, J C; Parkes, M; Satsangi, J

    2011-12-01

    Complex disease genetics has been revolutionised in recent years by the advent of genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have seen notable successes culminating in the discovery of 99 published susceptibility loci/genes (71 Crohn's disease; 47 ulcerative colitis) to date. Approximately one-third of loci described confer susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Amongst these are multiple genes involved in IL23/Th17 signalling (IL23R, IL12B, JAK2, TYK2 and STAT3), IL10, IL1R2, REL, CARD9, NKX2.3, ICOSLG, PRDM1, SMAD3 and ORMDL3. The evolving genetic architecture of IBD has furthered our understanding of disease pathogenesis. For Crohn's disease, defective processing of intracellular bacteria has become a central theme, following gene discoveries in autophagy and innate immunity (associations with NOD2, IRGM, ATG16L1 are specific to Crohn's disease). Genetic evidence has also demonstrated the importance of barrier function to the development of ulcerative colitis (HNF4A, LAMB1, CDH1 and GNA12). However, when the data are analysed in more detail, deeper themes emerge including the shared susceptibility seen with other diseases. Many immune-mediated diseases overlap in this respect, paralleling the reported epidemiological evidence. However, in several cases the reported shared susceptibility appears at odds with the clinical picture. Examples include both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review we will detail the presently available data on the genetic overlap between IBD and other diseases. The discussion will be informed by the epidemiological data in the published literature and the implications for pathogenesis and therapy will be outlined. This arena will move forwards very quickly in the next few years. Ultimately, we anticipate that these genetic insights will transform the landscape of common complex diseases such as IBD.

  15. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found? Who is at risk? What are the health effects of lead? Get educational material about lead Get certified as a Lead Abatement Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home ...

  16. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  17. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network and pathway analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette J. A. Kogelman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH and differentially wired (DW networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g. NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g. metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways

  18. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network, and pathway analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Pant, Sameer D; Fredholm, Merete; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome investigations focusing on single genetic variants have achieved limited success, and the importance of including genetic interactions is becoming evident. Here, the aim was to perform an integrative genomic analysis in an F2 pig resource population that was constructed with an aim to maximize genetic variation of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation of haplotype blocks. We built Weighted Interaction SNP Hub (WISH) and differentially wired (DW) networks using genotypic correlations amongst obesity-associated SNPs resulting from GWA analysis. GWA results and SNP modules detected by WISH and DW analyses were further investigated by functional enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of SNPs revealed several genes associated with obesity, e.g., NPC2 and OR4D10. Moreover, gene enrichment analyses identified several significantly associated pathways, over and above the GWA study results, that may influence obesity and obesity related diseases, e.g., metabolic processes. WISH networks based on genotypic correlations allowed further identification of various gene ontology terms and pathways related to obesity and related traits, which were not identified by the GWA study. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop a (genetic) obesity index and employ systems genetics in a porcine model to provide important insights into the complex genetic architecture associated with obesity and many biological pathways that underlie

  19. Genetic and Environmental Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping. I. Basic theory and an analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Drosophila. Genetics 117:343–351, 1987...reserved.1. Introduction Fructose, which occurs naturally in honey and sweet fruits, is produced in crystalline and syrup forms for commercial use...regulating glucose and lipid metabo- lism. Hepatic FABP levels are also up-regulated in response to high fat feeding or increased alcohol consumption

  20. Actin-induced hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway leads to apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, C W; Ayscough, K R

    2006-09-01

    Recent research has revealed a conserved role for the actin cytoskeleton in the regulation of aging and apoptosis among eukaryotes. Here we show that the stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton caused by deletion of Sla1p or End3p leads to hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway. The consequent rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels leads to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death. We have established a mechanistic link between Ras signaling and actin by demonstrating that ROS production in actin-stabilized cells is dependent on the G-actin binding region of the cyclase-associated protein Srv2p/CAP. Furthermore, the artificial elevation of cAMP directly mimics the apoptotic phenotypes displayed by actin-stabilized cells. The effect of cAMP elevation in inducing actin-mediated apoptosis functions primarily through the Tpk3p subunit of protein kinase A. This pathway represents the first defined link between environmental sensing, actin remodeling, and apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  1. Revisiting sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathways leading to santalene and its analogues: a comprehensive mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-10-21

    Santalene and bergamotene are the major olefinic sesquiterpenes responsible for the fragrance of sandalwood oil. Herein we report the details of density functional theory investigations on the biosynthetic pathway of this important class of terpenes. The mechanistic study has been found to be effective toward gaining significant new insight into different possibilities for the formation of the key intermediates involved in santalene and bergamotene biosynthesis. The stereoelectronic features of the transition states and intermediates for (i) ring closure of the initial bisabolyl cation, and (ii) skeletal rearrangements in the ensuing bicyclic carbocationic intermediates leading to (-)-epi-β-santalene, (-)-β-santalene, (-)-α-santalene, (+)-epi-β-santalene, exo-β-bergamotene, endo-β-bergamotene, exo-α-bergamotene, and endo-α-bergamotene are presented. Interesting structural features pertaining to certain new carbocationic intermediates (such as b) resulting from the ring closure of bisabolyl cation are discussed. Extensive conformational sampling of all key intermediates along the biosynthetic pathway offered new insight into the role of the isoprenyl side chain conformation in the formation of santalene and its analogues. Although the major bicyclic products in Santalum album appear to arise from the right or left handed helical form of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), different alternatives for their formation are found to be energetically feasible. The interconversion of the exo and endo isomers of bisabolyl cation and a likely epimerization, both with interesting mechanistic implications, are presented. The exo to endo conversion is identified to be energetically more favorable than another pathway emanating from the left handed helical FPP. The role of pyrophosphate (OPP(-)) in the penultimate deprotonation step leading to olefinic sesquiterpenes is also examined.

  2. A recessive genetic screen for components of the RNA interference pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    Several key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway were identified in genetic screens performed in nonmammalian model organisms. To identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, we developed a recessive genetic screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Recessive genetic screens are feasible in ES cells that are Bloom-syndrome protein (Blm-) deficient. Therefore, we constructed a reporter cell line in Blm-deficient ES cells to isolate RNAi mutants through a simple drug-selection scheme. This chapter describes how we used retroviral gene traps to mutagenize the reporter cell line and select for RNAi mutants. Putative RNAi mutants were confirmed using a separate functional assay. The location of the gene trap was then identified using molecular techniques such as Splinkerette PCR. Our screening strategy successfully isolated several mutant clones of Argonaute2, a vital component of the RNAi pathway.

  3. Towards a genetic definition of cancer-associated inflammation: role of the IDO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, George C; Metz, Richard; Muller, Alexander J

    2010-05-01

    Chronic inflammation drives the development of many cancers, but a genetic definition of what constitutes 'cancer-associated' inflammation has not been determined. Recently, a mouse genetic study revealed a critical role for the immune escape mediator indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in supporting inflammatory skin carcinogenesis. IDO is generally regarded as being immunosuppressive; however, there was no discernable difference in generalized inflammatory processes in IDO-null mice under conditions where tumor development was significantly suppressed, implicating IDO as key to establishing the pathogenic state of 'cancer-associated' inflammation. Here we review recent findings and their potential implications to understanding the relationship between immune escape and inflammation in cancer. Briefly, we propose that genetic pathways of immune escape in cancer are synonymous with pathways that define 'cancer-associated' inflammation and that these processes may be identical rather than distinct, as generally presumed, in terms of their genetic definition.

  4. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adel Fahmideh, Maral; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk.The study...... cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways....

  5. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahmideh, Maral Adel; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk. The study...... cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways....

  6. Simultaneous perturbation of the MAPK and the PI3K/mTOR pathways does not lead to increased radiosensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Kuger, Sebastian; Flentje, Michael; Djuzenova, Cholpon S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways are intertwined on various levels and simultaneous inhibition reduces tumorsize and prolonges survival synergistically. Furthermore, inhibiting these pathways radiosensitized cancer cells in various studies. To assess, if phenotypic changes after perturbations of this signaling network depend on the genetic background, we integrated a time series o...

  7. Pathways to Understanding Ovarian Cancer, Epidemiology, Genetic Susceptibility, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    develop from the fallopian tubes while others develop from the ovarian surface epithelium through Mullerian inclusions or endometriosis implants ...RAS and BRA F mutations leading to low grade serous and m ucinous carcinomas, 2) endometriosis implants or transformation into endometrioid...serous tum ors. Oral contraceptive use was associated with a decreased risk of both dom inant and non-dominant tumors with the strongest

  8. A systems genetics approach provides a bridge from discovered genetic variants to biological pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nakaoka

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have yielded novel genetic loci underlying common diseases. We propose a systems genetics approach to utilize these discoveries for better understanding of the genetic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Current evidence of genetic associations with RA was sought through PubMed and the NHGRI GWAS catalog. The associations of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 alleles were confirmed in 1,287 cases and 1,500 controls of Japanese subjects. Among these, HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight SNPs showed significant associations and all but one of the variants had the same direction of effect as identified in the previous studies, indicating that the genetic risk factors underlying RA are shared across populations. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC for the genetic risk score based on the selected variants was 68.4%. For seropositive RA patients only, the AUC improved to 70.9%, indicating good but suboptimal predictive ability. A simulation study shows that more than 200 additional loci with similar effect size as recent GWAS findings or 20 rare variants with intermediate effects are needed to achieve AUC = 80.0%. We performed the random walk with restart (RWR algorithm to prioritize genes for future mapping studies. The performance of the algorithm was confirmed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The RWR algorithm pointed to ZAP70 in the first rank, in which mutation causes RA-like autoimmune arthritis in mice. By applying the hierarchical clustering method to a subnetwork comprising RA-associated genes and top-ranked genes by the RWR, we found three functional modules relevant to RA etiology: "leukocyte activation and differentiation", "pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathway", and "chemokines and their receptors".These results suggest that the systems genetics approach is useful to find directions of future mapping strategies to illuminate

  9. Human exposure pathways of heavy metals in a lead-zinc mining area, Jiangsu Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sheng Qu

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is becoming a serious issue in developing countries such as China, and the public is increasingly aware of its adverse health impacts in recent years. We assessed the potential health risks in a lead-zinc mining area and attempted to identify the key exposure pathways. We evaluated the spatial distributions of personal exposure using indigenous exposure factors and field monitoring results of water, soil, food, and indoor and outdoor air samples. The risks posed by 10 metals and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact pathways to these risks were estimated. Human hair samples were also analyzed to indicate the exposure level in the human body. Our results show that heavy metal pollution may pose high potential health risks to local residents, especially in the village closest to the mine (V1, mainly due to Pb, Cd and Hg. Correspondingly, the residents in V1 had higher Pb (8.14 mg/kg levels in hair than those in the other two villages. Most of the estimated risks came from soil, the intake of self-produced vegetables and indoor air inhalation. This study highlights the importance of site-specific multipathway health risk assessments in studying heavy-metal exposures in China.

  10. HCV upregulates Bim through the ROS/JNK signalling pathway, leading to Bax-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lin; Chen, Ming; Tanaka, Motofumi; Ku, Yonson; Itoh, Tomoo; Shoji, Ikuo; Hotta, Hak

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces Bax-triggered, mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis by using the HCV J6/JFH1 strain and Huh-7.5 cells. However, it was still unclear how HCV-induced Bax activation. In this study, we showed that the HCV-induced activation and mitochondrial accumulation of Bax were significantly attenuated by treatment with a general antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), or a specific c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125, with the result suggesting that the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/JNK signalling pathway is upstream of Bax activation in HCV-induced apoptosis. We also demonstrated that HCV infection transcriptionally activated the gene for the pro-apoptotic protein Bim and the protein expression of three major splice variants of Bim (BimEL, BimL and BimS). The HCV-induced increase in the Bim mRNA and protein levels was significantly counteracted by treatment with NAC or SP600125, suggesting that the ROS/JNK signalling pathway is involved in Bim upregulation. Moreover, HCV infection led to a marked accumulation of Bim on the mitochondria to facilitate its interaction with Bax. On the other hand, downregulation of Bim by siRNA (small interfering RNA) significantly prevented HCV-mediated activation of Bax and caspase 3. Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV-induced ROS/JNK signalling transcriptionally activates Bim expression, which leads to Bax activation and apoptosis induction.

  11. Pathway analysis of GWAS provides new insights into genetic susceptibility to 3 inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariklia Eleftherohorinou

    Full Text Available Although the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS have greatly increased the number of genes associated with common diseases, only a small proportion of the predicted genetic contribution has so far been elucidated. Studying the cumulative variation of polymorphisms in multiple genes acting in functional pathways may provide a complementary approach to the more common single SNP association approach in understanding genetic determinants of common disease. We developed a novel pathway-based method to assess the combined contribution of multiple genetic variants acting within canonical biological pathways and applied it to data from 14,000 UK individuals with 7 common diseases. We tested inflammatory pathways for association with Crohn's disease (CD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and type 1 diabetes (T1D with 4 non-inflammatory diseases as controls. Using a variable selection algorithm, we identified variants responsible for the pathway association and evaluated their use for disease prediction using a 10 fold cross-validation framework in order to calculate out-of-sample area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC. The generalisability of these predictive models was tested on an independent birth cohort from Northern Finland. Multiple canonical inflammatory pathways showed highly significant associations (p 10(-3-10(-20 with CD, T1D and RA. Variable selection identified on average a set of 205 SNPs (149 genes for T1D, 350 SNPs (189 genes for RA and 493 SNPs (277 genes for CD. The pattern of polymorphisms at these SNPS were found to be highly predictive of T1D (91% AUC and RA (85% AUC, and weakly predictive of CD (60% AUC. The predictive ability of the T1D model (without any parameter refitting had good predictive ability (79% AUC in the Finnish cohort. Our analysis suggests that genetic contribution to common inflammatory diseases operates through multiple genes interacting in functional pathways.

  12. Pigmentation, pleiotropy, and genetic pathways in humans and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsh, G.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Some of the most striking polymorphisms in human populations affect the color of our eyes, hair, or skin. Despite some simple lessons from high school biology (blue eyes are recessive; brown are dominant), the genetic basis of such phenotypic variability has, for the most part, eluded Mendelian description. A logical place to search for the keys to understanding common variation in human pigmentation are genes in which defects cause uncommon conditions such as albinism or piebaldism. The area under this lamppost has recently gotten larger, with two articles, one in this issue of the Journal, that describe the map position for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) and with the recent cloning of a gene that causes X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). In addition, a series of three recent articles in Cell demonstrate (1) that defects in the gene encoding the endothelin B (ET{sub B}) receptor cause hypopigmentation and Hirschsprung disease in a Mennonite population and the mouse mutation piebald(s) and (2) that a defect in the edn3 gene, which encodes one of the ligands for the ET{sub B} receptor, causes the lethal spotting (ls) mouse mutation. 47 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Beyond induced mutants: using worms to study natural variation in genetic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Philips, P.C.; Bono, de M.; Doroszuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    Induced mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are used to study genetic pathways of processes ranging from aging to behavior. The effects of such mutations are usually analyzed in a single wildtype background: N2. However, studies in other species demonstrate that the phenotype(s) of induce

  14. Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudijs, M.J.; den Broeder, M.J.; Groot, E.; van Eeden, F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a r

  15. Identifying genetic variants for heart rate variability in the acetylcholine pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz Venegas, Loretto; Hartman, Catharina A; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; van Roon, Arie M; van der Most, Peter J; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ronald; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Nolte, Ilja M; de Geus, Eco J C; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-causemortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3,

  16. THE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY (AOP) FRAMEWORK: A FRAMEWORK FOR ORGANIZING BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE LEADING TO HEALTH RISKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) represents the organization of current and newly acquired knowledge of biological pathways. These pathways contain a series of nodes (Key Events, KEs) that when sufficiently altered influence the next node on the pathway, beginning from an Molecul...

  17. Differing Patterns of Selection and Geospatial Genetic Diversity within Two Leading Plasmodium vivax Candidate Vaccine Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Christian M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Hathaway, Nicholas J.; Socheat, Duong; Rogers, William O.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Although Plasmodium vivax is a leading cause of malaria around the world, only a handful of vivax antigens are being studied for vaccine development. Here, we investigated genetic signatures of selection and geospatial genetic diversity of two leading vivax vaccine antigens – Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (pvmsp-1) and Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (pvcsp). Using scalable next-generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced amplicons of the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1 (n = 44) and the complete gene of pvcsp (n = 47) from Cambodian isolates. These sequences were then compared with global parasite populations obtained from GenBank. Using a combination of statistical and phylogenetic methods to assess for selection and population structure, we found strong evidence of balancing selection in the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1, which varied significantly over the length of the gene, consistent with immune-mediated selection. In pvcsp, the highly variable central repeat region also showed patterns consistent with immune selection, which were lacking outside the repeat. The patterns of selection seen in both genes differed from their P. falciparum orthologs. In addition, we found that, similar to merozoite antigens from P. falciparum malaria, genetic diversity of pvmsp-1 sequences showed no geographic clustering, while the non-merozoite antigen, pvcsp, showed strong geographic clustering. These findings suggest that while immune selection may act on both vivax vaccine candidate antigens, the geographic distribution of genetic variability differs greatly between these two genes. The selective forces driving this diversification could lead to antigen escape and vaccine failure. Better understanding the geographic distribution of genetic variability in vaccine candidate antigens will be key to designing and implementing efficacious vaccines. PMID:24743266

  18. Differing patterns of selection and geospatial genetic diversity within two leading Plasmodium vivax candidate vaccine antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Parobek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although Plasmodium vivax is a leading cause of malaria around the world, only a handful of vivax antigens are being studied for vaccine development. Here, we investigated genetic signatures of selection and geospatial genetic diversity of two leading vivax vaccine antigens--Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (pvmsp-1 and Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (pvcsp. Using scalable next-generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced amplicons of the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1 (n = 44 and the complete gene of pvcsp (n = 47 from Cambodian isolates. These sequences were then compared with global parasite populations obtained from GenBank. Using a combination of statistical and phylogenetic methods to assess for selection and population structure, we found strong evidence of balancing selection in the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1, which varied significantly over the length of the gene, consistent with immune-mediated selection. In pvcsp, the highly variable central repeat region also showed patterns consistent with immune selection, which were lacking outside the repeat. The patterns of selection seen in both genes differed from their P. falciparum orthologs. In addition, we found that, similar to merozoite antigens from P. falciparum malaria, genetic diversity of pvmsp-1 sequences showed no geographic clustering, while the non-merozoite antigen, pvcsp, showed strong geographic clustering. These findings suggest that while immune selection may act on both vivax vaccine candidate antigens, the geographic distribution of genetic variability differs greatly between these two genes. The selective forces driving this diversification could lead to antigen escape and vaccine failure. Better understanding the geographic distribution of genetic variability in vaccine candidate antigens will be key to designing and implementing efficacious vaccines.

  19. Effect of genetic polymorphisms in the folate pathway on methotrexate therapy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lisa K; Roberts, Rebecca L

    2011-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the first-line treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and is frequently used in the management of other forms of inflammatory arthritis. It is currently challenging to predict which patients will achieve adequate disease control and which patients will develop adverse effects while taking MTX. As an analog of dihydrofolic acid, MTX enters cells through the reduced folate carrier-1 protein, and is polyglutamated. MTX polyglutamates inhibit key enzymes in the folate pathway to produce an anti-inflammatory effect. It has been suggested that genetic polymorphisms in the folate pathway may influence intracellular folate and MTX polyglutamates pools, and thus MTX response. However, studies to identify genetic predictors have yielded inconclusive results. Nonreplication across studies has been attributed to insufficient statistical power as well as pharmacological and clinical confounders. Prospective studies, standardizing the definitions of response and toxicity, and application of genome-wide approaches may advance the search for genetic predictors of MTX response.

  20. Codon sextets with leading role of serine create "ideal" symmetry classification scheme of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir

    2014-06-10

    The standard classification scheme of the genetic code is organized for alphabetic ordering of nucleotides. Here we introduce the new, "ideal" classification scheme in compact form, for the first time generated by codon sextets encoding Ser, Arg and Leu amino acids. The new scheme creates the known purine/pyrimidine, codon-anticodon, and amino/keto type symmetries and a novel A+U rich/C+G rich symmetry. This scheme is built from "leading" and "nonleading" groups of 32 codons each. In the ensuing 4 × 16 scheme, based on trinucleotide quadruplets, Ser has a central role as initial generator. Six codons encoding Ser and six encoding Arg extend continuously along a linear array in the "leading" group, and together with four of six Leu codons uniquely define construction of the "leading" group. The remaining two Leu codons enable construction of the "nonleading" group. The "ideal" genetic code suggests the evolution of genetic code with serine as an initiator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Applications of genetically-encoded biosensors for the construction and control of biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, Joshua K; Thodey, Kate; Liang, Joe C; Smolke, Christina D

    2012-05-01

    Cells are filled with biosensors, molecular systems that measure the state of the cell and respond by regulating host processes. In much the same way that an engineer would monitor a chemical reactor, the cell uses these sensors to monitor changing intracellular environments and produce consistent behavior despite the variable environment. While natural systems derive a clear benefit from pathway regulation, past research efforts in engineering cellular metabolism have focused on introducing new pathways and removing existing pathway regulation. Synthetic biology is a rapidly growing field that focuses on the development of new tools that support the design, construction, and optimization of biological systems. Recent advances have been made in the design of genetically-encoded biosensors and the application of this class of molecular tools for optimizing and regulating heterologous pathways. Biosensors to cellular metabolites can be taken directly from natural systems, engineered from natural sensors, or constructed entirely in vitro. When linked to reporters, such as antibiotic resistance markers, these metabolite sensors can be used to report on pathway productivity, allowing high-throughput screening for pathway optimization. Future directions will focus on the application of biosensors to introduce feedback control into metabolic pathways, providing dynamic control strategies to increase the efficient use of cellular resources and pathway reliability.

  3. The synthetic genetic interaction network reveals small molecules that target specific pathways in Sacchromyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamble, Craig M; St Onge, Robert P; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Williams, Alexander G; Stuart, Joshua M; Lokey, R Scott

    2011-06-01

    High-throughput elucidation of synthetic genetic interactions (SGIs) has contributed to a systems-level understanding of genetic robustness and fault-tolerance encoded in the genome. Pathway targets of various compounds have been predicted by comparing chemical-genetic synthetic interactions to a network of SGIs. We demonstrate that the SGI network can also be used in a powerful reverse pathway-to-drug approach for identifying compounds that target specific pathways of interest. Using the SGI network, the method identifies an indicator gene that may serve as a good candidate for screening a library of compounds. The indicator gene is selected so that compounds found to produce sensitivity in mutants deleted for the indicator gene are likely to abrogate the target pathway. We tested the utility of the SGI network for pathway-to-drug discovery using the DNA damage checkpoint as the target pathway. An analysis of the compendium of synthetic lethal interactions in yeast showed that superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) has significant SGI connectivity with a large subset of DNA damage checkpoint and repair (DDCR) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and minimal SGIs with non-DDCR genes. We screened a sod1Δ strain against three National Cancer Institute (NCI) compound libraries using a soft agar high-throughput halo assay. Fifteen compounds out of ∼3100 screened showed selective toxicity toward sod1Δ relative to the isogenic wild type (wt) strain. One of these, 1A08, caused a transient increase in growth in the presence of sublethal doses of DNA damaging agents, suggesting that 1A08 inhibits DDCR signaling in yeast. Genome-wide screening of 1A08 against the library of viable homozygous deletion mutants further supported DDCR as the relevant targeted pathway of 1A08. When assayed in human HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells, 1A08 caused DNA-damage resistant DNA synthesis and blocked the DNA-damage checkpoint selectively in S-phase.

  4. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Appendix I Appendix II Tables Figures State Programs Alabama Alaska Arizona ... Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks File Formats Help: ...

  5. Determination of informed choice and pathways leading to selection of the Environmental Studies major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierberger, Betsy S.

    The reasons why students select the Environmental Studies (ES) major at the University of Nebraska were investigated. A survey was used to determine factors of influence and career awareness as measures for making an informed choice in selection of a major. In addition, pathways of selection of the ES major were determined. Thirty-five students with ES majors and 14 faculty advisors completed the survey. Seven students participated in interviews. Student interviews were conducted to determine the "life-world" of the students during the decision making process leading to the selection of major. Interest in environmental issues, the challenge of solving environmental problems and a desire to make a difference in the environment were factors identified as positively influencing selection of this major. Environmental career attributes which influenced choice of major were variety of tasks and use of science skills. Faculty advisor perception of careers and advisor understanding of why students select the ES major were explored. Faculty advisors recommended selection of the ES major to students who demonstrated a clear interest in natural resources. Faculty advisors and students selected career categories appropriate to the ES curriculum indicating an awareness of career and job requirements. Informed choice was defined as evidence of student self-knowledge of interests, abilities and aptitudes and evidence of awareness of career opportunities in environmentally related areas. Students expressed self- knowledge of factors influential in major selection and career awareness. Therefore, the students did make informed decisions for selection of the ES major. Interview themes suggested three pathways for the selection of the ES major: (1) Direct Choice, (2) Focused Choice, and (3) Delayed Choice. Direct Choice occurs Men a student with ES interest selects the major and enrolls as a new student. Focused Choice occurs when students have life or school experiences that narrow

  6. Integrated GWAS and Pathway profiling for feed efficiency traits in pigs leads to novel genes and their molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Ostersen, Tage; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    . Residual feed intake is a feed efficiency measure and is highly economically important in animal production. In our study, a total of 596 Yorkshire boars had phenotypic and genotypic records. After quality control, 37,915 SNPs were available for GWAS which was implemented in the DMU software package...... is an important step where we firstly detect genes located near GWAS-detected SNPs and subsequently we detect enrichment of these genes in various biological processes and pathways. The objective of this study was to apply these steps to identify relevant pathways involved in residual feed intake (RFI) in pigs...

  7. Comprehensive dissection of PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways in PDGFR genetically defined cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erxi Wu

    Full Text Available Despite the growing understanding of pdgf signaling, studies of pdgf function have encountered two major obstacles: the functional redundancy of PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta in vitro and their distinct roles in vivo. Here we used wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF, MEF null for either PDGFRalpha, beta, or both to dissect PDGF-PDGFR signaling pathways. These four PDGFR genetically defined cells provided us a platform to study the relative contributions of the pathways triggered by the two PDGF receptors. They were treated with PDGF-BB and analyzed for differential gene expression, in vitro proliferation and differential response to pharmacological effects. No genes were differentially expressed in the double null cells, suggesting minimal receptor-independent signaling. Protean differentiation and proliferation pathways are commonly regulated by PDGFRalpha, PDGFRbeta and PDGFRalpha/beta while each receptor is also responsible for regulating unique signaling pathways. Furthermore, some signaling is solely modulated through heterodimeric PDGFRalpha/beta.

  8. Understanding the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changhui; Chen, Dan; Fang, Jun; Wang, Pingrong; Deng, Xiaojian; Chu, Chengcai

    2014-12-01

    Although the molecular basis of flowering time control is well dissected in the long day (LD) plant Arabidopsis, it is still largely unknown in the short day (SD) plant rice. Rice flowering time (heading date) is an important agronomic trait for season adaption and grain yield, which is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. During the last decade, as the nature of florigen was identified, notable progress has been made on exploration how florigen gene expression is genetically controlled. In Arabidopsis expression of certain key flowering integrators such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are also epigenetically regulated by various chromatin modifications, however, very little is known in rice on this aspect until very recently. This review summarized the advances of both genetic networks and chromatin modifications in rice flowering time control, attempting to give a complete view of the genetic and epigenetic architecture in complex network of rice flowering pathways.

  9. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the ...

  10. Physician scientist research pathway leading to certification by the American Board of Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sharon W; Johnson, Rebecca L

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the American Board of Pathology, in response to the pathology community, approved a physician scientist research pathway (PSRP). This brief report summarizes the history of and objectives for creating the physician scientist research pathway and the requirements of the American Board of Pathology for the certification of physician scientist research pathway trainees.

  11. A genetic signature of spina bifida risk from pathway-informed comprehensive gene-variant analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Marini

    Full Text Available Despite compelling epidemiological evidence that folic acid supplements reduce the frequency of neural tube defects (NTDs in newborns, common variant association studies with folate metabolism genes have failed to explain the majority of NTD risk. The contribution of rare alleles as well as genetic interactions within the folate pathway have not been extensively studied in the context of NTDs. Thus, we sequenced the exons in 31 folate-related genes in a 480-member NTD case-control population to identify the full spectrum of allelic variation and determine whether rare alleles or obvious genetic interactions within this pathway affect NTD risk. We constructed a pathway model, predetermined independent of the data, which grouped genes into coherent sets reflecting the distinct metabolic compartments in the folate/one-carbon pathway (purine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, and homocysteine recycling to methionine. By integrating multiple variants based on these groupings, we uncovered two provocative, complex genetic risk signatures. Interestingly, these signatures differed by race/ethnicity: a Hispanic risk profile pointed to alterations in purine biosynthesis, whereas that in non-Hispanic whites implicated homocysteine metabolism. In contrast, parallel analyses that focused on individual alleles, or individual genes, as the units by which to assign risk revealed no compelling associations. These results suggest that the ability to layer pathway relationships onto clinical variant data can be uniquely informative for identifying genetic risk as well as for generating mechanistic hypotheses. Furthermore, the identification of ethnic-specific risk signatures for spina bifida resonated with epidemiological data suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis may differ between Hispanic and non-Hispanic groups.

  12. If Racial disparity in pathophysiologic pathways of preterm birth based on genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Brad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study pathophysiologic pathways in spontaneous preterm birth and possibly the racial disparity associating with maternal and fetal genetic variations, using bioinformatics tools. Methods A large scale candidate gene association study was performed on 1442 SNPs in 130 genes in a case (preterm birth 37 weeks. Both maternal and fetal DNA from Caucasians (172 cases and 198 controls and 279 African-Americans (82 cases and 197 controls were used. A single locus association (genotypic analysis followed by hierarchical clustering was performed, where clustering was based on p values for significant associations within each race. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA software, known pathophysiologic pathways in both races were determined. Results From all SNPs entered into the analysis, the IPA mapped genes to specific disease functions. Gene variants in Caucasians were implicated in disease functions shared with other known disorders; specifically, dermatopathy, inflammation, and hematological disorders. This may reflect abnormal cervical ripening and decidual hemorrhage. In African-Americans inflammatory pathways were the most prevalent. In Caucasians, maternal gene variants showed the most prominent role in disease functions, whereas in African Americans it was fetal variants. The IPA software was used to generate molecular interaction maps that differed between races and also between maternal and fetal genetic variants. Conclusion Differences at the genetic level revealed distinct disease functions and operational pathways in African Americans and Caucasians in spontaneous preterm birth. Differences in maternal and fetal contributions in pregnancy outcome are also different between African Americans and Caucasians. These results present a set of explicit testable hypotheses regarding genetic associations with preterm birth in African Americans and Caucasians

  13. MAPKs are essential upstream signaling pathways in proteolytic cartilage degradation--divergence in pathways leading to aggrecanase and MMP-mediated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B-C; Schultz, N; Madsen, S H;

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases are essential players in cartilage degradation. However, the signaling pathways that results in MMP and/or aggrecanase synthesis and activation are not well understood. We investigated the molecular events leading to MMP- and aggrecanase-mediated ...

  14. Genetic demography at the leading edge of the distribution of a rabies virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Russell, Amy L; Osorio, Ignacio A; Jiménez Ramírez, Alejandro; Fischer, Justin W; Neuwald, Jennifer L; Tibbels, Annie E; Lecuona, Luis; McCracken, Gary F

    2017-07-01

    The common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus, ranges from South America into northern Mexico in North America. This sanguivorous species of bat feeds primarily on medium to large-sized mammals and is known to rely on livestock as primary prey. Each year, there are hotspot areas of D. rotundus-specific rabies virus outbreaks that lead to the deaths of livestock and economic losses. Based on incidental captures in our study area, which is an area of high cattle mortality from D. rotundus transmitted rabies, it appears that D. rotundus are being caught regularly in areas and elevations where they previously were thought to be uncommon. Our goal was to investigate demographic processes and genetic diversity at the north eastern edge of the range of D. rotundus in Mexico. We generated control region sequences (441 bp) and 12-locus microsatellite genotypes for 602 individuals of D. rotundus. These data were analyzed using network analyses, Bayesian clustering approaches, and standard population genetic statistical analyses. Our results demonstrate panmixia across our sampling area with low genetic diversity, low population differentiation, loss of intermediate frequency alleles at microsatellite loci, and very low mtDNA haplotype diversity with all haplotypes being very closely related. Our study also revealed strong signals of population expansion. These results follow predictions from the leading-edge model of expanding populations and supports conclusions from another study that climate change may allow this species to find suitable habitat within the U.S. border.

  15. Pathway engineering for phenolic acid accumulations in Salvia miltiorrhiza by combinational genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Yan, Ya-Ping; Wu, Yu-Cui; Hua, Wen-Ping; Chen, Chen; Ge, Qian; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To produce beneficial phenolic acids for medical and commercial purposes, researchers are interested in improving the normally low levels of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) produced by Salvia miltiorrhiza. Here, we present a strategy of combinational genetic manipulation to enrich the precursors available for Sal B biosynthesis. This approach, involving the lignin pathway, requires simultaneous, ectopic expression of an Arabidopsis Production of Anthocyanin Pigment 1 transcription factor (AtPAP1) plus co-suppression of two endogenous, key enzyme genes: cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (SmCCR) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (SmCOMT). Compared with the untransformed control, we achieved a greater accumulation of Sal B (up to 3-fold higher) along with a reduced lignin concentration. This high-Sal B phenotype was stable in roots during vegetative growth and was closely correlated with increased antioxidant capacity for the corresponding plant extracts. Although no outward change in phenotype was apparent, we characterized the molecular phenotype through integrated analysis of transcriptome and metabolome profiling. Our results demonstrated the far-reaching consequences of phenolic pathway perturbations on carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, photo-respiration, and stress responses. This report is the first to describe the production of valuable end products through combinational genetic manipulation in S. miltiorrhiza plants. Our strategy will be effective in efforts to metabolically engineer multi-branch pathway(s), such as the phenylpropanoid pathway, in economically significant medicinal plants.

  16. Building strong relationships between conservation genetics and primary industry leads to mutually beneficial genomic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Stephanie J; Buckley, Thomas R; Elshire, Rob; Hale, Marie L; Knapp, Michael; McCallum, John; Moraga, Roger; Santure, Anna W; Wilcox, Phillip; Steeves, Tammy E

    2016-11-01

    Several reviews in the past decade have heralded the benefits of embracing high-throughput sequencing technologies to inform conservation policy and the management of threatened species, but few have offered practical advice on how to expedite the transition from conservation genetics to conservation genomics. Here, we argue that an effective and efficient way to navigate this transition is to capitalize on emerging synergies between conservation genetics and primary industry (e.g., agriculture, fisheries, forestry and horticulture). Here, we demonstrate how building strong relationships between conservation geneticists and primary industry scientists is leading to mutually-beneficial outcomes for both disciplines. Based on our collective experience as collaborative New Zealand-based scientists, we also provide insight for forging these cross-sector relationships.

  17. Genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic transmitter pathways in functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; Blandizzi, Corrado; de Bortoli, Nicola; Bellini, Massimo; Antonioli, Luca; Tuccori, Marco; Fornai, Matteo; Marchi, Santino; Colucci, Rocchina

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are highly prevalent syndromes, without evident underlying organic causes. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial in nature, with a combination of environmental and genetic factors contributing to their clinical manifestations, for which most of current treatments are not satisfactory. It is acknowledged that amine mediators (noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin) play pivotal regulatory actions on gut functions and visceral sensation. In addition, drugs of therapeutic interest for FGIDs act on these transmitter pathways. The present article reviews current knowledge on the impact of genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic pathways on FGID pathophysiology, clinical presentations, symptom severity and medical management, in an attempt of highlighting the most relevant evidence and point out issues that should be addressed in future investigations.

  18. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. Objective: To investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. Methods: We meta-analyzed two GWAS on self......-reported allergy and sensitization comprising a total of 62,330 individuals. These results were used to calculate enrichment for SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we probed for enrichment within genetic pathways and of transcription factor binding sites, and characterized...... commonalities in the variant burden on tissue-specific regulatory sites by calculating the enrichment of allergy SNPs falling in gene regulatory regions in various cells using Encode Roadmap DHS data, and compared the allergy data with all known diseases. Conclusion: Among 290 loci previously associated with 16...

  19. Genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and the risk of CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwei; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 and the downstream Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway have previously been reported to be important in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), and several studies have shown the relationship between the polymorphisms of related genes in this pathway with the risk of CRC. However, the findings of these related studies are inconsistent. Moreover, there has no systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the relationship between polymorphisms in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway genes and CRC risk. Eighteen eligible studies with a total of 13,795 CRC cases and 18,043 controls were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases for the period up to September 15, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strength of the association. Our results indicated that IL-6 genetic variants in allele additive model (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI = 1.00, 1.09) and JAK2 genetic variants (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI = 1.15, 1.65) in genotype recessive model were significantly associated with CRC risk. Moreover, the pooled data revealed that IL-6 rs1800795 polymorphism significantly increased the risk of CRC in allele additive model in Europe (OR = 1.07, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.14). In conclusion, the present findings indicate that IL-6 and JAK2 genetic variants are associated with the increased risk of CRC while STAT3 genetic variants not. We need more well-designed clinical studies covering more countries and population to definitively establish the association between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility.

  20. Genetic variants in the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and risk of different types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juan; Yu, Chen-Yang; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Hao-Yan; Guan, Jian; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-02-16

    Members of the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway regulate cell proliferation, migration and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Whether germline genetic variants in inositol phosphate metabolism pathway are associated with cancer risk remains to be clarified. We examined the association between inositol phosphate metabolism pathway genes and risk of eight types of cancer using data from genome-wide association studies. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the permutation-based adaptive rank-truncated product method. The overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway was significantly associated with risk of lung cancer (P = 2.00 × 10(-4)), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (P = 5.70 × 10(-3)), gastric cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-2)) and renal cell carcinoma (P = 1.26 × 10(-2)), but not with pancreatic cancer (P = 1.40 × 10(-1)), breast cancer (P = 3.03 × 10(-1)), prostate cancer (P = 4.51 × 10(-1)), and bladder cancer (P = 6.30 × 10(-1)). Our results provide a link between inherited variation in the overall inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and several individual genes and cancer. Further studies will be needed to validate these positive findings, and to explore its mechanisms.

  1. A cellular genetics approach identifies gene-drug interactions and pinpoints drug toxicity pathway nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Takeo Suzuki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to toxicity testing have incorporated high-throughput screening across a broad-range of in vitro assays to identify potential key events in response to chemical or drug treatment. To date, these approaches have primarily utilized repurposed drug discovery assays. In this study, we describe an approach that combines in vitro screening with genetic approaches for the experimental identification of genes and pathways involved in chemical or drug toxicity. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from 32 genetically-characterized inbred mouse strains were treated in concentration-response format with 65 compounds, including pharmaceutical drugs, environmental chemicals, and compounds with known modes-of-action. Integrated cellular responses were measured at 24 and 72 hours using high-content imaging and included cell loss, membrane permeability, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis. Genetic association analysis of cross-strain differences in the cellular responses resulted in a collection of candidate loci potentially underlying the variable strain response to each chemical. As a demonstration of the approach, one candidate gene involved in rotenone sensitivity, Cybb, was experimentally validated in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis on the combined list of candidate loci across all chemicals identified a number of over-connected nodes that may serve as core regulatory points in toxicity pathways.

  2. GeneAnalytics Pathway Analysis and Genetic Overlap among Autism Spectrum Disorder, Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S. Khanzada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BPD and schizophrenia (SCH show similar neuropsychiatric behavioral disturbances, including impaired social interaction and communication, seen in autism spectrum disorder (ASD with multiple overlapping genetic and environmental influences implicated in risk and course of illness. GeneAnalytics software was used for pathway analysis and genetic profiling to characterize common susceptibility genes obtained from published lists for ASD (792 genes, BPD (290 genes and SCH (560 genes. Rank scores were derived from the number and nature of overlapping genes, gene-disease association, tissue specificity and gene functions subdivided into categories (e.g., diseases, tissues or functional pathways. Twenty-three genes were common to all three disorders and mapped to nine biological Superpathways including Circadian entrainment (10 genes, score = 37.0, Amphetamine addiction (five genes, score = 24.2, and Sudden infant death syndrome (six genes, score = 24.1. Brain tissues included the medulla oblongata (11 genes, score = 2.1, thalamus (10 genes, score = 2.0 and hypothalamus (nine genes, score = 2.0 with six common genes (BDNF, DRD2, CHRNA7, HTR2A, SLC6A3, and TPH2. Overlapping genes impacted dopamine and serotonin homeostasis and signal transduction pathways, impacting mood, behavior and physical activity level. Converging effects on pathways governing circadian rhythms support a core etiological relationship between neuropsychiatric illnesses and sleep disruption with hypoxia and central brain stem dysfunction.

  3. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Ting

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC/β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer.

  4. Care pathways lead to better teamwork: results of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneckere, Svin; Euwema, Martin; Van Herck, Pieter; Lodewijckx, Cathy; Panella, Massimiliano; Sermeus, Walter; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2012-07-01

    Care pathways are often said to promote interprofessional teamwork. As no systematic review on pathway effectiveness has ever focused on how care pathways promote teamwork, the objective of this review was to study this relationship. We performed an extensive search of electronic databases and identified 26 relevant studies. In our analysis of these studies we identified 20 team indicators and found that care pathways positively affected 17 of these indicators. Most frequently positive effects were found on staff knowledge, interprofessional documentation, team communication and team relations. However, the level of evidence was rather low. We found Level II evidence for improved interprofessional documentation. We also found Level II evidence for increased workload; improved actual versus planned team size; and improved continuity of care. The studies most frequently mentioned the need for a multidisciplinary approach and educational training sessions in order for pathways to be successful. The systematic review revealed that care pathways have the potential to support interprofessional teams in enhancing teamwork. Necessary conditions are a context that supports teamwork and including appropriate active pathway components that can mediate an effect on team processes. To achieve this, each care pathway requires a clearly defined team approach customized to the individual teams' needs.

  5. Genetic analysis of interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT): evidence for a key role for MHC and apoptosis related genes and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasham, Alia; Zhang, Weijia; Lotay, Vaneet; Haggerty, Shannon; Stefan, Mihaela; Concepcion, Erlinda; Dieterich, Douglas T; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) have become increasingly recognized as a complication of interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as clinical thyroiditis in approximately 15% of HCV patients receiving IFNα and subclinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of patients, possibly resulting in either dose reduction or discontinuation of IFNα treatment. However, the exact mechanisms that lead to the development of IIT are unknown and may include IFNα-mediated immune-recruitment as well as direct toxic effects on thyroid follicular cells. We hypothesized that IIT develops in genetically predisposed individuals whose threshold for developing thyroiditis is lowered by IFNα. Therefore, our aim was to identify the susceptibility genes for IIT. We used a genomic convergence approach combining genetic association data with transcriptome analysis of genes upregulated by IFNα. Integrating results of genetic association, transcriptome data, pathway, and haplotype analyses enabled the identification of 3 putative loci, SP100/110/140 (2q37.1), HLA (6p21.3), and TAP1 (6p21.3) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of IIT. Immune-regulation and apoptosis emerged as the predominant mechanisms underlying the etiology of IIT.

  6. Recent Advances in Human Genetics and Epigenetics of Adiposity: Pathway to Precision Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Tove; Mendelson, Michael; Speliotes, Elizabeth K

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a heritable trait that contributes to substantial global morbidity and mortality. Here, we summarize findings from the past decade of genetic and epigenetic research focused on unravelling the underpinnings of adiposity. More than 140 genetic regions now are known to influence adiposity traits. The genetics of general adiposity, as measured by body mass index, and that of abdominal obesity, as measured by waist-to-hip ratio, have distinct biological backgrounds. Gene expression associated with general adiposity is enriched in the nervous system. In contrast, genes associated with abdominal adiposity function in adipose tissue. Recent population-based epigenetic analyses have highlighted additional distinct loci. We discuss how associated genetic variants can lead to understanding causal mechanisms, and to disentangling reverse causation in epigenetic analyses. Discoveries emerging from population genomics are identifying new disease markers and potential novel drug targets to better define and combat obesity and related diseases. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ecdysone receptor agonism leading to lethal molting disruption in arthropods: Review and adverse outcome pathway development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molting is a key biological process in growth, development, reproduction and survival in arthropods. Complex neuroendocrine pathways are involved in the regulation of molting and may potentially become targets of environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). For example, s...

  8. Genetic studies on components of the Wnt signalling pathway and the severity of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooy, Diederik P. C.; Yeremenko, Nataliya G.; Wilson, Anthony Gerard; Knevel, Rachel; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Saxne, Tore; Krabben, Annemarie; Leijsma, Martha K.; Daha, Nina A.; Tsonaka, S.; Zhernakova, A.; Houwing-Duistermaat, J. J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; Brouwer, E.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    Background Progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is partly heritable; knowledge of genetic factors may increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying joint destruction. The activity of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway influences osteoblast differentiation. Dickkopf-1

  9. Genetic Variation in the Histamine Production, Response, and Degradation Pathway Is Associated with Histamine Pharmacodynamic Response in Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bridgette L.; Sherwin, Catherine M. T.; Liu, Xiaoxi; Dai, Hongying; Vyhlidal, Carrie A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: There is growing knowledge of the wide ranging effects of histamine throughout the body therefore it is important to better understand the effects of this amine in patients with asthma. We aimed to explore the association between histamine pharmacodynamic (PD) response and genetic variation in the histamine pathway in children with asthma. Methods: Histamine Iontophoresis with Laser Doppler Monitoring (HILD) was performed in children with asthma and estimates for area under the effect curve (AUEC), maximal response over baseline (Emax), and time of Emax (Tmax) were calculated using non-compartmental analysis and non-linear mixed-effects model with a linked effect PK/PD model. DNA isolation and genotyping were performed among participants to detect known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 10) among genes (HDC, HNMT, ABP1, HRH1, HRH4) within the histamine pathway. General linear model was used to identify associations between histamine related genetic variants and measured histamine PD response parameters. Results: Genotyping and HILD response profiles were completed for 163 children. ABP1 47 C/T, ABP1 4107, and HNMT-1639 C/Twere associated with Emax (ABP1 47 CC genotype mean Emax 167.21 vs. CT/TT genotype mean Emax 139.20, p = 0.04; ABP1 4107 CC genotype mean Emax 141.72 vs. CG/GG genotype mean Emax 156.09, p = 0.005; HNMT-1639 CC genotype mean Emax 132.62 vs. CT/TT genotype mean Emax 155.3, p = 0.02). In a stratified analysis among African American children only, ABP1 and HNMT SNPs were also associated with PD response; HRH4 413 CC genotype was associated with lower Emax, p = 0.009. Conclusions: We show for the first time that histamine pathway genetic variation is associated with measureable changes in histamine response in children with asthma. The variability in histamine response and impact of histamine pathway genotype is important to further explore in patients with asthma so as to improve disease phenotyping leading to more

  10. Microarray analysis reveals genetic pathways modulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancet Jeffrey E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors (FTIs were originally developed to inhibit oncogenic ras, however it is now clear that there are several other potential targets for this drug class. The FTI tipifarnib (ZARNESTRA™, R115777 has recently demonstrated clinical responses in adults with refractory and relapsed acute leukemias. This study was conducted to identify genetic markers and pathways that are regulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Methods Tipifarnib-mediated gene expression changes in 3 AML cell lines and bone marrow samples from two patients with AML were analyzed on a cDNA microarray containing approximately 7000 human genes. Pathways associated with these expression changes were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results The expression analysis identified a common set of genes that were regulated by tipifarnib in three leukemic cell lines and in leukemic blast cells isolated from two patients who had been treated with tipifarnib. Association of modulated genes with biological functional groups identified several pathways affected by tipifarnib including cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, immunity, and apoptosis. Gene expression changes were verified in a subset of genes using real time RT-PCR. Additionally, regulation of apoptotic genes was found to correlate with increased Annexin V staining in the THP-1 cell line but not in the HL-60 cell line. Conclusions The genetic networks derived from these studies illuminate some of the biological pathways affected by FTI treatment while providing a proof of principle for identifying candidate genes that might be used as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity.

  11. DMPD: Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16095970 Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. Jefferies CA, Fit...zgerald KA. Trends Mol Med. 2005 Sep;11(9):403-11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Interferon gene regulation: not all road...s lead to Tolls. PubmedID 16095970 Title Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to

  12. Designing RNA-based genetic control systems for efficient production from engineered metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jason T; Carothers, James M

    2015-02-20

    Engineered metabolic pathways can be augmented with dynamic regulatory controllers to increase production titers by minimizing toxicity and helping cells maintain homeostasis. We investigated the potential for dynamic RNA-based genetic control systems to increase production through simulation analysis of an engineered p-aminostyrene (p-AS) pathway in E. coli. To map the entire design space, we formulated 729 unique mechanistic models corresponding to all of the possible control topologies and mechanistic implementations in the system under study. Two thousand sampled simulations were performed for each of the 729 system designs to relate the potential effects of dynamic control to increases in p-AS production (total of 3 × 10(6) simulations). Our analysis indicates that dynamic control strategies employing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) can yield >10-fold improvements over static control. We uncovered generalizable trends in successful control architectures and found that highly performing RNA-based control systems are experimentally tractable. Analyzing the metabolic control state space to predict optimal genetic control strategies promises to enhance the design of metabolic pathways.

  13. Conserved genetic pathways controlling the development of the diffuse endocrine system in vertebrates and Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L

    2010-05-01

    The midgut epithelium is formed by absorptive enterocytes, secretory cells and endocrine cells. Each of these lineages is derived from the pluripotent progenitors that constitute the embryonic endoderm; the mature midgut retains pools of self-renewing stem cells that continue to produce all lineages. Recent findings in vertebrates and Drosophila shed light on the genetic mechanism that specifies the fate of the different lineages. A pivotal role is played by the Notch signaling pathway that, in a manner that appears to be very similar to the way in which Notch signaling selects neural progenitors within the neurectoderm, distinguishes the fate of secretory/endocrine cells and enterocytes. Proneural genes encoding bHLH transcription factors are expressed and required in prospective endocrine cells; activation of the Notch pathways restricts the number of these cells and promotes enterocyte development. In this review we compare the development of the intestinal endocrine cells in vertebrates and insects and summarize recent findings dealing with genetic pathways controlling this cell type.

  14. Identifying genetic variants for heart rate variability in the acetylcholine pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriëtte Riese

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n = 3429, discovery stage. Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n = 3311, replication stage, and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n = 6740. RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study.

  15. Identifying Genetic Variants for Heart Rate Variability in the Acetylcholine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz, Loretto M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Roon, Arie M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n = 3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n = 3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n = 6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

  16. Proliferation and survival molecules implicated in the inhibition of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cells harbouring different genetic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seca Hugo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid carcinomas show a high prevalence of mutations in the oncogene BRAF which are inversely associated with RAS or RET/PTC oncogenic activation. The possibility of using inhibitors on the BRAF pathway as became an interesting therapeutic approach. In thyroid cancer cells the target molecules, implicated on the cellular effects, mediated by inhibition of BRAF are not well established. In order to fill this lack of knowledge we studied the proliferation and survival pathways and associated molecules induced by BRAF inhibition in thyroid carcinoma cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds. Methods Suppression of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, TPC1 and C643 was achieved using RNA interference (RNAi for BRAF and the kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Proliferation analysis was performed by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis was accessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of protein expression were analysed by western-blot. Results Both BRAF RNAi and sorafenib inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines independently of the genetic background, mostly in cells with BRAFV600E mutation. In BRAFV600E mutated cells inhibition of BRAF pathway lead to a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 levels and an increase in p27Kip1. Specific inhibition of BRAF by RNAi in cells with BRAFV600E mutation had no effect on apoptosis. In the case of sorafenib treatment, cells harbouring BRAFV600E mutation showed increase levels of apoptosis due to a balance of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. Conclusion Our results in thyroid cancer cells, namely those harbouring BRAFV600Emutation showed that BRAF signalling pathway provides important proliferation signals. We have shown that in thyroid cancer cells sorafenib induces apoptosis by affecting Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in BRAFV600E mutated cells which was independent of BRAF. These results suggest that sorafenib may prove useful in the treatment of thyroid carcinomas, particularly

  17. The role of MAPK and FAS death receptor pathways in testicular germ cell apoptosis induced by lead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuying Dong; Duoping Liang; Na An; Li Jia; Yujuan Shan; Chao Chen; Kuo Sun; Fei Niu; Huiyan Li; Songbin Fu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate gene expression involved in the signal pathway of MAPK and death signal receptor pathway of FAS in lead-induced apoptosis of testicular germ cells. First, cell viabilities were determined by MTT assay. Second, using single cell gel-electrophoresis test (comet assay) and TUNEL staining technique, apoptotie rate and cell apoptosis localization of testicular germ cells were measured in mice treated with 0.15%, 0.3%, and 0.6% lead, respectively. Third, the immunolocalization of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry. Finally, changes in the translational levels of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 were further detected by western blot analysis. Our results showed that lead could significantly induce testicular germ cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). The mechanisms were closely related to the increased expressions of K-ras, c-fos, Fas, and active caspase-3 in apoptotic germ cells. In conclusion, K-ras/c-fos and Fas/caspase-3 death signaling receptor pathways were involved in the lead-induced apoptosis of the testicular germ cells in mice.

  18. FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Sjozef; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Koumbi, Daphne; Cuppens, Harry; Riccardino, Francesca; Macek, Milan; Scriver, Charles R; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

  19. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothee; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant

  20. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  1. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan;

    2015-01-01

    expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected...... polymorphisms to detect obesity-related genes and pathways. Building a co-expression network using eQTLs resulted in the detection of a module strongly associated with lipid pathways. Furthermore, we detected several obesity candidate genes, for example, ENPP1, CTSL, and ABHD12B. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge......BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about...

  2. Long-term human exposure to lead from different media and intake pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Thomsen, Marianne; Andersen, Mikael Skou

    2010-01-01

    , and predicting the resulting internal body exposure levels and effects that occur under long-term exposure conditions. In this paper, a modeling approach is used to meet these challenges with reference to Danish exposure conditions. Levels of lead content in various media have been coupled with data for lead......Lead (Pb) is well known as an environmental pollutant: it can accumulate in various media, so actual lead exposure reflects both historical and present contaminations. Two main challenges then emerge: obtaining updated information to gain an overall picture of the sources of exposure......–internalconcentration relationships for the direct linkage between lead in environmental media and resultingconcentrations of lead in blood are then presented....

  3. Pathway analysis to identify genetic variants associated with efficacy of adalimumab in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eektimmerman, Frank; Swen, Jesse J; Böhringer, Stefan; Huizinga, Tom Wj; Kooloos, Wouter M; Allaart, Cornelia F; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2017-07-01

    About 30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients have no clinical benefit from TNF inhibitors. Genome-wide association (GWA) and candidate gene studies tested several putative genetic variants for TNF inhibitor efficacy with inconclusive results. Therefore, this study applied a systematic pathway analysis. A total of 325 rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with adalimumab were genotyped for 223 SNPs. We tested the association between SNPs and European League Against Rheumatism response and remission at 14 weeks under the additive genetic model using logistic regression. A total of 3 SNPs located in CD40LG (rs1126535), TANK (rs1267067) and VEGFA (rs25648) showed association with both end points. TNFAIP3 (rs2230926) had the strongest effect related to European League Against Rheumatism response. This exploratory study suggests that TNFAIP3, CD40LG, TANK and VEGFA play a role in the response to adalimumab treatment.

  4. Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; McKay, James; Sinilnikova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    -binding protein), which is induced by glucose, and SREBP-1 (sterol response element-binding protein-1), which is stimulated by insulin through the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes encoding for ChREBP, SREBP and FAS (respectively, MLXIPL, SREBF1...... and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases....... Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall...

  5. New discoveries in schizophrenia genetics reveal neurobiological pathways: A review of recent findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlar, Alex V; Mercer, Kristina B; Zwick, Michael E; Mulle, Jennifer G

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia research has undergone a recent transformation. By leveraging large sample sizes, genome-wide association studies of common genetic variants have approximately tripled the number of candidate genetic loci. Rare variant studies have identified copy number variants that are schizophrenia risk loci. Among these, the 3q29 microdeletion is now known to be the single largest schizophrenia risk factor. Next-generation sequencing studies are increasingly used for rare variant association testing, and have already facilitated identification of large effect alleles. Collectively, recent findings implicate voltage-gated calcium channel and cytoskeletal pathways in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Taken together, these results suggest the possibility of imminent breakthroughs in the molecular understanding of schizophrenia.

  6. Genetic Variation along the Histamine Pathway in Children with Allergic versus Nonallergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Sara; Vyhlidal, Carrie A; Dai, Hongying; Jones, Bridgette L

    2015-12-01

    Histamine is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of asthma. Variation in genes along the histamine production, response, and degradation pathway may be important in predicting response to antihistamines. We hypothesize that differences exist among single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the histamine pathway between children with allergic versus nonallergic asthma. Children (7-18 yr of age; n = 202) with asthma were classified as allergic or nonallergic based on allergy skin testing. Genotyping was performed to detect known SNPs (n = 10) among genes (HDC, HNMT, ABP1, HRH1, and HRH4) within the histamine pathway. Chi square tests and Cochran-Armitage Trend were used to identify associations between genetic variants and allergic or nonallergic asthma. Significance was determined by P histamine pathway may be associated with an allergic versus nonallergic asthma phenotype. Further studies are needed to determine the functional significance of identified SNPs and their impact on antihistamine response in patients with asthma and allergic disease.

  7. Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot Evelyn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a result of a loss of its activity. We attempted to fully activate the Hh pathway by removing both receptors for the Hh proteins, called Patched1 and 2, which are functioning as negative regulators in this pathway. Results Here we describe a splice-donor mutation in Ptc1, called ptc1hu1602, which in a homozygous state results in a subtle eye and somite phenotype. Since we recently positionally cloned a ptc2 mutant, a ptc1;ptc2 double mutant was generated, showing severely increased levels of ptc1, gli1 and nkx2.2a, confirming an aberrant activation of Hh signaling. As a consequence, a number of phenotypes were observed that have not been reported previously using Shh mRNA overexpression. Somites of ptc1;ptc2 double mutants do not express anteroposterior polarity markers, however initial segmentation of the somites itself is not affected. This is the first evidence that segmentation and anterior/posterior (A/P patterning of the somites are genetically uncoupled processes. Furthermore, a novel negative function of Hh signaling is observed in the induction of the fin field, acting well before any of the previously reported function of Shh in fin formation and in a way that is different from the proposed early role of Gli3 in limb/fin bud patterning. Conclusion The generation and characterization of the ptc1;ptc2 double mutant assigned novel and unexpected functions to the Hh signaling pathway. Additionally, these mutants will provide a useful system to further investigate the consequences of constitutively activated Hh signaling during vertebrate development.

  8. Theoretical Study on Reaction Pathways Leading to CO and CO2 in the Pyrolysis of Resorcinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Yuki; Kudo, Shinji; Hayashi, Jun-Ichiro; Norinaga, Koyo

    2017-01-26

    Possible pathways for the pyrolysis of resorcinol with the formation of CO and CO2 as final products were proposed and evaluated using ab initio calculations. Our experimental study revealed that large quantities of CO2 are generated in the pyrolysis of 1,3-dihydroxybenzene (resorcinol), while the pyrolysis of the dihydroxybenzene isomers 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol) and 1,4-dihydroxybenzene (hydroquinone) produces little CO2. The fate of oxygen atoms in catechol and hydroquinone was essentially the formation of CO. In the proposed pathways, the triplet ground state m-benzoquinone was generated initially from simultaneous cleavage of the two O-H bonds in resorcinol. Subsequently, the direct cleavage of a C-C bond of the m-benzoquinone diradical yields 2-oxidanylcyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-yl-methanone, which can be converted via two channels: release of CO from the aldehyde radical group and combination of the ketone radical and carbon atom in the aldehyde radical group to form the 6-oxabicyclo[3.2.0]hepta-2,4-dien-7-one, resulting in the release of CO2. Potential energy surfaces along the proposed reaction pathways were calculated employing the CBS-QB3 method, and the rate constants at the high-pressure limit were also evaluated based on transition-state theory to assess the feasibility of the proposed reaction pathways.

  9. Def defines a conserved nucleolar pathway that leads p53 to proteasome-independent degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Tao; Hui Shi; Yihong Guan; Delai Huang; Ye Chen; David P Lane; Jun Chen

    2013-01-01

    p53 protein turnover through the ubiquitination pathway is a vital mechanism in the regulation of its transcriptional activity; however,little is known about p53 turnover through proteasome-independent pathway(s).The digestive organ expansion factor (Def) protein is essential for the development of digestive organs.In zebrafish,loss of function of defselectively upregulates the expression of p53 response genes,which raises a question as to what is the relationship between Def and p53.We report here that Def is a nucleolar protein and that loss of function of defleads to the upregulation of p53 protein,which surprisingly accumulates in the nucleoli.Our extensive studies have demonstrated that Def can mediate the degradation of p53 protein and that this process is independent of the proteasome pathway,but dependent on the activity of Calpain3,a cysteine protease.Our findings define a novel nucleolar pathway that regulates the turnover function of p53,which will advance our understanding of p53's role in organogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  10. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON OF BRAIN AROMATASE IN FISH LEADING TO REPRODUCTIVE IMPAIRMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework p...

  11. Pattern recognition pathways leading to a Th2 cytokine bias in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, K.L.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Smeekens, S.P.; Jacobs, C.W.M.; Magis-Escurra Ibanez, C.; Jaeger, M.; Wang, X.; Lubbers, R.; Oosting, M.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Reijers, M.H.E.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is characterised by an exaggerated Th2 response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but the immunological pathways responsible for this effect are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to decipher the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and

  12. An assessment of molecular pathways of obesity susceptible to nutrient, toxicant and genetically induced epigenetic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jing; Ideraabdullah, Folami Y

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the etiology of human disease has greatly improved with the inclusion of epigenetic mechanisms, in particular as a common link between environment and disease. However, for most diseases we lack a detailed interpretation of the epigenetic regulatory pathways perturbed by environment and causal mechanisms. Here, we focus on recent findings elucidating nutrient-related epigenetic changes linked to obesity. We highlight studies demonstrating that obesity is a complex disease linked to disruption of epigenetically regulated metabolic pathways in the brain, adipose tissue and liver. These pathways regulate (1) homeostatic and hedonic eating behaviors, (2) adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, and (3) energy expenditure. By compiling these data, we illustrate that obesity-related phenotypes are repeatedly linked to disruption of critical epigenetic mechanisms that regulate key metabolic genes. These data are supported by genetic mutation of key epigenetic regulators, and many of the diet-induced epigenetic mechanisms of obesity are also perturbed by exposure to environmental toxicants. Identifying similarly perturbed epigenetic mechanisms in multiple experimental models of obesity strengthens the translational applications of these findings. We also discuss many of the ongoing challenges to understanding the role of environmentally induced epigenetic pathways in obesity and suggest future studies to elucidate these roles. This assessment illustrates our current understanding of molecular pathways of obesity that are susceptible to environmental perturbation via epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, it lays the groundwork for dissecting the complex interactions between diet, genes and toxicants that contribute to obesity and obesity-related phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-09-11

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  14. Genetic alteration in notch pathway is associated with better prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenchen; Xiong, Zuquan; Jiang, Haowen; Ding, Qiang; Fang, Zujun; Hui, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling was associated with a variety of cancers but was not comprehensively studied in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We have in this study studied the genetic alteration (mutation and copy number variance) of Notch gene set in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma (KIRC) database. We found that Notch pathway was frequently altered in ccRCC. The Notch gene set was genetically altered in 182 (44%) of the 415 ccRCC patients. CNV was the predominant type of alteration in most genes. Alterations in KAT2B and MAML1 occurred in 13% and 19% of patients, respectively, both of which were functionally active in ccRCC. Deletion of VHL was exclusively found in cases with Notch alteration. Overall survival was longer in ccRCC patients with altered-Notch pathway. The median survival was 90.41 months in Notch-altered cases and 69.15 in Notch-unaltered cases (P = 0.0404). The median disease free time was 89.82 months in Notch-altered cases and 77.27 months in in Notch-unaltered cases (P = 0.935). Conclusively, Notch signaling was altered in almost half of the ccRCC patients and copy number variances in MAML1 and KAT2B were predominant changes. These findings broadened our understanding of the role of Notch in ccRCC.

  15. Comparison of LAIR-1 genetic pathways in murine vs human internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuqiu; Jiao, Yan; Wei, Wei; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Gu, Weikuan; Sun, Dianjun

    2014-11-15

    Growing evidence suggests that defective expression or dysfunction of LAIR-1, a novel immunoinhibitory receptor for collagen, is closely associated with some autoimmune diseases, cancers, as well as viral infections. We analyzed the variation of LAIR-1 genetic pathways in murine versus human internal organs, including the lung and brain. The results showed that, under physiological conditions, LAIR-1 links more closely to the common genes in mouse than in human, which poses tissue specificity. It means that mice experimental data in relation to the role of LAIR-1 immune regulation may be overestimated when applied to assess human conditions. Moreover, we found that the in vivo interaction of LAIR-1 with LAIR-2 rarely occurs, implying that the species difference in LAIR-1 genetic pathways could not be primarily attributed to the existence of human LAIR-2. In summary, this study opens the door for insight into LAIR-1 functions inside the human body, and raises concern as to extrapolative credibility of the murine model in biomedical research.

  16. Neuronal c-Abl activation leads to induction of cell cycle and interferon signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Expression of active c-Abl in adult mouse forebrain neurons in the AblPP/tTA mice resulted in severe neurodegeneration, particularly in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Neuronal loss was preceded and accompanied by substantial microgliosis and astrocytosis. In contrast, expression of constitutively active Arg (Abl-related gene) in mouse forebrain neurons (ArgPP/tTA mice) caused no detectable neuronal loss or gliosis, although protein expression and kinase activity were at similar levels to those in the AblPP/tTA mice. Methods To begin to elucidate the mechanism of c-Abl-induced neuronal loss and gliosis, gene expression analysis of AblPP/tTA mouse forebrain prior to development of overt pathology was performed. Selected results from gene expression studies were validated with quantitative reverse transcription PCR , immunoblotting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling, and by immunocytochemistry. Results Two of the top pathways upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice with c-Abl expression for 2 weeks were cell cycle and interferon signaling. However, only the expression of interferon signaling pathway genes remained elevated at 4 weeks of c-Abl induction. BrdU incorporation studies confirm that, while the cell cycle pathway is upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice at 2 weeks of c-Abl induction, the anatomical localization of the pathway is not consistent with previous pathology seen in the AblPP/tTA mice. Increased expression and activation of STAT1, a known component of interferon signaling and interferon-induced neuronal excitotoxicity, is an early consequence of c-Abl activation in AblPP/tTA mice and occurs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, the same region that goes on to develop severe neurodegenerative pathology and neuroinflammation. Interestingly, no upregulation of gene expression of interferons themselves was detected. Conclusions Our data suggest that the interferon signaling pathway may play a role in the pathologic processes caused by c-Abl expression in

  17. Neuronal c-Abl activation leads to induction of cell cycle and interferon signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlatterer Sarah D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of active c-Abl in adult mouse forebrain neurons in the AblPP/tTA mice resulted in severe neurodegeneration, particularly in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Neuronal loss was preceded and accompanied by substantial microgliosis and astrocytosis. In contrast, expression of constitutively active Arg (Abl-related gene in mouse forebrain neurons (ArgPP/tTA mice caused no detectable neuronal loss or gliosis, although protein expression and kinase activity were at similar levels to those in the AblPP/tTA mice. Methods To begin to elucidate the mechanism of c-Abl-induced neuronal loss and gliosis, gene expression analysis of AblPP/tTA mouse forebrain prior to development of overt pathology was performed. Selected results from gene expression studies were validated with quantitative reverse transcription PCR , immunoblotting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeling, and by immunocytochemistry. Results Two of the top pathways upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice with c-Abl expression for 2 weeks were cell cycle and interferon signaling. However, only the expression of interferon signaling pathway genes remained elevated at 4 weeks of c-Abl induction. BrdU incorporation studies confirm that, while the cell cycle pathway is upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice at 2 weeks of c-Abl induction, the anatomical localization of the pathway is not consistent with previous pathology seen in the AblPP/tTA mice. Increased expression and activation of STAT1, a known component of interferon signaling and interferon-induced neuronal excitotoxicity, is an early consequence of c-Abl activation in AblPP/tTA mice and occurs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, the same region that goes on to develop severe neurodegenerative pathology and neuroinflammation. Interestingly, no upregulation of gene expression of interferons themselves was detected. Conclusions Our data suggest that the interferon signaling pathway may play a role in the pathologic processes

  18. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. Methods We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and both disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Results Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779 and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845 and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.41-4.88 and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69. We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93 and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14, respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results.

  19. Biotechnology of polyketides: New breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the “goose that laid the golden egg,” the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from “micro” to “nano”, that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms. PMID:24688489

  20. Biotechnology of polyketides: new breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Soares Gomes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928 and the beginning of their industrial application (1940 opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the "goose that laid the golden egg," the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from "micro" to "nano", that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms.

  1. Biotechnology of polyketides: new breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the "goose that laid the golden egg," the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from "micro" to "nano", that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair pathway and lung cancer risk: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikako Kiyohara, Kouichi Yoshimasu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various DNA alterations can be caused by exposure to environmental and endogenous carcinogens. Most of these alterations, if not repaired, can result in genetic instability, mutagenesis and cell death. DNA repair mechanisms are important for maintaining DNA integrity and preventing carcinogenesis. Recent lung cancer studies have focused on identifying the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in candidate genes, among which DNA repair genes are increasingly being studied. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes are thought to modulate DNA repair capacity and are suggested to be related to lung cancer risk. We identified a sufficient number of epidemiologic studies on lung cancer to conduct a meta-analysis for genetic polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair pathway genes, focusing on xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA, excision repair cross complementing group 1 (ERCC1, ERCC2/XPD, ERCC4/XPF and ERCC5/XPG. We found an increased risk of lung cancer among subjects carrying the ERCC2 751Gln/Gln genotype (odds ratio (OR = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.14 - 1.49. We found a protective effect of the XPA 23G/G genotype (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.59 - 0.95. Considering the data available, it can be conjectured that if there is any risk association between a single SNP and lung cancer, the risk fluctuation will probably be minimal. Advances in the identification of new polymorphisms and in high-throughput genotyping techniques will facilitate the analysis of multiple genes in multiple DNA repair pathways. Therefore, it is likely that the defining feature of future epidemiologic studies will be the simultaneous analysis of large samples.

  3. The role of inflammatory pathway genetic variation on maternal metabolic phenotypes during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrit Urbanek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since mediators of inflammation are associated with insulin resistance, and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes, we hypothesized that genetic variation in members of the inflammatory gene pathway impact glucose levels and related phenotypes in pregnancy. We evaluated this hypothesis by testing for association between genetic variants in 31 inflammatory pathway genes in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO cohort, a large multiethnic multicenter study designed to address the impact of glycemia less than overt diabetes on pregnancy outcome. RESULTS: Fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour glucose, fasting and 1-hour C-peptide, and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples obtained from HAPO participants during an oral glucose tolerance test at 24-32 weeks gestation. We tested for association between 458 SNPs mapping to 31 genes in the inflammatory pathway and metabolic phenotypes in 3836 European ancestry and 1713 Thai pregnant women. The strongest evidence for association was observed with TNF alpha and HbA1c (rs1052248; 0.04% increase per allele C; p-value = 4.4×10(-5, RETN and fasting plasma glucose (rs1423096; 0.7 mg/dl decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.1×10(-4, IL8 and 1 hr plasma glucose (rs2886920; 2.6 mg/dl decrease per allele T; p-value = 1.3×10(-4, ADIPOR2 and fasting C-peptide (rs2041139; 0.55 ug/L decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.4×10(-4, LEPR and 1-hour C-peptide (rs1171278; 0.62 ug/L decrease per allele T; p-value = 2.4×10(-4, and IL6 and 1-hour plasma glucose (rs6954897; -2.29 mg/dl decrease per allele G, p-value = 4.3×10(-4. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the genes surveyed in this study the inflammatory pathway is unlikely to have a strong impact on maternal metabolic phenotypes in pregnancy although variation in individual members of the pathway (e.g. RETN, IL8, ADIPOR2, LEPR, IL6, and TNF alpha, may contribute to metabolic phenotypes in pregnant women.

  4. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Bin [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hiromatsu, Kenji, E-mail: khiromatsu@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi [Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji [Department of Molecular Oncology, The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Himeno, Kunisuke [Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  5. Crumbs and stardust act in a genetic pathway that controls the organization of epithelia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepass, U; Knust, E

    1993-09-01

    We provide evidence that the genes crumbs (crb) and stardust (sdt) encode critical components of a pathway that acts at the apical pole of epithelial cells to control the cytoarchitecture of ectodermally derived epithelia of the Drosophila embryo. We describe the developmental defects caused by sdt mutations, which are very similar to those associated with mutations in crb. In both mutants the epithelial structure of ectodermal cells breaks down during early organogenesis, leading to the formation of irregular clusters of cells and cell death in some epithelia. Certain cells can, however, compensate for the loss of crb or sdt function in a tissue-specific manner, later reassuming an epithelial cell shape and forming small epithelial vesicles, suggesting that, besides crb and sdt, other tissue-specific components are involved in this process. The crb protein (CRB) is continuously expressed in wild-type embryos in cells of the ectoderm and ectodermally derived epithelia. In sdt mutant embryos CRB is present only during gastrulation, but becomes undetectable during germ band extension; the protein is again visible during early organogenesis, at the time when the sdt mutant phenotype becomes apparent. In sdt mutant embryos, CRB is associated with the apical membrane only in well-differentiated epithelial cells, but it is expressed diffusely in the cytoplasm of cells which have lost epithelial morphology. Our results suggest that time- and tissue-specific control mechanisms exist to establish and maintain epithelial cell structure. Mosaic experiments suggest that sdt is required cell autonomously, in contrast to crb, the requirement of which appears to be non-cell-autonomous. Double mutant combinations of crb and sdt suggest that these genes are part of a common genetic pathway (crb/sdt pathway), in which sdt acts downstream of crb and is activated by the latter.

  6. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  7. The independent acquisition of plant root nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in Fabids recruited the same genetic pathway for nodule organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Svistoonoff

    Full Text Available Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae and Parasponia (Cannabaceae associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae, which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis.

  8. Pathways Leading from BarA/SirA to Motility and Virulence Gene Expression in Salmonella

    OpenAIRE

    Teplitski, Max; Goodier, Robert I.; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2003-01-01

    The barA and sirA genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encode a two-component sensor kinase and a response regulator, respectively. This system increases the expression of virulence genes and decreases the expression of motility genes. In this study, we examined the pathways by which SirA affects these genes. We found that the master regulator of flagellar genes, flhDC, had a positive regulatory effect on the primary regulator of intestinal virulence determinants, hilA, but that h...

  9. Proanthocyanidins Attenuation of Chronic Lead-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage in Kunming Mice via the Nrf2/ARE Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Miao; Liu, Yi; Cao, Yu; Wang, Nan; Dang, Meng; He, Jianbin

    2016-10-21

    Lead is harmful for human health and animals. Proanthocyanidins (PCs), a natural antioxidant, possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead-induced liver damage have not been clarified. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PCs on the hepatotoxicity of male Kunming mice induced by chronic lead exposure. A total of 70 healthy male Kunming mice were averagely divided into four groups: control group, i.e., the group exposed to lead, the group treated with PCs, and the group co-treated with lead and PCs. The mice exposed to lead were given water containing 0.2% lead acetate. Mice treated in the PCs and PCs lead co-treated groups were given PC (100 mg/kg) in 0.9% saline by oral gavage. Lead exposure caused a significant elevation in the liver function parameters, lead level, lipid peroxidation, and inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The induction of oxidative stress and histological alterations in the liver were minimized by co-treatment with PCs. Meanwhile, the number of Transferase-Mediated Deoxyuridine Triphosphate-Biotin Nick End Labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells was significantly reduced in the PCs/lead co-treated group compared to the lead group. In addition, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of Bax, while the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Furthermore, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes and protein (GRP78 and CHOP). Co-treated with PCs significantly reversed these expressions in the liver. PCs were, therefore, demonstrated to have protective, antioxidant, and anti-ER stress and anti-apoptotic activities in liver damage caused by chronic lead exposure in the Kunming mouse. This may be due to the ability of PCs to enhance the ability of liver tissue to protect against oxidative stress via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, resulting in decreasing ER stress and apoptosis of

  10. Proanthocyanidins Attenuation of Chronic Lead-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage in Kunming Mice via the Nrf2/ARE Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Long

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lead is harmful for human health and animals. Proanthocyanidins (PCs, a natural antioxidant, possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead-induced liver damage have not been clarified. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PCs on the hepatotoxicity of male Kunming mice induced by chronic lead exposure. A total of 70 healthy male Kunming mice were averagely divided into four groups: control group, i.e., the group exposed to lead, the group treated with PCs, and the group co-treated with lead and PCs. The mice exposed to lead were given water containing 0.2% lead acetate. Mice treated in the PCs and PCs lead co-treated groups were given PC (100 mg/kg in 0.9% saline by oral gavage. Lead exposure caused a significant elevation in the liver function parameters, lead level, lipid peroxidation, and inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The induction of oxidative stress and histological alterations in the liver were minimized by co-treatment with PCs. Meanwhile, the number of Transferase-Mediated Deoxyuridine Triphosphate-Biotin Nick End Labeling (TUNEL-positive cells was significantly reduced in the PCs/lead co-treated group compared to the lead group. In addition, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of Bax, while the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Furthermore, the lead group showed an increase in the expression level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-related genes and protein (GRP78 and CHOP. Co-treated with PCs significantly reversed these expressions in the liver. PCs were, therefore, demonstrated to have protective, antioxidant, and anti-ER stress and anti-apoptotic activities in liver damage caused by chronic lead exposure in the Kunming mouse. This may be due to the ability of PCs to enhance the ability of liver tissue to protect against oxidative stress via the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway, resulting in decreasing ER stress

  11. fDWI Evaluation of Hypothalamic Appetite Regulation Pathways in Mice Genetically Deficient in Leptin or Neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the contribution of leptin-dependent anorexigenic pathways and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent orexigenic pathways to the changes in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters observed in vivo by functional diffusion weighted MRI (fDWI). Mice genetically deficient in leptin (B6.V-Lep (ob) /J) or NPY (129S-Npy (tm1Rpa) /J) and the corresponding wild-type controls, were subjected to sequential isocaloric feeding, fasting and recovery regimes. Non-invasive fDWI measurements were performed under these conditions, and complemented with parallel determinations of food and water consumption, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), locomotor activity and endocrine profiles. Control mice showed significant increases in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters upon fasting, returning to normal values in the recovery period. Leptin deficient mice depicted permanently increased water diffusion parameters under all feeding conditions as compared to wild type controls, without important changes upon fasting or recovery. These results paralleled sustained increases in food and water intake, significantly augmented body weight, and decreased RER values or locomotor activity, thus configuring an obese phenotype. NPY-deficient mice showed significantly reduced increases (or even slight decreases) in the water diffusion parameters upon fasting as compared to wild type controls, paralleled by decreased food and water intake during the recovery period. In conclusion, leptin deficiency results in sustained orexigenic stimulation, leading to increased water diffusion parameters, while NPY deficiency lead to reduced orexigenic stimulation and water diffusion parameters. Diffusion changes are proposed to reflect net astrocytic volume changes induced by the balance between the orexigenic and anorexigenic firings of AgRP/NPY and POMC/CART neurons, respectively. Together, our results suggest that fDWI provides an adequate tool to investigate hypothalamic appetite disorders.

  12. Problem Solving Behaviors of Successful and Unsuccessful Subjects Leading to a Genetics Problem Solving Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.

    An integral part of the curriculum in introductory biology courses is the study of Mendelian genetics. Results from genetics learning studies and needs assessments demonstrated the need for additional intensive research in biology education and genetics learning. There exists a lack of detailed information describing reasoning patterns and…

  13. Identification of Biochemical Pathways Associated with Lead Tolerance and Detoxification in Chrysopogon zizanioides L. Nash (Vetiver) by Metabolic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Li, Kefeng; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major urban pollutant, due to deteriorating lead-based paint in houses built before 1978. Phytoremediation is an inexpensive and effective technique for remediation of Pb-contaminated homes. Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides), a noninvasive, fast-growing grass with high biomass, can tolerate and accumulate large quantities of Pb in its tissues. Lead is known to induce phytochelatins and antioxidative enzymes in vetiver; however, the overall impact of Pb stress on metabolic pathways of vetiver is unknown. In the current study, vetiver plants were treated with different concentrations of Pb in a hydroponic setup. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Multivariate analysis of metabolites in both root and shoot tissue showed tremendous induction in key metabolic pathways including sugar metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and an increase in production of osmoprotectants, such as betaine and polyols, and metal-chelating organic acids. The data obtained provide a comprehensive insight into the overall stress response mechanisms in vetiver.

  14. Different genetic pathways in leukemogenesis for patients presenting with therapy-related myelodysplasia and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J; Pedersen, M; Roulston, D; Philip, P

    1995-11-01

    Development of myelodysplasia (MDS) with subsequent progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an example of the multistep process of malignant transformation in which each step often relates to genetic abnormalities that can be directly seen as chromosomal aberrations. Therapy-related MDS and AML (t-MDS and t-AML) may serve as an ideal model for a study of the genetic evolution of MDS and AML because chromosomal abnormalities are observed in most cases and because the disease is often diagnosed early due to a close patient follow-up. The cytogenetic characteristics at diagnosis were studied in 137 consecutive cases of t-MDS and t-AML, including 22 new cases, and correlated with the clinical characteristics and the course of the disease. Balanced translocations to chromosome bands 11q23 and 21q22 represent primary steps in pathways leading directly to overt t-AML. Specific chromosomal deletions or losses, on the other hand, represent primary or secondary events in alternative pathways leading to t-MDS with potential for subsequent transformation to overt t-AML. Loss of a whole chromosome 7 (-7) or deletion of its long arm (7q-) and deletion of the long arm of a chromosome 5 (5q-) were the most frequent primary abnormalities significantly related to t-MDS. Loss of a whole chromosome 5 (-5) was also a primary event, but surprisingly, was observed equally in t-MDS and in t-AML. Deletion of chromosome 13, including bands q13q14, was another less common primary aberration of t-MDS. Except for -7 and del(13q), these primary aberrations were most often observed together with secondary abnormalities. These included balanced aberrations involving band 3q26 and various deletions of chromosome 3, a gain of a whole chromosome 8, deletions of the short arm or loss of chromosomes 12 and 17, loss of a whole chromosome 18, and deletions of the short arm of chromosome 21. Deletions or loss or chromosomes 5 and 7 were significantly associated with previous therapy with

  15. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  16. Multiple Pathways of Genome Plasticity Leading to Development of Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Mazel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of multi-resistant bacterial strains is a major source of concern and has been correlated with the widespread use of antibiotics. The origins of resistance are intensively studied and many mechanisms involved in resistance have been identified, such as exogenous gene acquisition by horizontal gene transfer (HGT, mutations in the targeted functions, and more recently, antibiotic tolerance through persistence. In this review, we focus on factors leading to integron rearrangements and gene capture facilitating antibiotic resistance acquisition, maintenance and spread. The role of stress responses, such as the SOS response, is discussed.

  17. Phenylpropanoid pathway metabolites promote tolerance response of lupine roots to lead stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbiańska, Karolina; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Deckert, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been increasing interest in the role of phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids in plants in response to heavy metal stress. In this study, it was found that treatment of yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) with Pb (150mg/l Pb(NO3)2) increased flavonoid contents in both cotyledons (by ca. 67%) and roots (by ca. 54%). Moreover, seedling roots preincubated with flavonoid extracts, derived from Pb-treated lupine cotyledons, exhibited enhanced tolerance to the heavy metal. Flavonoid preincubated lupine seedlings, growing for 48h in the presence of Pb(NO3)2, showed mitigated symptoms of lead stress, which was manifested by a significant increase in the root length and its biomass. Additionally, in seedlings pretreated with the natural flavonoid preparations an impressive rise of the antioxidant capacity was observed. Simultaneously, root cells exhibited reduced accumulation of both H2O2 and O2(-), which was associated with the decreased TBARS content and the number of dying cells under Pb stress. Taken together, accumulation of flavonoids could be an effective event in the plant׳s spectrum of defense responses to heavy metal stress, and the protective role of flavonoids against heavy metals might be associated with their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species overproduced under lead stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2010-08-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine are essential amino acids that play critical roles in animal growth and development. Animals cannot synthesize these amino acids and must obtain them from their diet. Plants are the ultimate source of these essential nutrients, and they synthesize BCAAs through a conserved pathway that is inhibited by its end products. This feedback inhibition has prevented scientists from engineering plants that accumulate high levels of BCAAs by simply over-expressing the respective biosynthetic genes. To identify components critical for this feedback regulation, we performed a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit enhanced resistance to BCAAs. Multiple dominant allelic mutations in the VALINE-TOLERANT 1 (VAT1) gene were identified that conferred plant resistance to valine inhibition. Map-based cloning revealed that VAT1 encodes a regulatory subunit of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS), the first committed enzyme in the BCAA biosynthesis pathway. The VAT1 gene is highly expressed in young, rapidly growing tissues. When reconstituted with the catalytic subunit in vitro, the vat1 mutant-containing AHAS holoenzyme exhibits increased resistance to valine. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the mutated vat1 gene exhibit valine tolerance and accumulate higher levels of BCAAs. Our studies not only uncovered regulatory characteristics of plant AHAS, but also identified a method to enhance BCAA accumulation in crop plants that will significantly enhance the nutritional value of food and feed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Combinatorial genetic transformation of cereals and the creation of metabolic libraries for the carotenoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, Gemma; Naqvi, Shaista; Sanahuja, Georgina; Bai, Chao; Zorrilla-López, Uxue; Rivera, Sol M; Canela, Ramon; Sandman, Gerhard; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial nuclear transformation is used to generate populations of transgenic plants containing random selections from a collection of input transgenes. This is a useful approach because it provides the means to test different combinations of genes without the need for separate transformation experiments, allowing the comprehensive analysis of metabolic pathways and other genetic systems requiring the coordinated expression of multiple genes. The principle of combinatorial nuclear transformation is demonstrated in this chapter through protocols developed in our laboratory that allow combinations of genes encoding enzymes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway to be introduced into rice and a white-endosperm variety of corn. These allow the accumulation of carotenoids to be screened initially by the colour of the endosperm, which ranges from white through various shades of yellow and orange depending on the types and quantities of carotenoids present. The protocols cover the preparation of DNA-coated metal particles, the transformation of corn and rice plants by particle bombardment, the regeneration of transgenic plants, the extraction of carotenoids from plant tissues, and their analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  20. Investigation of Genetic Disturbances in Oxygen Sensing and Erythropoietin Signaling Pathways in Cases of Idiopathic Erythrocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Luana Dinardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Idiopathic erythrocytosis is the term reserved for cases with unexplained origins of abnormally increased hemoglobin after initial investigation. Extensive molecular investigation of genes associated with oxygen sensing and erythropoietin signaling pathways, in those cases, usually involves sequencing all of their exons and it may be time consuming. Aim. To perform a strategy for molecular investigation of patients with idiopathic erythrocytosis regarding oxygen sensing and erythropoietin signaling pathways. Methods. Samples of patients with idiopathic erythrocytosis were evaluated for the EPOR, VHL, PHD2, and HIF-2α genes using bidirectional sequencing of their hotspots. Results. One case was associated with HIF-2α mutation. Sequencing did not identify any pathogenic mutation in 4 of 5 cases studied in any of the studied genes. Three known nonpathogenic polymorphisms were found (VHL p.P25L, rs35460768; HIF-2α p.N636N, rs35606117; HIF-2α p.P579P, rs184760160. Conclusion. Extensive molecular investigation of cases considered as idiopathic erythrocytosis does not frequently change the treatment of the patient. However, we propose a complementary molecular investigation of those cases comprising genes associated with erythrocytosis phenotype to meet both academic and genetic counseling purposes.

  1. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  2. Genetic analysis of benzothiophene biodesulfurization pathway of Gordonia terrae strain C-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Sulfur can be removed from benzothiophene (BT by some bacteria without breaking carbon-carbon bonds. However, a clear mechanism for BT desulfurization and its genetic components have not been reported in literatures so far. In this study, we used comparative transcriptomics to study differential expression of genes in Gordonia terrae C-6 cultured with BT or sodium sulfate as the sole source of sulfur. We found that 135 genes were up-regulated with BT relative to sodium sulfate as the sole sulfur source. Many of these genes encode flavin-dependent monooxygenases, alkane sulfonate monooxygenases and desulfinase, which perform similar functions to those involved in the 4S pathway of dibenzothiophene (DBT biodesulfurization. Three of the genes were found to be located in the same operon, designated bdsABC. Cell extracts of pET28a-bdsABC transfected E. coli Rosetta (DE3 converted BT to a phenolic compound, identified as o-hydroxystyrene. These results advance our understanding of enzymes involved in the BT biodesulfurization pathway.

  3. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  4. Identification of downstream genetic pathways of Tbx1 in the second heart field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jun; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Nowotschin, Sonja; Bondarev, Alexei; Lipner, Shari; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Tbx1, a T-box transcription factor, and an important gene for velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) in humans, causes outflow tract (OFT) heart defects when inactivated in the mouse. Tbx1 is expressed in the second heart field (SHF) and is required in this tissue for OFT development. To identify Tbx1 regulated genetic pathways in the SHF, we performed gene expression profiling of the caudal pharyngeal region in Tbx1-/- and wild type embryos. Isl1, a key marker for the SHF, as well as Hod and Nkx2-6, were downregulated in Tbx1-/- mutants, while genes required for cardiac morphogenesis, such as Raldh2, Gata4, and Tbx5, as well as a subset of muscle contractile genes, signifying myocardial differentiation, were ectopically expressed. Pan-mesodermal ablation of Tbx1 resulted in similar gene expression changes, suggesting cell-autonomous roles of Tbx1 in regulating these genes. Opposite expression changes concomitant with SHF-derived cardiac defects occurred in TBX1 gain-of-function mutants, indicating that appropriate levels of Tbx1 are required for heart development. When taken together, our studies show that Tbx1 acts upstream in a genetic network that positively regulates SHF cell proliferation and negatively regulates differentiation, cell-autonomously in the caudal pharyngeal region. PMID:18328475

  5. Genetic variation in the parasympathetic signaling pathway in patients with reflex syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, H N; Benn, M; Mehlsen, J

    2013-01-01

    the vagal signaling in the heart may be involved in reflex syncope pathogenesis. We systematically resequenced the entire coding regions and flanking intron sequences in 5 genes in the cardiac post-synaptic parasympathetic signaling pathway [muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2); G-protein beta-1...... International Study (VASIS-IIB), N = 38] or vasodepressor (VASIS-III, N = 36) type. We identified 2 novel genetic variants (CHRM2 c.1114C>G and GNG2 c.87+34G>A) and several known variants (GNB1: c.267+14G>A, c.267+19C>T, and c.738C>T; KCNJ3: c.119A>G, c.591C>T, c.1038T>C, and c.1494T>C; KCNJ5: c. 171T>C, c.810T...... compared to controls. Genetic variations in genes responsible for the vagal signaling in the heart, including CHRM2, GNB1, GNG2, KCNJ3, and KCNJ5, are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of reflex syncope of vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory types....

  6. Pathways leading from BarA/SirA to motility and virulence gene expression in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitski, Max; Goodier, Robert I; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2003-12-01

    The barA and sirA genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encode a two-component sensor kinase and a response regulator, respectively. This system increases the expression of virulence genes and decreases the expression of motility genes. In this study, we examined the pathways by which SirA affects these genes. We found that the master regulator of flagellar genes, flhDC, had a positive regulatory effect on the primary regulator of intestinal virulence determinants, hilA, but that hilA had no effect on flhDC. SirA was able to repress flhDC in a hilA mutant and activate hilA in an flhDC mutant. Therefore, although the flhDC and hilA regulatory cascades interact, sirA affects each of them independently. A form of BarA lacking the two N-terminal membrane-spanning domains, BarA198, autophosphorylates in the presence of ATP and transfers the phosphate to purified SirA. Phosphorylated SirA was found to directly bind the hilA and hilC promoters in gel mobility shift assays but not the flhD, fliA, hilD, and invF promoters. Given that the CsrA/csrB system is known to directly affect flagellar gene expression, we tested the hypothesis that SirA affects flagellar gene expression indirectly by regulating csrA or csrB. The sirA gene did not regulate csrA but did activate csrB expression. Consistent with these results, phosphorylated SirA was found to directly bind the csrB promoter but not the csrA promoter. We propose a model in which SirA directly activates virulence expression via hilA and hilC while repressing the flagellar regulon indirectly via csrB.

  7. Dispersal Pathways and Genetic Differentiation among Worldwide Populations of the Invasive Weed Centaurea solstitialis L. (Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Renée L.; Hierro, José L.; Eren, Özkan; Andonian, Krikor; Török, Katalin; Becerra, Pablo I.; Montesinos, Daniel; Khetsuriani, Liana; Diaconu, Alecu; Kesseli, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of introduced species is often unclear due to a lack of historical records. Even when historical information is readily available, important factors of the invasions such as genetic bottlenecks, hybridization, historical relationships among populations and adaptive changes are left unknown. In this study, we developed a set of nuclear, simple sequence repeat markers and used these to characterize the genetic diversity and population structure among native (Eurasian) and non-native (North and South American) populations of Centaurea solstitialis L., (yellow starthistle). We used these data to test hypotheses about the invasion pathways of the species that were based on historical and geographical records, and we make inferences about historical relationships among populations and demographic processes following invasion. We confirm that the center of diversity and the native range of the species is likely the eastern Mediterranean region in the vicinity of Turkey. From this region, the species likely proceeded to colonize other parts of Europe and Asia via a slow, stepwise range expansion. Spanish populations were the primary source of seed to invade South America via human-mediated events, as was evident from historical records, but populations from the eastern Mediterranean region were also important. North American populations were largely derived from South America, but had secondary contributors. We suggest that the introduction history of non-native populations from disparate parts of the native range have allowed not just one, but multiple opportunities first in South America then again in North America for the creation of novel genotypes via intraspecific hybridization. We propose that multiple intraspecific hybridization events may have created especially potent conditions for the selection of a noxious invader, and may explain differences in genetic patterns among North and South America populations, inferred differences in demographic

  8. Genetic variation in DNA repair pathways and risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Rendleman

    Full Text Available Molecular and genetic evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may contribute to lymphoma susceptibility. Several studies have examined the association of DNA repair genes with lymphoma risk, but the findings from these reports have been inconsistent. Here we provide the results of a focused analysis of genetic variation in DNA repair genes and their association with the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. With a population of 1,297 NHL cases and 1,946 controls, we have performed a two-stage case/control association analysis of 446 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tagging the genetic variation in 81 DNA repair genes. We found the most significant association with NHL risk in the ATM locus for rs227060 (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.13-1.43, p = 6.77×10(-5, which remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. In a subtype-specific analysis, associations were also observed for the ATM locus among both diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL and small lymphocytic lymphomas (SLL, however there was no association observed among follicular lymphomas (FL. In addition, our study provides suggestive evidence of an interaction between SNPs in MRE11A and NBS1 associated with NHL risk (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.34-0.77, p = 0.0002. Finally, an imputation analysis using the 1,000 Genomes Project data combined with a functional prediction analysis revealed the presence of biologically relevant variants that correlate with the observed association signals. While the findings generated here warrant independent validation, the results of our large study suggest that ATM may be a novel locus associated with the risk of multiple subtypes of NHL.

  9. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman‐Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas‐Gómez, Petra; García‐Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso‐Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome‐wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. Methods We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. Results In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10–5). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10–5) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10–4) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10–5), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. Interpretation We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983–990 PMID:27044000

  10. Genetic Characterization of the Galactitol Utilization Pathway of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolle, Nicoletta; Felsl, Angela; Heermann, Ralf; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2017-02-15

    Galactitol degradation by salmonellae remains underinvestigated, although this metabolic capability contributes to growth in animals (R. R. Chaudhuri et al., PLoS Genet 9:e1003456, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003456). The genes responsible for this metabolic capability are part of a 9.6-kb gene cluster that spans from gatY to gatR (STM3253 to STM3262) and encodes a phosphotransferase system, four enzymes, and a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily. Genome comparison revealed the presence of this genetic determinant in nearly all Salmonella strains. The generation time of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ST4/74 was higher in minimal medium with galactitol than with glucose. Knockout of STM3254 and gatC resulted in a growth-deficient phenotype of S Typhimurium, with galactitol as the sole carbon source. Partial deletion of gatR strongly reduced the lag phase of growth with galactitol, whereas strains overproducing GatR exhibited a near-zero growth phenotype. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated strong induction of the gatY and gatZ promoters, which control all genes of this cluster except gatR, in the presence of galactitol but not glucose. Purified GatR bound to these two main gat gene cluster promoters as well as to its own promoter, demonstrating that this autoregulated repressor controls galactitol degradation. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed distinct binding properties of GatR toward the three promoters, resulting in a model of differential gat gene expression. The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) bound these promoters with similarly high affinities, and a mutant lacking crp showed severe growth attenuation, demonstrating that galactitol utilization is subject to catabolite repression. Here, we provide the first genetic characterization of galactitol degradation in Salmonella, revealing novel insights into the regulation of this dissimilatory pathway.

  11. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Zhernakova, Daria V; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-10-20

    Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected differentially expressed genes, and previously detected co-expressed gene modules. Further data integration was performed by detecting co-expression patterns among eQTLs and integration with protein data. Differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing data revealed 458 differentially expressed genes. The eQTL mapping resulted in 987 cis-eQTLs and 73 trans-eQTLs (false discovery rate genes and disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms to detect obesity-related genes and pathways. Building a co-expression network using eQTLs resulted in the detection of a module strongly associated with lipid pathways. Furthermore, we detected several obesity candidate genes, for example, ENPP1, CTSL, and ABHD12B. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an integrated genomics and

  12. Inhibitors of Intracellular Signaling Pathways that Lead to Stimulated Epidermal Pigmentation: Perspective of Anti-Pigmenting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genji Imokawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Few anti-pigmenting agents have been designed and developed according to their known hyperpigmentation mechanisms and corresponding intracellular signaling cascades. Most anti-pigmenting agents developed so far are mechanistically involved in the interruption of constitutional melanogenic mechanisms by which skin color is maintained at a normal and unstimulated level. Thus, owing to the difficulty of confining topical application to a specific hyperpigmented skin area, potent anti-pigmenting agents capable of attenuating the natural unstimulated pigmentation process have the risk of leading to hypopigmentation. Since intracellular signaling pathways within melanocytes do not function substantially in maintaining normal skin color and are activated only by environmental stimuli such as UV radiation, specifically down-regulating the activation of melanogenesis to the constitutive level would be an appropriate strategy to develop new potent anti-pigmenting agents with a low risk of hypopigmentation. In this article, we review the hyperpigmentation mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the stimulation of melanogenesis. We also discuss a screening and evaluation system to select candidates for new anti-melanogenic substances by focusing on inhibitors of endothelin-1 or stem cell factor-triggered intracellular signaling cascades. From this viewpoint, we show that extracts of the herbs Withania somnifera and Melia toosendan and the natural chemicals Withaferin A and Astaxanthin are new candidates for potent anti-pigmenting substances that avoid the risk of hypopigmentation.

  13. Retinoic acid amide inhibits JAK/STAT pathway in lung cancer which leads to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Xing; Zhao, Wei; Shi, Yan; Li, Ya-Na; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Zhang, Hong-Qin; Wang, Dong

    2015-11-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 12 to 16% of lung neoplasms and has a high rate of metastasis. The present study demonstrates the antiproliferative effect of retinoic acid amide in vitro and in vivo against human lung cancer cells. The results from MTT assay showed a significant growth inhibition of six tested lung cancer cell lines and inhibition of clonogenic growth at 30 μM. Retinoic acid amide also leads to G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. It caused inhibition of JAK2, STAT3, and STAT5, increased the level of p21WAF1, and decreased cyclin A, cyclin B1, and Bcl-XL expression. Retinoic acid amide exhibited a synergistic effect on antiproliferative effects of methotrexate in lung cancer cells. In lung tumor xenografts, the tumor volume was decreased by 82.4% compared to controls. The retinoic acid amide-treated tumors showed inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and Bcl-XL expression. There was also increase in expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in tumors on treatment with retinoic acid amide. Thus, retinoic acid amide exhibits promising antiproliferative effects against human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and enhances the antiproliferative effect of methotrexate.

  14. Natal philopatry does not lead to population genetic differentiation in Buller's albatross (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bekkum, Margo; Sagar, Paul M; Stahl, Jean-Claude; Chambers, Geoffrey K

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variability in the only two existing populations of Buller's albatross (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri) was assessed using six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Large biological samples were obtained from both the Snares (n = 99) and the Solander Islands (n = 27). Several measures of genetic differentiation including F(ST) and R(ST) and a principal coordinates analysis (PCO) suggest a complete absence of genetic structure between three breeding colonies on the Snares Islands, and between them and one breeding colony on the Solander Islands. Mark/recapture studies of recently banded albatross chicks on the Snares found high natal philopatry in T. b. bulleri, but the microsatellite DNA data suggest that sufficient gene flow still occurs between all four breeding colonies to maintain a genetically homogeneous population overall.

  15. How genetic testing can lead to targeted management of XIAP deficiency-related inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; LaCasse, Eric Charles

    2017-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP-2, OMIM 300635) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by the loss of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis gene at Xq25. XLP-2 individuals are susceptible to several specific and potentially fatal inf......, and expedite specific targeted therapy.Genet Med advance online publication 14 July 2016Genetics in Medicine (2016); doi:10.1038/gim.2016.82....

  16. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2009-03-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the isolation of putative homozygous RNAi mutant cells. Candidate clones were confirmed by an independent RNAi-based reporter assay and the causative gene trap integration site was identified using molecular techniques. Our screen identified multiple mutant cell lines of Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a known essential component of the RNAi pathway. This result demonstrates that true RNAi components can be isolated by this screening strategy. Furthermore, Ago2 homozygous mutant ES cells provide a null genetic background to perform mutational analyses of the Ago2 protein. Using genetic rescue, we resolve an important controversy regarding the role of two phenylalanine residues in Ago2 activity.

  17. Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopps, Anna M; Ackermann, Corinne Y; Sherwin, William B; Allen, Simon J; Bejder, Lars; Krützen, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Socially learned behaviours leading to genetic population structure have rarely been described outside humans. Here, we provide evidence of fine-scale genetic structure that has probably arisen based on socially transmitted behaviours in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in western Shark Bay, Western Australia. We argue that vertical social transmission in different habitats has led to significant geographical genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. Dolphins with mtDNA haplotypes E or F are found predominantly in deep (more than 10 m) channel habitat, while dolphins with a third haplotype (H) are found predominantly in shallow habitat (less than 10 m), indicating a strong haplotype-habitat correlation. Some dolphins in the deep habitat engage in a foraging strategy using tools. These 'sponging' dolphins are members of one matriline, carrying haplotype E. This pattern is consistent with what had been demonstrated previously at another research site in Shark Bay, where vertical social transmission of sponging had been shown using multiple lines of evidence. Using an individual-based model, we found support that in western Shark Bay, socially transmitted specializations may have led to the observed genetic structure. The reported genetic structure appears to present an example of cultural hitchhiking of mtDNA haplotypes on socially transmitted foraging strategies, suggesting that, as in humans, genetic structure can be shaped through cultural transmission.

  18. Genetic analysis of a transcriptional activation pathway by using hepatoma cell variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, G A; Fournier, R E

    1994-01-01

    A hierarchy of liver-enriched transcription factors plays an important role in activating expression of many hepatic genes. In particular, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a major activator of the gene encoding HNF-1, and HNF-1 itself activates expression of more than 20 liver genes. To dissect this activation pathway genetically, we prepared somatic cell variants that were deficient in expression of the liver-specific alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) gene, which requires both HNF-1 and HNF-4 for high-level gene activity. This was accomplished in two steps. First, hepatoma transfectants that stably expressed two selectable markers under alpha 1AT promoter control were prepared; second, variant sublines that could no longer express either transgene were isolated by direct selection. In this report, we demonstrate that the variants contain defects in the HNF-4/HNF-1 activation pathway. These defects functioned in trans, as expression of many liver genes was affected, but the variant phenotypes were recessive to wild type in somatic cell hybrids. Three different variant classes could be discriminated by their phenotypic responses to ectopic expression of either HNF-4 or HNF-1. Two variant clones appeared specifically deficient in HNF-4 expression, as transfection with an HNF-4 expression cassette fully restored their hepatic phenotypes. Another line activated HNF-1 in response to forced HNF-4 expression, but activation of downstream genes failed to occur. One clone was unresponsive to either HNF-1 or HNF-4. Using the variants, we demonstrate further that the chromosomal genes encoding alpha 1AT, aldolase B, and alpha-fibrinogen display strict requirements for HNF-1 activation in vivo, while other liver genes were unaffected by the presence or absence of HNF-1 or HNF-4. We also provide evidence for the existence of an autoregulatory loop in which HNF-1 regulates its own expression through activation of HNF-4. Images PMID:7935424

  19. Comparison of Metabolic Pathways in Escherichia coli by Using Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ortegon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how cellular metabolism has taken its modern form, the conservation and variations between metabolic pathways were evaluated by using a genetic algorithm (GA. The GA approach considered information on the complete metabolism of the bacterium Escherichia coli K-12, as deposited in the KEGG database, and the enzymes belonging to a particular pathway were transformed into enzymatic step sequences by using the breadth-first search algorithm. These sequences represent contiguous enzymes linked to each other, based on their catalytic activities as they are encoded in the Enzyme Commission numbers. In a posterior step, these sequences were compared using a GA in an all-against-all (pairwise comparisons approach. Individual reactions were chosen based on their measure of fitness to act as parents of offspring, which constitute the new generation. The sequences compared were used to construct a similarity matrix (of fitness values that was then considered to be clustered by using a k-medoids algorithm. A total of 34 clusters of conserved reactions were obtained, and their sequences were finally aligned with a multiple-sequence alignment GA optimized to align all the reaction sequences included in each group or cluster. From these comparisons, maps associated with the metabolism of similar compounds also contained similar enzymatic step sequences, reinforcing the Patchwork Model for the evolution of metabolism in E. coli K-12, an observation that can be expanded to other organisms, for which there is metabolism information. Finally, our mapping of these reactions is discussed, with illustrations from a particular case.

  20. Final Technical Report: Genetic and Molecular Analysis of a new control pathway in assimilate partitioning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Daniel, R.

    2009-03-10

    Assimilate partitioning refers to the systemic distribution of photoassimilate from sites of primary assimilation (source tissue) to import-dependent tissues and organs (sinks). One of the defining questions in this area is how plants balance source productivity with sink demand. We discovered a sucrose-sensing signal transduction pathway that controls the activity of BvSUT1, a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. Sucrose symporters are responsible for sucrose accumulation in the phloem of many plants and, therefore, they mediate the pivotal step in the long-distance transport of photoassimilate to non-photosynthetic tissues, such as roots and seed. We previously showed that sucrose transport activity is directly proportional to the transcription rate of BvSUT1 and that symporter mRNA and protein have high rates of turnover with half-lives on the order of 2 h. We further demonstrated that symporter transcription is regulated by sucrose levels in the leaf and that sucrose-dependent regulation of BvSUT1 transcription is mediated, at least in part, by a protein phosphorylation relay pathway. The goal of the experiments during this current grant were to use genetic and molecular approaches to identify essential components of this vital regulatory system. The initial objectives were to: (1) to characterize Arabidopsis mutants we've isolated that are resistant to growth inhibition by sucrose analogues that are recognized by the sucrose-sensor, (2) to screen for loss of function mutants in BvSUT1-promoter:luciferase transgenic plants that no longer respond to sucrose accumulation in the leaf using non-destructive visualization of luciferase activity, (3) to use gel mobility-shift assays and nuclease protection experiments to identify cis elements in the symporter promoter and DNA-binding proteins that are involved in sucrose regulation of symporter expression.

  1. Genetically distinct pathways guide effector export through the type VI secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John C; Beck, Christina M; Goo, Young Ah; Russell, Alistair B; Harding, Brittany N; De Leon, Justin A; Cunningham, David A; Tran, Bao Q; Low, David A; Goodlett, David R; Hayes, Christopher S; Mougous, Joseph D

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial secretion systems often employ molecular chaperones to recognize and facilitate export of their substrates. Recent work demonstrated that a secreted component of the type VI secretion system (T6SS), haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), binds directly to effectors, enhancing their stability in the bacterial cytoplasm. Herein, we describe a quantitative cellular proteomics screen for T6S substrates that exploits this chaperone-like quality of Hcp. Application of this approach to the Hcp secretion island I-encoded T6SS (H1-T6SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of a novel effector protein, termed Tse4 (type VI secretion exported 4), subsequently shown to act as a potent intra-specific H1-T6SS-delivered antibacterial toxin. Interestingly, our screen failed to identify two predicted H1-T6SS effectors, Tse5 and Tse6, which differ from Hcp-stabilized substrates by the presence of toxin-associated PAAR-repeat motifs and genetic linkage to members of the valine-glycine repeat protein G (vgrG) genes. Genetic studies further distinguished these two groups of effectors: Hcp-stabilized effectors were found to display redundancy in interbacterial competition with respect to the requirement for the two H1-T6SS-exported VgrG proteins, whereas Tse5 and Tse6 delivery strictly required a cognate VgrG. Together, we propose that interaction with either VgrG or Hcp defines distinct pathways for T6S effector export.

  2. Genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianmin; Yao, Song; Hu, Qiang; Zhu, Qianqian; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Haddad, Stephen A; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Troester, Melissa A; Bandera, Elisa V; Rosenberg, Lynn; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-10-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Dysfunction of the Hippo pathway components has been linked with breast cancer stem cell regulation, as well as breast tumor progression and metastasis. TAZ, a key component of the Hippo pathway, is highly expressed in triple negative breast cancer; however, the associations of genetic variations in this important pathway with breast cancer risk remain largely unexplored. Here, we analyzed 8309 germline variants in 15 genes from the Hippo pathway with a total of 3663 cases and 4687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1983 ER positive and 1098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses by ER status. The Hippo signaling pathway was significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer (pathway level P = 0.02). Gene-based analyses revealed that CDH1 was responsible for the pathway association (P CDH1 statistically significant after gene-level adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = 9.2×10(-5), corrected P = 0.02). rs142697907 in PTPN14 was associated with ER-positive breast cancer and rs2456773 in CDK1 with ER-negativity in case-only analysis after gene-level correction for multiple comparisons (corrected P < 0.05). In conclusion, common genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway may contribute to both ER-negative and ER+ breast cancer risk in AA women.

  3. Randomized BioBrick assembly: a novel DNA assembly method for randomizing and optimizing genetic circuits and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, Sean C; Sauro, Herbert M

    2013-09-20

    The optimization of genetic circuits and metabolic pathways often involves constructing various iterations of the same construct or using directed evolution to achieve the desired function. Alternatively, a method that randomizes individual parts in the same assembly reaction could be used for optimization by allowing for the ability to screen large numbers of individual clones expressing randomized circuits or pathways for optimal function. Here we describe a new assembly method to randomize genetic circuits and metabolic pathways from modular DNA fragments derived from PCR-amplified BioBricks. As a proof-of-principle for this method, we successfully assembled CMY (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow) three-gene circuits using Gibson Assembly that express CFP, RFP, and YFP with independently randomized promoters, ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, and all parts randomized simultaneously. Sequencing results from 24 CMY circuits with various parts randomized show that 20/24 circuits are distinct and expression varies over a 200-fold range above background levels. We then adapted this method to randomize the same parts with enzyme coding sequences from the lycopene biosynthesis pathway instead of fluorescent proteins, designed to independently express each enzyme in the pathway from a different promoter. Lycopene production is improved using this randomization method by about 30% relative to the highest polycistronic-expressing pathway. These results demonstrate the potential of generating nearly 20,000 unique circuit or pathway combinations when three parts are permutated at each position in a three-gene circuit or pathway, and the methodology can likely be adapted to other circuits and pathways to maximize products of interest.

  4. Persistent ER stress induces the spliced leader RNA silencing pathway (SLS, leading to programmed cell death in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanoch Goldshmidt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomes are parasites that cycle between the insect host (procyclic form and mammalian host (bloodstream form. These parasites lack conventional transcription regulation, including factors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR. However, they possess a stress response mechanism, the spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS pathway. SLS elicits shut-off of spliced leader RNA (SL RNA transcription by perturbing the binding of the transcription factor tSNAP42 to its cognate promoter, thus eliminating trans-splicing of all mRNAs. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in procyclic trypanosomes elicits changes in the transcriptome similar to those induced by conventional UPR found in other eukaryotes. The mechanism of up-regulation under ER stress is dependent on differential stabilization of mRNAs. The transcriptome changes are accompanied by ER dilation and elevation in the ER chaperone, BiP. Prolonged ER stress induces SLS pathway. RNAi silencing of SEC63, a factor that participates in protein translocation across the ER membrane, or SEC61, the translocation channel, also induces SLS. Silencing of these genes or prolonged ER stress led to programmed cell death (PCD, evident by exposure of phosphatidyl serine, DNA laddering, increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as typical morphological changes observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. ER stress response is also induced in the bloodstream form and if the stress persists it leads to SLS. We propose that prolonged ER stress induces SLS, which serves as a unique death pathway, replacing the conventional caspase-mediated PCD observed in higher eukaryotes.

  5. Genetic analysis of the CDI pathway from Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Koskiniemi

    Full Text Available Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI is a mode of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion systems. CdiA binds to receptors on susceptible target bacteria, then delivers a toxin domain derived from its C-terminus. Studies with Escherichia coli suggest the existence of multiple CDI growth-inhibition pathways, whereby different systems exploit distinct target-cell proteins to deliver and activate toxins. Here, we explore the CDI pathway in Burkholderia using the CDIIIBp1026b system encoded on chromosome II of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b as a model. We took a genetic approach and selected Burkholderia thailandensis E264 mutants that are resistant to growth inhibition by CDIIIBp1026b. We identified mutations in three genes, BTH_I0359, BTH_II0599, and BTH_I0986, each of which confers resistance to CDIIIBp1026b. BTH_I0359 encodes a small peptide of unknown function, whereas BTH_II0599 encodes a predicted inner membrane transport protein of the major facilitator superfamily. The inner membrane localization of BTH_II0599 suggests that it may facilitate translocation of CdiA-CTIIBp1026b toxin from the periplasm into the cytoplasm of target cells. BTH_I0986 encodes a putative transglycosylase involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS synthesis. ∆BTH_I0986 mutants have altered LPS structure and do not interact with CDI⁺ inhibitor cells to the same extent as BTH_I0986⁺ cells, suggesting that LPS could function as a receptor for CdiAIIBp1026b. Although ∆BTH_I0359, ∆BTH_II0599, and ∆BTH_I0986 mutations confer resistance to CDIIIBp1026b, they provide no protection against the CDIE264 system deployed by B. thailandensis E264. Together, these findings demonstrate that CDI growth-inhibition pathways are distinct and can differ significantly even between closely related species.

  6. Genetic variation in the TP53 pathway and bladder cancer risk. a comprehensive analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pineda

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Germline variants in TP63 have been consistently associated with several tumors, including bladder cancer, indicating the importance of TP53 pathway in cancer genetic susceptibility. However, variants in other related genes, including TP53 rs1042522 (Arg72Pro, still present controversial results. We carried out an in depth assessment of associations between common germline variants in the TP53 pathway and bladder cancer risk. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated 184 tagSNPs from 18 genes in 1,058 cases and 1,138 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study. Cases were newly-diagnosed bladder cancer patients during 1998-2001. Hospital controls were age-gender, and area matched to cases. SNPs were genotyped in blood DNA using Illumina Golden Gate and TaqMan assays. Cases were subphenotyped according to stage/grade and tumor p53 expression. We applied classical tests to assess individual SNP associations and the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO-penalized logistic regression analysis to assess multiple SNPs simultaneously. RESULTS: Based on classical analyses, SNPs in BAK1 (1, IGF1R (5, P53AIP1 (1, PMAIP1 (2, SERINPB5 (3, TP63 (3, and TP73 (1 showed significant associations at p-value≤0.05. However, no evidence of association, either with overall risk or with specific disease subtypes, was observed after correction for multiple testing (p-value≥0.8. LASSO selected the SNP rs6567355 in SERPINB5 with 83% of reproducibility. This SNP provided an OR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.05-1.38, p-value = 0.006, and a corrected p-value = 0.5 when controlling for over-estimation. DISCUSSION: We found no strong evidence that common variants in the TP53 pathway are associated with bladder cancer susceptibility. Our study suggests that it is unlikely that TP53 Arg72Pro is implicated in the UCB in white Europeans. SERPINB5 and TP63 variation deserve further exploration in extended studies.

  7. Mental quality of life is related to a cytokine genetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounya Schoormans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quality of life (QoL in patients with chronic disease is impaired and cannot be solely explained by disease severity. We explored whether genetic variability and activity contributes to QoL in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS, a genetic connective tissue disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 121 MFS patients, patient characteristics (i.e. demographics and MFS-related symptoms were assessed. Patients completed the SF-36 to measure QoL. In addition, transcriptome wide gene expression and 484 Single Nucleotide Polymorphysms (SNPs in cytokine genes were available. QoL was first analyzed and associated with patient characteristics. Patients' physical QoL was impaired and weakly related with age and scoliosis, whereas mental quality of life (MCS was normal. To explain a largely lacking correlation between disease severity and QoL, we related genome wide gene expression to QoL. Patients with lower MCS scores had high expression levels of CXCL9 and CXCL11 cytokine-related genes (p=0.001; p=0.002; similarly, patients with low vitality scores had high expression levels of CXCL9, CXCL11 and IFNA6 cytokine-related genes (p=0.02; p=0.02; p=0.04, independent of patient characteristics. Subsequently, we associated cytokine related SNPs to mental QoL (MCS and vitality. SNP-cluster in the IL4R gene showed a weak association with MCS and vitality (strongest association p=0.0017. Although overall mental QoL was normal, >10% of patients had low scores for MCS and vitality. Post-hoc analysis of systemic inflammatory mediators showed that patients with lowest MCS and vitality scores had high levels of CCL11 cytokine (p=0.03; p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Variation in the cytokine genetic pathway and its activation is related to mental QoL. These findings might allow us to identify and, ultimately, treat patients susceptible to poor QoL.

  8. Born to Lead? A Twin Design and Genetic Association Study of Leadership Role Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Mikhaylov, Slava; Dawes, Christopher T; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-01

    We address leadership emergence and the possibility that there is a partially innate predisposition to occupy a leadership role. Employing twin design methods on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the heritability of leadership role occupancy at 24%. Twin studies do not point to specific genes or neurological processes that might be involved. We therefore also conduct association analysis on the available genetic markers. The results show that leadership role occupancy is associated with rs4950, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) residing on a neuronal acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNB3). We replicate this family-based genetic association result on an independent sample in the Framingham Heart Study. This is the first study to identify a specific genotype associated with the tendency to occupy a leadership position. The results suggest that what determines whether an individual occupies a leadership position is the complex product of genetic and environmental influences; with a particular role for rs4950.

  9. [Role and function of voltage-gated chloride channels of the CIC family and their defects leading to genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dołowy, Krzysztof; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Hordejuk, Renata; Dworakowska, Beata; Nurowska, Ewa; Jarzabek, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    There are 9 channels of the ClC family in mammals and few others in fishes, plants, yeast and bacteria. The ClC channels are present in different tissues and play a role in transmembrane potential stabilization, transepithelial transport, cell volume regulation, acidification of intracellular organelles. The genetic defects of ClC-1 chloride channel lead to myotonias, the defect in ClC-5 channel to the formation of stones in kidney, while the defect in ClC-Kb channel leads to the Bartter's syndrome.

  10. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  11. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  12. Maternal hyperglycemia activates an ASK1-FoxO3a-caspase 8 pathway that leads to embryonic neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peixin; Li, Xuezheng; Xu, Cheng; Eckert, Richard L; Reece, E Albert; Zielke, Horst Ronald; Wang, Fang

    2013-08-27

    Neural tube defects result from failure to completely close neural tubes during development. Maternal diabetes is a substantial risk factor for neural tube defects, and available evidence suggests that the mechanism that links hyperglycemia to neural tube defects involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. We demonstrated that maternal hyperglycemia correlated with activation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in the developing neural tube, and Ask1 gene deletion was associated with reduced neuroepithelial cell apoptosis and development of neural tube defects. ASK1 activation stimulated the activity of the transcription factor FoxO3a, which increased the abundance of the apoptosis-promoting adaptor protein TRADD, leading to activation of caspase 8. Hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis and the development of neural tube defects were reduced with genetic ablation of either FoxO3a or Casp8 or inhibition of ASK1 by thioredoxin. Examination of human neural tissues affected by neural tube defects revealed increased activation or abundance of ASK1, FoxO3a, TRADD, and caspase 8. Thus, activation of an ASK1-FoxO3a-TRADD-caspase 8 pathway participates in the development of neural tube defects, which could be prevented by inhibiting intermediates in this cascade.

  13. 34. Effect and the Possible Mediated Pathway of Cortisol Secretion in Adrenocortical Cells Induced by Lead and Cadmium in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To understand the direct effect on the secretion of adreno-cortical cells induced by lead and cadmium and the possible mediated pathway. Methods: The adrenocortical cells of male guinea pigs were dispersed and primarily cultured, then the cells were incubated wich cadmiun chloride and lead acetate in dosage as 0,6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L respectively for different periods (30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes). The cortisol levels in culture medium and cellular cAMP concentration were measured with RIA. Results: Under the existence of ACTH, the levels of cortisol secreted from the cultured cells were showed significantly declined in dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated in 6.25-100μmol/L CdCl2 for 30 to 240 minutes. There would be an interaction for cortisol secretion between the dose of CdCl2 and the incubatal period. Nevertheless, it seemed to have no obvious linear relation in the alterations of cortisol secretion after 12.5~100μmol/L PbAc incubated for 30~240 minutes. It appeared to have a tendency of dual-phase response in a manner of inhibiting the cortisol secretion in low dose (lower than 25μmol/L) and stimulating the secretion function in high dose (50 and 100μmol/L). The cAMP level was presented a remarkably decrease after 6.25~100 μmol/L CdCl2 incubated with the cells. It was proved that the cAMP level had does-effect relations with the CdCl2 dose. PbAc appeared not only dual response with the tendency of cAMP inhibition in low dose and activating to raise in high dose but also dose-effect relationship. Conclusion: CdCl2 could directly inhibit the secretion of cortisol. PbAc is also of the toxic effect on the cortisol secretion with the characteristic of dual-response as inhibition in early phase and low dose while induction to raising in high dose. cAMP, as an important second messenger, play a role in synthesis and secretion of adrenocorticoids. The toxic effects on steroids secretion induced by cadmium and lead were

  14. Integrating pathway analysis and genetics of gene expression for genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Liang, Liming; Morar, Nilesh; Dixon, Anna L; Lathrop, G Mark; Ding, Jun; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Kraft, Peter; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have primarily focused on marginal effects for individual markers and have incorporated external functional information only after identifying robust statistical associations. We applied a new approach combining the genetics of gene expression and functional classification of genes to the GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to identify potential biological pathways associated with BCC. We first identified 322,324 expression-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs) from two existing GWASs of global gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 955), and evaluated the association of these functionally annotated SNPs with BCC among 2,045 BCC cases and 6,013 controls in Caucasians. We then grouped them into 99 KEGG pathways for pathway analysis and identified two pathways associated with BCC with p value <0.05 and false discovery rate (FDR) <0.5: the autoimmune thyroid disease pathway (mainly HLA class I and II antigens, p < 0.001, FDR = 0.24) and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway (p = 0.02, FDR = 0.49). Seventy-nine (25.7%) out of 307 significant eSNPs in the JAK-STAT pathway were associated with BCC risk (p < 0.05) in an independent replication set of 278 BCC cases and 1,262 controls. In addition, the association of JAK-STAT signaling pathway was marginally validated using 16,691 eSNPs identified from 110 normal skin samples (p = 0.08). Based on the evidence of biological functions of the JAK-STAT pathway on oncogenesis, it is plausible that this pathway is involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  15. Harnessing biodiesel-producing microbes: from genetic engineering of lipase to metabolic engineering of fatty acid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinyong; Yan, Yunjun; Madzak, Catherine; Han, Bingnan

    2017-02-01

    Microbial production routes, notably whole-cell lipase-mediated biotransformation and fatty-acids-derived biosynthesis, offer new opportunities for synthesizing biodiesel. They compare favorably to immobilized lipase and chemically catalyzed processes. Genetically modified whole-cell lipase-mediated in vitro route, together with in vivo and ex vivo microbial biosynthesis routes, constitutes emerging and rapidly developing research areas for effective production of biodiesel. This review presents recent advances in customizing microorganisms for producing biodiesel, via genetic engineering of lipases and metabolic engineering (including system regulation) of fatty-acids-derived pathways. Microbial hosts used include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus oryzae. These microbial cells can be genetically modified to produce lipases under different forms: intracellularly expressed, secreted or surface-displayed. They can be metabolically redesigned and systematically regulated to obtain balanced biodiesel-producing cells, as highlighted in this study. Such genetically or metabolically modified microbial cells can support not only in vitro biotransformation of various common oil feedstocks to biodiesel, but also de novo biosynthesis of biodiesel from glucose, glycerol or even cellulosic biomass. We believe that the genetically tractable oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica could be developed to an effective biodiesel-producing microbial cell factory. For this purpose, we propose several engineered pathways, based on lipase and wax ester synthase, in this promising oleaginous host.

  16. Genetic variation in the parasympathetic signaling pathway in patients with reflex syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmegard, H N; Benn, M; Mehlsen, J; Haunsø, S

    2013-01-30

    Reflex syncope is defined by a self-terminating transient loss of consciousness associated with an exaggerated response of the vagal reflexes upon orthostatic challenges. A hereditary component has previously been suggested. We hypothesized that variations in genes encoding proteins mediating the vagal signaling in the heart may be involved in reflex syncope pathogenesis. We systematically resequenced the entire coding regions and flanking intron sequences in 5 genes in the cardiac post-synaptic parasympathetic signaling pathway [muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2); G-protein beta-1 subunit (GNB1); G-protein gamma-2 subunit (GNG2); potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 3 (KCNJ3); and potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 5 (KCNJ5)] in 74 patients with well-characterized reflex syncope of either cardioinhibitory [Vasovagal Syncope International Study (VASIS-IIB), N = 38] or vasodepressor (VASIS-III, N = 36) type. We identified 2 novel genetic variants (CHRM2 c.1114C>G and GNG2 c.87+34G>A) and several known variants (GNB1: c.267+14G>A, c.267+19C>T, and c.738C>T; KCNJ3: c.119A>G, c.591C>T, c.1038T>C, and c.1494T>C; KCNJ5: c. 171T>C, c.810T>G, c.834T>C, c.844C>G, c.938+7C>T, and c.938-10G>A). The minor allele frequency of the KCNJ5 c.938+7C>T variant was significantly lower in patients than in the control group (0.014 versus 0.089, P = 0.001), and the frequency of heterozygosity and homozygosity was lower in cardioinhibitory patients compared to controls. Genetic variations in genes responsible for the vagal signaling in the heart, including CHRM2, GNB1, GNG2, KCNJ3, and KCNJ5, are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of reflex syncope of vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory types.

  17. Genetic susceptibility of lead poisoning%儿童铅中毒易感基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李珊珊; 王琳琳; 赵娟

    2013-01-01

    遗传因素影响机体对铅毒性的易感性.δ-氨基乙酰丙酸脱水酶(ALAD)基因、维生素D受体(VDR)基因、血色素基因(HFE)基因、基质γ-羧基谷氨酸蛋白(MGP)T-138C、X射线交错互不修复基因1(XRCC1)和X射线交错互不修复基因3(XRCC3)的不同基因多态性对铅中毒的易感性有一定影响.铅毒性基因的易感性研究将会为儿童铅中毒的易感人群筛选和铅中毒治疗提供遗传学的依据,以便及早识别易感者,尽早保护易感人群,防止或减少铅中毒的发生并采取针对性的健康教育宣传.%Genetic factors affect the susceptibility of lead toxicity. It has certain influence to the susceptibility of lead poisoning that is the different gene polymorphism of delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase ( ALAD) gene, vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene, hemoglobin gene (HFE), matrix-carboxyl glutamic acid protein (MGP) T-138C, X ray staggered no repair gene 1 (XRCC1) and X ray staggered no repair gene 3 (XRRC3). The research of lead toxicity genetic susceptibility will provide the basis for the children lead poisoning at-risk group screening and lead poisoning treatments, in order to recognise and protect the susceptible person, prevent or reduce the occurrence of lead poisoning and take pertinent the health education propaganda.

  18. Accumulation, elimination, sequestration, and genetic variation of lead (Pb(2+)) loads within and between generations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Elizabeth K; Wilson, Diane T; Possidente, Bernard; McDaniel, Phillip; Morley, Eric J; Possidente, Debra; Hollocher, Kurt T; Ruden, Douglas M; Hirsch, Helmut V B

    2017-08-01

    We examined accumulation, sequestration, elimination, and genetic variation for lead (Pb) loads within and between generations of Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were reared in control or leaded medium at various doses and tested for their Pb loads at different stages of development (larvae, eclosion, newly-eclosed adults, and mature adults). Pb loads were tested using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). We found that D. melanogaster readily accumulated Pb throughout their lifespan and the levels of accumulation increased with Pb exposure in the medium. Wandering third-instar larvae accumulated more Pb than mature adults; this phenomenon may be due to elimination of Pb in the pupal cases during eclosion and/or depuration in adults post-eclosion. The accumulated Pb in mature adults was not transferred to F1 mature adult offspring. Using a set of recombinant inbred strains, we identified a quantitative trait locus for adult Pb loads and found that genetic variation accounted for 34% of the variance in Pb load. We concluded that D. melanogaster is a useful model organism for evaluating changes in Pb loads during development, as well as between generations. Furthermore, we found that genetic factors can influence Pb loads; this provides an essential foundation for evaluating phenotypic variation induced by the toxic effects of Pb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic variation in the tau protein phosphatase-2A pathway is not associated with Alzheimer's disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berciano José

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tau abnormal hyperphosphorylation and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in AD brain is the result of upregulation of tau kinases and downregulation of tau phosphatases. Methods In a group of 729 Spanish late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and 670 healthy controls, we examined variations into a set of candidate genes (PPP2CA, PPP2R2A, ANP32A, LCMT1, PPME1 and PIN1 in the tau protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A pathway, to address hypotheses of genetic variation that might influence AD risk. Results There were no differences in the genotypic, allelic or haplotypic distributions between cases and controls in the overall analysis or after stratification by age, gender or APOE ε4 allele. Conclusion Our negative findings in the Spanish population argue against the hypothesis that genetic variation in the tau protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A pathway is causally related to AD risk

  20. Pattern Recognition and Pathway Analysis with Genetic Algorithms in Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A robust and complete workflow for metabolic profiling and data mining was described in detail. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling were applied: hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC–LC–ESI–MS, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP–LC–ESI–MS, and gas chromatography (GC–TOF–MS all coupled to mass spectrometry (MS. Unsupervised methods, such as principle component analysis (PCA and clustering, and supervised methods, such as classification and PCA-DA (discriminatory analysis were used for data mining. Genetic Algorithms (GA, a multivariate approach, was probed for selection of the smallest subsets of potentially discriminative predictors. From thousands of peaks found in total, small subsets selected by GA were considered as highly potential predictors allowing discrimination among groups. It was found that small groups of potential top predictors selected with PCA-DA and GA are different and unique. Annotated GC–TOF–MS data generated identified feature metabolites. Metabolites putatively detected with LC–ESI–MS profiling require further elemental composition assignment with accurate mass measurement by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS and structure elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. GA was also used to generate correlated networks for pathway analysis. Several case studies, comprising groups of plant samples bearing different genotypes and groups of samples of human origin, namely patients and healthy volunteers’ urine samples, demonstrated that such a workflow combining comprehensive metabolic profiling and advanced data mining techniques provides a powerful approach for pattern recognition and biomarker discovery

  1. Genetic variants in chromatin-remodeling pathway associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liguo; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Cheng, Yang; Liu, Jia; Shen, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Jiahui; Wang, Cheng; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng

    2016-08-10

    Chromatin remodeling complexes utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have essential roles in transcriptional modulation. Increasing evidences indicate that these complexes directly interact with numerous proteins and regulate the formation of cancer. However, few studies reported the association of polymorphisms in chromatin remodeling genes and lung cancer. We hypothesized that variants in critical genes of chromatin remodeling pathway might contribute to the susceptibility of lung cancer. To validate this hypothesis, we systematically screened 40 polymorphisms in six key chromatin remodeling genes (SMARCA5, SMARCC2, SMARCD2, ARID1A, NR3C1 and SATB1) and evaluated them with a case-control study including 1341 cases and 1982 controls. Logistic regression revealed that four variants in NR3C1 and SATB1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk after false discovery rate (FDR) correction [For NR3C1, rs9324921: odds ratio (OR)=1.23, P for FDR=0.029; rs12521436: OR=0.85, P for FDR=0.040; rs4912913: OR=1.17, P for FDR=0.040; For SATB1, rs6808523: OR=1.33, P for FDR=0.040]. Combing analysis presented a significant allele-dosage tendency for the number of risk alleles and lung cancer risk (Ptrendlung tumor and adjacent normal tissues in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (P=0.009 for rs6808523). These findings suggested that genetic variants in key chromatin remodeling genes may contribute to lung cancer risk in Chinese population. Further large and well-designed studies are warranted to validate our results.

  2. Association between common genetic variants in the opioid pathway and smoking behaviors in Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Wang, Xiaohong; He, Bei

    2014-01-21

    There is biological evidence that the brain opioidergic system plays a critical role in the addictive properties of nicotine. The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and the MOR-interacting proteins (including OPRM1, ARRB2, and HINT1) with smoking behaviors in Chinese men. A total of 284 subjects (including current and ex-smokers) were recruited. Special questionnaires were used to assess smoking behaviors including age of smoking initiation, daily cigarette consumption, and Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) score. Participant samples were genotyped for six SNPs in the opioid pathway genes: rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs1045280, rs2036657 and rs3786047 in ARRB2, rs3852209 and rs2278060 in HINT1. Linear and logistic regression models were used to determine single-locus and haplotype-based association analyses. There was no significant association between any of SNPs analyzed and smoking behaviors. Logistic regression analyses under dominant, recessive, and additive models showed no significant associations of the six SNPs with smoking status (current vs. ex-smokers). After adjustment for age at enrollment and smoking initiation age, HINT1 rs3852209 was significantly associated with smoking status with an OR of 0.54 (95% CI, 0.31-0.95; P = 0.03) under dominant inheritance model. No haplotypes in ARRB2 or HINT1 were related to smoking status. The present study indicates no significant association between common genetic variations in MOR and MOR-interacting proteins and smoking behaviors in Chinese men, and gives suggestive evidence that HINT1 rs3852209 may be related to smoking status. The findings require confirmation from further studies in additional larger samples.

  3. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  4. Genetic Determinants of Variable Metabolism Have Little Impact on the Clinical Use of Leading Antipsychotics in the CATIE study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Iris; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Walley, Nicole; Liu, Youfang; Dawson, Jeffrey R.; Gumbs, Curtis; Gaedigk, Andrea; Leeder, J. Steven; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Weale, Michael E.; Goldstein, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate systematically in real clinical settings whether functional genetic variations in drug metabolizing enzymes influence optimized doses, efficacy, and safety of antipsychotic medications. Methods DNA was collected from 750 patients with chronic schizophrenia treated with five antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone and perphenazine) as part of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study. Doses for each of the medicines were optimized to 1, 2, 3, or 4x units in identically-appearing capsules in a double blind design. We analyzed 25 known functional genetic variants in the major and minor metabolizing enzymes for each medication. These variants were tested for association with optimized dose and other relevant clinical outcomes. Results None of the tested variants showed a nominally significant main effect in association with any of the tested phenotypes in European-Americans, African-Americans or all patients. Even after accounting for potential covariates no genetic variant was found to be associated with dosing, efficacy, overall tolerability, or tardive dyskinesia. Conclusion There are no strong associations between common functional genetic variants in drug metabolizing enzymes and dosing, safety or efficacy of leading antipsychotics, strongly suggesting merely modest effects on the use of these medicines in most patients in typical clinical settings. PMID:18813134

  5. DMPD: The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16001129 The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. Beutler B. I...mmunogenetics. 2005 Jul;57(6):385-92. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The Toll-like receptors: analysis b...y forward genetic methods. PubmedID 16001129 Title The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic meth

  6. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Barber

    Full Text Available Although 24 Alzheimer's disease (AD risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1, Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP, Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M, Factor VII (F7, Adiponectin (ADN and Tenascin C (TN-C. Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10(-7. Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes, which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point

  7. Notch Pathway Is Activated via Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations and Is a Therapeutic Target in Clear Cell Renal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Tushar D; Zou, Yiyu; Huang, Shizheng; Park, Jihwan; Palmer, Matthew B; Hu, Caroline; Li, Weijuan; Shenoy, Niraj; Giricz, Orsolya; Choudhary, Gaurav; Yu, Yiting; Ko, Yi-An; Izquierdo, María C; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Laurence, Remi; Lopez, Robert; Suzuki, Masako; Pullman, James; Kaner, Justin; Gartrell, Benjamin; Hakimi, A Ari; Greally, John M; Patel, Bharvin; Benhadji, Karim; Pradhan, Kith; Verma, Amit; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-01-20

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is an incurable malignancy in advanced stages and needs newer therapeutic targets. Transcriptomic analysis of CCRCCs and matched microdissected renal tubular controls revealed overexpression of NOTCH ligands and receptors in tumor tissues. Examination of the TCGA RNA-seq data set also revealed widespread activation of NOTCH pathway in a large cohort of CCRCC samples. Samples with NOTCH pathway activation were also clinically distinct and were associated with better overall survival. Parallel DNA methylation and copy number analysis demonstrated that both genetic and epigenetic alterations led to NOTCH pathway activation in CCRCC. NOTCH ligand JAGGED1 was overexpressed and associated with loss of CpG methylation of H3K4me1-associated enhancer regions. JAGGED2 was also overexpressed and associated with gene amplification in distinct CCRCC samples. Transgenic expression of intracellular NOTCH1 in mice with tubule-specific deletion of VHL led to dysplastic hyperproliferation of tubular epithelial cells, confirming the procarcinogenic role of NOTCH in vivo Alteration of cell cycle pathways was seen in murine renal tubular cells with NOTCH overexpression, and molecular similarity to human tumors was observed, demonstrating that human CCRCC recapitulates features and gene expression changes observed in mice with transgenic overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain. Treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor LY3039478 led to inhibition of CCRCC cells in vitro and in vivo In summary, these data reveal the mechanistic basis of NOTCH pathway activation in CCRCC and demonstrate this pathway to a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Optimization of thermomechanical processes in Cu-Cr-Zr lead frame alloy using neural networks and genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Juanhua; LIU; Ping; DONG; Qiming; LI; Hejun

    2005-01-01

    The thermomechanical treatment process is effective in enhancing the properties of the lead frame copper alloy. In this study, an optimal pattern of the thermomechanical processes for Cu-Cr-Zr was investegated using an intelligent control technique consisting of neural networks and genetic algorithms. The input parameters of the artificial neural network (ANN) are the reduction ratio of cold rolling, aging temperature and aging time. The outputs of the ANN model are the two most important properties of hardness and conductivity. Based on the successfully trained ANN model,genetic algorithms (GA) are used to optimize the input parameters of the model and select perfect combinations of thermomechanical processing parameters and properties.The good generalization performance and optimized results of the integrated model are achieved.

  9. FINDbase: A relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Baal (Sjozef); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Phommarinh (Manyphong); D. Koumbi (Daphne); H. Cuppens (Harry); F. Riccardino (Francesca); M. Macek (Milan MI); C.R. Scriver (Charles); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFrequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the

  10. FINDbase: A relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Baal (Sjozef); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Phommarinh (Manyphong); D. Koumbi (Daphne); H. Cuppens (Harry); F. Riccardino (Francesca); M. Macek (Milan MI); C.R. Scriver (Charles); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFrequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the

  11. Brain imaging genetics in ADHD and beyond - mapping pathways from gene to disorder at different levels of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marieke; Onnink, Marten; van Donkelaar, Marjolein; Wolfers, Thomas; Harich, Benjamin; Shi, Yan; Dammers, Janneke; Arias-Va Squez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara

    2017-01-31

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and often persistent neurodevelopmental disorder. Beyond gene-finding, neurobiological parameters, such as brain structure, connectivity, and function, have been used to link genetic variation to ADHD symptomatology. We performed a systematic review of brain imaging genetics studies involving 62 ADHD candidate genes in childhood and adult ADHD cohorts. Fifty-one eligible research articles described studies of 13 ADHD candidate genes. Almost exclusively, single genetic variants were studied, mostly focussing on dopamine-related genes. While promising results have been reported, imaging genetics studies are thus far hampered by methodological differences in study design and analysis methodology, as well as limited sample sizes. Beyond reviewing imaging genetics studies, we also discuss the need for complementary approaches at multiple levels of biological complexity and emphasize the importance of combining and integrating findings across levels for a better understanding of biological pathways from gene to disease. These may include multi-modal imaging genetics studies, bioinformatic analyses, and functional analyses of cell and animal models.

  12. No evidence that genetic variation in the myeloid-derived suppressor cell pathway influences ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Cannioto, Rikki; Clay, Alyssa I

    2016-01-01

    tolerance of malignant cells in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To this end, we hypothesized genetic variation in MDSC pathway genes would be associated with survival after EOC diagnoses. METHODS: We measured the hazard of death due to EOC within 10 years of diagnosis, overall and by invasive subtype......BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which the immune system is adversely affected in cancer patients remains poorly understood, but the accumulation of immune suppressive/pro-tumorigenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is thought to be one prominent mechanism contributing to immunologic......, attributable to SNPs in 24 genes relevant in the MDSC pathway in 10,751 women diagnosed with invasive EOC. Versatile Gene-based Association study (VEGAS) and the Admixture Likelihood method (AML), were used to test gene and pathway associations with survival. RESULTS: We did not identify individual SNPs...

  13. Deciphering tumor-suppressor signaling in flies: Genetic link between Scribble/Dlg/Lgl and the Hippo pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masato Enomoto; Tatsushi Igaki

    2011-01-01

    Loss of apico-basal polarity is one of the crucial factors that drives epithelial tumor progression.scribble/discs large/lethal giant larvae (scrib/dlg/lgl),a group of apico-basal polarity genes,were initially identified as members of “neoplastic” tumor-suppressors in flies.The components of the Hippo signaling pathway,which is crucial for organ size control and cancer development,were also identified through Drosophila genetic screens as members of “hyperplastic” tumor-suppressors.Accumulating evidence in recent studies implies that these two tumor-suppressor signaling pathways are not mutually exclusive but rather cooperatively act to give rise to highly malignant tumors.The interaction of these tumor-suppressor pathways could include deregulations of actin cytoskeleton,cell-cell contact,and apical-domain size of the epithelial cell.

  14. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Cellular Pathways Affected by the Stilbenoid Lead Drug SK-03-92 Using a Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwan, William R; Polanowski, Rebecca; Dunman, Paul M; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Rott, Marc; Lipker, Lauren; Wescott, Amy; Monte, Aaron; Cook, James M; Baumann, Douglas D; Tiruveedhula, V V N Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M; Mikel, Cassandra; Rahman, Md Toufiqur

    2017-09-11

    The mechanism of action for a new lead stilbene compound coded SK-03-92 with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is unknown. To gain insight into the killing process, transcriptional profiling was performed on SK-03-92 treated vs. untreated S. aureus. Fourteen genes were upregulated and 38 genes downregulated by SK-03-92 treatment. Genes involved in sortase A production, protein metabolism, and transcriptional regulation were upregulated, whereas genes encoding transporters, purine synthesis proteins, and a putative two-component system (SACOL2360 (MW2284) and SACOL2361 (MW2285)) were downregulated by SK-03-92 treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses validated upregulation of srtA and tdk as well as downregulation of the MW2284/MW2285 and purine biosynthesis genes in the drug-treated population. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of MW2284 and MW2285 mutants compared to wild-type cells demonstrated that the srtA gene was upregulated by both putative two-component regulatory gene mutants compared to the wild-type strain. Using a transcription profiling technique, we have identified several cellular pathways regulated by SK-03-92 treatment, including a putative two-component system that may regulate srtA and other genes that could be tied to the SK-03-92 mechanism of action, biofilm formation, and drug persisters.

  15. A novel TLR4-mediated signaling pathway leading to IL-6 responses in human bladder epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Song

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The vigorous cytokine response of immune cells to Gram-negative bacteria is primarily mediated by a recognition molecule, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, which recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS and initiates a series of intracellular NF-kappaB-associated signaling events. Recently, bladder epithelial cells (BECs were reported to express TLR4 and to evoke a vigorous cytokine response upon exposure to LPS. We examined intracellular signaling events in human BECs leading to the production of IL-6, a major urinary cytokine, following activation by Escherichia coli and isolated LPS. We observed that in addition to the classical NF-kappaB-associated pathway, TLR4 triggers a distinct and more rapid signaling response involving, sequentially, Ca(2+, adenylyl cyclase 3-generated cAMP, and a transcriptional factor, cAMP response element-binding protein. This capacity of BECs to mobilize secondary messengers and evoke a more rapid IL-6 response might be critical in their role as first responders to microbial challenge in the urinary tract.

  16. Recasting developmental evolution in terms of genetic pathway and network evolution ... and the implications for comparative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Adam S

    2005-09-15

    The morphological features of complex organisms are the outcomes of developmental processes. Developmental processes, in turn, reflect the genetic networks that underlie them. Differences in morphology must ultimately, therefore, reflect differences in the underlying genetic networks. A mutation that affects a developmental process does so by affecting either a gene whose product acts as an upstream controlling element, an intermediary connecting link, or as a downstream output of the network that governs the trait's development. Although the immense diversity of gene networks in the animal and plant kingdoms would seem to preclude any general "rules" of network evolution, the material discussed here suggests that the patterns of genetic pathway and network evolution actually fall into a number of discrete modes. The potential utility of this conceptual framework in reconstructing instances of developmental evolution and for comparative neurobiology will be discussed.

  17. Genetic engineering of the complete carotenoid pathway towards enhanced astaxanthin formation in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous starting from a high-yield mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassel, Sören; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the rare organisms which can synthesize the commercially interesting carotenoid astaxanthin. However, astaxanthin yield in wild-type and also in classical mutants is still too low for an attractive bioprocess. Therefore, we combined classical mutagenesis with genetic engineering of the complete pathway covering improved precursor supply for carotenogenesis, enhanced metabolite flow into the pathway, and efficient conversion of intermediates into the desired end product astaxanthin. We also constructed new transformation plasmids for the stepwise expression of the genes of 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase/lycopene cyclase, and astaxanthin synthase. Starting from two mutants with a 15-fold higher astaxanthin, we obtained transformants with an additional 6-fold increase in the final step of pathway engineering. Thus, a maximum astaxanthin content of almost 9 mg per g dry weight was reached in shaking cultures. Under optimized fermenter conditions, astaxanthin production with these engineered transformants should be comparable to Haematococcus pluvialis, the leading commercial producer of natural astaxanthin.

  18. Modified natural clinoptilolite detoxifies small mammal's organism loaded with lead II: genetic, cell, and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topashka-Ancheva, Margarita; Beltcheva, Michaela; Metcheva, Roumiana; Rojas, J Antonio Heredia; Rodriguez-De la Fuente, Abraham O; Gerasimova, Tsvetelina; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Teodorova, Svetla E

    2012-06-01

    The detoxification capacity of the clinoptilolite modification KLS-10-MA used as food additive in small mammals, chronically lead-exposed, was proven for the first time. The modified clinoptilolite was prepared based on natural Bulgarian clinoptilolite deposits. As a powder, it was mechanically mixed at 12.5% concentration with the conventional forage for small rodents. Lead in the form of aqueous solution of Pb(NO(3))(2) was diluted in the drinking water. In the ecotoxicological experiment covering 90 days, imprinting control region laboratory mice were used. They were allocated into four groups: group 1, (control): animals fed with conventional food for small rodents and water; group 2: animals fed with conventional food + clinosorbent KLS-10-MA and water; group 3: animals fed with conventional food and water + Pb(NO(3))(2); and group 4: animals fed with conventional food + KLS-10-MA and water + Pb(NO(3))(2). A group of non-exposed healthy animals was fed with conventional forage mixed with KLS-10-MA to prove eventual toxicity of the sorbent and influence on growth performance. The changes in the chromosome structure, mitotic index, erythrocyte form, erythropoiesis, and body weight gain were recorded. On day 90, the following relations were established: Pb-exposed and clinoptilolite-supplemented mice exhibited 2.3-fold lower chromosome aberrations frequency, 2.5-fold higher mitotic index, and 1.5-fold higher percentage normal erythrocytes 1.3-fold higher body weight compared to Pb-exposed and unsupplemented animals. The obtained data showed that the sorbent is practically non-toxic. The results of the present study encourage a further elaboration of a reliable drug based on the tested substance in the cases of chronic lead intoxication.

  19. Genetic background of aberrant thermogenin expression (UCP1) in obesity leading to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosio, Małgorzata; Witkowicz, Agata; Kowalska, Anna; Karabon, Lidia

    2016-12-31

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disturbances individually and interdependently lead to chronic pathological conditions observed in cardio-metabolic diseases (CMDs). In Europe, the morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease are the highest among all diseases. Therefore, it seems important to search for new and alternative therapies for obesity, which is the main cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CD). Great attention has been paid to the role of brown adipose tissue in fat burning and the possibility of transformation of the white adipose tissue to cells with brown adipose tissue function as a potential form of treatment of obesity. The best-characterized marker of brown adipose tissue is uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which has the ability to dissipate energy as heat in the process called non-shivering thermogenesis. Numerous studies have shown that altered expression of this protein can lead to disturbances in fat metabolism. One possible reason for the aberrant expression of UCP1 may be inherited variations in the gene encoding that protein. Therefore, several studies investigating the role of polymorphisms in the gene encoding UCP1 in susceptibility to obesity or metabolic syndrome have been performed. Here we summarize the results of studies describing the associations between the UCP1 gene polymorphisms A-3826G, A-1766G, Met229Leu and Ala64Thr and polymorphism Trp64Arg in the β3-AR gene, their correlations and their associations with the occurrence of metabolic syndrome.

  20. Lead toxicity induces autophagy to protect against cell death through mTORC1 pathway in cardiofibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Li; Zhang, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Ping; Yun, Ke-Li; Zhang, Hong-Cai; Liu, Li; Hu, Ming-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals, such as lead (Pb2+), are usually accumulated in human bodies and impair human's health. Lead is a metal with many recognized adverse health side effects and yet the molecular processes underlying lead toxicity are still poorly understood. In the present study, we proposed to investigate the effects of lead toxicity in cultured cardiofibroblasts. After lead treatment, cultured cardiofibroblasts showed severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, the lead-treated cardiofibro...

  1. Using the Drosophila Melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic information is needed to link effects of chemicals at molecular targets in high­ throughput screening assays to adverse outcomes in whole organisms. This study was designed to use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a set of genetically well...

  2. Using the Drosophila Melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic information is needed to link effects of chemicals at molecular targets in high­ throughput screening assays to adverse outcomes in whole organisms. This study was designed to use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a set of genetically well...

  3. DMPD: The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10669111 The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysa...ccharide. Qureshi ST, Gros P, Malo D. Inflamm Res. 1999 Dec;48(12):613-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. PubmedID 10669111 Title The

  4. The Functional Genetics of Handedness and Language Lateralization: Insights from Gene Ontology, Pathway and Disease Association Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Judith; Lor, Stephanie; Klose, Rena; Güntürkün, Onur; Ocklenburg, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Handedness and language lateralization are partially determined by genetic influences. It has been estimated that at least 40 (and potentially more) possibly interacting genes may influence the ontogenesis of hemispheric asymmetries. Recently, it has been suggested that analyzing the genetics of hemispheric asymmetries on the level of gene ontology sets, rather than at the level of individual genes, might be more informative for understanding the underlying functional cascades. Here, we performed gene ontology, pathway and disease association analyses on genes that have previously been associated with handedness and language lateralization. Significant gene ontology sets for handedness were anatomical structure development, pattern specification (especially asymmetry formation) and biological regulation. Pathway analysis highlighted the importance of the TGF-beta signaling pathway for handedness ontogenesis. Significant gene ontology sets for language lateralization were responses to different stimuli, nervous system development, transport, signaling, and biological regulation. Despite the fact that some authors assume that handedness and language lateralization share a common ontogenetic basis, gene ontology sets barely overlap between phenotypes. Compared to genes involved in handedness, which mostly contribute to structural development, genes involved in language lateralization rather contribute to activity-dependent cognitive processes. Disease association analysis revealed associations of genes involved in handedness with diseases affecting the whole body, while genes involved in language lateralization were specifically engaged in mental and neurological diseases. These findings further support the idea that handedness and language lateralization are ontogenetically independent, complex phenotypes.

  5. Comparative Haploid Genetic Screens Reveal Divergent Pathways in the Biogenesis and Trafficking of Glycophosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Davis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs play essential roles in physiology, but their biogenesis and trafficking have not been systematically characterized. Here, we took advantage of the recently available haploid genetics approach to dissect GPI-AP pathways in human cells using prion protein (PrP and CD59 as model molecules. Our screens recovered a large number of common and unexpectedly specialized factors in the GPI-AP pathways. PIGN, PGAP2, and PIGF, which encode GPI anchor-modifying enzymes, were selectively isolated in the CD59 screen, suggesting that GPI anchor composition significantly influences the biogenesis of GPI-APs in a substrate-dependent manner. SEC62 and SEC63, which encode components of the ER-targeting machinery, were selectively recovered in the PrP screen, indicating that they do not constitute a universal route for the biogenesis of mammalian GPI-APs. Together, these comparative haploid genetic screens demonstrate that, despite their similarity in overall architecture and subcellular localization, GPI-APs follow markedly distinct biosynthetic and trafficking pathways.

  6. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network and pathway analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Fredholm, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome...... of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation...

  7. Systems genetics of obesity in an F2 pig model by genome-wide association, genetic network and pathway analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Fredholm, Merete

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition with world-wide exponentially rising prevalence rates, linked with severe diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. Economic and welfare consequences have led to a raised interest in a better understanding of the biological and genetic background. To date, whole genome...... of obesity-related phenotypes and genotyped using the 60K SNP chip. Firstly, Genome Wide Association (GWA) analysis was performed on the Obesity Index to locate candidate genomic regions that were further validated using combined Linkage Disequilibrium Linkage Analysis and investigated by evaluation...

  8. A common mechanism involving the TORC1 pathway can lead to amphotericin B-persistence in biofilm and planktonic Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Regenberg, Birgitte; Gresham, David;

    2016-01-01

    exposed to the TORC1 pathway inhibitor rapamycin. Inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin also increased the proportion of persisters in Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. We propose that decreased TORC1-mediated induction of ribosome biosynthesis via Ras can lead to formation of AmB-persister cells...

  9. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-Methyl-D-Erythritol 4-Phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl-phosphate (IPP) in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisi...

  10. Exploration of the possible effect on survival of lead-time associated with implementation of cancer patient pathways among symptomatic first-time cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henry; Vedsted, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation of standardised cancer patient pathways (CPPs) has provided faster diagnosis of cancer. Cancer survival has improved during the same time period. Concern has been raised that the faster diagnosis may have introduced lead-time bias by elongating the period from diagnosis...

  11. Integrative approach detected association between genetic variants of microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes and OSCC susceptibility in Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a leading malignancy worldwide; the overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 50%. A variety of proteins in Toll-like receptors (TLRs pathway have been related with the risk of OSCC. However, the influence of genetic variations in TLRs pathway genes on OSCC susceptibility is unclear. Previous studies mainly focused on the coding region of genes, while the UTR region remains unstudied. In the current study, a bioinformatics approach was performed to select candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on microRNA binding sites of TLRs pathway genes related with OSCC. After screening 90 OSCC related TLRs pathway genes, 16 SNPs were selected for genotyping. We found that rs5030486, the polymorphisms on 3' UTR of TRAF6, was significantly associated with OSCC risk. AG genotype of TRAF6 was strongly associated with a decreased risk of OSCC (OR = 0.252; 95% CI = 0.106, 0.598; p = 0.001. In addition, AG genotype was also related with a reduced risk of OSCC progression both in univariable analysis (HR = 0.303, 95% CI = 0.092, 0.995 and multivariable analysis (HR = 0.272, 95% CI = 0.082, 0.903. Furthermore, after detecting the mRNA expression level of TRAF6 in 24 OSCC patients, we found that TRAF6 expression level was significantly different between patients carrying different genotypes at locus rs5030486 (p = 0.013, indicating that rs5030486 of TRAF6 might contribute to OSCC risk by altering TRAF6 expression level. In general, these data indicated that SNP rs5030486 could be a potential bio-marker for OSCC risk and our results might provide new insights into the association of polymorphisms within the non-coding area of genes with cancers.

  12. Estimating P-coverage of biosynthetic pathways in DNA libraries and screening by genetic selection: biotin biosynthesis in the marine microorganism Chromohalobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Angell, Scott; Janes, Jeff; Watanabe, Coran M H

    2008-06-01

    Traditional approaches to natural product discovery involve cell-based screening of natural product extracts followed by compound isolation and characterization. Their importance notwithstanding, continued mining leads to depletion of natural resources and the reisolation of previously identified metabolites. Metagenomic strategies aimed at localizing the biosynthetic cluster genes and expressing them in surrogate hosts offers one possible alternative. A fundamental question that naturally arises when pursuing such a strategy is, how large must the genomic library be to effectively represent the genome of an organism(s) and the biosynthetic gene clusters they harbor? Such an issue is certainly augmented in the absence of expensive robotics to expedite colony picking and/or screening of clones. We have developed an algorism, named BPC (biosynthetic pathway coverage), supported by molecular simulations to deduce the number of BAC clones required to achieve proper coverage of the genome and their respective biosynthetic pathways. The strategy has been applied to the construction of a large-insert BAC library from a marine microorganism, Hon6 (isolated from Honokohau, Maui) thought to represent a new species. The genomic library is constructed with a BAC yeast shuttle vector pClasper lacZ paving the way for the culturing of libraries in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts. Flow cytometric methods are utilized to estimate the genome size of the organism and BPC implemented to assess P-coverage or percent coverage. A genetic selection strategy is illustrated, applications of which could expedite screening efforts in the identification and localization of biosynthetic pathways from marine microbial consortia, offering a powerful complement to genome sequencing and degenerate probe strategies. Implementing this approach, we report on the biotin biosynthetic pathway from the marine microorganism Hon6.

  13. Genetic Variation in Base Excision Repair Pathway Genes, Pesticide Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathryn Hughes Barry; Stella Koutros; Sonja I. Berndt; Gabriella Andreotti; Jane A. Hoppin; Dale P. Sandler; Laurie A. Burdette; Meredith Yeager; Laura E. Beane Freeman; Jay H. Lubin; Xiaomei Ma; Tongzhang Zheng; Michael C. R. Alavanja

    2011-01-01

    .... OBJECTIVES: Because base excision repair (BER) is the predominant pathway involved in repairing oxidative damage, we evaluated interactions between 39 pesticides and 394 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...

  14. Genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen A; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Zhu, Qianqian; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-05-01

    Studies of genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk have been conducted mostly in populations of European ancestry, and only sparsely in African Americans (AA), who are known for a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed 24,445 germline variants in 63 genes from vitamin D-related pathways in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) consortium, including 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression models for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1,983 ER positive and 1,098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses of ER status. None of the three vitamin D-related pathways were associated with breast cancer risk overall or by ER status. Gene-level analyses identified associations with risk for several genes at a nominal p ≤ 0.05, particularly for ER- breast cancer, including rs4647707 in DDB2. In case-only analyses, vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways were associated with ER- cancer (pathway-level p = 0.02), driven by a single gene CASR (gene-level p = 0.001). The top SNP in CASR was rs112594756 (p = 7 × 10(-5), gene-wide corrected p = 0.01), followed by a second signal from a nearby SNP rs6799828 (p = 1 × 10(-4), corrected p = 0.03). In summary, several variants in vitamin D pathways were associated with breast cancer risk in AA women. In addition, CASR may be related to tumor ER status, supporting a role of vitamin D or calcium in modifying breast cancer phenotypes.

  15. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-03-16

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets.

  16. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tze-Fei Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets.

  17. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J. Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets. PMID:26999216

  18. The Central Role of KNG1 Gene as a Genetic Determinant of Coagulation Pathway-Related Traits: Exploring Metaphenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet, Raimon; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Martin-Fernandez, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Perera, Alexandre; Soria, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Traditional genetic studies of single traits may be unable to detect the pleiotropic effects involved in complex diseases. To detect the correlation that exists between several phenotypes involved in the same biological process, we introduce an original methodology to analyze sets of correlated phenotypes involved in the coagulation cascade in genome-wide association studies. The methodology consists of a two-stage process. First, we define new phenotypic meta-variables (linear combinations of the original phenotypes), named metaphenotypes, by applying Independent Component Analysis for the multivariate analysis of correlated phenotypes (i.e. the levels of coagulation pathway–related proteins). The resulting metaphenotypes integrate the information regarding the underlying biological process (i.e. thrombus/clot formation). Secondly, we take advantage of a family based Genome Wide Association Study to identify genetic elements influencing these metaphenotypes and consequently thrombosis risk. Our study utilized data from the GAIT Project (Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia). We obtained 15 metaphenotypes, which showed significant heritabilities, ranging from 0.2 to 0.7. These results indicate the importance of genetic factors in the variability of these traits. We found 4 metaphenotypes that showed significant associations with SNPs. The most relevant were those mapped in a region near the HRG, FETUB and KNG1 genes. Our results are provocative since they show that the KNG1 locus plays a central role as a genetic determinant of the entire coagulation pathway and thrombus/clot formation. Integrating data from multiple correlated measurements through metaphenotypes is a promising approach to elucidate the hidden genetic mechanisms underlying complex diseases. PMID:28005926

  19. Genetic variability of the mTOR pathway and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    Full Text Available The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway integrates various signals, regulating ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis as a function of available energy and amino acids, and assuring an appropriate coupling of cellular proliferation with increases in cell size. In addition, recent evidence has pointed to an interplay between the mTOR and p53 pathways. We investigated the genetic variability of 67 key genes in the mTOR pathway and in genes of the p53 pathway which interact with mTOR. We tested the association of 1,084 tagging SNPs with prostate cancer risk in a study of 815 prostate cancer cases and 1,266 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. We chose the SNPs (n = 11 with the strongest association with risk (p<0.01 and sought to replicate their association in an additional series of 838 prostate cancer cases and 943 controls from EPIC. In the joint analysis of first and second phase two SNPs of the PRKCI gene showed an association with risk of prostate cancer (OR(allele = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94, p = 1.3 x 10⁻³ for rs546950 and OR(allele = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93, p = 5.6 x 10⁻⁴ for rs4955720. We confirmed this in a meta-analysis using as replication set the data from the second phase of our study jointly with the first phase of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project. In conclusion, we found an association with prostate cancer risk for two SNPs belonging to PRKCI, a gene which is frequently overexpressed in various neoplasms, including prostate cancer.

  20. Lack of myotubularin (MTM1) leads to muscle hypotrophy through unbalanced regulation of the autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qusairi, Lama; Prokic, Ivana; Amoasii, Leonela; Kretz, Christine; Messaddeq, Nadia; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the phosphoinositide phosphatase myotubularin (MTM1) results in X-linked myotubular/centronuclear myopathy (XLMTM), characterized by a severe decrease in muscle mass and strength in patients and murine models. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the muscle hypotrophy is unclear. Here we show that the IGF1R/Akt pathway is affected in Mtm1-deficient murine muscles, characterized by an increase in IGF1 receptor and Akt levels in both the presymptomatic and symptomatic phases. Moreover, up-regulation of atrogenes was observed in the presymptomatic phase of the myopathy, supporting overactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In parallel, the autophagy machinery was affected as indicated by the increase in the number of autophagosomes and of autophagy markers, such as LC3 and P62. However, phosphorylation of FOXO3a and mTOR were abnormal at late but not at early stages of the disease, suggesting that myotubularin acts both upstream in the IGF1R/Akt pathway and downstream on the balance between the autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways in vivo. Adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of Mtm1 into Mtm1-null muscles rescued muscle mass and normalized the expression levels of IGF1 receptor, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and autophagy markers. These data support the hypothesis that the unbalanced regulation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and the autophagy machinery is a primary cause of the XLMTM pathogenesis.

  1. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  2. Parallel imaging of Drosophila embryos for quantitative analysis of genetic perturbations of the Ras pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Goyal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ras pathway patterns the poles of the Drosophila embryo by downregulating the levels and activity of a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor Capicua (Cic. We demonstrate that the spatiotemporal pattern of Cic during this signaling event can be harnessed for functional studies of mutations in the Ras pathway in human diseases. Our approach relies on a new microfluidic device that enables parallel imaging of Cic dynamics in dozens of live embryos. We found that although the pattern of Cic in early embryos is complex, it can be accurately approximated by a product of one spatial profile and one time-dependent amplitude. Analysis of these functions of space and time alone reveals the differential effects of mutations within the Ras pathway. Given the highly conserved nature of Ras-dependent control of Cic, our approach provides new opportunities for functional analysis of multiple sequence variants from developmental abnormalities and cancers.

  3. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Corniani

    Full Text Available The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisic acid and gibberellins. Consequently, disruption of this pathway is harmful to plants. We developed an in vivo bioassay that can measure the carbon flow through the carotenoid pathway. Leaf cuttings are incubated in the presence of a phytoene desaturase inhibitor to induce phytoene accumulation. Any compound reducing the level of phytoene accumulation is likely to interfere with either one of the steps in the MEP pathway or the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate. This concept was tested with known inhibitors of steps of the MEP pathway. The specificity of this in vivo bioassay was also verified by testing representative herbicides known to target processes outside of the MEP and carotenoid pathways. This assay enables the rapid screen of new inhibitors of enzymes preceding the synthesis of phytoene, though there are some limitations related to the non-specific effect of some inhibitors on this assay.

  4. Quercetin, a Lead Compound against Type 2 Diabetes Ameliorates Glucose Uptake via AMPK Pathway in Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dhanya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein we investigated the molecular mechanism of action of the citrus flavonoid, quercetin in skeletal muscle cells (L6 myotubes. Taking advantage of protein kinase inhibitors, we proved that the effect of quercetin on 2-NBDG uptake in L6 myotubes was not through insulin signaling pathway, but through adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK pathway and its downstream target p38 MAPK. An increase in the cellular AMP to ATP ratio on pretreatment may account for AMPK activation which was coupled with a transient change in mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, quercetin triggered a rise in intracellular calcium suggesting that calcium-calmodulin mediated protein kinase (CaMKK may also be involved. Quercetin shared a similar mechanism with the well-known drug metformin, highlighting it as a promising compound for the management of type 2 diabetes. The AMPK signaling pathway could contribute to correction of insulin resistance through bypassing the insulin-regulated system for GLUT4 translocation.

  5. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sober, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjogren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, [No Value; Lehtimaki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Bis, Joshua C.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A. Hoffman; Koettgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Graessler, Juergen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Ine S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stancakova, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, W. T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Wurtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Doerr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V. Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien Y.; Tai, E. Shyong; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait(1) influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (>= 140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or >= 90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure)(2). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change - the DIOGenes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huaidong, D.U.; Vimaleswaran, K.S.; Angquist, L.; Hansen, R.D.; A, van der D.L.; Holst, C.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Uhre Jakobsen, M.; Boeing, H.; Meidtner, K.; Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Saris, W.H.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Wareham, N.J.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Loos, R.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects. \\\\ Aim: We conducted a case-cohort study to investigate the associations of SNPs in candidate genes with

  7. miRNA Nomenclature : A View Incorporating Genetic Origins, Biosynthetic Pathways, and Sequence Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desvignes, T.; Batzel, P.; Berezikov, E.; Eilbeck, K.; Eppig, J. T.; McAndrews, M. S.; Singer, A.; Postlethwait, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of miRNAs has revealed the diversity and variability of mature and functional short noncoding RNAs, including their genomic origins, biogenesis pathways, sequence variability, and newly identified products such as miRNA-offset RNAs (moRs). Here we review known cases of alt

  8. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.B. Ehret (Georg); P. Munroe (Patricia); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); M. Bochud (Murielle); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); M.D. Tobin (Martin); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); S.J. Hwang; V. Pihur (Vasyl); P. Vollenweider (Peter); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); A. Teumer (Alexander); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J. Hua Zhao (Jing); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); S.C. Heath (Simon); S. Sõber (Siim); A. Parsa (Afshin); J. Luan; P. Arora (Pankaj); A. Dehghan (Abbas); F. Zhang (Feng); G. Lucas (Gavin); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Peden (John); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); S.H. Wild (Sarah); I. Rudan (Igor); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); A.N. Parker (Alex); C. Fava (Cristiano); J.C. Chambers (John); E.R. Fox (Ervin); M. Kumari (Meena); M. Jin Go (Min); P. van der Harst (Pim); W. Hong Linda Kao (Wen); M. Sjögren (Marketa); D.G. Vinay; M. Alexander (Myriam); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); S. Shaw-Hawkins (Sue); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Liu (Yongmei); G. Shi (Gang); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); B. Tayo (Bamidele); M. Seielstad (Mark); X. Sim (Xueling); K.-D. Hoang Nguyen; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Matullo (Giuseppe); Y. Wu (Ying); T.R. Gaunt (Tom); N. Charlotte Onland-Moret; M.N. Cooper (Matthew); C. Platou (Carl); E. Org (Elin); R. Hardy (Rebecca); S. Dahgam (Santosh); J. Palmen (Jutta); V. Vitart (Veronique); P.S. Braund (Peter); T. Kuznetsova (Tatiana); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); A. Adeyemo (Adebowale); W. Palmas (Walter); H. Campbell (Harry); B. Ludwig (Barbara); M. Tomaszewski; I. Tzoulaki; N.D. Palmer (Nicholette); T. Aspelund (Thor); M. Garcia (Melissa); Y.-P.C. Chang (Yen-Pei); J.R. O´Connell; N.I. Steinle (Nanette); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Kardia (Sharon); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); D. Hadley (David); M.J. Brown (Morris); J. Connell (John); A. Hingorani (Aroon); I.N.M. Day (Ian); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); J.P. Beilby (John); R.W. Lawrence (Robert); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); A.W. Dreisbach (Albert); Y. Li (Yali); J. Hunter Young; J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); N.R. Lee (Nanette); M-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); M. Olden (Matthias); C. Pattaro (Cristian); J.A. Hoffman Bolton (Judith); A. Köttgen (Anna); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); V. Mooser (Vincent); N. Chaturvedi (Nish); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); M. Islam (Muhammad); T.H. Jafar (Tazeen); S.R. Kulkarni (Smita); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); J. Kettunen (Johannes); P. Howard (Philip); A. Taylor (Andrew); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); F. Ricceri (Fulvio); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); A.B. Weder (Alan); S.C. Hunt (Steven); Y.V. Sun (Yan); R.N. Bergman (Richard); F.S. Collins (Francis); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); L.J. Scott (Laura); H.M. Stringham (Heather); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); M. Perola (Markus); E. Vartiainen (Erkki); S.-M. Brand; J.A. Staessen (Jan); Y.A. Wang (Ying); P.R. Burton (Paul); M. Soler Artigas (Maria); Y. Dong (Yanbin); H. Snieder (Harold); H. Zhu (Haidong); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Rudock (Megan); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); A. Doumatey (Ayo); D. Shriner (Daniel); G. Veldre (Gudrun); M. Viigimaa (Margus); S. Kinra (Sanjay); D. Prabhakaran (Dorairaj); V. Tripathy (Vikal); C.D. Langefeld (Carl); A. Rosengren (Annika); D.S. Thelle (Dag); A. Maria Corsi (Anna); A. Singleton (Andrew); T. Forrester (Terrence); G. Hilton (Gina); C.A. McKenzie (Colin); T. Salako (Tunde); N. Iwai (Naoharu); Y. Kita (Yoshikuni); T. Ogihara (Toshio); T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); T. Okamura (Tomonori); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); S. Umemura (Satoshi); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); T. Meitinger (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); Y. Shin Cho (Yoon); H.-L. Kim; J.S. Sehmi (Joban); B. Hedblad (Bo); P. Nilsson (Peter); G. Davey-Smith (George); A. Wong (Andrew); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Stancáková (Alena); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); J. Yao (Jie); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); W.T. Longstreth Jr; T.H. Mosley (Thomas); S. Seshadri (Sudha); N.R.G. Shrine (Nick); L.V. Wain (Louise); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.J. Swift (Amy); J. Laitinen (Jaana); I. Prokopenko (Inga); P. Zitting (Paavo); S.E. Humphries (Steve); J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed (Asif); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); H. Watkins (Hugh); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); C.S. Janipalli (Charles); K. Radha Mani; C. Yajnik (Chittaranjan); A. Hofman (Albert); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Lakatta (Edward); M. Orrù (Marco); A. Scuteri (Angelo); M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); A.J. Kangas (Antti); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); P. Soininen (Pasi); T. Tukiainen (Taru); P. Würtz (Peter); R. Twee-Hee Ong (Rick); M. Dörr (Marcus); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Zelenika (Diana); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Mangino (Massimo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); G. Zhai (Guangju); J.F. Meschia (James F.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Sharma (Pankaj); J. Terzic (Janos); M.V. Kranthi Kumar; M. Denniff (Matthew); E. Zukowska-Szczechowska (Ewa); L.E. Wagenknecht (Lynne); F. Gerald R. Fowkes; F.J. Charchar (Fadi); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); C. Hayward (Caroline); X. Guo (Xiuqing); C. Rotimi (Charles); M.L. Bots (Michiel); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); O. Polasek (Ozren); P.J. Talmud (Philippa); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laan (Maris); K. Hveem (Kristian); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); J.P. Casas (Juan); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); P. Vineis (Paolo); O. Raitakari (Olli); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); E. Shyong Tai; M. Laakso (Markku); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); R.W. Morris (Richard); A. Dominiczak (Anna); M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Marmot (Michael); T. Miki (Tetsuro); D. Saleheen; G.R. Chandak (Giriraj); J. Coresh (Josef); G. Navis (Gerjan); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.-G. Han; J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); R. Elosua (Roberto); N. Soranzo (Nicole); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.J. Wareham (Nick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); R. Rettig (Rainer); M. Uda (Manuela); D.P. Strachan (David); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A.L. Hartikainen; J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.G. Larson (Martin); M.R. Järvelin; B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); P. Elliott (Paul); D. Levy (Daniel); M. Caulfield (Mark); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); L.S. Adair (Linda); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); I. Barroso (Inês)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBlood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140mmg Hg systolic blood pressure ≥90mmg Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  9. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sober, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjogren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, [No Value; Lehtimaki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Bis, Joshua C.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A. Hoffman; Koettgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Graessler, Juergen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Ine S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stancakova, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, W. T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Wurtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Doerr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V. Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien Y.; Tai, E. Shyong; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait(1) influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (>= 140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or >= 90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure)(2). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  10. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.B. Ehret (Georg); P. Munroe (Patricia); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); M. Bochud (Murielle); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); M.D. Tobin (Martin); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); S.J. Hwang; V. Pihur (Vasyl); P. Vollenweider (Peter); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); A. Teumer (Alexander); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J. Hua Zhao (Jing); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); S.C. Heath (Simon); S. Sõber (Siim); A. Parsa (Afshin); J. Luan; P. Arora (Pankaj); A. Dehghan (Abbas); F. Zhang (Feng); G. Lucas (Gavin); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Peden (John); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); S.H. Wild (Sarah); I. Rudan (Igor); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); A.N. Parker (Alex); C. Fava (Cristiano); J.C. Chambers (John); E.R. Fox (Ervin); M. Kumari (Meena); M. Jin Go (Min); P. van der Harst (Pim); W. Hong Linda Kao (Wen); M. Sjögren (Marketa); D.G. Vinay; M. Alexander (Myriam); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); S. Shaw-Hawkins (Sue); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Liu (Yongmei); G. Shi (Gang); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); B. Tayo (Bamidele); M. Seielstad (Mark); X. Sim (Xueling); K.-D. Hoang Nguyen; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Matullo (Giuseppe); Y. Wu (Ying); T.R. Gaunt (Tom); N. Charlotte Onland-Moret; M.N. Cooper (Matthew); C. Platou (Carl); E. Org (Elin); R. Hardy (Rebecca); S. Dahgam (Santosh); J. Palmen (Jutta); V. Vitart (Veronique); P.S. Braund (Peter); T. Kuznetsova (Tatiana); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); A. Adeyemo (Adebowale); W. Palmas (Walter); H. Campbell (Harry); B. Ludwig (Barbara); M. Tomaszewski; I. Tzoulaki; N.D. Palmer (Nicholette); T. Aspelund (Thor); M. Garcia (Melissa); Y.-P.C. Chang (Yen-Pei); J.R. O´Connell; N.I. Steinle (Nanette); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Kardia (Sharon); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); D. Hadley (David); M.J. Brown (Morris); J. Connell (John); A. Hingorani (Aroon); I.N.M. Day (Ian); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); J.P. Beilby (John); R.W. Lawrence (Robert); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); A.W. Dreisbach (Albert); Y. Li (Yali); J. Hunter Young; J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); N.R. Lee (Nanette); M-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); M. Olden (Matthias); C. Pattaro (Cristian); J.A. Hoffman Bolton (Judith); A. Köttgen (Anna); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); V. Mooser (Vincent); N. Chaturvedi (Nish); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); M. Islam (Muhammad); T.H. Jafar (Tazeen); S.R. Kulkarni (Smita); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); J. Kettunen (Johannes); P. Howard (Philip); A. Taylor (Andrew); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); F. Ricceri (Fulvio); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); A.B. Weder (Alan); S.C. Hunt (Steven); Y.V. Sun (Yan); R.N. Bergman (Richard); F.S. Collins (Francis); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); L.J. Scott (Laura); H.M. Stringham (Heather); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); M. Perola (Markus); E. Vartiainen (Erkki); S.-M. Brand; J.A. Staessen (Jan); Y.A. Wang (Ying); P.R. Burton (Paul); M. Soler Artigas (Maria); Y. Dong (Yanbin); H. Snieder (Harold); H. Zhu (Haidong); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Rudock (Megan); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); A. Doumatey (Ayo); D. Shriner (Daniel); G. Veldre (Gudrun); M. Viigimaa (Margus); S. Kinra (Sanjay); D. Prabhakaran (Dorairaj); V. Tripathy (Vikal); C.D. Langefeld (Carl); A. Rosengren (Annika); D.S. Thelle (Dag); A. Maria Corsi (Anna); A. Singleton (Andrew); T. Forrester (Terrence); G. Hilton (Gina); C.A. McKenzie (Colin); T. Salako (Tunde); N. Iwai (Naoharu); Y. Kita (Yoshikuni); T. Ogihara (Toshio); T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); T. Okamura (Tomonori); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); S. Umemura (Satoshi); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); T. Meitinger (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); Y. Shin Cho (Yoon); H.-L. Kim; J.S. Sehmi (Joban); B. Hedblad (Bo); P. Nilsson (Peter); G. Davey-Smith (George); A. Wong (Andrew); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Stancáková (Alena); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); J. Yao (Jie); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); W.T. Longstreth Jr; T.H. Mosley (Thomas); S. Seshadri (Sudha); N.R.G. Shrine (Nick); L.V. Wain (Louise); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.J. Swift (Amy); J. Laitinen (Jaana); I. Prokopenko (Inga); P. Zitting (Paavo); S.E. Humphries (Steve); J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed (Asif); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); H. Watkins (Hugh); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); C.S. Janipalli (Charles); K. Radha Mani; C. Yajnik (Chittaranjan); A. Hofman (Albert); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Lakatta (Edward); M. Orrù (Marco); A. Scuteri (Angelo); M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); A.J. Kangas (Antti); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); P. Soininen (Pasi); T. Tukiainen (Taru); P. Würtz (Peter); R. Twee-Hee Ong (Rick); M. Dörr (Marcus); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Zelenika (Diana); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Mangino (Massimo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); G. Zhai (Guangju); J.F. Meschia (James F.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Sharma (Pankaj); J. Terzic (Janos); M.V. Kranthi Kumar; M. Denniff (Matthew); E. Zukowska-Szczechowska (Ewa); L.E. Wagenknecht (Lynne); F. Gerald R. Fowkes; F.J. Charchar (Fadi); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); C. Hayward (Caroline); X. Guo (Xiuqing); C. Rotimi (Charles); M.L. Bots (Michiel); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); O. Polasek (Ozren); P.J. Talmud (Philippa); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laan (Maris); K. Hveem (Kristian); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); J.P. Casas (Juan); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); P. Vineis (Paolo); O. Raitakari (Olli); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); E. Shyong Tai; M. Laakso (Markku); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); R.W. Morris (Richard); A. Dominiczak (Anna); M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Marmot (Michael); T. Miki (Tetsuro); D. Saleheen; G.R. Chandak (Giriraj); J. Coresh (Josef); G. Navis (Gerjan); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.-G. Han; J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); R. Elosua (Roberto); N. Soranzo (Nicole); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.J. Wareham (Nick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); R. Rettig (Rainer); M. Uda (Manuela); D.P. Strachan (David); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A.L. Hartikainen; J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.G. Larson (Martin); M.R. Järvelin; B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); P. Elliott (Paul); D. Levy (Daniel); M. Caulfield (Mark); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); L.S. Adair (Linda); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); I. Barroso (Inês)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBlood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140mmg Hg systolic blood pressure ≥90mmg Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  11. miRNA Nomenclature : A View Incorporating Genetic Origins, Biosynthetic Pathways, and Sequence Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desvignes, T.; Batzel, P.; Berezikov, E.; Eilbeck, K.; Eppig, J. T.; McAndrews, M. S.; Singer, A.; Postlethwait, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of miRNAs has revealed the diversity and variability of mature and functional short noncoding RNAs, including their genomic origins, biogenesis pathways, sequence variability, and newly identified products such as miRNA-offset RNAs (moRs). Here we review known cases of

  12. Improving the hydrogen production capacity of Rhodobacter capsulatus by genetically modifying redox balancing pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, Yavuz [TUEBITAK Research Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey); Goekce, Abdulmecit [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics; Guergan, Muazzez; Yuecel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biology

    2010-07-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, balancing the oxidation-reduction potential (redox-balance) is maintained via a number of inter-dependent regulatory mechanisms that enable these organisms to accommodate divergent growth modes. In order to maintain redox homeostasis, this bacterium possesses regulatory mechanisms functioning as electron sinks affecting the oxidation-reduction state of the ubiquinone pool. Under the photoheterotrophic growth conditions with reduced carbon sources, the excess reducing equivalents are primarily consumed via the reduction of CO{sub 2} through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway or by the reduction of protons into hydrogen with the use of dinitrogenase enzyme system. In this study, our aim was to develop strategies to funnel the excess reducing equivalents to nitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production by blocking the carbon-fixation pathway. To realize this purpose, CO{sub 2} fixation was blocked by inactivating the Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) of CBB pathway in wild type (MT1131), uptake-hydrogenase (YO3) and cyt cbb{sub 3} oxidase deficient (YO4) strains. The hydrogen production capacity of newly generated strains deficient in the Calvin-Benson-Bassham pathway were analyzed and compared with wild type strains. The results indicated that, the hydrogen production efficiency and capacity of R. capsulatus was further improved by directing the excess reducing equivalents to dinitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production. (orig.)

  13. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the

  14. Yeast Genetics for Delineating Bax/Bcl Pathway of Cell Death Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    de Biochimie et Genetique Cellulaires regulatory functions apart from their ability to form chan- Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique nels...8217-TGGAGTGCACCACT- y manipulated in terms of genetic analysis. Re- TGCTAAAG-3’. The resulting PCR product was digested with fly, it has been shown that the

  15. Genetically Programming Interfaces between Active Materials, Conductive Pathway and Current Collector in Li Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    assembled into coin cell with metallic lithium as counter electrode. Electrochemical characterization was conducted by galvanostatically cycling the half...encodes either A1, A2, S7, T7 or H7. These DNAs were then introduced into bacteria cells for amplification. Genetic sequencing performed on the

  16. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the tr

  17. Creating new evolutionary pathways through bioinvasion: the population genetics of brushtail possums in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarre, Stephen D; Aitken, Nicola; Adamack, Aaron T; MacDonald, Anna J; Gruber, Bernd; Cowan, Phil

    2014-07-01

    Rapid increases in global trade and human movement have created novel mixtures of organisms bringing with them the potential to rapidly accelerate the evolution of new forms. The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), introduced into New Zealand from Australia in the 19th century, is one such species having been sourced from multiple populations in its native range. Here, we combine microsatellite DNA- and GIS-based spatial data to show that T. vulpecula originating from at least two different Australian locations exhibit a population structure that is commensurate with their introduction history and which cannot be explained by landscape features alone. Most importantly, we identify a hybrid zone between the two subspecies which appears to function as a barrier to dispersal. When combined with previous genetic, morphological and captive studies, our data suggest that assortative mating between the two subspecies may operate at a behavioural or species recognition level rather than through fertilization, genetic incompatibility or developmental inhibition. Nevertheless, hybridization between the two subspecies of possum clearly occurs, creating the opportunity for novel genetic combinations that would not occur in their natural ranges and which is especially likely given that multiple contact zones occur in New Zealand. This discovery has implications for wildlife management in New Zealand because multiple contact zones are likely to influence the dispersal patterns of possums and because differential susceptibility to baiting with sodium fluoroacetate between possums of different origins may promote novel genetic forms.

  18. Using functional genetics to identify components of cancer relevant signaling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heynen, G.J.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical introduction of the so-called ‘targeted therapies’ some 15 years ago has started a new era in the treatment of cancer patients. These drugs hugely increase the possibilities to treat patients based on the genetic mutations of their cancer and therefore hold the promise of ‘personalized

  19. A Board Game for Undergraduate Genetics Vocabulary and Concept Review: The Pathway Shuffle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V. Osier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A board game for the review of fundamental genetics concepts is presented.  The game is easily prepared and dropped into a classroom setting.  Printable materials are available as article supplements.  Preliminary results of field testing are discussed, demonstrating a meaningful improvement in student success.

  20. Neither replication nor simulation supports a role for the axon guidance pathway in the genetics of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Li

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD is thought to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors and their interaction with each other. Statistical models including multiple variants in axon guidance pathway genes have recently been purported to be capable of predicting PD risk, survival free of the disease and age at disease onset; however the specific models have not undergone independent validation. Here we tested the best proposed risk panel of 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in two PD sample sets, with a total of 525 cases and 518 controls. By single marker analysis, only one marker was significantly associated with PD risk in one of our sample sets (rs6692804: P = 0.03. Multi-marker analysis using the reported model found a mild association in one sample set (two sided P = 0.049, odds ratio for each score change = 1.07 but no significance in the other (two sided P = 0.98, odds ratio = 1, a stark contrast to the reported strong association with PD risk (P = 4.64x10(-38, odds ratio as high as 90.8. Following a procedure similar to that used to build the reported model, simulated multi-marker models containing SNPs from randomly chosen genes in a genome wide PD dataset produced P-values that were highly significant and indistinguishable from similar models where disease status was permuted (3.13x10(-23 to 4.90x10(-64, demonstrating the potential for overfitting in the model building process. Together, these results challenge the robustness of the reported panel of genetic markers to predict PD risk in particular and a role of the axon guidance pathway in PD genetics in general.

  1. Alcohol consumption, genetic variants in the alcohol- and folate metabolic pathways and colorectal cancer risk: the JPHC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Thomas; Yamaji, Taiki; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Hidaka, Akihisa; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sawada, Norie; Inoue, Manami; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-11-09

    The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) may vary secondary to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two pathways related to alcohol intake. 375 cases of CRC were identified among 38 373 Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study (JPHC Study) participants who had returned a baseline questionnaire, reported no diagnosis of any cancer and provided blood samples. For each case, two controls were selected on matching variables. Logistic regression models were used to determine matched Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption, genetic polymorphisms of enzymes in the alcohol- and folate metabolic pathways (e.g. methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) rs1801133) and CRC risk. Compared to never/occasional alcohol intake, moderate to heavy alcohol intake was associated with CRC (OR = 2.12, 95% CI, 1.34-3.36). When compared to the CC genotype, the MTHFR rs1801133 CT/TT genotype was inversely associated with CRC (OR = 0.72, 95% CI, 0.54-0.97). Never/occasional consumers of alcohol with the MTHFR rs1801133 CT/TT genotype were also at a reduced risk of CRC compared to never/occasional drinkers with the CC genotype (OR = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.47-0.98) (P for interaction = 0.27). The results indicate that the folate pathway is likely to be involved in alcohol-related CRC development.

  2. Genetics of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: Update from the Alzgene Database and Analysis of Shared Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Olgiati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD has taken impressive steps forwards in the last few years. To date, more than six-hundred genes have been linked to the disorder. However, only a minority of them are supported by a sufficient level of evidence. This review focused on such genes and analyzed shared biological pathways. Genetic markers were selected from a web-based collection (Alzgene. For each SNP in the database, it was possible to perform a meta-analysis. The quality of studies was assessed using criteria such as size of research samples, heterogeneity across studies, and protection from publication bias. This produced a list of 15 top-rated genes: APOE, CLU, PICALM, EXOC3L2, BIN1, CR1, SORL1, TNK1, IL8, LDLR, CST3, CHRNB2, SORCS1, TNF, and CCR2. A systematic analysis of gene ontology terms associated with each marker showed that most genes were implicated in cholesterol metabolism, intracellular transport of beta-amyloid precursor, and autophagy of damaged organelles. Moreover, the impact of these genes on complement cascade and cytokine production highlights the role of inflammatory response in AD pathogenesis. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are prominent issues in AD genetics, but they are not specifically featured in the Alzgene database.

  3. A genetic framework for flowering-time pathways in Citrus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carnier Dornelas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Floral transition is one the most drastic changes occurring during the life cycle of a plant. The shoot apical meristem switches from the production of leaves with associated secondary shoot meristems to the production of flower meristems. This transition is abrupt and generally irreversible, suggesting it is regulated by a robust gene regulatory network capable of driving sharp transitions. The moment at which this transition occurs is precisely determined by environmental and endogenous signals. A large number of genes acting within these pathways have been cloned in model herbaceous plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. In this paper, we report the results of our search in the Citrus expressed sequence tag (CitEST database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs showing sequence homology with known elements of flowering-time pathways. We have searched all sequence clusters in the CitEST database and identified more than one hundred Citrus spp sequences that codify putative conserved elements of the autonomous, vernalization, photoperiod response and gibberelic acid-controlled flowering-time pathways. Additionally, we have characterized in silico putative members of the Citrus spp homologs to the Arabidopsis CONSTANS family of transcription factors.

  4. Robust gene signatures from microarray data using genetic algorithms enriched with biological pathway keywords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Baena, R M; Urda, D; Gonzalo Claros, M; Franco, L; Jerez, J M

    2014-06-01

    Genetic algorithms are widely used in the estimation of expression profiles from microarrays data. However, these techniques are unable to produce stable and robust solutions suitable to use in clinical and biomedical studies. This paper presents a novel two-stage evolutionary strategy for gene feature selection combining the genetic algorithm with biological information extracted from the KEGG database. A comparative study is carried out over public data from three different types of cancer (leukemia, lung cancer and prostate cancer). Even though the analyses only use features having KEGG information, the results demonstrate that this two-stage evolutionary strategy increased the consistency, robustness and accuracy of a blind discrimination among relapsed and healthy individuals. Therefore, this approach could facilitate the definition of gene signatures for the clinical prognosis and diagnostic of cancer diseases in a near future. Additionally, it could also be used for biological knowledge discovery about the studied disease.

  5. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about...... the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from...... a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. METHODS: Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential...

  6. Characterization of intracellular pathways leading to coinduction of thrombospondin-1 and TGF-beta1 expression in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Katja; Sawitza, Iris; Gressner, Axel M

    2005-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has identified Thrombospondin (TSP)-1 as important activator of latent TGF-beta. Since little is known about signal transduction pathways regulating TSP expression in liver, we investigated cytokine-mediated upregulation of TSP-1 and TGF-beta1 in primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC). PDGF-BB and TNF-a rapidly coinduce mRNA levels of TSP-1 and TGF-beta1. Interestingly, blockade of basal Erk activity by synthetic Erk-binding peptides also leads to strong induction of both mRNA transcripts in non-stimulated cells. We show that PDGF-BB induces TSP-1 and TGF-beta1 via the src kinase pathway whereas TNF-a utilizes the MAPK/Erk pathway. However, especially TSP-1 induction by both cytokines involves a pathway, which depends to a certain extent on PI3 kinase activity. In summary the data illustrate specific pathways activated by PDGF-BB and TNF-a in HSC giving new insights into the tightly controlled mechanisms regulating TSP-1 and TGF-beta1 expression in these cells.

  7. Jasmonate and ethylene signalling and their interaction are integral parts of the elicitor signalling pathway leading to beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2004-05-01

    Roles of jasmonate and ethylene signalling and their interaction in yeast elicitor-induced biosynthesis of a phytoalexin, beta-thujaplicin, were investigated in Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures. Yeast elicitor, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene all induce the production of beta-thujaplicin. Elicitor also stimulates the biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene before the induction of beta-thujaplicin accumulation. The elicitor-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation can be partly blocked by inhibitors of jasmonate and ethylene biosynthesis or signal transduction. These results indicate that the jasmonate and ethylene signalling pathways are integral parts of the elicitor signal transduction leading to beta-thujaplicin accumulation. Methyl jasmonate treatment can induce ethylene production, whereas ethylene does not induce jasmonate biosynthesis; methyl jasmonate-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation can be partly blocked by inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and signalling, while blocking jasmonate biosynthesis inhibits almost all ethylene-induced beta-thujaplicin accumulation. These results indicate that the ethylene and jasmonate pathways interact in mediating beta-thujaplicin production, with the jasmonate pathway working as a main control and the ethylene pathway as a fine modulator for beta-thujaplicin accumulation. Both the ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways can be regulated upstream by Ca(2+). Ca(2+) influx negatively regulates ethylene production, and differentially regulates elicitor- or methyl jasmonate-stimulated ethylene production.

  8. Genome-wide survey of yeast mutations leading to activation of the yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway: Novel insights into diverse MAPK outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Patricia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (CWI-MAPK pathway is the main regulator of adaptation responses to cell wall stress in yeast. Here, we adopt a genomic approach to shed light on two aspects that are only partially understood, namely, the characterization of the gene functional catalog associated with CWI pathway activation and the extent to which MAPK activation correlates with transcriptional outcomes. Results A systematic yeast mutant deletion library was screened for constitutive transcriptional activation of the CWI-related reporter gene MLP1. Monitoring phospho-Slt2/Mpk1 levels in the identified mutants revealed sixty-four deletants with high levels of phosphorylation of this MAPK, including mainly genes related to cell wall construction and morphogenesis, signaling, and those with unknown function. Phenotypic analysis of the last group of mutants suggests their involvement in cell wall homeostasis. A good correlation between levels of Slt2 phosphorylation and the magnitude of the transcriptional response was found in most cases. However, the expression of CWI pathway-related genes was enhanced in some mutants in the absence of significant Slt2 phosphorylation, despite the fact that functional MAPK signaling through the pathway was required. CWI pathway activation was associated to increased deposition of chitin in the cell wall - a known survival compensatory mechanism - in about 30% of the mutants identified. Conclusion We provide new insights into yeast genes related to the CWI pathway and into how the state of activation of the Slt2 MAPK leads to different outcomes, discovering the versatility of this kind of signaling pathways. These findings potentially have broad implications for understanding the functioning of other eukaryotic MAPKs.

  9. Dissecting Causal Pathways Using Mendelian Randomization with Summarized Genetic Data: Application to Age at Menarche and Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Deborah J; Rees, Jessica M B; Day, Felix R; Perry, John R; Ong, Ken K

    2017-08-23

    Mendelian randomization is the use of genetic variants as instrumental variables to estimate causal effects of risk factors on outcomes. The total causal effect of a risk factor is the change in the outcome resulting from intervening on the risk factor. This total causal effect may potentially encompass multiple mediating mechanisms. For a proposed mediator, the direct effect of the risk factor is the change in the outcome resulting from a change in the risk factor keeping the mediator constant. A difference between the total effect and the direct effect indicates that the causal pathway from the risk factor to the outcome acts at least in part via the mediator (an indirect effect). Here, we show that Mendelian randomization estimates of total and direct effects can be obtained using summarized data on genetic associations with the risk factor, mediator, and outcome, potentially from different data sources. We perform simulations to test the validity of this approach when there is unmeasured confounding and/or bidirectional effects between the risk factor and mediator. We illustrate this method using the relationship between age at menarche and risk of breast cancer, with body mass index (BMI) as a potential mediator. We show an inverse direct causal effect of age at menarche on risk of breast cancer (independent of BMI) and a positive indirect effect via BMI. In conclusion, multivariable Mendelian randomization using summarized genetic data provides a rapid and accessible analytic strategy that can be undertaken using publicly-available data to better understand causal mechanisms. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  10. On a Generalized Entropy Measure Leading to the Pathway Model with a Preliminary Application to Solar Neutrino Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J. Haubold

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An entropy for the scalar variable case, parallel to Havrda-Charvat entropy, was introduced by the first author, and the properties and its connection to Tsallis non-extensive statistical mechanics and the Mathai pathway model were examined by the authors in previous papers. In the current paper, we extend the entropy to cover the scalar case, multivariable case, and matrix variate case. Then, this measure is optimized under different types of restrictions, and a number of models in the multivariable case and matrix variable case are obtained. Connections of these models to problems in statistical and physical sciences are pointed out. An application of the simplest case of the pathway model to the interpretation of solar neutrino data by applying standard deviation analysis and diffusion entropy analysis is provided.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayor-Olea Alvaro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development. In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes variations and diet, is directly involved in genetic and epigenetic variations that can influence the changes of last growing period of development in human and the appearance of the TMD. Methods A case-control study was designed to evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms above described on TMD. A total of 229 individuals (69% women were included at the study; 86 were patients with TMD and 143 were healthy control subjects. Subjects underwent to a clinical examination following the guidelines by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD. Genotyping of 20 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs, divided in two groups, was performed by multiplex minisequencing preceded by multiplex PCR. Other seven genetic polymorphisms different from SNPs (deletions, insertions, tandem repeat, null genotype were achieved by a multiplex-PCR. A chi-square test was performed to determine the differences in genotype and allelic frequencies between TMD patients and healthy subjects. To estimate TMD risk, in those polymorphisms that shown significant differences, odds ratio (OR with a 95% of confidence interval were calculated. Results Six of the polymorphisms showed statistical associations with TMD. Four of them are related to enzymes of folates metabolism: Allele G of Serine Hydoxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1 rs1979277 (OR = 3.99; 95%CI 1.72, 9.25; p = 0.002, allele G of SHMT1 rs638416 (OR = 2.80; 95%CI 1.51, 5.21; p = 0.013, allele T of Methylentetrahydrofolate

  12. Malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) leads to the degeneration of nigro-striatal pathway in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Michal; Galron, Ronit; Frenkel, Dan; Mandelbaum, Gil; Shiloh, Yosef; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Barzilai, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Pronounced neuropathology is a feature of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which are both genomic instability syndromes. The Nbs1 protein, which is defective in NBS, is a component of the Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex. This complex plays a major role in the early phase of the cellular response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA. Among others, MRN is required for timely activation of the protein kinase ATM (A-T mutated), which is disrupted in patients with A-T. Earlier reports show that Atm-deficient mice exhibit severe degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons and their terminals in the striatum. This cell loss is accompanied by a large reduction in immunoreactivity for the dopamine transporter protein (DAT) in the striatum. To test whether Nbs1 inactivation also affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway, we examined this pathway in a murine model with conditional inactivation of the Nbs1 gene in central nervous system (Nbs1-CNS-Δ). We report that this model has a reduction in TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra. This phenomenon was seen at very early age, while Atm-/- mice showed a progressive age-dependent reduction. Furthermore, we observed an age-dependent increase in the level of TH in the striatum of Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice. In addition to the altered expression of TH, we also found a reduction of DAT in the striatum of both Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice at 60 days of age. Finally, microglial recruitment and alterations in the levels of various neurotrophic factors were also observed. These results indicate that malfunctioning DNA damage response severely affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway and suggest a new neurodegenerative pathway in Parkinsonian syndromes.

  13. Antagonizing pathways leading to differential dynamics in colon carcinogenesis in Shugoshin1 (Sgo1)-haploinsufficient chromosome instability model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Sanghera, Saira; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Reddy, Arun; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2016-05-01

    Colon cancer is the second most lethal cancer. It is predicted to claim 50,310 lives in 2014. Chromosome Instability (CIN) is observed in 80-90% of colon cancers, and is thought to contribute to colon cancer progression and recurrence. However, there are no animal models of CIN that have been validated for studies of colon cancer development or drug testing. In this study, we sought to validate a mitotic error-induced CIN model mouse, the Shugoshin1 (Sgo1) haploinsufficient mouse, as a colon cancer study model. Wild-type and Sgo1(-/+) mice were treated with the colonic carcinogen, azoxymethane (AOM). We tracked colon tumor development 12, 24, and 36 wk after treatment to assess progression of colon tumorigenesis. Initially, more precancerous lesions, Aberrant Crypt Foci (ACF), developed in Sgo1(-/+) mice. However, the ACF did not develop straightforwardly into larger tumors. At the 36-wk endpoint, the number of gross tumors in Sgo1(-/+) mice was no different from that in wild-type controls. However, Copy Number Variation (CNV) analysis indicated that fully developed colon tumor in Sgo1(-/+) mice carried 13.75 times more CNV. Immunohistological analyses indicated that Sgo1(-/+) mice differentially expressed IL-6, Bcl2, and p16(INK4A) . We propose that formation of ACF in Sgo1(-/+) mice is facilitated by the IL6-STAT3-SOCS3 oncogenic pathway and by the Bcl2-anti-apoptotic pathway, yet further development of the ACF to tumors is inhibited by the p16(INK4A) tumor suppressor pathway. Manipulating these pathways would be beneficial for inhibiting development of colon cancer with CIN. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Restoring KLF5 in esophageal squamous cell cancer cells activates the JNK pathway leading to apoptosis and reduced cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapore, Rohinton S; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2013-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and has an extremely dismal prognosis, with a 5-year survival of less than 20%. Current treatment options are limited, and thus identifying new molecular targets and pathways is critical to derive novel therapies. Worldwide, more than 90% of esophageal cancers are esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Previously, we identified that Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5), a key transcriptional regulator normally expressed in esophageal squamous epithelial cells, is lost in human ESCC. To examine the effects of restoring KLF5 in ESCC, we transduced the human ESCC cell lines TE7 and TE15, both of which lack KLF5 expression, with retrovirus to express KLF5 upon doxycycline induction. When KLF5 was induced, ESCC cells demonstrated increased apoptosis and decreased viability, with up-regulation of the proapoptotic factor BAX. Interestingly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, an important upstream mediator of proapoptotic pathways including BAX, was also activated following KLF5 induction. KLF5 activation of JNK signaling was mediated by KLF5 transactivation of two key upstream regulators of the JNK pathway, ASK1 and MKK4, and inhibition of JNK blocked apoptosis and normalized cell survival following KLF5 induction. Thus, restoring KLF5 in ESCC cells promotes apoptosis and decreases cell survival in a JNK-dependent manner, providing a potential therapeutic target for human ESCC.

  15. Multiple genetic pathways for restarting DNA replication forks in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, S J

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the primosome assembly proteins, PriA, PriB, PriC, DnaT, DnaC, DnaB, and DnaG, are thought to help to restart DNA replication forks at recombinational intermediates. Redundant functions between priB and priC and synthetic lethality between priA2::kan and rep3 mutations raise the possibility that there may be multiple pathways for restarting replication forks in vivo. Herein, it is shown that priA2::kan causes synthetic lethality when placed in combination with either Delt...

  16. Genetic analysis of the CDI pathway from Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b

    OpenAIRE

    Koskiniemi, S; Garza-Sánchez, F; Edman, N; Chaudhuri, S.; Poole, SJ; Manoil, C; Hayes, CS; Low, DA

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Koskiniemi et al. Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a mode of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion systems. CdiA binds to receptors on susceptible target bacteria, then delivers a toxin domain derived from its C-terminus. Studies with Escherichia coli suggest the existence of multiple CDI growth-inhibition pathways, whereby different systems exploit distinct target-cell proteins to deliver and activate toxins. Here, we explore...

  17. Genetic variants in microRNA and microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer risk among women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Frank; Feng, Ye; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Haiman, Christopher A; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate breast biology by binding to specific RNA sequences, leading to RNA degradation and inhibition of translation of their target genes. While germline genetic variations may disrupt some of these interactions between miRNAs and their targets, studies assessing the relationship between genetic variations in the miRNA network and breast cancer risk are still limited, particularly among women of African ancestry. We systematically put together a list of 822 and 10,468 genetic variants among primary miRNA sequences and 38 genes in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, respectively; and examined their association with breast cancer risk in the ROOT consortium which includes women of African ancestry. Findings were replicated in an independent consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). For overall breast cancer risk, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis genes DROSHA rs78393591 (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI: 0.55-0.88, P = 0.003), ESR1 rs523736 (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI: 0.82-0.95, P = 3.99 × 10(-4)), and ZCCHC11 rs114101502 (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002), and one SNP in primary miRNA sequence (rs116159732 in miR-6826, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.63-0.89, P = 0.001) were found to have significant associations in both discovery and validation phases. In a subgroup analysis, two SNPs were associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, and three SNPs were associated with risk of ER-positive breast cancer. Several variants in miRNA and miRNA biogenesis pathway genes were associated with breast cancer risk. Risk associations varied by ER status, suggesting potential new mechanisms in etiology.

  18. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  19. Evaluation of a reverse-hybridization StripAssay for the detection of genetic polymorphisms leading to acenocoumarol sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialeraki, Argyri; Markatos, Christos; Grouzi, Elisabeth; Merkouri, Efrosyni; Travlou, Anthi; Politou, Marianna

    2010-04-01

    Acenocoumarol is mainly catabolized by CYP2C9 isoform of cytochrome P450 (CYP) liver complex and exerts its anticoagulant effect through the inhibition of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase (VKOR). The most important genetic polymorphisms which lead to an impaired enzymatic activity and therefore predispose to acenocoumarol sensitivity, are considered to be CYP2C9*2 (Arg144Cys), CYP2C9*3 (Ile359Leu) and VKORC1-1639G>A, respectively. In this study we compared the results of the PGXThrombo StripAssay kit (ViennaLab Diagnostics,Vienna, Austria) with direct DNA sequencing and in house Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP) for the detection of the aforementioned Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The reverse hybridization StripAssay was found to be equally effective with RFLP and direct DNA sequencing for the detection of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms, respectively. The comparison of the RFLP reference method with the reverse hybridization StripAssay for the detection of VKORC1-1639 G>A polymorphism showed that the reverse hybridization StripAsssay might misclassify some A/A homozygotes as heterozygotes. Optimization of the hybridization procedures may eliminate the extra low signal band observed in some samples at the reverse hybridization StripAssay and improve its diagnostic value.

  20. Similar genetic switch systems might integrate the floral inductive pathways in dicots and monocots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.H.; Jensen, C.S.; Petersen, K.

    2004-01-01

    A recent paper by Million Tadege et A shows that a SOC1-like gene from rice, OsSOC1, can complement the Arabidopsis soc1 mutant, and that ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLC in rice delays flowering and up-regulation of OsSOC1 These findings, together with the identificatio...... of the wheat vernalization VRN1 locus as an AP1 homologue, suggest that related genetic switch systems control floral transition in dicots and monocots but that they are based on different MADS-box transcription factors....

  1. Identification of genetic bases of vibrio fluvialis species-specific biochemical pathways and potential virulence factors by comparative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-03-01

    Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen.

  2. Simultaneous genome-wide inference of physical, genetic, regulatory, and functional pathway components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Y Park

    Full Text Available Biomolecular pathways are built from diverse types of pairwise interactions, ranging from physical protein-protein interactions and modifications to indirect regulatory relationships. One goal of systems biology is to bridge three aspects of this complexity: the growing body of high-throughput data assaying these interactions; the specific interactions in which individual genes participate; and the genome-wide patterns of interactions in a system of interest. Here, we describe methodology for simultaneously predicting specific types of biomolecular interactions using high-throughput genomic data. This results in a comprehensive compendium of whole-genome networks for yeast, derived from ∼3,500 experimental conditions and describing 30 interaction types, which range from general (e.g. physical or regulatory to specific (e.g. phosphorylation or transcriptional regulation. We used these networks to investigate molecular pathways in carbon metabolism and cellular transport, proposing a novel connection between glycogen breakdown and glucose utilization supported by recent publications. Additionally, 14 specific predicted interactions in DNA topological change and protein biosynthesis were experimentally validated. We analyzed the systems-level network features within all interactomes, verifying the presence of small-world properties and enrichment for recurring network motifs. This compendium of physical, synthetic, regulatory, and functional interaction networks has been made publicly available through an interactive web interface for investigators to utilize in future research at http://function.princeton.edu/bioweaver/.

  3. The necrophagous fly anthrax transmission pathway: empirical and genetic evidence from wildlife epizootics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Jason K; Van Ert, Matthew; Mullins, Jocelyn C; Hadfield, Ted L; Hugh-Jones, Martin E

    2014-08-01

    Early studies confirmed Bacillus anthracis in emesis and feces of flies under laboratory conditions, but there is little empirical field evidence supporting the roles of flies in anthrax transmission. We collected samples during outbreaks of anthrax affecting livestock and native and exotic wildlife on two ranches in West Texas (2009-2010). Sampling included animal carcasses, maggots, adult flies feeding on or within several meters of carcasses, and leaves from surrounding vegetation. Microbiology and PCR were used to detect B. anthracis in the samples. Viable B. anthracis and/or PCR-positive results were obtained from all represented sample types. Genetic analysis of B. anthracis samples using multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) confirmed that each ranch represented a distinct genetic lineage. Within each ranch, we detected the same genotype of B. anthracis from carcasses, maggots, and adult flies. The results of this study provide evidence supporting a transmission cycle in which blowflies contaminate vegetation near carcasses that may then infect additional browsing animals during anthrax outbreaks in the shrubland environment of West Texas.

  4. The TREM2-DAP12 signaling pathway in Nasu–Hakola disease: a molecular genetics perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Junjie Xing,1,2 Amanda R Titus,1 Mary Beth Humphrey1–31Department of Medicine, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 3Department of Veteran's Affairs, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Nasu–Hakola disease or polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL is a rare recessively inherited disease that is associated with early dementia and bone cysts with fractures. Here, we review the genetic causes of PLOSL with loss-of-function mutations or deletions in one of two genes, TYROBP and TREM2, encoding for two proteins DNAX-activating protein 12 (DAP12 and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2. TREM2 and DAP12 form an immunoreceptor signaling complex that mediates myeloid cell, including microglia and osteoclasts, development, activation, and function. Functionally, TREM2-DAP12 mediates osteoclast multi-nucleation, migration, and resorption. In microglia, TREM2-DAP12 participates in recognition and apoptosis of neuronal debris and amyloid deposits. Review of the complex immunoregulatory roles of TREM2-DAP12 in the innate immune system, where it can both promote and inhibit pro-inflammatory responses, is given. Little is known about the function of TREM2-DAP12 in normal brain homeostasis or in pathological central nervous system diseases. Based on the state of the field, genetic testing now aids in diagnosis of PLOSL, but therapeutics and interventions are still under development.Keywords: polycystic, leukoencephalopathy, Alzheimer's, lipomembranous, dementia, microglia

  5. Implementation of fuzzy system using different voltages of OTA for JNK pathway leading to cell survival/ death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Jain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a well defined method for the design of JNK pathway for epidermal growth factor/ insulin using fuzzy system using operational transconductance amplifier was discussed. Fuzzy system includes fuzzification of the input variables, application of the fuzzy operator (AND or OR in the antecedent, implication from the antecedent to the consequent, aggregation of the consequents across the rules, and defuzzfication. Fuzzy system with various electrical parameters for different voltages of OTA with different membership function was found. Results with 3V were the best.

  6. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to blockage of IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxin He; Jie Shi; Ximing Xu; Wenhua Zhang; Yuxin Wang; Xing Chen; Yuping Du; Ning Zhu; Jing Zhang; Qin Wang; Jinbo Yang

    2012-06-01

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically identified in autosomal-dominant (AD) HIES patients’ cells, and therefore, the genotype of STAT3 has been associated with the phenotype of HIES. Here, we conducted studies on the functional loss of the seven specific STAT3 mutations correlated with ADHIES. Using STAT3-null human colon carcinoma cell line A4 cells, we generated seven mutants of STAT3 bearing single mutations clinically identified in AD-HIES patients’ cells and studied the functional loss of these mutants in IL-6-Jak/STAT3 signalling pathway. Our results show that five STAT3 mutants bearing mutations in the DNA-binding domain maintain the phosphorylation of Tyr705 and the ability of dimerization while the other two with mutations in SH2 domain are devoid of the phosphorylation of Try705 and abrogate the dimerization in response to IL-6. The phosphorylation of Ser727 in these mutants shows diversity in response to IL-6. These mutations eventually converge on the abnormalities of the IL-6/Gp130/Jak2-mediated STAT3 transactivation on target genes, indicative of the dysregulation of JAK/STAT signalling present in HIES.

  7. Thrombin stimulation of inflammatory breast cancer cells leads to aggressiveness via the EGFR-PAR1-Pak1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Bui-Nguyen, Tri M; Divijendra Natha, Reddy S; Schwartz, Arnold M; Levine, Paul; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-12-27

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) accounts for a small fraction but aggressive form of epithelial breast cancer. Although the role of thrombin in cancer is beginning to be unfolded, its impact on the biology of IBC remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of thrombin on the invasiveness of IBC cells. The IBC SUM149 cell line was treated with thrombin in the absence or presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) inhibitor. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors on the ability of thrombin to stimulate the growth rate and invasiveness were examined. We found that the inhibition of putative cellular targets of thrombin action suppresses both the growth and invasiveness of SUM149 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, thrombin-mediated increased invasion of SUM149 cells was routed through EGFR phosphorylation, and in turn, stimulation of the p21-activated kinase (Pak1) activity in a EGFR-sensitive manner. Interestingly, thrombin-mediated activation of the Pak1 pathway stimulation was blocked by erlotinib and PAR1 inhibitor. For proof-of-principle studies, we found immunohistochemical evidence of Pak1 activation as well as expression of PAR1 in IBC. Thrombin utilizes EGFR to relay signals promoting SUM149 cell growth and invasion via the Pak1 pathway. The study provides the rationale for future therapeutic approaches in mitigating the invasive nature of IBC by targeting Pak1 and/or EGFR.

  8. Can joined-up data lead to joined-up thinking? The Western Australian developmental pathways project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Fiona; Glauert, Rebecca; McKenzie, Anne; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies are challenged by "wicked problems" - by definition, those that are difficult to define, multi-causal and hard to treat. Problems such as low birth weight, obesity, mental ill health, teenage pregnancy, educational difficulties and juvenile crime fit this category. Given the complex nature of these problems, they require the best data in order to measure them, guide policy frameworks and evaluate whether the steps taken to address them are actually making a difference. What such problems really require are joined-up approaches to enable effective solutions. In this paper, we describe a unique initiative to encourage a more preventive, whole-of-government approach to these problems - the Developmental Pathways Project, which has enabled the linkage of a large number of de-identified administrative databases in order to explore the pathways into and out of the negative outcomes affecting our children and youth. This project has not only enabled the linkage of agency data, but also of agency personnel, in order to improve and promote cross-agency research, policy and preventive solutions. Through the use of these linkages we are attempting to shift the paradigm to encourage agencies to appreciate that these "wicked problems" demand a preventive approach, as well as the provision of effective services for those already affected.

  9. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Parfett

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An emerging vision for toxicity testing in the 21st century foresees in vitro assays assuming the leading role in testing for chemical hazards, including testing for carcinogenicity. Toxicity will be determined by monitoring key steps in functionally validated molecular pathways, using tests designed to reveal chemically-induced perturbations that lead to adverse phenotypic endpoints in cultured human cells. Risk assessments would subsequently be derived from the causal in vitro endpoints and concentration vs. effect data extrapolated to human in vivo concentrations. Much direct experimental evidence now shows that disruption of epigenetic processes by chemicals is a carcinogenic mode of action that leads to altered gene functions playing causal roles in cancer initiation and progression. In assessing chemical safety, it would therefore be advantageous to consider an emerging class of carcinogens, the epigenotoxicants, with the ability to change chromatin and/or DNA marks by direct or indirect effects on the activities of enzymes (writers, erasers/editors, remodelers and readers that convey the epigenetic information. Evidence is reviewed supporting a strategy for in vitro hazard identification of carcinogens that induce toxicity through disturbance of functional epigenetic pathways in human somatic cells, leading to inactivated tumour suppressor genes and carcinogenesis. In the context of human cell transformation models, these in vitro pathway measurements ensure high biological relevance to the apical endpoint of cancer. Four causal mechanisms participating in pathways to persistent epigenetic gene silencing were considered: covalent histone modification, nucleosome remodeling, non-coding RNA interaction and DNA methylation. Within these four interacting mechanisms, 25 epigenetic toxicity pathway components (SET1, MLL1, KDM5, G9A, SUV39H1, SETDB1, EZH2, JMJD3, CBX7, CBX8, BMI, SUZ12, HP1, MPP8, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, TET1, MeCP2, SETDB2, BAZ2

  10. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfett, Craig L.; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An emerging vision for toxicity testing in the 21st century foresees in vitro assays assuming the leading role in testing for chemical hazards, including testing for carcinogenicity. Toxicity will be determined by monitoring key steps in functionally validated molecular pathways, using tests designed to reveal chemically-induced perturbations that lead to adverse phenotypic endpoints in cultured human cells. Risk assessments would subsequently be derived from the causal in vitro endpoints and concentration vs. effect data extrapolated to human in vivo concentrations. Much direct experimental evidence now shows that disruption of epigenetic processes by chemicals is a carcinogenic mode of action that leads to altered gene functions playing causal roles in cancer initiation and progression. In assessing chemical safety, it would therefore be advantageous to consider an emerging class of carcinogens, the epigenotoxicants, with the ability to change chromatin and/or DNA marks by direct or indirect effects on the activities of enzymes (writers, erasers/editors, remodelers and readers) that convey the epigenetic information. Evidence is reviewed supporting a strategy for in vitro hazard identification of carcinogens that induce toxicity through disturbance of functional epigenetic pathways in human somatic cells, leading to inactivated tumour suppressor genes and carcinogenesis. In the context of human cell transformation models, these in vitro pathway measurements ensure high biological relevance to the apical endpoint of cancer. Four causal mechanisms participating in pathways to persistent epigenetic gene silencing were considered: covalent histone modification, nucleosome remodeling, non-coding RNA interaction and DNA methylation. Within these four interacting mechanisms, 25 epigenetic toxicity pathway components (SET1, MLL1, KDM5, G9A, SUV39H1, SETDB1, EZH2, JMJD3, CBX7, CBX8, BMI, SUZ12, HP1, MPP8, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, TET1, MeCP2, SETDB2, BAZ2A, UHRF1, CTCF

  11. A common mechanism involving the TORC1 pathway can lead to amphotericin B-persistence in biofilm and planktonic Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Regenberg, Birgitte; Gresham, David; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-02-23

    Fungal infections are an increasing clinical problem. Decreased treatment effectiveness is associated with biofilm formation and drug recalcitrance is thought to be biofilm specific. However, no systematic investigations have tested whether resistance mechanisms are shared between biofilm and planktonic populations. We performed multiplexed barcode sequencing (Bar-seq) screening of a pooled collection of gene-deletion mutants cultivated as biofilm and planktonic cells. Screening for resistance to the ergosterol-targeting fungicide amphotericin B (AmB) revealed that the two growth modes had significant overlap in AmB-persistent mutants. Mutants defective in sterol metabolism, ribosome biosynthesis, and the TORC1 and Ras pathways showed increased persistence when treated with AmB. The ras1, ras2 and tor1 mutants had a high-persister phenotype similar to wild-type biofilm and planktonic cells exposed to the TORC1 pathway inhibitor rapamycin. Inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin also increased the proportion of persisters in Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. We propose that decreased TORC1-mediated induction of ribosome biosynthesis via Ras can lead to formation of AmB-persister cells regardless of whether the cells are in planktonic or biofilm growth mode. Identification of common pathways leading to growth mode-independent persister formation is important for developing novel strategies for treating fungal infections.

  12. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen C. Light

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2, and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4 ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed.

  13. Discovering new genetic and psychosocial pathways in Major Depressive Disorder: the NewMood project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeborough, Annabel; Kimpton, Jessica

    2011-09-01

    The World Health Organisation predicts that Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will be the second greatest contributor to the global burden of disease by 2020, however, the neurobiological mechanisms behind the disease and the risk factors for it are yet unknown. NewMood (New Molecules for Mood Disorders) was a research project funded by the EU, collaborating work from 10 European countries with the aim of finding new molecular mechanisms behind MDD to develop more effective treatment options. This review explains the aims and objectives of NewMood and how it intends to achieve them with regards to the current literature. It also outlines two of its most recent projects: genome wide association replication study for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increasing susceptibility to MDD and stress related pathways in depression using the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Both of these studies had significant results and could further contribute to our current understanding of MDD.

  14. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie; Charbonneau, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX.

  15. Genetic Diversity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on the Hawaiian Islands: Implications for an Introduction Pathway Into California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Norman B; Ledezma, Lisa A; Leblanc, Luc; San Jose, Michael; Rubinoff, Daniel; Geib, Scott M; Fujita, Brian; Bartels, David W; Garza, Daniel; Kerr, Peter; Hauser, Martin; Gaimari, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Population genetic diversity of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii (the Big Island) was estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. In total, 932 flies representing 36 sampled sites across the four islands were sequenced for a 1,500-bp fragment of the gene named the C1500 marker. Genetic variation was low on the Hawaiian Islands with >96% of flies having just two haplotypes: C1500-Haplotype 1 (63.2%) or C1500-Haplotype 2 (33.3%). The other 33 flies (3.5%) had haplotypes similar to the two dominant haplotypes. No population structure was detected among the islands or within islands. The two haplotypes were present at similar frequencies at each sample site, suggesting that flies on the various islands can be considered one population. Comparison of the Hawaiian data set to DNA sequences of 165 flies from outbreaks in California between 2006 and 2012 indicates that a single-source introduction pathway of Hawaiian origin cannot explain many of the flies in California. Hawaii, however, could not be excluded as a maternal source for 69 flies. There was no clear geographic association for Hawaiian or non-Hawaiian haplotypes in the Bay Area or Los Angeles Basin over time. This suggests that California experienced multiple, independent introductions from different sources.

  16. Network-based integration of systems genetics data reveals pathways associated with lignocellulosic biomass accumulation and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizrachi, Eshchar; Verbeke, Lieven; Christie, Nanette; Fierro, Ana C.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Davis, Mark F.; Gjersing, Erica; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Van Montagu, Marc; Van de Peer, Yves; Marchal, Kathleen; Myburg, Alexander A.

    2017-01-17

    As a consequence of their remarkable adaptability, fast growth, and superior wood properties, eucalypt tree plantations have emerged as key renewable feedstocks (over 20 million ha globally) for the production of pulp, paper, bioenergy, and other lignocellulosic products. However, most biomass properties such as growth, wood density, and wood chemistry are complex traits that are hard to improve in long-lived perennials. Systems genetics, a process of harnessing multiple levels of component trait information (e.g., transcript, protein, and metabolite variation) in populations that vary in complex traits, has proven effective for dissecting the genetics and biology of such traits. We have applied a network-based data integration (NBDI) method for a systems-level analysis of genes, processes and pathways underlying biomass and bioenergy-related traits using a segregating Eucalyptus hybrid population. We show that the integrative approach can link biologically meaningful sets of genes to complex traits and at the same time reveal the molecular basis of trait variation. Gene sets identified for related woody biomass traits were found to share regulatory loci, cluster in network neighborhoods, and exhibit enrichment for molecular functions such as xylan metabolism and cell wall development. These findings offer a framework for identifying the molecular underpinnings of complex biomass and bioprocessing-related traits. A more thorough understanding of the molecular basis of plant biomass traits should provide additional opportunities for the establishment of a sustainable bio-based economy.

  17. Network-based integration of systems genetics data reveals pathways associated with lignocellulosic biomass accumulation and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrachi, Eshchar; Verbeke, Lieven; Christie, Nanette; Fierro, Ana C; Mansfield, Shawn D; Davis, Mark F; Gjersing, Erica; Tuskan, Gerald A; Van Montagu, Marc; Van de Peer, Yves; Marchal, Kathleen; Myburg, Alexander A

    2017-01-31

    As a consequence of their remarkable adaptability, fast growth, and superior wood properties, eucalypt tree plantations have emerged as key renewable feedstocks (over 20 million ha globally) for the production of pulp, paper, bioenergy, and other lignocellulosic products. However, most biomass properties such as growth, wood density, and wood chemistry are complex traits that are hard to improve in long-lived perennials. Systems genetics, a process of harnessing multiple levels of component trait information (e.g., transcript, protein, and metabolite variation) in populations that vary in complex traits, has proven effective for dissecting the genetics and biology of such traits. We have applied a network-based data integration (NBDI) method for a systems-level analysis of genes, processes and pathways underlying biomass and bioenergy-related traits using a segregating Eucalyptus hybrid population. We show that the integrative approach can link biologically meaningful sets of genes to complex traits and at the same time reveal the molecular basis of trait variation. Gene sets identified for related woody biomass traits were found to share regulatory loci, cluster in network neighborhoods, and exhibit enrichment for molecular functions such as xylan metabolism and cell wall development. These findings offer a framework for identifying the molecular underpinnings of complex biomass and bioprocessing-related traits. A more thorough understanding of the molecular basis of plant biomass traits should provide additional opportunities for the establishment of a sustainable bio-based economy.

  18. The Arabidopsis DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed by basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C coupled to diacylglycerol kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafi, Nabila; Vergnolle, Chantal; Cantrel, Catherine; Wietrzyñski, Wojciech; Delage, Elise; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Gey, Delphine; Collin, Sylvie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipases C (PI-PLCs) are activated in response to various stimuli. They utilize substrates provided by type III-Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinases (PI4KIII) to produce inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol (DAG) that is phosphorylated into phosphatidic acid (PA) by DAG-kinases (DGKs). The roles of PI4KIIIs, PI-PLCs, and DGKs in basal signaling are poorly understood. We investigated the control of gene expression by basal PI-PLC pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells. A transcriptome-wide analysis allowed the identification of genes whose expression was altered by edelfosine, 30 μM wortmannin, or R59022, inhibitors of PI-PLCs, PI4KIIIs, and DGKs, respectively. We found that a gene responsive to one of these molecules is more likely to be similarly regulated by the other two inhibitors. The common action of these agents is to inhibit PA formation, showing that basal PI-PLCs act, in part, on gene expression through their coupling to DGKs. Amongst the genes up-regulated in presence of the inhibitors, were some DREB2 genes, in suspension cells and in seedlings. The DREB2 genes encode transcription factors with major roles in responses to environmental stresses, including dehydration. They bind to C-repeat motifs, known as Drought-Responsive Elements that are indeed enriched in the promoters of genes up-regulated by PI-PLC pathway inhibitors. PA can also be produced by phospholipases D (PLDs). We show that the DREB2 genes that are up-regulated by PI-PLC inhibitors are positively or negatively regulated, or indifferent, to PLD basal activity. Our data show that the DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed in resting conditions and that DGK coupled to PI-PLC is active in this process, in suspension cells and seedlings. We discuss how this basal negative regulation of DREB2 genes is compatible with their stress-triggered positive regulation.

  19. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  20. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh;

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified...... gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks that were strongly associated with islet insulin secretion and HbA(1c). We integrated our data to form a rank list of putative T2D genes, of which CHL1, LRFN2, RASGRP1, and PPM1K were validated in INS-1 cells to influence insulin secretion...... of genes potentially involved in T2D....

  1. Erythritol feeds the pentose phosphate pathway via three new isomerases leading to D-erythrose-4-phosphate in Brucella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Thibault; Collard, François; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyón, Ignacio; Godard, Thibault; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2014-12-16

    Erythritol is an important nutrient for several α-2 Proteobacteria, including N2-fixing plant endosymbionts and Brucella, a worldwide pathogen that finds this four-carbon polyol in genital tissues. Erythritol metabolism involves phosphorylation to L-erythritol-4-phosphate by the kinase EryA and oxidation of the latter to L-3-tetrulose 4-phosphate by the dehydrogenase EryB. It is accepted that further steps involve oxidation by the putative dehydrogenase EryC and subsequent decarboxylation to yield triose-phosphates. Accordingly, growth on erythritol as the sole C source should require aldolase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase to produce essential hexose-6-monophosphate. However, we observed that a mutant devoid of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases grew normally on erythritol and that EryC, which was assumed to be a dehydrogenase, actually belongs to the xylose isomerase superfamily. Moreover, we found that TpiA2 and RpiB, distant homologs of triose phosphate isomerase and ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, were necessary, as previously shown for Rhizobium. By using purified recombinant enzymes, we demonstrated that L-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate was converted to D-erythrose 4-phosphate through three previously unknown isomerization reactions catalyzed by EryC (tetrulose-4-phosphate racemase), TpiA2 (D-3-tetrulose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryH), and RpiB (D-erythrose-4-phosphate isomerase; renamed EryI), a pathway fully consistent with the isotopomer distribution of the erythrose-4-phosphate-derived amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine obtained from bacteria grown on (13)C-labeled erythritol. D-erythrose-4-phosphate is then converted by enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate, thus bypassing fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. This is the first description to our knowledge of a route feeding carbohydrate metabolism exclusively via D-erythrose 4-phosphate, a pathway that may provide clues to the preferential metabolism of

  2. The interplay of DNA methylation over time with Th2 pathway genetic variants on asthma risk and temporal asthma transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Tong, Xin; Holloway, John W; Rezwan, Faisal I; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Patil, Veeresh; Ray, Meredith; Everson, Todd M; Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Arshad, S Hasan; Ewart, Susan; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Genetic effects on asthma of genes in the T-helper 2 (Th2) pathway may interact with epigenetic factors including DNA methylation. We hypothesized that interactions between genetic variants and methylation in genes in this pathway (IL4, IL4R, IL13, GATA3, and STAT6) influence asthma risk, that such influences are age-dependent, and that methylation of some CpG sites changes over time in accordance with asthma transition. We tested these hypotheses in subsamples of girls from a population-based birth cohort established on the Isle of Wight, UK, in 1989. Logistic regression models were applied to test the interaction effect of DNA methylation and SNP on asthma within each of the five genes. Bootstrapping was used to assess the models identified. From 1,361 models fitted at each age of 10 and 18 years, 8 models, including 4 CpGs and 8 SNPs, showed potential associations with asthma risk. Of the 4 CpGs, methylation of cg26937798 (IL4R) and cg23943829 (IL4) changes between ages 10 and 18 (both higher at 10; P = 9.14 × 10(-6) and 1.07 × 10(-5), respectively). At age 10, the odds of asthma tended to decrease as cg12405139 (GATA3) methylation increased (log-OR = -12.15; P = 0.049); this effect disappeared by age 18. At age 18, methylation of cg09791102 (IL4R) was associated with higher risk of asthma among subjects with genotype GG compared to AG (P = 0.003), increased cg26937798 methylation among subjects with rs3024685 (IL4R) genotype AA (P = 0.003) or rs8832 (IL4R) genotype GG (P = 0.01) was associated with a lower asthma risk; these CpGs had no effect at age 10. Increasing cg26937798 methylation over time possibly reduced the risk of positive asthma transition (asthma-free at age 10 → asthma at age 18; log-OR = -3.11; P = 0.069) and increased the likelihood of negative transition (asthma at age 10 → asthma-free at age 18; log-OR = 3.97; P = 0.074). The interaction of DNA methylation and SNPs in Th2 pathway

  3. Parasexual genetics of Dictyostelium gene disruptions: identification of a ras pathway using diploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insall Robert H

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative ease of targeted gene disruption in the social amoeba Dictyostelium has stimulated its widespread use as an experimental organism for cell and developmental biology. However, the field has been hamstrung by the lack of techniques to recombine disrupted genes. Results We describe new techniques for parasexual fusion of strains in liquid medium, selection and maintenance of the resulting stable diploid strains, and segregation to make recombined haploids. We have used these techniques to isolate rasS/gefB double nulls. The phenotypes of these mutants are no more severe than either parent, with movement, phagocytosis and fluid-phase endocytosis affected to the same degree as in rasS or gefB single nulls. In addition, we have produced diploids from one AX2- and one AX3-derived parent, providing an axenic strain with fewer secondary phenotypes than has been previously available. Conclusions The phenotype of the rasS/gefB double mutant suggests that the RasS and GefB proteins lie on the same linear pathway. In addition, axenic diploids and the techniques to generate, maintain and segregate them will be productive tools for future work on Dictyostelium. They will particularly facilitate generation of multiple mutants and manuipulation of essential genes.

  4. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  5. Metallo-pathways to Alzheimer's disease: lessons from genetic disorders of copper trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, M A; Ramírez Munoz, A; Bush, A I; Opazo, C M

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential metal ion that provides catalytic function to numerous enzymes and also regulates neurotransmission and intracellular signaling. Conversely, a deficiency or excess of copper can cause chronic disease in humans. Menkes and Wilson disease are two rare heritable disorders of copper transport that are characterized by copper deficiency and copper overload, respectively. Changes to copper status are also a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the case of AD, which is characterized by brain copper depletion, changes in the distribution of copper has been linked with various aspects of the disease process; protein aggregation, defective protein degradation, oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although AD is a multifactorial disease that is likely caused by a breakdown in multiple cellular pathways, copper and other metal ions such as iron and zinc play a central role in many of these cellular processes. Pioneering work by researchers who have studied relatively rare copper transport diseases has shed light on potential metal ion related disease mechanisms in other forms of neurodegeneration such as AD.

  6. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens.

  7. Rewriting the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Takahito; Lajoie, Marc J; Englert, Markus; Söll, Dieter

    2017-09-08

    The genetic code-the language used by cells to translate their genomes into proteins that perform many cellular functions-is highly conserved throughout natural life. Rewriting the genetic code could lead to new biological functions such as expanding protein chemistries with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) and genetically isolating synthetic organisms from natural organisms and viruses. It has long been possible to transiently produce proteins bearing ncAAs, but stabilizing an expanded genetic code for sustained function in vivo requires an integrated approach: creating recoded genomes and introducing new translation machinery that function together without compromising viability or clashing with endogenous pathways. In this review, we discuss design considerations and technologies for expanding the genetic code. The knowledge obtained by rewriting the genetic code will deepen our understanding of how genomes are designed and how the canonical genetic code evolved.

  8. Biosynthesis of monoterpenoids in higher plants. The biosynthetic pathway leading to the monoterpenoids from amino acids with a carbon-skeleton similar to mevalonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tange, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-09-01

    Radioisotopically labeled L-valine, DL-alanine, sodium acetate, and DL-mevalonic acid were incorporated into linalool by the intact plant of Cinnamomum camphora Sieb. var. linalooliferum Fujita and into geraniol and citronellol by that of Pelargonium roseum Bourbon. The uptake of leucine and valine resulted in the preferential location of the radioactivity on the 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety of these acyclic monoterpenoids, whereas the uptake of alanine resulted in the preferential location on the isopentenyl pyrophosphate-derived moiety, much as in the cases of mevalonic acid and sodium acetate. A biosynthetic pathway leading to the monoterpenoids from the amino acids is discussed.

  9. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9. Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9, a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2 and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel

  10. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10−9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10−9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in

  11. Genetics and Physiology of Acetate Metabolism by the Pta-Ack Pathway of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    In the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans, phosphotransacetylase (Pta) catalyzes the conversion of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetyl phosphate (AcP), which can be converted to acetate by acetate kinase (Ack), with the concomitant generation of ATP. A ΔackA mutant displayed enhanced accumulation of AcP under aerobic conditions, whereas little or no AcP was observed in the Δpta or Δpta ΔackA mutant. The Δpta and Δpta ΔackA mutants also had diminished ATP pools compared to the size of the ATP pool for the parental or ΔackA strain. Surprisingly, when exposed to oxidative stress, the Δpta ΔackA strain appeared to regain the capacity to produce AcP, with a concurrent increase in the size of the ATP pool compared to that for the parental strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants exhibited enhanced (p)ppGpp accumulation, whereas the strain lacking Pta produced less (p)ppGpp than the wild-type strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants displayed global changes in gene expression, as assessed by microarrays. All strains lacking Pta, which had defects in AcP production under aerobic conditions, were impaired in their abilities to form biofilms when glucose was the growth carbohydrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate the complex regulation of the Pta-Ack pathway and critical roles for these enzymes in processes that appear to be essential for the persistence and pathogenesis of S. mutans.

  12. Genetic dissection of medial habenula–interpeduncular nucleus pathway function in mice

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    Yuki eKobayashi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The habenular complex linking forebrain and midbrain structures is subdivided into the medial (mHb and the lateral nuclei (lHb. The mHb is characterized by the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor isoforms and the release of acetylcholine to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN, the sole output region of the mHb. The specific function of this circuit, however, is poorly understood. Here we generated transgenic mice in which mHb cells were selectively ablated postnatally. These lesions led to large reductions in acetylcholine levels within the IPN. The mutant mice exhibited abnormalities in a wide range of behavioral domains. They tended to be hyperactive during the early night period and were maladapted when repeatedly exposed to new environments. Mutant mice also showed a high rate of premature responses in the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT, indicating impulsive and compulsive behavior. Additionally, mice also exhibited delay and effort aversion in a decision-making test, deficits in spatial memory, a subtle increase in anxiety levels, and attenuated sensorimotor gating. IntelliCage studies under social housing conditions confirmed hyperactivity, environmental maladaptation, and impulsive/compulsive behavior, delay discounting, deficits in long-term spatial memory, and reduced flexibility in complex learning paradigms. In 5CSRTT and adaptation tasks, systemic administration of nicotine slowed down a nose-poke reaction and enhanced adaptation in control but not mutant mice. These findings demonstrate that the mHb–IPN pathway plays a crucial role in inhibitory control and cognition-dependent executive functions.

  13. Xanthohumol inhibits STAT3 activation pathway leading to growth suppression and apoptosis induction in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Sangkhamanon, Sakkarn; Yageta, Mika Sakurai; Murakami, Yoshinori; Loilome, Watcharin

    2016-04-01

    STAT3 plays a significant role in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with the liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini; Ov). Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid extracted from hops, has known anticancer activity and could potentially target STAT3. The present study determined the effect of XN on STAT3, as well as ascertained its usefulness against CCA. The CCA cell proliferation at 20 µM and 50 µM of XN was shown to inhibited, while 20 µM partially inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 activation. At 50 µM, the inhibition was complete. The reduction in STAT3 activity at 20 and 50 µM was associated with a significant reduction of CCA cell growth and apoptosis. We also found that the administration of 50 µM XN orally in drinking water to nude mice inoculated with CCA led to a reduction in tumor growth in comparison with controls. In addition, apoptosis of cancer cells increased although there was no visible toxicity. The present study shows that XN can inhibit STAT3 activation both in vivo and in vitro due to suppression of the Akt-NFκB signaling pathway. XN should be considered as a possible therapeutic agent against CCA.

  14. Genetic variations in regulatory pathways of fatty acid and glucose metabolism are associated with obesity phenotypes : a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, S. W.; Dolle, M. E. T.; Imholz, S.; van der A, D. L.; van 't Slot, R.; Wijmenga, C.; Verschuren, W. M. M.; Strien, C.; Siezen, C. L. E.; Hoebee, B.; Feskens, E. J. M.; Boer, J. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: As nuclear receptors and transcription factors have an important regulatory function in adipocyte differentiation and fat storage, genetic variation in these key regulators and downstream pathways may be involved in the onset of obesity. Objective: To explore associations between single

  15. Impaired P2X signalling pathways in renal microvascular myocytes in genetic hypertension

    KAUST Repository

    Gordienko, Dmitri V.

    2014-12-16

    Aims P2X receptors (P2XRs) mediate sympathetic control and autoregulation of renal circulation triggering preglomerular vasoconstriction, which protects glomeruli from elevated pressures. Although previous studies established a casual link between glomerular susceptibility to hypertensive injury and decreased preglomerular vascular reactivity to P2XR activation, the mechanisms of attenuation of the P2XR signalling in hypertension remained unknown. We aimed to analyse molecular mechanisms of the impairment of P2XR signalling in renal vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) in genetic hypertension. Methods and results We compared the expression of pertinent genes and P2XR-linked Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release mechanisms in RVSMCs of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their normotensive controls, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. We found that, in SHR RVSMCs, P2XR-linked Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are both significantly reduced. The former is due to down-regulation of the P2X1 subunit. The latter is caused by a decrease of the SR Ca2+ load. The SR Ca2+ load reduction is caused by attenuated Ca2+ uptake via down-regulated sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2b and elevated Ca2+ leak from the SR via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Spontaneous activity of these Ca2+-release channels is augmented due to up-regulation of RyR type 2 and elevated IP3 production by up-regulated phospholipase C-β1. Conclusions Our study unravels the cellular and molecular mechanisms of attenuation of P2XR-mediated preglomerular vasoconstriction that elevates glomerular susceptibility to harmful hypertensive pressures. This provides an important impetus towards understanding of the pathology of hypertensive renal injury.

  16. Genetic Ablation of PDGF-Dependent Signaling Pathways Abolishes Vascular Remodeling and Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Berghausen, Eva M; Janssen, Wiebke; Leuchs, Maike; Zierden, Mario; Murmann, Kirsten; Klinke, Anna; Vantler, Marius; Caglayan, Evren; Kramer, Tilmann; Baldus, Stephan; Schermuly, Ralph T; Tallquist, Michelle D; Rosenkranz, Stephan

    2015-05-01

    Despite modern therapies, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) harbors a high mortality. Vascular remodeling is a hallmark of the disease. Recent clinical studies revealed that antiremodeling approaches with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors such as imatinib are effective, but its applicability is limited by significant side effects. Although imatinib has multiple targets, expression analyses support a role for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in the pathobiology of the disease. However, its precise role and downstream signaling events have not been established. Patients with PAH exhibit enhanced expression and phosphorylation of β PDGF receptor (βPDGFR) in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, particularly at the binding sites for phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ at tyrosine residues 751 and 1021, respectively. These signaling molecules were identified as critical downstream mediators of βPDGFR-mediated proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We, therefore, investigated mice expressing a mutated βPDGFR that is unable to recruit phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ (βPDGFR(F3/F3)). PDGF-dependent Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, cyclin D1 induction, and proliferation, migration, and protection against apoptosis were abolished in βPDGFR(F3/F3) pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. On exposure to chronic hypoxia, vascular remodeling of pulmonary arteries was blunted in βPDGFR(F3/F3) mice compared with wild-type littermates. These alterations led to protection from hypoxia-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy. By means of a genetic approach, our data provide definite evidence that the activated βPDGFR is a key contributor to pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH. Selective disruption of PDGF-dependent phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ activity is sufficient to abolish these pathogenic responses in vivo, identifying these signaling events as valuable targets for antiremodeling strategies in PAH. © 2015 American

  17. Genetic and transgenic perturbations of carbon reserve production in Arabidopsis seeds reveal metabolic interactions of biochemical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yun; Ulanov, Alexander V; Lozovaya, Vera; Widholm, Jack; Zhang, Guirong; Guo, Jinhua; Goodman, Howard M

    2006-12-01

    The biosynthesis of seed oil and starch both depend on the supply of carbon from the maternal plant. The biochemical interactions between these two pathways are not fully understood. In the Arabidopsis mutant shrunken seed 1 (sse1)/pex16, a reduced rate of fatty acid synthesis leads to starch accumulation. To further understand the metabolic impact of the decrease in oil synthesis, we compared soluble metabolites in sse1 and wild type (WT) seeds. Sugars, sugar phosphates, alcohols, pyruvate, and many other organic acids accumulated in sse1 seeds as a likely consequence of the reduced carbon demand for lipid synthesis. The enlarged pool size of hexose-P, the metabolites at the crossroad of sugar metabolism, glycolysis, and starch synthesis, was likely a direct cause of the increased flow into starch. Downstream of glycolysis, more carbon entered the TCA cycle as an alternative to the fatty acid pathway, causing the total amount of TCA cycle intermediates to rise while moving the steady state of the cycle away from fumarate. To convert the excess carbon metabolites into starch, we introduced the Escherichia coli starch synthetic enzyme ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) into sse1 seeds. Expression of AGPase enhanced net starch biosynthesis in the mutant, resulting in starch levels that reached 37% of seed weight. However, further increases above this level were not achieved and most of the carbon intermediates remained high in comparison with the WT, indicating that additional mechanisms limit starch deposition in Arabidopsis seeds.

  18. Improvement of a predictive model of castration-resistant prostate cancer: functional genetic variants in TGFβ1 signaling pathway modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Teixeira

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. The acquisition of castration-resistant (CR phenotype is associated with the activation of signaling pathways mediated by growth factors. The TGFβ1 and its receptors have an important role in tumor progression, being the pro-apoptotic function modulated by the expression of TGFBR2. A single nucleotide polymorphism -875 G > A in TGFBR2 gene has been described, which may influence the expression levels of the receptor. Our purpose was to investigate the potential role of TGFBR2-875G>A in PC risk and in the response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. TGFBR2-875G>A polymorphism was studied by allelic discrimination using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 891 patients with PC and 874 controls. A follow-up study was undertaken to evaluate response to ADT. The TGFBR2 and SMAD7 mRNA expression were analyzed by a quantitative real-time PCR. We found that TGFBR2-875GG homozygous patients present lower expression levels of TGFBR2 mRNA (AA/AG: 2(-ΔΔCT =1.5, P=0.016. GG genotype was also associated with higher Gleason grade (OR=1.51, P=0.019 and increased risk of an early relapse after ADT (HR=1.47, P=0.024. The concordance (c index analysis showed that the definition of profiles that contains information regarding tumor characteristics associated with genetic information present an increased capacity to predict the risk for CR development (c-index model 1: 0.683 vs model 2: 0.736 vs model 3: 0.746 vs model 4: 0.759. The TGFBR2-875G>A contribution to an early relapse in ADT patients, due to changes in mRNA expression, supports the involvement of TGFβ1 pathway in CRPC. Furthermore, according to our results, we hypothesize the potential benefits of the association of genetic information in predictive models of CR development.

  19. Influence of a dopamine pathway additive genetic efficacy score on smoking cessation: results from two randomized clinical trials of bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sean P; Strong, David R; Leventhal, Adam M; Lancaster, Molly A; McGeary, John E; Munafò, Marcus R; Bergen, Andrew W; Swan, Gary E; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F; Conti, David V; Brown, Richard A; Lerman, Caryn; Niaura, Raymond

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the associations of treatment and an additive genetic efficacy score (AGES) based on dopamine functional polymorphisms with time to first smoking lapse and point prevalence abstinence at end of treatment among participants enrolled into two randomized clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Double-blind pharmacogenetic efficacy trials randomizing participants to active or placebo bupropion. Study 1 also randomized participants to cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation treatment (CBT) or this treatment with CBT for depression. Study 2 provided standardized behavioural support. Two hospital-affiliated clinics (study 1), and two university-affiliated clinics (study 2). A total of 792 self-identified white treatment-seeking smokers aged ≥18 years smoking ≥10 cigarettes per day over the last year. Age, gender, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, dopamine pathway genotypes (rs1800497 [ANKK1 E713K], rs4680 [COMT V158M], DRD4 exon 3 variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism [DRD4 VNTR], SLC6A3,3' VNTR) analyzed both separately and as part of an AGES, time to first lapse and point prevalence abstinence at end of treatment. Significant associations of the AGES (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-1.14, P = 0.009) and of the DRD4 VNTR (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.17-1.41, P = 0.0073) were observed with time to first lapse. A significant AGES by pharmacotherapy interaction was observed (β standard error = -0.18 [0.07], P = 0.016), such that AGES predicted risk for time to first lapse only for individuals randomized to placebo. A score based on functional polymorphisms relating to dopamine pathways appears to predict lapse to smoking following a quit attempt, and the association is mitigated in smokers using bupropion. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Blockade of the programmed death-1 (PD1 pathway undermines potent genetic protection from type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora M Kochupurakkal

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Inhibition of PD1-PDL1 signaling in NOD mice accelerates onset of type 1 diabetes implicating this pathway in suppressing the emergence of pancreatic beta cell reactive T-cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PD1 signaling protects from type 1 diabetes is not clear. We hypothesized that differential susceptibility of Idd mouse strains to type 1 diabetes when challenged with anti PDL1 will identify genomic loci that collaborate with PD1 signaling in suppressing type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Anti PDL1 was administered to NOD and various Idd mouse strains at 10 weeks of age and onset of disease was monitored by measuring blood glucose levels. Additionally, histological evaluation of the pancreas was performed to determine degree of insulitis. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Log-Rank and Student's t-test. RESULTS: Blockade of PDL1 rapidly precipitated type 1 diabetes in nearly all NOD Idd congenic strains tested, despite the fact that all are moderately (Idd5, Idd3 and Idd10/18 or highly (Idd3/10/18 and Idd9 protected from spontaneous type 1 diabetes by virtue of their protective Idd genes. Only the Idd3/5 strain, which is nearly 100% protected from spontaneous disease, remained normoglycemic following PDL1 blockade. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that multiple Idd loci collaborate with PD1 signaling. Anti PDL1 treatment undermines a large portion of the genetic protection mediated by Idd genes in the NOD model of type 1 diabetes. Basal insulitis correlated with higher susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. These findings have important implications since the PD1 pathway is a target for immunotherapy.

  1. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  2. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  3. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  4. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya S Rangaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4. Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  5. Actin dynamics is rapidly regulated by the PTEN and PIP2 signaling pathways leading to myocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieli; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Russell, Brenda

    2014-12-01

    Mature cardiac myocytes are terminally differentiated, and the heart has limited capacity to replace lost myocytes. Thus adaptation of myocyte size plays an important role in the determination of cardiac function. The hypothesis tested is that regulation of the dynamic exchange of actin leads to cardiac hypertrophy. ANG II was used as a hypertrophic stimulant in mouse heart and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) in culture for assessment of a mechanism for regulation of actin dynamics by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Actin dynamics in NRVMs rapidly increased in a PIP2-dependent manner, measured by imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A significant increase in PIP2 levels was found by immunoblotting in both adult mouse heart tissue and cultured NRVMs. Inhibition of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in NRVMs markedly blunted ANG II-induced increases in actin dynamics, the PIP2 level, and cell size. Furthermore, PTEN activity was dramatically upregulated in ANG II-treated NRVMs but downregulated when PTEN inhibitors were used. The time course of the rise in the PIP2 level was inversely related to the fall in the PIP3 level, which was significant by 30 min in ANG II-treated NRVMs. However, significant translocation of PTEN to the plasma membrane occurred by 10 min, suggesting a crucial initial step for PTEN for the cellular responses to ANG II. In conclusion, PTEN and PIP2 signaling may play an important role in myocyte hypertrophy by the regulation of actin filament dynamics, which is induced by ANG II stimulation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Optimized hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding at the target-ligand interface leads the pathways of drug-designing.

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    Rohan Patil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Weak intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are key players in stabilizing energetically-favored ligands, in an open conformational environment of protein structures. However, it is still poorly understood how the binding parameters associated with these interactions facilitate a drug-lead to recognize a specific target and improve drugs efficacy. To understand this, comprehensive analysis of hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding and binding affinity have been analyzed at the interface of c-Src and c-Abl kinases and 4-amino substituted 1H-pyrazolo [3, 4-d] pyrimidine compounds. METHODOLOGY: In-silico docking studies were performed, using Discovery Studio software modules LigandFit, CDOCKER and ZDOCK, to investigate the role of ligand binding affinity at the hydrophobic pocket of c-Src and c-Abl kinase. Hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions of docked molecules were compared using LigPlot program. Furthermore, 3D-QSAR and MFA calculations were scrutinized to quantify the role of weak interactions in binding affinity and drug efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: The in-silico method has enabled us to reveal that a multi-targeted small molecule binds with low affinity to its respective targets. But its binding affinity can be altered by integrating the conformationally favored functional groups at the active site of the ligand-target interface. Docking studies of 4-amino-substituted molecules at the bioactive cascade of the c-Src and c-Abl have concluded that 3D structural folding at the protein-ligand groove is also a hallmark for molecular recognition of multi-targeted compounds and for predicting their biological activity. The results presented here demonstrate that hydrogen bonding and optimized hydrophobic interactions both stabilize the ligands at the target site, and help alter binding affinity and drug efficacy.

  7. Genetics of the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway using a transgene-based selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidder, P; Johnson, M A; Sullivan, M L; Thompson, D M; Pérez-Amador, M A; Howard, C J; Green, P J

    2004-08-01

    mRNA sequences that control abundance, localization and translation initiation have been identified, yet the factors that recognize these sequences are largely unknown. In this report, a transgene-based strategy designed to isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that fail to recognize these sequences is described. In this strategy, a selectable gene and a screenable marker gene are put under the control of the sequence element being analysed and mutants are selected with altered abundance of the corresponding marker RNAs. The selection of mutants deficient in recognition of the DST (downstream) mRNA degradation signal is used as a test-case to illustrate some of the technical aspects that have facilitated success. Using this strategy, we report the isolation of a new mutant, dst3, deficient in the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway. The targeted genetic strategy described circumvents certain technical limitations of biochemical approaches. Hence, it provides a means to investigate a variety of other mechanisms responsible for post-transcriptional regulation.

  8. Longitudinal pathways from marital hostility to child anger during toddlerhood: genetic susceptibility and indirect effects via harsh parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Kimberly A; Leve, Leslie D; Harold, Gordon T; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Shaw, Daniel S; Reiss, David

    2011-04-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways from marital hostility to toddler anger/frustration via harsh parenting and parental depressive symptoms, with an additional focus on the moderating role of genetic influences as inferred from birth parent anger/frustration. Participants were 361 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children who were 9 (T1) and 18 (T2) months old across the study period. Results indicated an indirect effect from T1 marital hostility to T2 toddler anger/frustration via T2 parental harsh discipline. Results also indicated that the association between marital hostility and toddler anger was moderated by birth mother anger/frustration. For children whose birth mothers reported high levels of anger/frustration, adoptive parents' marital hostility at T1 predicted toddler anger/frustration at T2. This relation did not hold for children whose birth mothers reported low levels of anger/frustration. The results suggest that children whose birth mothers report elevated frustration might inherit an emotional lability that makes them more sensitive to the effects of marital hostility.

  9. An integrative multi-dimensional genetic and epigenetic strategy to identify aberrant genes and pathways in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockwood William W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics has substantially changed our approach to cancer research. Gene expression profiling, for example, has been utilized to delineate subtypes of cancer, and facilitated derivation of predictive and prognostic signatures. The emergence of technologies for the high resolution and genome-wide description of genetic and epigenetic features has enabled the identification of a multitude of causal DNA events in tumors. This has afforded the potential for large scale integration of genome and transcriptome data generated from a variety of technology platforms to acquire a better understanding of cancer. Results Here we show how multi-dimensional genomics data analysis would enable the deciphering of mechanisms that disrupt regulatory/signaling cascades and downstream effects. Since not all gene expression changes observed in a tumor are causal to cancer development, we demonstrate an approach based on multiple concerted disruption (MCD analysis of genes that facilitates the rational deduction of aberrant genes and pathways, which otherwise would be overlooked in single genomic dimension investigations. Conclusions Notably, this is the first comprehensive study of breast cancer cells by parallel integrative genome wide analyses of DNA copy number, LOH, and DNA methylation status to interpret changes in gene expression pattern. Our findings demonstrate the power of a multi-dimensional approach to elucidate events which would escape conventional single dimensional analysis and as such, reduce the cohort sample size for cancer gene discovery.

  10. Mechanisms of Resistance to Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer: Focus on Signaling Pathways, miRNAs and Genetically Based Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Becerra, Rocío; Santos, Nancy; Díaz, Lorenza; Camacho, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy diagnosed in women. Approximately 70% of breast tumors express the estrogen receptor (ER). Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most common and effective therapies for patients with ERα-positive breast cancer. Alone or combined with chemotherapy, tamoxifen significantly reduces disease progression and is associated with more favorable impact on survival in patients. Unfortunately, endocrine resistance occurs, either de novo or acquired during the course of the treatment. The mechanisms that contribute to hormonal resistance include loss or modification in the ERα expression, regulation of signal transduction pathways, altered expression of specific microRNAs, balance of co-regulatory proteins, and genetic polymorphisms involved in tamoxifen metabolic activity. Because of the clinical consequences of endocrine resistance, new treatment strategies are arising to make the cells sensitive to tamoxifen. Here, we will review the current knowledge on mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer cells. In addition, we will discuss novel therapeutic strategies to overcome such resistance. Undoubtedly, circumventing endocrine resistance should help to improve therapy for the benefit of breast cancer patients. PMID:23344024

  11. Common Genetic Pathways Regulate Organ-Specific Infection-Related Development in the Rice Blast Fungus[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sara L.; Besi, Maria I.; Galhano, Rita; Franceschetti, Marina; Goetz, Stephan; Lenhert, Steven; Osbourn, Anne; Sesma, Ane

    2010-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the most important fungal pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa). Under laboratory conditions, it is able to colonize both aerial and underground plant organs using different mechanisms. Here, we characterize an infection-related development in M. oryzae produced on hydrophilic polystyrene (PHIL-PS) and on roots. We show that fungal spores develop preinvasive hyphae (pre-IH) from hyphopodia (root penetration structures) or germ tubes and that pre-IH also enter root cells. Changes in fungal cell wall structure accompanying pre-IH are seen on both artificial and root surfaces. Using characterized mutants, we show that the PMK1 (for pathogenicity mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) pathway is required for pre-IH development. Twenty mutants with altered pre-IH differentiation on PHIL-PS identified from an insertional library of 2885 M. oryzae T-DNA transformants were found to be defective in pathogenicity. The phenotypic analysis of these mutants revealed that appressorium, hyphopodium, and pre-IH formation are genetically linked fungal developmental processes. We further characterized one of these mutants, M1373, which lacked the M. oryzae ortholog of exportin-5/Msn5p (EXP5). Mutants lacking EXP5 were much less virulent on roots, suggesting an important involvement of proteins and/or RNAs transported by EXP5 during M. oryzae root infection. PMID:20348434

  12. Analysis of JAK-STAT signaling pathway genes and their microRNAs in the intestinal mucosa of genetically disparate chicken lines induced with necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Anh Duc; Rengaraj, Deivendran; Hong, Yeojin; Hoang, Cong Thanh; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2017-05-01

    The JAK-STAT signaling pathway plays a key role in cytokine and growth factor activation and is involved in several cellular functions and diseases. The main objective of this study was to investigate the expression of candidate JAK-STAT pathway genes and their regulators and interactors in the intestinal mucosal layer of two genetically disparate chicken lines [Marek's disease (MD)-resistant line 6.3 and MD-susceptible line 7.2] induced with necrotic enteritis (NE). Through RNA-sequencing, we investigated 116 JAK-STAT signaling pathway-related genes that were significant and differentially expressed between the intestinal mucosa of the two lines compared with respective uninfected controls. About 15 JAK-STAT pathway genes were further verified by qRT-PCR, and the results were in agreement with our sequencing data. All the identified 116 genes were annotated through Gene Ontology and mapped to the KEGG chicken JAK-STAT signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to represent the transcriptional analysis of a large number of candidate genes, regulators, and potential interactors in the JAK-STAT pathway of the two chicken lines induced with NE. Several key genes of the interactome, namely, STAT1/3/4, STAT5B, JAK1-3, TYK2, AKT1/3, SOCS1-5, PIAS1/2/4, PTPN6/11, and PIK3, were determined to be differentially expressed in the two lines. Moreover, we detected 68 known miRNAs variably targeting JAK-STAT pathway genes and differentially expressed in the two lines induced with NE. The RNA-sequencing and bioinformatics analyses in this study provided an abundance of data that will be useful for future studies on JAK-STAT pathways associated with the functions of two genetically disparate chicken lines induced with NE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic diversity in normal cell populations is the earliest stage of oncogenesis leading to intra-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory L Howk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Random mutations and epigenetic alterations provide a rich substrate for microevolutionary phenomena to occur in proliferating epithelial tissues. Genetic diversity resulting from random mutations in normal cells is critically important for understanding the genetic basis of oncogenesis. However, evaluation of the cell-specific role of individual (epi-genetic alterations in living tissues is extremely difficult from a direct experimental perspective. We have developed a theoretical model for uterine epithelial cell proliferation. Computational simulations have shown that a base-line mutation rate of two mutations per cell division is sufficient to explain sporadic endometrial cancer as a rare evolutionary consequence with an incidence similar to that reported in SEER data. Simulation of the entire oncogenic process has allowed us to analyze the features of the tumor initiating cells and their clonal expansion. Analysis of the malignant features of individual cancer cells, such as de-differentiation status, proliferation potential, and immortalization status, permits a mathematical characterization of malignancy and a comparison of intra-tumor heterogeneity between individual tumors. We found, under the conditions specified, that cancer stem cells account for approximately 7% of the total cancer cell population. Taken together, our mathematical modeling describes the genetic diversity and evolution in a normal cell population at the early stages of oncogenesis and characterizes intra-tumor heterogeneity. This model has explored the role of accumulation of a large number of genetic alterations in oncogenesis as an alternative to traditional biological approaches emphasizing the driving role of a small number of genetic mutations, and this accumulation, along with environmental factors, has a significant impact on the growth advantage of and selection pressure on individual cancer cells and the resulting tumor composition and progression.

  14. Multi-variant pathway association analysis reveals the importance of genetic determinants of estrogen metabolism in breast and endometrial cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Ling Low

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the central role of estrogen exposure in breast and endometrial cancer development and numerous studies of genes in the estrogen metabolic pathway, polymorphisms within the pathway have not been consistently associated with these cancers. We posit that this is due to the complexity of multiple weak genetic effects within the metabolic pathway that can only be effectively detected through multi-variant analysis. We conducted a comprehensive association analysis of the estrogen metabolic pathway by interrogating 239 tagSNPs within 35 genes of the pathway in three tumor samples. The discovery sample consisted of 1,596 breast cancer cases, 719 endometrial cancer cases, and 1,730 controls from Sweden; and the validation sample included 2,245 breast cancer cases and 1,287 controls from Finland. We performed admixture maximum likelihood (AML-based global tests to evaluate the cumulative effect from multiple SNPs within the whole metabolic pathway and three sub-pathways for androgen synthesis, androgen-to-estrogen conversion, and estrogen removal. In the discovery sample, although no single polymorphism was significant after correction for multiple testing, the pathway-based AML global test suggested association with both breast (p(global = 0.034 and endometrial (p(global = 0.052 cancers. Further testing revealed the association to be focused on polymorphisms within the androgen-to-estrogen conversion sub-pathway, for both breast (p(global = 0.008 and endometrial cancer (p(global = 0.014. The sub-pathway association was validated in the Finnish sample of breast cancer (p(global = 0.015. Further tumor subtype analysis demonstrated that the association of the androgen-to-estrogen conversion sub-pathway was confined to postmenopausal women with sporadic estrogen receptor positive tumors (p(global = 0.0003. Gene-based AML analysis suggested CYP19A1 and UGT2B4 to be the major players within the sub-pathway. Our study indicates that the composite

  15. Genetic variants of the Wnt signaling pathway as predictors of recurrence and survival in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscio, Angela; Chang, David W; Roth, Jack A; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Yang, Ping; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-06-01

    Early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is potentially curative. Nevertheless, many patients will show disease recurrence after curative treatment. The Wnt signaling pathway is a developmental and stem cell pathway that plays an important role in tumorigenesis and may affect cancer progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Wnt pathway may influence clinical outcome in early-stage NSCLC patients. We genotyped 441 functional and tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 54 genes of the Wnt pathway in 535 early-stage NSCLC patients treated with curative intent therapy including surgery and chemotherapy. For validation, 4 top SNPs were genotyped in 301 early-stage NSCLC patients from the Mayo Clinic. Cox proportional hazard model and combined SNP analyses were performed to identify significant SNPs correlated with recurrence-free and overall survival. Results from discovery group showed a total of 40 SNPs in 20 genes correlated with disease recurrence (P recurrence-free and overall survival. Joint SNP analyses identified predictive markers for recurrence stratified by treatment. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the Wnt signaling pathway may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage NSCLC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. 骨肉瘤重要信号通路的遗传学研究%Genetic aberrations of key signaling pathways in human osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文雅; 王国文; 郝梦泽; 杜晓玲; 杨蕴; 杨吉龙

    2015-01-01

    目的 通过微阵列-比较基因组杂交(microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization,aCGH)方法检测人骨肉瘤基因组的拷贝数异常,探讨并验证骨肉瘤重要信号通路的遗传学异常及其在骨肉瘤发生、发展中的作用.方法 应用aCGH检测10例新鲜骨肉瘤标本的基因拷贝数变化,然后利用基因和基因组京都百科全书通路分析方法(Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes,KEGG)确定骨肉瘤有关信号通路的基因改变,并采用荧光原位杂交(fluorescence in situ hybridization,FISH)和免疫组织化学染色(Immunohistochemistry,IHC)等方法进行验证.结果 对10例骨肉瘤标本的aCGH数据进行KEGG通路分析发现33条信号通路的分子有明显的基因拷贝数改变,20条信号通路的分子存在明显的基因扩增,如血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)和mTOR通路;13条信号通路的分子存在明显的基因缺失,如Wnt和Hedgehog通路.另外,还发现与细胞-细胞-基质相互作用相关的信号通路也存在明显的遗传学改变,如CAMs和紧密连接信号通路存在基因扩增、黏着连接通路存在基因缺失.通过荧光原位杂交的方法证实VEGF信号通路中的VEGFA基因明显扩增,通过免疫组织化学染色方法证实骨肉瘤中VEGFA蛋白高表达,并且与微血管密度紧密相关.结论 骨肉瘤信号通路的遗传学改变涉及VEGF、mTOR、Wnt、Hedgehog、CAMs、紧密连接、黏着连接信号通路及其他26条信号通路,这些信号通路的遗传学改变可能与骨肉瘤的发生、发展有关,为骨肉瘤针对特定信号通路的靶向治疗提供了有力的分子遗传学依据.%Objective To performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) detection and carried out pathway analysis to gain a systemic view on the pathway alterations of the genetically altered genes in human osteosarcoma.Methods aCGH experiments were carried on 10 fresh osteosarcoma samples to obtain recurrent copy

  17. Knowing and doing: research leading to action in the conservation of forest genetic diversity of Patagonian temperate forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Leonardo A; Marchelli, Paula; Chauchard, Luis; Peñalba, Marcelo Gonzalez

    2009-08-01

    Researchers dealing with conservation subjects usually do not put the results of their work into practice, even when the primary purpose of their research is the preservation of biodiversity. In the South American temperate forests we identified an area with the highest genetic diversity in Argentina of Nothofagus nervosa, one of the most relevant southern beech species. Based on the information of our scientific study and our recommendations, the authorities of Lanin National Park changed the protection status of this area to avoid logging. The new forestry management plans include consideration of "high genetic diversity" in decisions on where logging will be allowed. Results of our initial genetic study induced the analysis of biodiversity at the species and ecosystems levels, which yielded results similar to our genetic studies. A strong connection among researchers and managers from the onset of our study and the awareness of the former about the importance of the implementation of the research work were key to bridging the gap between conservation research and conservation practice.

  18. Hybridization Leads to Loss of Genetic Integrity in Shortleaf Pine: Unexpected Consequences of Pine Management and Fire Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Tauer; John F. Stewart; Rodney E. Will; Curtis J. Lilly; James M. Guldin; C. Dana Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization between shortleaf pine and loblolly pine is causing loss of genetic integrity (the tendency of a population to maintain its genotypes over generations) in shortleaf pine, a species already exhibiting dramatic declines due to land-use changes. Recent findings indicate hybridization has increased in shortleaf pine stands from 3% during the 1950s to 45% for...

  19. How could differences in 'control over destiny' lead to socio-economic inequalities in health? A synthesis of theories and pathways in the living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Margaret; Pennington, Andy; Orton, Lois; Nayak, Shilpa; Petticrew, Mark; Sowden, Amanda; White, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We conducted the first synthesis of theories on causal associations and pathways connecting degree of control in the living environment to socio-economic inequalities in health-related outcomes. We identified the main theories about how differences in 'control over destiny' could lead to socio-economic inequalities in health, and conceptualised these at three distinct explanatory levels: micro/personal; meso/community; and macro/societal. These levels are interrelated but have rarely been considered together in the disparate literatures in which they are located. This synthesis of theories provides new conceptual frameworks to contribute to the design and conduct of theory-led evaluations of actions to tackle inequalities in health.

  20. Dementia revealed: novel chromosome 6 locus for late-onset Alzheimer disease provides genetic evidence for folate-pathway abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Naj

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD have consistently observed strong evidence of association with polymorphisms in APOE. However, until recently, variants at few other loci with statistically significant associations have replicated across studies. The present study combines data on 483,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from a previously reported GWAS of 492 LOAD cases and 496 controls and from an independent set of 439 LOAD cases and 608 controls to strengthen power to identify novel genetic association signals. Associations exceeding the experiment-wide significance threshold (alpha=1.03x10(-7 were replicated in an additional 1,338 cases and 2,003 controls. As expected, these analyses unequivocally confirmed APOE's risk effect (rs2075650, P=1.9x10(-36. Additionally, the SNP rs11754661 at 151.2 Mb of chromosome 6q25.1 in the gene MTHFD1L (which encodes the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NADP+ dependent 1-like protein was significantly associated with LOAD (P=4.70x10(-8; Bonferroni-corrected P=0.022. Subsequent genotyping of SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r2>0.8 with rs11754661 identified statistically significant associations in multiple SNPs (rs803424, P=0.016; rs2073067, P=0.03; rs2072064, P=0.035, reducing the likelihood of association due to genotyping error. In the replication case-control set, we observed an association of rs11754661 in the same direction as the previous association at P=0.002 (P=1.90x10(-10 in combined analysis of discovery and replication sets, with associations of similar statistical significance at several adjacent SNPs (rs17349743, P=0.005; rs803422, P=0.004. In summary, we observed and replicated a novel statistically significant association in MTHFD1L, a gene involved in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis pathway. This finding is noteworthy, as MTHFD1L may play a role in the generation of methionine from homocysteine and influence homocysteine

  1. Genetic associations of type 2 diabetes with islet amyloid polypeptide processing and degrading pathways in asian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kwok Lim Lam

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a complex disease characterized by beta cell dysfunctions. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is highly conserved and co-secreted with insulin with over 40% of autopsy cases of T2D showing islet amyloid formation due to IAPP aggregation. Dysregulation in IAPP processing, stabilization and degradation can cause excessive oligomerization with beta cell toxicity. Previous studies examining genetic associations of pathways implicated in IAPP metabolism have yielded conflicting results due to small sample size, insufficient interrogation of gene structure and gene-gene interactions. In this multi-staged study, we screened 89 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 6 candidate genes implicated in IAPP metabolism and tested for independent and joint associations with T2D and beta cell dysfunctions. Positive signals in the stage-1 were confirmed by de novo and in silico analysis in a multi-centre unrelated case-control cohort. We examined the association of significant SNPs with quantitative traits in a subset of controls and performed bioinformatics and relevant functional analyses. Amongst the tag SNPs, rs1583645 in carboxypeptidase E (CPE and rs6583813 in insulin degrading enzyme (IDE were associated with 1.09 to 1.28 fold increased risk of T2D (P Meta = 9.4×10(-3 and 0.02 respectively in a meta-analysis of East Asians. Using genetic risk scores (GRS with each risk variant scoring 1, subjects with GRS≥3 (8.2% of the cohort had 56% higher risk of T2D than those with GRS = 0 (P = 0.01. In a subcohort of control subjects, plasma IAPP increased and beta cell function index declined with GRS (P = 0.008 and 0.03 respectively. Bioinformatics and functional analyses of CPE rs1583645 predicted regulatory elements for chromatin modification and transcription factors, suggesting differential DNA-protein interactions and gene expression. Taken together, these results support the importance of dysregulation of IAPP

  2. Genetic Associations of Type 2 Diabetes with Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Processing and Degrading Pathways in Asian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Vincent Kwok Lim; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Lee, Heung Man; Hu, Cheng; Park, Kyong Soo; Furuta, Hiroto; Wang, Ying; Tam, Claudia Ha Ting; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E. Shyong; Morris, Andrew P.; Tang, Nelson Leung Sang; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping Chung; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Ozaki, Risa; Jia, Wei Ping; Lee, Hong Kyu; Nanjo, Kishio; Xu, Gang; Ng, Maggie Chor Yin; So, Wing-Yee; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease characterized by beta cell dysfunctions. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is highly conserved and co-secreted with insulin with over 40% of autopsy cases of T2D showing islet amyloid formation due to IAPP aggregation. Dysregulation in IAPP processing, stabilization and degradation can cause excessive oligomerization with beta cell toxicity. Previous studies examining genetic associations of pathways implicated in IAPP metabolism have yielded conflicting results due to small sample size, insufficient interrogation of gene structure and gene-gene interactions. In this multi-staged study, we screened 89 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6 candidate genes implicated in IAPP metabolism and tested for independent and joint associations with T2D and beta cell dysfunctions. Positive signals in the stage-1 were confirmed by de novo and in silico analysis in a multi-centre unrelated case-control cohort. We examined the association of significant SNPs with quantitative traits in a subset of controls and performed bioinformatics and relevant functional analyses. Amongst the tag SNPs, rs1583645 in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and rs6583813 in insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) were associated with 1.09 to 1.28 fold increased risk of T2D (PMeta = 9.4×10−3 and 0.02 respectively) in a meta-analysis of East Asians. Using genetic risk scores (GRS) with each risk variant scoring 1, subjects with GRS≥3 (8.2% of the cohort) had 56% higher risk of T2D than those with GRS = 0 (P = 0.01). In a subcohort of control subjects, plasma IAPP increased and beta cell function index declined with GRS (P = 0.008 and 0.03 respectively). Bioinformatics and functional analyses of CPE rs1583645 predicted regulatory elements for chromatin modification and transcription factors, suggesting differential DNA-protein interactions and gene expression. Taken together, these results support the importance of dysregulation of IAPP metabolism in

  3. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.;

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three...

  4. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  5. Genetic variability within the cholesterol lowering pathway and the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Bas J M; Pett, Helmi; Klungel, Olaf H; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Psaty, Bruce M; Glazer, Nicole L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Bis, Josh C; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2011-08-01

    Genetic variability has been shown to affect statin responsiveness. Participants from the Utrecht Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics (UCP) studies were enrolled from a population-based registry of pharmacy records linked to hospital discharge records (PHARMO) to investigate tagging SNPs within candidate genes involved in the cholesterol lowering pathway for modification of the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who received a prescription for an antihypertensive drug and/or had hypercholesterolemia were selected from the PHARMO database. We designed a nested case-control study in which cases were hospitalized for MI and controls were not. Patients were contacted through their community pharmacies. For this study, only hypercholesterolemic participants were selected. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate pharmacogenetic interactions. The Heart and Vascular Health Study (HVH) was used to replicate findings from UCP. The study population included 668 cases and 1217 controls. We selected 231 SNPs of which 209 SNPs in 27 genes passed quality control. Ten SNPs in eight genes were found to influence the effectiveness of statins in UCP, of which the most significant interaction was found with SCARB1 rs4765615. Other genes that reached statistical significance (p<0.05) included two SNPs in PCSK9 (rs10888896 and rs505151 (E670G)), two SNPs in ABCG5 (rs4245786 and rs1864815), LIPC rs16940379, ABCA1 rs4149264, PPARG rs2972164, LRP1 rs715948, and SOAT1 rs2493121. None of the total of 5 SNPs that were available for replication in HVH reached statistical significance. In conclusion, ten SNPs were found to modify the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI in the UCP study. Five were also tested in the HVH study, but no interactions reached statistical significance.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change--the DiOGenes study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaidong Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects. AIM: We conducted a case-cohort study to investigate the associations of SNPs in candidate genes with weight change during an average of 6.8 years of follow-up and to examine the potential effect modification by glycemic index (GI and protein intake. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants, aged 20-60 years at baseline, came from five European countries. Cases ('weight gainers' were selected from the total eligible cohort (n = 50,293 as those with the greatest unexplained annual weight gain (n = 5,584. A random subcohort (n = 6,566 was drawn with the intention to obtain an equal number of cases and noncases (n = 5,507. We genotyped 134 SNPs that captured all common genetic variation across the 15 candidate genes; 123 met the quality control criteria. Each SNP was tested for association with the risk of being a 'weight gainer' (logistic regression models in the case-noncase data and with weight gain (linear regression models in the random subcohort data. After accounting for multiple testing, none of the SNPs was significantly associated with weight change. Furthermore, we observed no significant effect modification by dietary factors, except for SNP rs7180849 in the neuromedin β gene (NMB. Carriers of the minor allele had a more pronounced weight gain at a higher GI (P = 2 x 10⁻⁷. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of association between SNPs in the studied hypothalamic genes with weight change. The interaction between GI and NMB SNP rs7180849 needs further confirmation.

  7. Genetic Drift during Systemic Arbovirus Infection of Mosquito Vectors Leads to Decreased Relative Fitness during Host Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Murrieta, Reyes A; Fauver, Joseph R; Garcia-Luna, Selene M; Prasad, Abhishek N; Black, William C; Ebel, Gregory D

    2016-04-13

    The emergence of mosquito-borne RNA viruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), is facilitated by genetically complex virus populations within hosts. Here, we determine whether WNV enzootic (Culex tarsalis, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. pipiens) and bridge vectors (Aedes aegypti) have differential impacts on viral mutational diversity and fitness. During systemic mosquito infection, WNV faced stochastic reductions in genetic diversity that rapidly was recovered during intra-tissue population expansions. Interestingly, this intrahost selection and diversification was mosquito species dependent with Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus exhibiting greater WNV divergence. However, recovered viral populations contained a preponderance of potentially deleterious mutations (i.e., high mutational load) and had lower relative fitness in avian cells compared to input virus. These findings demonstrate that the adaptive potential associated with mosquito transmission varies depending on the mosquito species and carries a significant fitness cost in vertebrates.

  8. DMPD: Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1757110 Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Bl... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gene story. Pubmed...ID 1757110 Title Genetic regulation of macrophage priming/activation: the Lsh gen

  9. Selection in a fluctuating environment leads to decreased genetic variation and facilitates the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallsson, L R; Björklund, M

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the environment are expected to induce changes in the quantitative genetic variation, which influences the ability of a population to adapt to environmental change. Furthermore, environmental changes are not constant in time, but fluctuate. Here, we investigate the effect of rapid, continuous and/or fluctuating temperature changes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using an evolution experiment followed by a split-brood experiment. In line with expectations, individuals responded in a plastic way and had an overall higher potential to respond to selection after a rapid change in the environment. After selection in an environment with increasing temperature, plasticity remained unchanged (or decreased) and environmental variation decreased, especially when fluctuations were added; these results were unexpected. As expected, the genetic variation decreased after fluctuating selection. Our results suggest that fluctuations in the environment have major impact on the response of a population to environmental change; in a highly variable environment with low predictability, a plastic response might not be beneficial and the response is genetically and environmentally canalized resulting in a low potential to respond to selection and low environmental sensitivity. Interestingly, we found greater variation for phenotypic plasticity after selection, suggesting that the potential for plasticity to evolve is facilitated after exposure to environmental fluctuations. Our study highlights that environmental fluctuations should be considered when investigating the response of a population to environmental change.

  10. Molecular pathways leading to loss of skeletal muscle mass in cancer cachexia--can findings from animal models be translated to humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Bachmann, Jeannine; Prokopchuk, Olga; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc E

    2016-02-08

    Cachexia is a multi-factorial, systemic syndrome that especially affects patients with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, and leads to reduced treatment response, survival and quality of life. The most important clinical feature of cachexia is the excessive wasting of skeletal muscle mass. Currently, an effective treatment is still lacking and the search for therapeutic targets continues. Even though a substantial number of animal studies have contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, subsequent clinical trials of potential new drugs have not yet yielded any effective treatment for cancer cachexia. Therefore, we questioned to which degree findings from animal studies can be translated to humans in clinical practice and research. A substantial amount of animal studies on the molecular mechanisms of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia has been conducted in recent years. This extensive review of the literature showed that most of their observations could not be consistently reproduced in studies on human skeletal muscle samples. However, studies on human material are scarce and limited in patient numbers and homogeneity. Therefore, their results have to be interpreted critically. More research is needed on human tissue samples to clarify the signaling pathways that lead to skeletal muscle loss, and to confirm pre-selected drug targets from animal models in clinical trials. In addition, improved diagnostic tools and standardized clinical criteria for cancer cachexia are needed to conduct standardized, randomized controlled trials of potential drug candidates in the future.

  11. Health risk assessment of various metal(loid)s via multiple exposure pathways on children living near a typical lead-acid battery plant, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Suzhen; Duan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiuge; Wang, Beibei; Ma, Jin; Fan, Delong; Sun, Chengye; He, Bin; Wei, Fusheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-05-01

    Manufacture of lead-acid batteries is of widespread interest because of its emissions of heavy metals and metalloids into environment, harming environmental quality and consequently causing detrimental effects on human health. In this study, exposure pathways and health risks of children to heavy metal(loid)s (Pb, Cd, As, etc) were investigated based on field sampling and questionnaire. Pb was one of the most abundant elements in children's blood, with an elevated blood lead level of 12.45 μg dL(-1). Soil/dust and food were heavily polluted by targeted metal(loid)s. Food ingestion accounted for more than 80% of the total exposure for most metal(loid)s. The non-cancer risks to children were 3-10 times higher than the acceptable level of 1, while the cancer risks were 5-200 times higher than the maximum acceptable level of 1.0 × 10(-4). The study emphasized the significance of effective environmental management, particularly to ensure food security near battery facilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of protein kinase C delta following cerebral ischemia leads to release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria via bad pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjan R Dave

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria following cerebral ischemia is a key event leading to cell death. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in post-ischemic activation of protein kinase c delta (δPKC that lead to cytochrome c release. METHODS/FINDINGS: We used a rat model of cardiac arrest as an in vivo model, and an in vitro analog, oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Cardiac arrest triggered translocation of δPKC to the mitochondrial fraction at 1 h reperfusion. In synaptosomes, the peptide inhibitor of δPKC blocked OGD-induced translocation to the mitochondria. We tested two potential pathways by which δPKC activation could lead to cytochrome c release: phosphorylation of phospholipid scramblase-3 (PLSCR3 and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Cardiac arrest increased levels of phosphorlyated PLSCR3; however, inhibition of δPKC translocation failed to affect the OGD-induced increase in PLSCR3 in synaptosomal mitochondria suggesting the post-ischemic phosphorylation of PLSCR3 is not mediated by δPKC. Inhibition of either δPKC or PP2A decreased cytochrome c release from synaptosomal mitochondria. Cardiac arrest results in the dephosphorylation of Bad and Bax, both downstream targets of PP2A promoting apoptosis. Inhibition of δPKC or PP2A prevented OGD-induced Bad, but not Bax, dephosphorylation. To complement these studies, we used proteomics to identify novel mitochondrial substrates of δPKC. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that δPKC initiates cytochrome c release via phosphorylation of PP2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Bad and identified δPKC, PP2A and additional mitochondrial proteins as potential therapeutic targets for ischemic neuroprotection.

  13. Pathways for the release of polonium from a lead-bismuth spallation target (thermochemical calculation); Verfluechtigungspfade des Poloniums aus einem Pb-Bi-Spallationstarget (Thermochemische Kalkulation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, B.; Neuhausen, J

    2004-06-01

    An analysis of literature data for the thermochemical constants of polonium reveals considerable discrepancies in the relations of these data among each other as well as in their expected trends within the chalcogen group. This fact hinders a reliable assessment of possible reaction paths for the release of polonium from a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target. In this work an attempt is made to construct a coherent data set for the thermochemical properties of polonium and some of its compounds that are of particular importance with respect to the behaviour of polonium in a liquid Pb-Bi target. This data set is based on extrapolations using general trends throughout the periodic table and, in particular, within the chalcogen group. Consequently, no high accuracy should be attributed to the derived data set. However, the data set derived in this work is consistent with definitely known experimental data. Furthermore, it complies with the general trends of physicochemical properties within the chalcogen group. Finally, well known relations between thermochemical quantities are fulfilled by the data derived in this work. Thus, given the lack of accurate experimental data it can be regarded as best available data. Thermochemical constants of polonium hydride, lead polonide and polonium dioxide are derived based on extrapolative procedures. Furthermore, the possibility of formation of the gaseous intermetallic molecule BiPo, which has been omitted from discussion up to now, is investigated. From the derived thermochemical data the equilibrium constants of formation, release and dissociation reactions are calculated for different polonium containing species. Furthermore equilibrium constants are determined for the reaction of lead polonide and polonium dioxide with hydrogen, water vapour and the target components lead and bismuth. The most probable release pathways are discussed. From thermochemical evaluations polonium is expected to be released from liquid lead

  14. Pinitol targets nuclear factor-kappaB activation pathway leading to inhibition of gene products associated with proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-06-01

    Pinitol (3-O-methyl-chiroinositol), a component of traditional Ayurvedic medicine (talisapatra), has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic activities through undefined mechanisms. Because the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has been linked with inflammatory diseases, including insulin resistance, we hypothesized that pinitol must mediate its effects through modulation of NF-kappaB activation pathway. We found that pinitol suppressed NF-kappaB activation induced by inflammatory stimuli and carcinogens. This suppression was not specific to cell type. Besides inducible, pinitol also abrogated constitutive NF-kappaB activation noted in most tumor cells. The suppression of NF-kappaB activation by pinitol occurred through inhibition of the activation of IkappaBalpha kinase, leading to sequential suppression of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, IkappaBalpha degradation, p65 phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene expression. Pinitol also suppressed the NF-kappaB reporter activity induced by tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-1, TNFR-associated death domain, TNFR-associated factor-2, transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase-1 (TAK-1)/TAK1-binding protein-1, and IkappaBalpha kinase but not that induced by p65. The inhibition of NF-kappaB activation thereby led to down-regulation of gene products involved in inflammation (cyclooxygenase-2), proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-myc), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), and cell survival (cIAP1, cIAP2, X-linked inhibitor apoptosis protein, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL). Suppression of these gene products by pinitol enhanced the apoptosis induced by TNF and chemotherapeutic agents and suppressed TNF-induced cellular invasion. Our results show that pinitol inhibits the NF-kappaB activation pathway, which may explain its ability to suppress inflammatory cellular responses.

  15. SpA, ClfA, and FnbA Genetic Variations Lead to Staphaurex Test-Negative Phenotypes in Bovine Mastitis Staphylococcus aureus Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Katrin; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus encodes many proteins that act as virulence factors, leading to a variety of diseases, including mastitis in cows. Among these virulence factors, SpA, ClfA, ClfB, FnbA, and FnbB are important for the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and invade host cells as well as to evade host immune responses. The interaction between these S. aureus surface proteins and human immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen that are coupled to latex particles is utilized to induce latex agglutination reactions, which are used widely in diagnostic kits for confirmation of presumptive S. aureus isolates. In this study, the Staphaurex latex agglutination test was performed on a collection of confirmed bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates. Notably, 54% (43/79 isolates) of these isolates exhibited latex agglutination-negative phenotypes (Staphaurex-negative result). To gain insights into the reasons for the high frequency of Staphaurex-negative bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates, the spa, clfA, clfB, fnbA, and fnbB genes were examined. Specific genetic changes in spa, clfA, and fnbA, as well as a loss of fnbB, which may impair SpA, ClfA, FnbA, and FnbB functions in latex agglutination reactions, were detected in Staphaurex-negative S. aureus isolates. The genetic changes included a premature stop codon in the spa gene, leading to a truncated SpA protein that is unable to participate in S. aureus cell-mediated agglutination of latex particles. In addition, clfA and fnbA genetic polymorphisms were detected that were linked to ClfA and FnbA amino acid changes that may significantly reduce fibrinogen-binding activity. The genetic variations in these S. aureus isolates might also have implications for their bovine mastitis virulence capacity. PMID:21147952

  16. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhugashvili, Maia [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid Oncology Institute (Group IMO), Murcia (Spain); Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Conesa-Zamora, Pablo [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Escolar, Pedro Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Santa Lucía, Cartagena (Spain); Calvo, Felipe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University General Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Vicente, Vicente [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain); Ayala de la Peña, Francisco, E-mail: frayala@um.es [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  17. Method for the production of l-serine using genetically engineered microorganisms deficient in serine degradation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes encoding for enzymes...... concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  18. Genetic control of courtship behavior in the housefly: evidence for a conserved bifurcation of the sex-determining pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Meier

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, genes of the sex-determination hierarchy orchestrate the development and differentiation of sex-specific tissues, establishing sex-specific physiology and neural circuitry. One of these sex-determination genes, fruitless (fru, plays a key role in the formation of neural circuits underlying Drosophila male courtship behavior. Conservation of fru gene structure and sex-specific expression has been found in several insect orders, though it is still to be determined whether a male courtship role for the gene is employed in these species due to the lack of mutants and homologous experimental evidence. We have isolated the fru ortholog (Md-fru from the common housefly, Musca domestica, and show the gene's conserved genomic structure. We demonstrate that male-specific Md-fru transcripts arise by conserved mechanisms of sex-specific splicing. Here we show that Md-fru, is similarly involved in controlling male courtship behavior. A male courtship behavioral function for Md-fru was revealed by the behavioral and neuroanatomical analyses of a hypomorphic allele, Md-tra(man , which specifically disrupted the expression of Md-fru in males, leading to severely impaired male courtship behavior. In line with a role in nervous system development, we found that expression of Md-fru was confined to neural tissues in the brain, most prominently in optic neuropil and in peripheral sensory organs. We propose that, like in Drosophila, overt sexual differentiation of the housefly depends on a sex-determining pathway that bifurcates downstream of the Md-tra gene to coordinate dimorphic development of non-neuronal tissues mediated by Md-dsx with that of neuronal tissues largely mediated by Md-fru.

  19. Multivariate imaging-genetics study of MRI gray matter volume and SNPs reveals biological pathways correlated with brain structural differences in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Khadka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder affecting children, adolescents, and adults. Its etiology is not well-understood, but it is increasingly believed to result from diverse pathophysiologies that affect the structure and function of specific brain circuits. Although one of the best-studied neurobiological abnormalities in ADHD is reduced fronto-striatal-cerebellar gray matter volume, its specific genetic correlates are largely unknown. Methods: In this study, T1-weighted MR images of brain structure were collected from 198 adolescents (63 ADHD-diagnosed. A multivariate parallel independent component analysis technique (Para-ICA identified imaging-genetic relationships between regional gray matter volume and single nucleotide polymorphism data. Results: Para-ICA analyses extracted 14 components from genetic data and 9 from MR data. An iterative cross-validation using randomly-chosen sub-samples indicated acceptable stability of these ICA solutions. A series of partial correlation analyses controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity revealed two genotype-phenotype component pairs significantly differed between ADHD and non-ADHD groups, after a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The brain phenotype component not only included structures frequently found to have abnormally low volume in previous ADHD studies, but was also significantly associated with ADHD differences in symptom severity and performance on cognitive tests frequently found to be impaired in patients diagnosed with the disorder. Pathway analysis of the genotype component identified several different biological pathways linked to these structural abnormalities in ADHD. Conclusions: Some of these pathways implicate well-known dopaminergic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment hypothesized to be abnormal in ADHD. Other more recently implicated pathways included glutamatergic and GABA-eric physiological systems

  20. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gradinaru

    Full Text Available α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs. α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant, different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  1. Antipodean white sharks on a Mediterranean walkabout? Historical dispersal leads to genetic discontinuity and an endangered anomalous population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubili, Chrysoula; Bilgin, Rasit; Kalkan, Evrim; Karhan, S Ünsal; Jones, Catherine S; Sims, David W; Kabasakal, Hakan; Martin, Andrew P; Noble, Leslie R

    2011-06-07

    The provenance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Mediterranean is both a conundrum and an important conservation issue. Considering this species's propensity for natal philopatry, any evidence that the Mediterranean stock has little or no contemporary immigration from the Atlantic would suggest that it is extraordinarily vulnerable. To address this issue we sequenced the mitochondrial control region of four rare Mediterranean white sharks. Unexpectedly, the juvenile sequences were identical although collected at different locations and times, showing little genetic differentiation from Indo-Pacific lineages, but strong separation from geographically closer Atlantic/western Indian Ocean haplotypes. Historical long-distance dispersal (probably a consequence of navigational error during past climatic oscillations) and potential founder effects are invoked to explain the anomalous relationships of this isolated 'sink' population, highlighting the present vulnerability of its nursery grounds.

  2. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  3. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  4. Fine particulate matter leads to reproductive impairment in male rats by overexpressing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Ning; Yan, Chao; Liu, Dong-Yao; Peng, Jin-Pu; Chen, Jin-Jun; Zhou, Yue; Long, Chun-Lan; He, Da-Wei; Lin, Tao; Shen, Lian-Ju; Wei, Guang-Hui

    2015-09-17

    Maintenance of male reproductive function depends on normal sperm generation during which process Sertoli cells play a vital role. Studies found that fine particulate matter (PM) causes decreased male sperm quality, mechanism of which unestablished. We aim to investigate the definite mechanism of PM impairment on male reproduction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were daily exposed to normal saline (NS) or PM2.5 with the doses of 9 mg/kg.b.w and 24 mg/kg.b.w. via intratracheal instillation for seven weeks. Reproductive function was tested by mating test and semen analysis after last exposure. Testes were collected to assess changes in histomorphology, and biomarkers including connexin 43 (Cx43), superoxide dismutase (SOD), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt). Male rats exposed to PM2.5 showed noticeable decreased fertility, significantly reduced sperm count, increased sperm abnormality rate and severe testicular damage in histomorphology. After PM2.5 exposure, the levels of Cx43 was significantly downregulated, and SOD was upregulated and downregulated significantly with different dose, respectively. Protein expression of PI3K and p-Akt dramatically enhanced, and the later one being located in Sertoli cells, the upward or declining trend was in dose dependent. PM2.5 exposure leads to oxidative stress impairment via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on male reproduction in rats.

  5. Signal transduction pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in cancer cells by Allium vegetable-derived organosulfur compounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Singh, Shivendra V

    2004-11-02

    Epidemiological studies continue to support the premise that dietary intake of Allium vegetables (e.g., garlic, onions and so forth) may lower the risk of various types of cancer. Anticarcinogenic effect of Allium vegetables is attributed to organosulfur compounds (OSCs) that are generated upon processing of these vegetables. Preclinical studies have provided convincing evidence to indicate that Allium vegetable-derived OSCs including diallyl sulfide, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide are highly effective in affording protection against cancer in laboratory animals induced by a variety of chemical carcinogens. Inhibition of carcinogen activation through modulation of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases and/or acceleration of carcinogen detoxification via induction of phase II enzymes (glutathione transferases, quinone reductase, etc.) are believed to be responsible for protective effects of OSCs against chemically induced cancers. More recent studies have indicated that some naturally occurring OSC analogues can suppress proliferation of cancer cells in culture and inhibit growth of transplanted tumor xenografts in vivo by inducing apoptosis and/or by perturbing cell cycle progression. This review summarizes current knowledge on signal transduction pathways leading to perturbations in cell cycle progression and apoptosis induction by OSCs.

  6. Genetic variants in PI3K/AKT pathway are associated with severe radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Liu, Bo; Li, Jing; Wu, Huanlei; Yang, Ju; Zhou, Xiao; Yi, Mingxiao; Li, Qianxia; Yu, Shiying; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    PI3K/AKT pathway plays important roles in inflammatory and fibrotic diseases while its connection to radiation pneumonitis (RP) is unclear. In this study, we explored the associations of genetic variants in PI3K/AKT pathway with RP in lung cancer patients with radiotherapy. Two hundred and sixty one lung cancer patients with radiotherapy were included in this prospective study (NCT02490319) and genotyped by MassArray and Sanger Sequence methods. By multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, GA/GG genotype of AKT2: rs33933140 (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.140-0.530, P = 1.3E-4, Pc = 9.1E-4), and the GT/GG genotype of PI3CA: rs9838117 (HR = 0.132, 95% CI: 0.042-0.416, P = 0.001, Pc = 0.006) were found to be strongly associated with a decreased occurrence of RP ≥ grade 3. And patients with the CT/TT genotype of AKT2: rs11880261 had a notably higher incidence of RP ≥ grade 3 (HR = 2.950, 95% CI: 1.380-6.305, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). We concluded that the genetic variants of PI3K/AKT pathway were significantly related to RP of grade ≥ 3 and may thus be predictors of severe RP before radiotherapy, if further validated in larger population.

  7. Genetic model for the chronic activation of skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase leads to glycogen accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Laura; Richardson, Christine; Hirshman, Michael F; Brozinick, Joseph; Fiering, Steven; Kemp, Bruce E; Goodyear, Laurie J; Witters, Lee A

    2007-03-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important metabolic sensor/effector that coordinates many of the changes in mammalian tissues during variations in energy availability. We have sought to create an in vivo genetic model of chronic AMPK activation, selecting murine skeletal muscle as a representative tissue where AMPK plays important roles. Muscle-selective expression of a mutant noncatalytic gamma1 subunit (R70Qgamma) of AMPK activates AMPK and increases muscle glycogen content. The increase in glycogen content requires the presence of the endogenous AMPK catalytic alpha-subunit, since the offspring of cross-breeding of these mice with mice expressing a dominant negative AMPKalpha subunit have normal glycogen content. In R70Qgamma1-expressing mice, there is a small, but significant, increase in muscle glycogen synthase (GSY) activity associated with an increase in the muscle expression of the liver isoform GSY2. The increase in glycogen content is accompanied, as might be expected, by an increase in exercise capacity. Transgene expression of this mutant AMPKgamma1 subunit may provide a useful model for the chronic activation of AMPK in other tissues to clarify its multiple roles in the regulation of metabolism and other physiological processes.

  8. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamasa; Miyazawa, Masaki; Takanashi, Yumi; Tanigawa, Maya; Yasuda, Kayo; Onouchi, Hiromi; Kawabe, Noboru; Mitsushita, Junji; Hartman, Phil S.; Ishii, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility. PMID:24936442

  9. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility.

  10. OsbHLH148, a basic helix-loop-helix protein, interacts with OsJAZ proteins in a jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ju-Seok; Joo, Joungsu; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong Seob; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Yang Do

    2011-03-01

    Jasmonates play important roles in development, stress responses and defense in plants. Here, we report the results of a study using a functional genomics approach that identified a rice basic helix-loop-helix domain gene, OsbHLH148, that conferred drought tolerance as a component of the jasmonate signaling module in rice. OsbHLH148 transcript levels were rapidly increased by treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or abscisic acid, and abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity, low temperature and wounding. Transgenic over-expression of OsbHLH148 in rice confers plant tolerance to drought stress. Expression profiling followed by DNA microarray and RNA gel-blot analyses of transgenic versus wild-type rice identified genes that are up-regulated by OsbHLH148 over-expression. These include OsDREB and OsJAZ genes that are involved in stress responses and the jasmonate signaling pathway, respectively. OsJAZ1, a rice ZIM domain protein, interacted with OsbHLH148 in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, but it interacted with the putative OsCOI1 only in the presence of coronatine. Furthermore, the OsJAZ1 protein was degraded by rice and Arabidopsis extracts in the presence of coronatine, and its degradation was inhibited by MG132, a 26S proteasome inhibitor, suggesting 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of OsJAZ1 via the SCF(OsCOI1) complex. The transcription level of OsJAZ1 increased upon exposure of rice to MeJA. These results show that OsJAZ1 could act as a transcriptional regulator of the OsbHLH148-related jasmonate signaling pathway leading to drought tolerance. Thus, our study suggests that OsbHLH148 acts on an initial response of jasmonate-regulated gene expression toward drought tolerance, constituting the OsbHLH148-OsJAZ-OsCOI1 signaling module in rice.

  11. Genetic substitution of Cdk1 by Cdk2 leads to embryonic lethality and loss of meiotic function of Cdk2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Ande; Berthet, Cyril; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Coppola, Vincenzo; Tessarollo, Lino; Kaldis, Philipp

    2008-10-01

    It was believed that Cdk2-cyclin E complexes are essential to drive cells through the G1-S phase transition. However, it was discovered recently that the mitotic kinase Cdk1 (Cdc2a) compensates for the loss of Cdk2. In the present study, we tested whether Cdk2 can compensate for the loss of Cdk1. We generated a knockin mouse in which the Cdk2 cDNA was knocked into the Cdk1 locus (Cdk1Cdk2KI). Substitution of both copies of Cdk1 by Cdk2 led to early embryonic lethality, even though Cdk2 was expressed from the Cdk1 locus. In addition, we generated Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI mice in which one copy of Cdk2 and one copy of Cdk1 were expressed from the Cdk1 locus and the Cdk2 gene was deleted from the endogenous Cdk2 locus. We found that both male and female Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI mice were sterile, similar to Cdk2-/- mice, even though they expressed the Cdk2 protein from the Cdk1 locus in testes. The translocational and cell cycle properties of knockin Cdk2 in Cdk2-/- Cdk1+/Cdk2KI cells were comparable to those of endogenous Cdk2, but we detected premature transcriptional activation of Cdk1 during liver regeneration in the absence of Cdk2. This study provides evidence of the molecular differences between Cdk2 and Cdk1 and highlights that the timing of transcriptional activation and the genetic locus play important roles in determining the function of Cdk proteins in vivo.

  12. Regulation of skeletal muscle growth by the IGF1-Akt/PKB pathway: insights from genetic models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Mammucari, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A highly conserved signaling pathway involving insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), and a cascade of intracellular components that mediate its effects, plays a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth...

  13. Progress in Understanding the Genetic Information and Biosynthetic Pathways behind Amycolatopsis Antibiotics, with Implications for the Continued Discovery of Novel Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su; Wu, Qihao; Shen, Qingqing; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Species of Amycolatopsis, well recognized as producers of both vancomycin and rifamycin, are also known for producing other secondary metabolites, with wide usage in medicine and agriculture. The molecular genetics of natural antibiotics produced by this genus have been well studied. Since the rise of antibiotic resistance, finding new drugs to fight infection has become an urgent priority. Progress in understanding the biosynthesis of metabolites greatly helps the rational manipulation of biosynthetic pathways, and thus to achieve the goal of generating novel natural antibiotics. The efforts made in exploiting Amycolatopsis genome sequences for the discovery of novel natural products and biosynthetic pathways are summarized. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A Functional Genetic Screen Identifies the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Pathway as a Determinant of Resistance to Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors in FGFR Mutant Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqin; Šuštić, Tonći; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lieftink, Cor; Halonen, Pasi; van de Ven, Marieke; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Bernards, René; van der Heijden, Michiel S

    2017-01-17

    Activating mutations and translocations of the FGFR3 gene are commonly seen in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder and urinary tract. Several fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors are currently in clinical development and response rates appear promising for advanced UCC. A common problem with targeted therapeutics is intrinsic or acquired resistance of the cancer cells. To find potential drug targets that can act synergistically with FGFR inhibition, we performed a synthetic lethality screen for the FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 using a short hairpin RNA library targeting the human kinome in the UCC cell line RT112 (FGFR3-TACC3 translocation). We identified multiple members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and found that inhibition of PIK3CA acts synergistically with FGFR inhibitors. The PI3K inhibitor BKM120 acted synergistically with inhibition of FGFR in multiple UCC and lung cancer cell lines having FGFR mutations. Consistently, we observed an elevated PI3K-protein kinase B pathway activity resulting from epidermal growth factor receptor or Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 3 reactivation caused by FGFR inhibition as the underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy. Our data show that feedback pathways activated by FGFR inhibition converge on the PI3K pathway. These findings provide a strong rationale to test FGFR inhibitors in combination with PI3K inhibitors in cancers harboring genetic activation of FGFR genes.

  15. Genetic View To Stroke Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Yoosefee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death. The role of genetics in the etiology and development of this disease is undeniable. As a result of inadequate previous research, more and more studies in the field of genetics are necessary to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, which in turn, may lead to new therapeutic approaches. However, due to the multifactorial nature of stroke and the few studies conducted in this field, genetic diversity is able to predict only a small fraction of the risk of disease. On the other hand, studies have shown genetically different architecture for different types of stroke, and finally pharmacogenomics as an important part of personalized medicine approach, is influenced by genetic studies, all of which confirm the need of addressing the topic by researchers.

  16. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, Peter M.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I.; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Witte, John S.; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hunter, David J.; Garber, Judy E.; Joshi, Amit D.; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F.; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, though GWAS have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Methods We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 SNPs, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. Results We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (p < 5.09 × 10−6), MSH5 (p < 5.09 × 10−6) and BRCA2 (p = 5.70 × 10−6). Hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Conclusions Only three susceptibility loci were identified which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Impact Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. PMID:26637267

  17. Carrying-over effects of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression of oocytes: species difference and the signaling pathway leading to MPF activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Zhong Jiao

    Full Text Available Efforts to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes by blocking germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD and allowing more time for ooplasmic maturation have achieved little due to a lack of knowledge on the molecular events during GVBD blocking. Such knowledge is also important for studies aimed at regulating gene expression in maturing oocytes prior to GVBD. We studied species difference and signaling pathways leading to the carrying-over effect of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression (PBMP. Overall, GVBD-blocking with roscovitine decelerated PBMP of mouse oocytes but accelerated that of pig oocytes. During blocking culture, whereas cyclin B of pig oocytes increased continuously, that of mouse oocytes declined first and then increased slowly. In both species, (a whereas active CDC2A showed a dynamics similar to cyclin B, inactive CDC2A decreased continuously; (b when oocytes were blocked in blocking medium containing cycloheximide, PBMP was decelerated significantly while cyclin B and active CDC2A decreasing to the lowest level; (c whereas sodium vanadate in blocking medium reduced PBMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF in blocking medium accelerated PBMP significantly with no effect on cyclin B levels. In conclusion, the EGF signaling cascade accelerated PBMP by promoting the pre-MPF (M-phase-promoting factor to MPF conversion during GVBD blocking with roscovitine. The significant difference in PBMP observed between mouse and pig oocytes was caused by species difference in cyclin B dynamics during blocking culture as no species difference was observed in either pre-MPF to MPF conversion or the EGF signaling activity.

  18. Carrying-Over Effects of GVBD Blocking on Post-Blocking Meiotic Progression of Oocytes: Species Difference and the Signaling Pathway Leading to MPF Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Lian, Hua-Yu; Gao, Yan; Sun, Ming-Ju; Gong, Shuai; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Chuan-Xin; Tan, Jing-He

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes by blocking germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and allowing more time for ooplasmic maturation have achieved little due to a lack of knowledge on the molecular events during GVBD blocking. Such knowledge is also important for studies aimed at regulating gene expression in maturing oocytes prior to GVBD. We studied species difference and signaling pathways leading to the carrying-over effect of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression (PBMP). Overall, GVBD-blocking with roscovitine decelerated PBMP of mouse oocytes but accelerated that of pig oocytes. During blocking culture, whereas cyclin B of pig oocytes increased continuously, that of mouse oocytes declined first and then increased slowly. In both species, (a) whereas active CDC2A showed a dynamics similar to cyclin B, inactive CDC2A decreased continuously; (b) when oocytes were blocked in blocking medium containing cycloheximide, PBMP was decelerated significantly while cyclin B and active CDC2A decreasing to the lowest level; (c) whereas sodium vanadate in blocking medium reduced PBMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF) in blocking medium accelerated PBMP significantly with no effect on cyclin B levels. In conclusion, the EGF signaling cascade accelerated PBMP by promoting the pre-MPF (M-phase-promoting factor) to MPF conversion during GVBD blocking with roscovitine. The significant difference in PBMP observed between mouse and pig oocytes was caused by species difference in cyclin B dynamics during blocking culture as no species difference was observed in either pre-MPF to MPF conversion or the EGF signaling activity. PMID:25078078

  19. Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae Infection Upregulates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Leads to Caspase-1-Dependent Secretion of Interleukin-1β - A Possible Pathway of Exacerbations in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Rotta Detto Loria

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is the most common cause for bacterial exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Recent investigations suggest the participation of the inflammasome in the pathomechanism of airway inflammation. The inflammasome is a cytosolic protein complex important for early inflammatory responses, by processing Interleukin-1β (IL-1β to its active form.Since inflammasome activation has been described for a variety of inflammatory diseases, we investigated whether this pathway plays a role in NTHi infection of the airways.A murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7, human alveolar macrophages and human lung tissue (HLT were stimulated with viable or non-viable NTHi and/or nigericin, a potassium ionophore. Secreted cytokines were measured with ELISA and participating proteins detected via Western Blot or immunohistochemistry.Western Blot analysis of cells and immunohistochemistry of lung tissue detected the inflammasome key components NLRP3 and caspase-1 after stimulation, leading to a significant induction of IL-1β expression (RAW: control at the lower detection limit vs. NTHi 505±111pg/ml, p<0.01. Inhibition of caspase-1 in human lung tissue led to a significant reduction of IL-1β and IL-18 levels (IL-1β: NTHi 24 h 17423±3198pg/ml vs. NTHi+Z-YVAD-FMK 6961±1751pg/ml, p<0.01.Our data demonstrate the upregulation of the NRLP3-inflammasome during NTHi-induced inflammation in respiratory cells and tissues. Our findings concerning caspase-1 dependent IL-1β release suggest a role for the inflammasome in respiratory tract infections with NTHi which may be relevant for the pathogenesis of bacterial exacerbations in COPD.

  20. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Moore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  1. Association between genetic variants of the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway and the risk of stroke: a case-control study in the Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hao; ZHANG Jing; WANG Jun; SUN Tao; XIAO Hang; ZHANG Jin-song

    2013-01-01

    Background Leukotrienes are arachidonic acid derivatives long known for their inflammatory properties.Leukotrienebased inflammation has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in atherosclerosis,a major risk factor for several human diseases.Recently,human genetic studies from us and others suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in leukotriene pathway genes influence the risk of atherosclerotic diseases such as stroke.This study aimed to assess the role of additional leukotriene pathway genes as a stroke risk factor within the Chinese Han population.Methods We sequenced the promoter,exonic,and intronic regions of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5),and then genotyped five SNPs in LTA4H and four SNPs in ALOX5 among 691 cases with stroke and 732 controls from the Chinese population.Results We detected a significant association between an intronic SNP in LTA4H (rs6538697) and stroke in our subjects (adjusted odds ratio,recessive model,1.75; P=0.022); and the SNP rs2029253 in ALOX5 was associated with a decreased risk of stroke (adjusted odds ratio,0.76; 95% confidence interval,0.59-0.97).Conclusion Genetic variants in LTA4H and ALOX5 may modulate the risk of stroke in the Chinese Han population.

  2. Commonalities in biological pathways, genetics, and cellular mechanism between Alzheimer Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases: An in silico-updated overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Greig, Nigel H; Choi, Inho

    2017-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and well-studied neurodegenerative disease (ND). Biological pathways, pathophysiology and genetics of AD show commonalities with other NDs viz. Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), Prion Disease and Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Many of the NDs, sharing the common features and molecular mechanisms suggests that pathology may be directly comparable and be implicated in disease prevention and development of highly effective therapies. In this review, a brief description of pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and available treatment of various NDs have been explored with special emphasis on AD. Commonalities in these fatal NDs provide support for therapeutic advancements and enhance the understanding of disease manifestation. The studies concentrating on the commonalities in biological pathways, cellular mechanisms and genetics may provide the scope to researchers to identify few novel common target/s for disease prevention and development of effective common drugs for multi-neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Mining literature for a comprehensive pathway analysis: A case study for retrieval of homocysteine related genes for genetic and epigenetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Anubha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. It is also known to be associated with a variety of complex disorders. While there are a large number of independent studies implicating homocysteine in isolated pathways, the mechanism of homocysteine induced adverse effects are not clear. Homocysteine-induced modulation of gene expression through alteration of methylation status or by hitherto unknown mechanisms is predicted to lead to several pathological conditions either directly or indirectly. In the present manuscript, using literature mining approach, we have identified the genes that are modulated directly or indirectly by an elevated level of homocysteine. These genes were then placed in appropriate pathways in an attempt to understand the molecular basis of homocysteine induced complex disorders and to provide a resource for selection of genes for polymorphism screening and analysis of mutations as well as epigenetic modifications in relation to hyperhomocysteinemia. We have identified 135 genes in 1137 abstracts that either modulate the levels of homocysteine or are modulated by elevated levels of homocysteine. Mapping the genes to their respective pathways revealed that an elevated level of homocysteine leads to the atherosclerosis either by directly affecting lipid metabolism and transport or via oxidative stress and/or Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER stress. Elevated levels of homocysteine also decreases the bioavailability of nitric oxide and modulates the levels of other metabolites including S-adenosyl methionine and S-adenosyl homocysteine which may result in cardiovascular or neurological disorders. The ER stress emerges as the common pathway that relates to apoptosis, atherosclerosis and neurological disorders and is modulated by levels of homocysteine. The comprehensive network collated has lead to the identification of genes that are modulated by homocysteine indicating that homocysteine exerts its

  4. A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Predict Pathway Activation of Xenobiotic Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors(TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  5. The reverse cholesterol transport pathway improves understanding of genetic networks for fat deposition and muscle growth in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F1 bulls, 113 ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on the Hawaiian Islands: Implications for an introduction pathway into California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population genetic diversity of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii (the Big Island) was estimated using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. A total of 932 flies representing 36 sampled sites across...

  7. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  8. Two forward genetic screens for vein density mutants in sorghum converge on a cytochrome P450 gene in the brassinosteroid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Govinda; Thakur, Vivek; Dionora, Jacqueline; Karki, Shanta; Wanchana, Samart; Acebron, Kelvin; Larazo, Nikki; Garcia, Richard; Mabilangan, Abigail; Montecillo, Florencia; Danila, Florence; Mogul, Reychelle; Pablico, Paquito; Leung, Hei; Langdale, Jane A; Sheehy, John; Kelly, Steven; Quick, William Paul

    2015-10-01

    The specification of vascular patterning in plants has interested plant biologists for many years. In the last decade a new context has emerged for this interest. Specifically, recent proposals to engineer C(4) traits into C(3) plants such as rice require an understanding of how the distinctive venation pattern in the leaves of C(4) plants is determined. High vein density with Kranz anatomy, whereby photosynthetic cells are arranged in encircling layers around vascular bundles, is one of the major traits that differentiate C(4) species from C(3) species. To identify genetic factors that specify C(4) leaf anatomy, we generated ethyl methanesulfonate- and γ-ray-mutagenized populations of the C(4) species sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and screened for lines with reduced vein density. Two mutations were identified that conferred low vein density. Both mutations segregated in backcrossed F(2) populations as homozygous recessive alleles. Bulk segregant analysis using next-generation sequencing revealed that, in both cases, the mutant phenotype was associated with mutations in the CYP90D2 gene, which encodes an enzyme in the brassinosteroid biosynthesis pathway. Lack of complementation in allelism tests confirmed this result. These data indicate that the brassinosteroid pathway promotes high vein density in the sorghum leaf, and suggest that differences between C(4) and C(3) leaf anatomy may arise in part through differential activity of this pathway in the two leaf types.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the vitamin D pathway associating with circulating concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and non-skeletal health outcomes: Review of genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, David A; Walton, Robert T; Griffiths, Christopher J; Martineau, Adrian R

    2016-11-01

    Polymorphisms in genes encoding proteins involved in vitamin D metabolism and transport are recognised to influence vitamin D status. Syntheses of genetic association studies linking these variants to non-skeletal health outcomes are lacking. We therefore conducted a literature review to identify reports of statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 11 vitamin D pathway genes (DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP3A4, CYP27A1, DBP, LRP2, CUB, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, VDR and RXRA) and non-bone health outcomes and circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D). A total of 120 genetic association studies reported positive associations, of which 44 investigated determinants of circulating 25(OH)D and/or 1,25(OH)2D concentrations, and 76 investigated determinants of non-skeletal health outcomes. Statistically significant associations were reported for a total of 55 SNP in the 11 genes investigated. There was limited overlap between genetic determinants of vitamin D status and those associated with non-skeletal health outcomes: polymorphisms in DBP, CYP2R1 and DHCR7 were the most frequent to be reported to associate with circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D, while polymorphisms in VDR were most commonly reported to associate with non-skeletal health outcomes, among which infectious and autoimmune diseases were the most represented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming Li; Khera, Pawan; Pandey, Manish K; Wang, Hui; Qiao, Lixian; Feng, Suping; Tonnis, Brandon; Barkley, Noelle A; Pinnow, David; Holbrook, Corley C; Culbreath, Albert K; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022') and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20') were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

  11. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li Wang

    Full Text Available Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0, stearic acid (C18:0, arachidic acid (C20:0, gadoleic acid (C20:1, behenic acid (C22:0, and lignoceric acid (C24:0 are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022' and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20' were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE. Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

  12. Genetic link between Cabeza, a Drosophila homologue of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), and the EGFR signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Mai; Kyotani, Akane [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Azuma, Yumiko [Department of Neurology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho,Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Yoshida, Hideki; Binh Nguyen, Thanh [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Mizuno, Toshiki [Department of Neurology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho,Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Nakagawa, Masanori [North Medical Center, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Tokuda, Takahiko, E-mail: ttokuda@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho,Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Department of Molecular Pathobiology of Brain Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive muscular weakness. Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) that has been identified in familial ALS is an RNA binding protein that is normally localized in the nucleus. However, its function in vivo is not fully understood. Drosophila has Cabeza (Caz) as a FUS homologue and specific knockdown of Caz in the eye imaginal disc and pupal retina using a GMR-GAL4 driver was here found to induce an abnormal morphology of the adult compound eyes, a rough eye phenotype. This was partially suppressed by expression of the apoptosis inhibitor P35. Knockdown of Caz exerted no apparent effect on differentiation of photoreceptor cells. However, immunostaining with an antibody to Cut that marks cone cells revealed fusion of these and ommatidia of pupal retinae. These results indicate that Caz knockdown induces apoptosis and also inhibits differentiation of cone cells, resulting in abnormal eye morphology in adults. Mutation in EGFR pathway-related genes, such as rhomboid-1, rhomboid-3 and mirror suppressed the rough eye phenotype induced by Caz knockdown. Moreover, the rhomboid-1 mutation rescued the fusion of cone cells and ommatidia observed in Caz knockdown flies. The results suggest that Caz negatively regulates the EGFR signaling pathway required for determination of cone cell fate in Drosophila. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Cabeza induced rough eye phenotype. • Knockdown of Cabeza induced fusion of cone cells in pupal retinae. • Knockdown of Cabeza induced apoptosis in pupal retinae. • Mutation in EGFR pathway-related genes suppressed the rough eye phenotype. • Cabeza may negatively regulate the EGFR pathway.

  13. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS and spheroid non-forming (AD thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation.

  14. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  15. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

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    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  16. Insulin-like Growth Factor Pathway Genetic Polymorphisms, Circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3, and Prostate Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stevens, Victoria L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Canzian, Federico; Chamosa, Saioa; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Johansson, Mattias; Marchand, Loïc Le; Palli, Domenico; Rosner, Bernard; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Kraft, Peter; Hsing, Ann W.; Pollak, Michael; Lin, Xihong

    2014-01-01

    Background The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway has been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) initiation, but its role in progression remains unknown. Methods Among 5887 PCa patients (704 PCa deaths) of European ancestry from seven cohorts in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, we conducted Cox kernel machine pathway analysis to evaluate whether 530 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 IGF pathway-related genes were collectively associated with PCa mortality. We also conducted SNP-specific analysis using stratified Cox models adjusting for multiple testing. In 2424 patients (313 PCa deaths), we evaluated the association of prediagnostic circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels and PCa mortality. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The IGF signaling pathway was associated with PCa mortality (P = .03), and IGF2-AS and SSTR2 were the main contributors (both P = .04). In SNP-specific analysis, 36 SNPs were associated with PCa mortality with P trend less than .05, but only three SNPs in the IGF2-AS remained statistically significant after gene-based corrections. Two were in linkage disequilibrium (r 2 = 1 for rs1004446 and rs3741211), whereas the third, rs4366464, was independent (r 2 = 0.03). The hazard ratios (HRs) per each additional risk allele were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 1.34; P trend = .003) for rs3741211 and 1.44 (95% CI = 1.20 to 1.73; P trend < .001) for rs4366464. rs4366464 remained statistically significant after correction for all SNPs (P trend.corr = .04). Prediagnostic IGF1 (HRhighest vs lowest quartile = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.48 to 1.04) and IGFBP3 (HR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.65 to 1.34) levels were not associated with PCa mortality. Conclusions The IGF signaling pathway, primarily IGF2-AS and SSTR2 genes, may be important in PCa survival.

  17. Identification of potential genetic components involved in the deviant quorum-sensing signaling pathways of Burkholderia glumae through a functional genomics approach

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    Ruoxi eChen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae is the chief causal agent for bacterial panicle blight of rice. The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL-mediated quorum-sensing (QS system dependent on a pair of luxI and luxR homologs, tofI and tofR, is the primary cell-to-cell signaling mechanism determining the virulence of this bacterium. Production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of B. glumae, is known to be dependent on the tofI/tofR QS system. In our previous study, however, it was observed that B. glumae mutants defective in tofI or tofR produced toxoflavin if they grew on the surface of a solid medium, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways independent of tofI or tofR are activated in that growth condition for the production of toxoflavin. In this study, potential genetic components involved in the tofI- and tofR-independent signaling pathways for toxoflavin production were sought through screening random mini-Tn5 mutants of B. glumae to better understand the intercellular signaling pathways of this pathogen. Fifteen and three genes were initially identified as the potential genetic elements of the tofI- and tofR-independent pathways, respectively. Especially, the ORF (bglu_2g06320 divergently transcribed from toxJ, which encodes an orphan LuxR protein and controls toxoflavin biosynthesis, was newly identified in this study as a gene required for the tofR-independent toxoflavin production and named as toxK. Among those genes, flhD, dgcB, and wyzB were further studied to validate their functions in the tofI-independent toxoflavin production, and similar studies were also conducted with qsmR and toxK for their functions in the tofR-independent toxoflavin production. This work provides a foundation for future comprehensive studies of the intercellular signaling systems of B. glumae and other related pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Contribution of genetic polymorphisms on functional status at very old age: a gene-based analysis of 38 genes (311 SNPs) in the oxidative stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, S; Soerensen, M; Lagani, V; Montesanto, A; Passarino, G; Christensen, K; Tan, Q; Christiansen, L

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of functional ability is a well-recognized marker of longevity. At a molecular level, a major determinant of the physiological decline occurring with aging is the imbalance between production and accumulation of oxidative damage to macromolecules, together with a decreased efficiency of stress response to avoid or repair such damage. In this paper we investigated the association of 38 genes (311 SNPs) belonging to the pro-antioxidant pathways with physical and cognitive performances, by analyzing single SNP and gene-based associations with Hand Grip strength (HG), Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Walking Speed (WS), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Composite Cognitive Score (CCS) in a Cohort of 1089 Danish nonagenarians. Moreover, for each gene analyzed in the pro-antioxidant pathway, we tested the influence on longitudinal survival. In the whole sample, nominal associations were found for TXNRD1 variability with ADL and WS, NDUFS1 and UCP3 with HG and WS, GCLC and UCP2 with WS (p<0.05). Stronger associations although not holding the multiple comparison correction, were observed between MMSE and NDUFV1, MT1A and GSTP1 variability (p<0.009). Moreover, we found that association between genetic variability in the pro-antioxidant pathway and functional status at old age is influenced by sex. In particular, most significant associations were observed in nonagenarian females, between HG scores and GLRX and UCP3 variability, between ADL levels and TXNRD1, MMSE and MT1A genetic variability. In males, a borderline statistically significant association with ADL level was found for UQCRFS1 gene. Nominally significant associations in relation to survival were found in the female sample only with SOD2, NDUFS1, UCP3 and TXNRD1 variability, the latter two confirming previous observations reported in the same cohort. Overall, our work supports the evidence that genes belonging to the pro-anti-oxidant pathway are able to modulate physical and cognitive

  19. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-β, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

  20. Establishment of pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root cultures for genetic interrogation of the hydrolyzable tannin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Nadia N; Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C G; Tian, Li

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the human therapeutic applications of hydrolyzable tannins (HTs), genes involved in their biosynthesis have not been identified at the molecular level from any plant species. Although we have previously identified candidate HT biosynthetic genes in pomegranate using transcriptomic and bioinformatic analyses, characterization of in planta enzyme function remains a critical step in biochemical pathway elucidation. We here report the establishment of a pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root culture system that produces HTs. Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains transformed with a binary vector harboring a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) gene were used for hairy root induction, allowing visual, non-destructive, detection of transgene incorporation. It also demonstrated that the pomegranate hairy root culture system is suitable for expressing heterologous genes (YFP in this case). Expression of 26 putative UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes, obtained from a pomegranate fruit peel (a tissue highly abundant in HTs) RNA-Seq library, were verified in wild type and hairy roots. In addition, two candidate UGTs for HT biosynthesis were identified based on HPLC and differential gene expression analyses of various pomegranate tissues. Together with in vitro enzyme activity assays, the hairy root culture system holds great promise for revealing the undivulged HT biosynthetic pathway using pomegranate as a model system.

  1. Genetic link between Cabeza, a Drosophila homologue of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), and the EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Mai; Kyotani, Akane; Azuma, Yumiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Binh Nguyen, Thanh; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Tokuda, Takahiko; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive muscular weakness. Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) that has been identified in familial ALS is an RNA binding protein that is normally localized in the nucleus. However, its function in vivo is not fully understood. Drosophila has Cabeza (Caz) as a FUS homologue and specific knockdown of Caz in the eye imaginal disc and pupal retina using a GMR-GAL4 driver was here found to induce an abnormal morphology of the adult compound eyes, a rough eye phenotype. This was partially suppressed by expression of the apoptosis inhibitor P35. Knockdown of Caz exerted no apparent effect on differentiation of photoreceptor cells. However, immunostaining with an antibody to Cut that marks cone cells revealed fusion of these and ommatidia of pupal retinae. These results indicate that Caz knockdown induces apoptosis and also inhibits differentiation of cone cells, resulting in abnormal eye morphology in adults. Mutation in EGFR pathway-related genes, such as rhomboid-1, rhomboid-3 and mirror suppressed the rough eye phenotype induced by Caz knockdown. Moreover, the rhomboid-1 mutation rescued the fusion of cone cells and ommatidia observed in Caz knockdown flies. The results suggest that Caz negatively regulates the EGFR signaling pathway required for determination of cone cell fate in Drosophila.

  2. Genetic Validation of Cell Proliferation via Ras-Independent Activation of the Raf/Mek/Erk Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Carmen G; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Jacob, Harrys K C; Drosten, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Signaling transmitted by the Ras family of small GTPases (H-, N-, and K-Ras) is essential for proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). However, constitutive activation of the downstream Raf/Mek/Erk pathway can bypass the requirement for Ras proteins and allow cells to proliferate in the absence of the three Ras isoforms. Here we describe a protocol for a colony formation assay that permits evaluating the role of candidate proteins that are positive or negative regulators of cell proliferation mediated via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk pathway activation. K-Ras(lox) (H-Ras (-/-), N-Ras (-/-), K-Ras (lox/lox), RERT(ert/ert)) MEFs are infected with retro- or lentiviral vectors expressing wild-type or constitutively activated candidate cDNAs, shRNAs, or sgRNAs in combination with Cas9 to ascertain the possibility of candidate proteins to function either as an activator or inhibitor of Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation. These cells are then seeded in the absence or presence of 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), which activates the resident CreERT2 alleles resulting in elimination of the conditional K-Ras alleles and ultimately generating Rasless cells. Colony formation in the presence of 4-OHT indicates cell proliferation via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation.

  3. Genetic engineering, high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy elucidate the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Birgit; Studt, Lena; Wiemann, Philipp; Osmanov, Helena; Kleigrewe, Karin; Köhler, Jens; Krug, Isabel; Tudzynski, Bettina; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi can be highly bioactive, ranging from antibiotic to cancerogenic properties. In this study we were able to identify a new, yet unknown metabolite produced by Fusarium fujikuroi, an ascomycetous rice pathogen. With the help of genomic engineering and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) followed by isolation and detailed structure elucidation, the new substance could be designated as an unknown bikaverin precursor, missing two methyl- and one hydroxy group, hence named oxo-pre-bikaverin. Though the bikaverin gene cluster has been extensively studied in the past, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway remained elusive due to a negative feedback loop that regulates the genes within the cluster. To decipher the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway and to overcome these negative regulation circuits, the structural cluster genes BIK2 and BIK3 were overexpressed independently in the ΔΔBIK2/BIK3+OE::BIK1 mutant background by using strong constitutive promoters. Using the software tool MZmine 2, the metabolite profile of the generated mutants obtained by HPLC-HRMS was compared, revealing further intermediates.

  4. Activation of Sonic Hedgehog Leads to Survival Enhancement of Astrocytes via the GRP78-Dependent Pathway in Mice Infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis

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    Kuang-Yao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection may cause elevation of ROS and antioxidants in the CSF of infected mice. Astrocytes may protect the surrounding neurons from oxidative stress-induced cell death by secreting Sonic hedgehog (Shh via the PI3-K/AKT/Bcl-2 pathway. This study was conducted to determine the role of the Shh signaling pathway in A. cantonensis-infected BABL/c mice by coculturing astrocytes with living fifth-stage larvae or soluble antigens. The Shh pathway was activated with corresponding increases in the level of the Shh. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and Shh were increased in astrocyte cocultured with living fifth-stage larvae or soluble antigens. The survival of astrocytes pretreated with Shh was significantly elevated in cocultures with the antigens but reduced by its inhibitor cyclopamine. The expression of GRP78 and Bcl-2 was significantly higher in astrocytes pretreated with recombinant Shh. These findings suggest that the expression of Shh may inhibit cell death by activating Bcl-2 through a GRP78-dependent pathway.

  5. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

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    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  6. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  7. Genetic predisposition to fracture non-union: a case control study of a preliminary single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis of the BMP pathway

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    Giannoudis Peter V

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the known multi-factorial nature of atrophic fracture non-unions, a possible genetic predisposition for the development of this complication after long bone fractures remains unknown. This pilot study aimed to address this issue by performing a preliminary SNP analysis of specific genes known to regulate fracture healing. Methods A total of fifteen SNPs within four genes of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP pathway (BMP-2, BMP-7, NOGGIN and SMAD6 were examined, in 109 randomly selected patients with long bone fractures as a result of motor vehicle accident, fall or direct blow. There were sixty-two patients with atrophic non-union and forty-seven patients (54 fractures with uneventful fracture union. Overall SNPs frequencies were computed with respect to patient's age, gender, smoking habits, fracture-associated parameters and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, and tested for their association to the impaired bone healing process, using binary logistic regression (STATA 11.1; StataCorp, Texas USA. Results Statistical analysis revealed age to be an important covariate in the development of atrophic non-union (p = 0.01, OR 1.05 [per year], and two specific genotypes (G/G genotype of the rs1372857 SNP, located on NOGGIN and T/T genotype of the rs2053423 SNP, located on SMAD6 to be associated with a greater risk of fracture non-union (p = 0.02, OR 4.56 and p = 0.04, OR 10.27, respectively, after adjustment for age. Conclusions This is the first clinical study to investigate the potential existence of genetic susceptibility to fracture non-union. Even though no concrete conclusions can be obtained from this pilot study, our results indicate the existence of a potential genetically predetermined impairment within the BMP signalling cascade, initiated after a fracture and when combined with other risk factors could synergistically increase the susceptibility of a patient to develop non-union. Further

  8. Leishmania spp: Delta-aminolevulinate-inducible neogenesis of porphyria by genetic complementation of incomplete heme biosynthesis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sujoy; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Chang, Kwang-Poo Chang

    2008-01-01

    To further develop the Leishmania model for porphyria based on their deficiencies in heme biosynthesis, three Old World species were doubly transfected as before for Leishmania amazonensis with cDNAs, encoding the 2nd and 3rd enzymes in the pathway. Expression of the transgenes was verified immunologically at the protein level and functionally by uroporphyrin neogenesis that occurs only after exposure of the double-transfectants to delta-aminolevulinate. All species examined were equally deficient in heme biosynthesis, as indicated by the accumulation of uroporphyrin as the sole porphyrin and the production of coproporphyrin upon further transfection of one representative species with the downstream gene. The results obtained thus demonstrate that at least the first five enzymes for heme biosynthesis are absent in all species examined, rendering their transfectants inducible with aminolevulinate to accumulate porphyrins and thus useful as cellular models for human porphyrias. PMID:18164705

  9. Genetic relationship between silver-lead-zinc mineralization in the Wutong deposit, Guangxi Province and Mesozoic granitic magmatism in the Nanling belt, southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Romer, Rolf L.; Lüders, Volker; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    More than 50 % of the world's total reserves of tungsten are in China and most tungsten deposits are located in the Nanling range in southeast China. This study explores the potential genetic relationship between tungsten-tin (W-Sn) mineralization and shallower Ag-Pb-Zn deposits in the Nanling range based on data from the Wutong deposit, Guangxi Province. The lead, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, and strontium isotopic compositions of minerals at Wutong indicate that a single crustal-derived fluid was responsible for mineralization. Wutong likely formed at relatively low temperatures (˜200-300 °C) and low pressures, as indicated by the similarity between homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions and those estimated from S isotopic compositions of minerals. The hübnerite age (92.3-104.4 Ma) indicates that the Wutong mineralization is likely related to nearby Late Yanshanian (Cretaceous) S-type granites derived from Proterozoic crust. This mineralization event coincides with the last W-Sn mineralization event and the Cretaceous peak of mineralization in the Nanling range.

  10. The Arabidopsis DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed by basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C coupled to diacylglycerol kinase in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Nabila eDjafi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipases C (PI-PLCs are activated in response to various stimuli. They utilize substrates provided by type III-Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinases (PI4KIII to produce inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol (DAG that is phosphorylated into phosphatidic acid (PA by DAG-kinases (DGKs. The roles of PI4KIIIs, PI-PLCs and DGKs in basal signalling are poorly understood. We investigated the control of gene expression by basal PI-PLC pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells. A transcriptome-wide analysis allowed the identification of genes whose expression was altered by edelfosine, 30 µM wortmannin or R59022, inhibitors of PI-PLCs, PI4KIIIs and DGKs, respectively. We found that a gene responsive to one of these molecules is more likely to be similarly regulated by the other two inhibitors. The common action of these agents is to inhibit PA formation, showing that basal PI-PLCs act, in part, on gene expression through their coupling to DGKs. Amongst the genes up-regulated in presence of the inhibitors, were some DREB2 genes, in suspension cells and in seedlings. The DREB2 genes encode transcription factors with major roles in responses to environmental stresses, including dehydration. They bind to C-repeat motifs, known as Drought-Responsive Elements, that are indeed enriched in the promoters of genes up-regulated by PI-PLC pathway inhibitors. PA can also be produced by phospholipases D (PLDs. We show that the DREB2 genes that are up-regulated by PI-PLC inhibitors are positively or negatively regulated, or indifferent, to PLD basal activity. Our data show that the DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed in resting conditions and that DGK coupled to PI-PLC is active in this process, in suspension cells and seedlings. We discuss how this basal negative regulation of DREB2 genes is compatible with their stress-triggered positive regulation.

  11. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

    2009-01-29

    Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

  12. Migraine genetics : from monogenic to complex forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanmolkot, Kaate Raymond Josepha

    2008-01-01

    Migraine has a strong genetic component, but the identification of these factors has proven difficult mainly because of the complex interaction of multiple loci and environmental factors. Unraveling its molecular basis and deciphering pathways leading to migraine attacks will help identifying novel

  13. Migraine genetics : from monogenic to complex forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanmolkot, Kaate Raymond Josepha

    2008-01-01

    Migraine has a strong genetic component, but the identification of these factors has proven difficult mainly because of the complex interaction of multiple loci and environmental factors. Unraveling its molecular basis and deciphering pathways leading to migraine attacks will help identifying novel

  14. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan [Department of Urology, The University of Pittsburgh, 5200 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); Fisher, Alfred L., E-mail: fishera2@uthscsa.edu [Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology, and Palliative Medicine, Department of Medicine, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Center for Healthy Aging, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); GRECC, STVAHCS, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Wang, Zhou, E-mail: wangz2@upmc.edu [Department of Urology, The University of Pittsburgh, 5200 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); GRECC, STVAHCS, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in

  15. Linking family economic pressure and supportive parenting to adolescent health behaviors: two developmental pathways leading to health promoting and health risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Josephine A; Wickrama, K A S

    2014-07-01

    Adolescent health behaviors, especially health risk behaviors, have previously been linked to distal (i.e., family economic pressure) and proximal (i.e., parental support) contributors. However, few studies have examined both types of contributors along with considering health promoting and health risk behaviors separately. The present study investigated the influences of family economic hardship, supportive parenting as conceptualized by self-determination theory, and individual psychosocial and behavioral characteristics (i.e., mastery and delinquency, respectively) on adolescents' health promoting and health risk behaviors. We used structural equation modeling to analyze longitudinal data from a sample of Caucasian adolescent children and their mothers and fathers (N = 407, 54 % female) to examine direct and indirect effects, as well as gender symmetry and asymmetry. Findings suggest that family economic pressure contributed to adolescent mastery and delinquency through supportive parenting. Further, supportive parenting indirectly affected adolescent health risk behaviors only through delinquency, whereas supportive parenting indirectly influenced health promoting behaviors only through mastery, suggesting different developmental pathways for adolescent health risk and health promoting behaviors. Testing for gender symmetry of the full model showed that maternal and paternal parenting contributed to females' health risk behaviors directly, while maternal and paternal parenting contributed to males' health risk behaviors through delinquency. Gender symmetry was largely unsupported. The study highlights key direct and indirect pathways to adolescent health risk and health promoting behaviors within a family stress model and self-determination theory framework, and also highlights important gender differences in these developmental pathways.

  16. Golden Rice: introducing the beta-carotene biosynthesis pathway into rice endosperm by genetic engineering to defeat vitamin A deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim; Ye, Xudong; Lucca, Paola; Schaub, Patrick; Welsch, Ralf; Potrykus, Ingo

    2002-03-01

    To obtain a functioning provitamin A (beta-carotene) biosynthetic pathway in rice endosperm, we introduced in a single, combined transformation effort the cDNA coding for phytoene synthase (psy) and lycopene beta-cyclase (beta-lcy) both from Narcissus pseudonarcissus and both under the control of the endosperm-specific glutelin promoter together with a bacterial phytoene desaturase (crtI, from Erwinia uredovora under constitutive 35S promoter control). This combination covers the requirements for beta-carotene synthesis and, as hoped, yellow beta-carotene-bearing rice endosperm was obtained in the T(0)-generation. Additional experiments revealed that the presence of beta-lcy was not necessary, because psy and crtI alone were able to drive beta-carotene synthesis as well as the formation of further downstream xanthophylls. Plausible explanations for this finding are that these downstream enzymes are constitutively expressed in rice endosperm or are induced by the transformation, e.g., by enzymatically formed products. Results using N. pseudonarcissus as a model system led to the development of a hypothesis, our present working model, that trans-lycopene or a trans-lycopene derivative acts as an inductor in a kind of feedback mechanism stimulating endogenous carotenogenic genes. Various institutional arrangements for disseminating Golden Rice to research institutes in developing countries also are discussed.

  17. Genetic variants in T helper cell type 1, 2 and 3 pathways and gastric cancer risk in a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rajeev; El-Omar, Emad M; Lissowska, Jolanta; Grillo, Paolo; Rabkin, Charles S; Baccarelli, Andrea; Yeager, Meredith; Sobin, Leslie H; Zatonski, Witold; Channock, Stephen J; Chow, Wong-Ho; Hou, Lifang

    2008-09-01

    Host immune responses are known determinants of gastric cancer susceptibility. We previously reported an increased gastric cancer risk associated with common variants of several T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokine genes in a population-based case-control study in Warsaw, Poland. In the present study, we augmented our investigation to include additional Th1 genes as well as key genes in the Th2 and Th3 pathways. Analysis of 378 cases and 435 age- and sex-matched controls revealed associations for polymorphisms in the Th1 IL7R gene and one polymorphism in the Th2 IL5 gene. The odd ratios (ORs) for IL7R rs1494555 were 1.4 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.9] for A/G and 1.5 (95% CI, 1.0-2.4) for G/G carriers relative to A/A carriers (P = 0.04). The ORs for IL5 rs2069812 were 0.9 (95% CI, 0.7-1.3) for C/T and 0.6 (95% CI, 0.3-1.0) T/T carriers compared with C/C carriers (P = 0.03). These results suggest that IL5 rs2069812 and IL7R rs1389832, rs1494556 and rs1494555 polymorphisms may contribute to gastric cancer etiology.

  18. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovas, Vanessa Cristina; Rovaris, Diego Luiz; Peréz, Orlando; de Azevedo, Soledad; Macedo, Gabriel Souza; Sandoval, José Raul; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Villena, Mercedes; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ramallo, Virginia; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271) were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90%) of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco) were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m) or in lowlands (< 2,500 m). Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes.

  19. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Jacovas

    Full Text Available The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271 were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90% of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m or in lowlands (< 2,500 m. Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes.

  20. Genetic Variations in the TP53 Pathway in Native Americans Strongly Suggest Adaptation to the High Altitudes of the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peréz, Orlando; de Azevedo, Soledad; Macedo, Gabriel Souza; Sandoval, José Raul; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Villena, Mercedes; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ramallo, Virginia; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of the five single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes of the TP53 pathway (TP53, rs1042522; MDM2, rs2279744; MDM4, rs1563828; USP7, rs1529916; and LIF, rs929271) were studied in a total of 282 individuals belonging to Quechua, Aymara, Chivay, Cabanaconde, Yanke, Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, Uros, Guarani Ñandeva, and Guarani Kaiowá populations, characterized as Native American or as having a high level (> 90%) of Native American ancestry. In addition, published data pertaining to 100 persons from five other Native American populations (Surui, Karitiana, Maya, Pima, and Piapoco) were analyzed. The populations were classified as living in high altitude (≥ 2,500 m) or in lowlands (< 2,500 m). Our analyses revealed that alleles USP7-G, LIF-T, and MDM2-T showed significant evidence that they were selected for in relation to harsh environmental variables related to high altitudes. Our results show for the first time that alleles of classical TP53 network genes have been evolutionary co-opted for the successful human colonization of the Andes. PMID:26382048

  1. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes of Components Affecting the WNT Pathway in Colorectal Carcinomas Stratified by Microsatellite Instability

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    Lin Thorstensen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available An unselected series of 310 colorectal carcinomas, stratified according to microsatellite instability (MSI and DNA ploidy, was examined for mutations and/or promoter hypermethylation of five components of the WNT signaling cascade [APC, CTNNB1 (encoding Rcatenin, AXIN2, TCF4, and WISP3] and three genes indirectly affecting this pathway [CDH1 (encoding β-cadherin, PTEN, and TP53]. APC and TP53 mutations were each present more often in microsatellite-stable (MSS tumors than in those with MSI (P < .001 for both. We confirmed that the aneuploid MSS tumors frequently contained TP53 mutations (P < .001, whereas tumors with APC mutations and/or promoter hypermethylation revealed no associations to ploidy. Mutations in APC upstream of codons 1020 to 1169, encoding the β-catenin binding site, were found in 15/144 mutated tumors and these patients seemed to have poor clinical outcome (P = .096. Frameshift mutations in AXIN2, PTEN, TCF4, and WISP3 were found in 20%, 17%, 46%, and 28% of the MSI tumors, respectively. More than half of the tumors with heterozygote mutations in AXIN2 were concurrently mutated in APC. The present study showed that more than 90% of all samples had alteration in one or more of the genes investigated, adding further evidence to the vital importance of activated WNT signaling in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  2. Integrating high-content imaging and chemical genetics to probe host cellular pathways critical for Yersinia pestis infection.

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    Krishna P Kota

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery that regulates the entry and survival of Yersinia pestis in host macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we report the development of automated high-content imaging assays to quantitate the internalization of virulent Y. pestis CO92 by macrophages and the subsequent activation of host NF-κB. Implementation of these assays in a focused chemical screen identified kinase inhibitors that inhibited both of these processes. Rac-2-ethoxy-3 octadecanamido-1-propylphosphocholine (a protein Kinase C inhibitor, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor, and parthenolide (an IκB kinase inhibitor, inhibited pathogen-induced NF-κB activation and reduced bacterial entry and survival within macrophages. Parthenolide inhibited NF-κB activation in response to stimulation with Pam3CSK4 (a TLR2 agonist, E. coli LPS (a TLR4 agonist or Y. pestis infection, while the PI3K and PKC inhibitors were selective only for Y. pestis infection. Together, our results suggest that phagocytosis is the major stimulus for NF-κB activation in response to Y. pestis infection, and that Y. pestis entry into macrophages may involve the participation of protein kinases such as PI3K and PKC. More importantly, the automated image-based screening platform described here can be applied to the study of other bacteria in general and, in combination with chemical genetic screening, can be used to identify host cell functions facilitating the identification of novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  3. Single-gene association between GATA-2 and autoimmune hepatitis: A novel genetic insight highlighting immunologic pathways to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym; Chen, Yung-Yi; Li, Ka-Kit; Neil, Desley; Oo, Ye Htun; Richter, Alex; Bigley, Venetia; Collin, Matthew; Adams, David H; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-05-01

    Background & Aims Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), an immune-mediated liver disease, originates as a consequence of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors. Treatment remains non-specific and prone to side effects. Deficiencies in regulatory T cell (Treg) function are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of AIH. Methods We describe an adult patient who presented with AIH in the context of monocytopenia. The patient was characterized by GATA2 gene sequencing, flow cytometry of peripheral blood for leucocyte subsets, ELISA for serum Flt-3 ligand, and immunohistochemistry of liver biopsy tissue. Results Sequencing confirmed a GATA2 mutation. Peripheral Treg were absent in the context of a preserved total T cell count. Immunostaining for the Treg transcription factor FOXP3 was reduced in liver tissue as compared to a control AIH specimen. There were marked deficiencies in multiple antigen-presenting cell subsets and Flt-3 ligand was elevated. These findings are consistent with previous reports of GATA2 dysfunction. Conclusions The association of a GATA2 mutation with AIH is previously unrecognized. GATA2 encodes a hematopoietic cell transcription factor, and mutations may manifest as monocytopenia, dendritic and B cell deficiencies, myelodysplasia, and immunodeficiency. Tregs may be depleted as in this case. Our findings provide support for the role of Tregs in AIH, complement reports of other deficiencies in T cell regulation causing AIH-like syndromes, and support the rationale of attempting to modulate the Treg axis for the therapeutic benefit of AIH patients.

  4. Evolution-based strategy to generate non-genetically modified organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains impaired in sulfate assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vero, L; Solieri, L; Giudici, P

    2011-11-01

    An evolution-based strategy was designed to screen novel yeast strains impaired in sulfate assimilation. Specifically, molybdate and chromate resistance was used as selectable phenotype to select sulfate permease-deficient variants that unable to produce sulfites and hydrogen sulfide (H(2) S). Four Saccharomyces cerevisiae parent strains were induced to sporulate. After tetrad digestion, spore suspensions were observed under the microscope to monitor the conjugation of gametes. Then, the cell suspension was inoculated in tubes containing YPD medium supplemented with ammonium molybdate or potassium chromate. Forty-four resistant strains were obtained and then tested in microvinifications. Three strains with a low sulfite production (SO2 sulfites were selected. Our strategy enabled the selection of improved yeasts with desired oenological characteristics. Particularly, resistance to toxic analogues of sulfate allowed us to detect strains that unable to assimilate sulfates. This strategy that combines the sexual recombination of spores and application of a specific selective pressure provides a rapid screening method to generate genetic variants and select improved wine yeast strains with an impaired metabolism regarding the production of sulfites and H2S. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Expression profiling of a genetic animal model of depression reveals novel molecular pathways underlying depressive-like behaviours.

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    Ekaterini Blaveri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Flinders model is a validated genetic rat model of depression that exhibits a number of behavioural, neurochemical and pharmacological features consistent with those observed in human depression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have used genome-wide microarray expression profiling of the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex of Flinders Depression Sensitive (FSL and control Flinders Depression Resistant (FRL lines to understand molecular basis for the differences between the two lines. We profiled two independent cohorts of Flinders animals derived from the same colony six months apart, each cohort statistically powered to allow independent as well as combined analysis. Using this approach, we were able to validate using real-time-PCR a core set of gene expression differences that showed statistical significance in each of the temporally distinct cohorts, representing consistently maintained features of the model. Small but statistically significant increases were confirmed for cholinergic (chrm2, chrna7 and serotonergic receptors (Htr1a, Htr2a in FSL rats consistent with known neurochemical changes in the model. Much larger gene changes were validated in a number of novel genes as exemplified by TMEM176A, which showed 35-fold enrichment in the cortex and 30-fold enrichment in hippocampus of FRL animals relative to FSL. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide significant insights into the molecular differences underlying the Flinders model, and have potential relevance to broader depression research.

  6. Pre-ordering of interfacial water in the pathway of heterogeneous ice nucleation does not lead to a two-step crystallization mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Laura; Peters, Baron; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    According to Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), the transition from liquid to crystal occurs in a single activated step with a transition state controlled by the size of the crystal embryo. This picture has been challenged in the last two decades by several reports of two-step crystallization processes in which the liquid first produces pre-ordered or dense domains, within which the crystal nucleates in a second step. Pre-ordering preceding crystal nucleation has been recently reported in simulations of ice crystallization, raising the question of whether the mechanism of ice nucleation involves two steps. In this paper, we investigate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on carbon surfaces. We use molecular simulations with efficient coarse-grained models combined with rare event sampling methods and free energy calculations to elucidate the role of pre-ordering of liquid water at the carbon surface in the reaction coordinate for heterogeneous nucleation. We find that ice nucleation proceeds through a classical mechanism, with a single barrier between liquid and crystal. The reaction coordinate that determines the crossing of the nucleation barrier is the size of the crystal nucleus, as predicted by CNT. Wetting of the critical ice nuclei within pre-ordered domains decreases the nucleation barrier, increasing the nucleation rates. The preferential pathway for crystallization involves the early creation of pre-ordered domains that are the birthplace of the ice crystallites but do not represent a minimum in the free energy pathway from liquid to ice. We conclude that a preferential pathway through an intermediate-order precursor does not necessarily result in a two-step mechanism.

  7. Cigarette sidestream smoke induces histone H3 phosphorylation via JNK and PI3K/Akt pathways, leading to the expression of proto-oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibuki, Yuko; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Yoshida, Ikuma

    2014-06-01

    Post-translational modifications in histones have been associated with cancer. Although cigarette sidestream smoke (CSS) as well as mainstream smoke are carcinogens, the relationship between carcinogenicity and histone modifications has not yet been clarified. Here, we demonstrated that CSS induced phosphorylation of histones, involving a carcinogenic process. Treatment with CSS markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 and 28 residues (H3S10 and H3S28), which was independent from the cell cycle, in the human pulmonary epithelial cell model, A549 and normal human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5 and WI-38. Using specific inhibitors and small interfering RNA, the phosphorylation of H3S10 was found to be mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. These pathways were different from that of the CSS-induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) mediated by Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM-Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinases. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the phosphorylation of H3S10 was increased in the promoter sites of the proto-oncogenes, c-fos and c-jun, which indicated that CSS plays a role in tumor promotion. Because the phosphorylation of H3S10 was decreased in the aldehyde-removed CSS and was significantly induced by treatment with formaldehyde, aldehydes are suspected to partially contribute to this phosphorylation. These findings suggested that any chemicals in CSS, including aldehydes, phosphorylate H3S10 via JNK and PI3K/Akt pathways, which is different from the DNA damage response, resulting in tumor promotion.

  8. Lung necrosis and neutrophils reflect common pathways of susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in genetically diverse, immune-competent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad K K; Dhulekar, Nimit; Schmidt, Diane; Major, Samuel; Cooper, Rachel; Abeijon, Claudia; Gatti, Daniel M; Kramnik, Igor; Yener, Bulent; Gurcan, Metin; Beamer, Gillian

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in susceptible humans. Here, we infected Diversity Outbred (DO) mice with ∼100 bacilli by aerosol to model responses in a highly heterogeneous population. Following infection, 'supersusceptible', 'susceptible' and 'resistant' phenotypes emerged. TB disease (reduced survival, weight loss, high bacterial load) correlated strongly with neutrophils, neutrophil chemokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and cell death. By contrast, immune cytokines were weak correlates of disease. We next applied statistical and machine learning approaches to our dataset of cytokines and chemokines from lungs and blood. Six molecules from the lung: TNF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12); and two molecules from blood - IL-2 and TNF - were identified as being important by applying both statistical and machine learning methods. Using molecular features to generate tree classifiers, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5 distinguished four classes (supersusceptible, susceptible, resistant and non-infected) from each other with approximately 77% accuracy using completely independent experimental data. By contrast, models based on other molecules were less accurate. Low to no IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-2 and IL-10 successfully discriminated non-infected mice from infected mice but failed to discriminate disease status amongst supersusceptible, susceptible and resistant M.-tuberculosis-infected DO mice. Additional analyses identified CXCL1 as a promising peripheral biomarker of disease and of CXCL1 production in the lungs. From these results, we conclude that: (1) DO mice respond variably to M. tuberculosis infection and will be useful to identify pathways involving necrosis and neutrophils; (2) data from DO mice is suited for machine learning methods to build, validate and test models with independent data based solely on molecular biomarkers; (3) low levels of immunological cytokines best indicate a lack of exposure

  9. Lung necrosis and neutrophils reflect common pathways of susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in genetically diverse, immune-competent mice

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    Muhammad K. K. Niazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in susceptible humans. Here, we infected Diversity Outbred (DO mice with ∼100 bacilli by aerosol to model responses in a highly heterogeneous population. Following infection, ‘supersusceptible’, ‘susceptible’ and ‘resistant’ phenotypes emerged. TB disease (reduced survival, weight loss, high bacterial load correlated strongly with neutrophils, neutrophil chemokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and cell death. By contrast, immune cytokines were weak correlates of disease. We next applied statistical and machine learning approaches to our dataset of cytokines and chemokines from lungs and blood. Six molecules from the lung: TNF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin 12 (IL-12; and two molecules from blood – IL-2 and TNF – were identified as being important by applying both statistical and machine learning methods. Using molecular features to generate tree classifiers, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5 distinguished four classes (supersusceptible, susceptible, resistant and non-infected from each other with approximately 77% accuracy using completely independent experimental data. By contrast, models based on other molecules were less accurate. Low to no IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-2 and IL-10 successfully discriminated non-infected mice from infected mice but failed to discriminate disease status amongst supersusceptible, susceptible and resistant M.-tuberculosis-infected DO mice. Additional analyses identified CXCL1 as a promising peripheral biomarker of disease and of CXCL1 production in the lungs. From these results, we conclude that: (1 DO mice respond variably to M. tuberculosis infection and will be useful to identify pathways involving necrosis and neutrophils; (2 data from DO mice is suited for machine learning methods to build, validate and test models with independent data based solely on molecular biomarkers; (3 low levels of immunological cytokines best

  10. Association of symptoms and severity of rift valley fever with genetic polymorphisms in human innate immune pathways.

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    Amy G Hise

    2015-03-01

    -associated clinical outcomes. Studies of these and related genetic polymorphisms are warranted to advance understanding of RVF pathogenesis.

  11. HSD3B and gene-gene interactions in a pathway-based analysis of genetic susceptibility to bladder cancer.

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    Angeline S Andrew

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the 4(th most common cancer among men in the U.S. We analyzed variant genotypes hypothesized to modify major biological processes involved in bladder carcinogenesis, including hormone regulation, apoptosis, DNA repair, immune surveillance, metabolism, proliferation, and telomere maintenance. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between genetic variation affecting these processes and susceptibility in 563 genotyped urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 863 controls enrolled in a case-control study of incident bladder cancer conducted in New Hampshire, U.S. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Statistical Epistasis Network analysis. The 3'UTR flanking variant form of the hormone regulation gene HSD3B2 was associated with increased bladder cancer risk in the New Hampshire population (adjusted OR 1.85 95%CI 1.31-2.62. This finding was successfully replicated in the Texas Bladder Cancer Study with 957 controls, 497 cases (adjusted OR 3.66 95%CI 1.06-12.63. The effect of this prevalent SNP was stronger among males (OR 2.13 95%CI 1.40-3.25 than females (OR 1.56 95%CI 0.83-2.95, (SNP-gender interaction P = 0.048. We also identified a SNP-SNP interaction between T-cell activation related genes GATA3 and CD81 (interaction P = 0.0003. The fact that bladder cancer incidence is 3-4 times higher in males suggests the involvement of hormone levels. This biologic process-based analysis suggests candidate susceptibility markers and supports the theory that disrupted hormone regulation plays a role in bladder carcinogenesis.

  12. Decreased expression of CHIP leads to increased angiogenesis via VEGF-VEGFR2 pathway and poor prognosis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Hai-long; Chen, Hai-rong; Shi, Mei-lin; Liu, Qing-hua; Pan, Zhen-qiang; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-nian

    2015-05-29

    CHIP (c-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein) is an E3 ligase which may play different roles in different cancers. The elucidation of the VHL-HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α)-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) pathway has led to the development of targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, little is known about the role of CHIP and the relationship between CHIP and VEGF-VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2) pathway in RCC. In this study, we found that the expression of CHIP was downregulated and significantly correlated with pT status (P = 0.022) and TNM stage (P = 0.022) in 304 RCC and 35 normal renal tissues using tissue microarray. Moreover, low expression of CHIP is a strong and independent negative prognostic value for RCC. In vitro, CHIP negatively regulated RCC cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, ELISA tests showed that restoration of CHIP inhibited, while knockdown promoted, the secreted level of VEGF. Furthermore, western blot indicated that the VEGFR2 protein level was reduced after CHIP overexpression. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that CHIP may be involved in RCC angiogenesis through regulating VEGF secretion and expression of VEGFR2. CHIP may serve as promising prognostic biomarker of angiogenesis and may constitute a potential therapeutic target in RCC.

  13. Absence of both Sos-1 and Sos-2 in peripheral CD4(+) T cells leads to PI3K pathway activation and defects in migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittard, Geoffrey; Kortum, Robert L; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Çuburu, Nicolas; Nguyen, Phan; Sommers, Connie L; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2015-08-01

    Sos-1 and Sos-2 are ubiquitously expressed Ras-guanine exchange factors involved in Erk-MAP kinase pathway activation. Using mice lacking genes encoding Sos-1 and Sos-2, we evaluated the role of these proteins in peripheral T-cell signaling and function. Our results confirmed that TCR-mediated Erk activation in peripheral CD4(+) T cells does not depend on Sos-1 and Sos-2, although IL-2-mediated Erk activation does. Unexpectedly, however, we show an increase in AKT phosphorylation in Sos-1/2dKO CD4(+) T cells upon TCR and IL-2 stimulation. Activation of AKT was likely a consequence of increased recruitment of PI3K to Grb2 upon TCR and/or IL-2 stimulation in Sos-1/2dKO CD4(+) T cells. The increased activity of the PI3K/AKT pathway led to downregulation of the surface receptor CD62L in Sos-1/2dKO T cells and a subsequent impairment in T-cell migration.

  14. Activation of an EDS1-mediated R-gene pathway in the snc1 mutant leads to constitutive, NPR1-independent pathogen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Clarke, J D; Zhang, Y; Dong, X

    2001-10-01

    The Arabidopsis NPR1 protein is an essential regulatory component of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Mutations in the NPR1 gene completely block the induction of SAR by signals such as salicylic acid (SA). An Arabidopsis mutant, snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1), was isolated in a screen for suppressors of npr1-1. In the npr1-1 background, the snc1 mutation resulted in constitutive resistance to Pseudomonas syringae maculicola ES4326 and Peronospora parasitica Noco2. High levels of SA were detected in the mutant and shown to be required for manifestation of the snc1 phenotype. The snc1 mutation was mapped to the RPP5 resistance (R) gene cluster and the eds1 mutation that blocks RPP5-mediated resistance suppressed snc1. These data suggest that a RPP5-related resistance pathway is activated constitutively in snc1. This pathway does not employ NPR1 but requires the signal molecule SA and the function of EDS1. Moreover, in snc1, constitutive resistance is conferred in the absence of cell death, which is often associated with R-gene mediated resistance.

  15. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the sig...

  16. Genetic variants in the folate pathway and the risk of neural tube defects: a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural Tube Defects (NTDs are among the most prevalent and most severe congenital malformations worldwide. Polymorphisms in key genes involving the folate pathway have been reported to be associated with the risk of NTDs. However, the results from these published studies are conflicting. We surveyed the literature (1996-2011 and performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide empirical evidence on the association. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of 5 genetic variants from 47 study populations, for a total of 85 case-control comparisons MTHFR C677T (42 studies; 4374 cases, 7232 controls, MTHFR A1298C (22 studies; 2602 cases, 4070 controls, MTR A2756G (9 studies; 843 cases, 1006 controls, MTRR A66G (8 studies; 703 cases, 1572 controls, and RFC-1 A80G (4 studies; 1107 cases, 1585 controls. We found a convincing evidence of dominant effects of MTHFR C677T (OR 1.23; 95%CI 1.07-1.42 and suggestive evidence of RFC-1 A80G (OR 1.55; 95%CI 1.24-1.92. However, we found no significant effects of MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G in risk of NTDs in dominant, recessive or in allelic models. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis strongly suggested a significant association of the variant MTHFR C677T and a suggestive association of RFC-1 A80G with increased risk of NTDs. However, other variants involved in folate pathway do not demonstrate any evidence for a significant marginal association on susceptibility to NTDs.

  17. The chalcone 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone activates death receptor 5 pathway and leads to apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Su, Ling; Cao, Congmei; Xu, Linyan; Zhong, Diansheng; Xu, Lijia; Liu, Xiangguo

    2013-06-01

    Natural chalcones have been proved to inhibit cancer cells with therapeutic potential, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still largely unexplored. Here, we identified a novel chalcone, 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone (HDMC) and demonstrated that HDMC induced apoptosis in various nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Further study showed that HDMC elevated cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, thus inducing expressions of ATF4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Then, death receptor 5 (DR5) was upregulated through ATF4-CHOP axis and eventually resulted in apoptosis. We also found that downregulation of c-FLIPL contributed to HDMC-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, HDMC induces apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells via activation of DR5 signaling pathway, and ROS-mediated ATF4-CHOP axis is involved in the process. Our results further supported the potential for HDMC to be developed as a new antitumor agent for cancer therapy or chemoprevention.

  18. Elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway for Okenone in Thiodictyon sp. CAD16 leads to the discovery of two novel carotene ketolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Kajetan; Bryant, Donald A

    2011-11-01

    Okenone is a unique ketocarotenoid found in many purple sulfur bacteria; it is important because of its unique light absorption and photoprotection properties. Okenane, a compound formed by diagenetic reduction of okenone, is an important biomarker in geochemical analyses of sedimentary rocks. Despite its ecological and biogeochemical importance, the biochemical pathway for okenone synthesis has not yet been fully described. The genome sequence of an okenone-producing organism, Thiodictyon sp. strain CAD16, revealed four genes whose predicted proteins had strong sequence similarity to enzymes known to produce ψ-end group modifications of carotenoids in proteobacteria. These four genes encoded homologs of a 1,2-carotenoid hydratase (CrtC), an O-methyltransferase (CrtF), and two paralogs of carotenoid 3,4-desaturases (CrtD). Expression studies in lycopene- or neurosporene-producing strains of Escherichia coli confirmed the functions of crtC and crtF, but the crtD paralogs encoded enzymes with previously undescribed functions. One enzyme, CruS, was only distantly related to CrtD desaturases, was bifunctional, and performed a 3,4-desaturation and introduced a C-2 keto group into neurosporene derivatives in the presence of dioxygen. The enzyme encoded by the other crtD paralog also represents a new enzyme in carotenogenesis and was named cruO. CruO encodes the C-4/4' ketolase uniquely required for okenone biosynthesis. The identification of CruO and the demonstration of its biochemical activity complete the elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway for okenone and other related ketocarotenoids.

  19. Changes in correlation between spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones lead to differential recruitment of inhibitory pathways in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, D; Rodríguez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2012-04-01

    Simultaneous recordings of cord dorsum potentials along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat revealed the occurrence of spontaneous synchronous negative (n) and negative-positive (np) cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). The npCDPs, unlike the nCDPs, appeared preferentially associated with spontaneous negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) resulting from primary afferent depolarization. Spontaneous npCDPs recorded in preparations with intact neuroaxis or after spinalization often showed a higher correlation than the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. The acute section of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves further increased the correlation between paired sets of npCDPs and reduced the correlation between the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs and npCDPs are produced by the activation of interconnected sets of dorsal horn neurones located in Rexed's laminae III–IV and bilaterally distributed along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord. Under conditions of low synchronization in the activity of this network of neurones there would be a preferential activation of the intermediate nucleus interneurones mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition. Increased synchronization in the spontaneous activity of this ensemble of dorsal horn neurones would recruit the interneurones mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition and, at the same time, reduce the activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. Central control of the synchronization in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones and its modulation by cutaneous inputs is envisaged as an effective mechanism for the selection of alternative inhibitory pathways during the execution of specific motor or sensory tasks.

  20. Identifying quantitative operation principles in metabolic pathways: a systematic method for searching feasible enzyme activity patterns leading to cellular adaptive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorribas Albert

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimization methods allow designing changes in a system so that specific goals are attained. These techniques are fundamental for metabolic engineering. However, they are not directly applicable for investigating the evolution of metabolic adaptation to environmental changes. Although biological systems have evolved by natural selection and result in well-adapted systems, we can hardly expect that actual metabolic processes are at the theoretical optimum that could result from an optimization analysis. More likely, natural systems are to be found in a feasible region compatible with global physiological requirements. Results We first present a new method for globally optimizing nonlinear models of metabolic pathways that are based on the Generalized Mass Action (GMA representation. The optimization task is posed as a nonconvex nonlinear programming (NLP problem that is solved by an outer-approximation algorithm. This method relies on solving iteratively reduced NLP slave subproblems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP master problems that provide valid upper and lower bounds, respectively, on the global solution to the original NLP. The capabilities of this method are illustrated through its application to the anaerobic fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We next introduce a method to identify the feasibility parametric regions that allow a system to meet a set of physiological constraints that can be represented in mathematical terms through algebraic equations. This technique is based on applying the outer-approximation based algorithm iteratively over a reduced search space in order to identify regions that contain feasible solutions to the problem and discard others in which no feasible solution exists. As an example, we characterize the feasible enzyme activity changes that are compatible with an appropriate adaptive response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat shock Conclusion Our results

  1. Overexpression of the PP2A regulatory subunit Tap46 leads to enhanced plant growth through stimulation of the TOR signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Ahn, Hee-Kyung; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-02-01

    Tap46, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), plays an essential role in plant growth and development through a functional link with the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathway. Here, we have characterized the molecular mechanisms behind a gain-of-function phenotype of Tap46 and its relationship with TOR to gain further insights into Tap46 function in plants. Constitutive overexpression of Tap46 in Arabidopsis resulted in overall growth stimulation with enlarged organs, such as leaves and siliques. Kinematic analysis of leaf growth revealed that increased cell size was mainly responsible for the leaf enlargement. Tap46 overexpression also enhanced seed size and viability under accelerated ageing conditions. Enhanced plant growth was also observed in dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible Tap46 overexpression Arabidopsis lines, accompanied by increased cellular activities of nitrate-assimilating enzymes. DEX-induced Tap46 overexpression and Tap46 RNAi resulted in increased and decreased phosphorylation of S6 kinase (S6K), respectively, which is a sensitive indicator of endogenous TOR activity, and Tap46 interacted with S6K in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, inactivation of TOR by estradiol-inducible RNAi or rapamycin treatment decreased Tap46 protein levels, but increased PP2A catalytic subunit levels. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that Tap46 overexpression induced transcriptional modulation of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, and lignin biosynthesis. These findings suggest that Tap46 modulates plant growth as a positive effector of the TOR signalling pathway and Tap46/PP2Ac protein abundance is regulated by TOR activity.

  2. Associations between genetic variants in the TGF-β signaling pathway and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Stephanie D; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; Connor, Avonne E; Pinkston, Christina M; John, Esther M; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Giuliano, Anna R; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Brock, Guy N; Groves, Frank D; Kerber, Richard A; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L

    2013-09-01

    The TGF-β signaling pathway has a significant role in breast cancer initiation and promotion by regulating various cellular processes. We evaluated whether genetic variation in eight genes (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-βR1, TGF-βR2, TGF-βR3, RUNX1, RUNX2, and RUNX3) is associated with breast cancer risk in women from the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study. A total of 3,524 cases (1,431 non-Hispanic whites (NHW); 2,093 Hispanics/Native Americans(NA)) and 4,209 population-based controls (1,599 NHWs; 2,610 Hispanics/NAs) were included in analyses. Genotypes for 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were determined. Additionally, 104 ancestral informative markers estimated proportion of NA ancestry. Associations with breast cancer risk overall, by menopausal status, NA ancestry, and estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor tumor phenotype were evaluated. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk: RUNX3 (rs906296 ORCG/GG = 1.15 95 % CI 1.04-1.26) and TGF-β1 (rs4803455 ORCA/AA = 0.89 95 % CI 0.81-0.98). RUNX3 (rs906296) and TGF-βR2 (rs3773644) were associated with risk in pre-menopausal women (p adj = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively) and in those with intermediate to high NA ancestry (p adj = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). Self-reported race was strongly correlated with NA ancestry (r = 0.86). There was a significant interaction between NA ancestry and RUNX1 (rs7279383, p adj = 0.04). Four RUNX SNPs were associated with increased risk of ER- tumors. Results provide evidence that genetic variation in TGF-β and RUNX genes are associated with breast cancer risk. This is the first report of significant associations between genetic variants in TGF-β and RUNX genes and breast cancer risk among women of NA ancestry.

  3. Ligation of MHC class I and class II molecules can lead to heterologous desensitization of signal transduction pathways that regulate homotypic adhesion in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N; Engel, P; Vega, M; Tedder, T F

    1994-06-01

    Engagement of lymphocyte MHC class I and class II Ags activates an array of intracellular signal transduction pathways that up-regulates the activity of cell-surface adhesion receptors, resulting in homotypic cell-cell aggregation. In this study, engagement of MHC class I and class II molecules with specific mAbs was shown to also inhibit lymphocyte homotypic adhesion. Two mAbs reactive with class II Ag, homotypic adhesion blocking mAb (HAB)-2, and HAB-3, and one mAb reactive with class I Ag, HAB-4, were generated that inhibited homotypic adhesion of activated lymphocytes and B and T cell lines at concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Binding of these mAbs resulted in heterologous desensitization of other surface signal transduction molecules as homotypic adhesion induced through class I, class II, CD19, CD20, CD39, CD40, Leu-13, and PMA was also inhibited. The spontaneous adhesion exhibited by some cell lines was also abrogated by binding of these mAbs. Abs that either induced, blocked, or had no effect on adhesion bound to distinct epitopes on class I, whereas the anti-class II mAbs recognized either distinct or overlapping epitopes. Thus, engagement of distinct epitopes on MHC molecules can result in homologous or heterologous desensitization of cell-surface signaling molecules. The induction or inhibition of homotypic adhesion through class I molecules did not require the presence of the cytoplasmic domain, as deletion of this portion of the class I molecule had no effect. In contrast, the transmembrane region was essential for signal transduction as the mAbs binding to a chimeric molecule in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of class I were exchanged with those of the HB15 molecule did not induce or inhibit homotypic adhesion. Although this report is the first demonstration that homotypic adhesion can be influenced in a negative manner through MHC molecules, these findings demonstrate a considerable level of cross-talk between MHC molecules

  4. Perinatal Western Diet Consumption Leads to Profound Plasticity and GABAergic Phenotype Changes within Hypothalamus and Reward Pathway from Birth to Sexual Maturity in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Paradis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal maternal consumption of energy dense food increases the risk of obesity in children. This is associated with an overconsumption of palatable food that is consumed for its hedonic property. The underlying mechanism that links perinatal maternal diet and offspring preference for fat is still poorly understood. In this study, we aim at studying the influence of maternal high-fat/high-sugar diet feeding [western diet (WD] during gestation and lactation on the reward pathways controlling feeding in the rat offspring from birth to sexual maturity. We performed a longitudinal follow-up of WD and Control offspring at three critical time periods (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood and focus on investigating the influence of perinatal exposure to palatable diet on (i fat preference, (ii gene expression profile, and (iii neuroanatomical/architectural changes of the mesolimbic dopaminergic networks. We showed that WD feeding restricted to the perinatal period has a clear long-lasting influence on the organization of homeostatic and hedonic brain circuits but not on fat preference. We demonstrated a period specific evolution of the preference for fat that we correlated with specific brain molecular signatures. In offspring from WD fed dams, we observed during childhood the existence of fat preference associated with a higher expression of key gene involved in the dopamine (DA systems; at adolescence, a high-fat preference for both groups, progressively reduced during the 3 days test for the WD group and associated with a reduced expression of key gene involved in the DA systems for the WD group that could suggest a compensatory mechanism to protect them from further high-fat exposure; and finally at adulthood, a preference for fat that was identical to contro