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Sample records for genetic defects induced

  1. Genetic basis of susceptibility to teratogen induced birth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Palacios, Ana M; Chapa, Claudia J; Zhu, Huiping; George, Timothy M; Finnell, Richard H

    2011-08-15

    Birth defects remain the leading cause of infant death in US. The field of teratology has been focused on the causes and underlying mechanisms of birth defects for decades, yet our understanding of these critical issues remain unacceptably vague. Conclusions from years of animal and human studies made it clear that the vast majority of birth defects have multifactorial origins, with contributions from environmental and genetic factors. The environment comprises not only of the physical, biological, and chemical external environment surrounding the pregnant woman, but it also includes the internal environment of the woman's body that interact with the developing embryo in a complex fashion. The importance of maternal and embryonic genetic factors consisting of countless genetic variants/mutations that exist within every individual contribute to birth defect susceptibility is only now being more fully appreciated. This great complexity of the genome and its diversity within individuals and populations seems to be the principal reason why the same teratogenic exposure can induce severe malformation in one embryo, while fail to do so to other exposed embryos. As the interaction between genetic and environmental factors has long been recognized as the first "Principle of Teratology" by Wilson and Warkany [1965. Teratology: Principles and techniques. Chicago: University of Chicago Press], it is only recently that the appropriate investigative tools have been developed with which to fully investigate this fundamental principle. The introduction of high throughput technologies like whole genome sequencing or genome-wide association studies are promising to deliver an enormous amount of new data that will shed light on the genomic factors that contribute susceptibility to environmental teratogens. In this review, we attempt to summarize the epidemiological and experimental literature concerning birth defects whose phenotypic expression can be clearly related to the

  2. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  3. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  4. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  5. Improved Genetic Algorithm Application in Textile Defect Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Zhao-feng; Li Bei-bei; ZHAO Zhi-hong

    2007-01-01

    Based on an efficient improved genetic algorithm,a pattern recognition approach is represented for textile defects inspection. An image process is developed to automatically detect the drawbacks on textile caused by three circumstances: break, dual, and jump of yams. By statistic method, some texture feature values of the image with defects points can be achieved. Therefore, the textile defects are classified properly. The advanced process of the defect image is done. Image segmentation is realized by an improved genetic algorithm to detect the defects. This method can be used to automatically classify and detect textile defects. According to different users' requirements, ifferent types of textile material can be detected.

  6. Genetics of T Cell Defects in Lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifang Chen; Laurence More

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by anti-nuclear autoantibodies that cause damage to multiple organs and tissues. Intrinsic defects have been demonstrated in the lymphoid and myeloid cellular compartments, including T cells. Lupus susceptibility is mediated through the interplay of a large number of genes, most of which are still unidentified. Most of the genetic studies in both human patients and mouse models have addressed lupus susceptibility as a whole. More recently however, more attention has been paid to the inheritance of specific lupus-associated phenotypes. In this review, we summarized our results obtained with the Slel locus in the NZM2410 mouse model, which mediates the generation of anti-histone autoreactive T cells. Sle1,which is constituted of multiple genes, is the only known genomic region that is sufficient for the generation of autoreactive T cells. The identification of the corresponding genes will constitute a landmark for our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity. Our results are discussed in the context of candidate genes and the role of T cells in systemic autoimmunity.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  8. Genetic and epigenetic defects in mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, J.M.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2009-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a highly diverse group of cognitive disorders. The high incidence of MR, 2-3% in most populations, and the high burden for families and society makes this condition one of the major unsolved problems in modern medicine. Gene defects account for about half of all patients a

  9. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  10. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  11. Defects in trafficking bridge Parkinson's disease pathology and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeliovich, Asa; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-11-10

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating, age-associated movement disorder. A central aspect of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is the progressive demise of midbrain dopamine neurons and their axonal projections, but the underlying causes of this loss are unclear. Advances in genetics and experimental model systems have illuminated an important role for defects in intracellular transport pathways to lysosomes. The accumulation of altered proteins and damaged mitochondria, particularly at axon terminals, ultimately might overwhelm the capacity of intracellular disposal mechanisms. Cell-extrinsic mechanisms, including inflammation and prion-like spreading, are proposed to have both protective and deleterious functions in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Defect-induced mix experiment for NIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt M.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME-II will measure the implosion and mix characteristics of CH capsules filled with 5 atmospheres of DT by incorporating mid-Z dopant layers of Ge and Ga. This polar direct drive (PDD experiment also will demonstrate the filling of a CH capsule at target chamber center using a fill tube. Diagnostics for these experiments include areal x-ray backlighting to obtain early time images of the implosion trajectory and a multiple-monochromatic imager (MMI to collect spectrally-resolved images of the capsule dopant line emission near bangtime. The inclusion of two (or more thin dopant layers at separate depths within the capsule shell facilitates spatial correlation of mix between the layers and the hot gas core on a single shot. The dopant layers are typically 2 μm thick and contain dopant concentrations of 1.5%. Three dimensional Hydra simulations have been performed to assess the effects of PDD asymmetry on capsule performance.

  13. Genetic Drivers of Kidney Defects in the DiGeorge Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Liu, Yangfan P; Verbitsky, Miguel; Anderson, Blair R; Capone, Valentina P; Otto, Edgar A; Yan, Zhonghai; Mitrotti, Adele; Martino, Jeremiah; Steers, Nicholas J; Fasel, David A; Vukojevic, Katarina; Deng, Rong; Racedo, Silvia E; Liu, Qingxue; Werth, Max; Westland, Rik; Vivante, Asaf; Makar, Gabriel S; Bodria, Monica; Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Petrey, Donald S; Honig, Barry; Lozanovski, Vladimir J; Salomon, Rémi; Heidet, Laurence; Carpentier, Wassila; Gaillard, Dominique; Carrea, Alba; Gesualdo, Loreto; Cusi, Daniele; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco; van Wijk, Joanna A E; Arapovic, Adela; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Saraga, Marijan; Kunac, Nenad; Samii, Ali; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Crowley, Terrence B; Zackai, Elaine H; Drozdz, Dorota; Miklaszewska, Monika; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Sikora, Przemyslaw; Szczepanska, Maria; Mizerska-Wasiak, Malgorzata; Krzemien, Grazyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Zaniew, Marcin; Darlow, John M; Puri, Prem; Barton, David; Casolari, Emilio; Furth, Susan L; Warady, Bradley A; Gucev, Zoran; Hakonarson, Hakon; Flogelova, Hana; Tasic, Velibor; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Allegri, Landino; Wong, Craig S; Drummond, Iain A; D'Agati, Vivette; Imamoto, Akira; Barasch, Jonathan M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Lifton, Richard P; Morrow, Bernice E; Jeanpierre, Cecile; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gharavi, Ali G; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2017-02-23

    Background The DiGeorge syndrome, the most common of the microdeletion syndromes, affects multiple organs, including the heart, the nervous system, and the kidney. It is caused by deletions on chromosome 22q11.2; the genetic driver of the kidney defects is unknown. Methods We conducted a genomewide search for structural variants in two cohorts: 2080 patients with congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies and 22,094 controls. We performed exome and targeted resequencing in samples obtained from 586 additional patients with congenital kidney anomalies. We also carried out functional studies using zebrafish and mice. Results We identified heterozygous deletions of 22q11.2 in 1.1% of the patients with congenital kidney anomalies and in 0.01% of population controls (odds ratio, 81.5; P=4.5×10(-14)). We localized the main drivers of renal disease in the DiGeorge syndrome to a 370-kb region containing nine genes. In zebrafish embryos, an induced loss of function in snap29, aifm3, and crkl resulted in renal defects; the loss of crkl alone was sufficient to induce defects. Five of 586 patients with congenital urinary anomalies had newly identified, heterozygous protein-altering variants, including a premature termination codon, in CRKL. The inactivation of Crkl in the mouse model induced developmental defects similar to those observed in patients with congenital urinary anomalies. Conclusions We identified a recurrent 370-kb deletion at the 22q11.2 locus as a driver of kidney defects in the DiGeorge syndrome and in sporadic congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Of the nine genes at this locus, SNAP29, AIFM3, and CRKL appear to be critical to the phenotype, with haploinsufficiency of CRKL emerging as the main genetic driver. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  14. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  15. Effect of native defects and laser-induced defects on multi-shot laser-induced damage in multilayer mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Yuanan Zhao; Tanda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2011-01-01

    The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated. The HfO2/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE). Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-l and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nm pulsed laser at a duration of 8 ns. It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT. In the multi-shot mode, the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects. The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy. Moreover, the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples. A correlative model based on critical conduction band (CB) electron density (ED) is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.%@@ The roles of laser-induced defects and native defects in multilayer mirrors under multi-shot irradiation condition are investigated.The Hf02/SiO2 dielectric mirrors are deposited by electron beam evaporation (EBE).Laser damage testing is carried out on both the 1-on-1 and S-on-1 regimes using 355-nn pulsed laser at a duration of 8 us.It is found that the single-shot laser-induced damage threshold(LIDT)is much higher than the multi-shot LIDT.In the multi-shot mode,the main factor influencing LIDT is the accumulation of irreversible laser-induced defects and native defects.The surface morphologies of the samples are observed by optical microscopy.Moreover,the number of laser-induced defects affects the damage probability of the samples.A correlative model based on critical conduction band(CB)electron density(ED)is presented to simulate the multi-shot damage behavior.

  16. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  17. RUPTURING OF POLYMER FILMS WITH RUBBING-INDUCED SURFACE DEFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Du; F.C.Xie; Y.J.Wang; O.K.C.Tsui

    2003-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question whether dewetting of polymer film from non-wettable substrate surfaces wherein the bicontinuous morphology never forms in the dewetting film is due to spinodal instability or heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, we use a simple method to make the distinction through introduction of topographical defects of the films by rubbing the sample surface with a rayon cloth. Spinodal dewetting is identified for those films that dewet by a characteristic wavevector, q*, independent of the density of rubbing-induced defects. Heterogeneous nucleation, on the other hand, is identified for those with q* increasing with increasing density of defects. Our result shows that PS films on oxide coated silicon with thickness less than ≈ 13 nm are dominated by spinodal dewetting, but the thicker films are dominated by nucleation dewetting. We also confirm that spinodal dewetting does not necessarily lead to a bicontinuous morphology in the dewetting film, contrary to the classic theory of Cahn.

  18. Birth defects and genetic disorders among Arab Americans--Michigan, 1992-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanni, Emad A; Copeland, Glenn; Olney, Richard S

    2010-06-01

    Birth defects and genetic disorders are leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in many countries. Population-based data on birth defects among Arab-American children have not been documented previously. Michigan has the second largest Arab-American community in the United States after California. Using data from the Michigan Birth Defects Registry (MBDR), which includes information on parents' country of birth and ancestry, birth prevalences were estimated in offspring of Michigan women of Arab ancestry for 21 major categories of birth defects and 12 congenital endocrine, metabolic, and hereditary disorders. Compared with other non-Hispanic white children in Michigan, Arab-American children had similar or lower birth prevalences of the selected types of structural birth defects, with higher rates of certain hereditary blood disorders and three categories of metabolic disorders. These estimates are important for planning preconception and antenatal health care, genetic counseling, and clinical care for Arab Americans.

  19. Coagulation defects resulting from ambient temperature-induced hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, D B; Sorensen, V J; Fath, J J; Raman, S B; Horst, H M; Obeid, F N

    1994-05-01

    Ambient temperature-induced hypothermia noted in trauma patients is frequently accompanied by a bleeding diathesis despite "laboratory normal" coagulation values. To document this impression, the following experiment was conducted. Coagulation studies and platelet function studies were performed in ten minipigs during induced whole body hypothermia (40 degrees C to 34 degrees C) and rewarming. Cooling was achieved in 2 to 3 hours and rewarming took 4 to 5 hours. In addition, similar coagulation and platelet function studies were conducted on plasma samples from the same animals that were cooled and then rewarmed in a water bath. Platelet counts and function as measured by Sonoclot analysis and aggregation did not decrease significantly with hypothermia in either model. Plasma cooled in a water bath demonstrated abnormal PT and aPTT (p coagulation defects in a porcine model. Some of the coagulation defects were most pronounced during rewarming.

  20. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Th., E-mail: thierry.allard@impmc.upmc.fr [IMPMC, UMR CNRS 7590, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Denis Diderot, IRD, IPGP, Case 115, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Balan, E.; Calas, G.; Fourdrin, C.; Morichon, E.; Sorieul, S. [IMPMC, UMR CNRS 7590, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Denis Diderot, IRD, IPGP, Case 115, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-04-15

    Extensive information has been collected on radiation effects on clay minerals over the last 35 years, providing a wealth of information on environmental and geological processes. The fields of applications include the reconstruction of past radioelement migrations, the dating of clay minerals or the evolution of the physico-chemical properties under irradiation. The investigation of several clay minerals, namely kaolinite, dickite, montmorillonite, illite and sudoite, by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy has shown the presence of defects produced by natural or artificial radiations. These defects consist mostly of electron holes located on oxygen atoms of the structure. The various radiation-induced defects are differentiated through their nature and their thermal stability. Most of them are associated with a {pi} orbital on a Si-O bond. The most abundant defect in clay minerals is oriented perpendicular to the silicate layer. Thermal annealing indicates this defect in kaolinite (A-center) to be stable over geological periods at ambient temperature. Besides, electron or heavy ion irradiation easily leads to an amorphization in smectites, depending on the type of interlayer cation. The amorphization dose exhibits a bell-shaped variation as a function of temperature, with a decreasing part that indicates the influence of thermal dehydroxylation. Two main applications of the knowledge of radiation-induced defects in clay minerals are derived: (i) The use of defects as tracers of past radioactivity. In geological systems where the age of the clay can be constrained, ancient migrations of radioelements can be reconstructed in natural analogues of high level nuclear waste repositories. When the dose rate may be assumed constant over time, the paleodose is used to date clay populations, an approach applied to fault gouges or laterites of the Amazon basin. (ii) The influence of irradiation over physico-chemical properties of clay minerals. An environmental

  1. Systems Biology and Birth Defects Prevention: Blockade of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Prevents Arsenic-Induced Birth Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Ahir, Bhavesh K.; Sanders, Alison P.; Julia E. Rager; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The biological mechanisms by which environmental metals are associated with birth defects are largely unknown. Systems biology–based approaches may help to identify key pathways that mediate metal-induced birth defects as well as potential targets for prevention. Objectives: First, we applied a novel computational approach to identify a prioritized biological pathway that associates metals with birth defects. Second, in a laboratory setting, we sought to determine whether inhibiti...

  2. Hydrogen-induced defects and multiplication of dislocations in Palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čížek, J., E-mail: jakub.cizek@mff.cuni.cz; Melikhova, O.; Procházka, I.

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hydrogen-induced defects in Pd were characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy. • Hydrogen remarkably reduces vacancy formation energy in Pd. • In alpha phase region hydrogen creates vacancies and causes solid solution hardening. • Dislocations are introduced in the two phase field and cause strain hardening. - Abstract: In the present work positron lifetime spectroscopy was employed for investigation of hydrogen-induced defects in Pd. Well annealed polycrystalline Pd samples were electrochemically charged with hydrogen and the development of defects with increasing hydrogen concentration was investigated. At low concentrations (α-phase region, x{sub H} < 0.017 H/Pd) hydrogen loading introduced vacancies surrounded by hydrogen atoms and characterized by a positron lifetime of ≈200 ps. When the hydrogen concentration exceeded 0.017 H/Pd the α-phase transformed into the hydrogen rich α′-phase. This generated dislocations characterized by a positron lifetime of ≈170 ps. Dislocations can accommodate a large volume mismatch between the α and the α′-phase. Hardness testing revealed that absorbed hydrogen made Pd harder. In the α-phase region hardness increased due to solid solution hardening caused by dissolved hydrogen. Dislocations created by the α to α′-phase transition caused strain hardening which led to an additional increase of hardness.

  3. Preshot Predictions for Defect Induced Mix (DIME) Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31

    In this memo, we evaluate the most probable yield and other results for the Defect Induced Mix (DIME-12A) Polar Direct Drive (PDD) capsule-only shots. We evaluate the expected yield, bang time, burn averaged ion temperature, and the average electron temperature of the Ge line-emitting region. We also include synthetic images of the capsule backlit by Cu K-{alpha} emission (8.39 keV) and core self-emission synthetic images. This memo is a companion to the maximum credible yield memo (LA-UR-12-00287) published earlier.

  4. RUPTURING OF POLYMER FILMS WITH RUBBING—INDUCED SURFACE DEFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Du; F.C.Xie; Y.J.Wang; O.K.C.Tsui; O.K.C.Tsui

    2003-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question whether dewetting of polymer film from non-wettable substrate surfaces wherein the bicontinuous morphology never forms in the dewetting film is due to spinodal instability or heterogeneous nucleation.In this experiment,we use a simple method to make the distinction through introduction of topographical defects of the films by rubbing the sample surface with a rayon cloth.Spinodal dewetting is identified for those films that dewet by a characteristic wavevector,q,independent of the density of rubbing-induced defects.Heterogeneous nucleation,on the other hand,is identified for those with q increasing with increasing density of defects.Our result shows that PS films on oxide coated silicon with thickness less than≈13nm are dominated by spinodal dewetting,but the thicker films are dominated by nucleation dewetting.We also confirm that spinodal dewetting does not necessarily lead to a bicontinuous morphology in the dewetting film,contrary to the classic theory of Cahn.

  5. Genetic knowledge and attitudes of parents of children with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Klima, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly; Chisolm, Deena; McBride, Kim L

    2014-12-01

    Clinical genetic testing for specific isolated congenital heart defects (CHD) is becoming standard of care in pediatric cardiology practice. Both genetic knowledge and attitudes toward genetic testing are associated with an increased utilization of genetic testing, but these factors have not been evaluated in parents of children with CHD. We mailed a survey to measure the demographics, genetic knowledge, and attitudes towards genetic testing of parents of children with CHD who previously consented to participate in a separate research study of the genetic etiology of left ventricular outflow tract malformations (LVOT). Of the 378 eligible families, 190 (50%) returned surveys with both parents completing surveys in 97 (51%) families, resulting in 287 participants. Genetic knowledge was assessed on an adapted measure on which the mean percent correct was 73.8%. Educational attainment and household income were directly and significantly associated with genetic knowledge (P Parents of younger children were less likely to endorse employment or racial/social discrimination. Genetic knowledge was not correlated with specific attitudes. Among parents of children with CHD, genetic knowledge was directly associated with household income and education, but additional research is necessary to determine what factors influence attitudes towards genetic testing.

  6. Retinoic Acid Excess Impairs Amelogenesis Inducing Enamel Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Mathieu, Eric; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Niederreither, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Abnormalities of enamel matrix proteins deposition, mineralization, or degradation during tooth development are responsible for a spectrum of either genetic diseases termed Amelogenesis imperfecta or acquired enamel defects. To assess if environmental/nutritional factors can exacerbate enamel defects, we investigated the role of the active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA). Robust expression of RA-degrading enzymes Cyp26b1 and Cyp26c1 in developing murine teeth suggested RA excess would reduce tooth hard tissue mineralization, adversely affecting enamel. We employed a protocol where RA was supplied to pregnant mice as a food supplement, at a concentration estimated to result in moderate elevations in serum RA levels. This supplementation led to severe enamel defects in adult mice born from pregnant dams, with most severe alterations observed for treatments from embryonic day (E)12.5 to E16.5. We identified the enamel matrix proteins enamelin (Enam), ameloblastin (Ambn), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (Odam) as target genes affected by excess RA, exhibiting mRNA reductions of over 20-fold in lower incisors at E16.5. RA treatments also affected bone formation, reducing mineralization. Accordingly, craniofacial ossification was drastically reduced after 2 days of treatment (E14.5). Massive RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on E14.5 and E16.5 lower incisors. Reductions in Runx2 (a key transcriptional regulator of bone and enamel differentiation) and its targets were observed at E14.5 in RA-exposed embryos. RNA-seq analysis further indicated that bone growth factors, extracellular matrix, and calcium homeostasis were perturbed. Genes mutated in human AI (ENAM, AMBN, AMELX, AMTN, KLK4) were reduced in expression at E16.5. Our observations support a model in which elevated RA signaling at fetal stages affects dental cell lineages. Thereafter enamel protein production is impaired, leading to permanent enamel alterations. PMID:28111553

  7. Epidemiologic and Genetic Aspects of Spina Bifida and Other Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kit Sing; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Northrup, Hope

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 per 1,000 births with almost equal frequencies between two major categories: anencephaly and spina bifida (SB). Epidemiological studies have provided valuable insight for (a) researchers to identify nongenetic and genetic factors contributing to etiology, (b) public…

  8. Epidemiologic and Genetic Aspects of Spina Bifida and Other Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kit Sing; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Northrup, Hope

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 per 1,000 births with almost equal frequencies between two major categories: anencephaly and spina bifida (SB). Epidemiological studies have provided valuable insight for (a) researchers to identify nongenetic and genetic factors contributing to etiology, (b) public…

  9. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  10. Genetic variation in genes of folate metabolism and neural-tube defect risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, I.J. van der; Afman, L.A.; Heil, S.G.; Blom, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Neural-tube defects (NTD) are common congenital malformations that can lead to severe disability or even death. Periconceptional supplementation with the B-vitamin folic acid has been demonstrated to prevent 50-70% of NTD cases. Since the identification of the first genetic risk factor of NTD, the C

  11. Genetic variation in genes of folate metabolism and neural-tube defect risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der I.J.; Afman, L.A.; Heil, S.G.; Blom, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Neural-tube defects (NTD) are common congenital malformations that can lead to severe disability or even death. Periconceptional supplementation with the B-vitamin folic acid has been demonstrated to prevent 50–70% of NTD cases. Since the identification of the first genetic risk factor of NTD, the C

  12. Defect-induced magnetism in neutron irradiated 6H-SiC single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Gang; Wang, Shunchong; Yang, Jianhui; Chen, Liang; Qin, Xiubo; Song, Bo; Wang, Baoyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2011-02-25

    Defect-induced magnetism is firstly observed in neutron irradiated SiC single crystals. We demonstrated that the intentionally created defects dominated by divacancies (V(Si)V(C)) are responsible for the observed magnetism. First-principles calculations revealed that defect states favor the formation of local moments and the extended tails of defect wave functions make long-range spin couplings possible. Our results confirm the existence of defect-induced magnetism, implying the possibility of tuning the magnetism of wide band-gap semiconductors by defect engineering.

  13. Genetic remodeling of protein glycosylation in vivo induces autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Daniel; Sellakumar, Gayathri; Green, Ryan S.; Sutton-Smith, Mark; McQuistan, Tammie; Marek, Kurt W.; Morris, Howard R.; Dell, Anne; Marth, Jamey D.

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are among the most prevalent of afflictions, yet the genetic factors responsible are largely undefined. Protein glycosylation in the Golgi apparatus produces structural variation at the cell surface and contributes to immune self-recognition. Altered protein glycosylation and antibodies that recognize endogenous glycans have been associated with various autoimmune syndromes, with the possibility that such abnormalities may reflect genetic defects in glycan formation. We show that mutation of a single gene, encoding α-mannosidase II, which regulates the hybrid to complex branching pattern of extracellular asparagine (N)-linked oligosaccharide chains (N-glycans), results in a systemic autoimmune disease similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. α-Mannosidase II-deficient autoimmune disease is due to an incomplete overlap of two conjoined pathways in complex-type N-glycan production. Lymphocyte development, abundance, and activation parameters are normal; however, serum immunoglobulins are increased and kidney function progressively falters as a disorder consistent with lupus nephritis develops. Autoantibody reactivity and circulating immune complexes are induced, and anti-nuclear antibodies exhibit reactivity toward histone, Sm antigen, and DNA. These findings reveal a genetic cause of autoimmune disease provoked by a defect in the pathway of protein N-glycosylation. PMID:11158608

  14. Genetic counseling for young adults who have a congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, R

    1986-01-01

    Early individual guidance is needed for all adolescents and young adults with congenital heart defects. This should include not only a personal interest in the individual but also an attempt to identify concerns about sex education, smoking, drugs and the risks of pregnancy and possible inheritance. In a prospective study of 252 women with various cardiac malformations, the incidence of congenital heart defects in their progeny was 15.7% (13% exclusive of genetic syndromes and those with a positive family history). In those with a positive family history or a genetic syndrome the incidence was 56% in the offspring. Genetic syndromes with cardiac components are increasingly apparent. The role of teratogens such as medications, illicit drugs, and environmental exposure play a not yet clearly defined role. Careful discussion with potential parents, giving facts but with a positive approach, is an obligation of every physician.

  15. Proinsulin atypical maturation and disposal induces extensive defects in mouse Ins2+/Akita β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxin Yuan

    Full Text Available Because of its low relative folding rate and plentiful manufacture in β-cells, proinsulin maintains a homeostatic balance of natively and plentiful non-natively folded states (i.e., proinsulin homeostasis, PIHO through the integration of maturation and disposal processes. PIHO is susceptible to genetic and environmental influences, and its disorder has been critically linked to defects in β-cells in diabetes. To explore this hypothesis, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR, metabolic-labeling, immunoblotting, and histological studies to clarify what defects result from primary disorder of PIHO in model Ins2(+/Akita β-cells. We used T antigen-transformed Ins2(+/Akita and control Ins2(+/+ β-cells established from Akita and wild-type littermate mice. In Ins2(+/Akita β-cells, we found no apparent defect at the transcriptional and translational levels to contribute to reduced cellular content of insulin and its precursor and secreted insulin. Glucose response remained normal in proinsulin biosynthesis but was impaired for insulin secretion. The size and number of mature insulin granules were reduced, but the size/number of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, mitochondrion, and lysosome organelles and vacuoles were expanded/increased. Moreover, cell death increased, and severe oxidative stress, which manifested as increased reactive oxygen species, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and protein tyrosine nitration, occurred in Ins2(+/Akita β-cells and/or islets. These data show the first clear evidence that primary PIHO imbalance induces severe oxidative stress and impairs glucose-stimulated insulin release and β-cell survival as well as producing other toxic consequences. The defects disclosed/clarified in model Ins2(+/Akita β-cells further support a role of the genetic and stress-susceptible PIHO disorder in β-cell failure and diabetes.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of radiation-induced defects in gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing

    Radiation damage studies of GaN provide insights into the fundamental properties of the material as well as the basic knowledge needed to predict degradation of GaN-based devices in space-based applications or other radiation environments. The main interests are in investigating the properties of radiation-induced defects at the microscopic level and providing data to evaluate the radiation hardness of the material. Selective damage of the N-sublattice is achieved with 0.42 MeV electron irradiation. Two new luminescence lines at 3.4732 eV and 3.4545 eV are detected by time-resolved photoluminescence after irradiation. The two lines are associated with the ground state bound exciton of a new donor B1 and its two-electron transition. The donor binding energy of B1 is determined as 24.9 +/- 0.4 meV, shallower than the impurity donors ON and Si Ga. Among the possible defects, the nitrogen vacancy (VN) is the best candidate for the new donor B1. In addition, a change under focused 267 nm laser beam is observed at cryogenic temperatures in the excitonic luminescence of the irradiated sample. The donor bound exciton intensity of ON and SiGa, the total band edge luminescence intensity, and the luminescence decay lifetime of free and bound excitons all increase with laser exposure time. In contrast, the relative intensity of the B 1 bound exciton emission decreases. The change is not observed with below bandgap illumination. We propose that the light-induced change reflects the illumination-assisted dissociation of non-radiative defect complexes O N-Ni and SiGa-Ni, and subsequently the migration of Ni and at least partial annihilation of N i at VN. The new donor B1 bound exciton emission and the light-induced change starts to disappear at annealing temperature around 300°C, indicating the annihilation of the irradiation-induced vacancy and interstitial defects. An activation energy of 1.5 eV is obtained, which is proposed to be the sum of the dissociation energy of the ON

  17. Use of genetically modified muscle and fat grafts to repair defects in bone and cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel technology for the rapid healing of large osseous and chondral defects, based upon the genetic modification of autologous skeletal muscle and fat grafts. These tissues were selected because they not only possess mesenchymal progenitor cells and scaffolding properties, but also can be biopsied, genetically modified and returned to the patient in a single operative session. First generation adenovirus vector carrying cDNA encoding human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Ad.BMP-2 was used for gene transfer to biopsies of muscle and fat. To assess bone healing, the genetically modified (“gene activated” tissues were implanted into 5mm-long critical size, mid-diaphyseal, stabilized defects in the femora of Fischer rats. Unlike control defects, those receiving gene-activated muscle underwent rapid healing, with evidence of radiologic bridging as early as 10 days after implantation and restoration of full mechanical strength by 8 weeks. Histologic analysis suggests that the grafts rapidly differentiated into cartilage, followed by efficient endochondral ossification. Fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of Y-chromosomes following the transfer of male donor muscle into female rats demonstrated that at least some of the osteoblasts of the healed bone were derived from donor muscle. Gene activated fat also healed critical sized defects, but less quickly than muscle and with more variability. Anti-adenovirus antibodies were not detected. Pilot studies in a rabbit osteochondral defect model demonstrated the promise of this technology for healing cartilage defects. Further development of these methods should provide ways to heal bone and cartilage more expeditiously, and at lower cost, than is presently possible.

  18. Defect-induced bandgap narrowing in low-k dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing & Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Afanas' ev, V. V. [Department of Physics, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baklanov, M. R.; Marneffe, J.-F. de [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-08-24

    In this work, core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the surface bandgap for various porous and non-porous low-k a-SiCOH dielectrics before and after ion sputtering. By examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in O 1s core-level spectra, the gap narrowing was universally found in Ar{sup +} ion sputtered low-k dielectrics. The reduction of the bandgap ranges from 1.3 to 2.2 eV depending on the film composition. We show that the bandgap narrowing in these low-k dielectrics is caused by development of the valence-band tail as evidenced by the presence of additional electronic states above the valence-band maximum. Electron-spin-resonance measurements were made on a-SiCOH films to gain atomic insight into the nature of the sputtering-induced defects and reveal formation of carbon-related defects as the most probable origin of the gap states.

  19. Thermal desorption from surfaces with laser-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, Pawel; Panczyk, Tomasz; Rudzinski, Wladyslaw

    2002-12-30

    Monte Carlo simulation method was used to mimic surface damage development caused by short laser pulses. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the creation of defect concentration was examined in the case of a model surface. In particular, the dependence of the intact surface area on a number of laser scans was studied and compared with the experimental results obtained for Rh(1 1 1) crystal face. Changes in the adsorptivoperties of the surface produced by laser irradiation are explained with the help of a simple geometric model connecting the laser intensity and the disordered area generated by a single laser shot. It was demonstrated that exponential decay of the Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) signal with the number of laser scans, which is observed experimentally, may result directly from the overlapping of the laser spots created on the surface. This effect becomes enhanced when the laser intensity, hence the spot size, increases. The importance of laser-induced defects in the kinetics of catalytic/separation processes was examined in the case of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra from surfaces subjected to a different number of laser shots. The spectra were simulated by employing the Monte Carlo method as well as by application of the absolute rate theory (ART) coupled with the mean field approximation. The results obtained with both methods were in a good agreement even when weak lateral interactions in the adsorbed phase were allowed.

  20. Genetic analysis of Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Yu, Tao; Matsui, Sei-ichi; ZHANG Li; Fu, Dawei; Pao, Annie; Costa, Alberto C.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cowell, John K; Nowak, Norma J; Parmacek, Michael S.; Liang, Ping; Baldini, Antonio; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Human trisomy 21, the chromosomal basis of Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of heart defects. Regions on human chromosome 21 (Has21) are syntenically conserved with three regions located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of duplications of each syntenic region on cardiovascular development in mice and have found that only the duplication on Mmu16, i.e., Dp(16)1Yey, is associated with heart defects. Furthermore, we g...

  1. CPT-Violating Leptogenesis induced by Gravitational Defects

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2012-01-01

    We explore leptogenesis induced by the propagation of neutrinos in gravitational backgrounds that may occur in string theory. The first background is due to linear dilatons and the associated Kalb-Ramond field (axion) in four non-compact space-time dimensions of the string, and can be described within the framework of local effective lagrangians. The axion is linear in the time coordinate of the Einstein frame and gives rise to a constant torsion which couples to the fermion spin through a gravitational covariant derivative. This leads to different energy-momentum dispersion relations for fermions and anti-fermions and hence leptogenesis. The next two backgrounds go beyond the local effective lagrangian framework. One is a stochastic (Lorentz Violating) Finsler metric which again leads to different dispersion relations between fermions and antifermions. The third background of primary interest is the one due to populations of stochastically fluctuating point-like space-time defects that can be encountered in ...

  2. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  3. Recent perspectives on the genetic background of neural tube defects with special regard to iniencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-04-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare and mostly lethal type of neural tube defect. The pattern of inheritance of this group of malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of human neurulation. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the CNS include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure, as well as the sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of neural tube defects. In this review we have attempted to summarize the knowledge on iniencephaly and neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  4. A Genetic Algorithm Based Approach for Segmentingand Identifying Defects in Glass Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mathew

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work mainly aims at designing and developing a suitable tool for identifying defects in glass bottles through visual inspection based on Segmentation algorithm. The defect identification is done in three stages. These are Image acquisition, Pre-processing and filtering and Segmentation. In the Image acquisition stage, samples of real time images are taken and are converted into 512x512 monochrome images. In the Preprocessing and filtering stage, the image acquired is passed through median filters. The Proposed filter is Modified Decision Based Unsymmetric Trimmed Median Filter (MDBUTMF because it produces a high value of Peak to Signal Ratio (PSNR of 60-75db.The de-noised images is further sent to the third stage which is Segmentation. In this work, Segmentation is done using Genetic Algorithm (GA. The defects in the images are segmented and highlighted. Thus the areas of defects are spotted out. The Genetic segmentation has produced high Sensitivity, high Specificity and high Accuracy of 92%, 93% and 93% respectively. Thus the Proposed work produced effective results and hence this tool shall be useful for food processing industries for the Quality Inspection of the glass bottles

  5. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  6. Zinc antagonizes homocysteine-induced fetal heart defects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyu; Hong, Xinru; Zeng, Fang; Kang, Fenhong; Li, Li; Sun, Qinghua

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that zinc may have a protective role against heart defects during fetal development. We investigated the effects of zinc on the development of fetal cardiac malformations induced by homocysteine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into one of five groups: control (C), homocysteine (H), homocysteine + zinc (Z), homocysteine + folic acid (F), or homocysteine + zinc + folic acid (ZF) (each n = 8). Homocysteine (8 nmol/day) was administered intraperitoneally in the H, Z, F, and ZF groups on gestation days (GD) 8, 9, and 10. Zinc (30 mg/kg day), folic acid (30 mg/kg day), or both (30 mg/kg day each) were administered intragastrically daily in the Z, F, and ZF groups, respectively, throughout the pregnancy. In each group, two fetuses were removed on GD 13, 15, 17, and 19 and examined for cardiac malformations; maternal copper/zinc-containing-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) activity and metallothionein type I (MT-1) mRNA expression were measured simultaneously. The prevalence of cardiac malformations was significantly higher in group H than in group C, and significantly lower in group Z than in group H at the studied time points. Cu/Zn-SOD activity and MT-1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in group H than in group C, and significantly higher in group Z than in group H. Our data suggest that zinc antagonizes homocysteine-induced teratogenic effects on the fetal heart, possibly via the inhibition of excessive peroxidation.

  7. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  8. Genetic analysis of Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Yu, Tao; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Zhang, Li; Fu, Dawei; Pao, Annie; Costa, Alberto C; Gardiner, Katheleen J; Cowell, John K; Nowak, Norma J; Nowak, Normal J; Parmacek, Michael S; Liang, Ping; Baldini, Antonio; Yu, Y Eugene

    2011-11-01

    Human trisomy 21, the chromosomal basis of Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of heart defects. Regions on human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) are syntenically conserved with three regions located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of duplications of each syntenic region on cardiovascular development in mice and have found that only the duplication on Mmu16, i.e., Dp(16)1Yey, is associated with heart defects. Furthermore, we generated two novel mouse models carrying a 5.43-Mb duplication and a reciprocal deletion between Tiam1 and Kcnj6 using chromosome engineering, Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+ and Df(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+, respectively, within the 22.9-Mb syntenic region on Mmu16. We found that Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+, but not Dp(16)1Yey/Df(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey, resulted in heart defects, indicating that triplication of the Tiam1-Knj6 region is necessary and sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16Tiam1-Kcnj6)Yey/+ embryos confirmed elevated expression levels for the genes located in the Tiam-Kcnj6 region. Therefore, we established the smallest critical genomic region for DS-associated heart defects to lay the foundation for identifying the causative gene(s) for this phenotype.

  9. Ventricular Septal Defect Spontaneous Close Induced by Transcatheter: A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qilian Xie; Jun Wang; Lei Gao; Zhen Wang; Milin Zhang; Kunshen Liu

    2007-01-01

    Congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD) spontaneous close induced by transcatheter treatment is rare and has not yet been reported.We report on one case of VSD spontaneous close induced by transcatheter treatment in a 10 years old girl.

  10. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Murdoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  11. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  12. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  13. Defective CFTR induces aggresome formation and lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis through ROS-mediated autophagy inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Alessandro; Villella, Valeria Rachela; Esposito, Speranza; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Medina, Diego; Settembre, Carmine; Gavina, Manuela; Pulze, Laura; Giardino, Ida; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; D'Apolito, Maria; Guido, Stefano; Masliah, Eliezer; Spencer, Brian; Quaratino, Sonia; Raia, Valeria; Ballabio, Andrea; Maiuri, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    Accumulation of unwanted/misfolded proteins in aggregates has been observed in airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-threatening genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Here we show how the defective CFTR results in defective autophagy and decreases the clearance of aggresomes. Defective CFTR-induced upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tissue transglutaminase (TG2) drive the crosslinking of beclin 1, leading to sequestration of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI(3)K) complex III and accumulation of p62, which regulates aggresome formation. Both CFTR knockdown and the overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged-CFTR(F508del) induce beclin 1 downregulation and defective autophagy in non-CF airway epithelia through the ROS-TG2 pathway. Restoration of beclin 1 and autophagy by either beclin 1 overexpression, cystamine or antioxidants rescues the localization of the beclin 1 interactome to the endoplasmic reticulum and reverts the CF airway phenotype in vitro, in vivo in Scnn1b-transgenic and Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice, and in human CF nasal biopsies. Restoring beclin 1 or knocking down p62 rescued the trafficking of CFTR(F508del) to the cell surface. These data link the CFTR defect to autophagy deficiency, leading to the accumulation of protein aggregates and to lung inflammation.

  14. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  15. Defect-induced loading of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Yong Jin; Ra, Eun Ju; Kim, Ki Kang; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Chan Ho; Doo, Seok Kwang; Park, Min Ho; Yang, Cheol Woong

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticles were loaded using a microwave oven on the defective carbon nanotubes generated by an additional oxidant during acid treatment. The authors' Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that defects created during oxidation and microwave treatment acted as nucleation seeds for Pt adsorption. The generated Pt nanoparticles had the size distributions of 2-3nm and were uniformly distributed on the defects of carbon nanotubes. The authors' density functional calculations showed that the adsorption of Pt atom on the vacancy of nanotube was significantly stronger by s-p hybridization with carbon atoms near the defect site.

  16. Physics of defect induced local moments in pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinenko, Vadim; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud; Aswartham, Saicharan; Wolter-Giraud, Anja; Hess, Christian; Kumar, Manoj; Wurmehl, Sabine; Fuchs, Guenter; Nenkov, Konstantin; Hammerath, Franziska; Lang, Guillaume; Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Holzapfel, Bernhard; Brink, Jeroen van den; Buechner, Bernd; Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden (Germany); Kikoin, Konstatin [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University (Israel)

    2012-07-01

    Many unusual physical properties of Fe-pnictide superconductors are related to the presence of local magnetic moments induced by point-defects, e.g. As-vacancies. In the La-1111 system they improve the superconducting properties as compared with As-stoichiometric samples enhancing T{sub c} and the -dH{sub c2}/dT at T{sub c}. But they also enhance strongly the spin susceptibility, which governs the Pauli limiting behavior of the As-deficient La-1111. In heavily hole doped K-122 superconducting single crystals the local moments leads to a complex phase diagram with a Griffith and a spin glass phase. The local moments picture explains also the observed non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the large effective mass enhancement of the quasi-particles in K-122. In Co-doped Ba-122 superconducting single crystals the local moments form also a spin glass state and lead to a strong Pauli limiting behavior.

  17. Mycophenolic Acid-Induced Developmental Defects in Zebrafish Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling-Ling; Liu, Mei-Hui; Li, Jian-Ying; He, Zhi-Heng; Li, Huan; Shen, Ning; Wei, Ping; He, Ming-Fang

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing use of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in solid organ transplantation, some clinical studies indicate that it is also a human teratogen. However, it is unknown by which mechanism MPA acts as a teratogen. Mycophenolic acid was a selective blocker of de novo purine synthesis, and its immunosuppressive effect is mediated by the inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, which could be a target for MPA-induced toxicity as well. The aim of our study was to examine the direct influence of MPA exposure on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Morphological defects including tail curvature and severe pericardial edema in zebrafish embryos caused by MPA (3.7-11.1 µmol/L) were found in a dose-dependent manner. The teratogenic index (25% lethal concentration value (LC25)/no observed adverse effect level ratio) was 16, which indicated MPA as a teratogen. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the expression level of impdh1b and impdh2 was significantly reduced by MPA treatment at 8 µmol/L (equals to LC25 level). All the toxic effects could be partially reversed by the addition of 33.3 µmol/L guanosine. Our results indicated that MPA impairs the development of zebrafish embryos via inhibition of impdh activity, which subsequently caused a guanosine nucleotide depletion in vivo.

  18. Implantation induced extended defects and transient enhanced diffusion in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Liu, J.; Listebarger, J.; Krishnamoorthy, W.; Zhang, L.; Jones, K.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of dopant in silicon caused by point defects during annealing of implanted. Si has become one of the essential concerns in miniaturization of silicon device technology. In order to control and minimize the TED effect, a fundamental understanding of the evolution of the point defects upon annealing and the interaction between point defects and extended defects and their effects on dopant diffusion is necessary. Our studies were carried out by two parts; (1) For understanding the evolution of <311> and <110> defects, B{sup +} and Si{sup +} implantation at energies (from 5 keV to 40 keV) and doses in the range from 5 x 10{sup 12} to 1 x 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} were used. The annealing kinetics were investigated using a N{sub 2} ambient with temperatures for time ranging from 500{degrees}C to 1100{degrees}C for time ranging from 3 min to 3 hours. A matrix of implant energy vs. dose on formation threshold of <311> and <110> defect, interstitials napped and dissolved condition were obtained. (2) For Understanding the interaction between Type II dislocation loop and point defect a B doped buried marker layer was used. The oxidation of silicon surface used as a interstitials injection source and a buried type II loop layer as a point defect detector used to quantify the flux of interstitials injected. Combining the flux measured by loops and dopant diffusion the D{sub I} C{sub I} was determined. The diffusion limited kinetics was concluded. The TED from <311> and EOR (End of Range) <110> defect was studied using 8keV B{sup +} implanted Si to a dose of the le14 and 190keV Ge{sub +} implanted to a dose of le15. Subsequent anneals are done for 5 min and 30 min, respectively, These defects affect dopant diffusion by trapping and releasing point defects.

  19. Atrioventricular canal defect and associated genetic disorders: new insights into polydactyly syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Digilio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD is a common congenital heart defect (CHD, representing 7.4% of all cardiac malformations, considered secondary to an extracellular matrix anomaly. The AVCD is associated with extracardiac defects in about 75% of the cases. In this review we analyzed different syndromic AVCDs, in particular those associated with polydactyly disorders, which show remarkable genotype-phenotype correlations. Chromo - some imbalances more frequently associated with AVCD include Down syndrome, deletion 8p23 and deletion 3p25, while mendelian disorders include Noonan syndrome and related RASopathies, several polydactyly syndromes, CHARGE and 3C (cranio-cerebello-cardiac syndrome. The complete form of AVCD is prevalent in patients with chromosomal imbalances. Additional cardiac defects are found in patients affected by chromosomal imbalances different from Down syndrome. Left-sided obstructive lesions are prevalently found in patients with RASopathies. Patients with deletion 8p23 often display AVCD with tetralogy of Fallot or with pulmonary valve stenosis. Tetralogy of Fallot is the only additional cardiac defect found in patients with Down syndrome and AVCD. On the other hand, the association of AVCD and tetralogy of Fallot is also quite characteristic of CHARGE and 3C syndromes. Heterotaxia defects, including common atrium and anomalous pulmonary venous return, occur in patients with AVCD associated with polydactyly syndromes (Ellis-van Creveld, short rib polydactyly, oral-facial-digital, Bardet-Biedl, and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. The initial clinical evidence of anatomic similarities between AVCD and heterotaxia in polydactyly syndromes was corroborated and explained by experimental studies in transgenic mice. These investigations have suggested the involvement of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway in syndromes with postaxial polydactyly and heterotaxia, and ciliary dysfunction was detected as pathomechanism for these disorders

  20. Feasibility of Genetic Algorithm for Textile Defect Classification Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tarek Habib

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The global market for textile industry is highly competitive nowadays. Quality control in production process in textile industry has been a key factor for retaining existence in such competitive market. Automated textile inspection systems are very useful in this respect, because manual inspection is time consuming and not accurate enough. Hence, automated textile inspection systems have been drawing plenty of attention of the researchers of different countries in order to replace manual inspection. Defect detection and defect classification are the two major problems that are posed by the research of automated textile inspection systems. In this paper, we perform an extensive investigation on the applicability of genetic algorithm (GA in the context of textile defect classification using neural network (NN. We observe the effect of tuning different network parameters and explain the reasons. We empirically find a suitable NN model in the context of textile defect classification. We compare the performance of this model with that of the classification models implemented by others.

  1. Defects in cytochrome c oxidase expression induce a metabolic shift to glycolysis and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei W. Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction is often seen in cancers. This paper shows that the defect in a mitochondrial electron transport component, the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO, leads to increased glycolysis and carcinogenesis. Using whole genome microarray expression analysis we show that genetic silencing of the CcO subunit Cox4i1 in mouse C2C12 myoblasts resulted in metabolic shift to glycolysis, activated a retrograde stress signaling, and induced carcinogenesis. In the knockdown cells, the expression of Cox4i1 was less than 5% of the control and the expression of the irreversible glycolytic enzymes (Hk1, Pfkm and Pkm increased two folds, facilitating metabolic shift to glycolysis. The expression of Ca2+ sensitive Calcineurin (Ppp3ca and the expression of PI3-kinase (Pik3r4 and Pik3cb increased by two folds. This Ca2+/Calcineurin/PI3K retrograde stress signaling induced the up-regulation of many nuclear genes involved in tumor progression. Overall, we found 1047 genes with 2-folds expression change (with p-value less than 0.01 between the knockdown and the control, among which were 35 up-regulated genes in pathways in cancer (enrichment p-value less than 10−5. Functional analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes in pathways in cancer were dominated by genes in signal transduction, regulation of transcription and PI3K signaling pathway. These results suggest that a defect in CcO complex initiates a retrograde signaling which can induce tumor progression. Physiological studies of these cells and esophageal tumors from human patients support these results. GEO accession number = GSE68525.

  2. C-V and DLTS studies of radiation induced Si-SiO2 interface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capan, I.; Janicki, V.; Jacimovic, R.; Pivac, B.

    2012-07-01

    Interface traps at the Si-SiO2 interface have been and will be an important performance limit in many (future) semiconductor devices. In this paper, we present a study of fast neutron radiation induced changes in the density of Si-SiO2 interface-related defects. Interface related defects (Pb centers) are detected before and upon the irradiation. The density of interface-related defects is increasing with the fast neutron fluence.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, a genetic cause for familial recurrent neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi V Yaliwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene mutations have been implicated as risk factors for neural tube defects (NTDs. The best-characterized MTHFR genetic mutation 677C→T is associated with a 2-4 fold increased risk of NTD if patient is homozygous for this mutation. This risk factor is modulated by folate levels in the body. A second mutation in the MTHFR gene is an A→C transition at position 1298. The 1298A→C mutation is also a risk factor for NTD, but with a smaller relative risk than 677C→T mutation. Under conditions of low folate intake or high folate requirements, such as pregnancy, this mutation could become of clinical importance. We present a case report with MTHFR genetic mutation, who presented with recurrent familial pregnancy losses due to anencephaly/NTDs.

  4. Surface Defect Target Identification on Copper Strip Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm and Feature Saliency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the stability and robustness of visual inspection system (VIS, a new surface defect target identification method for copper strip based on adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA and feature saliency is proposed. First, the study uses gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM and HU invariant moments for feature extraction. Then, adaptive genetic algorithm, which is used for feature selection, is evaluated and discussed. In AGA, total error rates and false alarm rates are integrated to calculate the fitness value, and the probability of crossover and mutation is adjusted dynamically according to the fitness value. At last, the selected features are optimized in accordance with feature saliency and are inputted into a support vector machine (SVM. Furthermore, for comparison, we conduct experiments using the selected optimal feature subsequence (OFS and the total feature sequence (TFS separately. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can guarantee the correct rates of classification and can lower the false alarm rates.

  5. Classification of Atrial Septal Defect and Ventricular Septal Defect with Documented Hemodynamic Parameters via Cardiac Catheterization by Genetic Algorithms and Multi-Layered Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yıldız

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed to develop a classification method to discriminate ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect by using severalhemodynamic parameters.Patients and Methods: Forty three patients (30 atrial septal defect, 13 ventricular septal defect; 26 female, 17 male with documentedhemodynamic parameters via cardiac catheterization are included to study. Such parameters as blood pressure values of different areas,gender, age and Qp/Qs ratios are used for classification. Parameters, we used in classification are determined by divergence analysismethod. Those parameters are; i pulmonary artery diastolic pressure, ii Qp/Qs ratio, iii right atrium pressure, iv age, v pulmonary arterysystolic pressure, vi left ventricular sistolic pressure, vii aorta mean pressure, viii left ventricular diastolic pressure, ix aorta diastolicpressure, x aorta systolic pressure. Those parameters detected from our study population, are uploaded to multi-layered artificial neuralnetwork and the network was trained by genetic algorithm.Results: Trained cluster consists of 14 factors (7 atrial septal defect and 7 ventricular septal defect. Overall success ratio is 79.2%, andwith a proper instruction of artificial neural network this ratio increases up to 89%.Conclusion: Parameters, belonging to artificial neural network, which are needed to be detected by the investigator in classical methods,can easily be detected with the help of genetic algorithms. During the instruction of artificial neural network by genetic algorithms, boththe topology of network and factors of network can be determined. During the test stage, elements, not included in instruction cluster, areassumed as in test cluster, and as a result of this study, we observed that multi-layered artificial neural network can be instructed properly,and neural network is a successful method for aimed classification.

  6. Teratogens inducing congenital abdominal wall defects in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorp, Dennis R; Malleis, John M; Sullivan, Brian P; Klein, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects are common anomalies which include gastroschisis, omphalocele and umbilical cord hernia. Recent reports indicate that gastroschisis is increasing in prevalence, whereas omphalocele has remained steady, suggesting that environmental factors may play a part in their pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to review animal teratogen studies resulting in abdominal wall defects to investigate their possible causes. Each report was examined not only for the teratogens causing the defects, but also to carefully identify the defect occurring and its correlation with the known clinical anomalies. We found many discrepancies between the nomenclature used by animal teratology investigators and that used by clinicians. We were able to confirm the induction of gastroschisis by 22 teratogens, omphalocele by 9 teratogens and umbilical cord hernia by 8. There is no doubt that environmental factors may be responsible, at least in part, for all three of the clinical abdominal wall defects. Future studies should take care to appreciate the differences between these anomalies and describe them in detail, so that accurate and meaningful conclusions can be obtained.

  7. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A.; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula HB; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×109/L to 186×109/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. PMID:27479822

  8. Genetic and environmental effects on a meat spotting defect in seasoned dry-cured ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Pagnacco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of a visible spotting defect on the slice of dry-cured ham and assess environmental and genetic causes of this frequent problem. A group of 233 pigs from commercial cross-breeding lines, progeny of ten boars and forty seven sows, was raised in a single herd to obtain the “Italian Heavy Pig”, typically slaughtered at 160 ± 10 kg live weight and older than 9 months of age. A quality evaluation of their right dry-cured hams, seasoned according to the Parma P.D.O. protocol, was undertaken. Each ham was cross-sectioned to obtain a slice of Semimembranosus, Semitendinosus and Biceps Femoris muscles. The focused phenotype was the presence/absence of brownish spots in these muscles, which represent a remarkable meat defect with strong impact on the final sale price. Environmental and management factors were considered in order to evaluate variability related to the phenotype. Animals were raised on two different flooring types (concrete and slatted floor and a Vitamin C diet was also supplemented in the last 45 days before slaughtering to half of the animals. While the pre-planned environmental effects did not show any significant contribution to the total variability of the phenotype, the genetic analysis showed a near to zero value for heritability with a consistent 0.32 repeatability. The proportion of the total phenotypic variance was explained by an important dominance genetic component (0.26 indicating that the technological seasoning process may play a secondary role on the expression of this phenotype.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, A.; Rizo, P. J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, C. J.; Banine, V.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    We use Raman spectroscopy to show that exposing few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5 nm) radiation, i.e., relatively low photon energy, results in an increasing density of defects. Furthermore, exposure to EUV radiation in a H2 background increases the graphene dosage sensitivity, du

  10. A genetic screen for replication initiation defective (rid mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locovei Alexandra M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In fission yeast the intra-S phase and DNA damage checkpoints are activated in response to inhibition of DNA replication or DNA damage, respectively. The intra-S phase checkpoint responds to stalled replication forks leading to the activation of the Cds1 kinase that both delays cell cycle progression and stabilizes DNA replication forks. The DNA damage checkpoint, that operates during the G2 phase of the cell cycle delays mitotic progression through activation of the checkpoint kinase, Chk1. Delay of the cell cycle is believed to be essential to allow time for either replication restart (in S phase or DNA damage repair (in G2. Previously, our laboratory showed that fission yeast cells deleted for the N-terminal half of DNA polymerase ε (Cdc20 are delayed in S phase, but surprisingly require Chk1 rather than Cds1 to maintain cell viability. Several additional DNA replication mutants were then tested for their dependency on Chk1 or Cds1 when grown under semi-permissive temperatures. We discovered that mutants defective in DNA replication initiation are sensitive only to loss of Chk1, whilst mutations that inhibit DNA replication elongation are sensitive to loss of both Cds1 and Chk1. To confirm that the Chk1-sensitive, Cds1-insensitive phenotype (rid phenotype is specific to mutants defective in DNA replication initiation, we completed a genetic screen for cell cycle mutants that require Chk1, but not Cds1 to maintain cell viability when grown at semi-permissive temperatures. Our screen identified two mutants, rid1-1 and rid2-1, that are defective in Orc1 and Mcm4, respectively. Both mutants show defects in DNA replication initiation consistent with our hypothesis that the rid phenotype is replication initiation specific. In the case of Mcm4, the mutation has been mapped to a highly conserved region of the protein that appears to be required for DNA replication initiation, but not elongation. Therefore, we conclude that the cellular

  11. Thermally induced native defect transform in annealed GaSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Su; Tong, Liu; Jing-Ming, Liu; Jun, Yang; Yong-Biao, Bai; Gui-Ying, Shen; Zhi-Yuan, Dong; Fang-Fang, Wang; You-Wen, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Undoped p-type GaSb single crystals were annealed at 550-600 °C for 100 h in ambient antimony. The annealed GaSb samples were investigated by Hall effect measurement, glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS), infrared (IR) optical transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Compared with the as-grown GaSb single crystal, the annealed GaSb samples have lower hole concentrations and weak native acceptor related PL peaks, indicating the reduction of the concentration of gallium antisite related native acceptor defects. Consequently, the below gap infrared transmission of the GaSb samples is enhanced after the thermal treatment. The mechanism about the reduction of the native defect concentration and its influence on the material property were discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61474104 and 61504131).

  12. [Role and function of voltage-gated chloride channels of the CIC family and their defects leading to genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dołowy, Krzysztof; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Hordejuk, Renata; Dworakowska, Beata; Nurowska, Ewa; Jarzabek, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    There are 9 channels of the ClC family in mammals and few others in fishes, plants, yeast and bacteria. The ClC channels are present in different tissues and play a role in transmembrane potential stabilization, transepithelial transport, cell volume regulation, acidification of intracellular organelles. The genetic defects of ClC-1 chloride channel lead to myotonias, the defect in ClC-5 channel to the formation of stones in kidney, while the defect in ClC-Kb channel leads to the Bartter's syndrome.

  13. Defect-induced Raman spectroscopy in single-layer graphene with boron and nitrogen substitutional defects by theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Pachter, Ruth; Islam, Ahmad E.; Maruyama, Benji; Boeckl, John J.

    2016-10-01

    Although advances in heteroatom incorporation into the single-layer graphene lattice resulted in films with large carrier densities, careful characterization by Raman spectroscopy is important for assessment of the material's quality. We investigated theoretically I(D)/I(D‧) Raman intensity ratios induced by B- and N- substitutional doping, demonstrated to be consistent with measurements. Calculated Fermi level shifts showed that for a moderate doping density results are comparable to electrolyte gating, while analytical analysis of the electron-defect scattering provided insight into changes of cross-sections. Effects of doping density on the D band intensity and broadening were quantified, and will assist in graphene characterization.

  14. Detection of Defective Sensors in Phased Array Using Compressed Sensing and Hybrid Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Ullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compressed sensing based array diagnosis technique has been presented. This technique starts from collecting the measurements of the far-field pattern. The system linking the difference between the field measured using the healthy reference array and the field radiated by the array under test is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA, parallel coordinate descent (PCD algorithm, and then a hybridized GA with PCD algorithm. These algorithms are applied for fully and partially defective antenna arrays. The simulation results indicate that the proposed hybrid algorithm outperforms in terms of localization of element failure with a small number of measurements. In the proposed algorithm, the slow and early convergence of GA has been avoided by combining it with PCD algorithm. It has been shown that the hybrid GA-PCD algorithm provides an accurate diagnosis of fully and partially defective sensors as compared to GA or PCD alone. Different simulations have been provided to validate the performance of the designed algorithms in diversified scenarios.

  15. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of native defect induced electron-phonon coupling in GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Santanu; Patsha, Avinash; Bera, Santanu; Dhara, Sandip

    2017-07-01

    The integration of advanced optoelectronic properties in nanoscale devices of group III nitride can be realized by understanding the coupling of charge carriers with optical excitations in these nanostructures. The native defect induced electron-phonon coupling in GaN nanowires are reported using various spectroscopic studies. The GaN nanowires having different native defects are grown in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis revealed the variation of Ga/N ratios in nanowires having possible native defects, with respect to their growth parameters. The analysis of the characteristic features of electron-phonon coupling in the Raman spectra show the variations in carrier density and mobility, with respect to the native defects in unintentionally doped GaN nanowires. The radiative recombination of donor acceptor pair transitions and the corresponding LO phonon replicas observed in photoluminescence studies further emphasize the role of native defects in electron-phonon coupling.

  17. Radiation-induced defects in As-Sb-S glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, Ya; Filipecki, J; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Defect-related instability was studied in {gamma}-irradiated (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} glasses (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy treated within high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in average positron lifetime in the studied glasses is explained as a renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds after irradiation. This process is governed by monomolecular relaxation kinetics, being described in the framework of universal configuration-coordinate model.

  18. Pressure-induced Phase Transitions in Defect Pyrochlores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Perottoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of pressure and temperature on four compounds with defect pyrochlore structure (NH4NbWO6, RbNbWO6, CsNbWO6 and p-WO3 is explored by means of X-ray diffraction, vibrational (Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy and computer simulations. Several structural transitions were observed, including an unusual insertion reaction with volume increase at high pressures. This latter transition is further explored to reveal the influence on the transition pressure of the nature and ionic radius of the cation residing inside the cages formed by the pyrochlore framework.

  19. Characterization of Si and C implantation induced defects in 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummari, Venkata; Dhoubhadel, Mangal; Rout, Bibhudutta; Reinert, Tilo; Spemann, Daniel; Jiang, Weilin; McDaniel, Floyd

    2011-10-01

    Silicon Carbide is considered to be a promising material for dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Past experimental studies reveal that ferromagnetism can be observed in SiC diluted with 3d transition metals. Recent studies, based on first principle calculations, show that for SiC monolayers, the presence of silicon vacancies (VSi) may induce local magnetization. However, no spin polarization occurs for carbon vacancies (VC), Si+C divacancies, and Si-C antisite defects. Ion implantation is an excellent technique to create vacancies for defect induced magnetism. We have implanted Si and C into 4H-SiC at low energy 60 keV to study the implantation defects for different fluences which corresponds to different percentages of simulated damages (e.g. 10 -- 60 %) obtained using Monte-Carlo simulations code SRIM/TRIM-2008. Defect disorder after ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry/Channeling (RBS/C) and Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Radiation-induced defects, energy storage and release in nitrogen solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, E.; Khyzhniy, I.; Uyutnov, S.; Bludov, M.; Barabashov, A.; Gumenchuk, G.; Bondybey, V.

    2017-02-01

    New trends in the study of radiation effects in nitrogen solids with a focus on the defect-induced processes are presented. An electron beam of subthreshold energy was used to generate radiation defects via electronic subsystem. Experimental techniques developed enabled us to detect neutral and charged defects of both signs. Defect production and desorption were monitored using optical and current emission spectroscopy: cathodoluminescence CL, thermally stimulated luminescence TSL and exoelectron emission TSEE along with the detection of postdesorption. Our results show stabilization and accumulation of radiation defects – ionic centres of both signs (N4 +, N3 +, N3 -), trapped electrons and radicals (N, N3). The neutralization reactions: N4 ++e-→N4 *→N2 *(a‘1Σu -)+N2 *(a‘1Σu -) +ΔE 1 →N2 +N2 +2hν+ΔE 2 and N3 ++e-→N*(2D)+N2(1Σg +)+ΔE 3→N(4S)+N2(1Σg +)+h γ+ΔE 3 are shown to be the basis of defect production and anomalous low-temperature post-desorption ALTpD. The part played by pre-existing and radiation-induced defects in energy storage is discussed.

  1. Defect-induced change of temperature-dependent elastic constants in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Zhang, S. H.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of radiation-induced defects (randomly distributed vacancies, voids, and interstitial dislocation loops) on temperature-dependent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 in BCC iron, are studied with molecular dynamics method. The elastic constants are found to decrease with increasing temperatures for all cases containing different defects. The presence of vacancies, voids, or interstitial loops further decreases the elastic constants. For a given number of point defects, the randomly distributed vacancies show the strongest effect compared to voids or interstitial loops. All these results are expected to provide useful information to combine with experimental results for further understanding of radiation damage.

  2. Defect-Induced Changes in the Spectral Properties of HIGH-Tc Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Margaritondo, G.; Pavuna, D.; Grioni, L. Forroand M.

    Superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates is particularly sensitive to disorder due to the unconventional d-wave pairing symmetry. We investigated effects of disorder on the spectral properties of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x high-Tc superconductor. We found that already small defect densities suppress the characteristic spectral signature of the superconducting state. The spectral line shape clearly reflects new excitations within the gap, as expected for defect-induced pair breaking. At the lowest defect concentrations the normal state remains unaffected, while increased disorder leads to suppression of the normal quasiparticle peaks.

  3. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  4. Surface phase defects induced downstream laser intensity modulation in high-power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Wanjun Dai; Dongxia Hu; Xuewei Deng; Wanqing Huang; Lidan Zhou; Qiang Yuan; Xiaoxia Huang; De’en Wang; Ying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optics surface phase defects induced intensity modulation in high-power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion research is studied. Calculations and experiments reveal an exact mapping of the modulation patterns and the optics damage spot distributions from the surface phase defects. Origins are discussed during the processes of optics manufacturing and diagnostics, revealing potential improvements for future optics manufacturing techniques and diagnostic index, which is meaningful for fusion level laser facility construction and its operation safety.

  5. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Derichs

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  6. GENETIC DEFECTS IN THE GROWTH HORMONE-IGF-I AXIS CAUSING GROWTH HORMONE INSENSITIVITY AND IMPAIRED LINEAR GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Savage

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human genetic defects in the growth hormone (GH –IGF-I axis affecting the IGF system present with growth failure as their principal clinical feature. This is usually associated with GH insensitivity (GHI presenting in childhood as severe or mild short stature. Dysmorphic features and metabolic abnormalities may also be present. The field of GHI due to mutations affecting GH action has evolved radidly since the first description of the extreme phenotype related to homozygous GH receptor (GHR mutations in 1966. A continuum of genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical abnormalities can be defined associated with clinically relevant defects in linear growth. The mechanisms of the GH–IGF-I axis in the regulation of normal human growth is discussed followed by descriptions of mutations in GHR, STAT5B, IGF-I, IGFALS, IGF1R and GH1 defects causing bioinactive GH or anti-GH antibodies. These GH-IGF-I axis defects are associated with a range of clinical, and hormonal characteristics. An up-dated approach to the clinical assessment of the patient with GHI focussing on investigation of the GH–IGF-I axis and relevant molecular studies contributing to the identification of causative genetic defects is also discussed.

  7. Genetic Damage Induced by Accidental Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Cadahía

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum is one of the main energy sources worldwide. Its transport is performed by big tankers following some established marine routes. In the last 50 years a total amount of 37 oil tankers have given rise to great spills in different parts of the world, Prestige being the last one. After the accident, a big human mobilisation took place in order to clean beaches, rocks and fauna, trying to reduce the environmental consequences of this serious catastrophe. These people were exposed to the complex mixture of compounds contained in the oil. This study aimed at determine the level of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC, and the possible damage induced on the population involved in the different cleaning tasks by applying the genotoxicity tests sister chromatid exchanges (SCE, micronucleus (MN test, and comet assay. Four groups of individuals were included: volunteers (V, hired manual workers (MW, hired high-pressure cleaner workers (HPW and controls. The higher VOC levels were associated with V environment, followed by MW and lastly by HPW, probably due to the use of high-pressure cleaners. Oil exposure during the cleaning tasks has caused an increase in the genotoxic damage in individuals, the comet assay being the most sensitive biomarker to detect it. Sex, age and tobacco consumption have shown to influence the level of genetic damage, while the effect of using protective devices was less noticeable than expected, perhaps because the kind used was not the most adequate.

  8. Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth: The Genetic Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Noronha Shyam Curtis; Chavan, Rahul; Moon, Ninad Joshirao; Nalla, Srinivas; Mali, Jaydeepchandra; Prajapati, Anchal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, the etiology of drug-induced gingival overgrowth is not entirely understood but is clearly multifactorial. Phenytoin, one of the common drugs implicated in gingival enlargement, is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and partly by CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are polymorphically expressed and most of the variants result in decreased metabolism of the respective substrates. Aims: The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of the CYP2C9*2 and *3 variant genotypes on phenytoin hydroxylation in subjects diagnosed with epilepsy from South India, thus establishing the genetic polymorphisms leading to its defective hydroxylation process. Materials and Methods: Fifteen epileptic subjects, age 9 to 60 years were included in the study. Among the study subjects, 8 were males and 7 were females. Genomic DNA was extracted from patients’ blood using Phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was done for CYP2C9 using customized TaqMan genotyping assays on a real time thermocycler, by allelic discrimination method. The genetic polymorphisms *1, *2 and *3 on CYP2C9 were selected based on their function and respective allele frequencies in Asian subcontinent among the Asian populations. Results: CYP2C9*1*2 and CYP2C9*3/*3 were identified with equal frequency in the study population. There were seven subjects with CYP2C9*1/*2 genotype (heterozygous mutant), one subject with CYP2C9*1/*1 (wild type) and seven study subjects with CYP2C9*3/*3 (homozygous mutant). Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study will be helpful in the medical prescription purposes of phenytoin, and a more personalized patient approach with its administration can be advocated. PMID:25317394

  9. Radiation-induced defects in tungsten and evolution in temperature: a positron annihilation spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debelle, A.; Barthe, M.F.; Sauvage, T.; Gentils, A.; Desgardin, P. [CERI, Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches par Irradiation, CNRS, 45 - Orleans (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the future International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), tungsten, due to its physical intrinsic properties, such as low sputtering yield with light elements and good thermo-mechanical behaviour, is a potential divertor candidate. The divertor, as a plasma-facing component, will be subjected to intense irradiations at high temperature. In the specific case of fusion reactor, high 14 MeV neutrons flux will cause the continuous production of both H and He by (n,p) and (n,a) nuclear reactions, and of irradiation-induced defects by recoils. Thus, it appears of crucial interest to study the He and H interaction with the irradiation-induced defects. Obviously, this first requires to accurately characterise these defects. To address this issue, positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques were implemented, namely Doppler Broadening measurements with the use of a slow positron beam, and lifetime measurements with fast positrons. The presented results deal with the characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in tungsten, and also with its evolution during thermal treatment. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were first thermally annealed in order to eliminate most of the pre-existing defects so that detection of radiation-induced defects becomes possible. Then, specimens were irradiated with 12 MeV H at a 4x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} fluence or with 800 keV {sup 3}He at different fluences, ranging from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The positron annihilation characteristics, namely low and high annihilation fractions and lifetimes, were determined in the annealed and irradiated samples. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the SRIM code to evaluate the radiation damage. Results allowed to identify the radiation-induced defects as mono-vacancies. Besides, it is shown that the defects nature does not change with increasing fluence, but their concentration increases. The evolution of the defects nature and

  10. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  11. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A. [Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} and (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3})(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}){sub y} amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co{sup 60} gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  12. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  13. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  14. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions.

  15. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  16. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  17. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  18. Transformation between divacancy defects induced by an energy pulse in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Liu, XiaoYi; Zhou, Wei; Wang, FengChao; Wu, HengAn

    2016-07-01

    The mutual transformations among the four typical divacancy defects induced by a high-energy pulse were studied via molecular dynamics simulation. Our study revealed all six possible mutual transformations and found that defects transformed by absorbing energy to overcome the energy barrier with bonding, debonding, and bond rotations. The reversibility of defect transformations was also investigated by potential energy analysis. The energy difference was found to greatly influence the transformation reversibility. The direct transformation path was irreversible if the energy difference was too large. We also studied the correlation between the transformation probability and the input energy. It was found that the transformation probability had a local maxima at an optimal input energy. The introduction of defects and their structural evolutions are important for tailoring the exceptional properties and thereby performances of graphene-based devices, such as nanoporous membranes for the filtration and desalination of water.

  19. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Assa Aravindh, S

    2015-12-14

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  20. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  1. Radiation-induced defect formation in chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.I.; Filipecki, J. [Physics Institute of Pedagogical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Kozdras, A. [Physics Laboratory of Opole Technical University, 75 ul. Ozimska, Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Kavetskyy, T.S. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' Carat' , Stryjska Str. 202, Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2003-10-01

    The modified model of native and radiation-induced microvoid-type positron traps in vitreous chalcogenide semiconductors is developed to explain compositional features of positron annihilation lifetime measurements in stoichiometric As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-GeS{sub 2} and non-stoichiometric As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-Ge{sub 2}S{sub 3} chalcogenide glasses before and after {gamma}-irradiation.

  2. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  3. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  4. Linking a genetic defect in migraine to spreading depression in a computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Dahlem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM is a rare subtype of migraine with aura. A mutation causing FHM type 3 (FHM3 has been identified in SCN1A encoding the Nav1.1 Na+ channel. This genetic defect affects the inactivation gate. While the Na+ tail currents following voltage steps are consistent with both hyperexcitability and hypoexcitability, in this computational study, we investigate functional consequences beyond these isolated events. Our extended Hodgkin–Huxley framework establishes a connection between genotype and cellular phenotype, i.e., the pathophysiological dynamics that spans over multiple time scales and is relevant to migraine with aura. In particular, we investigate the dynamical repertoire from normal spiking (milliseconds to spreading depression and anoxic depolarization (tens of seconds and show that FHM3 mutations render gray matter tissue more vulnerable to spreading depression despite opposing effects associated with action potential generation. We conclude that the classification in terms of hypoexcitability vs. hyperexcitability is too simple a scheme. Our mathematical analysis provides further basic insight into also previously discussed criticisms against this scheme based on psychophysical and clinical data.

  5. Defect-Induced Optoelectronic Response in Single-layer Group-VI Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philippe K.

    The ever-evolving symbiosis between mankind and nanoelectronics-driven technology pushes the limits of its constituent materials, largely due to the dominance of undesirable hetero-interfacial physiochemical behavior at the few-nanometer length scale, which dominates over bulk material characteristics. Driven by such instabilities, research into two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals-layered materials (e.g. graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), boron nitride), which have characteristically inert surface chemistry, has virtually exploded over the past few years. The discovery of an indirect- to direct-gap conversion in semiconducting group-VI TMDCs (e.g. MoS2) upon thinning to a single atomic layer provided the critical link between metallic and insulating 2D materials. While proof-of-concept demonstrations of single-layer TMDC-based devices for visible-range photodetection, light-emission and solar energy conversion have showed promising results, the exciting qualities are downplayed by poorly-understood defectinduced photocarrier traps, limiting the best-achieved external quantum efficiencies to approximately ~1%. This thesis explores the behavior of defects in atomically-thin TMDC layers in response to optical stimuli using a combination of steady-state photoluminescence, reflectance and Raman spectroscopy at room-temperature. By systematically varying the defect density using plasma-irradiation techniques, an unprecedented room-temperature defect-induced monolayer PL feature was discovered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy correlated the defect-induced PL with plasma-generation of sulfur vacancy defects while reflectance measurements indicate defect-induced sub-bandgap light absorption. Excitation intensity-dependent PL measurements and exciton rate modeling further help elucidate the origin of the defect-induced PL response and highlights the role of non-radiative recombination on exciton conversion processes. The results in this

  6. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S.C.; Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A.; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  7. Process induced disorder in crystalline materials: differentiating defective crystals from the amorphous form of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Pinal, Rodolfo; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2008-08-01

    This research investigates milling induced disorder in crystalline griseofulvin. Griseofulvin was subjected to cryogenic milling for various lengths of time. For comparison, the amorphous form of griseofulvin was also prepared by the quench melt method. Different analytical techniques were used to study the differences between the cryomilled, amorphous and crystalline forms of the drug. Cryogenic milling of griseofulvin progressively reduces the crystallinity of the drug by inducing crystal defects, rather than amorphous materials. Raman analysis provides evidence of structural differences between the two. The differences between the defective crystals produced by milling and the amorphous form are significant enough as to be measurable in their bulk thermal properties. Defective crystals show significant decrease in the heat of fusion as a function of milling time but do not exhibit a glass transition nor recrystallization from the amorphous form. Crystal defects undergo recrystallization upon heating at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T(g)) in a process that is separate and completely independent from the crystallization of the amorphous griseofulvin, observed above T(g). Physical mixtures of defective crystals and amorphous drug demonstrate that the thermal events associated with each form persist in the mixtures, unaffected by the presence of the other form.

  8. Applications of Natural Radiation-Induced Paramagnetic Defects in Quartz to Exploration in Sedimentary Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Y M; Botis S; Nokhrin S

    2006-01-01

    Quartz grains in contact with uranium-bearing minerals or fluids are characterized by natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects (e. G. , oxygen vacancy centers, silicon vacancy centers, and peroxy radicals), which are amenable to study by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.These natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects, except for the oxygen vacancy centers, in quartz are concentrated in narrow bands penetrated by α particles: (1) in halos around U- and Th-bearing mineral inclusions and (2) in outer rims or along fractures. The second type of occurrence provides information about uranium mineralization or remobilization (I. E. , sources of uranium, timing of mineralization or remobilization, pathways of uranium-bearing fluids). It can also be used to evaluate sedimentary basins for potential of uranium mineralization. In particular, the peroxy radicals are stable up to 800℃and, therefore, are useful for evaluating metasedimentary rocks (e. G. , Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary sequences in the central zone of the North China craton). EPR study of the Changcheng Series can focus on quartz from the sediment-basement unconformity and faults to determine the presence and types of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects, with which to identify and prioritize uranium anomalies. Other potential applications of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in quartz include uranium-bearing hydrocarbon deposits in sedimentary basins. For example, the Junggar, Ordos, and Tarim basins in northwestern China all contain important oil and natural gas fields and are well known for elevated uranium concentrations, including economic sandstone-hosted uranium deposits. Therefore,systematic studies on the distribution of natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in quartz from host sedimentary sequences are expected to provide information about the migration of oil and natural gas in those basins.

  9. Effect of radiation-induced emission of Schottky defects on the formation of colloids in alkali halides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubinko, [No Value; Vainshtein, DI; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    Formation of vacancy clusters in irradiated crystals is considered taking into account radiation-induced Schottky defect emission (RSDE) from extended defects. RSDE acts in the opposite direction compared with Frenkel pair production, and it results in the radiation-induced recovery processes. In th

  10. The effects of hyper velocity impact phenomena on radiation induced defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, C.; Ikeya, M.

    1994-06-01

    Effects of high speed impacts on radiation-induced defects were investigated with a plasma rail-gun. Vitreous quartz targets irradiated by γ-ray were shocked with polycarbonate projectiles at a speed of 7 km/s, then the remaining destroyed pieces were examined by ESR spectroscopy to investigate the degree of "impact-annealing". The white substance from the impact point showed a trace of melting and no ESR signal, while the rest of the scattered pieces showed a decrease of E' center density to 50 ± 10% of the initial density. The defect production efficiency for the impacted silica was almost two-third of the original material.

  11. Possible genetic defects in regulation of glycosaminoglycans in patients with diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckert, T.; Horowitz, I.M.; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A.; Kjellen, L.; Deckert, M.; Lykkelund, C.; Burcharth, F. (Steno Memorial Hospital, Gentofte (Denmark))

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis of genetic defects in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) regulation among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nephropathy was assessed by studies in tissue cultures of fibroblasts obtained from 7 patients with normal urinary albumin excretion, 11 patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 6 nondiabetic control subjects. The incorporation of (2H) glucosamine and (35S) sulfate into hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate (CS + DS), and heparan sulfate (HS) was measured in cells, matrix, and medium and related to micrograms of tissue protein. Large interindividual variations were seen in all three groups, and the incorporation of (3H) glucosamine into HA, CS + DS, and HS and (35S) sulfate into CS + DS and HS were not significantly different between the three groups. However, the fractional incorporation of (3H)glucosamine into HS was significantly reduced in diabetic patients with nephropathy compared with control subjects. This was the case not only when related to the total amount of GAGs (P = 0.014) but also when related to HA (P = 0.014). No significant difference was seen between control subjects and normoalbuminuric diabetic patients. The degree of N-sulfation of HS was not significantly different between the experimental groups. The results suggest that patients with diabetic nephropathy may suffer from deficiencies of coordinate regulation in the biosynthesis of GAG in fibroblasts, which may lead to a reduced density of HS in the extracellular matrix. If these changes reflect alterations in the biosynthesis of GAG from endothelial, myomedial, and mesangial cells, this observation may be relevant for the pathogenesis of severe diabetic complications.

  12. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, David S; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S; Priori, Silvia G; Chinitz, Larry A; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5A(E558X/+) pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5A(E558X/+) hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5A(E558X/+) pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias.

  13. Genetic Programming Approach for Predicting Surface Subsidence Induced by Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The surface subsidence induced by mining is a complex problem, which is related with many complex and uncertain factors.Genetic programming (GP) has a good ability to deal with complex and nonlinear problems, therefore genetic programming approach is proposed to predict mining induced surface subsidence in this article.First genetic programming technique is introduced, second, surface subsidence genetic programming model is set up by selecting its main affective factors and training relating to practical engineering data, and finally, predictions are made by the testing of data, whose results show that the relative error is approximately less than 10%, which can meet the engineering needs, and therefore, this proposed approach is valid and applicable in predicting mining induced surface subsidence.The model offers a novel method to predict surface subsidence in mining.

  14. Contribution of Metal Defects in the Assembly Induced Emission of Cu Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zhennan

    2017-03-20

    Aggregation/assembly induced emission (AIE) has been observed for metal nanoclusters (NCs), but the origin of the enhanced emission is not fully understood, yet. In this work, the significant contribution of metal defects on AIE is revealed by engineering the self-assembly process of Cu NCs using ethanol. The presence of ethanol leads to a rapid assembly of NCs into ultrathin nanosheets, promoting the formation of metal defects-rich surface. Detailed studies and computer simulation confirm that the metal defects-rich nanosheets possess increased Cu(I)-to-Cu(0) ratio, which greatly influences ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer and therewith facilitates the radiative relaxation of excitons. Consequently, the Cu NCs self-assembly nanosheets exhibit obvious emission enhancement.

  15. Cascade diffusion theory of displacement-induced point defect concentration and flux fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L.K.; Brailsford, A.D.; Coghlan, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical approach, which has been developed to assess the fluctuations in point defect concentrations and fluxes to sinks that are induced by the production of point defects in spatially and temporally discrete cascades, is summarized. Solutions for cascade dissipation are outlined for the case where cascades occur in a homogeneous lossy medium as well as for the more involved geometries where cascades occur in the presence of a nearby dislocation or cavity. By superposition of solutions representing discrete cascades under conditions of interest, time profiles of point defect concentrations and fluxes are generated. The profiles exhibit extreme fluctuations. Continuum rate theory results arise by applying limits and approximations to cascade diffusion theory. Application of the theory to microstructural processes shows that property changes, especially creep are affected by the fluctuations.

  16. Defect-induced enhanced photocatalytic activities of reduced α-Fe2O3 nanoblades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Honglei; Wang, Yiqian; Wang, Chao; Diao, Feiyu; Zhu, Wenhui; Mu, Peng; Yuan, Lu; Zhou, Guangwen; Rosei, Federico

    2016-07-01

    Bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 nanoblades (NBs) synthesized by thermal oxidation of iron foils were reduced in vacuum, to study the effect of reduction treatment on microstructural changes and photocatalytic properties. After the vacuum reduction, most bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 NBs transform into single-layered NBs, which contain more defects such as oxygen vacancies, perfect dislocations and dense pores. By comparing the photodegradation capability of non-reduced and reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs over model dye rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we find that vacuum-reduction induced microstructural defects can significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. Even after 10 cycles, the reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs still show a very high photocatalytic activity. Our results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the photocatalytic performance of nanomaterials.

  17. Conducting state of GeTe by defect-induced topological insulating order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwoong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Topological insulating order protected by time-reversal symmetry is robust under structural disorder. Interestingly, recent studies on phase change materials like GeSbTe showed that their topological insulating order is sensitive to atomic stacking sequences. It was also shown that their structural phase transition is correlated with topological insulating order. GeTe, a well-known phase change material, is trivial insulator in its equilibrium structure. In this study, we discuss how atomic defects such as Ge tetrahedral defect observed in amorphous GeTe can change its topological insulating order based on first-principles calculations and model Hamiltonian. We also investigated the critical density of such tetrahedral defects to induce topological insulating order in GeTe. Our study will help explore hidden orders in GeTe.

  18. Defect-induced performance degradation of 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, N.; Johnson, B. C.; Hoshino, N.; Ito, M.; Tsuchida, H.; Kojima, K.; Ohshima, T.

    2013-04-01

    The formation and evolution of defects in 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode high-energy particle detectors have been investigated and correlated with the detectors' properties. Low temperature annealing at 300 °C is found to significantly recover the charge collection efficiency as degraded by 1 MeV electron irradiation. At higher temperatures, an anneal-induced degradation in the detector's performance is observed. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements are used to ascertain the effect of defects on the detector performance. The latter reveals that the DLTS defect levels, EH1 and EH3, are related to the initial recovery of the charge collection efficiency.

  19. Effect of defects on long-pulse laser-induced damage of two kinds of optical thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Yuan; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian

    2010-10-10

    In order to study the effect of defects on the laser-induced damage of different optical thin films, we carried out damage experiments on two kinds of thin films with a 1 ms long-pulse laser. Surface-defect and subsurface-defect damage models were used to explain the damage morphology. The two-dimensional finite element method was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal-stress fields of these two films. The results show that damages of the two films are due to surface and subsurface defects, respectively. Furthermore, the different dominant defects for thin films of different structures are discussed.

  20. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  1. Sensitivity Jump of Micro Accelerometer Induced by Micro-fabrication Defects of Micro Folded Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal phenomenon occurring in sensor calibration is an obstacle to product development but a useful guideline to product improvement. The sensitivity jump of micro accelerometers in the calibrating process is recognized as an important abnormal behavior and investigated in this paper. The characteristics of jumping output in the centrifuge test are theoretically and experimentally analyzed and their underlying mechanism is found to be related to the varied stiffness of supporting beam induced by the convex defect on it. The convex defect is normally formed by the lithography deviation and/or etching error and can result in a jumping stiffness of folded microbeams and further influence the sensitivity when a part of the bending beams is stopped from moving by two surfaces contacting. The jumping level depends on the location of convex and has nothing to do with the contacting properties of beam and defects. Then the location of defect is predicted by theoretical model and simulation and verified by the observation of micro structures under microscopy. The results indicate that the tested micro accelerometer has its defect on the beam with a distance of about 290μm from the border of proof mass block.

  2. Neutron induced defects in silicon detectors characterized by DLTS and TSC methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fretwurst, E. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Dehn, C. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Feick, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Heydarpoor, P. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Lindstroem, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Moll, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Schuetze, C. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Schulz, T. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    1996-08-01

    Neutron induced defects in silicon detectors fabricated from n-type float zone material of different resistivity (100-6000 {Omega} cm) have been studied using the C-DLTS (capacitance-deep level transient spectroscopy) and TSC (thermally stimulated current) method. While the application of the C-DLTS technique for high resistivity material is limited to neutron fluences below about 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} the TSC method remains a powerful tool for the defect characterization even at high fluences. Up to 5 defect levels were observed in some of the unirradiated samples. These partly are due to thermal treatments during the fabrication process. After neutron irradiation defect levels at E{sub c}-0.17, -0.23 and -0.42 eV and at E{sub v}+0.36 eV were found. A detailed analysis of the predominant peak at about -0.42 eV has shown that it is a superposition of two levels at -0.39 and -0.42 eV. For these defect levels introduction rates, annealing effects and a comparison between the DLTS and TSC technique are presented. Possible correlations of these results with macroscopic detector properties are discussed. (orig.).

  3. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  4. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  5. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced birth defects: the role of polymorphisms of placental transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Aizati N A; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Bakker, Marian K; Wang, Hao; de Walle, Hermien E K; Plösch, Torsten; Wilffert, Bob

    2014-05-01

    One of the ongoing issues in perinatal medicine is the risk of birth defects associated with maternal drug use. The teratogenic effect of a drug depends, apart from other factors, on the exposition of the fetus to the drug. Transporter proteins are known to be involved in the pharmacokinetics of drugs and have an effect on drug level and fetal drug exposure. This condition may subsequently alter the risk of teratogenicity, which occurs in a dose-dependent manner. This review focuses on the clinically important polymorphisms of transporter proteins and their effects on the mRNA and protein expression in placental tissue. We also propose a novel approach on how the different genotypes of the polymorphism can be translated into phenotypes to facilitate genetic association studies. The last section looks into the recent studies exploring the association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and the risk of fetal birth defects associated with medication use during pregnancy.

  6. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  7. Genetic background influences embryonic lethality and the occurrence of neural tube defects in Men1 null mice: relevance to genetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Manuel C; Harding, Brian; Reed, Anita A C; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Walls, Gerard V; Bowl, Michael R; Sharpe, James; Wedden, Sarah; Moss, Julie E; Ross, Allyson; Davidson, Duncan; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2009-10-01

    Germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene cause parathyroid, pancreatic and pituitary tumours in man. MEN1 mutations also cause familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and the same MEN1 mutations, in different families, can cause either FIHP or MEN1. This suggests a role for genetic background and modifier genes in altering the expression of a mutation. We investigated the effects of genetic background on the phenotype of embryonic lethality that occurs in a mouse model for MEN1. Men1(+/-) mice were backcrossed to generate C57BL/6 and 129S6/SvEv incipient congenic strains, and used to obtain homozygous Men1(-/-) mice. No viable Men1(-/-) mice were obtained. The analysis of 411 live embryos obtained at 9.5-16.5 days post-coitum (dpc) revealed that significant deviations from the expected Mendelian 1:2:1 genotype ratio were first observed at 12.5 and 14.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively (P<0.05). Moreover, live Men1(-/-) embryos were absent by 13.5 and 15.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively thereby indicating an earlier lethality by 2 days in the 129S6/SvEv strain (P<0.01). Men1(-/-) embryos had macroscopic haemorrhages, and histology and optical projection tomography revealed them to have internal haemorrhages, myocardial hypotrophy, pericardial effusion, hepatic abnormalities and neural tube defects. The neural tube defects occurred exclusively in 129S6/SvEv embryos (21 vs 0%, P<0.01). Thus, our findings demonstrate the importance of genetic background in influencing the phenotypes of embryonic lethality and neural tube defects in Men1(-/-) mice, and implicate a role for genetic modifiers.

  8. 100 MeV silver ions induced defects and modifications in silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Vijay S.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: •Study of silver ion induced defects and modifications in silica glass. •Variation in oxygen deficiency centres (ODA-II) and nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC). •Study of structural damage in terms of Urbach energy. -- Abstract: A few silica glass samples having 1 cm{sup 2} area and 0.1 cm thickness were irradiated with 100 MeV energy Ag{sup 7+} ions for the fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} to 5 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The optical properties and the corresponding induced defects were characterised by the techniques such as UV–Visible, Photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The UV–Visible absorption spectra show two peaks, one at 5 eV and another weak peak at 5.8 eV. A peak observed at 5.0 eV corresponds to B{sub 2} band (oxygen deficiency in SiO{sub 2} network) and the peak at 5.8 eV is due to the paramagnetic defects like E′ centre. The intensities of these peaks found to be increased with increase in ion fluence. It attributes to the increase in the concentration of E′ centres and B{sub 2} band respectively. In addition, the optical band gap energy, Urbach energy and the defects concentration have been calculated using Urbach plot. The optical band gap found to be decreased from 4.65 eV to 4.39 eV and the Urbach energy found to be increased from 60 meV to 162 meV. The defect concentration of nonbridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC) and E′ centres are found to be increased to 1.69 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and 3.134 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} respectively. In PL spectra, the peak appeared at 1.92 eV and 2.7 eV envisage the defects of nonbridging oxygen hole centres and B{sub 2α} oxygen deficient centres respectively. ESR spectra also confirms the existence of E′ and NBOHC centres. FTIR spectra shows scissioning of Si-O-Si bonds and the formation of Si-H and Si-OH bonds, which supports to the co-existence of the defects induced by Ag

  9. Defect-induced ferromagnetism in crystalline SrTiO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osten, Julia; Potzger, Kay; Shalimov, Artem; Talut, Georg; Reuther, Helfried; Arpaci, Seda; Buerger, Danilo; Schmidt, Heidemarie [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Levin, Alexander.A. [Institut fuer Strukturphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 (Germany); Nestler, Tina; Meyer, Dirk C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ion irradiation of high-quality SrTiO3 single crystals leads to room-temperature ferromagnetism. Structural analysis revealed oxygen deficient (polycrystalline) SrTiO3, Sr2Ti6O13, or Ruddlesden-Popper like secondary phases at the sample surface induced by the irradiation. The lack of potentially ferromagnetic secondary phases suggests defects to be the origin of the observed ferromagnetic signal.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRODUCTION-INDUCED DEFECTS IN CARBON FIBER REINFORCED THERMOPLASTIC TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Frederic; Mezakeu Tongnan, Yannick; Beyrle, Matthias; Gerngroß, Tobias; Kupke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Advanced thermoplastic composites such as carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF-PEEK) have a great potential for efficient processing. Along the production chain certain manufacturing steps may cause slight, superficial flaws or mere optical effects without greater impact on performance whereas others may lead to severe changes of the final part properties. These production–induced defects can arise already in the early stages of the production chain and may hence cause significant...

  11. A defect in amino acid transport of filamentous Escherichia coli induced by penicillin.

    OpenAIRE

    内藤, 伸明; 友近, 健一; 口分田,晃; 塩出,純二; 金政, 泰弘

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a new type of penicillin action on the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. The ability of filamentous cells to uptake amino acids induced by low concentrations of penicillin increased with cell elongation. This defect in amino acid transport was mostly observed on the substrate of the osmotic shock resistant transport system. Penicillin treatment, however, did not disturb the other membrane functions such as the uptake of α-D-methyl glucopyranoside and triphenylmeth...

  12. Genetic structure of avian myeloblastosis virus, released from transformed myeloblasts as a defective virus particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter H.; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo

    1980-01-01

    Chicken myeloblasts transformed by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) in the absence of nondefective helper virus (termed nonproducer cells) were found to release a defective virus particle (DVP) that contains avian tumor viral gag proteins but lacks envelope glycoprotein and a DNA polymerase. Nonproducer cells contain a Pr76 gag precursor protein and also a protein that is indistinguishable from the Pr180 gag-pol protein of nondefective viruses. The RNA of the DVP is 7.5 kilobases (kb) long and is 0.7 kb shorter than the 8.2-kb RNAs of the helper viruses of AMV, MAV-1 and MAV-2. Comparisons based on RNA·cDNA hybridization and mapping of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides indicated that DVP RNA shares with MAV RNAs nearly isogenic 5′-terminal gag and pol-related sequences of 5.3 kb and a 3′-terminal c-region of 0.7 kb that is different from that found in other avian tumor viruses. Adjacent to the c-region, DVP RNA contains a contiguous specific sequence of 1.5 kb defined by 14 specific oligonucleotides. Except for two of these oligonucleotides that map at its 5′ end, this sequence is unrelated to any sequences of nondefective avian tumor viruses of four different envelope subgroups as well as to the specific sequences of fibroblast-transforming avian acute leukemia and sarcoma viruses of four different RNA subgroups. The specific sequence of the DVP RNA is present in infectious stocks of AMV from this and other laboratories in an AMV-transformed myeloblast line from another laboratory, and it is about 70% related to nucleotide sequences of E26 virus, an independent isolate of an AMV-like virus. Preliminary experiments show DVP to be leukemogenic if fused into susceptible cells in the presence of helper virus. We conclude that DVP RNA is the leukemogenic component of infectious AMV and that its specific sequence, termed AMV, may carry genetic information for oncogenicity. Thus we have found here a transformation-specific RNA sequence, unrelated to helper virus

  13. Irradiation-induced grain growth and defect evolution in nanocrystalline zirconia with doped grain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sanchita; Mardinly, John; Wang, Yongqiang; Valdez, James A; Holesinger, Terry G; Uberuaga, Blas P; Ditto, Jeff J; Drazin, John W; Castro, Ricardo H R

    2016-06-22

    Grain boundaries are effective sinks for radiation-induced defects, ultimately impacting the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline materials (dense materials with nanosized grains) against net defect accumulation. However, irradiation-induced grain growth leads to grain boundary area decrease, shortening potential benefits of nanostructures. A possible approach to mitigate this is the introduction of dopants to target a decrease in grain boundary mobility or a reduction in grain boundary energy to eliminate driving forces for grain growth (using similar strategies as to control thermal growth). Here we tested this concept in nanocrystalline zirconia doped with lanthanum. Although the dopant is observed to segregate to the grain boundaries, causing grain boundary energy decrease and promoting dragging forces for thermally activated boundary movement, irradiation induced grain growth could not be avoided under heavy ion irradiation, suggesting a different growth mechanism as compared to thermal growth. Furthermore, it is apparent that reducing the grain boundary energy reduced the effectiveness of the grain boundary as sinks, and the number of defects in the doped material is higher than in undoped (La-free) YSZ.

  14. Circular patterns of calcium oxalate crystals induced by defective Langmuir-Blodgett film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The injury of the renal epithelial cell membrane can promote the nucleation of nascent crystals, as well as adhesion of crystals on it. It thus accelerates the formation of renal calculi. In this paper, the defective Langmuir-Blodgett(LB)films were used as a model system to simulate the injured renal epithelial cell membrane. The microcosmic structure of the defective LB film and the molecular mechanism of the effect of this film on nucleation, growth, deposited patterns and adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate(COM)were investigated. The circular defective domains were formed in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine(DPPC)LB film after the film was treated by potassium oxalate. These domains could induce ring-shaped patterns of COM crystals. In comparison, the LB film without pretreatment by potassium oxalate only induced random growth of hexagonal COM crystals. As the crystallization time increased, the size of COM crystals in the patterns increased, the crystal patterns changed from empty circles to solid circles, and the number of the circular patterns with small size(5-20μm)increased. The results would shed light on the molecular mechanism of urolithiasis induced by injury of the renal epithelial membrane at the molecular and supramolecular level.

  15. Circular patterns of calcium oxalate crystals induced by defective Langmuir-Blodgett film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The injury of the renal epithelial cell membrane can promote the nucleation of nascent crystals, as well as adhesion of crystals on it. It thus accelerates the formation of renal calculi. In this paper, the defective Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were used as a model system to simulate the injured renal epithelial cell membrane. The microcosmic structure of the defective LB film and the molecular mechanism of the effect of this film on nucleation, growth, deposited patterns and adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) were investigated. The circular defective domains were formed in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) LB film after the film was treated by potassium oxalate. These domains could induce ring-shaped patterns of COM crystals. In comparison, the LB film without pretreatment by potassium oxalate only induced random growth of hexagonal COM crystals. As the crystallization time increased, the size of COM crystals in the patterns increased, the crystal patterns changed from empty circles to solid circles, and the number of the circular patterns with small size (5-20 μm) increased. The results would shed light on the molecular mechanism of urolithiasis induced by injury of the renal epithelial membrane at the molecular and supramolecular level.

  16. Molecular genetics and pathogenic mechanisms for the severe ciliopathies: insights into neurodevelopment and pathogenesis of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clare V; Abdel-Hamed, Zakia; Johnson, Colin A

    2011-02-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a severe autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by developmental defects of the central nervous system that comprise neural tube defects that most commonly present as occipital encephalocele. MKS is considered to be the most common syndromic form of neural tube defect. MKS is genetically heterogeneous with six known disease genes: MKS1, MKS2/TMEM216, MKS3/TMEM67, RPGRIP1L, CEP290, and CC2D2A with the encoded proteins all implicated in the correct function of primary cilia. Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the apical surface of most epithelial cell types. Recent progress has implicated the involvement of cilia in the Wnt and Shh signaling pathways and has led to an understanding of their role in normal mammalian neurodevelopment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the molecular genetics of the human disorder, and to assess recent insights into the etiology and molecular cell biology of severe ciliopathies from mammalian animal models of MKS.

  17. [Recent perspectives on the development of the central nervous system and the genetic background of neural tube defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-05-10

    Neural tube defects are rare and mostly lethal malformations. The pattern of inheritance of these malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of the development of the central nervous system. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the central nervous system include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure as well as sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes and their mutations influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of NTDs. In this review the author has attempted to summarize the knowledge on neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  18. C-V and DLTS studies of radiation induced Si-SiO{sub 2} interface defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capan, I., E-mail: capan@irb.hr [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Janicki, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Jacimovic, R. [Jozef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pivac, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-07-01

    Interface traps at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface have been and will be an important performance limit in many (future) semiconductor devices. In this paper, we present a study of fast neutron radiation induced changes in the density of Si-SiO{sub 2} interface-related defects. Interface related defects (P{sub b} centers) are detected before and upon the irradiation. The density of interface-related defects is increasing with the fast neutron fluence.

  19. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation addressing focal chondral defect in adolescent knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xue-song; CAI You-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation(MACI)is the third generation tissue-engineering technique for the treatment of full-thickness articular cartilage defects.The aim of this study was to describe this new technique and the postoperative findings in adolescent knee with focal chondral defect.Methods The MACI consists of diagnostic arthroscopy and cartilage harvest,chondrocyte culture and seeding in tissue-engineering collagenous membrane,and implantation of the scaffold.Clinical outcome at minimum 1-year follow-up was assessed in seven patients(mean age(16.6±1.5)years;14-19 years)with full-thickness cartilage defects,with International Knee Documentation Committee(IKDC)score,the International Cartilage Repair Society(ICRS)score and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score(KOOS).Besides,MR imaging was performed with T1 and T2-weighted imaging and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled(3D-SPGR)MR imaging.Results Clinical evaluation showed significant improvement and MRI analysis showed that the structure was homogeneous and the implant surface was regular and intact in six patients,but irregular in one.Of all the seven patients,the cartilage defect site was nearly totally covered by the implanted scaffold.Conclusions These results indicated that MACl technique is an option for cartilage defect in adolescent knee joint,especially large defect of over 2 cm2.Long-term assessment is necessary to determine the true value of this technique.

  20. Feasibility of Genetic Algorithm for Textile Defect Classification Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tarek Habib

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The global market for textile industry is highly competitive nowadays. Quality control in productionprocess in textile industry has been a key factor for retaining existence in such competitive market.Automated textile inspection systems are very useful in this respect, because manual inspection is timeconsuming and not accurate enough. Hence, automated textile inspection systems have been drawing plentyof attention of the researchers of different countries in order to replace manual inspection. Defect detectionand defect classification are the two major problems that are posed by the research of automated textileinspection systems. In this paper, we perform an extensive investigation on the applicability of geneticalgorithm (GA in the context of textile defect classification using neural network (NN. We observe theeffect of tuning different network parameters and explain the reasons. We empirically find a suitable NNmodel in the context of textile defect classification. We compare the performance of this model with that ofthe classification models implemented by others.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions AEC syndrome ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... mouth (a cleft palate ), a split in the lip (a cleft lip ), or both. Cleft lip or cleft palate ...

  2. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Maternal diabetes induces congenital heart defects in mice by altering the expression of genes involved in cardiovascular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Samuel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital heart defects are frequently observed in infants of diabetic mothers, but the molecular basis of the defects remains obscure. Thus, the present study was performed to gain some insights into the molecular pathogenesis of maternal diabetes-induced congenital heart defects in mice. Methods and results We analyzed the morphological changes, the expression pattern of some genes, the proliferation index and apoptosis in developing heart of embryos at E13.5 from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Morphological analysis has shown the persistent truncus arteriosus combined with a ventricular septal defect in embryos of diabetic mice. Several other defects including defective endocardial cushion (EC and aberrant myofibrillogenesis have also been found. Cardiac neural crest defects in experimental embryos were analyzed and validated by the protein expression of NCAM and PGP 9.5. In addition, the protein expression of Bmp4, Msx1 and Pax3 involved in the development of cardiac neural crest was found to be reduced in the defective hearts. The mRNA expression of Bmp4, Msx1 and Pax3 was significantly down-regulated (p p p Conclusion It is suggested that the down-regulation of genes involved in development of cardiac neural crest could contribute to the pathogenesis of maternal diabetes-induced congenital heart defects.

  4. Defects in cellular sorting and retroviral assembly induced by GGA overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashima Kunio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that overexpression of Golgi-localized, γ-ear containing, Arf-binding (GGA proteins inhibits retrovirus assembly and release by disrupting the function of endogenous ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs. GGA overexpression led to the formation of large, swollen vacuolar compartments, which in the case of GGA1 sequestered HIV-1 Gag. Results In the current study, we extend our previous findings to characterize in depth the GGA-induced compartments and the determinants for retroviral Gag sequestration in these structures. We find that GGA-induced structures are derived from the Golgi and contain aggresome markers. GGA overexpression leads to defects in trafficking of transferrin receptor and recycling of cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. Additionally, we find that compartments induced by GGA overexpression sequester Tsg101, poly-ubiquitin, and, in the case of GGA3, Hrs. Interestingly, brefeldin A treatment, which leads to the dissociation of endogenous GGAs from membranes, does not dissociate the GGA-induced compartments. GGA mutants that are defective in Arf binding and hence association with membranes also induce the formation of GGA-induced structures. Overexpression of ubiquitin reverses the formation of GGA-induced structures and partially rescues HIV-1 particle production. We found that in addition to HIV-1 Gag, equine infectious anemia virus Gag is also sequestered in GGA1-induced structures. The determinants in Gag responsible for sequestration map to the matrix domain, and recruitment to these structures is dependent on Gag membrane binding. Conclusion These data provide insights into the composition of structures induced by GGA overexpression and their ability to disrupt endosomal sorting and retroviral particle production.

  5. Voltage-induced defect mode interaction in a one-dimensional photonic crystal with a twisted-nematic defect layer

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, Ivan V; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Myslivets, Sergey A; Arkhipkin, Vasily G; Vetrov, Stepan Ya; Lee, Wei; Zyryanov, Victor Ya

    2011-01-01

    Defect modes are investigated in a band gap of an electrically tunable one-dimensional photonic crystal infiltrated with a twisted-nematic liquid crystal (1D PC/TN). Their frequency shift and interference under applied voltage are studied both experimentally and theoretically. We deal with the case where the defect layer thickness is much larger than the wavelength (Mauguin condition). It is shown theoretically that the defect modes could have a complex structure with the elliptic polarization. Two series of polarized modes interact with each other and exhibit an avoided crossing phenomenon in the case of opposite parity.

  6. Suppressed expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases in hyperthermia induced defective neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianliang; Leng, Zhaoting; Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Xia; Yan, Xue; Yu, Li

    2015-05-06

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common congenital malformations. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is involved in many physiological processes. HMGB1 has been showed closely associated with neurulation and NTDs induced by hyperthermia and could activate MAPKs pathway. Since hyperthermia caused increased activation of MAPKs in many systems, the present study aims to investigate whether HMGB1 contributes to hyperthermia induced NTDs through MAPKs pathway. The mRNA levels of MAPKs and HMGB1 between embryonic day 8.5 and 10 (E8.5-10) in hyperthermia induced defective neural tube were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By immunofluorescence and western blotting, the expressions of HMGB1 and phosphorylated MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) in neural tubes after hyperthermia were studied. The mRNA levels of MAPKs and HMGB1, as well as the expressions of HMGB1 along with phosphorylated JNK, p38 and ERK, were downregulated in NTDs groups induced by hyperthermia compared with control. The findings suggested that HMGB1 may contribute to hyperthermia induced NTDs formation through decreased cell proliferation due to inhibited phosphorylated ERK1/2 MAPK.

  7. Bone regeneration in rat cranium critical-size defects induced by Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Serrano

    Full Text Available Gene therapy approaches to bone and periodontal tissue engineering are being widely explored. While localized delivery of osteogenic factors like BMPs is attractive for promotion of bone regeneration; method of delivery, dosage and side effects could limit this approach. A novel protein, Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1, has recently been shown to promote regeneration of periodontal tissues. In order to address the possibility that CEMP1 can be used to regenerate other types of bone, experiments were designed to test the effect of hrCEMP1 in the repair/regeneration of a rat calvaria critical-size defect. Histological and microcomputed tomography (µCT analyses of the calvaria defect sites treated with CEMP1 showed that after 16 weeks, hrCEMP1 is able to induce 97% regeneration of the defect. Furthermore, the density and characteristics of the new mineralized tissues were normal for bone. This study demonstrates that hrCEMP1 stimulates bone formation and regeneration and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of bone defects and regeneration of mineralized tissues.

  8. Reducing the genetic code induces massive rearrangement of the proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Patrick; Prat, Laure; Kucklick, Martin; Schäfer, Johannes G; Riedel, Katharina; Rinehart, Jesse; Söll, Dieter; Heinemann, Ilka U

    2014-12-02

    Expanding the genetic code is an important aim of synthetic biology, but some organisms developed naturally expanded genetic codes long ago over the course of evolution. Less than 1% of all sequenced genomes encode an operon that reassigns the stop codon UAG to pyrrolysine (Pyl), a genetic code variant that results from the biosynthesis of Pyl-tRNA(Pyl). To understand the selective advantage of genetically encoding more than 20 amino acids, we constructed a markerless tRNA(Pyl) deletion strain of Methanosarcina acetivorans (ΔpylT) that cannot decode UAG as Pyl or grow on trimethylamine. Phenotypic defects in the ΔpylT strain were evident in minimal medium containing methanol. Proteomic analyses of wild type (WT) M. acetivorans and ΔpylT cells identified 841 proteins from >7,000 significant peptides detected by MS/MS. Protein production from UAG-containing mRNAs was verified for 19 proteins. Translation of UAG codons was verified by MS/MS for eight proteins, including identification of a Pyl residue in PylB, which catalyzes the first step of Pyl biosynthesis. Deletion of tRNA(Pyl) globally altered the proteome, leading to >300 differentially abundant proteins. Reduction of the genetic code from 21 to 20 amino acids led to significant down-regulation in translation initiation factors, amino acid metabolism, and methanogenesis from methanol, which was offset by a compensatory (100-fold) up-regulation in dimethyl sulfide metabolic enzymes. The data show how a natural proteome adapts to genetic code reduction and indicate that the selective value of an expanded genetic code is related to carbon source range and metabolic efficiency.

  9. Computational Characterization of Defects in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Spontaneous and Water-Induced Point Defects in ZIF-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyang; Han, Chu; Sholl, David S; Schmidt, J R

    2016-02-04

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are an important class of porous crystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) materials that have attracted widespread attention for applications ranging from gas adsorption and separation to catalysis. Although the bulk crystal structures of MOFs are typically well-characterized, comparatively little is known regarding MOF defect structures. Drawing on analogies with conventional silicon-based zeolites, we utilize computational methods to examine the structure and stability of putative point-defect structures (including vacancies, substitutions, and "dangling" linkers) within the prototypical ZIF-8 structure. Considering both postsynthetic (gas-phase) and synthetic (solution-phase) conditions, we find that several of the defect structures lie low in energy relative to the defect-free parent crystal, with barriers to defect formation that are large but surmountable under relevant temperatures. These results are consistent with prior experimental observations of ZIF stability and reactivity and suggest that defects may play an important role in influencing the long-term stability of MOFs under conditions that include exposure to water vapor and trace contaminants such as acid gases.

  10. Bremsstrahlung-induced highly penetrating probes for nondestructive assay and defect analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Selim, F A; Harmon, J F; Kwofie, J; Spaulding, R; Erickson, G; Roney, T

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive assay and defect analysis probes based on bremsstrahlung-induced processes have been developed to identify elements and probe defects in large volume samples. Bremsstrahlung beams from (electron accelerators) with end-point energies both above and below neutron emission threshold have been used. Below neutron emission threshold these beams (from 6 MeV small pulsed linacs), which exhibit high penetration, create positrons via pair production inside the material and produce X-ray fluorescence (XRF) radiation. Chemical assays of heavy elements in thick samples up to 10 g/cm sup 2 thick are provided by energy dispersive XRF measurements. The pair-produced positrons annihilate within the material, thereby emitting 511 keV gamma radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511 keV radiation can be performed to characterize the material and measure defects in samples of any desired thickness. This technique has successfully measured induced strain due to tensile stress in steel samples of 0.64 cm...

  11. Acrylamide induces locomotor defects and degeneration of dopamine neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Li, Dan; Yang, Yongsheng; Xu, Tiantian; Li, Ping; He, Defu

    2016-01-01

    Acrylamide can form in foods during the cooking process and cause multiple adverse effects. However, the neurotoxicity and mechanisms of acrylamide have not been fully elucidated. In Caenorhabditis elegans, we showed that 48 h exposure to 10-625 mg l(-1) acrylamide resulted in a significant decline in locomotor frequency of body bending, head thrashing and pharynx pumping. In addition, acrylamide exposure reduced crawling speeds and changed angles of body bending. It indicates that acrylamide induces locomotor defects, along with parkinsonian-like movement impairment, including bradykinesia and hypokinesia. Acrylamide also affected chemotaxis plasticity and reduced learning ability. Using transgenic nematodes, we found that acrylamide induced downexpression of P(dat-1) and led to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the enhanced expression of unc-54, encoding a subunit of α-synuclein was found. It illustrates that acrylamide is efficient in inducing crucial parkinsonian pathology, including dopaminergic damage and α-synuclein aggregation. These findings suggest the acrylamide-induced locomotor defects and neurotoxicity are associated with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Study of defect-induced ferromagnetism in hydrogenated anatase TiO2:Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, R. K.; Samariya, Arvind; Kumar, Sudhish; Xing, Y. T.; Jain, D. C.; Dolia, S. N.; Deshpande, U. P.; Shripathi, T.; Saitovitch, Elisa B.

    2010-06-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of Co-doped TiO2 polycrystalline pellets (Ti0.95Co0.05O2) have been investigated using x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoemission, magnetization, and resistance measurements. The as-synthesized and hydrogenated specimens crystallize in the anatase type tetragonal structure containing very small (˜4.4%) rutile phase. The dopant ions of Co are found to be divalent and well incorporated into TiO2 lattice, substituting the Ti site within the anatase phase, with no evidence of metallic Co or any other oxides of Co. The Co doping induces a weak ferromagnetic ordering in the diamagnetic TiO2 host matrix. Interestingly, when the Co-doped TiO2 is annealed in hydrogen atmosphere, it shows a giant enhancement in magnetization. However, an extended reheating in air causes this H-induced magnetization to vanish and the sample regains the as-prepared status. Our findings indicate that ferromagnetism originates from the doped matrix rather than any magnetic clusters and strongly correlated with oxygen vacancies in the doped TiO2. The induced ferromagnetic ordering is found to be a reversible process with regard to oxygen vacancy defects that could be induced or removed, respectively, upon introduction or removal of these defects.

  13. Rapamycin ameliorates chitosan nanoparticle-induced developmental defects of preimplantation embryos in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, DaSom; Jang, Hyung Seok; Park, Woo-Jin; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Song, Hyuk; Seo, Han Geuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) are used as drug or gene delivery vehicles. However, a detailed understanding of the effects of CSNPs on embryonic development remains obscure. Here, we show that CSNPs can be internalized into mouse blastocysts, such as the zona pellucida, the perivitelline space, and the cytoplasm. Consequently, CSNPs-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases both of Bip/Grp78, Chop, Atf4, Perk, and Ire1a mRNAs expression levels, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, CSNPs show double- and multi-membraned autophagic vesicles, and lead to cell death of blastocoels. Conversely, treatment with rapamycin, which plays an important role as a central regulator of cellular proliferation and stress responses, decreased CSNPs-induced mitochondrial Ca+2 overloading, apoptosis, oxidative stress, ER stress, and autophagy. In vivo studies demonstrated that CSNPs injection has significant toxic effect on primordial and developing follicles. Notably, rapamycin rescued oxidative stress-induced embryonic defects via modulating gene expression of sirtuin and mammalian target of rapamycin. Interestingly, CSNPs treatment alters epigenetic reprogramming in mouse embryos. Overall, these observations suggest that rapamycin treatment could ameliorate CSNPs-induced developmental defects in preimplantation embryos. The data from this study would facilitate to understand the toxicity of these CSNPs, and enable the engineering of safer nanomaterials for therapeutic applications. PMID:27463007

  14. [Oncovirus-induced permanent genetic instability in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mit', N V; Dzhansugurova, L B; Bersimbaev, R I

    2000-08-01

    Mutant alleles of a system of genetic instability induced by oncoviral DNAs were shown to demonstrate an unstable manifestation 500 generations after their emergence. A cytogenetic analysis of oncovirus-induced unstable lines has revealed numerous chromosome rearrangements. For the Lobe alleles of this system, a specific chromosome rearrangement, Df(2L) = 35C-36B, was found on the left arm of chromosome 2. We used recessive lethal mutations involving DNA rearrangements in a successful construction of cross systems for "explosive" instability.

  15. Folic acid supplementation during pregnancy protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Chen, Xue; Dong, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-13

    Folic acid is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin. Increasing evidence demonstrates that physiological supply of folic acid during pregnancy prevents folic acid deficiency-related neural tube defects (NTDs). Previous studies showed that maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure caused NTDs in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high-dose folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on LPS-induced NTDs. Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20 μg/kg/d) from gestational day (GD) 8 to GD12. As expected, a five-day LPS injection resulted in 19.96% of fetuses with NTDs. Interestingly, supplementation with folic acid (3mg/kg/d) during pregnancy significantly alleviated LPS-induced NTDs. Additionally, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced fetal growth restriction and skeletal malformations. Additional experiment showed that folic acid attenuated LPS-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion in maternal liver and placentas. Moreover, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced expression of placental MyD88. Additionally, folic acid inhibited LPS-induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in placentas. Correspondingly, folic acid significantly attenuated LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in placentas, maternal serum and amniotic fluid. In conclusion, supplementation with high-dose folic acid during pregnancy protects against LPS-induced NTDs through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  16. Syndromes of reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone: genetic defects in hormone receptors, cell transporters and deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refetoff, Samuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M

    2007-06-01

    At least six major steps are required for secreted thyroid hormone (TH) to exert its action on target tissues. Mutations interfering with three of these steps have been so far identified. The first recognized defect, which causes resistance to TH, involves the TH receptor beta gene and has been given the acronym RTH. Occurring in approximately 1 per 40,000 newborns, more than 1000 affected subjects, from 339 families, have been identified. The gene defect remains unknown in 15% of subjects with RTH. Two novel syndromes causing reduced sensitivity to TH were recently identified. One, producing severe psychomotor defects in > 100 males from 26 families, is caused by mutations in the cell-membrane transporter of TH, MCT8; the second, affecting the intracellular metabolism of TH in four individuals from two families, is caused by mutations in the SECISBP2 gene, which is required for the synthesis of selenoproteins, including TH deiodinases.

  17. Effect of thermal-convection-induced defects on the performance of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Tang, Wentao; Chen, Han; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-07-01

    Thermal-convection-induced defects can cause huge loss in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processed perovskite solar cells. We investigated two types of convection in perovskite solution during the formation of perovskite films. By balancing the convection via special configurations of surface tension and boiling point in mixed γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), we removed microscopic defects such as rings, bumps, and crevices. The deposited perovskite films were smooth and dense, which enabled a high power conversion efficiency of 17.7% in a 1 cm2 cell area. We believe that the present strategy for controlling the convection can be helpful in improving the perovskite film quality for solvent-rich scalable solution processes of solar cells such as doctor blading, soft-cover deposition, printing, and slot-die coating.

  18. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Guoliang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiao, Liyi [Department of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Bollmann, Joachim [Institute of Electronics and Sensor Materials, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, 71691 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  19. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  20. Defect-induced spatial coherence in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando, C L; Doedel, E J

    2004-03-01

    We have considered the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) with periodic boundary conditions in the context of coupled Kerr waveguides. The presence of a defect in the central oscillator equation can induce quasiperiodic or large chaotic amplitude oscillations. As for the quasiperiodic dynamics, an enhancement of the amplitude correlations in certain oscillator pairs can take place. However, when the array dynamics becomes chaotic, these correlations are destroyed, and, for suitable defects, synchronization, in the information sense, of certain signals arises in this Hamiltonian system. A numerical continuation analysis clarifies the onset of this dynamical regime. In this case, phase synchronization follows with a peculiar distribution of the Liapunov exponents. These effects occur for initial conditions in a small neighborhood of a family of stationary solutions. We have also found a regime characterized by persistent localized chaotic amplitudes. We have generalized these results to take into account birefringent effects in waveguides.

  1. DLTS study on point defects in silicon induced by accelerated particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryoo, Kun Kul; Kim, Woo Hyuk [Soonchunghyung University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    FZ silicon wafers for power device materials are irradiated by neutron and proton for obtaining homogeneous distribution of resistivity and increase in switching, respectively. However, those processes introduce damages to silicon crystal by bombarding particles. The effect of irradiation damage on FZ silicon crystal properties has been studied by electrical measurement such as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). There were several typical point defects induced by the accelerated particle irradiations. Their energy levels were in the wide range of the silicon band gap, and some were sufficiently deep enough to affect the carrier lifetime. Their concentrations were also significantly enough to be considered in power device fabrication processes. Hence there must be a delicate heat treatment technology to control the prerequisite defects and their concentrations.

  2. Energy Variable Slow Positron Beam Study of Li+-Implantation-Induced Defects in ZnO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-Quan; M. Maekawa; A. Kawasuso

    2006-01-01

    @@ ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates are implanted with 100-keV Li ions up to a total dose of 1 × 1016 cm-2. Vacancy-type defects, mostly vacancy clusters, are observed by positron annihilation measurements after implan tation. Upon annealing, they first have an agglomeration process which leads to the growth in the vacancy size. After annealing at about 500° C, vacancy clusters grow into microvoids, which is indicated by the positronium formation. With annealing temperature increases to above 500° C, the microvoids begin to recover, and finally all the implantation-induced vacancy defects are removed at 1000°C. No Li nanoclusters can be observed after Li+ implantation.

  3. Correlating defect induced ferromagnetism and gas sensing properties of undoped tin oxide sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Vinayak B.; Umarji, Arun M.

    2014-06-01

    A correlation between gas sensing properties and defect induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTFM) is demonstrated in non-stoichiometric SnO2 prepared by solution combustion method. The presence of oxygen vacancies (VO), confirmed by RTFM is identified as the primary factor for enhanced gas sensing effect. The as-prepared SnO2 shows high saturation magnetization of ˜0.018 emu/g as compared to ˜0.002 and ˜0.0005 emu/g in annealed samples and SnO2 prepared by precipitation respectively. The SnO2 prepared by precipitation which is an equilibrium method of synthesis shows lesser defects compared to the combustion product and hence exhibits lesser sensitivity in spite of smaller crystallite size. The study utilizes RTFM as a potential tool to characterize metal oxide gas sensors and recognizes the significance of oxygen vacancies in sensing mechanism over the microstructure.

  4. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs.

  5. Identification of Genetic Alterations, as Causative Genetic Defects in Long QT Syndrome, Using Next Generation Sequencing Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    Full Text Available Long QT Syndrome is an inherited channelopathy leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite that several genes have been associated with the disease, nearly 20% of cases remain without an identified genetic cause. Other genetic alterations such as copy number variations have been recently related to Long QT Syndrome. Our aim was to take advantage of current genetic technologies in a family affected by Long QT Syndrome in order to identify the cause of the disease.Complete clinical evaluation was performed in all family members. In the index case, a Next Generation Sequencing custom-built panel, including 55 sudden cardiac death-related genes, was used both for detection of sequence and copy number variants. Next Generation Sequencing variants were confirmed by Sanger method. Copy number variations variants were confirmed by Multiplex Ligation dependent Probe Amplification method and at the mRNA level. Confirmed variants and copy number variations identified in the index case were also analyzed in relatives.In the index case, Next Generation Sequencing revealed a novel variant in TTN and a large deletion in KCNQ1, involving exons 7 and 8. Both variants were confirmed by alternative techniques. The mother and the brother of the index case were also affected by Long QT Syndrome, and family cosegregation was observed for the KCNQ1 deletion, but not for the TTN variant.Next Generation Sequencing technology allows a comprehensive genetic analysis of arrhythmogenic diseases. We report a copy number variation identified using Next Generation Sequencing analysis in Long QT Syndrome. Clinical and familiar correlation is crucial to elucidate the role of genetic variants identified to distinguish the pathogenic ones from genetic noise.

  6. Structural – Electrical property correlation in defect induced nanostructured off-stoichiometric bismuth ferrite: A defect analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, R.K. [Department of Physics and Material Science & Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida, U. P. 201307 (India); Jha, Pardeep K., E-mail: pardeepjha.jiit@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Material Science & Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida, U. P. 201307 (India); Jha, Priyanka A. [Department of Physics and Material Science & Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida, U. P. 201307 (India); Department of Applied Sciences, HMR Institute of Technology and Management, GGSIPU, New Delhi 110036 (India); Kumar, Pawan [School of Basic and Applied Sciences, K. R. Mangalam University, Sohna Road, Gurgaon, Haryana 122103 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-08-15

    In order to increase magnetization, an attempt has been made to synthesize nanostructured bismuth ferrite using high energy planetary ball milling (HEPBM). In this process local heating in HEPBM and Bi-volatility has eventually led to the formation of BiFe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (off stoichiometric bismuth iron garnet (BIG)). Electrical characterization has been done in order to identify the nature of defects and diffusion mechanism which has been supported by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction images. The simultaneous analysis of current density-applied voltage (J–V) and current density-frequency (J–ν) curves gives insight mechanism for defect formation and how surface charge density depends on relaxation time and frequency of field applied. - Highlights: • Dielectric analysis has been carried out to analyse the defect mechanism. • RBS and EdX study confirm the elemental constituents. • Correlation between observed J-V-f behaviour and defects has been established. • HRTEM, SAED pattern and impedance analysis supports the defect analysis.

  7. Genetic background and phenotypic characterization over two farrowings of leg conformation defects in Landrace and Large White sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sevilla, X Fernàndez; Fàbrega, E; Tibau, J; Casellas, J

    2009-05-01

    A Bayesian threshold animal model was applied to evaluate the prevalence over 2 farrowings and genetic background of overall leg conformation score and the presence or absence of 6 specific leg defects (abnormal hoof growth, splay footed, plantigradism, straight pasterns, sickle-hocked legs, and the presence of swelling or injuries) in purebred Landrace and Large White sows. Data sets contained phenotypic records from 2,477 and 1,550 Landrace and Large White females, respectively, at the end of the growing period. Leg conformation data from first and second farrowings were available for 223 and 191 Landrace sows and 213 and 193 Large White sows, respectively. Overall leg conformation deteriorated with age, with statistically relevant differences between females at the end of the growing period, first farrowing (FF), and second farrowing (SF). In a similar way, the prevalence of the 6 specific leg defects increased between the end of the growing period and FF (with the exception of straight pasterns in the Landrace population). Differences between FF and second farrowing were statistically relevant for hoof growth (highest posterior density regions at 95% did not overlap), plantigradism, sickle-hocked legs, and overall leg conformation score in Landrace and for sickle-hocked leg and overall leg conformation score in Large White. The statistical relevance of the genetic background was tested through the Bayes factor (BF) between the model with the additive genetic component and the model with 0 heritability (nonheritable). Heritability (h(2)) was discarded (BF 100) of genetic background was obtained for overall leg conformation score in Landrace and Large White sows (h(2) = 0.27 and 0.38, respectively), hoof growth in both breeds (h(2) = 0.22 and 0.26, respectively), and plantigradism (h(2) = 0.34) and the presence of swelling or injuries in Landrace (h(2) = 0.27). Note that a BF > 100 implies that the model with infinitesimal genetic effects was more than 100 times

  8. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  9. Interactions between dislocations and irradiation-induced defects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude; Ruste, Jacky; Domain, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The REVE project (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international effort aimed at developing tools to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactors materials. In the framework of this project, a European team developed a first tool, called RPV-1 designed for reactor pressure vessel steels. This article is the third of a series dedicated to the presentation of the codes and models used to build RPV-1. It describes the simplified approach adopted to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening. This approach relies on a characterization of the interactions between a screw dislocation and irradiation-induced defects from molecular dynamics simulations. The pinning forces exerted by the defects on the dislocation were estimated from the obtained results and some hypotheses. In RPV-1, these forces are used as input parameters of a Foreman and Makin-type code, called DUPAIR, to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening at 20 °C. The relevance of the proposed approach was validated by the comparison with experimental results. However, this work has to be considered as an initial step to facilitate the development of a first tool to simulate irradiation effects. It can be improved by many ways (e.g. by use of dislocation dynamics code).

  10. Prevention of valproic acid-induced neural tube defects by sildenafil citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2015-08-15

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of sildenafil citrate (SC), a type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on valproic acid (VPA)-induced teratogenesis. On gestation day (GD) 8, ICR (CD-1) mice were treated by gastric intubation with SC at 0 (vehicle), 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg. One hour later, animals received a teratogenic dose of VPA (600mg/kg) or vehicle. Developmental endpoints were evaluated near the end of gestation. Twenty-eighth percent of fetuses exposed to VPA had neural tube defects (exencephaly). Pretreatment with SC at 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg significantly reduced the rate of VPA-induced exencephaly to 15.9%, 13.7%, and 10.0%, respectively. Axial skeletal defects were observed in 75.8% of VPA-exposed fetuses. Pre-treatment with SC at 10mg/kg, but not at lower doses, significantly decreased the rate of skeletally affected fetuses to 61.6%. These results show that SC, which prolongs nitric oxide (NO) signaling action protects from VPA-induced teratogenesis.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of the TYMS gene are not associated with congenital cardiac septal defects in a Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yuan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical research indicates that periconceptional administration of folic acid can reduce the occurrence of congenital cardiac septal defects (CCSDs. The vital roles of folate exhibits in three ways: the unique methyl donor for DNA expression regulation, the de novo biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine for DNA construction, and the serum homocysteine removal. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS is the solo catalysis enzyme for the de novo synthesis of dTMP, which is the essential precursor of DNA biosynthesis and repair process. To examine the role of TYMS in Congenital Cardiac Septal Defects (CCSDs risk, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS gene associated with the CCSDs in a Han Chinese population. METHOD: Polymorphisms in the noncoding region of TYMS were identified via direct sequencing in 32 unrelated individuals composed of half CCSDs and half control subjects. Nine SNPs and two insertion/deletion polymorphisms were genotyped from two independent case-control studies involving a total of 529 CCSDs patients and 876 healthy control participants. The associations were examined by both single polymorphism and haplotype tests using logistic regression. RESULT: We found that TYMS polymorphisms were not related to the altered CCSDs risk, and even to the changed risk of VSDs subgroup, when tested in both studied groups separately or in combination. In the haplotype analysis, there were no haplotypes significantly associated with risks for CCSDs either. CONCLUSION: Our results show no association between common genetic polymorphisms of the regulatory region of the TYMS gene and CCSDs in the Han Chinese population.

  12. The acceptability among young Hindus and Muslims of actively ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Shanmukh; Ahmed, Ramadan; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    To explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of damaged newborns. 254 university students from India and 150 from Kuwait rated the acceptability of ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects in 54 vignettes consisting of all combinations of four factors: gestational age (term or 7 months); severity of genetic defect (trisomy 21 alone, trisomy 21 with serious morphological abnormalities or trisomy 13 with impending death); the parents' attitude about prolonging care (unknown, in favour or opposed); and the procedure used (withholding treatment, withdrawing it or injecting a lethal substance). Four clusters were identified by cluster analysis and subjected to analysis of variance. Cluster I, labelled 'Never Acceptable', included 4% of the Indians and 59% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster II, 'No Firm Opinion', had little variation in rating from one scenario to the next; it included 38% of the Indians and 18% of the Kuwaitis. In Cluster III, 'Parents' Attitude+Severity+Procedure', all three factors affected the ratings; it was composed of 18% of the Indians and 16% of the Kuwaitis. Cluster IV was called 'Severity+Parents' Attitude' because these had the strongest impact; it was composed of 40% of the Indians and 7% of the Kuwaitis. In accordance with the teachings of Islam versus Hinduism, Kuwaiti students were more likely to oppose ending a newborn's life under all conditions, Indian students more likely to favour it and to judge its acceptability in light of the different circumstances.

  13. In Situ Studies on the Irradiation-Induced Twin Boundary-Defect Interactions in Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C.; Li, Jin; Fan, Zhe; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-08-01

    Polycrystalline Cu films with nanoscale annealing twins are subjected to in situ Kr++ ion irradiation at room temperature inside a transmission electron microscope up to a dose of 1 displacement-per-atom. Radiation induces prominent migration of incoherent twin boundaries. Depending on twin thickness, three types of twin boundary evolutions are observed, including rapid detwinning, gradual detwinning, and self-healing. The mechanism of twin thickness-dependent evolution of microstructures is discussed. This study provides further evidence on twin boundary-defect interactions and may assist the design of radiation-tolerant twinned metallic materials.

  14. Suppression of radiation-induced point defects by rhenium and osmium interstitials in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the evolution of radiation-induced defects is important for finding radiation-resistant materials, which would be greatly appreciated in nuclear applications. We apply the density functional theory combined with comprehensive analyses of massive experimental database to indicate a mechanism to mitigate the effect of radiation on W crystals by adding particular solute elements that change the migration property of interstitials. The resultant mechanism is applicable to any body-centered-cubic (BCC) metals whose self-interstitial atoms become a stable crowdion and is expected to provide a general guideline for computational design of radiation-resistant alloys in the field of nuclear applications.

  15. Suppression of radiation-induced point defects by rhenium and osmium interstitials in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the evolution of radiation-induced defects is important for finding radiation-resistant materials, which would be greatly appreciated in nuclear applications. We apply the density functional theory combined with comprehensive analyses of massive experimental database to indicate a mechanism to mitigate the effect of radiation on W crystals by adding particular solute elements that change the migration property of interstitials. The resultant mechanism is applicable to any body-centered-cubic (BCC) metals whose self-interstitial atoms become a stable crowdion and is expected to provide a general guideline for computational design of radiation-resistant alloys in the field of nuclear applications. PMID:27824134

  16. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  17. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  18. Low temperature solution process-based defect-induced orange-red light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Pranab; Baek, Sung-Doo; Hoon Lee, Sang; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Jeong Lee, Su; Il Lee, Tae; Myoung, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    We report low-temperature solution-processed p-CuO nanorods (NRs)/n-ZnO NRs heterojunction light emitting diode (LED), exploiting the native point defects of ZnO NRs. ZnO NRs were synthesized at 90 °C by using hydrothermal method while CuO NRs were synthesized at 100 °C by using microwave reaction system. The electrical properties of newly synthesized CuO NRs revealed a promising p-type nature with a hole concentration of 9.64 × 1018 cm−3. The current-voltage characteristic of the heterojunction showed a significantly high rectification ratio of 105 at 4 V with a stable current flow. A broad orange-red emission was obtained from the forward biased LED with a major peak at 610 nm which was attributed to the electron transition from interstitial zinc to interstitial oxygen point defects in ZnO. A minor shoulder peak was also observed at 710 nm, corresponding to red emission which was ascribed to the transition from conduction band of ZnO to oxygen vacancies in ZnO lattice. This study demonstrates a significant progress toward oxide materials based, defect-induced light emitting device with low-cost, low-temperature methods. PMID:26648420

  19. Defect induced d{sup 0} ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assa Aravindh, Sasikala Devi; Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S, E-mail: iman.roqan@kaust.edu.sa [Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 2955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-12-14

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary (GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnO GB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Zn vacancy (V{sub Zn}) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, V{sub Zn} induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μ{sub B}/atom to the O sites at the GB. Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of V{sub Zn} and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d{sup 0} semiconductors.

  20. Defect induced d0 ferromagnetism in a ZnO grain boundary

    KAUST Repository

    Devi, Assa Aravindh Sasikala

    2015-12-08

    Several experimental studies have referred to the grain boundary(GB) defect as the origin of ferromagnetism in zinc oxide (ZnO). However, the mechanism of this hypothesis has never been confirmed. Present study investigates the atomic structure and the effect of point defects in a ZnOGB using the generalized gradient approximation+U approximation. The relaxed GB possesses large periodicity and channels with 8 and 10 numbered atoms having 4 and 3 fold coordination. The Znvacancy (VZn) shows a tendency to be attracted to the GB, relative to the bulk-like region. Although no magnetization is obtained from point defect-free GB, VZn induces spin polarization as large as 0.68 μB/atom to the O sites at the GB.Ferromagnetic exchange energy >150 eV is obtained by increasing the concentration of VZn and by the injection of holes into the system. Electronic structure analysis indicates that the spin polarization without external dopants originates from the O 2p orbitals, a common feature of d0semiconductors.

  1. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Fu

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR, neural tube defects (NTDs and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg daily from gestational day (GD8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus.

  2. Mapping radiation-induced defects in CCDs through space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David; Bush, Nathan; Wood, Daniel; Murray, Neil J.; Gow, Jason; Skottfelt, Jesper; Holland, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    cycle of these traps through time after irradiation. In orbit, most devices will be operating cold to suppress dark current and the devices are therefore cold whilst undergoing damage from the radiation environment. The mobility of defects varies as a function of temperature such that the mix of defects present following a cryogenic irradiation may vary significantly from that found following a room temperature irradiation or after annealing. It is therefore essential to study the trap formation and migration in orbit-like conditions and over longer timescales. In this paper we present a selection of the latest methods and results in the trap pumping of n- and p-channel devices and demonstrate how this technique now allows us to map radiation-induced defects in CCDs through both space and time.

  3. Characterization of Transformation-Induced Defects in Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Matthew L.

    Shape memory alloys have remarkable strain recovery properties that make them ideal candidates for many applications that include devices in the automotive, aerospace, medical, and MEMS industries. Although these materials are widely used today, their performance is hindered by poor dimensional stability resulting from cyclic degradation of the martensitic transformation behavior. This functional fatigue results in decreased work output and cyclic accumulation of permanent strain. To date, few studies have taken a fundamental approach to investigating the interaction between plasticity and martensite growth and propagation, which is vitally important to mitigating functional fatigue in future alloy development. The current work focuses on understanding the interplay of these deformation mechanisms in NiTi-based shape memory alloys under a variety of different thermomechanical test conditions. Micron-scale compression testing of NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals is undertaken in an effort to probe the mechanism of austenite dislocation generation. Mechanical testing is paired with post mortem defect analysis via diffraction contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Accompanied by micromechanics-based modeling of local stresses surrounding a martensite plate, these results demonstrate that the previously existing martensite and resulting austenite dislocation substructure are intimately related. A mechanism of transformation-induced dislocation generation is described in detail. A study of pure and load-biased thermal cycling of bulk polycrystalline NiTi is done for comparison of the transformation behavior and resultant defects to the stress-induced case. Post mortem and in situ STEM characterization demonstrate unique defect configurations in this test mode and STEM-based orientation mapping reveals local crystal rotation with increasing thermal cycles. Changes in both martensite and austenite microstructures are explored. The results for

  4. Taurine protects methamphetamine-induced developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Hu, Chunyan; Bu, Qian; Yan, Guangyan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Pengchi [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Lv, Lei [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, Dan [College of Basic and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Deng, Yi; Zhao, Jinxuan; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Youzhi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Yinglan [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Cen, Xiaobo, E-mail: xbcenalan@vip.sina.com [National Chengdu Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, State Key Lab of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-01

    Investigations have characterized addictive drug-induced developmental cardiovascular malformation in human, non-human primate and rodent. However, the underlying mechanism of malformation caused by drugs during pregnancy is still largely unknown, and preventive and therapeutic measures have been lacking. Using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, we profiled the metabolites from human embryo endothelial cells exposed to methamphetamine (METH) and quantified a total of 226 peaks. We identified 11 metabolites modified robustly and found that taurine markedly increased. We then validated the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in taurine could attribute to its effect in inhibiting METH-induced developmental angiogenesis defect. Taurine supplement showed a more significant potential than other metabolites in protecting against METH-induced injury in endothelial cells. Taurine strongly attenuated METH-induced inhibition of proliferation and migration in endothelial cells. Furthermore, death rate and vessel abnormality of zebrafish embryos treated with METH were greatly reversed by taurine. In addition, taurine supplement caused a rapid decrease in reactive oxygen species generation and strongly attenuated the excitable arise of antioxidase activities in the beginning of METH exposure prophase. Dysregulations of NF-κB, p-ERK as well as Bax, which reflect apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium, were blocked by taurine. Our results provide the first evidence that taurine prevents METH-caused developmental angiogenesis defect through antioxidant mechanism. Taurine could serve as a potential therapeutic or preventive intervention of developmental vascular malformation for the pregnant women with drug use. Highlights: ► Metabonomics findings. ► Abnormal development. ► Dysregulations of key proteins.

  5. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  6. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7-Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang,Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two ta...

  7. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  8. Genetic defects in fatty acid beta-oxidation and acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter; Andresen, Brage S

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation deficiencies are due to genetic defects in enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation and transport proteins. Genetic defects have been identified in most of the genes where nearly all types of sequence variations (mutation types) have been associated with disease......, stability and kinetic properties for this variant enzyme will be discussed in detail and used as a paradigm for the study of other mis-sense variant proteins. We conclude that the total effect of mis-sense sequence variations may comprise an invariable--sequence variation specific--effect on the catalytic...

  9. Strain-induced structural defects and their effects on the electrochemical performances of silicon core/germanium shell nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Kim, Dongheun; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shixiong; Yoo, Jinkyoung

    2017-01-19

    We report on strain-induced structural defect formation in core Si nanowires of a Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure and the influence of the structural defects on the electrochemical performances in lithium-ion battery anodes based on Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures. The induced structural defects consisting of stacking faults and dislocations in the core Si nanowire were observed for the first time. The generation of stacking faults in the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure is observed to prefer settling in either only the Ge shell region or in both the Ge shell and Si core regions and is associated with the increase of the shell volume fraction. The relaxation of the misfit strain in the [112] oriented core/shell nanowire heterostructure leads to subsequent gliding of Shockley partial dislocations, preferentially forming the twins. The observation of crossover of defect formation is of great importance for understanding heteroepitaxy in radial heterostructures at the nanoscale and for building three dimensional heterostructures for the various applications. Furthermore, the effect of the defect formation on the nanomaterial's functionality is investigated using electrochemical performance tests. The Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructures enhance the gravimetric capacity of lithium ion battery anodes under fast charging/discharging rates compared to Si nanowires. However, the induced structural defects hamper lithiation of the Si/Ge core/shell nanowire heterostructure.

  10. Identification of genetic defects in primary immunodeficiencies by whole exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Jensen, Jens Magnus Bernth; Veirum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    to hypogammaglobulinaemia, and increased risk of both infections as well as cancer. We employed whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify mutations associated with primary immunodeficiency in severely affected children. We present WES data on 2 patients with severe immunodeficiency. WES was performed using TruSeq exome kit...... and severe infections including sepsis. Second, we identified compound heterozygote stopgain mutations in RAD52 and a heterozygote mutation in LRRC8A in a 7 year-old girl with T-cell deficiency, reduced T-cell mediated B-cell activity, hypogammaglobulinaemia, prolonged splenomegali and benign adenopathy. RAD......52 has not previously been linked to immunodeficiency and we are currently investigating the functional consequences. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying immunodeficiencies is a prerequisite for understanding disease pathogenesis. WES allows the demonstration of immune defects that may result from...

  11. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001).

  12. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedahl, B.; Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Kim, S. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.; Moewes, A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO2 with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO2 pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe2+ → Ti4+) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe3+ are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO2:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO2:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  13. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leedahl, B., E-mail: bdl816@mail.usask.ca; Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Moewes, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Zatsepin, D. A.; Zhidkov, I. S. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Boukhvalov, D. W. [School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS) Hoegiro 87, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kurmaev, E. Z. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, N. V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cholakh, S. O. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-07

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO{sub 2} with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO{sub 2} pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe{sup 2+} → Ti{sup 4+}) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe{sup 3+} are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO{sub 2}:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO{sub 2}:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  14. Atrx deficiency induces telomere dysfunction, endocrine defects, and reduced life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, L Ashley; Solomon, Lauren A; Li, Jennifer Ruizhe; Jiang, Yan; Edwards, Matthew; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Beier, Frank; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2013-05-01

    Human ATRX mutations are associated with cognitive deficits, developmental abnormalities, and cancer. We show that the Atrx-null embryonic mouse brain accumulates replicative damage at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is exacerbated by loss of p53 and linked to ATM activation. ATRX-deficient neuroprogenitors exhibited higher incidence of telomere fusions and increased sensitivity to replication stress-inducing drugs. Treatment of Atrx-null neuroprogenitors with the G-quadruplex (G4) ligand telomestatin increased DNA damage, indicating that ATRX likely aids in the replication of telomeric G4-DNA structures. Unexpectedly, mutant mice displayed reduced growth, shortened life span, lordokyphosis, cataracts, heart enlargement, and hypoglycemia, as well as reduction of mineral bone density, trabecular bone content, and subcutaneous fat. We show that a subset of these defects can be attributed to loss of ATRX in the embryonic anterior pituitary that resulted in low circulating levels of thyroxine and IGF-1. Our findings suggest that loss of ATRX increases DNA damage locally in the forebrain and anterior pituitary and causes tissue attrition and other systemic defects similar to those seen in aging.

  15. Expression of hepatitis B virus surface antigens induces defective gonad phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Yin; Lee, Li-Wei; Hong, Wei-Ning; Lo, Szecheng J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To test whether a simple animal, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), can be used as an alternative model to study the interaction between hepatitis B virus antigens (HBsAg) and host factors. METHODS Three plasmids that were able to express the large, middle and small forms of HBsAgs (LHBsAg, MHBsAg, and SHBsAg, respectively) driven by a ubiquitous promoter (fib-1) and three that were able to express SHBsAg driven by different tissue-specific promoters were constructed and microinjected into worms. The brood size, egg-laying rate, and gonad development of transgenic worms were analyzed using microscopy. Levels of mRNA related to endoplasmic reticulum stress, enpl-1, hsp-4, pdi-3 and xbp-1, were determined using reverse transcription polymerase reaction (RT-PCRs) in three lines of transgenic worms and dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated wild-type worms. RESULTS Severe defects in egg-laying, decreases in brood size, and gonad retardation were observed in transgenic worms expressing SHBsAg whereas moderate defects were observed in transgenic worms expressing LHBsAg and MHBsAg. RT-PCR analysis revealed that enpl-1, hsp-4 and pdi-3 transcripts were significantly elevated in worms expressing LHBsAg and MHBsAg and in wild-type worms pretreated with DTT. By contrast, only pdi-3 was increased in worms expressing SHBsAg. To further determine which tissue expressing SHBsAg could induce gonad retardation, we substituted the fib-1 promoter with three tissue-specific promoters (myo-2 for the pharynx, est-1 for the intestines and mec-7 for the neurons) and generated corresponding transgenic animals. Moderate defective phenotypes were observed in worms expressing SHBsAg in the pharynx and intestines but not in worms expressing SHBsAg in the neurons, suggesting that the secreted SHBsAg may trigger a cross-talk signal between the digestive track and the gonad resulting in defective phenotypes. CONCLUSION Ectopic expression of three forms of HBsAg that causes recognizable phenotypes in

  16. Induced transparency by coupling of Tamm and defect states in tunable terahertz plasmonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Allen, S James; Grine, Albert D; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials have emerged as two classes of tailorable materials that enable precise control of light. Plasmonic crystals, which can be thought of as photonic crystals fabricated from plasmonic materials, Bragg scatter incident electromagnetic waves from a repeated unit cell. However, plasmonic crystals, like metamaterials, are composed of subwavelength unit cells. Here, we study terahertz plasmonic crystals of several periods in a two dimensional electron gas. This plasmonic medium is both extremely subwavelength ($\\approx \\lambda/100$) and reconfigurable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Weakly localized crystal surface states known as Tamm states are observed. By introducing an independently controlled plasmonic defect that interacts with the Tamm states, we demonstrate a frequency agile electromagnetically induced transparency phenomenon. The observed 50% ${\\it in-situ}$ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges should be realizable in materials such as graph...

  17. N-Desmethyldauricine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Apoptosis-Defective Cells via Ca(2+) Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Betty Y K; Mok, Simon W F; Chen, Juan; Michelangeli, Francesco; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Han, Yu; Qu, Yuan Q; Qiu, Alena C L; Xu, Su-Wei; Xue, Wei-Wei; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jia Y; Javed, Masood-Ul-Hassan; Coghi, Paolo; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent K W

    2017-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy remains a significant problem in oncology. Mechanisms regulating programmed cell death, including apoptosis, autophagy or necrosis, in the treatment of cancers have been extensively investigated over the last few decades. Autophagy is now emerging as an important pathway in regulating cell death or survival in cancer therapy. Recent studies demonstrated variety of natural small-molecules could induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, therefore, discovery of novel autophagic enhancers from natural products could be a promising strategy for treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancer. By computational virtual docking analysis, biochemical assays, and advanced live-cell imaging techniques, we have identified N-desmethyldauricine (LP-4), isolated from rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC as a novel inducer of autophagy. LP-4 was shown to induce autophagy via the Ulk-1-PERK and Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-AMPK-mTOR signaling cascades, via mobilizing calcium release through inhibition of SERCA, and importantly, lead to autophagic cell death in a panel of cancer cells, apoptosis-defective and apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, this study provides detailed insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel autophagic compound that targeting the apoptosis resistant cancer cells, and new implication on drug discovery from natural products for drug resistant cancer therapy.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  19. Confocal fluorescence microscopy investigation of visible emitting defects induced by electron beam lithography in LIF films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montereali, R.M.; Bigotta, S.; Pace, A.; Piccinini, M. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Burattini, E.; Grilli, A.; Raco, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Fisica, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Giammatteo, M. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Centro di Microscopia Elettronica; Picozzi, P.; Santucci, S. [Unita' Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy)]|[L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2000-07-01

    Low energy electron irradiation of lithium fluoride (LiF), in the form of bulk crystals and films, gives rise to the stable formation of primary F defects and aggregated color centers in a thin layer located at the surface of the investigated material. For the first time a confocal light scanning microscope (CLSM) in fluorescence mode was used to reconstruct the depth distribution of efficiently emitting laser active color centers in a stripe-like region induced by 12 and 16 keV electrons on LiF films thermally evaporated on glass. The formation of the F{sub 3}{sup +} and F{sub 2} aggregated defects appears restricted to the electron penetration and proportional to their energy depth profile, as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. [Italian] L'irraggiamento con elettroni di bassa energia del fluoruro di litio (LiF), in forma di cristalli e film, induce la formazione di difetti primari F e centri di colore aggregati stabili in un sottile strato localizzato alla superficie del materiale investigato. Per la prima volta un microscopio confocale a scansione (CLSM) in modalita' fluorescenza e' stato usato per ricostruire la distribuzione di centri di colore laser attivi ad alta efficienza di emissione nel visibile, in strisce colorate ottenute con elettroni da 12 e 16 keV su film di LiF evaporati termicamente su vetro. La formazione dei difetti aggregati F2 e F3+ risulta ristretta spazialmente nella regione di penetrazione degli elettroni e proporzionale al profilo della distribuzione dell'energia da essi depositata, ricavata tramite simulazioni Monte Carlo.

  20. Management of traumatic tibial diaphyseal bone defect by “induced-membrane technique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gap nonunion of long bones is a challenging problem, due to the limitation of conventional reconstructive techniques more so if associated with infection and soft tissue defect. Treatment options such as autograft with non-vascularized fibula and cancellous bone graft, vascularized bone graft, and bone transportation are highly demanding on the part of surgeons and hospital setups and have many drawbacks. This study aims to analyze the outcome of patients with wide diaphyseal bone gap treated with induced-membrane technique (Masquelet technique.Materials and Methods: This study included 9 patients (7 males and 2 females, all with tibial bone-gap. Eight of the 9 patients were infected and in 3 patients there was associated large soft tissue defect requiring flap cover. This technique is two-stage procedure. Stage I surgery included debridement, fracture stabilization, application of spacer between bone ends, and soft tissue reconstruction. Stage II surgery included removal of spacer with preservation of induced membrane formed at spacer surface and filling the bone-gap with morselized iliac crest bone-graft within the membrane sleeve. Average bone-gap of 5.2 cm was treated. The spacer was always found to be encapsulated by a thick glistening membrane which did not collapse after its removal. All patients were followed up for an average period of 21.5 months. Results: Serial Radiographs showed regular uptake of autograft and thus consolidation within themselves in the region of bone gap and also with host bone. Bone-union was documented in all patients and all patients are walking full weight-bearing without support. Conclusions: The study highlights that the technique provide effective and practical management for difficult gap nonunion. It does not require specialized equipment, investigations, and surgery. Thus, it provides a reasonable alternative to the developing infrastructures and is a reliable and reproducible technique.

  1. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  2. Bacteriophage T4D Gene 42 Mutants Exhibit a Defective Genetic Exclusion Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    an adaptive mecanism for promoting individual fitness since the protected re3lource _s used for the production of the primary infecting 1nae𔃽 own...with the direction of transcription toward gene 42 has been mapped to the 26.3 kb region (Gram et al., 1984) (Fig. 2). All of this taken together...i i I I I IN122 E498 NG411 imm- E21x3 I I 1269x3 <------------------direction of transcription NG93 Fig. 3: A genetic map of the amber mutation sites

  3. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Genetic defects of PTH/PTHrP receptor in chondrodysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Naoshi

    2010-10-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling plays important roles in regulating the differentiation of chondrocytes in endochondral bone development. PTHrP signaling functions as an inhibitory effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy which is a terminal stage of differentiation at a growth plate. Mutations of the PTH÷PTHrP receptor have been identified in Jansen metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, Blomstrand's lethal chondrodysplasia, and enchondromatosis. Furthermore, genetic manipulations of the PTHrP and its receptor genes in mice have demonstrated the critical roles of these proteins in regulating both the switch between proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes.

  4. Inducible and constitutive promoters for genetic systems in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Silvia; Wlodkowski, Alexander; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Lipps, Georg

    2010-05-01

    Central to genetic work in any organism are the availability of a range of inducible and constitutive promoters. In this work we studied several promoters for use in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The promoters were tested with the aid of an E. coli-Sulfolobus shuttle vector in reporter gene experiments. As the most suitable inducible promoter a maltose inducible promoter was identified. It comprises 266 bp of the sequence upstream of the gene coding for the maltose/maltotriose binding protein (mbp, Saci_1165). Induction is feasible with either maltose or dextrin at concentrations of 0.2-0.4%. The highest increase in expression (up to 17-fold) was observed in late exponential and stationary phase around 30-50 h after addition of dextrin. Whereas in the presence of glucose and xylose higher basal activity and reduced inducibility with maltose is observed, sucrose can be used in the growth medium additionally without affecting the basal activity or the inducibility. The minimal promoter region necessary could be narrowed down to 169 bp of the upstream sequence. The ABCE1 protein from S. solfataricus was successfully expressed under control of the inducible promoter with the shuttle vector pC and purified from the S. acidocaldarius culture with a yield of about 1 mg L(-1) culture. In addition we also determined the promoter strength of several constitutive promoters.

  5. Gene expression in retinoic acid-induced neural tube defects A cDNA mieroarray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Long; Zhong Yang; Yi Zeng; Hongli Li; Yangyun Han; Chao You

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects can be induced by abnormal factors in vivo or in vitro during development. However, the molecular mechanisms of neural tube defect induction, and the related gene expression and regulation are still unknown.OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences in gene expression between normal embryos and those with neural tube defects.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A neural development study was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Third Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Among 120 adult Kunming mice, 60 pregnant mice were randomly and evenly divided into a retinoic acid group (n = 30) and a normal control group (n =30). The retinoic acid was produced by Sigma, USA, the gene microarray by the Amersham Pharmacia Company, Hong Kong, and the gene sequence was provided by the Incyte database, USA.METHODS: Retinoic acid was administered to prepare models of neural tube defects, and corn oil was similady administered to the normal control group. Total RNA was extracted from embryonic tissue of the two groups using a Trizol kit, and a cDNA microarray containing 1 100 known genes was used to compare differences in gene expression between the normal control group and the retinoic acid group on embryonic (E) clay 10.5 and 11.5. Several differentially expressed genes were randomly selected from the two groups for Northern blotting, to verify the results of the cDNA microarray.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Morphological changes and differential gene expression between the normal control group and the retinoic acid group.RESULTS: Anatomical microscopy demonstrated that an intact closure of the brain was formed in the normal mouse embryos by days E10.5 and E11.5. The cerebral appearance was full and smooth, and the surface of the spine was intact. However, in the retinoic acid group on days E10.5 and E11.5, there were more dead embryos. Morphological malformations typically included non-closure at the top of

  6. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  7. FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Sjozef; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Koumbi, Daphne; Cuppens, Harry; Riccardino, Francesca; Macek, Milan; Scriver, Charles R; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

  8. [Genetics of congenital color vision defects. II. Rare types of color blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, M R

    1995-01-01

    Between the rare types of colour blindness, the known best are defects of blue colour vision, which are called tritanopia or trinanomaly (tritanomalous trichromacy). Their incidence is 1 in 500 and they are inherited in autosomal dominant way with incomplete penetrance. The basis of them are mutations of the short (blue) wavelength sensitive visual pigment gene. The gene has been mapped on the chromosome 7 and has already been cloned and sequenced. However, the loci heterogeneity should not be excluded in that condition. Another rare type of colour blindness in blue cone monochromacy. It is based on the cone sensitivity to short (blue) wavelength only. The condition is inherited in X-linked recessive way and it is known, that it can be caused by 2 different mechanisms. The first one--two-step pathway--consists of green cone pigment gene deletion, and point mutation of red cone pigment gene. The second one--one-step pathway--arose by deletion of regulatory sequence of both genes of visual pigments, mapped on the X chromosome. Different types of total and partial achromatopsia are also described. The best known ones are: rod monochromacy, which is inherited in autosomal recessive way and consist of rod vision only, and cone dystrophy, usually inherited in X-linked recessive way.

  9. [Genetics of congenital color vision defects. I. Common types of color blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, M R

    1995-01-01

    Normal human colour vision is based on the presence of 3 kinds of cones containing 3 different visual pigments, sensitive to short (blue), middle (green) and long (red) wavelengths. Congenital defects of colour vision are based on handicap or total loss of these pigments' function, usually a result of changes in their coding genes. The common types of colour blindness, referred to red-green axis, are present in about 8% of males and 0.44% of females. 3/4 of them are deuteranopes or deuteranomalous trichromats and 1/4 of them are protanopes or protanomalous trichromats. All of them are inherited in X-linked recessive way. The genes have been already mapped and sequenced. The cause of the great majority of their changes is nonhomologous recombination, which produces a gene deletion or creates the red-green or green-red hybrid genes. The result of that is the production of visual pigment with partly or totally changed spectral sensitivity.

  10. Nanolaser spectroscopy of Normal and Genetically Defective Mitochondria: New Biostatistical Tool for Studying Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul; Hendricks, Judy; Naviaux, Robert; Yaffe, Michael

    2007-03-01

    We report an analysis of wild and mutant strains of mitochondria from yeast cells using nanolaser spectroscopy to measure cytochrome density and its statistical variation in the population. The first strain 110 was derived from wild-type strain 104 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), resulting in loss of all mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b that can be detected in the laser spectra. Histograms of laser wavelengths produced by wild-type mitochondria produced peaked distributions, while mutant mitochondria exhibit asymmetric, highly skewed distributions. Surprisingly, all of these distributions exhibit extended tails and can be self-consistently fit with log-normal distribution functions. In striking contrast, the mitochondrial diameters (measured separately by microscopy) exhibit normal Gaussian distributions. These results indicate that the nanolaser spectra are useful for quantifying cytochrome content in mitochondria and may have important implications for quantifying defects in mitochondria that manifest human disease.

  11. Characteristics and contributions of defective, ecotropic, and mink cell focus-inducing viruses involved in a retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome of mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Sengupta, D N; Fredrickson, T N; Morse, H. C.; Hartley, J W

    1991-01-01

    LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus, a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus, contains a mixture of replication-competent B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) viruses and a defective genome that is the proximal cause of a syndrome, murine AIDS (MAIDS), characterized by lymphoproliferation and immunodeficiency. The defective (BM5d) and ecotropic components of this mixture were molecularly cloned, and complete (BM5d) or partial (ecotropic) nucleotide sequences were determined. BM5d clos...

  12. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  13. Ordered arrangement of irradiation-induced defects of polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Fan, Hongyu; Liu, Lu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Berthold, Tobias; Benstetter, Günther [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Media Technology, University of Applied Sciences Deggendorf, Deggendorf 94469 (Germany); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Low-energy (20–520 eV) hydrogen ion irradiations were performed at W surface temperature of 373–1073 K and a fluence ranging from 5.0 × 10{sup 23} to 1.0 × 10{sup 25}/m{sup 2}. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a nondestructive analytical technique was successfully used to detect irradiation-induced defects in polycrystalline W. The size and density of these nanometer-sized defects were strongly dependent on the fluence of hydrogen ions. Both ion energy (E) and temperature (T) play a crucial role in determining the ordering of nanometer-sized defects. Ordered arrangements were formed at relatively high E and T. This can be attributed to the stress-driven ripple effect of defect growth at crystal grains, resulting in the movement of W lattice along one certain crystal planes.

  14. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of a Novel Mutant mst of Rice Defective in Flower Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun; XU Pei-zhou; ZHANG Hong-yu; FU Shao-hong; YANG Jin; ZHANG Ru-quan; WU Xian-jun

    2009-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant with multiple stigmas (mst) was found in an indica rice line 466. The mst mutant exhibits normal at the vegetative development stage and produces normal inflorescence structures. The difference between the mutant and the wild type was observed when the stamen primordium began to develop. In the mst florets, palea and lemma opened, lodicules were homeotically transformed into palea/lemma-like structures, and stamens were homeotically transformed into carpel-like structures. It looked like multiple stigmas being full of the whole floret. The phenotypic changes of mst were very similar to that of B-like mutant spw1. Compared with other mutants with pistillate morphologies, the severe mst florets showed that the inner three floral organs were completely changed into palea/lemma-like structures. Moreover, the mutant was female sterile. Occasionally, with the changing environment, one or two stamens were fertile. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant traits were controlled by a single recessive gene.

  15. DLTS study of annihilation of oxidation induced deep-level defects in Ni/SiO2/-Si MOS structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Shashank; Sanjeev K Gupta; K V Madhu; J Akhtar; R Damle

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of MOS capacitor and DLTS study of annihilation of deeplevel defects upon thermal annealing. Ni/SiO2/-Si MOS structures fabricated on -type Si wafers were investigated for process-induced deep-level defects. The deep-level traps in Si substrates induced during the processing of Ni/SiO2/-Si have been investigated using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). A characteristic deep-level defect at C = 0.49 eV which was introduced during high-temperature thermal oxidation process was detected. The trap position was found to shift to different energy levels (C = 0.43, 0.46 and 0.34 eV) during thermal annealing process. The deep-level trap completely anneals at 350°C. Significant reduction in trap density with an increase in recombination life time and substrate doping concentration as a function of isochronal annealing were observed.

  16. Defect in mevalonate pathway induces pyroptosis in Raw 264.7 murine monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2011-09-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway by the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALD) has been previously associated with an augmented lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) secretion in monocytes, as demonstrated in an auto-inflammatory disease known as mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). In this study we investigated the effect of ALD + LPS on monocyte cell line (Raw 264.7) death. ALD strongly augmented LPS-induced programmed cell death (PCD) as well as IL-1β secretion in Raw murine monocytes, whereas necrosis was rather unaffected. ALD + LPS induced caspase-3 activation. Inhibition of IL-1β stimulation partially restored cell viability. These findings suggest that the inhibition of mevalonate pathway, together with a bacterial stimulus, induce a PCD partly sustained by the caspase-3-related apoptosis and partly by caspase-1-associated pyroptosis. The involvement of pyroptosis is a novel hit in our cell model and opens discussions about its role in inflammatory cells with chemical or genetic inhibition of mevalonate pathway.

  17. Fluorescence-tagged transgenic lines reveal genetic defects in pollen growth--application to the eIF3 complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoyita Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in several subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 cause male transmission defects in Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the stage of pollen development at which eIF3 becomes essential it is desirable to examine viable pollen and distinguish mutant from wild type. To accomplish this we have developed a broadly applicable method to track mutant alleles that are not already tagged by a visible marker gene through the male lineage of Arabidopsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence tagged lines (FTLs harbor a transgenic fluorescent protein gene (XFP expressed by the pollen-specific LAT52 promoter at a defined chromosomal position. In the existing collection of FTLs there are enough XFP marker genes to track nearly every nuclear gene by virtue of its genetic linkage to a transgenic marker gene. Using FTLs in a quartet mutant, which yields mature pollen tetrads, we determined that the pollen transmission defect of the eif3h-1 allele is due to a combination of reduced pollen germination and reduced pollen tube elongation. We also detected reduced pollen germination for eif3e. However, neither eif3h nor eif3e, unlike other known gametophytic mutations, measurably disrupted the early stages of pollen maturation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: eIF3h and eIF3e both become essential during pollen germination, a stage of vigorous translation of newly transcribed mRNAs. These data delimit the end of the developmental window during which paternal rescue is still possible. Moreover, the FTL collection of mapped fluorescent protein transgenes represents an attractive resource for elucidating the pollen development phenotypes of any fine-mapped mutation in Arabidopsis.

  18. BMP2 genetically engineered MSCs and EPCs promote vascularized bone regeneration in rat critical-sized calvarial bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs.

  19. Genetic defects of GDF6 in the zebrafish out of sight mutant and in human eye developmental anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Hollander Anneke I

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size of the vertebrate eye and the retina is likely to be controlled at several stages of embryogenesis by mechanisms that affect cell cycle length as well as cell survival. A mutation in the zebrafish out of sight (out locus results in a particularly severe reduction of eye size. The goal of this study is to characterize the outm233 mutant, and to determine whether mutations in the out gene cause microphthalmia in humans. Results In this study, we show that the severe reduction of eye size in the outm233 mutant is caused by a mutation in the zebrafish gdf6a gene. Despite the small eye size, the overall retinal architecture appears largely intact, and immunohistochemical studies confirm that all major cell types are present in outm233 retinae. Subtle cell fate and patterning changes are present predominantly in amacrine interneurons. Acridine orange and TUNEL staining reveal that the levels of apoptosis are abnormally high in outm233 mutant eyes during early neurogenesis. Mutation analysis of the GDF6 gene in 200 patients with microphthalmia revealed amino acid substitutions in four of them. In two patients additional skeletal defects were observed. Conclusions This study confirms the essential role of GDF6 in the regulation of vertebrate eye size. The reduced eye size in the zebrafish outm233 mutant is likely to be caused by a transient wave of apoptosis at the onset of neurogenesis. Amino acid substitutions in GDF6 were detected in 4 (2% of 200 patients with microphthalmia. In two patients different skeletal defects were also observed, suggesting pleitrophic effects of GDF6 variants. Parents carrying these variants are asymptomatic, suggesting that GDF6 sequence alterations are likely to contribute to the phenotype, but are not the sole cause of the disease. Variable expressivity and penetrance suggest a complex non-Mendelian inheritance pattern where other genetic factors may influence the outcome of the phenotype.

  20. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntingtonâ s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  1. Paradoxical relationship between Mn superoxide dismutase deficiency and radiation-induced cognitive defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikki Corniola

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy of the CNS, even at low doses, can lead to deficits in neurocognitive functions. Reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is usually, but not always, associated with cognitive deficits resulting from radiation therapy. Generation of reactive oxygen species is considered the main cause of radiation-induced tissue injuries, and elevated levels of oxidative stress persist long after the initial cranial irradiation. Consequently, mutant mice with reduced levels of the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or Sod2, are expected to be more sensitive to radiation-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and the related functions. In this study, we showed that MnSOD deficiency led to reduced generation of immature neurons in Sod2-/+ mice even though progenitor cell proliferation was not affected. Compared to irradiated Sod2+/+ mice, which showed cognitive defects and reduced differentiation of newborn cells towards the neuronal lineage, irradiated Sod2-/+ mice showed normal hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions and normal differentiation pattern for newborn neurons and astroglia. However, we also observed a disproportional decrease in newborn neurons in irradiated Sod2-/+ following behavioral studies, suggesting that MnSOD deficiency may render newborn neurons more sensitive to stress from behavioral trainings following cranial irradiation. A positive correlation between normal cognitive functions and normal dendritic spine densities in dentate granule cells was observed. The data suggest that maintenance of synaptic connections, via maintenance of dendritic spines, may be important for normal cognitive functions following cranial irradiation.

  2. Curvature induced L-defects in water conduction in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Urs; Gonnet, Pedro G; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-06-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of the curvature induced static dipole moment of small open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) immersed in water. This dipole moment generates a nonuniform electric field, changing the energy landscape in the CNT and altering the water conduction process. The CNT remains practically filled with water at all times, whereas intermittent filling is observed when the dipole term is not included. In addition, the dipole moment induces a preferential orientation of the water molecules near the end regions of the nanotube, which in turn causes a reorientation of the water chain in the middle of the nanotube. The most prominent feature of this reorientation is an L-defect in the chain of water molecules inside the CNT. The analysis of the water energetics and structural characteristics inside and in the vicinity of the CNT helps to identify the role of the dipole moment and to suggest possible mechanisms for controlled water and proton transport at the nanoscale.

  3. Parenteral monofluorophosphate (MFP) is a more potent inducer of enamel fluorotic defects in neonatal hamster molars than sodium fluoride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Schoonderwoerd, M.; Tio, D.; Tse, C.; Bervoets, T.J.; Denbesten, P.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Supra-optimal intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) during early childhood results in formation of irreversible enamel defects. Monofluorophosphate (MFP) was considered as less toxic than NaF but equally cariostatic. We compared the potency of MFP and NaF to induce pre-eruptive sub-ameloblastic cysts and

  4. Eu(2)(+) -induced enhancement of defect luminescence of ZnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Bo, Zhang; Fu-Xiang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The Eu(2)(+) -induced enhancement of defect luminescence of ZnS was studied in this work. While photoluminescence (PL) spectra exhibited 460 nm and 520 nm emissions in both ZnS and ZnS:Eu nanophosphors, different excitation characteristics were shown in their photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra. In ZnS nanophosphors, there was no excitation signal in the PLE spectra at the excitation wavelength λex  > 337 nm (the bandgap energy 3.68 eV of ZnS); while in ZnS:Eu nanophosphors, two excitation bands appeared that were centered at 365 nm and 410 nm. Compared with ZnS nanophosphors, the 520 nm emission in the PL spectra was relatively enhanced in ZnS:Eu nanophosphors and, furthermore, in ZnS:Eu nanophosphors the 460 nm and 520 nm emissions increased more than 10 times in intensity. The reasons for these differences were analyzed. It is believed that the absorption of Eu(2)(+) intra-ion transition and subsequent energy transfer to sulfur vacancy, led to the relative enhancement of the 520 nm emission in ZnS:Eu nanophosphors. In addition, more importantly, Eu(2)(+) acceptor-bound excitons are formed in ZnS:Eu nanophosphors and their excited levels serve as the intermediate state of electronic relaxation, which decreases non-radiative electronic relaxation and thus increases the intensity of the 460 nm and 520 nm emission dramatically. In summary, the results in this work indicate a new mechanism for the enhancement of defect luminescence of ZnS in Eu(2)(+) -doped ZnS nanophosphors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Infertility caused by male partners with genetic defects in Sichuan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Q; Li, T J; Ding, X P; Wei, J; Li, L X; Fu, L

    2013-12-11

    The purpose of this study was to detect chromosomal aberrations and azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions in male patients with reproductive problems and to summarize related clinical features to provide reliable information for evaluating prenatal and preimplantation diagnoses. A large cohort of 5083 men with various phenotypes of male infertility was analyzed via G-banding karyotyping, and Origin 8.0 was used to analyze the prevalence of abnormalities. Additionally, patients with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia were analyzed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction to detect microdeletion in the AZF. We identified 387 patients with abnormal karyotypes, and the ratio was 7.61%. Among them were 175 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, which was the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality and accounted for 45.22% of all chromosomal aberrations. The frequencies of increased satellites, balanced translocations, and Robertsonian translocations were 6.47, 7.00, and 3.62%, respectively. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed in 810 cases with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia found a ratio of AZF microdeletions of 4.94%. The finding suggests that chromosomal abnormalities and AZF deletion are main factors that result in male infertility. Detecting these common genetic variations is necessary in infertile men seeking assisted reproductive technology.

  6. High fat diet induced developmental defects in the mouse: oocyte meiotic aneuploidy and fetal growth retardation/brain defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri M Luzzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal obesity is associated with poor outcomes across the reproductive spectrum including infertility, increased time to pregnancy, early pregnancy loss, fetal loss, congenital abnormalities and neonatal conditions. Furthermore, the proportion of reproductive-aged woman that are obese in the population is increasing sharply. From current studies it is not clear if the origin of the reproductive complications is attributable to problems that arise in the oocyte or the uterine environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the developmental basis of the reproductive phenotypes in obese animals by employing a high fat diet mouse model of obesity. We analyzed very early embryonic and fetal phenotypes, which can be parsed into three abnormal developmental processes that occur in obese mothers. The first is oocyte meiotic aneuploidy that then leads to early embryonic loss. The second is an abnormal process distinct from meiotic aneuploidy that also leads to early embryonic loss. The third is fetal growth retardation and brain developmental abnormalities, which based on embryo transfer experiments are not due to the obese uterine environment but instead must be from a defect that arises prior to the blastocyst stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that reproductive complications in obese females are, at least in part, from oocyte maternal effects. This conclusion is consistent with IVF studies where the increased pregnancy failure rate in obese women returns to the normal rate if donor oocytes are used instead of autologous oocytes. We postulate that preconceptional weight gain adversely affects pregnancy outcomes and fetal development. In light of our findings, preconceptional counseling may be indicated as the preferable, earlier target for intervention in obese women desiring pregnancy and healthy outcomes.

  7. Characterization of T cell mutants with defects in capacitative calcium entry: genetic evidence for the physiological roles of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, C M; Hoth, M; Crabtree, G R; Lewis, R S

    1995-11-01

    Prolonged Ca2+ influx is an essential signal for the activation of T lymphocytes by antigen. This influx is thought to occur through highly selective Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels that are activated by the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. We have isolated mutants of the Jurkat human T cell line NZdipA to explore the molecular mechanisms that underlie capacitative Ca2+ entry and to allow a genetic test of the functions of CRAC channels in T cells. Five mutant cell lines (CJ-1 through CJ-5) were selected based on their failure to express a lethal diphtheria toxin A chain gene and a lacZ reporter gene driven by NF-AT, a Ca(2+)- and protein kinase C-dependent transcription factor. The rate of Ca2+ influx evoked by thapsigargin was reduced to varying degrees in the mutant cells whereas the dependence of NF-AT/lacZ gene transcription on [Ca2+]i was unaltered, suggesting that the transcriptional defect in these cells is caused by a reduced level of capacitative Ca2+ entry. We examined several factors that determine the rate of Ca2+ entry, including CRAC channel activity, K(+)-channel activity, and Ca2+ clearance mechanisms. The only parameter found to be dramatically altered in most of the mutant lines was the amplitude of the Ca2+ current (ICRAC), which ranged from 1 to 41% of that seen in parental control cells. In each case, the severity of the ICRAC defect was closely correlated with deficits in Ca2+ influx rate and Ca(2-)-dependent gene transcription. Behavior of the mutant cells provides genetic evidence for several roles of ICRAC in T cells. First, mitogenic doses of ionomycin appear to elevate [Ca2+]i primarily by activating CRAC channels. Second, ICRAC promotes the refilling of empty Ca2+ stores. Finally, CRAC channels are solely responsible for the Ca2+ influx that underlies antigen-mediated T cell activation. These mutant cell lines may provide a useful system for isolating, expressing, and exploring the functions of genes involved in

  8. Defect-initiated atomic emissions from semiconductor surfaces induced by laser irradiation: Electronic cleaning of defects on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanasaki, Jun' ichi; Okano, Akiko; Nakai, Yasuo; Itoh, Noriaki (Dept. of Physics, Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan))

    1994-05-15

    We compare the emission of Si atoms from Si (100) surfaces and of Ga atoms from GaAs (110) and GaP (110) surfaces induced by irradiation with low-fluence laser pulses, each of which emits atoms of about 10[sup -6] monolayers, and found a strong correlation between the laser fluence that can cause emission and the strength of the bond by which the emitted atoms are bound

  9. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyirenda, A.N., E-mail: anyirenda@gmail.com; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-04-15

    It is known that when α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  10. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al2O3:C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, A. N.; Chithambo, M. L.

    2017-04-01

    It is known that when α-Al2O3:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al2O3:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450-650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  11. Arabidopsis ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 is involved in nitrogen starvation-induced anthocyanin accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yan Wang; Ju Yang; Chunli Ma; Ying Zhang; Ting Ge; Zhi Qi; Yan Kang

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin accumulation is a common phenom-enon seen in plants under environmental stress. In this study, we identified a new allele of ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 (RHD3) showing an anthocyanin overaccumulation phenotype under nitrogen starvation conditions. It is known that ethylene negatively regulates light- and sucrose-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis. We hypothesized that RHD3 achieves its negative effect on anthocyanin biosynthesis via an ethylene-regulating pathway. In support of this, similar to rhd3 mutants, the Arabidopsis ethylene signaling mutants etr1, ein2, and ein3/eil1 showed an anthocyanin overaccumulation phenotype under nitrogen starvation conditions. The ethylene precursor ACC strongly suppressed anthocyanin accumulation, dependent on ETR1, EIN2, EIN3/EIL1, and, partially, RHD3. In addition, inactivating RHD3 partially reversed the suppressive effect of ETO1 inactivation-evoked endogenous ethylene production on anthocyanin accumulation. The expression of nitrogen starva-tion-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis genes was negatively regulated by RHD3, but ethylene response genes were positively regulated by RHD3. Wild-type seedlings overexpress-ing RHD3 showed similar phenotypes to rhd3 mutants, indicating the existence of a fine-tuned relationship between gene expression and function. RHD3 was initial y identified as a gene involved in root hair development. This study uncovered a new physiological function of RHD3 in nitrogen starvation-induced anthocyanin accumulation and ethylene homeostasis. Correction added on 6 August 2015, after first online publica-tion:“RND3”corrected to“RHD3”.

  12. Destruction-polymerization transformations as a source of radiation-induced extended defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42200, Czestochowa (Poland); Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, SRC ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, SRC ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, SRC ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Department of Semiconductor Electronics, Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandery str. 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2013-01-15

    Long-wave shift of the optical transmission spectrum in the region of fundamental optical absorption edge is registered for As{sub 2}S{sub 3} chalcogenide glassy semiconductors after {gamma}-irradiation. This effect is explained in the frameworks of the destruction-polymerization transformations concept by accepting the switching of the heteropolar As-S covalent bonds into homopolar As-As ones. It is assumed that (As{sub 4}{sup +}; S{sub 1}{sup -}) defect pairs are created under such switching. Formula to calculate content of the induced defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors is proposed. It is assumed that defects concentration depends on energy of broken covalent bond, bond-switching energy balance, correlation energy, optical band-gap and energy of excitation light. It is shown that theoretically calculated maximally possible content of radiation-induced defects in As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is about 1.6% while concentration of native defects is negligible. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  14. Cascades of genetic instability resulting from compromised break-induced replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumini Vasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Break-induced replication (BIR is a mechanism to repair double-strand breaks (DSBs that possess only a single end that can find homology in the genome. This situation can result from the collapse of replication forks or telomere erosion. BIR frequently produces various genetic instabilities including mutations, loss of heterozygosity, deletions, duplications, and template switching that can result in copy-number variations (CNVs. An important type of genomic rearrangement specifically linked to BIR is half-crossovers (HCs, which result from fusions between parts of recombining chromosomes. Because HC formation produces a fused molecule as well as a broken chromosome fragment, these events could be highly destabilizing. Here we demonstrate that HC formation results from the interruption of BIR caused by a damaged template, defective replisome or premature onset of mitosis. Additionally, we document that checkpoint failure promotes channeling of BIR into half-crossover-initiated instability cascades (HCC that resemble cycles of non-reciprocal translocations (NRTs previously described in human tumors. We postulate that HCs represent a potent source of genetic destabilization with significant consequences that mimic those observed in human diseases, including cancer.

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E. Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R.; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects. STUDY DESIGN A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. RESULTS Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin

  16. Spectroscopic Signatures of Defect-Induced Pair Breaking in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.; Onellion, M.; Margaritondo, G.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Forró, L.; Grioni, M.

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the effect of disorder on the spectral properties of the high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x. We find that small defect densities, in the low 10-3 range, already suppress the characteristic spectral signature of the superconducting state, while new excitations appear within the gap. We conclude that, due to defect-induced pair breaking, superconducting pairs and normal carriers coexist below Tc. At higher levels of disorder the normal state is also strongly affected, and the quasiparticle features progressively smeared out.

  17. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-04-01

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  18. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent [Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université de Saint Etienne, Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire; Quey, Romain [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, CNRS, UMR5307, Laboratoire Georges Friedel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-04-28

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  19. Anomalous diffusion of isoelectronic antimony implant induced defects in GaAs-AlGaAs multiquantum well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, E. V. K.; Krauz, Ph.; Thibierge, H.; Azoulay, R.; Vieu, C.

    1994-03-01

    We present here evidence on the deep diffusion of isoelectronic Sb implant induced defects in thick GaAs-AlGaAs multiquantum well structures (MQW) to depths as far as ˜30 times the implant projected range (Rp). This observation has been confirmed by performing low temperature photoluminescence depth scanning measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) analysis on room temperature Sb implanted thick MQW samples. An explanation based on the isoelectronic nature of Sb and its substitution on As site (SbAs) has been proposed to understand the anomalous diffusion of defects during implant and their contribution to Al/Ga disordering during post-implant annealing.

  20. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  1. Repairing critical-sized calvarial defects with BMSCs modified by a constitutively active form of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and a phosphate cement scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Zhang, Zhiyuan; He, Jiacai; Zhu, Siheng; Wang, Shaoyi; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Jian; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Yan; Wang, Yuanyin; Han, Wei; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Shuhong; You, Sulan; Jiang, Xinquan; Huang, Yuanliang

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy represents a promising approach for bone regeneration. The Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) gene is a pivotal regulator of vascular reactivity and angiogenesis. Our recent study has showed that HIF-1α could promote osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) using a gene point mutant technique. To optimize the function of HIF-1α on inducing stem cells, another constitutively active form of HIF-1α (CA5) was constructed with truncation mutant method and its therapeutic potential on critical-sized bone defects was evaluated with calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) scaffold in a rat model. BMSCs were treated with Lenti (lentivirus) -CA5, Lenti-WT (wild-type HIF-1α), and Lenti-LacZ. These genetically modified BMSCs were then combined with CMPC scaffolds to repair critical-sized calvarial defects in rats. The results showed that the overexpression of HIF-1α obviously enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of osteogenic markers in vitro and robust new bone formation with the higher local bone mineral density (BMD) was found in vivo in the CA5 and WT groups. Furthermore, CA5 showed significantly greater stability and osteogenic activity in BMSCs compared with WT. These data suggest that BMSCs transduced with truncation mutanted HIF-1α gene can promote the overexpression of osteogenic markers. CMPC could serve as a potential substrate for HIF-1α gene modified tissue engineered bone to repair critical sized bony defects.

  2. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  3. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-03-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+. A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+-content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations.

  4. Green tea polyphenols rescue of brain defects induced by overexpression of DYRK1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Guedj

    Full Text Available Individuals with partial HSA21 trisomies and mice with partial MMU16 trisomies containing an extra copy of the DYRK1A gene present various alterations in brain morphogenesis. They present also learning impairments modeling those encountered in Down syndrome. Previous MRI and histological analyses of a transgenic mice generated using a human YAC construct that contains five genes including DYRK1A reveal that DYRK1A is involved, during development, in the control of brain volume and cell density of specific brain regions. Gene dosage correction induces a rescue of the brain volume alterations. DYRK1A is also involved in the control of synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Increased gene dosage results in brain morphogenesis defects, low BDNF levels and mnemonic deficits in these mice. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG - a member of a natural polyphenols family, found in great amount in green tea leaves - is a specific and safe DYRK1A inhibitor. We maintained control and transgenic mice overexpressing DYRK1A on two different polyphenol-based diets, from gestation to adulthood. The major features of the transgenic phenotype were rescued in these mice.

  5. Defects induced magnetization in B-doped ZnFeO dilute magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, Murtaza, E-mail: murtaza.saleem@lums.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Syed Babar Ali School of Science and Engineering (SBASSE), Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Opposite Sector U, D.H.A. Lahore 54792 (Pakistan); Sabieh Anwar, M., E-mail: sabieh@lums.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Syed Babar Ali School of Science and Engineering (SBASSE), Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Opposite Sector U, D.H.A. Lahore 54792 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Asif, E-mail: ahayat@ksu.edu.sa [Chemical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Atiq, Shahid, E-mail: shahidatiqpasrur@yahoo.com [Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Ramay, Shahid M., E-mail: schaudhry@ksu.edu.sa [Physics and Astronomy Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Siddiqi, Saadat A., E-mail: saadat.anwar@gmail.com [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-05-15

    Zn{sub 0.95−x}Fe{sub 0.05}B{sub x}O (x=0, 0.05) nano-particles have been synthesized using a modified chemically derived citrate gel method. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates the wurtzite type hexagonal structure belonging to P6{sub 3}mc space group without the presence of any secondary phase in both compositions. The Diffraction analysis shows that Fe{sup 2+} and B{sup 3+} ions have replaced some of the Zn{sup 2+} ions while some occupy un-detectable interstitial and inter-granular positions inside the structure. Scanning electron micrographs obtained using scanning electron microscopy show typical smaller size of particles in B-doped composition. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity analysis shows the semiconducting characteristics of the compositions and that doping of Fe and B up to 10 at% does not change the electrical behavior of the host material. Magnetic measurements display room temperature ferromagnetism in both compositions with enhanced magnetization in B-doped composition associated with defect induced magnetic mechanism belonging to intrinsically augmented interstitial and inter-granular effects.

  6. Radiation-induced defects in strontium carbonate rod for EPR dosimetry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, M. A. H.; Abdel-Fattah, A. A.; Soliman, Y. S.

    2017-02-01

    The radiation-induced defects in strontium carbonate (SrCO3) rod dosimeter in the dose range of 2.5 Gy-25 kGy was investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. The EPR spectra of γ-irradiated strontium carbonate (SC) rods exhibit a strong EPR signal with the spectroscopic splitting g-factor 2.008 and a weak signal at g-factor 2.003. This signal increases with increasing irradiation dose. The dose-response function has a good linearity in the low dose range of 2.5-500 Gy and slight sub-linearity in the high dose range of 0.5-25 kGy. The dosimeter is nearly humidity independent in the level of 33-77% relative humidity during irradiation. The temperature coefficient of the dose-response function is 0.22% per °C in the temperature range of 20-40 °C. The rod dosimeter exhibits a maximum deviation from water equivalency by 7% in the energy range of 0.3-5 MeV. The overall uncertainty of dose determination using SC dosimeter is 5.2% and 4.54% (2σ) for low and high dose range, respectively.

  7. Genomic DNA hypomethylation is associated with neural tube defects induced by methotrexate inhibition of folate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuwei Wang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is thought to be involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs. However, the exact mechanism between DNA methylation and NTDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the change of methylation in mouse model of NTDs associated with folate dysmetabolism by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, microarray, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Real time quantitative PCR. Results showed that NTD neural tube tissues had lower concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF, P = 0.005, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF, P = 0.040, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, P = 0.004 and higher concentrations of folic acid (P = 0.041, homocysteine (Hcy, P = 0.006 and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, P = 0.045 compared to control. Methylation levels of genomic DNA decreased significantly in the embryonic neural tube tissue of NTD samples. 132 differentially methylated regions (35 low methylated regions and 97 high methylated regions were selected by microarray. Two genes (Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt signal pathway demonstrated lower methylated regions (peak and higher expression in NTDs (P<0.05; P<0.05. Results suggest that DNA hypomethylation was one of the possible epigenetic variations correlated with the occurrence of NTDs induced by folate dysmetabolism and that Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt pathway may be candidate genes for NTDs.

  8. Genomic DNA hypomethylation is associated with neural tube defects induced by methotrexate inhibition of folate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Chen, Yan; Dong, Yanting; Niu, Yuhu; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is thought to be involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the exact mechanism between DNA methylation and NTDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the change of methylation in mouse model of NTDs associated with folate dysmetabolism by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS), liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), microarray, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Real time quantitative PCR. Results showed that NTD neural tube tissues had lower concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF, P = 0.005), 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF, P = 0.040), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, P = 0.004) and higher concentrations of folic acid (P = 0.041), homocysteine (Hcy, P = 0.006) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, P = 0.045) compared to control. Methylation levels of genomic DNA decreased significantly in the embryonic neural tube tissue of NTD samples. 132 differentially methylated regions (35 low methylated regions and 97 high methylated regions) were selected by microarray. Two genes (Siah1b, Prkx) in Wnt signal pathway demonstrated lower methylated regions (peak) and higher expression in NTDs (P<0.05; P<0.05). Results suggest that DNA hypomethylation was one of the possible epigenetic variations correlated with the occurrence of NTDs induced by folate dysmetabolism and that Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt pathway may be candidate genes for NTDs.

  9. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in burn-in stressed power VDMOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorić-Veljković Snežana M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The annealing of radiation-induced defects in burn-in stressed n-channel power VDMOSFETs with thick gate oxides (100 and 120 nm is analysed. In comparison with the previous spontaneous recovery, the changes of device electrical parameters observed during annealing are highlighted by the elevated temperature and voltage applied to the gate, and are more pronounced in devices with a 120 nm thick gate oxide. The threshold voltage of VDMOSFETs with a 100 nm thick gate oxide during annealing has an initially slow growth, but then increases rapidly and reaches the value higher than the pre-irradiation one (rebound effect. In the case of devices with a 120 nm thick gate oxide, the threshold voltage behaviour also consists of a slight initial increase followed by a rapid, but dilatory increase, with an obvious tendency to achieve the rebound. The changes of channel carrier mobility during annealing are similar in all samples: at first, it slowly and then rapidly declines, and after reaching the minimum it begins to increase. In the case of VDMOSFETs with a thicker gate oxide, these changes are much slower. The underlying changes in the densities of gate oxide-trapped charge and interface traps are also delayed in devices with a thicker gate oxide. All these phenomena occur with certain delay in burn-in stressed devices compared to unstressed ones. The leading role in the mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena is attributed to hydrogen related species.

  10. Direct test of defect-mediated laser-induced melting theory for two-dimensional solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Debasish; Sengupta, Surajit

    2006-01-01

    We investigate by direct numerical solution of appropriate renormalization flow equations the validity of a recent dislocation unbinding theory for laser-induced freezing and melting in two dimensions. The bare elastic moduli and dislocation fugacities are obtained for three different two-dimensional systems namely, the hard disk, inverse 12th power, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potentials. A restricted Monte Carlo simulation sampling only configurations without dislocations is used to obtain these quantities. These are then used as inputs to the flow equations. Numerical solution of the flow equations then yields the phase diagrams. We conclude that (a) the flow equations need to be correct at least up to third order in defect fugacity to reproduce meaningful results, (b) there is excellent quantitative agreement between our results and earlier conventional Monte Carlo simulations for the hard disk system, and (c) while the qualitative form of the phase diagram is reproduced for systems with soft potentials there is some quantitative discrepancy which we explain.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibition reduces hypothyroidism-induced neurodevelopmental defects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Mohan, Vishwa; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Chagtoo, Megha; Godbole, Madan M

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) through its receptor (TRα/β) influences spatio-temporal regulation of its target gene repertoire during brain development. Though hypothyroidism in WT rodent models of perinatal hypothyroidism severely impairs neurodevelopment, its effect on TRα/β knockout mice is less severe. An explanation to this paradox is attributed to a possible repressive action of unliganded TRs during development. Since unliganded TRs suppress gene expression through the recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDACs) via co-repressor complexes, we tested whether pharmacological inhibition of HDACs may prevent the effects of hypothyroidism on brain development. Using valproate, an HDAC inhibitor, we show that HDAC inhibition significantly blocks the deleterious effects of hypothyroidism on rat cerebellum, evident by recovery of TH target genes like Bdnf, Pcp2 and Mbp as well as improved dendritic structure of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Together with this, HDAC inhibition also rescues hypothyroidism-induced motor and cognitive defects. This study therefore provides an insight into the role of HDACs in TH insufficiency during neurodevelopment and their inhibition as a possible therapeutics for treatment.

  12. Maternal and infant genetic variants, maternal periconceptional use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and risk of congenital heart defects in offspring: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Wendy N; Tang, Xinyu; Hu, Zhuopei; MacLeod, Stewart; Stowe, Zachary; Webber, Daniel

    2017-03-06

    Objective To evaluate whether the association between maternal periconceptional use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and increased risk of congenital heart defects in offspring is modified by maternal or infant genetic variants in folate, homocysteine, or transsulfuration pathways.Design Population based study. DNA from mothers, fathers, and infants was genotyped with an Illumina GoldenGate custom single nucleotide polymorphism panel. A hybrid design based on a log linear model was used to calculate relative risks and Bayesian false discovery probabilities (BFDP) to identify polymorphisms associated with congenital heart defects modified by SSRI use.Data sources Data from the US National Birth Defects Prevention Study on 1180 liveborn infants with congenital heart defects and 1644 controls, born 1997-2008.Main outcome measures Cases included infants with selected congenital heart defects and control infants had no major defects. SSRI use was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers.Results For women who reported taking SSRIs periconceptionally, maternal SHMT1 (rs9909104) GG and AGgenotypes were associated with a 5.9 and 2.4 increased risk of select congenital heart defects in offspring, respectively, versus the AA genotype (BFDP=0.69). Compared with the AA genotype, BHMT (rs492842 and rs542852) GG and AG genotypes were associated with twice the riskof congenital heart defects (BFDP=0.74 and 0.79, respectively). MGST1 (rs2075237) CC and ACgenotypes were associated with an increased risk compared with the GG genotype (8.0 and 2.8, respectively; BFDP=0.79). Single nucleotide polymorphism in infant genes in the folate (MTHFS rs12438477), homocysteine (TRDMT1 rs6602178 and GNMT rs11752813) and transsulfuration (GSTP1 rs7941395 and MGST1 rs7294985) pathways were also associated with an increased risk of congenital heart defects.Conclusions Common maternal or infant genetic variants in folate, homocysteine, or transsulfuration pathways are

  13. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Scott J.; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation. PMID:26976437

  14. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Neal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation.

  15. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Scott J; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C; Butcher, Rebecca A; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-05-03

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation.

  16. Bax-induced apoptosis shortens the life span of DNA repair defect Ku70-knockout mice by inducing emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palmer, James; Bates, Adam; Poventud-Fuentes, Izmarie; Wong, Kelvin; Ngo, Justine; Matsuyama, Mieko

    2016-06-01

    Cells with DNA damage undergo apoptosis or cellular senescence if the damage cannot be repaired. Recent studies highlight that cellular senescence plays a major role in aging. However, age-associated diseases, including emphysema and neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells and neurons, respectively. Therefore, enhanced apoptosis also promotes aging and shortens the life span depending on the cell type. Recently, we reported that ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(-) (/) (-) and ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/) (-) mice showed significantly extended life span in comparison with ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/+) mice. Ku70 is essential for non-homologous end joining pathway for DNA double strand break repair, and Bax plays an important role in apoptosis. Our study suggests that Bax-induced apoptosis has a significant impact on shortening the life span of ku70(-) (/) (-) mice, which are defective in one of DNA repair pathways. The lung alveolar space gradually enlarges during aging, both in mouse and human, and this age-dependent change results in the decrease of respiration capacity during aging that can lead to emphysema in more severe cases. We found that emphysema occurred in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice at the age of three-months old, and that Bax deficiency was able to suppress it. These results suggest that Bax-mediated apoptosis induces emphysema in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice. We also found that the number of cells, including bronchiolar epithelial cells and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, shows a higher DNA double strand break damage response in ku70 KO mouse lung than in wild type. Recent studies suggest that non-homologous end joining activity decreases with increased age in mouse and rat model. Together, we hypothesize that the decline of Ku70-dependent DNA repair activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells is one of the causes of age-dependent decline of lung function resulting from excess Bax-mediated apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells (and their

  17. Genetic association studies in drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ann K; Day, Chris P

    2009-11-01

    Genetic studies on drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have proved challenging, both because of their rarity and their difficulty in replicating observed effects. However, significant progress has now been achieved by both candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies. These two approaches are considered in detail, together with examples of DILI due to specific drugs where consistent associations have been reported. Particular consideration is given to associations between antituberculosis drug-related liver injury and the "slow acetylator" genotype for N-acetyltransferase 2, amoxicillin/clavulanate-related liver injury, and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1*1501 allele and flucloxacillin-related injury and the HLA class I B*5701 allele. Although these associations are drug-specific, the possibility that additional, more general susceptibility genes for DILI exist requires further investigation, ideally by genome-wide association studies involving international collaboration. The possibility of interethnic variation in susceptibility to DILI also requires further study.

  18. Beryllium-Induced Hypersensitivity: Genetic Susceptibility and Neoantigen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Falta, Michael T; Kappler, John W; Dai, Shaodong; McKee, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic beryllium (Be) disease is a granulomatous lung disorder that results from Be exposure in a genetically susceptible host. The disease is characterized by the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4(+) T cells in the lung, and genetic susceptibility is primarily linked to HLA-DPB1 alleles possessing a glutamic acid at position 69 of the β-chain. Recent structural analysis of a Be-specific TCR interacting with a Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide complex revealed that Be is coordinated by amino acid residues derived from the HLA-DP2 β-chain and peptide and showed that the TCR does not directly interact with the Be(2+) cation. Rather, the TCR recognizes a modified HLA-DP2-peptide complex with charge and conformational changes. Collectively, these findings provide a structural basis for the development of this occupational lung disease through the ability of Be to induce posttranslational modifications in preexisting HLA-DP2-peptide complexes, resulting in the creation of neoantigens.

  19. Rap1 overexpression reveals that activated RasD induces separable defects during Dictyostelium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S A; Weeks, G; Spiegelman, G B

    1997-10-15

    One of the Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD, is expressed preferentially in prestalk cells at the slug stage of development and overexpression of this gene containing a G12T activating mutation causes the formation of aberrant multitipped aggregates that are blocked from further development (Reymond et al., 1986, Nature, 323, 340-343). The ability of the Dictyostelium rap1 gene to suppress this abnormal developmental phenotype was investigated. The rap1 gene and G12V activated and G10V negative mutant forms of the rap1 gene were independently linked to the rasD promoter and each construct used to transform M1, a Dictyostelium cell line expressing RasD[G12T]. Transformants of M1 that expressed Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] protein still formed multitipped aggregates, but most tips were able to complete development and form fruiting bodies. Cell lines showing this modified phenotype were designated ME (multitipped escape). The rap1[G10V] construct did not modify the M1 phenotype. These data suggest that overexpression of RasD[G12T] has two effects, the formation of a multitipped aggregate and a block in subsequent differentiation and that the expression of Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] reverses only the latter. Differentiation of ME cells in low density monolayers showed the identical low level of stalk and spore cell formation seen for M1 cells under the same conditions. Thus the cell autonomous defect in monolayer differentiation induced in the M1 strain was not corrected in the ME strain. Cell type-specific gene expression during the development of M1 cells is dramatically altered: prestalk cell-specific gene expression is greatly enhanced, whereas prespore-specific gene expression is almost suppressed (Louis et al., 1997, Mol. Biol. Cell, 8, 303-312). During the development of ME cells, ecmA mRNA levels were restored to those seen for Ax3, and tagB mRNA levels were also markedly reduced, although not to Ax3 levels. cotC expression in ME cells was enhanced severalfold relative to M1

  20. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Mizushima, Yoriko [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kim, Youngsuk [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Disco Corporation, Ota, Tokyo 143-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Tomoji [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); Ohba, Takayuki [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  1. Nonradiative recombination due to Ar implantation induced point defects in GaInN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Torsten; Pietscher, Hans-Georg; Joenen, Holger; Rossow, Uwe; Bremers, Heiko; Hangleiter, Andreas [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany); Menzel, Dirk [Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We quantitatively investigate nonradiative recombination at point defects via temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy on argon implanted MOVPE-grown GaInN/GaN single quantum wells (QW). An implantation dose dependent (doses: 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) reduction of nonradiative lifetimes from several nanoseconds (unimplanted sample) to less than 100 ps at room temperature is observed. This shortening of nonradiative lifetimes is attributed to nonradiative recombination due to increased implantation induced defect densities. An effective hole capture coefficient can be estimated to about 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} via the measured nonradiative lifetimes and simulated (SRIM) defect densities. The thermal stability of the defects is analyzed using rapid thermal annealing at 800 {sup circle} C in order to recover the crystal from implantation damage. At high temperatures, nonradiative recombination in the barriers becomes dominant: defect density dependent losses with an activation energy equal to half the difference between the GaN band gap and the peak position of the QW luminescence are observed.

  2. Administration with Bushenkangshuai Tang alleviates UV irradiation- and oxidative stress-induced lifespan defects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi RUI; Qin LU; Dayong WANG

    2009-01-01

    During normal metabolism, oxidative bypro-ducts will inevitably generate and damage molecules thereby impairing their biological functions, including the is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used for clini-cally treating premature ovarian failure. In the present study, BT administration at high concentrations signifi-cantly increased lifespan, slowed aging-related decline, and delayed accumulation of aging-related cellular damage in wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. BT admin-istration could further largely alleviate the aging defects induced by UV and oxidative stresses, and BT administra-tion at different concentrations could largely rescue the aging defects in mev-1 mutant animals. The protective effects of BT administration on aging process were at least partially dependent on the Ins/IGF-like signaling pathway. Moreover, BT administration at different concentrations obviously altered the expression patterns of antioxidant genes and suppressed the severe stress responses induced by UV and oxidative stresses, suggesting that BT-induced tolerance to UV or oxidative stress might result from reactive oxygen species scavenging. BT administration during development was not necessarily a requirement for UV and oxidative stress resistance, and the concentrations of administrated BT examined were not toxic for nematodes. Therefore, BT administration could effectively retrieve the aging defects induced by UV irradiation and oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

  3. Irradiation induced defects in deformed $Ni_{3}Ge$ and $Ni_{3}Al$ single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Murakumo, T; Miyahara, A; Hannuki, T; Sato, A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of plastic deformation on the formation of point defects and defect clusters by electron irradiation has been studied in Ll /sub 2/ ordered Ni/sub 3/Ge and Ni/sub 3/Al by high voltage electron microscopy. It is found that defects are formed preferentially along the Burgers vector directions as linear lines and grow into linear chains of clusters by electron irradiation. This phenomenon is explained by preferential generation of the defects along the antiphase boundary (APE) tubes, in specimens deformed both below and above the peak temperature T/sub p/. Based on three-dimensional analyses of the defect distribution, the formation mechanism of the APE tubes is discussed with particular reference to superdislocation motion and the strengthening of the Ll/sub 2/ ordered compounds of Ni /sub 3/Ge and Ni/sub 3/Al. (44 refs).

  4. Defect-induced phase transition in the asymmetric simple exclusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Johannes; Popkov, Vladislav; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We reconsider the long-standing question of the critical defect hopping rate r c in the one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with a slow bond (defect). For r queuing at the defect site, whereas for r≥ rc the defect site, has only local effects on the stationary state of the homogeneous system. Mean-field theory predicts r_c=1 (when hopping rates outside the defect bond are equal to 1) but numerical investigations seem to indicate rc ≈ 0.80 (2) . Here we improve the numerics to show that r c > 0.99 and give strong evidence that indeed r_c=1 as predicted by mean-field theory, and anticipated by recent theoretical findings.

  5. Heavy-ion induced genetic changes and evolution processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.; Mei, M.

    1994-01-01

    On Moon and Mars, there will be more galactic cosmic rays and higher radiation doses than on Earth. Our experimental studies showed that heavy ion radiation can effectively cause mutation and chromosome aberrations and that high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) heavy-ion induced mutants can be irreversible. Chromosome translocations and deletions are common in cells irradiated by heavy particles, and ionizing radiations are effective in causing hyperploidy. The importance of the genetic changes in the evolution of life is an interesting question. Through evolution, there is an increase of DNA content in cells from lower forms of life to higher organisms. The DNA content, however, reached a plateau in vertebrates. By increasing DNA content, there can be an increase of information in the cell. For a given DNA content, the quality of information can be changed by rearranging the DNA. Because radiation can cause hyperploidy, an increase of DNA content in cells, and can induce DNA rearrangement, it is likely that the evolution of life on Mars will be effected by its radiation environment. A simple analysis shows that the radiation level on Mars may cause a mutation frequency comparable to that of the spontaneous mutation rate on Earth. To the extent that mutation plays a role in adaptation, radiation alone on Mars may thus provide sufficient mutation for the evolution of life.

  6. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candito, Mirande; Rivet, Romain; Herbeth, Bernard; Boisson, Catherine; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Luton, Dominique; Journel, Hubert; Oury, Jean-François; Roux, François; Saura, Robert; Vernhet, Isabelle; Gaucherand, Pascal; Muller, Françoise; Guidicelli, Béatrice; Heckenroth, Hélène; Poulain, Patrice; Blayau, Martine; Francannet, Christine; Roszyk, Laurence; Brustié, Cécile; Staccini, Pascal; Gérard, Philippe; Fillion-Emery, Nathalie; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations due to failure of neural tube formation in early pregnancy. The proof that folic acid prevents NTDs raises the question of whether other parts of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism may affect rates of NTDs. This French case-control study covered: 77 women aged 17-42 years sampled prior to elective abortion for a severe NTDs (cases) and 61 women aged 20-43 years with a normal pregnancy. Plasma and erythrocyte folate, plasma B6, B12 and Hcy were tested as five polymorphisms MTHFR 677 C --> T, MTHFR 1298 A --> C, MTR 2756 A --> G, MTTR 66 A --> G and TCN2 776 C --> G. Cases had significantly lower erythrocyte folate, plasma folate, B12 and B6 concentrations than the controls, and higher Hcy concentration. The odds ratio was 2.15 (95% CI: 1.00-4.59) for women with the MTRR 66 A --> G allele and it was decreased for mothers carrying the MTHFR 1298 A --> C allele. In multivariate analysis, only the erythrocyte folate concentration (P = 0.005) and plasma B6 concentration (P = 0.020) were predictors. Red cell folate is the main determinant of NTDs in France. Folic acid supplement or flour fortification would prevent most cases. Increased consumption of vitamins B12 and B6 could contribute to the prevention of NTDs. Genetic polymorphisms played only a small role. Until folic acid fortification becomes mandatory, all women of reproductive age should consume folic acid in a multivitamin that also contains B12 and B6.

  7. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajihara, Koichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Skuja, Linards [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga iela 8, LV1063 Riga (Latvia); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory and Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  8. Extended free-volume defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors induced by high-energy {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, Valentina [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC (Ukraine); State University of Vital Activity Safety, Lviv 79007 (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek; Shpotyuk, Oleh [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2009-08-15

    It was shown that under-coordinated topological defects induced by high-energy {gamma}-irradiation can be a reason for significant changes in positron annihilation lifetime spectra of multicomponent chalcogenide glassy semiconductors within ternary Ge-As(Sb)-S systems. In the case of negatively-charged sulphur and arsenic atoms, the excess of free volume is quite enough to produce additional input in the second defect-related channel of positron trapping, while under-coordinated germanium atoms are practically non-detectable with this technique because of low associated free volume. Despite radiation-induced densification, the average positron lifetime demonstrate both growing and decaying tendencies after {gamma}-irradiation depending on glass composition. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Brett, E-mail: brett.hallam@unsw.edu.au; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, Level 1 Tyree Energy Technologies Building, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-14

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation.

  10. Topology-induced anomalous defect production by crossing a quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, A; Patanè, D; Amico, L; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2009-04-03

    We study the influence of topology on the quench dynamics of a system driven across a quantum critical point. We show how the appearance of certain edge states, which fully characterize the topology of the system, dramatically modifies the process of defect production during the crossing of the critical point. Interestingly enough, the density of defects is no longer described by the Kibble-Zurek scaling, but determined instead by the nonuniversal topological features of the system. Edge states are shown to be robust against defect production, which highlights their topological nature.

  11. Osteogenic Effects of Dedifferentiated Fat Cell Transplantation in Rabbit Models of Bone Defect and Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuta, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kazama, Minako; Kano, Koichiro; Ryu, Junnosuke; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Taro

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells have a high proliferative activity and the potential to differentiate into lineages of mesenchymal tissue similar to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we examined the effects of autologous DFAT cell transplantation on bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model. The formation of tissue-engineered bone (TEB) was obser...

  12. Model for Electron-Beam-Induced Current Analysis of mc-Si Addressing Defect Contrast Behavior in Heavily Contaminated PV Material: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrey, H.; Gorman, B.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2012-06-01

    Much work has been done to correlate electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) contrast behavior of extended defects with the character and degree of impurity decoration. However, existing models fail to account for recently observed contrast behavior of defects in heavily contaminated mc-Si PV cells. We have observed large increases in defect contrast with decreasing temperature for all electrically active defects, regardless of their initial contrast signatures at ambient temperature. This negates the usefulness of the existing models in identifying defect character and levels of impurity decoration based on the temperature dependence of the contrast behavior. By considering the interactions of transition metal impurities with the silicon lattice and extended defects, we attempt to provide an explanation for these observations. Our findings will enhance the ability of the PV community to understand and mitigate the effects of these types of defects as the adoption of increasingly lower purity feedstocks for mc-Si PV production continues.

  13. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  14. Genetic backgrounds and modifier genes of NTD mouse models: An opportunity for greater understanding of the multifactorial etiology of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Renee Y M; Singh, Parmveer; McDermid, Heather E

    2016-10-21

    Neurulation, the early embryonic process of forming the presumptive brain and spinal cord, is highly complex and involves hundreds of genes in multiple genetic pathways. Mice have long served as a genetic model for studying human neurulation, and the resulting neural tube defects (NTDs) that arise when neurulation is disrupted. Because mice appear to show mostly single gene inheritance for NTDs and humans show multifactorial inheritance, mice sometimes have been characterized as a simpler model for the identification and study of NTD genes. But are they a simple model? When viewed on different genetic backgrounds, many genes show significant variation in the penetrance and expressivity of NTD phenotypes, suggesting the presence of modifier loci that interact with the target gene to affect the phenotypic expression. Looking at mutations on different genetic backgrounds provides us with an opportunity to explore these complex genetic interactions, which are likely to better emulate similar processes in human neurulation. Here, we review NTD genes known to show strain-specific phenotypic variation. We focus particularly on the gene Cecr2, which is studied using both a hypomorphic and a presumptive null mutation on two different backgrounds: one susceptible (BALB/c) and one resistant (FVB/N) to NTDs. This strain difference has led to a search for genetic modifiers within a region on murine chromosome 19. Understanding how genetic variants alter the phenotypic outcome in NTD mouse models will help to direct future studies in humans, particularly now that more genome wide sequencing approaches are being used. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nickel sulfate induces numerous defects in Caenorhabditis elegans that can also be transferred to progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dayong [Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Ministry of Education (China)], E-mail: dayongw@seu.edu.cn; Wang Yang [Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Disease, Ministry of Education (China)

    2008-02-15

    Whether the multiple biological toxicities from nickel exposure could be transferred to progeny has not been clarified. In this report, we explored the Caenorhabditis elegans to analyze the multiple toxicities of nickel and their possibly transferable properties. The nickel toxicity caused multiple biological defects in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, most of these toxicities could be transferred and could be only partially rescued in progeny. Some specific phenotypes in progeny were also found to exhibit no obvious rescue phenotypes or to show even more severe defects than their parents. The defects caused by nickel exposure could be classified into four groups according to their transferring properties. That is, the defects caused by nickel exposure could be largely, or partially, or unable to be rescued, or became even more severe in progeny animals. Therefore, most of the nickel exposure-caused defects can be transferred from parents to their progeny to different degrees in C. elegans. - Nickel exposure can cause multi-biological toxicities and these defects can be transferred from parents to their progeny in C. elegans.

  16. Unexpected properties of the inductively coupled plasma induced defect in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, S.M.M., E-mail: sergio@up.ac.za; Auret, F.D.; Janse van Rensburg, P.J.; Nel, J.M.

    2014-04-15

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of germanium introduces a single defect, the E{sub 0.31} electron trap, for a large range of argon partial pressures from 4×10{sup –3} to 6.5×10{sup –4} mbar that correspond to ion energies of 8 to 60 eV. Ge of three crystallographic orientations, (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1), treated with 20 and 60 eV ICP had defect concentration profiles that were similar in appearance, with a maximum concentration of 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} extending more than a µm into the material, approximately three orders of magnitude deeper than what TRIM simulations predicted. All profiles were measured using Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (L-DLTS), a technique that is sensitive to defect concentrations as low as 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}. Isochronal annealing of samples showed concentration curves broadening after a 400 K anneal and decreasing to the 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} level after a 450 K anneal. Unannealed samples measured after a year exhibited similar decreases in defect concentration without broadening of their profiles. A 550 K anneal lowered the defect concentration to levels below the L-DLTS detection limit. Thereafter additional plasma treatment of the surface failed to reintroduce this defect indicating that the structure required for the formation of E{sub 0.31} was no longer present in the region under observation.

  17. Phenotypic and Behavioral Defects Induced by Iron Exposure Can Be Transferred to Progeny in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YA-OU HU; YANG WANG; BO-PING YE; DA-YONG WANG

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has showed that excess iron accumulation is harmful to reproduction and even promotes death;however,whether the multiple biological toxicity of iron (Fe) exposure could be transferred to progeny remains unknown.The present study used Caenorhabditis elegans to analyze the multiple toxicities of iron exposure and their possible transferable properties.Methods Three concentrations of iron sulfate solution (2.5μmol/L,75μmol/L,and 200 lamol/L) were used.The endpoints of lifespan,body size,generation time,brood size,head thrash and body bend frequencies,and chemotaxis plasticity were selected to investigate Fe toxicity and its effect on progeny in Caenorhabditis elegans.Results The Fe toxicity could cause multiple biological defects in a dose-dependent manner by affecting different endpoints in nematodes.Most of the multiple biological defects and behavior toxicities could be transferred from Fe-exposed Caenorhabditis elegans to their progeny.Compared to the parents,no recovery phenotypes were observed for some of the defects in the progeny,such as body bend frequency and life span.We further summarized the defects caused by Fe exposure into 2 groups according to their transferable properties.Conclusion Our results suggest that Fe exposure could cause multiple biological defects,and most of these severe defects could be transferred from Fe exposed nematodes to their progeny.

  18. Genetic improvement of Trichoderma ability to induce systemic resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ciliento R; Mach R L; Lorito M; Woo S L; Di Benedetto P; Ruocco M; Scala F; Soriente I; Ferraioli S; Brunner K; Zeilinger S

    2004-01-01

    @@ The beneficial applications of Trichoderma spp. in agriculture include not only the control of plant pathogens, but also the improvement of plant growth, micronutrient availability, and plant tolerance to abiotic stress. In addition, it has been suggested that these fungi are able to increase plant disease resistance by activating induced systemic resistance (ISR) . The mode of action of these beneficial fungi in the Trichoderma -plant-pathogen interaction are many, complex and not completely understood. Numerous lytic enzymes have been characterized, the encoding genes (ech42 gluc78,nag1 from T. atroviride strain P1) cloned, and their role in biocontrol demonstrated. The corresponding biocontrol-related inducible promoters have been used in a reporter system based on the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase gene (goxA) to monitor biocontrol activity. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxygen-dependent oxidation of D-glucose to D-glucono-1, 5-lactone and hydrogen peroxide; this latter compound is known to have an antifungal effect and activate the plant defence cascade, thus increasing resistance to pathogen attack. T. atroviride P1 transformants with various promoters gox were tested as seed coating treatments on bean seeds planted in soil infested with a soilborne fungal pathogen. Successively, the emergent leaves were inoculated with a foliar pathogen to determine the effect of the GOX transformants on biocontrol and resistance to pathogen attack.Inoculations with the P1-GOX transformants not only reduced disease symptoms caused by a soil pathogen, but also the lesions of various foliar pathogens applied far from the Trichoderma colonization, thus activating ISR. A similar approach is being use to genetically improve T.harzianum T22, a rhizosphere competent and commercially marketed strain not transformed yet, by using four different gox gene constructs under the control of constitutive and inducible promoters.Plasmids have been introduced in Trichoderma by

  19. A new approach for transition metal free magnetic SiC: Defect induced magnetism after self-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummari, Venkata Chandra Sekhar

    SiC has become an attractive wide bandgap semiconductor due to its unique physical and electronic properties and is widely used in high temperature, high frequency, high power and radiation resistant applications. SiC has been used as an alternative to Si in harsh environments such as in the oil industry, nuclear power systems, aeronautical, and space applications. SiC is also known for its polytypism and among them 3C-SiC, 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC are the most common polytypes used for research purposes. Among these polytypes 4H-SiC is gaining importance due to its easy commercial availability with a large bandgap of 3.26 eV at room temperature. Controlled creation of defects in materials is an approach to modify the electronic properties in a way that new functionality may result. SiC is a promising candidate for defect-induced magnetism on which spintronic devices could be developed. The defects considered are of room temperature stable vacancy types, eliminating the need for magnetic impurities, which easily diffuse at room temperature. Impurity free vacancy type defects can be created by implanting the host atoms of silicon or carbon. The implantation fluence determines the defect density, which is a critical parameter for defect induced magnetism. Therefore, we have studied the influence of low fluence low energy silicon and carbon implantation on the creation of defects in n-type 4H-SiC. The characterization of the defects in these implanted samples was performed using the techniques, RBS-channeling and Raman spectroscopy. We have also utilized these characterization techniques to analyze defects created in much deeper layers of the SiC due to implantation of high energy nitrogen ions. The experimentally determined depths of the Si damage peaks due to low energy (60 keV) Si and C ions with low fluences (disorders calculated along the c-axis (LO mode) and perpendicular to c-axis (TO mode) in 4H-SiC are found to be similar. Furthermore, the results obtained from

  20. Laser-induced damage characteristics in fused silica surface due to mechanical and chemical defects during manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical and chemical defects incurred by grinding and polishing as well as post-processing have been recognized as the most influential culprits that hamper the elevation of laser power/energy in high peak power/energy laser systems. In order to find out the causes for limiting the operational power of laser systems, the effects of these defects on laser damage and removal and mitigation of the defects were investigated in detail in the article. Cracks and scratches were created, annealed, etched and damaged so as to reveal the likely effects of mechanical defects on damage and potential techniques to reduce their influence. The results show that HF-based etching can open and smooth cracks/scratches, improving laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at scratches by up to >250%. Thermal annealing did heal, to some extent, cracks but the LIDT is little improved. Both HF-etching and leaching proves to be effective in removing metallic contamination during polishing process and handling of optics, which can "contribute" to damage/damage density in fused silica. However, HF-based etching may degrade surface roughness, from 20 nm under some conditions when >20 μm material was etched away while the surface roughness was perceptibly altered by leaching (30 J/cm2 (355 nm @3 ns, beam diameter 400 μm @1/e2), a significant progress.

  1. Osteogenic effects of dedifferentiated fat cell transplantation in rabbit models of bone defect and ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kazama, Minako; Kano, Koichiro; Ryu, Junnosuke; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Taro

    2013-08-01

    We have previously reported that mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells have a high proliferative activity and the potential to differentiate into lineages of mesenchymal tissue similar to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we examined the effects of autologous DFAT cell transplantation on bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model. The formation of tissue-engineered bone (TEB) was observed when rabbit DFAT cells were loaded onto a β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/collagen sponge and cultured in an osteogenic differentiation medium for 3 weeks. Autologous implantation of DFAT cell-mediated TEB constructs promoted bone regeneration in a rabbit tibial defect model. Regenerated bone tissue induced by transplantation of DFAT cell-mediated TEB constructs was histologically well differentiated and exhibited higher bone strength in a three-point bending test compared to that induced by the β-TCP/collagen sponge alone. In OVX-induced osteoporosis model rabbits, DFAT cells were obtained with the osteogenic activity similar to cells from healthy rabbits. Intrabone marrow injection of autologous DFAT cells significantly increased the bone mineral density (BMD) at the injected site in the OVX rabbits. Transplanted DFAT cells remained mainly on the injection side of the bone marrow by at least 28 days after intrabone marrow injection and a part of them expressed osteocalcin. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that autologous implantation of DFAT cells contributed to bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an OVX-induced osteoporosis model. DFAT cells may be an attractive cell source for cell-based bone tissue engineering to treat nonunion fractures in all patients, including those with osteoporosis.

  2. Prevention of congenital defects induced by prenatal alcohol exposure (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Megan M.; Karunamuni, Ganga; Pedersen, Cameron J.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2017-02-01

    Over 500,000 women per year in the United States drink during pregnancy, and 1 in 5 of this population also binge drink. Up to 40% of live-born children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) present with congenital heart defects (CHDs) including life-threatening outflow and valvuloseptal anomalies. Previously we established a PAE model in the avian embryo and used optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to assay looping-stage (early) cardiac function/structure and septation-stage (late) cardiac defects. Early-stage ethanol-exposed embryos had smaller cardiac cushions (valve precursors) and increased retrograde flow, while late-stage embryos presented with gross head/body defects, and exhibited smaller atrio-ventricular (AV) valves, interventricular septae, and aortic vessels. However, supplementation with the methyl donor betaine reduced gross defects, prevented cardiac defects such as ventricular septal defects and abnormal AV valves, and normalized cardiac parameters. Immunofluorescent staining for 5-methylcytosine in transverse embryo sections also revealed that DNA methylation levels were reduced by ethanol but normalized by co-administration of betaine. Furthermore, supplementation with folate, another methyl donor, in the PAE model appeared to normalize retrograde flow levels which are typically elevated by ethanol exposure. Studies are underway to correlate retrograde flow numbers for folate with associated cushion volumes. Finally, preliminary findings have revealed that glutathione, a key endogenous antioxidant which also regulates methyl group donation, is particularly effective in improving alcohol-impacted survival and gross defect rates. Current investigations will determine whether glutathione has any positive effect on PAE-related CHDs. Our studies could have significant implications for public health, especially related to prenatal nutrition recommendations.

  3. The effects of photobiomodulation on healing of bone defects in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Costa Lino, Maíra D.; Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Ferreira Moraes, Michel; Augusto Cardoso, José; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Maria Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of Low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of bone defects, but there are only a few that associates bone healing in the presence of a metabolic disorder as Diabetes Melitus and LLLT. The aim of this study was to assess histologically the effect of LLLT (AsGaAl), 780nm, 70mW, CW, Ø~0.4mm, 16J/cm2 per session) on the repair of surgical defects created in the femur of diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar Albinus rats. Surgical bone defects were created in 60 animals divided into four groups of 15 animals each: Group C (non-diabetic - control); Group CL (non-diabetic + LLLT); Group CD (diabetic); Group CDL (diabetic + LLLT). The animals on the irradiated group received 16 J/cm2 per session divided into four points around the defect, being the first irradiation immediately after surgery and repeated every 48h for 14 days. The animals were killed 15, 21 and 30 days after surgery. The results of the present investigation showed histological evidence of improved amount of collagen fibers at early stages of the bone healing (15 days) and increased amount of well organized bone trabeculae at the end of the experimental period (30 days) on irradiated animals, (diabetic and non-diabetic) compared to non irradiated ones. It is concluded that LLLT has a positive biomodulative effect on the healing process of bone defects, even when diabetes mellitus was present.

  4. Defect-induced selective oxidation of graphene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu-heng; Lu, Peng-fei; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-peng; Chen, Yong-ping

    2017-02-01

    Controlled oxidation of graphene is extremely important for nanopatterning and chemical functionalization. It is generally assumed in experiments that the oxidizing agent in the liquid-phase oxidation first attacks the defective sites in carbon lattices. To explore how the oxidation in the graphene sheet first begins, we have investigated the oxidization process with the structural defect using the density functional theory. Ten reaction pathways in the frame of the transition state theory are considered. We find that the most preferential reaction locus is located at the center of defect. It has also been observed that the preexistence of hydroxyl functional group on the graphene surface substantially decrease energy barrier for oxidization. Such facilitation of oxidation due to hydroxyl can explain how the oxidation process continues after its first oxidation around defects. The uneven redistributions of electron density caused both by defect and by the hydroxyl functional group account for the mechanism of the oxidization process on graphene sheet. Our calculation fully verifies the experimental assumption and is consistent with the recent experimental observations.

  5. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  6. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-01-01

    .... The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN...

  7. Degraded model of radiation-induced acceptor defects for GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Long; Hao Yue; Zhao Yuan-Fu; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Gao Zhi-Yuan; Li Pei-xian

    2009-01-01

    Using depletion approximation theory and introducing acceptor defects which can characterize radiation induced deep-level defects in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, we set up a radiation damage model of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) to separately simulate the effects of several main radiation damage mechanisms and the complete radiation damage effect simultaneously considering the degradation in mobility. Our calculated results,consistent with the experimental results, indicate that thin AlGaN barrier layer, high Al content and high doping concentration are favourable for restraining the shifts of threshold voltage in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT; when the acceptor concentration induced is less than 1014cm-3, the shifts in threshold voltage are not obvious; only when the acceptor concentration induced is higher than 1016cm-3, will the shifts of threshold voltage remarkably increase; the increase of threshold voltage, resulting from radiation induced acceptor, mainly contributes to the degradation in drain saturation current of the current-voltage (Ⅰ-Ⅴ) characteristic, but has no effect on the transconductance in the saturation area.

  8. Turmeric Extract Rescues Ethanol-Induced Developmental Defect in the Zebrafish Model for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Connors, Craig T; Mohammed, Arooj S; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, Kathleen; Marrs, James A; Chism, Grady W

    2017-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes the most frequent preventable birth disorder, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The effect of turmeric extracts in rescuing an ethanol-induced developmental defect using zebrafish as a model was determined. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms underlying FASD. We hypothesize that antioxidant inducing properties of turmeric may alleviate ethanol-induced defects. Curcuminoid content of the turmeric powder extract (5 mg/mL turmeric in ethanol) was determined by UPLC and found to contain Curcumin (124.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL), Desmethoxycurcumin (43.4 ± 0.1 μg/mL), and Bisdemethoxycurcumin (36.6 ± 0.1 μg/mL). Zebrafish embryos were treated with 100 mM (0.6% v/v) ethanol during gastrulation through organogenesis (2 to 48 h postfertilization (hpf)) and supplemented with turmeric extract to obtain total curcuminoid concentrations of 0, 1.16, 1.72, or 2.32 μM. Turmeric supplementation showed significant rescue of the body length at 72 hpf compared to ethanol-treated embryos. The mechanism underlying the rescue remains to be determined. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Defect-Induced New Emission in ZnSe Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Shi-Wei; MA Guo-Hong

    2009-01-01

    @@ The temperature-dependent photoluminescence behaviour of chemical vapour transport (CVT)-grown ZnSe crys-tal is investigated. A new emission band appears when temperature is reduced to 155K. It is shown that the new emission band is strongly related to defect emission peaked at around 2.1 eV. The emergence of the new emission band is accompanied by decreasing emission intensity of free exciton, as well as redshift of defect emis-sion with temperature decreases. The activated energy of the defect state is estimated to be 60.6meV, which is approximately equal to the energy difference between the new emission and the Tree exciton emission at 155 K.

  10. On the interaction between radiation-induced defects and foreign interstitial atoms in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, Alexander L., E-mail: nikolaev@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences Ural Branch 18, S. Kovalevskaya St., Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Kurennykh, Tatiana E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences Ural Branch 18, S. Kovalevskaya St., Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31

    Interaction between Frenkel pair (FP) defects and nitrogen atoms in {alpha}-iron has been investigated by means of resistivity recovery method. Both FP defects are attracted to nitrogen atoms. Dissociation of self-interstitial atoms from nitrogen atoms is observed at 165 K while that of vacancies at 250 K. The binding energies of FP defects with nitrogen are both about 0.1-0.15 eV. A weak RR stage is observed at 340 K assigned to the presence of carbon in concentration of about 1 appm. Analysis of its features leads to a conclusion on a dissociation (binding) energy of vacancy-carbon atom pairs of about 0.9 (0.35) eV.

  11. Sunken Eye Induced by Superior Orbital Wall Defect After Craniofacial Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon; Han, Jeong Joon; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enophthalmos after a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt placement is very rare. Previous defects of the orbital wall with intracranial hypotension can cause enophthalmos after V-P shunting. The authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects resulting from anterior clinoidectomy that was performed during previous aneurysmal surgery. Both patients received a V-P shunt for hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Although the hydrocephalus was improved by V-P shunts in both patients, sunken eyes were observed. The patients received reconstructive surgery of the superior orbital wall using titanium mesh and recovered after surgery without any neurological deficits. Here, the authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects treated by orbital wall reconstruction. PMID:27483101

  12. Defect induced structural and thermoelectric properties of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Diptasikha; Malik, K. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Deb, A. K. [Department of Physics, Raiganj University, Uttar Dinajpur 733 134 (India); Dhara, Sandip [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, Aritra, E-mail: arbphy@caluniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Center for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, JD-2, Sector-III, Saltlake City, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Structural and thermoelectric properties of metallic and semiconducting Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are reported. X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies reveal that semiconducting sample has higher defect density. Nature and origin of possible defects are highlighted. Semiconducting Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hosts larger numbers of defects, which act as scattering center and give rise to the increased value of resistivity, thermopower, and power factor. Thermopower data indicate p-type nature of the synthesized samples. It is evidenced that the surface states are often mixed with the bulk state, giving rise to metallicity in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Role of different scattering mechanism on the thermoelectric property of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is discussed.

  13. Genetic defect in CYP24A1, the vitamin D 24-hydroxylase gene, in a patient with severe infantile hypercalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia (IIH) is a disorder the genetic etiology and physiological basis of which are not well understood. The objective of the study was to describe the underlying physiology and genetic cause of hypercalcemia in an infant with severe IIH and to extend these genetic findi...

  14. Novel Use of PRF and PDT in the Management of Trauma Induced Root Resorption and Infrabony Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Preeti Jain; Yadav, Neha; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Talwar, Sangeeta; Lamba, Arundeep Kaur

    2015-05-01

    Root resorption is a common squeal of traumatic injury to the dentition. Its progression can be minimized by early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. This case report presents the diagnosis and management of a case of trauma induced trio of apical root resorption, intraradicular root resorption and infrabony defect in maxillary central incisor. The main aim in treating such cases of resorption is to limit the inflammatory response at the periapical region so as to halt the resorptive process. To allow faster regeneration of the periodontal tissues, Platelet rich fibrin (PRF), a second generation platelet concentrate was used as an apical matrix over which MTA plug was given. The periodontal defect was managed with the help of localized antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT).

  15. Properties of passive nano films on zircaloy-4 affected by defects induced by hydrogen permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jun-Ji; Ling, Yun-Han; Zhang, Rui-Qian; Dai, Xun; Bai, Xin-De

    2014-08-01

    In this work, hydrogen absorption and the permeation behavior of the passive layer formed on zircaloy-4 are investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization, Mott—Schottky analysis, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy are employed to characterize the passive defects before and after hydrogen permeation. It is found that the nanoscale passive ZrO2 films play an important role in the resistance against corrosion; hydrogen impingement, however, reduces the passive impedance towards hydrothermal oxidation. The increase of defects (vacancies) in passive film is probably attributed to the degradation. We believe that this finding will provide valuable insight into the understanding of the corrosion mechanism of zircaloys used in light water reactors.

  16. Correlation Between Morphological Defects, Electron Beam Induced Current Imaging, and the Electrical Properties of 4H-SiC Schottky Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang,Y.; Ali, G.; Mikhov, M.; Vaidyanathan, V.; Skromme, B.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Defects in SiC degrade the electrical properties and yield of devices made from this material. This article examines morphological defects in 4H-SiC and defects visible in electron beam-induced current (EBIC) images and their effects on the electrical characteristics of Schottky diodes. Optical Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to observe the morphological defects, which are classified into 26 types based on appearance alone. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics were used to extract barrier heights, ideality factors, and breakdown voltages. Barrier heights decrease about linearly with increasing ideality factor, which is explained by discrete patches of low barrier height within the main contact. Barrier height, ideality, and breakdown voltage all degrade with increasing device diameter, suggesting that discrete defects are responsible. Electroluminescence was observed under reverse bias from microplasmas associated with defects containing micropipes. EBIC measurements reveal several types of features corresponding to recombination centers. The density of dark spots observed by EBIC correlates strongly with ideality factor and barrier height. Most morphological defects do not affect the reverse characteristics when no micropipes are present, but lower the barrier height and worsen the ideality factor. However, certain multiple-tailed defects, irregularly shaped defects and triangular defects with 3C inclusions substantially degrade both breakdown voltage and barrier height, and account for most of the bad devices that do not contain micropipes. Micropipes in these wafers are also frequently found to be of Type II, which do not run parallel to the c axis.

  17. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105 bis, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G, E-mail: cghica@infim.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-27

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} and {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced birth defects : the role of polymorphisms of placental transporter proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Bakker, Marian K.; Wang, Hao; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; Plosch, Torsten; Wilffert, Bob

    2014-01-01

    One of the ongoing issues in perinatal medicine is the risk of birth defects associated with maternal drug use. The teratogenic effect of a drug depends, apart from other factors, on the exposition of the fetus to the drug. Transporter proteins are known to be involved in the pharmacokinetics of dru

  19. Modelling of parasitic effects induced by electrically active defects in a SiGe HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdara, M.; Latreche, S.; Gontrand, C.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical modelling of a NPN SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) realized in an industrial 0.35 μ m BiCMOS process, using our own software simulator “SIBIDIF”, taking into account some electrically active defects in the HBT device. The electric performances of this device can be penalized by the presence of defects inherent to the complex structure shrinking. For our devices, most of these relevant defects are located at the vertical interface between the spacers and the polysilicon emitter, due to the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process step. Nevertheless, their localization, as well as theirs effective density or their capture section, have an influence on the electric characteristics of the HBT's. As a check, we find some good agreement between our simulated results and some experimental ones. Our work is focused on the identification of defects responsible for the current fluctuations at the origin of low frequency noise or Random Telegraphic Signals in industrial submicronic BiCMOS technologies. Gummel characteristics are simulated in order to identify generation-recombination or trap assisted tunnelling process in the base current. We have shown that devices having an excess base current present random discrete fluctuations on the base current.

  20. Defect-induced magnon scattering mechanisms in exchange-coupled bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, R. A.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Landeros, P.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of two-magnon scattering mechanisms, which may be activated by different sorts of defects, is theoretically studied in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic exchange-biased bilayers. The spin-wave based model considers the influence of geometrical defects in the ferromagnetic (FM) layer as well as small domains in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) sub-lattice of the FM/AFM interface in such a way that both kinds of defects are randomly distributed over their respective surfaces. The in-plane angular dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth allows detection of the relevant influence of such defects in the relaxation mechanisms, where the role of the exchange-bias field is clearly identified. Typical experimental findings, such as quadratic dependence of the linewidth with the exchange-bias field and the in-plane angular dependence, are well explained within the proposed model. This lends confidence in the model's utility and leads to a better understanding of the role of the magnon-magnon scattering in the magnetization dynamics of exchange-coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic bilayers.

  1. Cirrhosis-induced defects in innate pulmonary defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander Top Elizabeth A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of mortality from pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is increased in patients with cirrhosis. However, the specific pneumococcal virulence factors and host immune defects responsible for this finding have not been clearly established. This study used a cirrhotic rat model of pneumococcal pneumonia to identify defect(s in innate pulmonary defenses in the cirrhotic host and to determine the impact of the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin on these defenses in the setting of severe cirrhosis. Results No cirrhosis-associated defects in mucociliary clearance of pneumococci were found in these studies, but early intrapulmonary killing of the organisms before the arrival of neutrophils was significantly impaired. This defect was exacerbated by pneumolysin production in cirrhotic but not in control rats. Neutrophil-mediated killing of a particularly virulent type 3 pneumococcal strain also was significantly diminished within the lungs of cirrhotic rats with ascites. Levels of lysozyme and complement component C3 were both significantly reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from cirrhotic rats. Finally, complement deposition was reduced on the surface of pneumococci recovered from the lungs of cirrhotic rats in comparison to organisms recovered from the lungs of control animals. Conclusion Increased mortality from pneumococcal pneumonia in this cirrhotic host is related to defects in both early pre-neutrophil- and later neutrophil-mediated pulmonary killing of the organisms. The fact that pneumolysin production impaired pre-neutrophil-mediated pneumococcal killing in cirrhotic but not control rats suggests that pneumolysin may be particularly detrimental to this defense mechanism in the severely cirrhotic host. The decrease in neutrophil-mediated killing of pneumococci within the lungs of the cirrhotic host is related to insufficient deposition of host proteins such as complement C3 on their surfaces. Pneumolysin

  2. Genetics progress on atrioventricular septal defect%先天性房室间隔缺损的遗传学进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓维

    2011-01-01

    先天性房室间隔缺损(atrioventricular sepial defect,AVSD)是一种常见的心血管畸形,由于存在房室间隔(房间隔下部、室间隔上部)以及中央心内膜垫组织的缺损,造成左右心腔之间的异常交通.虽然AVSD的胚胎学、病理生理学以及诊断和治疗目前都已基本阐明,但其确切的发病机制仍无突破性进展.随着分子生物学技术的广泛应用以及分子遗传学研究的深入开展,AVSD在遗传学的研究中取得一系列新进展,一些基因被证实与AVSD的发生发展存在一定的相关性.%Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) is a common cardiovascular malformation because of atrioventricular septal (lower atrial septum, ventricular septal upper) and the endocardial cushion defect,resulting in abnormal chambers of the heart. At the present, although the embryology, pathophysiology,diagnosis and treatment of the AVSD are clarified, but its precise pathogenesis has still no breakthrough progress.With the wide application of molecular biology and the depth research of molecular genetics, a series of new progress about AVSD has been made in the genetic study, and some genes are confirmed to be related to the occurrence and development of AVSD. The aim of this article is to review and discuss genetic mechanisms and related genes of AVSD, and to further identify the major genes causing AVSD.

  3. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7 Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S; Yu, Y Eugene

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two tandem duplications spanning the Tiam1-Kcnj6 genomic region on Mmu16 using recombinase-mediated genome engineering, Dp(16)3Yey and Dp(16)4Yey, spanning the 2.1 Mb Tiam1-Il10rb and 3.7 Mb Ifnar1-Kcnj6 regions, respectively. We found that Dp(16)4Yey/+, but not Dp(16)3Yey/+, led to heart defects, suggesting the triplication of the Ifnar1-Kcnj6 region is sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16)4Yey/+ embryos showed that the Hsa21 gene orthologs located within the duplicated interval were expressed at the elevated levels, reflecting the consequences of the gene dosage alterations. Therefore, we have identified a 3.7 Mb genomic region, the smallest critical genomic region, for DS-associated heart defects, and our results should set the stage for the final step to establish the identities of the causal gene(s), whose elevated expression(s) directly underlie this major DS phenotype.

  4. Prospect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Genetic Repair to Cure Genetic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Adiwinata Pawitan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In genetic diseases, where the cells are already damaged, the damaged cells can be replaced by new normal cells, which can be differentiated from iPSC. To avoid immune rejection, iPSC from the patient’s own cell can be developed. However, iPSC from the patients’s cell harbors the same genetic aberration. Therefore, before differentiating the iPSCs into required cells, genetic repair should be done. This review discusses the various technologies to repair the genetic aberration in patient-derived iPSC, or to prevent the genetic aberration to cause further damage in the iPSC-derived cells, such as Zn finger and TALE nuclease genetic editing, RNA interference technology, exon skipping, and gene transfer method. In addition, the challenges in using the iPSC and the strategies to manage the hurdles are addressed.

  5. Data on cytochrome c oxidase assembly in mice and human fibroblasts or tissues induced by SURF1 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article entitled "Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects" [1]. This paper includes data of the quantitative analysis of individual forms of respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV present in SURF1 knockout (SURF1 (-/-) ) and control (SURF1 (+/+) ) mouse fibroblasts and tissues and in fibroblasts of human control and patients with SURF1 gene mutation. Also it includes data demonstrating response of complex IV, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), to reversible inhibition of mitochondrial translation in SURF1 (-/-) mouse and SURF1 patient fibroblast cell lines.

  6. Comparison of defects responsible for nanosecond laser-induced damage and ablation in common high index optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yejia; Abdulameer, Mohammed R.; Emmert, Luke A.; Day, Travis; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporally resolved optical laser-induced damage is an experimental technique used to study nanosecond laser damage and initiation of ablation in dielectric metal-oxide films used for optical coatings. It measures the fluence (intensity) at the initiation of damage during a single laser pulse. The technique was applied to coatings of HfO2, Sc2O3, and Ta2O5, which were prepared by ion-beam sputtering, and HfO2 which was prepared by electron-beam evaporation. Using the data obtained, we were able to retrieve the defect density distributions of these films without a priori assumptions about their functional form.

  7. An evaluation method of the profile of plasma-induced defects based on capacitance-voltage measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukimasa; Ono, Kouichi; Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-06-01

    Aggressive shrinkage and geometrical transition to three-dimensional structures in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) lead to potentially serious problems regarding plasma processing such as plasma-induced physical damage (PPD). For the precise control of material processing and future device designs, it is extremely important to clarify the depth and energy profiles of PPD. Conventional methods to estimate the PPD profile (e.g., wet etching) are time-consuming. In this study, we propose an advanced method using a simple capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. The method first assumes the depth and energy profiles of defects in Si substrates, and then optimizes the C-V curves. We applied this methodology to evaluate the defect generation in (100), (111), and (110) Si substrates. No orientation dependence was found regarding the surface-oxide layers, whereas a large number of defects was assigned in the case of (110). The damaged layer thickness and areal density were estimated. This method provides the highly sensitive PPD prediction indispensable for designing future low-damage plasma processes.

  8. Point defects induced in LiF by low energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe; Montereali, Rosa Maria [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy); Scacco, Augusto [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[INFM, Rome (Italy); Cremona, Marco; D`Auria, Giuliano

    1997-09-01

    A systematic study of the coloring of LiF crystals and films irradiated by 3 keV electrons at various temperatures was carried out analysing their absorption and luminescence spectra. The three stage behaviour of the F coloring curve as a function of the irradiation dose was revealed and the saturation of the process was identified for the first time with this kind of radiation. The kinetics of the defect formation confirmed the expectations derived from the most comprehensive theoretical model developed to explain the coloring process. The irradiation temperature was found to have an influence on both the proportion of different defects created and on their stability and the overall coloring efficiency turned out to be higher when the irradiation was performed on films. Various explanations to these observations are put forward and discussed.

  9. Autologous Membrane Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the treatment of acetabular chondral defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acetabular chondral defect are very frequently associated to FAI. Treatment options are still questionable. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, 201 patients over 583 have been arthroscopically treated with the AMIC procedure for grade III and/or IV acetabular chondral lesions. Patients age was between 18 and 50 years; acetabular chondral lesion size was between 2 and 4 cm2; radiological Tönnis degree of osteoarthritis was ≤ 2. Results The mean follow up of the entire group of 201 patients was 5 years (from 8 to 2). Significant improvement, as measured by the mHHS, was observed at 6 months in comparison to preoperative levels (80.3 ± 8.3) (prepair medium-sized chondral defects on the acetabular side of the hip found during treatment of FAI and lead to long-term favourable outcomes. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28066742

  10. DLTS measurements of radiation induced defects in epitaxial and MCz silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönniger, F.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindström, G.; Kramberger, G.; Pintilie, I.; Röder, R.

    2007-12-01

    n-Type epitaxial silicon layers of different thickness and resistivity, grown on highly Sb doped CZ-substrate by ITME (Warsaw), and n-type MCz silicon supplied by Okmetic (Finland) were used for the processing of planar diodes at CiS (Erfurt). For the epi-diodes a standard as well as a diffusion oxygenation process was employed. Irradiations had been performed with 26 MeV protons at the cyclotron of the Karlsruhe University and with neutrons at the TRIGA reactor of the Ljubljana University. Microscopic investigations using the DLTS method were done. The correlation of the IO2i-defect and the oxygen concentration was studied by a depth-profile measurement. The annealing behavior of the IO2i-defect at different temperatures was investigated and the activation energy extracted.

  11. DLTS measurements of radiation induced defects in epitaxial and MCz silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: frank.hoenniger@desy.de; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany); Kramberger, G. [Josef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pintilie, I. [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Roeder, R. [CiS Institut fuer Mikrosensorik gGmbH, Erfurt (Germany)

    2007-12-11

    n-Type epitaxial silicon layers of different thickness and resistivity, grown on highly Sb doped CZ-substrate by ITME (Warsaw), and n-type MCz silicon supplied by Okmetic (Finland) were used for the processing of planar diodes at CiS (Erfurt). For the epi-diodes a standard as well as a diffusion oxygenation process was employed. Irradiations had been performed with 26 MeV protons at the cyclotron of the Karlsruhe University and with neutrons at the TRIGA reactor of the Ljubljana University. Microscopic investigations using the DLTS method were done. The correlation of the IO{sub 2i}-defect and the oxygen concentration was studied by a depth-profile measurement. The annealing behavior of the IO{sub 2i}-defect at different temperatures was investigated and the activation energy extracted.

  12. Pacing-induced congenital heart defects assessed by OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  13. Hydrogen storage on nitrogen induced defects in palladium-decorated graphene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling; Zhang, Jian-Min; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2014-02-01

    The structure and hydrogen storage behavior of Pd-decorated nitrogen-doped graphene are investigated using the first principals based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Among the three types of defective structures, it is found that Pd-decorated graphene with pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped defects are more stable and exhibit hydrogen uptake ability up to three H2 per Pd atom. A single H2 or two H2 are molecularly chemisorbed on the Pd atom, where the stretched Hsbnd H bond is relaxed but not dissociated. The binding mechanism of H2 molecule is attributed to hybridization of the 4d orbitals of Pd with the σ orbitals of H2 (so-called Kubas interaction). Out of two adsorbed H2, the first and second H2 are still chemisorbed molecularly, the nature of bonding is very weak physisorption for the third adsorbed H2. Double-side Pd-decorated graphene with pyridinic and pyrrolic N defects can theoretically reach a gravimetric capacity of 1.99 wt.% hydrogen, which is very close to the recent experimental finding.

  14. Tunable Dirac Electron and Hole Self-Doping of Topological Insulators Induced by Stacking Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramberri, Hugo; Cerdá, Jorge I; Muñoz, M Carmen

    2015-06-10

    Via density functional theory based calculations we show that self-doping of the surface Dirac cones in three-dimensional Bi2X3 (X = Se, Te) topological insulators can be tuned by controlling the sequence of stacking defects in the crystal. Twin boundaries inside the Bi2X3 bulk drive either n- or p-type self-doping of the (0001) topological surface states, depending on the precise orientation of the twin. The surface doping may achieve values up to 300 meV and can be controlled by the number of defects and their relative position with respect to the surface. Its origin relies on the spontaneous polarization generated by the dipole moments associated with the lattice defects. Our findings open the route to the fabrication of Bi2X3 surfaces with tailored surface charge and spin densities in the absence of external electric fields. In addition, in a thin film geometry two-dimensional electron and hole Dirac gases with the same spin-helicity coexist at opposite surfaces.

  15. Surface-defect induced modifications in the optical properties of α-MnO2 nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Reenu Elizabeth; Chandran, Anoop; Thomas, Marykutty; Jose, Joshy; George, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    The science of defect engineering via surface tuning opens a new route to modify the inherent properties of nanomaterials for advanced functional and practical applications. In this work, two independent synthesis methods (hydrothermal and co-precipitation) are adopted to fabricate α-MnO2 nanorods with different defect structures so as to understand the effect of surface modifications on their optical properties. The crystal structure and morphology of samples are investigated with the aid of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Atomic composition calculated from energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms non-stoichiometry of the samples. The surface properties and chemical environment are thoroughly studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Bond angle variance and bond valence sum are determined to validate distortions in the basic MnO6 octahedron. The surface studies indicate that the concentration of Jahn-Teller manganese (III) (Mn3+) ion in the samples differ from each other which results in their distinct properties. Band structure modifications due to Jahn-Teller distortion are examined with the aid of ultraviolet-visible (UV) reflectance and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The dual peaks obtained in derivative spectrum conflict the current concept on the bandgap energy of MnO2. These studies suggest that emission lines from the samples can be strongly modified by selectively varying their defect density.

  16. Ordering of defects induced by epitaxy in LaCoO3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Virat; Biskup, Neven; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Varela, Maria; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    In the bulk, LaCoO3 (LCO) undergoes a spin state transition from a diamagnet to a paramagnet with increasing temperature. Recent studies of epitaxial LCO thin films have resulted in the stabilization of a higher spin state and ferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures. Here, we explore the effects of epitaxy on the electronic structure of LCO films with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We find differences in XAS spectra in coherently strained thinner films compared to the thicker partially relaxed films which may be due to differences in Co valence and bonding. STEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy of thinner LCO films reveal ordered defect planes that appear to be associated with a change in the O and Co bonding environments. In films on LaAlO3 strained in compression periodic planes occur parallel to the substrate-film interface, while films on SrTiO3 strained in tension have perpendicular defect planes. Correlation with magnetic data suggests that defect rich regions may exhibit greater ferromagnetism.

  17. Plasticity induced by pre-existing defects during high strain-rate loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    High strain-rate deformation of metals has been typically studied for perfect monocrystals. Computational advances now allow more realistic simulations of materials including defects, which lower the Hugoniot Elastic Limit, and lead to microstructures differing from the ones from perfect monocrystals. As pre-existing defects one can consider vacancy clusters, dislocation loops, grain boundaries, etc. New analysis tools allow analysis of dislocation densities and twin fractions, for both f.c.c. and b.c.c. metals. Recent results for defective single crystal Ta [Tramontina et al.., High Energy Den. Phys. 10, 9 (2014), and Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 68, 818 (2013)], and for polycrystalline b.c.c metals [Tang et al., Mat. Sci. Eng. A 580, 414 (2013), and Gunkelmann et al., Phys. Rev. B 86, 144111 (2012)] will be highlighted, alongside new results for nanocrystalline Cu, Ta, Fe, and Zr [Ruestes et al., Scripta Mat. 71, 9 (2014)]. This work has been carried out in collaboration with D. Tramontina, C. Ruestes, E. Millan, J. Rodriguez-Nieva, M.A. Meyers, Y. Tang, H. Urbassek, N. Gunkelmann, A. Stukowski, M. Ruda, G. Bertolino, D. Farkas, A. Caro, J. Hawreliak, B. Remington, R. Rudd, P. Erhart, R. Ravelo, T. Germann, N. Park, M. Suggit, S. Michalik, A. Higginbotham and J. Wark. Funding by PICT2008-1325 and SeCTyP U.N. Cuyo.

  18. Metamizole Sodium Induces Neural Tube Defects in a Chick Embryo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Demirci, Adnan; Alagoz, Fatih; Dalgic, Ali; Belen, Deniz

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of metamizole sodium on neural tube development in the early stage chick embryo model that complies with the first month of embryonic development in mammals. A total of 40 fertilized chicken eggs were divided into 4 equal groups. The eggs were incubated in the incubator at a temperature of 37.8±2°C with 60±5% humidity. Group A was the control, Group B was administered physiological saline, Group C was administered 30 mg/kg metamizole sodium (based on the therapeutic index range of it used in humans) and Group D was administered 90 mg/kg metamizole sodium. All embryos were removed from the egg at the 48th hour and morphologically and histologically examined. Normal development was seen and the neural tube was closed in 17 embryos in Groups A and B. A neural tube defect was seen in 2 embryos in group A and in 1 embryo in group B. A neural tube closure defect was seen in all embryos in group C and 9 embryos in group D. There was 1 dead embryo in Group D. Metamizole sodium was seen to produce a neural tube defect in the chicken embyro model.

  19. Inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase induces orofacial defects in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Iskra A; Jerez, Carolina; Figueroa, Diego; Suazo, José; Marcelain, Katherine; Cerda, Oscar; Colombo Flores, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs) are common birth defects, which include a range of disorders with a complex etiology affecting formation of craniofacial structures. Some forms of syndromic OFCs are produced by defects in the cholesterol pathway. The principal enzyme of the cholesterol pathway is the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Our aim is to study whether defects of HMGCR function would produce orofacial malformation similar to those found in disorders of cholesterol synthesis. We used zebrafish hmgcrb mutants and HMGCR inhibition assay using atorvastatin during early and late stages of orofacial morphogenesis in zebrafish. To describe craniofacial phenotypes, we stained cartilage and bone and performed in situ hybridization using known craniofacial markers. Also, we visualized neural crest cell migration in a transgenic fish. Our results showed that mutants displayed loss of cartilage and diminished orofacial outgrowth, and in some cases palatal cleft. Late treatments with statin show a similar phenotype. Affected-siblings displayed a moderate phenotype, whereas early-treated embryos had a minor cleft. We found reduced expression of the downstream component of Sonic Hedgehog-signaling gli1 in ventral brain, oral ectoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in mutants and in late atorvastatin-treated embryos. Our results suggest that HMGCR loss-of-function primarily affects postmigratory cranial neural crest cells through abnormal Sonic Hedgehog signaling, probably induced by reduction in metabolites of the cholesterol pathway. Malformation severity correlates with the grade of HMGCR inhibition, developmental stage of its disruption, and probably with availability of maternal lipids. Together, our results might help to understand the spectrum of orofacial phenotypes found in cholesterol synthesis disorders. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:814-830, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Chiba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis.

  1. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takai, Atsushi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki, E-mail: maru@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Chiba, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2011-06-22

    Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis.

  2. Native defect induced charge and ferromagnetic spin ordering and coexisting electronic phases in CoO epitaxial thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negi, D. S., E-mail: devendranegi@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: ranjan@jncasr.ac.in; Loukya, B.; Datta, R., E-mail: devendranegi@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: ranjan@jncasr.ac.in [International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-12-07

    We report on the observation of Co vacancy (V{sub Co}) induced charge ordering and ferromagnetism in CoO epitaxial thin film. The ordering is associated with the coexistence of commensurate, incommensurate, and discommensurate electronic phases. Density functional theory calculation indicates the origin of ordering in Co atoms undergoing high spin to low spin transition immediately surrounding the V{sub Co(16.6 at. %)}. Electron magnetic chiral dichroism experiment confirms the ferromagnetic signal at uncompensated Co spins. Such a native defects induced coexistence of different electronic phases at room temperature in a simple compound CoO is unique and adds to the richness of the field with the possibility of practical device application.

  3. Isolation, characterization and genetic analysis of canine GATA4 gene in a family of Doberman Pinschers with an atrial septal defect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shin-Aeh Lee; Seung-Gon Lee; Hyeong-Sun Moon; Lopeti Lavulo; Kyoung-Oh Cho; Changbaig Hyun

    2007-12-01

    GATA4 is expressed early in the developing heart where it plays a key role in regulating the expression of genes encoding myocardial contractile proteins. Gene mutations in the human GATA4 have been implicated in various congenital heart defects (CHD), including atrial septal defect (ASD). Although ASD is the third most common CHD in humans, it is generally rare in dogs and cats. There is also no obvious predilection for ASD in dogs and cats, based on sex or breed. However, among dogs, the incidence rate of ASD is relatively high in Samoyeds and Doberman Pinschers, where its inheritance and genetic aetiology are not well understood. In this study, we identified and investigated the genetic aetiology of an ASD affected family in a pure breed dog population. Although the GATA4 gene was screened, we did not find any mutations that would result in the alteration of the coding sequence and hence, the predicted GATA4 structure and function. Although the aetiology of ASD is multifactorial, our findings indicate that GATA4 may not be responsible for the ASD in the dogs used in this study. However, this does not eliminate GATA4 as a candidate for ASD in other dog breeds.

  4. Screening for JH1 genetic defect carriers in Jersey cattle by a polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Guo, Gang; Huang, Hetian; Lu, Lu; Wang, Lijie; Fang, Lingzhao; Liu, Lin; Wang, Yachun; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-09-01

    An autosomal recessive genetic defect termed JH1 has been associated with early embryonic loss in the Jersey cattle breed. The genetic basis has been identified as a cytosine to thymine mutation in the CWC15 gene that changes an amino acid from arginine to a stop code. To screen for JH1 carriers in an imported Jersey population in China, a method based on a polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay (PCR-RFLP) was developed for the accurate diagnosis of the JH1 allele. A total of 449 randomly chosen cows were examined with the PCR-RFLP assay, and 31 were identified as JH1 carriers, corresponding to a carrier frequency of 6.9%. The PCR-RFLP method was validated by DNA sequencing of 8 positive and 13 negative samples, with all 21 samples giving the expected DNA sequence. In addition, 3 negative and 3 positive samples were confirmed by a commercial microarray-based single nucleotide polymorphism assay. Finally, samples from 9 bulls in the United States of known status were correctly identified as carriers (5 bulls) or noncarriers (4 bulls). As the JH1 defect has most likely spread worldwide, implementing routine screening is necessary to avoid the risk of carrier-to-carrier matings and to gradually eradicate the deleterious gene.

  5. Defect mitigation by ion induced amorphousization and solid-phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L. C.; Cottier, R. J.; Golding, T. D.; Holland, O. W.; Hossain, K. [Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore OK 73401 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Ion implantation is a common technique in the semiconductor industry used to modify the electrical properties of materials, usually silicon. Some dopant ions are sufficiently light, such as boron, that they do not create a continuous amorphous layer in silicon over the range of the ions. In the presence of such a layer, most of the ioninduced damage can be removed by solid-phase epitaxy growth (SPEG), which results in recrystallization of the amorphous damage. However, end-of-range defects at the amorphous-crystal interface give rise to threading dislocations during SPEG that degrade the quality of the recrytallized Si. We have studied the end of range defects in silicon with three different implantations. The first was with 80 keV {sup 30}Si with a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Si/cm{sup 2}, and the second was with 100 keV {sup 72}Ge at a dose of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Ge/cm{sup 2}, and the third was a double implant of 100 keV {sup 72}Ge at a dose of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Ge/cm{sup 2} followed by 340 keV {sup 28}Si at a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} Si/cm{sup 2}. SPEG was done at 650 Degree-Sign C to recrystalize the implanted samples, and the end of range defects were studied using channeled Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS-c). The effects of photon-assisted hydrogenation on amorphization and recrystallization were also studied.

  6. Defect induced changes on the excitation transfer dynamics in ZnS/Mn nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geburt Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transients of Mn internal 3d 5 luminescence in ZnS/Mn nanowires are strongly non-exponential. This non-exponential decay arises from an excitation transfer from the Mn ions to so-called killer centers, i.e., non-radiative defects in the nanostructures and is strongly related to the interplay of the characteristic length scales of the sample such as the spatial extensions, the distance between killer centers, and the distance between Mn ions. The transients of the Mn-related luminescence can be quantitatively described on the basis of a modified Förster model accounting for reduced dimensionality. Here, we confirm this modified Förster model by varying the number of killer centers systematically. Additional defects were introduced into the ZnS/Mn nanowire samples by irradiation with neon ions and by varying the Mn implantation or the annealing temperature. The temporal behavior of the internal Mn2+ (3d 5 luminescence is recorded on a time scale covering almost four orders of magnitude. A correlation between defect concentration and decay behavior of the internal Mn2+ (3d 5 luminescence is established and the energy transfer processes in the system of localized Mn ions and the killer centers within ZnS/Mn nanostructures is confirmed. If the excitation transfer between Mn ions and killer centers as well as migration effects between Mn ions are accounted for, and the correct effective dimensionality of the system is used in the model, one is able to describe the decay curves of ZnS/Mn nanostructures in the entire time window.

  7. Point Defects in Double Helix Induced by Interaction of Silver Nanoparticles with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Giorgadze, Tamar G; Monaselidze, Jamlet R; Jaliashvili, Zaza V; Khuskivadze, Temur B

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of DNA-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) complexes with H3O+, Cu2+ and Cl- has been studied by spectro-photometric, spectro-fluorimetric and differential scanning micro calorimetric methods. It is shown that DNA is a catalyst in redox reactions taking place in AgNPs adsorbed on its surface. We also demonstrate that Ag+ ions that are freed after corrosion of nanoparticles show absorption into the inner part of DNA double helix, i.e. they make the so-called cross-links between complementary base pairs of DNA. The cross-links present point defects of DNA which leads in-vivo to cell death.

  8. Defect-induced shift of the Peierls transition in TTF-TCNQ thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Huth, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of the substrate material and film thickness on the Peierls transition temperature in tetrathiafulvalene- tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) thin films, grown by physical vapor deposition. Our analysis shows that the substrate material and the growth...... conditions strongly influence the film morphology. In particular, we demonstrate that the Peierls transition temperature in thin films is lower than in TTF-TCNQ single crystals. We argue that this effect arises due to defects, which emerge in TTF-TCNQ thin films during the growth process. © 2011 Elsevier B.V....

  9. Identification of defects in GaAs induced by 1 MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, S.T.; Nener, B.D.; Faraone, L.; Nassibian, A.G. [Western Australia Univ., Nedlands, WA (Australia); Hotchkis, M.A.C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    This paper shows that 1 MeV electron irradiation on n-type vapor phase epitaxial (VPE) GaAs creates three electron traps E1, E2 and EL6, and results in the splitting of the EL2 center into two levels EL2-A and EL2-B. A 15 minutes isochronal anneal results in the annihilation of the E1 and E2 traps, a reduction in EL6 trap concentration, and the return of EL2 to a single level EL2-A. A defect model is outlined which correlates with the observed results. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Masashi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Nobuto; Arakaki, Kazunobu; Onodera, Shin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2011-02-22

    Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  11. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onodera Shin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN gel at the bottom of the defect. Methods Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I, 2.5-mm depth (in Group II, or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. Results The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p Conclusions This study demonstrated that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral condyle.

  12. [The genetic safety of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Qing-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Since Takahashi and Yamanaka first generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse fibroblasts successfully in 2006, iPS cells have rapidly become a new hotspot in the field of stem cells research because of their broad potential application prospects. Meanwhile, more and more attentions are paid to the genetic safety of iPS cells. This article summarizes recent findings on genetic safety of iPS cells and reviews the possible causes leading to genetic instability of iPS cells. Hopefully, this review is helpful to improve the induction of iPS cells and obtain genetically safe iPS cells.

  13. Genetic Determinants of Parkinson's Disease: Can They Help to Stratify the Patients Based on the Underlying Molecular Defect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redenšek, Sara; Trošt, Maja; Dolžan, Vita

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a sporadic progressive neurodegenerative brain disorder with a relatively strong genetic background. We have reviewed the current literature about the genetic factors that could be indicative of pathophysiological pathways of PD and their applications in everyday clinical practice. Information on novel risk genes is coming from several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses. GWASs that have been performed so far enabled the identification of 24 loci as PD risk factors. These loci take part in numerous cellular processes that may contribute to PD pathology: protein aggregation, protein, and membrane trafficking, lysosomal autophagy, immune response, synaptic function, endocytosis, inflammation, and metabolic pathways are among the most important ones. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms are usually located in the non-coding regions and their functionality remains to be determined, although they presumably influence gene expression. It is important to be aware of a very low contribution of a single genetic risk factor to PD development; therefore, novel prognostic indices need to account for the cumulative nature of genetic risk factors. A better understanding of PD pathophysiology and its genetic background will help to elucidate the underlying pathological processes. Such knowledge may help physicians to recognize subjects with the highest risk for the development of PD, and provide an opportunity for the identification of novel potential targets for neuroprotective treatment. Moreover, it may enable stratification of the PD patients according to their genetic fingerprint to properly personalize their treatment as well as supportive measures.

  14. Mitochondria defects are involved in lead-acetate-induced adult hematopoietic stem cell decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Jia, Dao-Yong; Cai, Shi-Zhong; Li, Cheng-Peng; Zhang, Meng-Si; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-19

    Occupational high-grade lead exposure has been reduced in recent decades as a result of increased regulation. However, environmental lead exposure remains widespread, and is associated with severe toxicity implicated in human diseases. We performed oral intragastric administration of various dose lead acetate to adult Sprague Dawley rats to define the role of lead exposure in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) function, and to clarify its underlying mechanism. Lead acetate-exposed rats exhibited developmental abnormalities in myeloid and lymphoid lineages, and a significant decline in immune functions. It also showed HSCs functional decline associated with senescent phenotype with low grade lead acetate exposure or apoptotic phenotype with relative higher grade dose exposure. Mechanistic exploration showed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lead acetate-exposed CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment, which correlated with functional defects in cellular mitochondria. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C led to reversion of the CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment functional decline. These results indicate that lead acetate perturbs the hematopoietic balance of adult HSCs, associated with cellular mitochondria defects, increased intracellular ROS generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Superovulation induces defective methylation in line-1 retrotransposon elements in blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xing-Wei; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Sun, Shao-Chen; Jin, Yong-Xun; Heo, Young Tae; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2013-07-18

    Series of epigenetic events happen during preimplantation development. Therefore assistant reproduction techniques (ART) have the potential to disrupt epigenetic regulation during embryo development. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether defects in methylation patterns in blastocyst due to superovulation originate from abnormal expression of Dnmts. Low- (6 IU) and high- (10 IU) dosage of PMSG was used to stimulate the female mice. The metaphase II(MII) oocytes, zygotes and blastocyst stage embryos were collected. Global methylation and methylation at H3K9 in zygote, and methylation at repeated sequence Line 1 and IAP in blastocysts were assayed. In addition, expression of Dnmts was examined in oocytes and zygotes. Global DNA methylation and methylation at H3K9 in zygotes derived from females after low- or high-dosage hormone treatment were unaltered compared to that in controls. Moreover, DNA methylation at IAP in blastocysts was also unaffected, regardless of hormone dosage. In contrast, methylation at Line1 decreased when high-dose hormone was administered. Unexpectedly, expression of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Dnmt3L as well as maintenance Dnmt1o in oocytes and zygotes was not disrupted. The results suggest that defects in embryonic methylation patterns do not originate from the disruption of Dnmt expression.

  16. Paramagnetic defects induced by electron irradiation in barium hollandite ceramics for caesium storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Chevaldonnet, V; Gourier, D; Caurant, D; Esnouf, S; Charpentier, T; Costantini, J M

    2006-04-26

    We have studied by electron paramagnetic resonance the mechanism of defect production by electron irradiation in barium hollandite, a material used for immobilization of radioactive caesium. The irradiation conditions were the closest possible to those occurring in Cs storage waste forms. Three paramagnetic defects were observed, independently of the irradiation conditions. A hole centre (H centre) is attributed to a superoxide ion O(2)(-) originating from hole trapping by interstitial oxygen produced by electron irradiation. An electron centre (E(1) centre) is attributed to a Ti(3+) ion adjacent to the resulting oxygen vacancy. Another electron centre (E(2) centre) is attributed to a Ti(3+) ion in a cation site adjacent to an extra Ba(2+) ion in a neighbouring tunnel, originating from barium displacement by elastic collisions. Comparison of the effects of external irradiations by electrons with the β-decay of Cs in storage waste forms is discussed. It is concluded that the latter would be dominated by E(1) and H centres rather than E(2) centres.

  17. Use of Bioresorbable Hydrogels and Genetic Engineering to Accomplish Rapid Stabilization and Healing in Segmental Long Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    also suggests that the lymphatics play a critical role in fracture repair. With normal healing of tibial fracture, foci of ossification are...Effectiveness in segmental tibial defects in rats. Tissue Eng 12:489–497. Finkemeier CG. 2002. Bone-grafting and bone-graft substitutes. J Bone Joint...Vogelin E, Brekke JH, Jones NF. 2000. Heterotopic and orthotopic bone formation with a vascularized periosteal flap, a matrix and rh-BMP- 2 (bone

  18. 5-AZA-2'-DEOXYCYTIDINE INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY AND LONG BONE REDUCTION DEFECTS IN THE MURINE LIMB

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antineoplastic drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (dAZA) is a DNA hypomethylating agent that can be used to induce hind limb phocomelia in the offspring of CD-1 Swiss Webster mice. Previously, our laboratory investigated the possibility that dAZA induced alterations in gene express...

  19. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. Beyond induced mutants: using worms to study natural variation in genetic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Philips, P.C.; Bono, de M.; Doroszuk, A.

    2008-01-01

    Induced mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are used to study genetic pathways of processes ranging from aging to behavior. The effects of such mutations are usually analyzed in a single wildtype background: N2. However, studies in other species demonstrate that the phenotype(s) of induce

  1. New inducible genetic method reveals critical roles of GABA in the control of feeding and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently available inducibleCre/loxPsystems, despite their considerable utility in gene manipulation, have pitfalls in certain scenarios, such as unsatisfactory recombination rates and deleterious effects on physiology and behavior. To overcome these limitations, we designed a new, inducible gene-t...

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  3. Natural and induced genetic variation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Bartholomeus Mathijs Godefridus

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most studied model organisms for human heath and disease. Researchers have developed many inbred strains that specifically mimic aspects of human genetic disease, like hypertension, diabetes, and neurological disorders, like anxiety, schizophrenia, and many others. T

  4. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  5. Identification of defective illegitimate recombinational repair of oxidatively-induced DNA double-strand breaks in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M. E.; Winters, T. A.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal-recessive lethal human disease. Homozygotes suffer from a number of neurological disorders, as well as very high cancer incidence. Heterozygotes may also have a higher than normal risk of cancer, particularly for the breast. The gene responsible for the disease (ATM) has been cloned, but its role in mechanisms of the disease remain unknown. Cellular A-T phenotypes, such as radiosensitivity and genomic instability, suggest that a deficiency in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may be the primary defect; however, overall levels of DSB rejoining appear normal. We used the shuttle vector, pZ189, containing an oxidatively-induced DSB, to compare the integrity of DSB rejoining in one normal and two A-T fibroblast cells lines. Mutation frequencies were two-fold higher in A-T cells, and the mutational spectrum was different. The majority of the mutations found in all three cell lines were deletions (44-63%). The DNA sequence analysis indicated that 17 of the 17 plasmids with deletion mutations in normal cells occurred between short direct-repeat sequences (removing one of the repeats plus the intervening sequences), implicating illegitimate recombination in DSB rejoining. The combined data from both A-T cell lines showed that 21 of 24 deletions did not involve direct-repeats sequences, implicating a defect in the illegitimate recombination pathway. These findings suggest that the A-T gene product may either directly participate in illegitimate recombination or modulate the pathway. Regardless, this defect is likely to be important to a mechanistic understanding of this lethal disease.

  6. Defect induced tunable near infrared emission of Er-CeO2 by heterovalent co-dopants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Mihaela; Avram, Daniel; Cojocaru, Bogdan; Tiseanu, Ion; Parvulescu, Vasile; Tiseanu, Carmen

    2016-07-21

    We investigate the effects of heterovalent co-dopants on the structural and emission properties of 1% Er-CeO2 nanoparticles. The CeO2 oxide host was selected on the basis of its fairly well-understood defect chemistry in either a pure or doped state. As a luminescent activator, Er is acknowledged as an interesting element due to its rich luminescence and excitation properties spanning the visible to near-infrared range. The optically inactive trivalent La and monovalent Li metal ions with a concentration of up to 20% were chosen to presumably generate a variable amount of defects in the Er-CeO2 lattice. It was found that La and Li co-dopants induced distinct changes related to the size, lattice constant, bandgap energy, lattice and surface defects of Er-CeO2. As a result of these changes, a strong modulation of the luminescence intensity and shape was measured using a suite of excitation conditions (charge-transfer absorption band of CeO2, direct/up-conversion into Er absorptions and X-ray excitation modes). The use of Eu as a luminescent probe offered additional information concerning the effects of La/Li co-doping on the local structure surrounding the luminescent activator. Remarkably high percentages of 90 and 98% of the total emission of Er measured between 500 and 1100 nm are measured in the near-infrared region at 980 nm under X-ray and up-conversion excitation at ∼1500 nm, respectively. The optical properties suggest that Li, Er co-doped CeO2 has good potential for therapy and biological imaging.

  7. Nxf1 natural variant E610G is a semi-dominant suppressor of IAP-induced RNA processing defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Concepcion

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons contribute functional genetic variation in animal genomes. In mice, Intracisternal A Particles (IAPs are a frequent source of both new mutations and polymorphism across laboratory strains. Intronic IAPs can induce alternative RNA processing choices, including alternative splicing. We previously showed IAP I∆1 subfamily insertional mutations are suppressed by a wild-derived allele of the major mRNA export factor, Nxf1. Here we show that a wider diversity of IAP insertions present in the mouse reference sequence induce insertion-dependent alternative processing that is suppressed by Nxf1CAST alleles. These insertions typically show more modest gene expression changes than de novo mutations, suggesting selection or attenuation. Genome-wide splicing-sensitive microarrays and gene-focused assays confirm specificity of Nxf1 genetic modifier activity for IAP insertion alleles. Strikingly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing demonstrates that a single amino acid substitution in Nxf1, E610G, is sufficient to recreate a quantitative genetic modifier in a co-isogenic background.

  8. Nxf1 natural variant E610G is a semi-dominant suppressor of IAP-induced RNA processing defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Concepcion

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons contribute functional genetic variation in animal genomes. In mice, Intracisternal A Particles (IAPs are a frequent source of both new mutations and polymorphism across laboratory strains. Intronic IAPs can induce alternative RNA processing choices, including alternative splicing. We previously showed IAP I∆1 subfamily insertional mutations are suppressed by a wild-derived allele of the major mRNA export factor, Nxf1. Here we show that a wider diversity of IAP insertions present in the mouse reference sequence induce insertion-dependent alternative processing that is suppressed by Nxf1CAST alleles. These insertions typically show more modest gene expression changes than de novo mutations, suggesting selection or attenuation. Genome-wide splicing-sensitive microarrays and gene-focused assays confirm specificity of Nxf1 genetic modifier activity for IAP insertion alleles. Strikingly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing demonstrates that a single amino acid substitution in Nxf1, E610G, is sufficient to recreate a quantitative genetic modifier in a co-isogenic background.

  9. Biotin-deficient diet induces chromosome misalignment and spindle defects in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ai; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Increased abnormal oocytes due to meiotic chromosome misalignment and spindle defects lead to elevated rates of infertility, miscarriage, and trisomic conceptions. Here, we investigated the effect of biotin deficiency on oocyte quality. Three-week-old female ICR mice were fed a biotin-deficient or control diet (0, 0.004 g biotin/kg diet) for 21 days. On day 22, these mouse oocytes were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Due to biotin, undernutrition increased the frequency of abnormal oocytes (the biotin deficient vs. control: 40 vs. 16%). Next, the remaining mice in the biotin-deficient group were fed a control or biotin-deficient diet from day 22 to 42. Although biotin nutritional status in the recovery group was restored, the frequency of abnormal oocytes in the recovery group was still higher than that in the control group (48 vs. 18%). Our results indicate that steady, sufficient biotin intake is required for the production of high-quality oocytes in mice.

  10. Antisite-defect-induced surface segregation in ordered NiPt alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourovskii, L.V.; Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I.A.;

    2003-01-01

    By means of first principles simulations we demonstrate that tiny deviations from stoichiometry in the bulk composition of the NiPt-L1(0) ordered alloy have a great impact on the atomic configuration of the (111) surface. We predict that at T=600 K the (111) surface of the Ni51Pt49 and Ni50Pt50...... alloys corresponds to the (111) truncation of the bulk L1(0) ordered structure. However, the (111) surface of the nickel deficient Ni49Pt51 alloy is strongly enriched by Pt and should exhibit the pattern of the 2x2 structure. Such a drastic change in the segregation behavior is due to the presence...... of different antisite defects in the Ni- and Pt-rich alloys and is a manifestation of the so-called off-stoichiometric effect....

  11. Electrospun biodegradable microfibers induce new collagen formation in a rat abdominal wall defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Menglin; Glindtvad, Cecilie; Vinge Nygaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Half of the female population over age 50 years will experience pelvic organ prolapse. We suggest a new approach based on tissue engineering principles to functionally reconstruct the anatomical structures of the pelvic floor. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical performance...... and effect on collagen and elastin production of a degradable mesh releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Implantation of biodegradable mesh with or without bFGF in their core has been conducted in 40 rats in an abdominal wall defect model. Samples were explanted after 4, 8, and 24 weeks...... after 4 weeks with bFGF but signs of elastin fibers were seen at 24 weeks. The investigation showed that a biodegradable mesh promotes tissue formation with a promising strength. The mesh with bFGF did not represent any advantage on either long or short term in comparison to the mesh without b...

  12. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  13. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hain, Christoph Hugenschmidt, Philip Pikart and Peter Böni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A friction stir welded (FSW Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  14. Anomalously high capacitance of β-rhombohedral boron induced by structural defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareishvili, Otar; Gabunia, Domenti; Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2009-06-01

    Capacitance and dielectric loss tangent measurements have been carried out for β-rhombohedral boron within the frequency range 102 - 104 Hz and temperature interval 77 - 373 K. Different specimens were studied: high-purity macrocrystals, vapor-liquid-grown faceted crystals, zone-melted single crystals, and crucible-melted polycrystals. Within the whole ranges of measurements, the capacitance of all samples was 10-60 times larger than their geometric capacitance. Temperature dependences of the capacitance reveal two-level step-like behavior. Location of levels is independent from the applied electric field frequency, but at higher frequencies, the capacitance steps shift to lower temperatures. For all frequencies, an abrupt rise in capacitance takes place at one and same temperature ~ 290 K. At low temperature, dielectric losses are negligible, but they increase towards the room temperature. At ~ 290 K (i.e., simultaneously with the abrupt rise in capacitance) their value abruptly falls down. Dielectric properties of β-rhombohedral boron are discussed on the basis of generalized barrier model of the heterogeneous semiconductor within its three-layer version. Planar defects like twins and stacking faults characteristic for real crystals are assumed to produce local elastic stresses sufficient for the local lowering in conductivity due to the piezoresistive effect. Consequently, layers adjacent to the planar defects should represent low-conducting inclusions in the relatively high-conducting matrix. In addition, the lesser-conducting barrier layers should appear at their boundaries. Effect at ~ 290 K seems to be related with a symmetry-restoring phase transition driven by the occupation patterns of certain atomic sites in β-rhombohedral crystalline boron lattice.

  15. ZnO:Cu nanorods with visible luminescence: copper induced defect levels and its luminescence dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, R.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of ZnO:Cu nanoparticles with rod-like morphology using co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that these ZnO:Cu nanoparticles has wurtzite structure with preferential growth along (1 0 1) crystal plane. The formation of additional defect levels in these particles on doping with Cu was investigated using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. The increase in intensity of E 1 (LO) mode observed at ~580 cm-1 in the Raman spectra of ZnO:Cu nanoparticles, confirmed the formation of additional defect levels in these nanoparticles on doping with Cu. The doping concentration was evident in the intensity of the additional Raman mode observed at ~280 cm-1 for the Cu doped nanoparticles. Photoluminescence spectra of Cu doped ZnO nanoparticles shows three visible emission peaks at 413, 435 and 531 nm along with a UV emission peak at 390 nm, whereas undoped ZnO nanoparticles showed only two peaks, at 389 and 582 nm. The shrinkage in band gap causing the emission of violet, blue and green colors on doping with Cu are attributed to the s-d and p-d exchange interactions between conduction band electrons of ZnO and localized d electrons of Cu ions, resulting in renormalization of band gap. The emission bands observed in these ZnO:Cu nanoparticles has been illustrated with a schematic energy level diagram.

  16. Genetic effects on variation in red-blood-cell folate in adults: Implications for the familial aggregation of neural tube defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, L.E. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Duffy, P.; Bellingham, G. [Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated folic acid as an important determinant of normal human growth, development, and function. Insufficient folate levels appear to be a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD), as well as for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, relatively little is known about the factors that influence folate status in the general population. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and nongenetic factors to variation in folate, we have evaluated red blood cell (RBC) folate levels in 440 pairs of MZ twins and in 331 pairs of DZ twins. The data were best described by a model in which 46% of the variance in RBC folate was attributable to additive genetic effects, 16% of the variance was due to measured phenotypic covariates, and 38% of the variance was due to random environmental effects. Moreover, the correlations for RBC folate in MZ co-twins (r = .46) and in repeat measures from the same individual (r = .51) were very similar, indicating that virtually all repeatable variation in RBC folate is attributable to genetic factors. On the basis of these results, it would seem reasonable to initiate a search for the specific genes that influence RBC folate levels in the general population. Such genes ultimately may be used to identify individuals at increased risk for NTD and other folate-related diseases. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Identification of two mutations that cause defects in the ligninolytic system through an efficient forward genetics in the white-rot agaricomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Izuno, Ayako; Kodera, Rina; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Masahiro; Isagi, Yuji; Honda, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    White-rot fungi play an important role in the global carbon cycle because they are the species that almost exclusively biodegrade wood lignin in nature. Lignin peroxidases (LiPs), manganese peroxidases (MnPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs) are considered key players in the ligninolytic system. Apart from LiPs, MnPs and VPs, however, only few other factors involved in the ligninolytic system have been investigated using molecular genetics, implying the existence of unidentified elements. By combining classical genetic techniques with next-generation sequencing technology, they successfully showed an efficient forward genetics approach to identify mutations causing defects in the ligninolytic system of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus. In this study, they identified two genes - chd1 and wtr1 - mutations in which cause an almost complete loss of Mn(2+) -dependent peroxidase activity. The chd1 gene encodes a putative chromatin modifier, and wtr1 encodes an agaricomycete-specific protein with a putative DNA-binding domain. The chd1-1 mutation and targeted disruption of wtr1 hamper the ability of P. ostreatus to biodegrade wood lignin. Examination of the effects of the aforementioned mutation and disruption on the expression of certain MnP/VP genes suggests that a complex mechanism underlies the ligninolytic system in P. ostreatus. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Chlamydia induces anchorage independence in 3T3 cells and detrimental cytological defects in an infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Knowlton

    Full Text Available Chlamydia are gram negative, obligate intracellular bacterial organisms with different species causing a multitude of infections in both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection (STI Chlamydia, the most commonly acquired bacterial STI in the United States. Chlamydial infections have also been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in women co-infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV. We have previously shown chlamydial infection results in centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation leading to chromosomal instability. Many studies indicate that centrosome abnormalities, spindle defects, and chromosome segregation errors can lead to cell transformation. We hypothesize that the presence of these defects within infected dividing cells identifies a possible mechanism for Chlamydia as a cofactor in cervical cancer formation. Here we demonstrate that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is able to transform 3T3 cells in soft agar resulting in anchorage independence and increased colony formation. Additionally, we show for the first time Chlamydia infects actively replicating cells in vivo. Infection of mice with Chlamydia results in significantly increased cell proliferation within the cervix, and in evidence of cervical dysplasia. Confocal examination of these infected tissues also revealed elements of chlamydial induced chromosome instability. These results contribute to a growing body of data implicating a role for Chlamydia in cervical cancer development and suggest a possible molecular mechanism for this effect.

  19. Depletion of SMN by RNA interference in HeLa cells induces defects in Cajal body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Cyrille; Neel, Henry; Bertrand, Edouard; Bordonné, Rémy

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced expression of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. The SMN protein is ubiquitously expressed and is present both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus where it localizes in Cajal bodies. The SMN complex plays an essential role for the biogenesis of spliceosomal U-snRNPs. In this article, we have used an RNA interference approach in order to analyse the effects of SMN depletion on snRNP assembly in HeLa cells. Although snRNP profiles are not perturbed in SMN-depleted cells, we found that SMN depletion gives rise to cytoplasmic accumulation of a GFP-SmB reporter protein. We also demonstrate that the SMN protein depletion induces defects in Cajal body formation with coilin being localized in multiple nuclear foci and in nucleolus instead of canonical Cajal bodies. Interestingly, the coilin containing foci do not contain snRNPs but appear to co-localize with U85 scaRNA. Because Cajal bodies represent the location in which snRNPs undergo 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, our results raise the possibility that SMN depletion might give rise to a defect in the snRNA modification process.

  20. α-Synuclein senses lipid packing defects and induces lateral expansion of lipids leading to membrane remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouberai, Myriam M; Wang, Juan; Swann, Marcus J; Galvagnion, Celine; Guilliams, Tim; Dobson, Christopher M; Welland, Mark E

    2013-07-19

    There is increasing evidence for the involvement of lipid membranes in both the functional and pathological properties of α-synuclein (α-Syn). Despite many investigations to characterize the binding of α-Syn to membranes, there is still a lack of understanding of the binding mode linking the properties of lipid membranes to α-Syn insertion into these dynamic structures. Using a combination of an optical biosensing technique and in situ atomic force microscopy, we show that the binding strength of α-Syn is related to the specificity of the lipid environment (the lipid chemistry and steric properties within a bilayer structure) and to the ability of the membranes to accommodate and remodel upon the interaction of α-Syn with lipid membranes. We show that this interaction results in the insertion of α-Syn into the region of the headgroups, inducing a lateral expansion of lipid molecules that can progress to further bilayer remodeling, such as membrane thinning and expansion of lipids out of the membrane plane. We provide new insights into the affinity of α-Syn for lipid packing defects found in vesicles of high curvature and in planar membranes with cone-shaped lipids and suggest a comprehensive model of the interaction between α-Syn and lipid bilayers. The ability of α-Syn to sense lipid packing defects and to remodel membrane structure supports its proposed role in vesicle trafficking.

  1. Assessment of locomotion behavioral defects induced by acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dayong; XING Xiaojuan

    2008-01-01

    Locomotion behaviors are susceptible to disruption by a broad spectrum of chemicals and environmental stresses. However, no systematic testing of locomotion behavior defects induced by metal exposure has been conducted in the model organism of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, the acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure on the locomotion behaviors was analyzed in nematodes. Endpoints of head thrash, body bend, forward turn, backward turn, and Omega/U turn were chosen to evaluate the locomotion behavioral defects. Our data suggest that the endpoints of head thrash, body bend, and forward turn will be useful for the evaluation of heavy metal toxicity in nematodes. The endpoint of head thrash could detect the toxicity from Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, and Pb exposures at a low concentration (2.5 μmol/L). The endpoint of body bend could be explored to evaluate the toxicity from all assayed heavy metal exposures at different concentrations, whereas the endpoint of forward turn will be more useful for the evaluation of heavy metal toxicity at high concentrations. Thus, endpoints of these locomotion behaviors establish a fast and economic way to assess the presence of acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure in nematode C. elegans.

  2. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  3. A Modulator-Induced Defect-Formation Strategy to Hierarchically Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks with High Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guorui; Jiang, Hai-Long

    2017-01-09

    The pore size enlargement and structural stability have been recognized as two crucial targets, which are rarely achieved together, in the development of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Herein, we have developed a versatile modulator-induced defect-formation strategy, in the presence of monocarboxylic acid as a modulator and an insufficient amount of organic ligand, successfully realizing the controllable synthesis of hierarchically porous MOFs (HP-MOFs) with high stability and tailorable pore characters. Remarkably, the integration of high stability and large mesoporous property enables these HP-MOFs to be important porous platforms for applications involving large molecules, especially in catalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. High-resolution electron-beam-induced-current study of the defect structure in GaN epilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Shmidt, N M; Usikov, A S; Yakimov, E B; Zavarin, E E

    2002-01-01

    Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) investigations of GaN structures grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition on (0001) sapphire substrates have been carried out. It is shown that the widths of the EBIC profiles for individual extended defects can be as small as about 100 nm. This width is observed to decrease with decreasing diffusion length and/or with increasing electron beam energy. The high spatial resolution is explained by the small diffusion length in the samples under study. The diffusion length is small even in structures with dislocation densities of about 10 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 and carrier mobilities of about 600 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 300 K and 1800 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 125 K.

  5. Dopaminergic neurons differentiating from LRRK2 G2019S induced pluripotent stem cells show early neuritic branching defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgs, Laurence; Peyre, Elise; Alix, Philippe; Hanon, Kevin; Grobarczyk, Benjamin; Godin, Juliette D; Purnelle, Audrey; Krusy, Nathalie; Maquet, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seutin, Vincent; Malgrange, Brigitte; Nguyen, Laurent

    2016-09-19

    Some mutations of the LRRK2 gene underlie autosomal dominant form of Parkinson's disease (PD). The G2019S is a common mutation that accounts for about 2% of PD cases. To understand the pathophysiology of this mutation and its possible developmental implications, we developed an in vitro assay to model PD with human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed from skin fibroblasts of PD patients suffering from the LRKK2 G2019S mutation. We differentiated the hiPSCs into neural stem cells (NSCs) and further into dopaminergic neurons. Here we show that NSCs bearing the mutation tend to differentiate less efficiently into dopaminergic neurons and that the latter exhibit significant branching defects as compared to their controls.

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction and respiratory chain defects in a rodent model of methotrexate-induced enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, V K; Natarajan, K; Isaac, B; Selvakumar, D; Abraham, P

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of methotrexate (MTX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, is limited by its gastrointestinal toxicity and the mechanism of which is not clear. The present study investigates the possible role of mitochondrial damage in MTX-induced enteritis. Small intestinal injury was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 7 mg kg(-1) body wt. MTX intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days. MTX administration resulted in severe small intestinal injury and extensive damage to enterocyte mitochondria. Respiratory control ratio, the single most useful and reliable test of mitochondrial function, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yll)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction, a measure of cell viability were significantly reduced in all the fractions of MTX-treated rat enterocytes. A massive decrease (nearly 70%) in the activities of complexes II and IV was also observed. The results of the present study suggest that MTX-induced damage to enterocyte mitochondria may play a critical role in enteritis. MTX-induced alteration in mitochondrial structure may cause its dysfunction and decreases the activities of the electron chain complexes. MTX-induced mitochondrial damage can result in reduced adenosine triphosphate synthesis, thereby interfering with nutrient absorption and enterocyte renewal. This derangement may contribute to malabsorption of nutrients, diarrhea, and weight loss seen in patients on MTX chemotherapy.

  7. Defects in Tendon, Ligament, and Enthesis in Response to Genetic Alterations in Key Proteoglycans and Glycoproteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Juneja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the genetic alterations and knockdown approaches published in the literature to assess the role of key proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the structural development, function, and repair of tendon, ligament, and enthesis. The information was collected from (i genetically altered mice, (ii in vitro knockdown studies, (iii genetic variants predisposition to injury, and (iv human genetic diseases. The genes reviewed are for small leucine-rich proteoglycans (lumican, fibromodulin, biglycan, decorin, and asporin; dermatan sulfate epimerase (Dse that alters structure of glycosaminoglycan and hence the function of small leucine-rich proteoglycans by converting glucuronic to iduronic acid; matricellular proteins (thrombospondin 2, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc, periostin, and tenascin X including human tenascin C variants; and others, such as tenomodulin, leukocyte cell derived chemotaxin 1 (chondromodulin-I, ChM-I, CD44 antigen (Cd44, lubricin (Prg4, and aggrecan degrading gene, a disintegrin-like and metallopeptidase (reprolysin type with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5. Understanding these genes represents drug targets for disrupting pathological mechanisms that lead to tendinopathy, ligamentopathy, enthesopathy, enthesitis and tendon/ligament injury, that is, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

  8. Genetic variation in normal tissue toxicity induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popanda, Odilia, E-mail: o.popanda@dkfz.de [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Marquardt, Jens Uwe [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang-Claude, Jenny [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmezer, Peter [Division of Epigenomics and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-10

    Radiotherapy is an important weapon in the treatment of cancer, but adverse reactions developing in the co-irradiated normal tissue can be a threat for patients. Early reactions might disturb the usual application schedule and limit the radiation dose. Late appearing and degenerative reactions might reduce or destroy normal tissue function. Genetic markers conferring the ability to identify hyper-sensitive patients in advance would considerably improve therapy. Association studies on genetic variation and occurrence of side effects should help to identify such markers. This survey includes published studies and novel data from our own laboratory. It illustrates the presence of candidate polymorphisms in genes involved in the cellular response to irradiation which could be used as predictive markers for radiosensitivity in breast or prostate cancer patients. For other tumor types such as head and neck cancers or brain tumors, the available data are much more limited. In any case, further validation of these markers is needed in large patient cohorts with systematically recorded data on side effects and patient characteristics. Genetic variation contributing to radiosensitivity should be screened on a broader basis using newly developed, more comprehensive approaches such as genome-wide association studies.

  9. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall components by 2-fluoro 2-deoxy-L-fucose induces defects in root cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bardor, Muriel; Burel, Carole; Vauzeilles, Boris; Lerouxel, Olivier; Anderson, Charles T; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Screening of commercially available fluoro monosaccharides as putative growth inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that 2-fluoro 2-l-fucose (2F-Fuc) reduces root growth at micromolar concentrations. The inability of 2F-Fuc to affect an Atfkgp mutant that is defective in the fucose salvage pathway indicates that 2F-Fuc must be converted to its cognate GDP nucleotide sugar in order to inhibit root growth. Chemical analysis of cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins demonstrated that fucosylation of xyloglucans and of N-linked glycans is fully inhibited by 10 μm 2F-Fuc in Arabidopsis seedling roots, but genetic evidence indicates that these alterations are not responsible for the inhibition of root development by 2F-Fuc. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides also affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). At low concentrations, 2F-Fuc induced a decrease in RG-II dimerization. Both RG-II dimerization and root growth were partially restored in 2F-Fuc-treated seedlings by addition of boric acid, suggesting that the growth phenotype caused by 2F-Fuc was due to a deficiency of RG-II dimerization. Closer investigation of the 2F-Fuc-induced growth phenotype demonstrated that cell division is not affected by 2F-Fuc treatments. In contrast, the inhibitor suppressed elongation of root cells and promoted the emergence of adventitious roots. This study further emphasizes the importance of RG-II in cell elongation and the utility of glycosyltransferase inhibitors as new tools for studying the functions of cell wall polysaccharides in plant development. Moreover, supplementation experiments with borate suggest that the function of boron in plants might not be restricted to RG-II cross-linking, but that it might also be a signal molecule in the cell wall integrity-sensing mechanism.

  10. Chronic exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate induces behavior defects and neurotoxicity through oxidative damages, in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is an emerging persistent pollutant which shows multiple adverse health effects. However, the neurotoxicity of PFOS and its mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods, the present study provides a detailed description of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Results showed that the median lethal concentration of PFOS was 2.03 mM in Caenorhabditis elegans for 48 h exposure. 20 µM PFOS caused decrease of locomotor behaviors including forward movement, body bend and head thrash. Additionally, PFOS exposure reduced chemotaxis index of C. elegans, which indicates the decline of chemotaxis learning ability. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled transgenic strains, we found that PFOS caused down-regulated expression of a chemoreceptor gene, gcy-5, in ASE chemosensory neurons, but did not affect cholinergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, 48 h exposure to 25 µM and 50 µM PFOS induced cell damage, apoptosis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. PFOS caused significant increases of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity, but an actual decrease of glutathione peroxidase activity. Furthermore, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine rescued cells from PFOS-induced apoptosis via blocking ROS. Our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS can cause obvious neurotoxicity and behavior defects. Oxidative damage and anti-oxidative deficit are crucial mechanisms in neurotoxicity of PFOS.

  11. Investigating alcohol-induced congenital heart defects using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shi; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Ma, Pei; Karunamuni, Ganga; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome commonly results in neurological and craniofacial defects, additionally, as high as 54% of live-born children with this syndrome also possess cardiac abnormalities. We have previously shown that CNCC-ablated embryos exhibit similar structural and functional phenotypes as ethanol-exposed embryos. Here, we present progress on two fronts toward understanding the association between CNCC dysfunction and FAS-related CHDs. We have developed a technique for measuring the thickness of the cardiac cushions throughout the heart. These values were then mapped onto a surface mesh of the myocardial wall for 3-D visualization. The cushions were observed to be significantly reduced in the outflow tract of CNCC-ablated embryos. We also observed a correlation between abnormal pulsed Doppler waveforms and increased separation of the atrioventricular inferior and superior cushions. This correlation between function and structure will enable rapid phenotyping of perturbed embryos. Finally, we present our preliminary results using methyl donors to rescue ethanol-exposed embryonic CHDs. Betaine was administered along with the ethanol injection to embryos at 21 hours of development. The embryos were then analyzed at day 8 for survival and heart morphology. The administration of betaine resulted in a significant increase in survival and normalization of atrioventricular valve leaflet volume and interventricular septum thickness.

  12. C5a receptor signaling prevents folate deficiency-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Kerina J; Coulthard, Liam G; Jeanes, Angela; Lisgo, Steven; Simmons, David G; Callaway, Leonie K; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Finnell, Richard H; Woodruff, Trent M; Taylor, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    The complement system is involved in a range of diverse developmental processes, including cell survival, growth, differentiation, and regeneration. However, little is known about the role of complement in embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role for the canonical complement 5a receptor (C5aR) in the development of the mammalian neural tube under conditions of maternal dietary folic acid deficiency. Specifically, we found C5aR and C5 to be expressed throughout the period of neurulation in wild-type mice and localized the expression to the cephalic regions of the developing neural tube. C5aR was also found to be expressed in the neuroepithelium of early human embryos. Ablation of the C5ar1 gene or the administration of a specific C5aR peptide antagonist to folic acid-deficient pregnant mice resulted in a high prevalence of severe anterior neural tube defect-associated congenital malformations. These findings provide a new and compelling insight into the role of the complement system during mammalian embryonic development.

  13. Changes in the osmolarity of the embryonic microenvironment induce neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi-Mei; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Nuan; Wei, Yi-Fan; Li, Shuai; Chen, You-Peng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Henry Siu Sum; Hocher, Berthold; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-05-01

    Many maternal disorders that modify the embryonic microenvironment, such as a change in osmolarity, can affect development, but how these changes influence the early embryo remains obscure. Neural tube defects, for example, are common congenital disorders found in fetus and neonates. In this study, we investigated the impact of anisotonic osmolarity (unequal osmotic pressures) on neural tube development in the early chick embryo, finding that neuronal cell differentiation was impaired in the neural tube due to enhanced apoptosis and repressed cell proliferation. Anisotonic osmolarity also affected normal development of the neural crest, which in turn influenced abnormal development of the neural tube. As neural tube development is highly dependent on the proper expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), paired box 7 (PAX7), and sonic hedgehog (SHH) genes in the dorsal and ventral regions along the tube, we investigated the impact of anisotonic osmolarity on their expression. Indeed, small changes in osmolarity could positively and negatively impact the expression of these regulatory genes, which profoundly affected neural tube development. Thus, both the central and peripheral nervous systems were perturbed by anisotonic consitions as a consequence of the abnormal expression of key genes within the developing neural tube.

  14. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in the sheep induces placental defects that likely precede fetal demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, C J; Roberts, C T; Hartwich, K M; Walker, S K; McMillen, I C

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is poor in livestock with approximately 5% of transferred cloned embryos developing to term. SCNT is associated with gross placental structural abnormalities. We aimed to identify defects in placental histology and gene expression in failing ovine cloned pregnancies to better understand why so many clones generated by SCNT die in utero. Placentomes from SCNT pregnancies (n = 9) and age matched, naturally mated controls (n = 20) were collected at two gestational age ranges (105-134 days and 135-154 days; term = 147 days). There was no effect of cloning on total placental weight. However, cloning reduced the number of placentomes at both gestational ages (105-134 days: control 55.0 +/- 4.2, clone 44.7 +/- 8.0 and 135-154 days: control 72.2 +/- 5.1, clone 36.6 +/- 5.1; P clone 18.6 +/- 2.8 g and 135-154 days: control 6.6 +/- 0.6 g, clone 7.0 +/- 2.0 g; P cloned pregnancies had a significant volume of shed trophoblast and fetal villous hemorrhage, absent in controls, at both gestational age ranges (P clones. In addition, cloning reduced placental expression of key genes in placental differentiation and function. Thus, cloning by SCNT results in both gross and microscopic placental abnormalities. We speculate that trophoblast apoptosis, shedding, and hemorrhage may be causal in fetal death in ovine clones.

  15. Hepatic and Renal Failure after Anterior Myocardial Infarction Induced Apical Ventricular Septal Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lossnitzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 68-year-old man suffering from incremental hepatic and renal failure one month after anterior myocardial infarction. Cardiac MRI showed a pronounced apical post-AMI aneurysm, a moderate to severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitation as well as a hemodynamically highly significant 12 mm apical ventricular septal defect with a left-to-right ventricular shunt of almost 63% as the underlying cause. Heart X-ray revealed a severe LAD in-stent restenosis. CAPD catheter drainage of hydroperitoneum due to congestive liver and renal failure was provided in combination with intensified CAPD hemodialysis. Heart surgery was performed where the apical aneurysm was excised, the mitral valve was reconstructed, the IVSD was closed and the subtotally in-stent occluded LAD was bypassed. Post-surgery, the ascites were significantly reduced, and CAPD hemodialysis therapy could be terminated since the renal function gradually improved (MDRD = 25 mL/min. To our knowledge, for the first time we report successful CAPD catheter drainage of hydroperitoneum in combination with CAPD hemodialysis.

  16. AFM study of the SIMS beam induced roughness in monocrystalline silicon in presence of initial surface or bulk defects of nanometric size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fares, B. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: boubker.fares@insa-lyon.fr; Dubois, C. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Gautier, B. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Dupuy, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Cayrel, F. [Universite de Tours, Laboratoire de Micro-Electronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Gaudin, G. [Universite de Tours, Laboratoire de Micro-Electronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France)

    2006-07-30

    In this paper, the SIMS beam induced roughness (BIR) in monocrystalline Si in presence of initial surface or bulk defects of nanometric size is studied. We follow the development of the BIR by monitoring the increase of Si{sup 2+} and SiO{sub 2} {sup +} signals during SIMS sputtering. The topography of the crater bottoms is measured at different steps of the evolution of the roughness using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We show that in presence of nanometric sized defects on the surface or in the bulk, the BIR develops far more rapidly than usual. It appears as soon as the crater reaches the defects and, as reported on Si free from any treatment, the same morphology evidencing waves perpendicular to the sputtering beam develops rapidly. This study of the behaviour of the BIR in presence of voluntarily introduced defects allows us to better understand the basic physical phenomena involved in its apparition.

  17. Large genetic screens for gynogenesis and androgenesis haploid inducers in Arabidopsis thaliana failed to identify mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie ePortemer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gynogenesis is a process in which the embryo genome originates exclusively from female origin, following embryogenesis stimulation by a male gamete. In contrast, androgenesis is the development of embryos that contain only the male nuclear genetic background. Both phenomena are of great interest in plant breeding as haploidisation is an efficient tool to reduce the length of breeding schemes to create varieties. Although few inducer lines have been described, the genetic control of these phenomena is poorly understood. We developed genetic screens to identify mutations that would induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability of mutant pollen to induce either gynogenesis or androgenesis was tested by crossing mutagenized plants as males. Seedlings from these crosses were screened with recessive phenotypic markers, one genetically controlled by the female genome and another by the male genome. Positive and negative controls confirmed the unambiguous detection of both gynogenesis and androgenesis events. This strategy was applied to 1,666 EMS-mutagenised lines and 47 distant Arabidopsis strains. While an internal control suggested that the mutagenesis reached saturation, no gynogenesis or androgenesis inducer was found. However, spontaneous gynogenesis was observed at a frequency of 1/10,800. Altogether, these results suggest that no simple EMS-induced mutation in the male genome is able to induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis.

  18. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysi...

  19. Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial protein SURF1 is a specific assembly factor of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), but its function is poorly understood. SURF1 gene mutations cause a severe COX deficiency manifesting as the Leigh syndrome in humans, whereas in mice SURF1(-/-) knockout leads only to a mild COX defect. We used SURF1(-/-) mouse model for detailed analysis of disturbed COX assembly and COX ability to incorporate into respiratory supercomplexes (SCs) in different tissues and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we compared fibroblasts from SURF1(-/-) mouse and SURF1 patients to reveal interspecies differences in kinetics of COX biogenesis using 2D electrophoresis, immunodetection, arrest of mitochondrial proteosynthesis and pulse-chase metabolic labeling. The crucial differences observed are an accumulation of abundant COX1 assembly intermediates, low content of COX monomer and preferential recruitment of COX into I-III2-IVn SCs in SURF1 patient fibroblasts, whereas SURF1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts were characterized by low content of COX1 assembly intermediates and milder decrease in COX monomer, which appeared more stable. This pattern was even less pronounced in SURF1(-/-) mouse liver and brain. Both the control and SURF1(-/-) mice revealed only negligible formation of the I-III2-IVn SCs and marked tissue differences in the contents of COX dimer and III2-IV SCs, also less noticeable in liver and brain than in heart and muscle. Our studies support the view that COX assembly is much more dependent on SURF1 in humans than in mice. We also demonstrate markedly lower ability of mouse COX to form I-III2-IVn supercomplexes, pointing to tissue-specific and species-specific differences in COX biogenesis.

  20. Communication: Visualization and spectroscopy of defects induced by dehydrogenation in individual silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Mills, Jon M.; Kocevski, Vancho; Chiu, Sheng-Kuei; DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Gervasi, Christian F.; Taber, Benjamen N.; Rosenfield, Ariel E.; Eriksson, Olle; Rusz, Ján; Goforth, Andrea M.; Nazin, George V.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) study of the impact of dehydrogenation on the electronic structures of hydrogen-passivated silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) supported on the Au(111) surface. Gradual dehydrogenation is achieved by injecting high-energy electrons into individual SiNCs, which results, initially, in reduction of the electronic bandgap, and eventually produces midgap electronic states. We use theoretical calculations to show that the STS spectra of midgap states are consistent with the presence of silicon dangling bonds, which are found in different charge states. Our calculations also suggest that the observed initial reduction of the electronic bandgap is attributable to the SiNC surface reconstruction induced by conversion of surface dihydrides to monohydrides due to hydrogen desorption. Our results thus provide the first visualization of the SiNC electronic structure evolution induced by dehydrogenation and provide direct evidence for the existence of diverse dangling bond states on the SiNC surfaces.

  1. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, G.

    2014-11-18

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an “elemental” genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  2. Fast oxygen diffusion and iodide defects mediate oxygen-induced degradation of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristidou, Nicholas; Eames, Christopher; Sanchez-Molina, Irene; Bu, Xiangnan; Kosco, Jan; Islam, M. Saiful; Haque, Saif A.

    2017-05-01

    Methylammonium lead halide perovskites are attracting intense interest as promising materials for next-generation solar cells, but serious issues related to long-term stability need to be addressed. Perovskite films based on CH3NH3PbI3 undergo rapid degradation when exposed to oxygen and light. Here, we report mechanistic insights into this oxygen-induced photodegradation from a range of experimental and computational techniques. We find fast oxygen diffusion into CH3NH3PbI3 films is accompanied by photo-induced formation of highly reactive superoxide species. Perovskite films composed of small crystallites show higher yields of superoxide and lower stability. Ab initio simulations indicate that iodide vacancies are the preferred sites in mediating the photo-induced formation of superoxide species from oxygen. Thin-film passivation with iodide salts is shown to enhance film and device stability. The understanding of degradation phenomena gained from this study is important for the future design and optimization of stable perovskite solar cells.

  3. Influence of defect-induced biaxial strain on flux pinning in thick YBa2Cu3O7 layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovyov, V [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Li, Q [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Weidong, Si [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Maiorov, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Haugan, T. J. [Air Force Research Laboratory; Macmanus-driscoll, J L [University of Cambridge; Yao, H [Soochow University, Suzhou, People' s Republic of China; Jia, Q X [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This work reports a detailed structural study by synchrotron x-ray diffraction of several sets of thickYBa2Cu3O7 layers. The samples represent recent advances in flux-pinning design, containing various concentrations of artificial pinning centers: (i) BaZrO3 nanorods, (ii) BaZrO3 nanoparticles, and (iii) Y2O3 nanoparticles. A statistical analysis was performed in order to separate the effects of defect-induced and intrinsic pinning. We report a statistically significant correlation between the orthorhombic distortion of the YBCO matrix and the pinning strength. Our result implies that the in-plane ordering of oxygen ions in the chain positions accounts for approximately 60% of the pinning force. The strain-induced pinning mechanism analysis, based on the Eshelby model of elastically strained composites, predicts that small YBCO grain size is a critical component of a strong pinning architecture that can enable critical current density values approaching the depairing limit.

  4. Interactions between X-ray induced transient defects and pre-existing damage precursors in DKDP crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Saw, C K; Demos, S G

    2008-10-24

    Large-aperture laser systems, currently designed to achieve high energy densities at the target location (exceeding {approx} 10{sup 11} J/m{sup 3}), will enable studies of the physics of matter and radiation under extreme conditions. As a result, their optical components, such as the frequency conversion crystals (KDP/DKDP), may be exposed to X-rays and other ionizing radiation. This in turn may lead to a change in the damage performance of these materials as they may be affected by radiation-induced effects by either forming new damage initiation centers or interacting with the pre-existing damage initiating defects (so-called damage precursors). We present an experimental study on the laser-induced bulk damage performance at 355-nm of DKDP crystals following X-ray irradiation at room temperature. Results indicate that the damage performance of the material is affected by exposure to X-rays. We attribute this behavior to a change in the physical properties of the precursors which, in turn, affect their individual damage threshold.

  5. Inhibition of Plk1 and Cyclin B1 expression results in panobinostat-induced G₂ delay and mitotic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prystowsky, Michael; Feeney, Katherine; Kawachi, Nicole; Montagna, Cristina; Willmott, Michelle; Wasson, Christopher; Antkowiak, Maciej; Loudig, Olivier; Parish, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The development of clinically useful histone deacetylase inhibitors has expanded greatly. In a preclinical study, we showed that panobinostat (LBH589) inhibits cell cycle progression of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines at G₂/M and an associated decrease in expression of particular genes required for passage through G₂ and mitosis. In this study we sought to analyse the mechanistic underpinnings of panobinostat-induced growth arrest. HNSCC cell lines were synchronised and progression through mitosis monitored. We demonstrate that panobinostat causes a marked G₂ delay and mitotic defects. A loss of G₂-specific Plk1 and Cyclin B1 expression and co-incident increase in p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression is also shown. Furthermore, we show a significant loss of E2F1 recruitment to the promoters of these genes in response to panobinostat treatment. These data provide mechanistic evidence of panobinostat-induced cell cycle arrest and highlight its potential as a chemotherapeutic agent for HNSCC.

  6. Characteristics and contributions of defective, ecotropic, and mink cell focus-inducing viruses involved in a retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Sengupta, D N; Fredrickson, T N; Morse, H C; Hartley, J W

    1991-08-01

    LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus, a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus, contains a mixture of replication-competent B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) viruses and a defective genome that is the proximal cause of a syndrome, murine AIDS (MAIDS), characterized by lymphoproliferation and immunodeficiency. The defective (BM5d) and ecotropic components of this mixture were molecularly cloned, and complete (BM5d) or partial (ecotropic) nucleotide sequences were determined. BM5d closely resembled the Du5H genome cloned from the Duplan virus, featuring a highly divergent p12 sequence in the gag open reading frame. In MAIDS-sensitive C57BL/6 mice, BM5d was detected in tissues within 2 weeks of infection but was absent from tissues of the MAIDS-resistant strain, A/J, 12 weeks after infection. B-cell-lineage tumors from mice with MAIDS contained and expressed BM5d, and clonal integrations of this genome were variably associated with clonal expansions of B cells in infected mice. Finally, mRNA crosshybridizing with a probe for BM5d was present in spleen but not kidney cells of uninfected B6 mice.

  7. Characterization of radiation induced defects in EUROFER 97 after neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenkov, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Möslang, A.

    2011-10-01

    Specimens of EUROFER 97 prepared for impact tests have been irradiated to an average dose of 16.3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of 250-450 °C. TEM investigations have been performed to study radiation induced changes in the microstructure. The characterization and statistical analysis show the temperature dependant formation of small dislocation loops and He bubbles. The Burgers vector of dislocation loops was ½. A novel feature is that within statistical uncertainty the maximum in the dislocation density observed around 300 °C decreased with decreasing irradiation temperature down to 250 °C. The TEM data are correlated with tensile and instrumented Charpy test results.

  8. Maternal obesity and diabetes induces latent metabolic defects and widespread epigenetic changes in isogenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheryl C Y; Young, Paul E; Maloney, Christopher A; Eaton, Sally A; Cowley, Mark J; Buckland, Michael E; Preiss, Thomas; Henstridge, Darren C; Cooney, Gregory J; Febbraio, Mark A; Martin, David I K; Cropley, Jennifer E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    Intrauterine nutrition can program metabolism, creating stable changes in physiology that may have significant health consequences. The mechanism underlying these changes is widely assumed to involve epigenetic changes to the expression of metabolic genes, but evidence supporting this idea is limited. Here we have performed the first study of the epigenomic consequences of exposure to maternal obesity and diabetes. We used a mouse model of natural-onset obesity that allows comparison of genetically identical mice whose mothers were either obese and diabetic or lean with a normal metabolism. We find that the offspring of obese mothers have a latent metabolic phenotype that is unmasked by exposure to a Western-style diet, resulting in glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. The offspring show changes in hepatic gene expression and widespread but subtle alterations in cytosine methylation. Contrary to expectation, these molecular changes do not point to metabolic pathways but instead reside in broadly developmental ontologies. We propose that, rather than being adaptive, these changes may simply produce an inappropriate response to suboptimal environments; maladaptive phenotypes may be avoidable if postnatal nutrition is carefully controlled.

  9. Failure analysis of an aluminum alloy material framework component induced by casting defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Hu, Weiye

    2017-09-01

    Failure analysis on a fractured radome framework component was carried out through visual observations, metallographic examination using optical microscope, fractog-raphy inspections using scanning electron microscope and chemical composition analysis. The failed frame was made of casting Al–Si7–Mg0.4 aluminum alloy. It had suffered a former vi-bration performance tests. It was indicated that the fractures were attributed to fatigue cracks which were induced by casting porosities at the outer surfaces of frame. Failure analysis was carefully conducted for the semi-penetrating crack appearing on the framework. According to the fractography inspected by scanning electron microscope, it was indicated that numerous casting porosities at the outer surface of the framework played the role of multiple fracture sources due to some applied stresses. Optical microstructure observations suggested that the dendrite-shaped casting porosities largely contributed to the crack-initiation. The groove-shaped structure at roots of spatial convex-bodies on the edge of casting porosities supplied the preferred paths of the crack-propagation. Besides, the brittle silicon eutectic particles distrib-uting along grain boundaries induced the intergranular fracture mode in the region of the over-load final fracture surface.

  10. Laser-induced defect insertion in DNA-linked 2D colloidal crystal array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Erik; Kim, Sejong; Marcus, Harris L.; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2009-02-01

    Insertion of vacancies at predetermined sites within the lattice of colloidal crystals is a prerequisite in order to realize high-quality, opaline-based photonic devices. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel methodology to afford controlled insertion of vacancies within two-dimensional (2D) opaline arrays. These 2D opaline arrays have been substrate-anchored with the help of DNA hybridization. This provides a heat-sensitive ‘adhesive’ between substrate and microspheres within a surrounding aqueous medium that enables tuning the hybridization strength of DNA linker as well as a mechanism to facilitate the removal of unbound microspheres. Focusing a laser beam onto the substrate/microsphere interface induces a localized heating event that detaches the irradiated microspheres, leaving behind vacancies. By repeating this process, line vacancies were successfully obtained. The effects of salt concentration, laser power, light-absorbing dyes, DNA length and refractive-index mismatch were investigated and found to correlate with heat-induced microsphere release.

  11. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysis of a parotid and a thyroid oncocytoma, developed by a BHD and a CS patient, respectively. The BHD lesion was shown to maintain the wild-type allele of FLCN, while losing one PTEN allele. On the other hand, a double heterozygosity for the same two genes was found to be the only detectable tumorigenic hit in the CS oncocytoma. Both conditions occurred in a context of high chromosomal stability, as highlighted by comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. We conclude that, similarly to PTEN, FLCN may not always follow the classical Two Hits model of tumorigenesis and may hence belong to a class of non-canonical tumour suppressor genes. We hence introduce a role of PTEN/FLCN double heterozygosity in syndromic oncocytic tumorigenesis, suggesting this to be an alternative determinant to pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, which are instead the genetic hallmark of sporadic oncocytic tumours. PMID:23386036

  12. Genetic ablation of cyclophilin D rescues mitochondrial defects and prevents muscle apoptosis in collagen VI myopathic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elena; Tiepolo, Tania; Angelin, Alessia; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Basso, Emy; Forte, Michael A; Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy are inherited muscle disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI (ColVI). Mice lacking ColVI (Col6a1(-/-)) display a myopathic phenotype associated with ultrastructural alterations of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial dysfunction with abnormal opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and increased apoptosis of muscle fibers. Treatment with cyclosporin (Cs) A, a drug that desensitizes the PTP by binding to cyclophilin (Cyp)-D, was shown to rescue myofiber alterations in Col6a1(-/-) mice and in UCMD patients, suggesting a correlation between PTP opening and pathogenesis of ColVI muscular dystrophies. Here, we show that inactivation of the gene encoding for Cyp-D rescues the disease phenotype of ColVI deficiency. In the absence of Cyp-D, Col6a1(-/-) mice show negligible myofiber degeneration, rescue from mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural defects, and normalized incidence of apoptosis. These findings (i) demonstrate that lack of Cyp-D is equivalent to its inhibition with CsA at curing the mouse dystrophic phenotype; (ii) establish a cause-effect relationship between Cyp-D-dependent PTP regulation and pathogenesis of the ColVI muscular dystrophy and (iii) validate Cyp-D and the PTP as pharmacological targets for the therapy of human ColVI myopathies.

  13. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  14. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhenzhou, E-mail: jiangcpu@yahoo.com.cn; Bao, Qingli, E-mail: bao_ql@126.com; Sun, Lixin, E-mail: slxcpu@126.com; Huang, Xin, E-mail: huangxinhx66@sohu.com; Wang, Tao, E-mail: wangtao1331@126.com; Zhang, Shuang, E-mail: cat921@sina.com; Li, Han, E-mail: hapo1101@163.com; Zhang, Luyong, E-mail: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  15. Elastic and failure response of imperfect three-dimensional metallic lattices: the role of geometric defects induced by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Kamm, Paul; García-Moreno, Francisco; Banhart, John; Pasini, Damiano

    2017-10-01

    This paper examines three-dimensional metallic lattices with regular octet and rhombicuboctahedron units fabricated with geometric imperfections via Selective Laser Sintering. We use X-ray computed tomography to capture morphology, location, and distribution of process-induced defects with the aim of studying their role in the elastic response, damage initiation, and failure evolution under quasi-static compression. Testing results from in-situ compression tomography show that each lattice exhibits a distinct failure mechanism that is governed not only by cell topology but also by geometric defects induced by additive manufacturing. Extracted from X-ray tomography images, the statistical distributions of three sets of defects, namely strut waviness, strut thickness variation, and strut oversizing, are used to develop numerical models of statistically representative lattices with imperfect geometry. Elastic and failure responses are predicted within 10% agreement from the experimental data. In addition, a computational study is presented to shed light into the relationship between the amplitude of selected defects and the reduction of elastic properties compared to their nominal values. The evolution of failure mechanisms is also explained with respect to strut oversizing, a parameter that can critically cause failure mode transitions that are not visible in defect-free lattices.

  16. A genetic timer through noise-induced stabilization of an unstable state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Marc; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M

    2008-10-14

    Stochastic fluctuations affect the dynamics of biological systems. Typically, such noise causes perturbations that can permit genetic circuits to escape stable states, triggering, for example, phenotypic switching. In contrast, studies have shown that noise can surprisingly also generate new states, which exist solely in the presence of fluctuations. In those instances noise is supplied externally to the dynamical system. Here, we present a mechanism in which noise intrinsic to a simple genetic circuit effectively stabilizes a deterministically unstable state. Furthermore, this noise-induced stabilization represents a unique mechanism for a genetic timer. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of noise intrinsic to a prototypical two-component gene-circuit architecture composed of interacting positive and negative feedback loops. Genetic circuits with this topology are common in biology and typically regulate cell cycles and circadian clocks. These systems can undergo a variety of bifurcations in response to parameter changes. Simulations show that near one such bifurcation, noise induces oscillations around an unstable spiral point and thus effectively stabilizes this unstable fixed point. Because of the periodicity of these oscillations, the lifetime of the noise-dependent stabilization exhibits a polymodal distribution with multiple, well defined, and regularly spaced peaks. Therefore, the noise-induced stabilization presented here constitutes a minimal mechanism for a genetic circuit to function as a timer that could be used in the engineering of synthetic circuits.

  17. Forward Genetics by Sequencing EMS Variation-Induced Inbred Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Addo-Quaye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to leverage novel sequencing techniques for cloning genes in eukaryotic organisms with complex genomes, the false positive rate of variant discovery must be controlled for by experimental design and informatics. We sequenced five lines from three pedigrees of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-mutagenized Sorghum bicolor, including a pedigree segregating a recessive dwarf mutant. Comparing the sequences of the lines, we were able to identify and eliminate error-prone positions. One genomic region contained EMS mutant alleles in dwarfs that were homozygous reference sequences in wild-type siblings and heterozygous in segregating families. This region contained a single nonsynonymous change that cosegregated with dwarfism in a validation population and caused a premature stop codon in the Sorghum ortholog encoding the gibberellic acid (GA biosynthetic enzyme ent-kaurene oxidase. Application of exogenous GA rescued the mutant phenotype. Our method for mapping did not require outcrossing and introduced no segregation variance. This enables work when line crossing is complicated by life history, permitting gene discovery outside of genetic models. This inverts the historical approach of first using recombination to define a locus and then sequencing genes. Our formally identical approach first sequences all the genes and then seeks cosegregation with the trait. Mutagenized lines lacking obvious phenotypic alterations are available for an extension of this approach: mapping with a known marker set in a line that is phenotypically identical to starting material for EMS mutant generation.

  18. GENETIC BACKGROUND BUT NOT METALLOTHIONEIN PHENOTYPE DICTATES SENSITIVITY TO CADMIUM-INDUCED TESTICULAR INJURY IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Background but not Metallothionein Phenotype Dictates Sensitivity to Cadmium-Induced Testicular Injury in MiceJie Liu1,2, Chris Corton3, David J. Dix4, Yaping Liu1, Michael P. Waalkes2 and Curtis D. Klaassen1 ABSTRACTParenteral administrati...

  19. Genetic mapping shows intraspecific variation and transgressive segregation for caterpillar-induced aphid resistance in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants in nature have inducible defenses that sometimes lead to targeted resistance against particular herbivores, but susceptibility to others. The metabolic diversity and genetic resources available for maize (Zea mays) make this a suitable system for a mechanistic study of within- species variati...

  20. Termination of Protofilament Elongation by Eribulin Induces Lattice Defects that Promote Microtubule Catastrophes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doodhi, Harinath; Prota, Andrea E; Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; Xiao, Hui; Custar, Daniel W; Bargsten, Katja; Katrukha, Eugene A; Hilbert, Manuel; Hua, Shasha; Jiang, Kai; Grigoriev, Ilya; Yang, Chia-Ping H; Cox, David; Horwitz, Susan Band; Kapitein, Lukas C; Akhmanova, Anna; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-07-11

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers built of tubulin dimers that attach in a head-to-tail fashion to form protofilaments, which further associate laterally to form a tube. Asynchronous elongation of individual protofilaments can potentially lead to an altered microtubule-end structure that promotes sudden depolymerization, termed catastrophe [1-4]. However, how the dynamics of individual protofilaments relates to overall growth persistence has remained unclear. Here, we used the microtubule targeting anti-cancer drug Eribulin [5-7] to explore the consequences of stalled protofilament elongation on microtubule growth. Using X-ray crystallography, we first revealed that Eribulin binds to a site on β-tubulin that is required for protofilament plus-end elongation. Based on the structural information, we engineered a fluorescent Eribulin molecule. We demonstrate that single Eribulin molecules specifically interact with microtubule plus ends and are sufficient to either trigger a catastrophe or induce slow and erratic microtubule growth in the presence of EB3. Interestingly, we found that Eribulin increases the frequency of EB3 comet "splitting," transient events where a slow and erratically progressing comet is followed by a faster comet. This observation possibly reflects the "healing" of a microtubule lattice. Because EB3 comet splitting was also observed in control microtubules in the absence of any drugs, we propose that Eribulin amplifies a natural pathway toward catastrophe by promoting the arrest of protofilament elongation.

  1. Reduced Cardiac Calcineurin Expression Mimics Long-Term Hypoxia-Induced Heart Defects in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarndt, Rachel; Walls, Stanley M; Ocorr, Karen; Bodmer, Rolf

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia is often associated with cardiopulmonary diseases, which represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Long-term hypoxia exposures, whether from disease or environmental condition, can cause cardiomyopathy and lead to heart failure. Indeed, hypoxia-induced heart failure is a hallmark feature of chronic mountain sickness in maladapted populations living at high altitude. In a previously established Drosophila heart model for long-term hypoxia exposure, we found that hypoxia caused heart dysfunction. Calcineurin is known to be critical in cardiac hypertrophy under normoxia, but its role in the heart under hypoxia is poorly understood. In the present study, we explore the function of calcineurin, a gene candidate we found downregulated in the Drosophila heart after lifetime and multigenerational hypoxia exposure. We examined the roles of 2 homologs of Calcineurin A, CanA14F, and Pp2B in the Drosophila cardiac response to long-term hypoxia. We found that knockdown of these calcineurin catalytic subunits caused cardiac restriction under normoxia that are further aggravated under hypoxia. Conversely, cardiac overexpression of Pp2B under hypoxia was lethal, suggesting that a hypertrophic signal in the presence of insufficient oxygen supply is deleterious. Our results suggest a key role for calcineurin in cardiac remodeling during long-term hypoxia with implications for diseases of chronic hypoxia, and it likely contributes to mechanisms underlying these disease states. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Alpha interferon-induced antiviral response noncytolytically reduces replication defective adenovirus DNA in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Tianlun; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    Although alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) is of benefit in the treatment of viral hepatitis B, HBV replication has been refractory to the cytokine in commonly used hepatocyte-derived cell lines. In search for a cell culture system to study the mechanism by which IFN-alpha inhibits HBV replication, we infected a variety of cell lines with an adenoviral vector containing a replication competent 1.3-fold genome length HBV DNA (AdHBV) and followed by incubation with IFN-alpha. We found that IFN-alpha efficiently decreased the level of HBV DNA replicative intermediates in AdHBV infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Further analysis revealed, surprisingly, that IFN-alpha did not directly inhibit HBV replication, rather the amount of adenovirus DNA in the nuclei of MDBK cells was reduced. As a consequence, HBV RNA transcription and DNA replication were inhibited. Experiments with adenoviral vector expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) further supported the notion that IFN-alpha treatment noncytolytically eliminated adenovirus DNA, but did not kill the vector infected MDBK cells. Our data suggest that IFN-alpha-induced antiviral program is able to discriminate host cellular DNA from episomal viral DNA and might represent a novel pathway of interferon mediate innate defense against DNA virus infections.

  3. Dovitinib induces mitotic defects and activates the G2 DNA damage checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258; formerly CHIR-258) is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. Interestingly, Dovitinib triggered a G2 /M arrest in cancer cell lines from diverse origins including HeLa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Single-cell analysis revealed that Dovitinib promoted a delay in mitotic exit in a subset of cells, causing the cells to undergo mitotic slippage. Higher concentrations of Dovitinib induced a G2 arrest similar to the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. In support of this, DNA damage was triggered by Dovitinib as revealed by γ-H2AX and comet assays. The mitotic kinase CDK1 was found to be inactivated by phosphorylation in the presence of Dovitinib. Furthermore, the G2 arrest could be overcome by abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint using small molecule inhibitors of CHK1 and WEE1. Finally, Dovitinib-mediated G2 cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death could be promoted after DNA damage repair was disrupted by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. These results are consistent with the recent finding that Dovitinib can also target topoisomerases. Collectively, these results suggest additional directions for use of Dovitinib, in particular with agents that target the DNA damage checkpoint.

  4. Altered nociception in mice with genetically induced hypoglutamatergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, V; Viguier, F; Melfort, M; Bourgoin, S; Hamon, M; Masson, J

    2015-05-07

    Extensive pharmacological evidence supports the idea that glutamate plays a key role in both acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we investigated the implication of the excitatory amino acid in physiological nociception by using mutant mice deficient in phosphate-activated glutaminase type 1 (GLS1), the enzyme that synthesizes glutamate in central glutamatergic neurons. Because homozygous GLS1-/- mutants die shortly after birth, assays for assessing mechanical, thermal and chemical (formalin) nociception were performed on heterozygous GLS1+/- mutants, which present a clear-cut decrease in glutamate synthesis in central neurons. As compared to paired wild-type mice, adult male GLS1+/- mutants showed decreased responsiveness to mechanical (von Frey filament and tail-pressure, but not tail-clip, tests) and thermal (Hargreaves' plantar, tail-immersion and hot-plate tests) nociceptive stimuli. Genotype-related differences were also found in the formalin test for which GLS1+/- mice exhibited marked decreases in the nociceptive responses (hindlimb lift, lick and flinch) during both phase 1 (0-5 min) and phase 2 (16-45 min) after formalin injection. On the other hand, acute treatment with memantine (1mg/kg i.p.), an uncompetitive antagonist at NMDA glutamate receptors, reduced nociception responses in wild-type but not GLS1+/- mice. Conversely, antinociceptive response to acute administration of a low dose (1mg/kg s.c.) of morphine was significantly larger in GLS1+/- mutants versus wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that genetically driven hypoactivity of central glutamatergic neurotransmission renders mice hyposensitive to nociceptive stimulations, and promotes morphine antinociception, further emphasizing the critical role of glutamate in physiological nociception and its opioid-mediated control.

  5. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  6. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  7. HDAC1 inactivation induces mitotic defect and caspase-independent autophagic cell death in liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jian Xie

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are known to play a central role in the regulation of several cellular properties interlinked with the development and progression of cancer. Recently, HDAC1 has been reported to be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but its biological roles in hepatocarcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated overexpression of HDAC1 in a subset of human HCCs and liver cancer cell lines. HDAC1 inactivation resulted in regression of tumor cell growth and activation of caspase-independent autophagic cell death, via LC3B-II activation pathway in Hep3B cells. In cell cycle regulation, HDAC1 inactivation selectively induced both p21(WAF1/Cip1 and p27(Kip1 expressions, and simultaneously suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK2. Consequently, HDAC1 inactivation led to the hypophosphorylation of pRb in G1/S transition, and thereby inactivated E2F/DP1 transcription activity. In addition, we demonstrated that HDAC1 suppresses p21(WAF1/Cip1 transcriptional activity through Sp1-binding sites in the p21(WAF1/Cip1 promoter. Furthermore, sustained suppression of HDAC1 attenuated in vitro colony formation and in vivo tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Taken together, we suggest the aberrant regulation of HDAC1 in HCC and its epigenetic regulation of gene transcription of autophagy and cell cycle components. Overexpression of HDAC1 may play a pivotal role through the systemic regulation of mitotic effectors in the development of HCC, providing a particularly relevant potential target in cancer therapy.

  8. Reverse genetic screening reveals poor correlation between morpholino-induced and mutant phenotypes in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; Ni, Chih-Wen; Gupta, Ankit; Grosse, Ann S; van Impel, Andreas; Kirchmaier, Bettina C; Peterson-Maduro, Josi; Kourkoulis, George; Male, Ira; DeSantis, Dana F; Sheppard-Tindell, Sarah; Ebarasi, Lwaki; Betsholtz, Christer; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Wolfe, Scot A; Lawson, Nathan D

    2015-01-12

    The widespread availability of programmable site-specific nucleases now enables targeted gene disruption in the zebrafish. In this study, we applied site-specific nucleases to generate zebrafish lines bearing individual mutations in more than 20 genes. We found that mutations in only a small proportion of genes caused defects in embryogenesis. Moreover, mutants for ten different genes failed to recapitulate published Morpholino-induced phenotypes (morphants). The absence of phenotypes in mutant embryos was not likely due to maternal effects or failure to eliminate gene function. Consistently, a comparison of published morphant defects with the Sanger Zebrafish Mutation Project revealed that approximately 80% of morphant phenotypes were not observed in mutant embryos, similar to our mutant collection. Based on these results, we suggest that mutant phenotypes become the standard metric to define gene function in zebrafish, after which Morpholinos that recapitulate respective phenotypes could be reliably applied for ancillary analyses.

  9. Plasmodesmata-located protein overexpression negatively impacts the manifestation of systemic acquired resistance and the long-distance movement of Defective in Induced Resistance1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carella, P; Isaacs, M; Cameron, R K

    2015-03-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defence response that provides immunity to distant uninfected leaves after an initial localised infection. The lipid transfer protein (LTP) Defective in Induced Resistance1 (DIR1) is an essential component of SAR that moves from induced to distant leaves following a SAR-inducing local infection. To understand how DIR1 is transported to distant leaves during SAR, we analysed DIR1 movement in transgenic Arabidopsis lines with reduced cell-to-cell movement caused by the overexpression of Plasmodesmata-Located Proteins PDLP1 and PDLP5. These PDLP-overexpressing lines were defective for SAR, and DIR1 antibody signals were not observed in phloem sap-enriched petiole exudates collected from distant leaves. Our data support the idea that cell-to-cell movement of DIR1 through plasmodesmata is important during long-distance SAR signalling in Arabidopsis.

  10. Methotrexate Toxicity in Growing Long Bones of Young Rats: A Model for Studying Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Bone Growth Defects in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaming Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement and intensive use of chemotherapy in treating childhood cancers has led to a growing population of young cancer survivors who face increased bone health risks. However, the underlying mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced skeletal defects remain largely unclear. Methotrexate (MTX, the most commonly used antimetabolite in paediatric cancer treatment, is known to cause bone growth defects in children undergoing chemotherapy. Animal studies not only have confirmed the clinical observations but also have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced skeletal damage. These models revealed that high-dose MTX can cause growth plate dysfunction, damage osteoprogenitor cells, suppress bone formation, and increase bone resorption and marrow adipogenesis, resulting in overall bone loss. While recent rat studies have shown that antidote folinic acid can reduce MTX damage in the growth plate and bone, future studies should investigate potential adjuvant treatments to reduce chemotherapy-induced skeletal toxicities.

  11. Genetic and functional studies implicate synaptic overgrowth and ring gland cAMP/PKA signaling defects in the Drosophila melanogaster neurofibromatosis-1 growth deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Walker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a genetic disease that affects 1 in 3,000, is caused by loss of a large evolutionary conserved protein that serves as a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP for Ras. Among Drosophila melanogaster Nf1 (dNf1 null mutant phenotypes, learning/memory deficits and reduced overall growth resemble human NF1 symptoms. These and other dNf1 defects are relatively insensitive to manipulations that reduce Ras signaling strength but are suppressed by increasing signaling through the 3'-5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA pathway, or phenocopied by inhibiting this pathway. However, whether dNf1 affects cAMP/PKA signaling directly or indirectly remains controversial. To shed light on this issue we screened 486 1(st and 2(nd chromosome deficiencies that uncover >80% of annotated genes for dominant modifiers of the dNf1 pupal size defect, identifying responsible genes in crosses with mutant alleles or by tissue-specific RNA interference (RNAi knockdown. Validating the screen, identified suppressors include the previously implicated dAlk tyrosine kinase, its activating ligand jelly belly (jeb, two other genes involved in Ras/ERK signal transduction and several involved in cAMP/PKA signaling. Novel modifiers that implicate synaptic defects in the dNf1 growth deficiency include the intersectin-related synaptic scaffold protein Dap160 and the cholecystokinin receptor-related CCKLR-17D1 drosulfakinin receptor. Providing mechanistic clues, we show that dAlk, jeb and CCKLR-17D1 are among mutants that also suppress a recently identified dNf1 neuromuscular junction (NMJ overgrowth phenotype and that manipulations that increase cAMP/PKA signaling in adipokinetic hormone (AKH-producing cells at the base of the neuroendocrine ring gland restore the dNf1 growth deficiency. Finally, supporting our previous contention that ALK might be a therapeutic target in NF1, we report that human ALK is expressed in cells that

  12. Ras Transformation Overrides a Proliferation Defect Induced by Tpm3.1 Knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Jason D; Schevzov, Galina; Kan, Chin-Yi; Petti, Carlotta; Maritz, Michelle F; Whittaker, Shane; Mackenzie, Karen L; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    Extensive re-organisation of the actin cytoskeleton and changes in the expression of its binding proteins is a characteristic feature of cancer cells. Previously we have shown that the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1, an integral component of the actin cytoskeleton in tumor cells, is required for tumor cell survival. Our objective was to determine whether cancer cells devoid of Tpm3.1 would evade the tumorgenic effects induced by H-Ras transformation. The tropomyosin isoform (Tpm) expression profile of a range of cancer cell lines (21) demonstrates that Tpm3.1 is one of the most broadly expressed Tpm isoform. Consequently, the contribution of Tpm3.1 to the transformation process was functionally evaluated. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from wild type (WT) and Tpm3.1 knockout (KO) mice were transduced with retroviral vectors expressing SV40 large T antigen and an oncogenic allele of the H-Ras gene, H-RasV12, to generate immortalized and transformed WT and KO MEFs respectively. We show that Tpm3.1 is required for growth factor-independent proliferation in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized MEFs, but this requirement is overcome by H-Ras transformation. Consistent with those findings, we found that Tpm3.1 was not required for anchorage independent growth or growth of H-Ras-driven tumors in a mouse model. Finally, we show that pERK and Importin 7 protein interactions are significantly decreased in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized KO MEFs but not in the H-Ras transformed KO cells, relative to control MEFs. The data demonstrate that H-Ras transformation overrides a requirement for Tpm3.1 in growth factor-independent proliferation of immortalized MEFs. We propose that in the SV40 large T antigen immortalized MEFs, Tpm3.1 is partly responsible for the efficient interaction between pERK and Imp7 resulting in cell proliferation, but this is overidden by Ras transformation.

  13. Near-infrared photocatalytic activity induced by intrinsic defects in Bi2MO6 (M = W, Mo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Tao; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Ma, Xiangchao; Huang, Baibiao

    2014-09-14

    The electronic structure and related photocatalytic properties of Bi2MO6 (M = W, Mo) with various intrinsic defects are studied based on the first-principles density functional theory (DFT). Our results indicate that O vacancies form easily in both Bi2WO6 and Bi2MoO6 under Bi rich/O poor conditions. The near-infrared light transitions can be realized involving electrons from the O vacancy induced impurity states within the band gap to the conduction band. Rather than acting as photogenerated carrier recombination centers, the impurity states caused by O vacancies favor the transfer of photogenerated holes and further benefit the photocatalytic process due to the delocalized nature. The spatial separation of photogenerated carriers among different layers can be realized, which reduces the carrier recombination and improves the photocatalytic activity. In addition, Bi2WO6 with O vacancies is desirable for having better near-infrared photocatalytic performance than Bi2MoO6 due to the larger mobility of photogenerated holes.

  14. Nf1 Loss and Ras Hyperactivation in Oligodendrocytes Induce NOS-Driven Defects in Myelin and Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Mayes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 and Costello syndrome Rasopathy have behavioral deficits. In NF1 patients, these may correlate with white matter enlargement and aberrant myelin. To model these features, we induced Nf1 loss or HRas hyperactivation in mouse oligodendrocytes. Enlarged brain white matter tracts correlated with myelin decompaction, downregulation of claudin-11, and mislocalization of connexin-32. Surprisingly, non-cell-autonomous defects in perivascular astrocytes and the blood-brain barrier (BBB developed, implicating a soluble mediator. Nitric oxide (NO can disrupt tight junctions and gap junctions, and NO and NO synthases (NOS1–NOS3 were upregulated in mutant white matter. Treating mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine corrected cellular phenotypes. CNP-HRasG12V mice also displayed locomotor hyperactivity, which could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that Nf1/Ras regulates oligodendrocyte NOS and that dysregulated NO signaling in oligodendrocytes can alter the surrounding vasculature. The data suggest that antioxidants may improve some behavioral deficits in Rasopathy patients.

  15. A study of electron induced defects in n-type germanium by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyamhere, C.; Auret, F.D.; Chawanda, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Das, M. [School of Information Technology, Monash South Africa, Roodepoort 1725 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the electrical characteristics of electron irradiation induced defects in n-type germanium doped with antimony (Sb) by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace- DLTS. The following electrons traps at 0.15 eV, 0.20 eV, 0.21 eV 0.23 eV, 0.31 eV and 0.38 eV below the conduction band were observed and two hole traps at 0.09 eV and 0.31 eV above the valence band were also recorded. The electron trap level at 0.38 eV is the E-center and is the most dominant electron trap for our measurements. The capacitance versus temperature and current versus temperature characteristics of our samples showed good correlation as the irradiation dose is increased. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. BCNU-induced gR2 defect mediates S-glutathionylation of Complex I and respiratory uncoupling in myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ren, Pei; Guarini, Giacinta; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-06-15

    A deficiency of mitochondrial glutathione reductase (or GR2) is capable of adversely affecting the reduction of GSSG and increasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. BCNU [1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] is an anticancer agent and known inhibitor of cytosolic GR ex vivo and in vivo. Here we tested the hypothesis that a BCNU-induced GR2 defect contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent impairment of heart function. Intraperitoneal administration of BCNU (40 mg/kg) specifically inhibited GR2 activity by 79.8 ± 2.7% in the mitochondria of rat heart. However, BCNU treatment modestly enhanced the activities of mitochondrial Complex I and other ETC components. The cardiac function of BCNU-treated rats was analyzed by echocardiography, revealing a systolic dysfunction associated with decreased ejection fraction, decreased cardiac output, and an increase in left ventricular internal dimension and left ventricular volume in systole. The respiratory control index of isolated mitochondria from the myocardium was moderately decreased after BCNU treatment, whereas NADH-linked uncoupling of oxygen consumption was significantly enhanced. Extracellular flux analysis to measure the fatty acid oxidation of myocytes indicated a 20% enhancement after BCNU treatment. When the mitochondria were immunoblotted with antibodies against GSH and UCP3, both protein S-glutathionylation of Complex I and expression of UCP3 were significantly up-regulated. Overexpression of SOD2 in the myocardium significantly reversed BCNU-induced GR2 inhibition and mitochondrial impairment. In conclusion, BCNU-mediated cardiotoxicity is characterized by the GR2 deficiency that negatively regulates heart function by impairing mitochondrial integrity, increasing oxidative stress with Complex I S-glutathionylation, and enhancing uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration.

  17. The effects of supplemental melatonin administration on the healing of bone defects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem YILDIRIMTURK

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diabetes mellitus (DM causes an increased production of free radicals that can impair bone healing. Melatonin is a hormone secreted mainly by the pineal gland, which participates in the neutralization process of free radicals. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate histologic and biochemical effects of supplemental melatonin administration on bone healing and antioxidant defense mechanism in diabetic rats. Material and Methods Eighty-six Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in this study. Diabetes mellitus was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ. Surgical bone defects were prepared in the tibia of each animal. Diabetic animals and those in control groups were treated either with daily melatonin (250 μg/animal/day/i.p. diluted in ethanol, only ethanol, or sterile saline solution. Rats were humanely killed at the 10th and 30th postoperative days. Plasma levels of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products (AOPP, Malondialdehyde (MDA, and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD were measured. The number of osteoblasts, blood vessels and the area of new mineralized tissue formation were calculated in histologic sections. Results At the 10th day, DM+MEL (rats receiving both STZ and melatonin group had significantly higher number of osteoblasts and blood vessels as well as larger new mineralized tissue surfaces (p<0.05 for each when compared with DM group. At the 30th day, DM group treated with melatonin had significantly lower levels of AOPP and MDA than those of DM group (p<0.05. Conclusion Melatonin administration in STZ induced diabetic rats reduced oxidative stress related biomarkers and showed beneficial effects on bone healing at short term.

  18. Prevalence of symptomatic and silent stress-induced perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, John O.; Calcagni, Maria-Lucia; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Monbaron, David; Ruiz, Juan [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Lausanne (Switzerland); Koehli, Melanie [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV University Hospital), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-01-01

    Silent myocardial ischaemia - as evaluated by stress-induced perfusion defects on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients without a history of chest pain - is frequent in diabetes and is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events. Its prevalence has been determined in asymptomatic diabetic patients, but remains largely unknown in diabetic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) in the clinical setting. In this study we therefore sought (a) to determine the prevalence of symptomatic and silent perfusion defects in diabetic patients with suspected CAD and (b) to characterise the eventual predictors of abnormal perfusion. The patient population comprised 133 consecutive diabetic patients with suspected CAD who had been referred for MPS. Studies were performed with exercise (41%) or pharmacological stress testing (1-day protocol, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 201}Tl or both). We used semi-quantitative analysis (20-segment polar maps) to derive the summed stress score (SSS) and the summed difference score (SDS). Abnormal MPS (SSS{>=}4) was observed in 49 (37%) patients (SSS=4.9{+-}8.4, SDS=2.4{+-}4.7), reversible perfusion defects (SDS{>=}2) in 40 (30%) patients [SSS=13.3{+-}10.9; SDS=8.0{+-}5.6; 20% moderate to severe (SDS>4), 7% multivessel] and fixed defects in 21 (16%) patients. Results were comparable between patients with and patients without a history of chest pain. Of 75 patients without a history of chest pain, 23 (31%, 95% CI=21-42%) presented reversible defects (SSS=13.9{+-}11.3; SDS=7.4{+-}1.2), indicative of silent ischaemia. Reversible defects were associated with inducible ST segment depression during MPS stress (odds ratio (OR)=3.2, p<0.01). Fixed defects were associated with erectile dysfunction in males (OR=3.7, p=0.02) and lower aspirin use (OR=0.25, p=0.02). Silent stress-induced perfusion defects occurred in 31% of the patients, a rate similar to that in patients with a history of chest pain. MPS could identify

  19. Hypophagia and metabolic adaptations in mice with defective ATGL-mediated lipolysis cause resistance to HFD-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Renate; Hofer, Peter; Taschler, Ulrike; Voshol, Peter J; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kotzbeck, Petra; Jaeger, Doris; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lord, Caleb C; Brown, J Mark; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zimmermann, Robert; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Zechner, Rudolf

    2015-11-10

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) initiates intracellular triglyceride (TG) catabolism. In humans, ATGL deficiency causes neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) characterized by a systemic TG accumulation. Mice with a genetic deletion of ATGL (AKO) also accumulate TG in many tissues. However, neither NLSDM patients nor AKO mice are exceedingly obese. This phenotype is unexpected considering the importance of the enzyme for TG catabolism in white adipose tissue (WAT). In this study, we identified the counteracting mechanisms that prevent excessive obesity in the absence of ATGL. We used "healthy" AKO mice expressing ATGL exclusively in cardiomyocytes (AKO/cTg) to circumvent the cardiomyopathy and premature lethality observed in AKO mice. AKO/cTg mice were protected from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity despite complete ATGL deficiency in WAT and normal adipocyte differentiation. AKO/cTg mice were highly insulin sensitive under hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions, eliminating insulin insensitivity as a possible protective mechanism. Instead, reduced food intake and altered signaling by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c in WAT accounted for the phenotype. These adaptations led to reduced lipid synthesis and storage in WAT of HFD-fed AKO/cTg mice. Treatment with the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone reversed the phenotype. These results argue for the existence of an adaptive interdependence between lipolysis and lipid synthesis. Pharmacological inhibition of ATGL may prove useful to prevent HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

  20. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects and annealing effects in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation induced deep-level defects and the recombination parameters in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells were investigated over a wide range of proton energies (from 50 KeV to 10 MeV) and proton fluences (from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, I-V, C-V, and SEM-EMIC measurement techniques. The measurements were used to determine the defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, carrier lifetimes, and the hole diffusion lengths in the GaAs LPE layers. Results show that a good correlation was obtained between the measured defect parameters and the dark recombination current as well as the performance parameters of the solar cells. The most damages to the cell were produced by the 200 KeV protons. In addition, the effects of low temperatures (200 to 400 C) thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and the dark current of the 200 KeV proton irradiated samples were examined.

  1. Defect evolution of nanocrystalline SnO{sub 2} thin films induced by pulsed delivery during in situ annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.W., E-mail: cnzwchen@yahoo.com.cn [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)] [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhang, H.J.; Li, Z.; Jiao, Z. [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Wu, M.H., E-mail: mhwu@staff.shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shek, C.H.; Wu, C.M.L.; Lai, J.K.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The microstructural defects of nanocrystalline SnO{sub 2} thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Defects inside nanocrystalline SnO{sub 2} thin films could be significantly reduced by in situ annealing SnO{sub 2} thin films at 300 deg. C for 2 h. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the stacking faults and twins were annihilated upon in situ annealing. In particular, the inside of the SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles demonstrated perfect lattices free of defects after in situ annealing. Raman spectra also confirmed that the in situ annealed specimen was almost defect-free. By using in situ annealing, defect-free nanocrystalline SnO{sub 2} thin films can be prepared in a simple and practical way, which holds the promise for applications as transparent electrodes and solid-state gas sensors.

  2. Analysis of irradiation induced defects on carbon nanostructures and their influences on nanomechanical and morphological properties using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregler, Sharon Kay

    Mechanisms such as nanomechanics, changes in chemical structure, and van der Waals interactions are difficult to observe on the atomic scale by experimental methods. It is important to understand the fundamentals of these processes on a small scale to reach conclusions of results that are observed on a larger scale. Computational methods may be readily applied to investigate these mechanisms on models a few nanometers in dimension and the results can give insights to processes that occur during real time experiments. The classical molecular dynamics simulations here utilize the reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) or adaptive intermolecular REBO (AIREBO) potentials, to model short range behavior, coupled with the Lennard Jones potential (and torsion for AIREBO), to model long range interactions of carbon nanostructures and hydrocarbons. The bond order term in the REBO/AIREBO potential allows for the realistic treatment of these materials as it correctly describes carbon (and silicon and germanium) hybridizations, and allows for bond breaking and reformation unlike basic molecular mechanics. This is a key feature for simulating irradiation and pullout mechanics on graphite and carbon nanotube and their composites. The irradiation simulations on graphite, with the same conditions as the experimental irradiation of highly pyrolythic graphite, provide insight to the types of defects that were observed on a larger scale by Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STM) images. Experimental characterization from collaborators mapped out the surface of irradiated graphite while computational theory further described the defects and observed the evolution of the defects during the irradiation procedure. Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were irradiated with different particles to compare the effect that incident species have on the nanotubes' surfaces as well as the crosslink distribution of the radial cross sections. Irradiation is a common technique to modify the interfacial

  3. Identification of genetic defects underlying FVII deficiency in 10 patients belonging to eight unrelated families of the North provinces from Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmahmoudi Hejer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inherited factor VII (FVII deficiency is a rare disorder characterized by a bleeding phenotype varying from mild to severe. To date, more than 200 mutations have been described along the F7 gene encoding for FVII. The aim of this study was the identification of genetic defects underlying FVII deficiency in 10 patients belonging to eight unrelated families of the North provinces from Tunisia. Mutation detection was performed by sequencing the whole F7 gene coding region, exon-intron boundaries and about 400 bp of the promoter region. We identified 5 mutations in five unrelated families; the novel p.F328Y mutation and the reported mutations: p.R304Q, p.M298I, IVS1aG > A and p.G-39G. For the remaining 5 patients we didn’t identified any mutations using PCR/Sequencing protocol. In conclusion, this study represents the first comprehensive molecular series of FVII deficiency affected patients in Tunisia from the North. We will try in the future to continue the molecular study for Tunisian patients from Center and South provinces in order to have a complete idea about the FVII deficiency mutational profile in our country. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1288044089753085

  4. ATR inhibition induces synthetic lethality and overcomes chemoresistance in TP53- or ATM-defective chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Marwan; Davies, Nicholas; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Smith, Edward; Oldreive, Ceri; Petermann, Eva; Stewart, Grant; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Taylor, Malcolm; Moss, Paul; Hillmen, Peter; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2016-02-04

    TP53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) defects are associated with genomic instability, clonal evolution, and chemoresistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Currently, therapies capable of providing durable remissions in relapsed/refractory TP53- or ATM-defective CLL are lacking. Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) mediates response to replication stress, the absence of which leads to collapse of stalled replication forks into chromatid fragments that require resolution through the ATM/p53 pathway. Here, using AZD6738, a novel ATR kinase inhibitor, we investigated ATR inhibition as a synthetically lethal strategy to target CLL cells with TP53 or ATM defects. Irrespective of TP53 or ATM status, induction of CLL cell proliferation upregulated ATR protein, which then became activated in response to replication stress. In TP53- or ATM-defective CLL cells, inhibition of ATR signaling by AZD6738 led to an accumulation of unrepaired DNA damage, which was carried through into mitosis because of defective cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in cell death by mitotic catastrophe. Consequently, AZD6738 was selectively cytotoxic to both TP53- and ATM-defective CLL cell lines and primary cells. This was confirmed in vivo using primary xenograft models of TP53- or ATM-defective CLL, where treatment with AZD6738 resulted in decreased tumor load and reduction in the proportion of CLL cells with such defects. Moreover, AZD6738 sensitized TP53- or ATM-defective primary CLL cells to chemotherapy and ibrutinib. Our findings suggest that ATR is a promising therapeutic target for TP53- or ATM-defective CLL that warrants clinical investigation.

  5. Phosphodiesterase 4B genetic variants are not associated with antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Renan P; Remington, Gary; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Kennedy, James L; Wong, Albert H C

    2010-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) has been evaluated as a genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. Selective PDE4 inhibitor drugs have antipsychotic-like effects and reduce tardive dyskinesia-like movements in animal models. We investigated whether PDE4B genetic variants are associated with antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia incidence and severity in schizophrenia patients. Our sample consisted of 169 Caucasian patients taking typical antipsychotic medication for at least 1 year. We found two PDE4B gene variants to be nominally associated with tardive dyskinesia (rs1338719 and rs7528545) in the overall population and two other variants nominally associated with the presence of tardive dyskinesia and severity in female patients (rs1890196 and rs783036). None of these results survived correction for multiple testing. Overall, our results do not support a genetic association between tardive dyskinesia and PDE4B.

  6. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  7. Effect of Tm3+-Induced Defects on the Photoexcitation Energy Relaxation in Tm-Doped AlxGa1-xN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-27

    band-to-band transitions Fig. 4a just slightly blueshifts with decreasing temperature from 300 to 85 K. The part of the PLE spectra related to the...the additional absorption band associated with Tm3+-induced defects is unusually big. The blueshift observed for AlxGa1−xN hosts with x=0.39 and 0.62 is

  8. Swift Heavy Ion Induced Defect Study in Epitaxial n-Type CaAs from {In} {Situ} Hall Effect Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikou, M.; Carin, R.; Bogdanski, P.; Marie, P.

    1997-08-01

    N-type (Si-doped, N_D ≈ 10^{17} cm^{-3}) GaAs epitaxial layers (MOCVD) are irradiated at 77 K with oxygen (0.163 GeV), krypton (5.15 GeV), xenon (5.73 GeV) and at 300 K with krypton (5.15 GeV). Hall effect measurements are performed, in situ, with increasing fluence. A decrease of the electron concentration and a degradation of the Hall mobility, respectively due to trapping and to scattering on irradiation-induced point defects are pointed out. In the heavily doped layers, shallow donor impurities merge with the conduction band in distorted band tail. A simple two band conduction model is used as a simulation tool, which allows the carrier Hall concentration variation to be correctly fitted, as a function of both temperature and ion fluence. The Hall mobility versus fluence variation at 77 K, which is mainly limited by screened ionized impurities and defects, is also simulated. From these simulations, the arsenic vacancy levels E_1 and E_2 are most likely to correspond respectively to single acceptor (-/0) and single donor (0/+) transitions. The introduction rates of induced defects (in particular V_As) are estimated: the total experimental introduction rate appears to be about 50% of the theoretical atomic displacement rate associated with nuclear collisions, independently of ion nature and of temperature. Although electronic stopping power S_e is about 2000 times larger than nuclear stopping power S_n, it is then suggested that irradiation-induced electronic excitation, in the investigated range S_e = 1 12 MeV/μm, has no effect on the degradation of n-type GaAs epitaxial layers. Des couches épitaxiées de GaAs de type n (dopage au silicium, N_D ≈ 10^{17} cm^{-3}) sont irradiées à 77 K avec des ions oxygène (0,163 GeV), krypton (5,15 GeV), xénon (5,73 GeV) et à 300 K avec des ions krypton (5,15 GeV). Les mesures d'effet Hall sont effectuées in situ, au fur et à mesure de l'accroissement de fluence. On observe une diminution de la concentration

  9. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

  10. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y-K. E-mail: yklee@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Chang, H-H.; Kim, J-S.; Kim, J.K.; Lee, K-S

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes. (author)

  11. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  12. Induced ferromagnetic and gas sensing properties in ZnO-nanostructures by altering defect concentration of oxygen and zinc vacancies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O ) and zinc vacancies(VZn) are the main defects and that their relative concentration decreases within creasing particlesizes, resulting in decreased ferromagnet- ism (FM). Moreover, the sensing performance decreased with an increase in nanostructures...

  13. Screening Tests for Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . A monosomy is ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A genetic disorder that causes serious heart defects ...

  14. MAPK14/p38α confers irinotecan resistance to TP53-defective cells by inducing survival autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillas, Salome; Causse, Annick; Marzi, Laetitia; de Medina, Philippe; Poirot, Marc; Denis, Vincent; Vezzio-Vie, Nadia; Espert, Lucile; Arzouk, Hayat; Coquelle, Arnaud; Martineau, Pierre; Del Rio, Maguy; Pattingre, Sophie; Gongora, Céline

    2012-07-01

    Recently we have shown that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) MAPK14/p38α is involved in resistance of colon cancer cells to camptothecin-related drugs. Here we further investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in such drug resistance and showed that, in HCT116 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in which TP53 was genetically ablated (HCT116-TP53KO), overexpression of constitutively active MAPK14/p38α decreases cell sensitivity to SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), inhibits cell proliferation and induces survival-autophagy. Since autophagy is known to facilitate cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatment, we then investigated the relationship between MAPK14/p38α, autophagy and resistance to irinotecan. We demonstrated that induction of autophagy by SN38 is dependent on MAPK14/p38α activation. Finally, we showed that inhibition of MAPK14/p38α or autophagy both sensitizes HCT116-TP53KO cells to drug therapy. Our data proved that the two effects are interrelated, since the role of autophagy in drug resistance required the MAPK14/p38α. Our results highlight the existence of a new mechanism of resistance to camptothecin-related drugs: upon SN38 induction, MAPK14/p38α is activated and triggers survival-promoting autophagy to protect tumor cells against the cytotoxic effects of the drug. Colon cancer cells could thus be sensitized to drug therapy by inhibiting either MAPK14/p38 or autophagy.

  15. The T-cell anergy induced by Leishmania amazonensis antigens is related with defective antigen presentation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta O. Pinheiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the main agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, a disease associated with anergic immune responses. In this study we show that the crude antigen of Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg but not L. braziliensis promastigotes (LbAg contains substances that suppress mitogenic and spontaneous proliferative responses of T cells. The suppressive substances in LaAg are thermoresistant (100ºC/1h and partially dependent on protease activity. T cell anergy was not due to a decreased production of growth factors as it was not reverted by addition of exogenous IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma or IL-12. LaAg did not inhibit anti-CD3-induced T cell activation, suggesting that anergy was due to a defect in antigen presentation. It was also not due to cell necrosis, but was accompanied by expressive DNA fragmentation in lymph node cells, indicative of apoptosis. Although pre-incubation of macrophages with LaAg prevented their capacity to present antigens, this effect was not due to apoptosis of the former. These results suggest that the T cell anergy found in diffuse leishmaniasis may be the result of parasite antigen-driven apoptosis of those cells following defective antigen presentation.A Leishmania amazonensis é o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose cutânea difusa, uma doença associada a respostas imunes anérgicas. Neste estudo nós mostramos que o extrato bruto de promastigotas de Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg, mas não de L. braziliensis (LbAg, contém substâncias que suprimem respostas proliferativas, espontâneas e mitogênicas, de células T. As substâncias supressoras no LaAg são termo-resistentes (100°C/1h e parcialmente dependentes da atividade de proteases. A anergia de células T não foi devida à diminuição na produção de fatores de crescimento, uma vez que não foi revertida pela adição de: IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gama ou IL-12. O LaAg não inibiu a ativação de células T induzida por anti-CD3, sugerindo que a anergia

  16. Defect-induced changes in the spectral properties of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}: Angle-resolved photoemission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Margaritondo, G.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Forro, L.; Grioni, M.

    1999-11-01

    The authors investigated the effects of disorder in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} high temperature superconductor. They found that small defect densities already suppress the characteristic spectral signature of the superconducting state. The spectral line shape clearly reflects new excitations within the gap, as expected for defect-induced pair breaking.

  17. Thermal evolution of vacancy defects induced in 12 MeV H{sup +} irradiated 6H-SiC single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbiriou, X.; Barthe, M.F.; Gentils, A.; Desgardin, P. [CERI-CNRS, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France)

    2007-07-01

    In this work positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been used to investigate the evolution of the vacancy defects induced in 12 MeV H{sup +} irradiated SiC as a function of the temperature. The irradiation has been performed at room temperature at a fluence of 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} in 6H-SiC single crystals using the CERI-Orleans cyclotron. Thermal treatments have been performed under an argon flux from 300 C up to 1050 C. The positron lifetime has been measured as a function of the temperature in the range 15-600 K. After irradiation, positrons detect negative ions and two types of vacancy defects: V{sub Si} monovacancies and V{sub Si}-V{sub C} divacancies. After annealing, the lifetime behaviour as a function of the measurement temperature changes indicating different annealing stages. An increase of the long lifetime component is specially observed whereas the corresponding intensity decreases. These changes are correlated to the migration of V{sub Si} and the clustering with V{sub Si}-V{sub C} to form a new vacancy defect. The lifetime of this new defect has been determined and is equal to 235{+-}2 ps. We propose that it is related to V{sub Si}-V{sub C}-V{sub Si}. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  19. Genetic variants in the folate pathway and the risk of neural tube defects: a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural Tube Defects (NTDs are among the most prevalent and most severe congenital malformations worldwide. Polymorphisms in key genes involving the folate pathway have been reported to be associated with the risk of NTDs. However, the results from these published studies are conflicting. We surveyed the literature (1996-2011 and performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide empirical evidence on the association. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of 5 genetic variants from 47 study populations, for a total of 85 case-control comparisons MTHFR C677T (42 studies; 4374 cases, 7232 controls, MTHFR A1298C (22 studies; 2602 cases, 4070 controls, MTR A2756G (9 studies; 843 cases, 1006 controls, MTRR A66G (8 studies; 703 cases, 1572 controls, and RFC-1 A80G (4 studies; 1107 cases, 1585 controls. We found a convincing evidence of dominant effects of MTHFR C677T (OR 1.23; 95%CI 1.07-1.42 and suggestive evidence of RFC-1 A80G (OR 1.55; 95%CI 1.24-1.92. However, we found no significant effects of MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G in risk of NTDs in dominant, recessive or in allelic models. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis strongly suggested a significant association of the variant MTHFR C677T and a suggestive association of RFC-1 A80G with increased risk of NTDs. However, other variants involved in folate pathway do not demonstrate any evidence for a significant marginal association on susceptibility to NTDs.

  20. Parvin overexpression uncovers tissue-specific genetic pathways and disrupts F-actin to induce apoptosis in the developing epithelia in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chountala

    Full Text Available Parvin is a putative F-actin binding protein important for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Here we used overexpression of Drosophila Parvin to uncover its functions in different tissues in vivo. Parvin overexpression caused major defects reminiscent of metastatic cancer cells in developing epithelia, including apoptosis, alterations in cell shape, basal extrusion and invasion. These defects were closely correlated with abnormalities in the organization of F-actin at the basal epithelial surface and of integrin-matrix adhesion sites. In wing epithelium, overexpressed Parvin triggered increased Rho1 protein levels, predominantly at the basal side, whereas in the developing eye it caused a rough eye phenotype and severely disrupted F-actin filaments at the retina floor of pigment cells. We identified genes that suppressed these Parvin-induced dominant effects, depending on the cell type. Co-expression of both ILK and the apoptosis inhibitor DIAP1 blocked Parvin-induced lethality and apoptosis and partially ameliorated cell delamination in epithelia, but did not rescue the elevated Rho1 levels, the abnormal organization of F-actin in the wing and the assembly of integrin-matrix adhesion sites. The rough eye phenotype was suppressed by coexpression of either PTEN or Wech, or by knock-down of Xrp1. Two main conclusions can be drawn from our studies: (1, high levels of cytoplasmic Parvin are toxic in epithelial cells; (2 Parvin in a dose dependent manner affects the organization of actin cytoskeleton in both wing and eye epithelia, independently of its role as a structural component of the ILK-PINCH-Parvin complex that mediates the integrin-actin link. Thus, distinct genetic interactions of Parvin occur in different cell types and second site modifier screens are required to uncover such genetic circuits.

  1. Modulation of ceramide-induced cell death and superoxide production by mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory chain defects in Rattus xenocybrid mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounce, Ian A; Crouch, Peter J; Carey, Kirstyn T; McKenzie, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Mitochondria play an integral role in cell death signaling, yet how mitochondrial defects disrupt this important function is not well understood. We have used a mouse L-cell fibroblast model harboring Rattus norvegicus mtDNA (Rn xenocybrids) to examine the effects of multiple oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell death signaling. Blue native-PAGE analyses of Rn xenocybrids revealed defects in OXPHOS complex biogenesis with reduced steady-state levels of complexes I, III and IV. Isolated Rn xenocybrid mitochondria exhibited deficiencies in complex II+III and III activities, with CIII-stimulated ROS generation 66% higher than in control mitochondria. Rn xenocybrid cells were resistant to staurosporine-induced cell death, but exhibited a four-fold increase in sensitivity to ceramide-induced cell death that was caspase-3 independent and did not induce chromosomal DNA degradation. Furthermore, ceramide directly inhibited Rn xenocybrid complex II+III activity by 97%, although this inhibition could be completely abolished by exogenous decylubiquinone. Ceramide also induced a further increase in ROS output from Rn xenocybrid complex III by 42%. These results suggest that the interaction of ceramide with OXPHOS complex III is significantly enhanced by the presence of the xenotypic Rattus cytochrome b in complex III, likely due to the increased affinity for ceramide at the ubiquinone binding site. We propose a novel mechanism of altered mitochondrial cell death signaling due to mtDNA mutations whereby ceramide directly induces OXPHOS complex ROS generation to initiate cell death pathways.

  2. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-15

    Thermonuclear fusion of light atoms is considered since decades as an unlimited, safe and reliable source of energy that could eventually replace classical sources based on fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. Fusion reactor technology and materials studies are important parts of the fusion energy development program. For the time being, the most promising materials for structural applications in the future fusion power reactors are the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels for which the greatest technology maturity has been achieved, i.e., qualified fabrication routes, welding technology and a general industrial experience are almost available. The most important issues concerning the future use of RAFM steels in fusion power reactors are derived from their irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons that are the product, together with 3.5 MeV helium ions, of the envisaged fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. Indeed, exposure of metallic materials to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons will result in the formation of severe displacement damage (about 20-30 dpa per year) and high amounts of helium, which are at the origin of significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of materials, such as hardening and embrittlement effects. This PhD Thesis work was aimed at investigating how far the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique could be used for detecting and characterizing nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in RAFM steels. Indeed, the resolution limit of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is about 1 nm in weak beam TEM imaging, and it is usually thought that a large number of irradiation-induced effects have a size below 1 nm in RAFM steels and that these very small defects actually contribute to the irradiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of RAFM steels occurring at irradiation temperatures below about 400 °C. The aim of this work was achieved by combining SANS experiments on unirradiated and irradiated specimens

  3. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC.

  4. Genetic defects in hepatocanalicular transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R; Jansen, PLM

    2000-01-01

    Bile is made as the result of active transport of its constituents into the biliary space. Most of this transport occurs across the canalicular membrane, with a further contribution from cholangiocytes. Water moves passively into bile. The major substrates that are transported out of hepatocytes are

  5. Genetic defects in hepatocanalicular transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R; Jansen, PLM

    2000-01-01

    Bile is made as the result of active transport of its constituents into the biliary space. Most of this transport occurs across the canalicular membrane, with a further contribution from cholangiocytes. Water moves passively into bile. The major substrates that are transported out of hepatocytes are

  6. Lack of IL-1R8 in neurons causes hyperactivation of IL-1 receptor pathway and induces MECP2-dependent synaptic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasoni, Romana; Morini, Raffaella; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Corradini, Irene; Canzi, Alice; Rasile, Marco; Mantovani, Cristina; Pozzi, Davide; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Menna, Elisabetta; Barco, Angel; Matteoli, Michela

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation modifies risk and/or severity of a variety of brain diseases through still elusive molecular mechanisms. Here we show that hyperactivation of the interleukin 1 pathway, through either ablation of the interleukin 1 receptor 8 (IL-1R8, also known as SIGIRR or Tir8) or activation of IL-1R, leads to up-regulation of the mTOR pathway and increased levels of the epigenetic regulator MeCP2, bringing to disruption of dendritic spine morphology, synaptic plasticity and plasticity-related gene expression. Genetic correction of MeCP2 levels in IL-1R8 KO neurons rescues the synaptic defects. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1R activation by Anakinra corrects transcriptional changes, restores MeCP2 levels and spine plasticity and ameliorates cognitive defects in IL-1R8 KO mice. By linking for the first time neuronal MeCP2, a key player in brain development, to immune activation and demonstrating that synaptic defects can be pharmacologically reversed, these data open the possibility for novel treatments of neurological diseases through the immune system modulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21735.001

  7. Characterisation of Ion Implantation-induced Defects in Certain Technologically Important Materials by Positron Annihilation (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.G. Nambissan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy for the studies of defects produced by different types of charged particles and ions in a variety of materials is discussed with specific examples. The ability to detect and quantify the information through the characteristic parameters of the annihilation radiation in a totally non-destructive method has made the fundamental process of electron-positron annihilation a powerful spectroscopic probe for investigating the structure and properties of materials. Ion implantation produces defects in the structure of solids and the latter can be recovered from the defects by annealing at high temperatures. Here the annealing is done in sequential steps so that the different stages of evolution of defects and their interaction with impurity atoms can be studied systematically. Defects produced by irradiation by particles like protons, alpha, boron and neon ions in materials ranging from simple metals to binary alloys are discussed.A detailed evaluation of the positron lifetimes in terms of the popular positron trapping models is also presented. Further as a special case, the method of extraction of values of several useful physical parameters of inert gas bubbles inside a metal matrix is explained with the help of a model analysis.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.329-341, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1531

  8. Edge-defect induced spin-dependent Seebeck effect and spin figure of merit in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Bo; Wu, Dan-Dan; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2017-10-02

    By using the first-principle calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we have studied spin caloritronic properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different edge defects. The theoretical results show that the edge-defected GNRs with sawtooth shapes can exhibit spin-dependent currents with opposite flowing directions by applying temperature gradients, indicating the occurrence of the spin-dependent Seebeck effect (SDSE). The edge defects bring about two opposite effects on the thermal spin currents: the enhancement of the symmetry of thermal spin-dependent currents, which contributes to the realization of pure thermal spin currents, and the decreasing of the spin thermoelectric conversion efficiency of the devices. It is fortunate that applying a gate voltage is an efficient route to optimize these two opposite spin thermoelectric properties towards realistic device applications. Moreover, due to the existence of spin-splitting band gaps, the edge-defected GNRs can be designed as spin-dependent Seebeck diodes and rectifiers, indicating that the edge-defected GNRs are potential candidates for room-temperature spin caloritronic devices.

  9. Defects and phase change induced by giant electronic excitations with GeV ions and 30 MeV cluster beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevenard, P.; Beranger, M. Canut, B.; Ramos, S.M.M.; Bonardi, N.; Fuchs, G. [Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Dept. de Physique des Materiaux

    1997-11-01

    MgO and LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals were bombarded with GeV swift heavy ions (Pb, Gd) and 30 MeV C{sub 60} clusters to study the damage production induced by giant electronic processes at stopping power up to 100 keV/nm. The defect creation was characterized by optical absorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS-C). In MgO point defects (F type centers) and extended defects (dislocation loops) were created by ionization processes in addition to those associated with nuclear collisions. The F-center concentration induced by electronic energy excitations was studied at different temperatures and as a function of the particle electronic energy losses. TEM revealed that dislocation loops were produced close to the particle trajectories and amorphization was never observed. On the opposite, in LiNbO{sub 3} continuous amorphous tracks were evidenced above a threshold near 5 keV/nm. The dependence of this effects with various solid state parameters will be discussed.

  10. Genetic determinants of drug-induced cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli-Magnus, Christiane; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and drug-induced cholestasis are two clinically important forms of acquired cholestatic liver disease. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms of acquired cholestasis has recently made considerable progress by the identification of canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as likely targets for these forms of cholestasis. Cholestasis of pregnancy is linked to estrogen and progesterone metabolites. These metabolites have been shown to impair the bile salt export pump (BSEP) function by an indirect mechanism. In addition, genetic variants (as well as mutants) of the genes coding for the phosphatidylcholine translocator MDR3 and BSEP and for the farnesoid X receptor, which is critical in the transcriptional activation of MDR3 ( ABCB4) and BSEP ( ABCB11) have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. The pathogenesis of drug-induced liver injury encompasses a wide spectrum of mechanisms, some of which are still poorly understood. BSEP is now known to be subject to drug inhibition in susceptible patients. Information on genetic factors rendering individuals susceptible to inhibition of BSEP by drugs or their metabolites is still scarce. Besides rare mutations that have been linked to drug-induced cholestasis, the common p.V444A polymorphism of BSEP has been identified as a potential risk factor. In this review, the authors summarize key concepts of physiology of bile formation, diagnostic principles to indentify these forms of acquired cholestasis, as well as pathogenetic mechanisms leading to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy or drug-induced cholestasis. In addition, they review the current knowledge on genetic susceptibility factors for these two forms of cholestasis.

  11. Genetic analysis of induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana: association between induced and basal resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1998-01-01

    Selected nonpathogenic rhizobacteria are able to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Different ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana were screened for expression of ISR against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, after treatment of the roots with the nonpathogenic P. fluorescens

  12. Detection of Genetic Variations in Marine Algae Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta Induced by Heavy Metal Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basel Saleh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta green macroalgae has been successfully used as bioindicator for heavy metals pollution in ecosystems. Random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMP marker was employed to investigate genetic DNA pattern variability in green U. lactuca 5 days after exposure to Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn heavy metals stress. Genomic template stability (GTS% value was employed as a qualitative DNA changes measurement based on RAMP technique. In this respect, estimated GTS% value was recorded to be 65.215, 64.630, 59.835 and 59.250% for Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn treatment, respectively. Moreover, genetic similarity (GS induced by the above heavy metals was also evaluated to measure genetic distance between algae treated plants and their respective control. In this respect, estimated GS values generated by RAMP marker ranged between 0.576 (between control and Zn treatment - 0.969 (for both case; between Pb and Cu and between Cd and Zn treatment with an average of 0.842. Based upon data presented herein based on variant bands number (VB, GTS% and GS values; the present study could be suggested that Pb and Cu followed similar tendency at genomic DNA changes. Similar finding was also observed with Cd and Zn ions. Thereby, RAMP marker successfully highlighted DNA change patterns induced by heavy metals stress.

  13. Folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributes to neuropathy in young and aged zebrafish--implication in neural tube defects and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tseng-Ting; Chu, Chia-Yi; Lee, Gang-Hui; Hsiao, Tsun-Hsien; Cheng, Nai-Wei; Chang, Nan-Shan; Chen, Bing-Hung; Fu, Tzu-Fun

    2014-11-01

    Folate is a nutrient essential for the development, function and regeneration of nervous systems. Folate deficiency has been linked to many neurological disorders including neural tube defects in fetus and Alzheimer's diseases in the elderly. However, the etiology underlying these folate deficiency-associated diseases is not completely understood. In this study, zebrafish transgenic lines with timing and duration-controllable folate deficiency were developed by ectopically overexpressing a recombinant EGFP-γ-glutamyl hydrolase (γGH). Impeded neural crest cell migration was observed in the transgenic embryos when folate deficiency was induced in early stages, leading to defective neural tube closure and hematopoiesis. Adding reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine reversed the phenotypic anomalies, supporting the causal link between the increased oxidative stress and the folate deficiency-induced abnormalities. When folate deficiency was induced in aged fish accumulation of beta-amyloid and phosphorylated Tau protein were found in the fish brain cryo-sections. Increased autophagy and accumulation of acidic autolysosome were apparent in folate deficient neuroblastoma cells, which were reversed by reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Decreased expression of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, was also observed in cells and tissue with folate deficiency. We concluded that folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributed to the folate deficiency-associated neuropathogenesis in both early and late stages of life.

  14. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  15. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Jun; Nagayasu-Tanaka, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Yamada, Satoru; Nozaki, Takenori; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT). After FGF-2 (0.3%) or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological healing process.

  16. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-α/Sima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-α polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-α/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima. PMID:16179946

  17. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha/Sima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-11-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-alpha polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-alpha/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima.

  18. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  19. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases.

  20. Defect ferromagnetism in ZnO and SnO2 induced by non-magnetic dopants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbar, Sadaf

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we determined that suitable defects (e.g. cationic vacancies) in ZnO and SnO2 systems can enable ferromagnetic behaviour even for small dopant concentrations. We elucidated that the structural, morphological, electronic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties are highly sensitive

  1. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  2. Mn fraction substitutional site and defects induced magnetism in Mn-implanted 6H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouziane, K., E-mail: Khalid.bouziane@uir.ac.ma [Pôle Energies Renouvelables et Etudes Pétrolières, Université Internationale de Rabat, 11000 – Salé el Jadida, Technopolis (Morocco); Al Azri, M.; Elzain, M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman); Chérif, S.M. [LSPM (CNRS-UPR 3407), Université Paris, 13-Nord, 99, Avenue Jean Baptiste Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Mamor, M. [Equipe MSISM, Faculté Poly-Disciplinaire, B.P. 4162 Safi, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Declémy, A. [Institut P’, CNRS – Université de Poitiers – ENSMA, UPR 3346, SP2MI – Téléport 2, 11 boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F-86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Thomé, L. [CSNSM-Orsay, Bât. 108, Université d’Orsay, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Shallow Mn-implanted 6H-SiC crystal. • Correlation between Mn-substitutional site concentration and magnetism. • Correlation between defects nature surrounding Mn site and magnetism. • Correlation of magnetism in Mn-doped SiC to Mn at Si sites and vacancy-related defect. - Abstract: n-type 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) single crystal substrates were implanted with three fluences of manganese (Mn{sup +}) ions: 5 × 10{sup 15}, 1 × 10{sup 16} and 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} with implantation energy of 80 keV at 365 °C to stimulate dynamic annealing. The samples were characterized using Rutherford backscattering channeling spectroscopy (RBS/C), high-resolution X-ray diffraction technique (HRXRD), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) techniques. Two main defect regions have been identified using RBS/C spectra fitted with the McChasy code combined to SRIM simulations. Intermediate defects depth region is associated with vacancies (D{sub V}) and deeper defect (D{sub N}) essentially related to the Si and C interstitial defects. The defect concentration and the maximum perpendicular strain exhibit similar increasing trend with the Mn{sup +} fluence. Furthermore, the amount of Mn atoms at Si substitutional sites and the corresponding magnetic moment per Mn atom were found to increase with increasing Mn fluence from 0.7 μ{sub B} to 1.7 μ{sub B} and then collapsing to 0.2 μ{sub B}. Moreover, a strong correlation has been found between the magnetic moment and the combination of both large D{sub V}/D{sub N} ratio and high Mn at Si sites. These results are corroborated by our ab initio calculations considering the most stable configurations showing that besides the amount of Mn substituting Si sites, local vacancy-rich environment is playing a crucial role in enhancing the magnetism.

  3. Genetic effects in somatic and germ cells, induced by ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, B.; Benova, D.; Bajrakova, A.; Bulanova, M.; Vyglenov, A.; Rupova, I.; Georgieva, I. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative data are reported on injuries to hereditary structures in somatic and sex cells, induced by different types of ionizing radiation. The model systems used were human peripheral blood lymphocytes, in vitro irradiated with different doses: bone-marrow cells of mice and rats irradiated in vivo: mouse, rat, rabbit and hamster sex cells. To evaluate the dose-effect dependency after acute and chronic irradiation, the authors used mathematical models, describing the amount of chromosomal injuries. Attempt was made to estimate the somatic and genetic risk, following acute and chronic irradiation with different doses of ionizing radiations.

  4. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels; Evaluacion de los defectos inducidos por la radiacion neutronica en los aceros de vasijas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-07-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs.

  5. Influence of Y-doped induced defects on the optical and magnetic properties of ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chung-Yuan; Young, San-Lin; Chen, Hone-Zern; Kao, Ming-Cheng; Horng, Lance; Shih, Yu-Tai; Lin, Chen-Cheng; Lin, Teng-Tsai; Ou, Chung-Jen

    2012-07-07

    One-dimensional pure zinc oxide (ZnO) and Y-doped ZnO nanorod arrays have been successfully fabricated on the silicon substrate for comparison by a simple hydrothermal process at the low temperature of 90°C. The Y-doped nanorods exhibit the same c-axis-oriented wurtzite hexagonal structure as pure ZnO nanorods. Based on the results of photoluminescence, an enhancement of defect-induced green-yellow visible emission is observed for the Y-doped ZnO nanorods. The decrease of E2(H) mode intensity and increase of E1(LO) mode intensity examined by the Raman spectrum also indicate the increase of defects for the Y-doped ZnO nanorods. As compared to pure ZnO nanorods, Y-doped ZnO nanorods show a remarked increase of saturation magnetization. The combination of visible photoluminescence and ferromagnetism measurement results indicates the increase of oxygen defects due to the Y doping which plays a crucial role in the optical and magnetic performances of the ZnO nanorods.

  6. Transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence induced by gradient effects in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Qi; Hu, Bambi; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2003-09-01

    The transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence was studied in a spatial open reactor using Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The experimental results show a new mechanism of the transition from spirals to spatiotemporal chaos, in which the gradient effects in the three-dimensional system are essential. The transition scenario consists of two stages: first, the effects of gradients in the third dimension cause a splitting of the spiral tip and a deletion of certain wave segments, generating new wave sources; second, the waves sent by the new wave sources undergo a backfire instability, and the back waves are laterally unstable. As a result, defects are automatically generated and fill all over the system. The result of numerical simulation using the FitzHugh-Nagumo model essentially agrees with the experimental observation.

  7. Genetic Disruption of Protein Kinase STK25 Ameliorates Metabolic Defects in a Diet-Induced Type 2 Diabetes Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, Manoj; Cansby, Emmelie; Chursa, Urszula;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular networks controlling ectopic lipid deposition, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity is essential to identifying new pharmacological approaches to treat type 2 diabetes. We recently identified serine/threonine protein kinase 25 (STK25) as a negative regulator...... to the metabolic phenotype of Stk25 transgenic mice, reinforcing the validity of the results. The findings suggest that STK25 deficiency protects against the metabolic consequences of chronic exposure to dietary lipids and highlight the potential of STK25 antagonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes....

  8. Defects induced luminescence and tuning of bandgap energy narrowing in ZnO nanoparticles doped with Li ions

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Saif Ullah

    2014-08-28

    Microstructural and optical properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤y ≤0.10) nanoparticles are investigated. Li incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characterization. From micro-structural analysis, no secondary phases or clustering of Li was detected. Elemental maps confirmed homogeneous distribution of Li in ZnO. Sharp UV peak due to the recombination of free exciton and defects based luminescence broad visible band was observed. The transition from the conduction band to Zinc vacancy defect level in photoluminescence spectra is found at 518±2.5nm. The yellow luminescence was observed and attributed to Li related defects in doped samples. With increasing Li doping, a decrease in energy bandgap was observed in the range 3.26±0.014 to 3.17±0.018eV. The bandgap narrowing behavior is explained in terms of the band tailing effect due to structural disorder, carrier-impurities, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interactions. Tuning of the bandgap energy in this class of wide bandgap semiconductor is very important for room temperature spintronics applications and optical devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. DLTS analysis of radiation-induced defects in one-MeV electron irradiated germanium and Alsub0.17Gasub0.83As solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. B.; Choi, C. G.; Loo, R. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation-induced deep-level defects in one-MeV electron-irradiated germanium and AlxGal-xAs solar cell materials using the deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and C-V techniques were investigated. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy levels, capture cross sections and lifetimes for both electron and hole traps were determined. The germanium and AlGaAs p/n junction cells were irradiated by one-MeV electrons. The DLTS, I-V, and C-V measurements were performed on these cells. The results are summarized as follows: (1) for the irradiated germanium samples, the dominant electron trap was due to the E sub - 0.24 eV level with density around 4x10 to the 14th power 1/cu cm, independent of electron fluence, its origin is attributed to the vacancy-donor complex defect formed during the electron irradiation; (2) in the one-MeV electron irradiated Al0.17Ga0.83 as sample, two dominant electron traps with energies of Ec-0.19 and -0.29 eV were observed, the density for both electron traps remained nearly constant, independent of electron fluence. It is shown that one-MeV electron irradiation creates very few or no new deep-level traps in both the germanium and AlxGa1-xAs cells, and are suitable for fabricating the radiation-hard high efficiency multijunction solar cells for space applications.

  10. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jen-Chu Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls.

  11. Induced Mutations Unleash the Potentials of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikelu Mba

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The options for increasing food production by at least 70% over the next four decades so as to keep pace with a rapidly increasing human population are bedeviled by erratic climatic conditions, depleted arable lands, dwindling water resources and by the significant environmental and health costs for increasing the use of agrochemicals. Enhanced productivities through “smart” crop varieties that yield more with fewer inputs is a viable option. However, the genetic similarities amongst crop varieties—which render entire cropping systems vulnerable to the same stresses—coupled with unvarying parental materials limit the possibilities for uncovering novel alleles of genes and, hence, assembling new gene combinations to break yield plateaux and enhance resilience. Induced mutation unmasks novel alleles that are harnessed to breed superior crop varieties. The historical antecedents, theoretical and practical considerations, and the successes of induced mutations in crop improvement are reviewed along with how induced mutagenesis underpins plant functional genomics. The roles of cell and molecular biology techniques in enhancing the efficiencies for the induction, detection and deployment of mutation events are also reviewed. Also, the integration of phenomics into induced mutagenesis and the use of pre-breeding for facilitating the incorporation of mutants into crop improvement are advocated.

  12. Genome-wide screening for genetic loci associated with noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Sheth, Sonal; Zebboudj, Amina F; McHugh, Richard K; Hoffman, Larry F; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; Friedman, Rick A

    2009-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the more common sources of environmentally induced hearing loss in adults. In a mouse model, Castaneous (CAST/Ei) is an inbred strain that is resistant to NIHL, while the C57BL/6J strain is susceptible. We have used the genome-tagged mice (GTM) library of congenic strains, carrying defined segments of the CAST/Ei genome introgressed onto the C57BL/6J background, to search for loci modifying the noise-induced damage seen in the C57BL/6J strain. NIHL was induced by exposing 6-8-week old mice to 108 dB SPL intensity noise. We tested the hearing of each mouse strain up to 23 days after noise exposure using auditory brainstem response (ABR). This study identifies a number of genetic loci that modify the initial response to damaging noise, as well as long-term recovery. The data suggest that multiple alleles within the CAST/Ei genome modify the pathogenesis of NIHL and that screening congenic libraries for loci that underlie traits of interest can be easily carried out in a high-throughput fashion.

  13. A Doxycycline-Inducible System for Genetic Correction of iPSC Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xiuli; Cardenas-Diaz, Fabian L; French, Deborah L; Gadue, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are valuable tools for the study of developmental biology and disease modeling. In both applications, genetic correction of patient iPSCs is a powerful method to understand the specific contribution of a gene(s) in development or diseased state(s). Here, we describe a protocol for the targeted integration of a doxycycline-inducible transgene expression system in a safe harbor site in iPSCs. Our gene targeting strategy uses zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) to enhance homologous recombination at the AAVS1 safe harbor locus, thus increasing the efficiency of the site-specific integration of the two targeting vectors that make up the doxycycline-inducible system. Importantly, the use of dual-drug selection in our system increases the efficiency of positive selection for double-targeted clones to >50 %, permitting a less laborious screening process. If desired, this protocol can also be adapted to allow the use of tissue-specific promoters to drive gene expression instead of the doxycycline-inducible promoter (TRE). Additionally, this protocol is also compatible with the use of Transcription-Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) or Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system in place of ZFNs.

  14. Genetic effects on source level evoked and induced oscillatory brain responses in a visual oddball task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakakis, Marios; Zervakis, Michalis; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco J C; Micheloyannis, Sifis; Smit, Dirk J A

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli in simple oddball target detection paradigms cause evoked responses in brain potential. These responses are heritable traits, and potential endophenotypes for clinical phenotypes. These stimuli also cause responses in oscillatory activity, both evoked responses phase-locked to stimulus presentation and phase-independent induced responses. Here, we investigate whether phase-locked and phase-independent oscillatory responses are heritable traits. Oscillatory responses were examined in EEG recordings from 213 twin pairs (91 monozygotic and 122 dizygotic twins) performing a visual oddball task. After group Independent Component Analysis (group-ICA) and time-frequency decomposition, individual differences in evoked and induced oscillatory responses were compared between MZ and DZ twin pairs. Induced (phase-independent) oscillatory responses consistently showed the highest heritability (24-55%) compared to evoked (phase-locked) oscillatory responses and spectral energy, which revealed lower heritability at 1-35.6% and 4.5-32.3%, respectively. Since the phase-independent induced response encodes functional aspects of the brain response to target stimuli different from evoked responses, we conclude that the modulation of ongoing oscillatory activity may serve as an additional endophenotype for behavioral phenotypes and psychiatric genetics.

  15. Colored Noise Induced Bistable Switch in the Genetic Toggle Switch Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Lü, Jinhu; Yu, Xinghuo

    2015-01-01

    Noise can induce various dynamical behaviors in nonlinear systems. White noise perturbed systems have been extensively investigated during the last decades. In gene networks, experimentally observed extrinsic noise is colored. As an attempt, we investigate the genetic toggle switch systems perturbed by colored extrinsic noise and with kinetic parameters. Compared with white noise perturbed systems, we show there also exists optimal colored noise strength to induce the best stochastic switch behaviors in the single toggle switch, and the best synchronized switching in the networked systems, which demonstrate that noise-induced optimal switch behaviors are widely in existence. Moreover, under a wide range of system parameter regions, we find there exist wider ranges of white and colored noises strengths to induce good switch and synchronization behaviors, respectively; therefore, white noise is beneficial for switch and colored noise is beneficial for population synchronization. Our observations are very robust to extrinsic stimulus strength, cell density, and diffusion rate. Finally, based on the Waddington's epigenetic landscape and the Wiener-Khintchine theorem, physical mechanisms underlying the observations are interpreted. Our investigations can provide guidelines for experimental design, and have potential clinical implications in gene therapy and synthetic biology.

  16. Genetic variation and exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for athletic performance, injury and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Philipp; Lake, Mark J; Stewart, Claire E; Drust, Barry; Erskine, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Prolonged unaccustomed exercise involving muscle lengthening (eccentric) actions can result in ultrastructural muscle disruption, impaired excitation-contraction coupling, inflammation and muscle protein degradation. This process is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness and is referred to as exercise-induced muscle damage. Although a certain amount of muscle damage may be necessary for adaptation to occur, excessive damage or inadequate recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage can increase injury risk, particularly in older individuals, who experience more damage and require longer to recover from muscle damaging exercise than younger adults. Furthermore, it is apparent that inter-individual variation exists in the response to exercise-induced muscle damage, and there is evidence that genetic variability may play a key role. Although this area of research is in its infancy, certain gene variations, or polymorphisms have been associated with exercise-induced muscle damage (i.e. individuals with certain genotypes experience greater muscle damage, and require longer recovery, following strenuous exercise). These polymorphisms include ACTN3 (R577X, rs1815739), TNF (-308 G>A, rs1800629), IL6 (-174 G>C, rs1800795), and IGF2 (ApaI, 17200 G>A, rs680). Knowing how someone is likely to respond to a particular type of exercise could help coaches/practitioners individualise the exercise training of their athletes/patients, thus maximising recovery and adaptation, while reducing overload-associated injury risk. The purpose of this review is to provide a critical analysis of the literature concerning gene polymorphisms associated with exercise-induced muscle damage, both in young and older individuals, and to highlight the potential mechanisms underpinning these associations, thus providing a better understanding of exercise-induced muscle damage.

  17. Study on proton irradiation induced defects in GaN thick film*%GaN厚膜中的质子辐照诱生缺陷研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明兰†; 杨瑞霞; 李卓昕; 曹兴忠; 王宝义; 王晓晖

    2013-01-01

      本文采用正电子湮没谱研究质子辐照诱生缺陷,实验发现:能量为5 MeV的质子辐照在GaN厚膜中主要产生的是Ga单空位,没有双空位或者空位团形成;在10 K测试的低温光致发光谱中,带边峰出现了“蓝移”,辐照后黄光带的发光强度减弱,说明黄光带的起源与Ga空位(VGa)之间不存在必然的联系,各激子发光峰位置没有改变,仅强度随质子注量发生变化;样品(0002)面双晶XRD扫描曲线的半峰宽在辐照后明显增大,说明质子辐照对晶格的周期性产生了影响,薄膜晶体质量下降。%Proton-irradiation-induced defects threaten seriously the stable performance of GaN-based devices in harsh environments, such as outer space. It is therefore urgent to understand the behaviors of proton-irradiation-induced defects for improving the radiation tolerance of GaN-based devices. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has been used to study proton-induced defects in GaN grown by HVPE. The result shows that VGa is the main defects and no (VGaVN) or (VGaVN)2 is formed in 5 MeV proton-irradiated GaN. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum is carried out at 10K. After irradiation, the band edge shows a blue-shift, but the donor-acceptor pair (DAP) emission band and its LO-phonon replicas is kept at the original position. The intensity of yellow luminescence (YL) band is decreased, which means that the origin of YL band has no relation with VGa. The increased FWHM of GaN (0002) peak in proton-irradiated GaN indicates a degradation of crystal quality.

  18. GENETICALLY MODIFIED DENDRITIC CELLS INDUCED SPECIFIC CYTOTOXITY AGAINST HUMAN HCC CELLS IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彬彬; 叶胜龙; 贺平; 郑宁; 赵燕; 孙瑞霞; 刘银坤; 汤钊猷

    2004-01-01

    Objective: to transduce the tumor associated antigen gene MAGE-1 and/or IL-12 gene into dendritic cells (DC) and to observe the in vitro cytotoxic effect induced by the genetically modified DC against the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC7721. Methods: the MAGE-1 gene was inserted into the retrovirus vector LXSN to construct the recombinant retrovirus LMSN. The monocyte-derived DCs were transfected at appropriate differentiation stage by LMSN and/or a recombinant adenovirus AdmiL-12, which containing murine IL-12 gene. The control groups included retrovirus LXSN transfected, adenovirus AdBGFP transfected and non-transfected DCs. The MAGE-1 gene expression was identified by western blot and the mIL-12 p70 secretion was detected by ELISA assay. The in vitro cytotoxicities against SMMC7721 induced by genetically modified and control groups of DC were tested by MTT assay. Results: The MAGE-1 expression was detected by a monoclonal antibody in DCs tranfected with LMSN but not in control groups. At 16 h, 24 h and 48 h after transfection with AdmIL-12, the concentration of the mIL-12 p70 in the culture medium was 580pg/106 cells, 960pg/106 cells and 1100pg/106 cells respectively. The mIL-12 p70 secretions were not detected in other groups. The lytic activity (as judged by % lysis) induced by each groups of DC was 94.2(5.2% (LMSN and AdmIL-12 cotransfected group), 78.9(3.6% (LMSN transfected groups), 52.6(9.7% (AdmIL-12 transfected group), 34.7(4.3% (LXSN transfected group), 36.3(3.8% (AdBGFP transfected group) and 3.9(2.0% (non-transfected group) respectively. Except for LXSN transfected and AdBGFP transfected group, the difference of the lytic activities between other groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The MAGE-1 gene modified DCs can induce relatively specific cytotoxicty against SMMC7721 in vitro and thus suggested that those genetically engineered DCs have the potential to serve as novel vaccine for HCC. Transduction of

  19. Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice: evidence for induced structural and functional sperm defects after short-, but not long-, term exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle A; Michael, Rowan; Aravindan, Rolands G; Dash, Soma; Shah, Syed I; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used commercially and exist in a variety of products. To determine if anatase TNPs (ATNPs) in doses smaller than previously used reach the scrotum after entry in the body at a distant location and induce sperm defects, 100% ATNP (2.5 or 5 mg kg-1 body weight) was administered intraperitoneally to adult males for three consecutive days, followed by sacrifice 1, 2, 3, or 5 weeks later (long-) or 24, 48 or 120 h (short-term exposure). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of ANTP in scrotal adipose tissues collected 120 h postinjection when cytokine evaluation showed an inflammatory response in epididymal tissues and fluid. At 120 h and up to 3 weeks postinjection, testicular histology revealed enlarged interstitial spaces. Significantly increased numbers of terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive (apoptotic) germ (P = 0.002) and interstitial space cells (P = 0.04) were detected in treated males. Caudal epididymal sperm from the short-term, but not a long-term, arm showed significantly (P < 0.001) increased frequencies of flagellar abnormalities, excess residual cytoplasm (ERC), and unreacted acrosomes in treated versus controls (dose-response relationship). A novel correlation between ERC and unreacted acrosomes was uncovered. At 120 h, there were significant decreases in hyperactivated motility (P < 0.001) and mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.05), and increased reactive oxygen species levels (P < 0.00001) in treated versus control sperm. These results indicate that at 4-8 days postinjection, ANTP induce structural and functional sperm defects associated with infertility, and DNA damage via oxidative stress. Sperm defects were transient as they were not detected 10 days to 5 weeks postinjection.

  20. Intestinal tuberculosis complicated with perforation during anti-tuberculous treatment in a 13-year-old girl with defective mitogen-induced IL-12 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Siu-Tong; Chiu, Sin-Chuen; Li, Kin Kong

    2014-10-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a cytokine which is secreted by activated phagocytes and dendritic cells and promotes cell-mediated immunity to intracellular pathogens, by inducing type 1 helper T cell (TH1) responses and interferon- γ (IFN- γ) production. Defects in the IL-12 may cause selective susceptibility to intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria. We herein report on a 13-year-old girl with defective mitogen-induced IL-12 production, who developed intestinal tuberculosis with wide dissemination involving the lung and urinary tract. She improved gradually, but developed terminal ileal perforation approximately 6.1 months following initiation of anti-tuberculous treatment. The paradoxical response phenomenon was suspected. The girl subsequently underwent surgical resection of the affected bowel segment with a temporary double barrel stoma, and ileocolonic anastomosis was performed after the completion of the anti-tuberculous therapy. The patient remained well, with no evidence of recurrent tuberculosis in the past 5 years. This case illustrates the possibility of underlying primary immunodeficiency in a patient with disseminated tuberculosis; delayed tuberculous intestinal perforation can develop during chemotherapy for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.