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Sample records for genes tumor suppressor

  1. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

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    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  2. Tumor suppressor genes in familial adenomatous polyposis.

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    Eshghifar, Nahal; Farrokhi, Naser; Naji, Tahereh; Zali, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is mostly due to a series of genetic alterations that are being greatly under the influence of the environmental factors. These changes, mutational or epigenetic modifications at transcriptional forefront and/or post-transcriptional effects via miRNAs, include inactivation and the conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Here, a thorough review was carried out on the role of TSGs with the focus on the APC as the master regulator, mutated genes and mal-/dysfunctional pathways that lead to one type of hereditary form of the CRC; namely familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). This review provides a venue towards defining candidate genes that can be used as new PCR-based markers for early diagnosis of FAP. In addition to diagnosis, defining the modes of genetic alterations will open door towards genome editing to either suppress the disease or reduce its progression during the course of action.

  3. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering

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    Hiroyuki Kugoh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  4. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering.

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    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-12-30

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  5. The ING tumor suppressor genes: status in human tumors.

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    Guérillon, Claire; Bigot, Nicolas; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-04-01

    ING genes (ING1-5) were identified has tumor suppressor genes. ING proteins are characterized as Type II TSGs since they are involved in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis and senescence. They may also function as Type I TSGs since they are also involved in DNA replication and repair. Most studies have reported that they are frequently lost in human tumors and epigenetic mechanisms or misregulation of their transcription may be involved. Recently, studies have described that this loss may be caused by microRNA inhibition. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ING functions, their involvement in tumor suppression and, in order to give a full assessment of the current knowledge, we review all the studies that have examined ING status in human cancers.

  6. Enhanced transfection of brain tumor suppressor genes by photochemical internalization

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    Chou, Chih H.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2011-03-01

    One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of a tumor suppressor gene (PAX-6) was investigated in monolayers and spheroids consisting of F98 rat glioma cells.

  7. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

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    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  8. Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Key to the Cancer Puzzle?

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    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1991-01-01

    Author describes developments in understanding of tumor suppressor genes or antioncogenes that he feels is most important breakthrough in solving cancer problem. Describes 1969 starting work of Harris with mouse fibroblast genes and later work of Knudson with retinoblastoma cells. Provides evidence that deletion of chromosome that results in the…

  9. Multiplexed Methylation Profiles of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Bladder Cancer

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    Cabello, Maria José; Grau, Laura; Franco, Noreli; Orenes, Esteban; Alvarez, Miguel; Blanca, Ana; Heredero, Oscar; Palacios, Alberto; Urrutia, Manuel; Fernández, Jesus María; López-Beltrán, Antonio; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation of tumor suppressors can occur early in carcinogenesis and are potentially important early indicators of cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the methylation of 25 tumor suppressor genes in bladder cancer using a methylation-specific (MS) multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA). Initial analyses in bladder cancer cell lines (n = 14) and fresh-frozen primary bladder tumor specimens (n = 31) supported the panel of genes selected being altered in bladder cancer. The process of MS-MLPA was optimized for its application in body fluids using two independent training and validation sets of urinary specimens (n = 146), including patients with bladder cancer (n = 96) and controls (n = 50). BRCA1 (71.0%), WT1 (38.7%), and RARB (38.7%) were the most frequently methylated genes in bladder tumors, with WT1 methylation being significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.011). WT1 and PAX5A were identified as methylated tumor suppressors. In addition, BRCA1, WT1, and RARB were the most frequently methylated genes in urinary specimens. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed significant diagnostic accuracies in both urinary sets for BRCA1, RARB, and WT1. The novelty of this report relates to applying MS-MLPA, a multiplexed methylation technique, for tumor suppressors in bladder cancer and body fluids. Methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes were clinically relevant for histopathological stratification of bladder tumors and offered a noninvasive diagnostic strategy for the clinical management of patients affected with uroepithelial neoplasias. PMID:21227392

  10. Some facts and thoughts: p73 as a tumor suppressor gene in the network of tumor suppressors

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    Boominathan Lakshmanane

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The question of whether p73 is a tumor suppressor gene, is not yet answered with full confidence. The lack of spontaneous tumor formation in p73 null mice and infrequent p73 mutations seen in a variety of cancers analyzed would straightaway negate its role as a primary tumor suppressor gene. However, accumulating evidence suggest that p73 gene and its target genes are hypermethylated in the cancer of lymphoid origin. Here I discuss some facts and thoughts that support the idea that p73 could still be a tumor suppressor gene. The tumor suppressor network in which p73 appears to be a participant involves E2F1, JunB, INK4a/p16, ARF/p19, p57kip2 and BRCA1. Knock out of each gene in E2F-1-p73-JunB-p16INK4a network of tumor suppressor proteins result in lymphoma/leukemia formation. Further, I tried to explain why lymphomas are not seen in p73 null mice and why p73 gene is not prone to frequent mutation.

  11. The new research on tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; YANG Hai-fan; YU Lei; PANG lin-lin; LI Hai-jiao; LIU Guang-da

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the world. The carcinogenesis of HCC is multifactorial, multifunctional and multistage. Tumor suppressor gene therapy is one of the strategies, it is mainly used to make use of tumor suppressor gene groups which can inhibit the cell growth, to prevent the expression of oncogenes or to resume the function of anti-oncogenes. But so far, there is not a particular gene to be a main tumor suppressor gene in HCC. Therefore, it is necessary to study on the new anti-oncogenes to explain pathogenesis of liver cancer and seek for the newly effective target to carry on liver cancer gene therapy. PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten) was discovered as a tumor suppressor gene. It functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and as a lipid phosphatase. As a lipid phosphatase, PTEN antagonizes PI3K/Akt signaling by dephosphorylating the D3 position of the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate(PIP3), to generate phosphatidylinositol-4, 5,- biphosphate(PIP2). On the other hand, as a protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTEN can dephosphorylate itself, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the platelet derived growth factor receptor, involves in the migration, adhension of cells. Many researches have been testified that there is a higher frequency of negative expression of PTEN protein in hepatocellular carcinoma, the negative correlation between expression of PTEN gene and differential grade, clinic stage of HCC indicated that in activation of PTEN gene maybe a late incidence in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and may play an important role in the genesis and development of some hepatocellular carcinoma. KLF6, a member of Krupple-like gene family, a ubiquitously expressed zinc finger transcription factor, has an important role in regulating cell growth and differentiation. Several experiments have been proved that the genetic events of tumor

  12. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

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    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  13. Role of tumor suppressor genes in transplacental lung carcinogenesis.

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    Rollins, L A; Leone-Kabler, S; O'Sullivan, M G; Miller, M S

    1998-03-01

    Most human cancers involve multiple genetic changes, including activation of oncogenes such as Ki-ras-2 (Kras2) and inactivation of any one of a number of tumor suppressor genes such as p53 and members of the retinoblastoma (Rb) regulatory axis. As part of an ongoing project to determine how in utero exposure to chemical carcinogens affects the molecular pathogenesis of murine lung tumors, the p53 and p16Cdkn2a genes were analyzed by using paraffin-embedded lung tissues from mice treated transplacentally with 3-methylcholanthrene. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exons 5-8 of the p53 gene, as well as their flanking introns, demonstrated an absence of mutations at this gene locus. However, a genetic polymorphism was identified at nt 708 in intron 4 of the DBA/2 strain of mice 5 bp downstream of a 3' branching-point splice signal. Analysis of exons 1 and 2 of the Cdkn2a gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analyses revealed mutations in exon 2 in 7% of the tumors examined. Tumor 23-1 exhibited a CAC-->TAC transition at nt 301 (His74-->Tyr74), and tumor 36-1 exhibited a GGG-->GAG transition at nucleotide 350 (Gly90-->Glu90). Northern blot analysis of 14 of the larger tumors showed a marked decrease in the levels of Rb RNA expression. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a spectrum of pRb expression, with the smaller adenomas showing moderate numbers of nuclei with heterogeneous staining for pRb in contrast with a highly reduced or near-complete absence of expression in the nuclei of larger tumors with features of adenocarcinomas. The low incidence of mutations at tumor suppressor loci suggested that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes was a late event in murine lung tumor pathogenesis. The identification of both mutations at the Cdkn2a gene locus and reduced levels of Rb expression combined with previous studies demonstrating a high incidence of mutated Kras2 alleles in these tumors implies that alterations of the Rb

  14. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

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    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  15. Oncogenes, protooncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

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    Hijiya, N; Gewirtz, A M

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of normal human hematopoiesis has expanded greatly. We have increased our knowledge of regulatory growth factors, the receptors through which they act, and the secondary messengers involved in transducing the growth/differentiation signals from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. This knowledge has revealed potential mechanisms for inducing the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. This applies in particular to the role of viral oncogenes and cellular protooncogenes and, more recently, to the role of tumor suppressor genes. Protooncogenes are intimately involved in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, any amplification, mutation, structural alteration, or change in transcriptional regulation of protooncogenes might lead to or be associated with induction of the malignant phenotype. Based on the importance of these genes in leukemogenesis and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that targeted disruption of leukemogenic genes may be of therapeutic value.

  16. Germline promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer

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    Pu-Yuan Wu; Zheng Zhang; Jing-Mei Wang; Wen-Wen Guo; Nong Xiao; Qiong He; Ya-Ping Wang; Yi-Mei Fan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore germline hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a in suspected cases of hereditary gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A group of 140 Chinese GC patients in whom the primary cancer had developed before the age of 60 or who had a familial history of cancer were screened for germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a tumor suppressor genes. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and modified by sodium bisulfite. The treated DNA was then subjected to bisulfite DNA sequencing for a specific region of the MLH1 promoter. The methylation status of CDH1 or P16INK4a was assayed using methylation- specific PCR. Clonal bisulfite allelic sequencing in positive samples was performed to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the CpG island methylation status of these promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was detected in the peripheral blood DNA of only 1/140 (0.7%) of the GC patient group. However, this methylation pattern was mosaic rather than the allelic pattern which has previously been reported for MLH1 in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. We found that 10% of the MLH1 alleles in the peripheral blood DNA of this patient were methylated, consistent with 20% of cells having one methylated allele. No germline promoter methylation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a genes was detected. CONCLUSION: Mosaic germline epimutation of the MLH1 gene is present in suspected hereditary GC patients in China but at a very low level. Germline epimutation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a gene is not a frequent event.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

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    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  18. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

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    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  19. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

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    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  20. Control of autophagy by oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

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    Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Criollo, A; Morselli, E; Vicencio, J M; Carnuccio, R; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Multiple oncogenes (in particular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K; activated Akt1; antiapoptotic proteins from the Bcl-2 family) inhibit autophagy. Similarly, several tumor suppressor proteins (such as BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase-1, DAPK1; the phosphatase that antagonizes PI3K, PTEN; tuberous sclerosic complex 1 and 2, TSC1 and TSC2; as well as LKB1/STK11) induce autophagy, meaning that their loss reduces autophagy. Beclin-1, which is required for autophagy induction acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor protein, and other essential autophagy mediators (such as Atg4c, UVRAG and Bif-1) are bona fide oncosuppressors. One of the central tumor suppressor proteins, p53 exerts an ambiguous function in the regulation of autophagy. Within the nucleus, p53 can act as an autophagy-inducing transcription factor. Within the cytoplasm, p53 exerts a tonic autophagy-inhibitory function, and its degradation is actually required for the induction of autophagy. The role of autophagy in oncogenesis and anticancer therapy is contradictory. Chronic suppression of autophagy may stimulate oncogenesis. However, once a tumor is formed, autophagy inhibition may be a therapeutic goal for radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Altogether, the current state-of-the art suggests a complex relationship between cancer and deregulated autophagy that must be disentangled by further in-depth investigation.

  1. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

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    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  2. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

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    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  3. Alternative poladenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

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    Anders eRehfeld

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation with proliferation, cell transformation and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-mRNA is cleaved at a polyA site and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo alternative polyadenylation. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3’ untranslated regions. Additionally, alternative polyadenylation can also produce mRNAs containing different 3’-terminal coding regions. Therefore, alternative polyadenylation alters both the repertoire and the expression level of proteins.Here we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors and a reference sample. In the tumors sixteen genes showed significant changes of alternative polyadenylation pattern, which lead to either the 3’ truncation of mRNA coding regions or 3’ untranslated regions. Among these, 11 genes had been previously associated with cancer, with 4 genes being known tumor suppressors: DCC, PDZD2, MAGI1 and DACT2. We validated the alternative polyadenylation in 3 out of 3 cases with Q-RT-PCR. Our findings suggest that changes of alternative polyadenylation pattern in these 16 genes could be involved in the tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors. Furthermore, they also point to alternative polyadenylation as a new target for both diagnostic and treatment of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors. The identified genes with alternative polyadenylation specific to the small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors could be further tested as diagnostic markers and drug targets for disease prevention and treatment.

  4. Frequent alteration of the tumor suppressor gene APC in sporadic canine colorectal tumors.

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    Youmans, Lydia; Taylor, Cynthia; Shin, Edwin; Harrell, Adrienne; Ellis, Angela E; Séguin, Bernard; Ji, Xinglai; Zhao, Shaying

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic canine colorectal cancers (CRCs) should make excellent models for studying the corresponding human cancers. To molecularly characterize canine CRC, we investigated exonic sequence mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), the best known tumor suppressor gene of human CRC, in 23 sporadic canine colorectal tumors, including 8 adenomas and 15 adenocarcinomas, via exon-resequencing analysis. As a comparison, we also performed the same sequencing analysis on 10 other genes, either located at human 5q22 (the same locus as APC) or 18q21 (also frequently altered in human CRC), or known to play a role in human carcinogenesis. We noted that APC was the most significantly mutated gene in both canine adenomas and adenocarcinomas among the 11 genes examined. Significantly, we detected large deletions of ≥ 10 bases, many clustered near the mutation cluster region, as well as single or two base deletions in ~70% canine tumors of both subtypes. These observations indicate that like in the human, APC is also frequently altered in sporadic colorectal tumors in the dog and its alteration is an early event in canine colorectal tumorigenesis. Our study provides further evidence demonstrating the molecular similarity in pathogenesis between sporadic human and canine CRCs. This work, along with our previous copy number abnormality study, supports that sporadic canine CRCs are valid models of human CRCs at the molecular level.

  5. Multiplexed methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes and clinical outcome in lung cancer

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    Venditti Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in DNA methylation of crucial cancer genes including tumor suppressors can occur early in carcinogenesis, being potentially important early indicators of cancer. The objective of this study was to examine a multiplexed approach to assess the methylation of tumor suppressor genes as tumor stratification and clinical outcome prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. Methods A multicandidate probe panel interrogated DNA for aberrant methylation status in 18 tumor suppressor genes in lung cancer using a methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MS-MLPA. Lung cancer cell lines (n = 7, and primary lung tumors (n = 54 were examined using MS-MLPA. Results Genes frequently methylated in lung cancer cell lines including SCGB3A1, ID4, CCND2 were found among the most commonly methylated in the lung tumors analyzed. HLTF, BNIP3, H2AFX, CACNA1G, TGIF, ID4 and CACNA1A were identified as novel tumor suppressor candidates methylated in lung tumors. The most frequently methylated genes in lung tumors were SCGB3A1 and DLC1 (both 50.0%. Methylation rates for ID4, DCL1, BNIP3, H2AFX, CACNA1G and TIMP3 were significantly different between squamous and adenocarcinomas. Methylation of RUNX3, SCGB3A1, SFRP4, and DLC1 was significantly associated with the extent of the disease when comparing localized versus metastatic tumors. Moreover, methylation of HTLF, SFRP5 and TIMP3 were significantly associated with overall survival. Conclusions MS-MLPA can be used for classification of certain types of lung tumors and clinical outcome prediction. This latter is clinically relevant by offering an adjunct strategy for the clinical management of lung cancer patients.

  6. Isolation of Breast Tumor Suppressor Genes from Chromosome 11p

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    2001-09-01

    at chromosome crucial role in urogenital development (Pelletier et al., llp15 has also been described in Wilms tumors but thus 1991). However...Atkins L and Riccardi VM. (1979). Nowak NJ, Evans G, Stanbridge EJ, de Jong P, Shows TB , Cytogenet. Cell Genet., 24, 185-192. Weissman BE and Higgins MJ...Singh-Kahlon P, Weksberg R, Squire J, Grundy P, Coppes MJ and Haber D. (1995). Hematology/ Shows TB and Higgins MJ. (1994). Genes Chromosomes Oncology

  7. Promoter methylation of PARG1, a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in mantle-cell lymphomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripperger, T.; Neuhoff, N. von; Kamphues, K.; Emura, M.; Lehmann, U.; Tauscher, M.; Schraders, M.; Groenen, P.; Skawran, B.; Rudolph, C.; Callet-Bauchu, E.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Schlegelberger, B.; Steinemann, D.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a mature B-cell neoplasm, is genetically characterized by the translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32). However, secondary alterations are required for malignant transformation. The identification of inactivated tumor suppressor genes contributing to the

  8. NTRK3 is a potential tumor suppressor gene commonly inactivated by epigenetic mechanisms in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxin Luo

    Full Text Available NTRK3 is a member of the neurotrophin receptor family and regulates cell survival. It appears to be a dependence receptor, and thus has the potential to act as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor gene. NTRK3 is a receptor for NT-3 and when bound to NT-3 it induces cell survival, but when NT-3 free, it induces apoptosis. We identified aberrantly methylated NTRK3 in colorectal cancers through a genome-wide screen for hypermethylated genes. This discovery led us to assess whether NTRK3 could be a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. NTRK3 is methylated in 60% of colon adenomas and 67% of colon adenocarcinomas. NTRK3 methylation suppresses NTRK3 expression. Reconstitution of NTRK3 induces apoptosis in colorectal cancers, if NT-3 is absent. Furthermore, the loss of NTRK3 expression associates with neoplastic transformation in vitro and in vivo. We also found that a naturally occurring mutant NTRK3 found in human colorectal cancer inhibits the tumor suppressor activity of NTRK3. In summary, our findings suggest NTRK3 is a conditional tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in colorectal cancer by both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms whose function in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer depends on the expression status of its ligand, NT-3.

  9. NTRK3 Is a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene Commonly Inactivated by Epigenetic Mechanisms in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Kaz, Andrew M.; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welsch, Piri; Morris, Shelli M.; Wang, Jianping; Lutterbaugh, James D.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Grady, William M.

    2013-01-01

    NTRK3 is a member of the neurotrophin receptor family and regulates cell survival. It appears to be a dependence receptor, and thus has the potential to act as an oncogene or as a tumor suppressor gene. NTRK3 is a receptor for NT-3 and when bound to NT-3 it induces cell survival, but when NT-3 free, it induces apoptosis. We identified aberrantly methylated NTRK3 in colorectal cancers through a genome-wide screen for hypermethylated genes. This discovery led us to assess whether NTRK3 could be a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. NTRK3 is methylated in 60% of colon adenomas and 67% of colon adenocarcinomas. NTRK3 methylation suppresses NTRK3 expression. Reconstitution of NTRK3 induces apoptosis in colorectal cancers, if NT-3 is absent. Furthermore, the loss of NTRK3 expression associates with neoplastic transformation in vitro and in vivo. We also found that a naturally occurring mutant NTRK3 found in human colorectal cancer inhibits the tumor suppressor activity of NTRK3. In summary, our findings suggest NTRK3 is a conditional tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in colorectal cancer by both epigenetic and genetic mechanisms whose function in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer depends on the expression status of its ligand, NT-3. PMID:23874207

  10. Quantitative Methylation Profiles for Multiple Tumor Suppressor Gene Promoters in Salivary Gland Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Megan L.; Mydlarz, Wojciech K.; Shao, Chunbo; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Chuang, Alice Y.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Westra, William H.; Liegeois, Nanette J.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sidransky, David; Ha, Patrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methylation profiling of tumor suppressor gene (TSGs) promoters is quickly becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for the early detection, prognosis, and even prediction of clinical response to treatment. Few studies address this in salivary gland tumors (SGTs); hence the promoter methylation profile of various TSGs was quantitatively assessed in primary SGT tissue to determine if tumor-specific alterations could be detected. Methodology DNA isolated from 78 tumor and 17 normal parotid gland specimens was assayed for promoter methylation status of 19 TSGs by fluorescence-based, quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). The data were utilized in a binary fashion as well as quantitatively (using a methylation quotient) allowing for better profiling and interpretation of results. Principal Findings The average number of methylation events across the studied genes was highest in salivary duct carcinoma (SDC), with a methylation value of 9.6, compared to the normal 4.5 (p<0.0003). There was a variable frequency and individual methylation quotient detected, depending on the TSG and the tumor type. When comparing normal, benign, and malignant SGTs, there was a statistically significant trend for increasing methylation in APC, Mint 1, PGP9.5, RAR-β, and Timp3. Conclusions/Significance Screening promoter methylation profiles in SGTs showed considerable heterogeneity. The methylation status of certain markers was surprisingly high in even normal salivary tissue, confirming the need for such controls. Several TSGs were found to be associated with malignant SGTs, especially SDC. Further study is needed to evaluate the potential use of these associations in the detection, prognosis, and therapeutic outcome of these rare tumors. PMID:20520817

  11. Correlation of primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with tumor suppressor gene p53 in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation of standard path morphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  12. RNA-DNA differences are rarer in proto-oncogenes than in tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2012-01-01

    It has long been assumed that DNA sequences and corresponding RNA transcripts are almost identical; a recent discovery, however, revealed widespread RNA-DNA differences (RDDs), which represent a largely unexplored aspect of human genome variation. It has been speculated that RDDs can affect disease susceptibility and manifestations; however, almost nothing is known about how RDDs are related to disease. Here, we show that RDDs are rarer in proto-oncogenes than in tumor suppressor genes; the number of RDDs in coding exons, but not in 3'UTR and 5'UTR, is significantly lower in the former than the latter, and this trend is especially pronounced in non-synonymous RDDs, i.e., those cause amino acid changes. A potential mechanism is that, unlike proto-oncogenes, the requirement of tumor suppressor genes to have both alleles affected to cause tumor 'buffers' these genes to tolerate more RDDs.

  13. Characterization of DOK1, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Ghani, Karim; Têtu, Bernard; Bairati, Isabelle; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2011-10-01

    In attempt to discover novel aberrantly hypermethylated genes with putative tumor suppressor function in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we applied expression profiling following pharmacologic inhibition of DNA methylation in EOC cell lines. Among the genes identified, one of particular interest was DOK1, or downstream of tyrosine kinase 1, previously recognized as a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for leukemia and other human malignancies. Using bisulfite sequencing, we determined that a 5'-non-coding DNA region (located at nt -1158 to -850, upstream of the DOK1 translation start codon) was extensively hypermethylated in primary serous EOC tumors compared with normal ovarian specimens; however, this hypermethylation was not associated with DOK1 suppression. On the contrary, DOK1 was found to be strongly overexpressed in serous EOC tumors as compared to normal tissue and importantly, DOK1 overexpression significantly correlated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) values of serous EOC patients. Ectopic modulation of DOK1 expression in EOC cells and consecutive functional analyses pointed toward association of DOK1 expression with increased EOC cell migration and proliferation, and better sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses were also confirmative for DOK1 association with EOC cell migration and proliferation. These analyses were also indicative for DOK1 protective role in EOC tumorigenesis, linked to DOK1-mediated induction of some tumor suppressor factors and its suppression of pro-metastasis genes. Taken together, our findings are suggestive for a possible tumor suppressor role of DOK1 in EOC; however its implication in enhanced EOC cell migration and proliferation restrain us to conclude that DOK1 represents a true TSG in EOC. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of DOK1 and other members of the DOK gene family in ovarian

  14. Analysis of tumor suppressor genes based on gene ontology and the KEGG pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Chen, Lei; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. We urgently need to design effective treatments to cure this disease. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a type of gene that can protect cells from becoming cancerous. In view of this, correct identification of TSGs is an alternative method for identifying effective cancer therapies. In this study, we performed gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis of the TSGs and non-TSGs. Some popular feature selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) and incremental feature selection (IFS), were employed to analyze the enrichment features. Accordingly, some GO terms and KEGG pathways, such as biological adhesion, cell cycle control, genomic stability maintenance and cell death regulation, were extracted, which are important factors for identifying TSGs. We hope these findings can help in building effective prediction methods for identifying TSGs and thereby, promoting the discovery of effective cancer treatments.

  15. High throughput functional genomics: identification of novel genes with tumor suppressor phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Hoffmann, Kerstin; Bonin-Debs, Angelika L; Boche, Irene; Gawin, Beate; Gnirke, Andrea; Hergersberg, Christoph; Madeo, Frank; Kazinski, Michael; Klein, Matthias; Korherr, Christian; Link, Dieter; Röhrig, Sascha; Schäfer, Rolf; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2005-01-20

    We have used a combination of high throughput functional genomics, computerized database mining and expression analyses to discover novel human tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). A genome-wide high throughput cDNA phenotype screen was established to identify genes that induce apoptosis or reduce cell viability. TSGs are expressed in normal tissue and frequently act by reduction of growth of transformed cells or induce apoptosis. In agreement with that and thus serving as platform validation, our pro-apoptotic hits included genes for which tumor suppressing activities were known, such as kangai1 and CD81 antigen. Additional genes that so far have been claimed as putative TSGs or associated with tumor inhibitory activities (prostate differentiation factor, hRAS-like suppressor 3, DPH2L1-like and the metastasis inhibitor Kiss1) were confirmed in their proposed TSG-like phenotype by functionally defining their growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic function towards cancer cells. Finally, novel genes were identified for which neither association with cell growth nor with apoptosis were previously described. A subset of these genes show characteristics of TSGs because they (i) reduce the growth or induce apoptosis in tumor cells; (ii) show reduced expression in tumor vs. normal tissue; and (iii) are located on chromosomal (LOH-) loci for which cancer-associated deletions are described. The pro-apoptotic phenotype and differential expression of these genes in normal and malignant tissue make them promising target candidates for the diagnosis and therapy of various tumors.

  16. Isolation of a rice gene homologous to the human putative tumor suppressor gene QM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    QM gene was originally isolated from human by Dowdy et al during a search for a wilms′ tumor suppressor gene. Researches of QM gene focused mainly on animals and yeasts, little was known about plant QM gene. For better understanding of QM gene in rice, a QM homologous fragment was used as a probe to screen rice (Oryza sativa subsp. indica c.v. Guanglu′ ai 4) genomic DNA library,and two clones were obtained. One of them, OSQM2, encoded a highly basic protein of 184 amino acids, the sequence was about 3.1 kb long with a very special promoter region compared with other known QM genes. Seven potential G boxes could be found between -690 and -230. G box, which contains a ACGT core motif, had been reported in many plants to act as a cis acting DNA element in the regulation of genes in a variety of environmental conditions, such as ABA regulated gene expression, red light, UV light, anaerobiosis, and wounding etc. Two closely linked DRE related motifs (dehydration responsive element) could also be found between -182 and 173, which had a CCGAC conserved sequence and had been identified in many cold and drought responsive genes in Arabidopsis. Six MYC recognition sequences with the conserved motif NCANNTGN were also presented, which might be essential for ABA and drought responsive expression of the plant genes.

  17. Alterations of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes in the development and progression of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen Tamura

    2006-01-01

    The development and progression of gastric cancer involves a number of genetic and epigenetic alterations of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes. The majority of differentiated carcinomas arise from intestinal metaplastic mucosa and exhibit structurally altered tumor suppressor genes, typified by p53,which is inactivated via the classic two-hit mechanism,i.e. loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and mutation of the remaining allele. LOH at certain chromosomal loci accumulates during tumor progression. Approximately 20% of differentiated carcinomas show evidence of mutator pathway tumorigenesis due to hMLH1inactivation via hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands, and exhibit high-frequency microsatellite instability. In contrast, undifferentiated carcinomas rarely exhibit structurally altered tumor suppressor genes. For instance, while methylation of E-cadherin is often observed in undifferentiated carcinomas,mutation of this gene is generally associated with the progression from differentiated to undifferentiated carcinomas. Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes, including APC, CHFR, DAP-kinase, DCC, E-cadherin, GSTP1, hMLH1, p16, PTEN,RASSF1A, RUNX3, and TSLC1, can be detected in both differentiated and undifferentiated carcinomas at varying frequencies. However, the significance of the hypermethylation varies according to the analyzed genomic region, and hypermethylation of these genes can also be present in non-neoplastic gastric epithelia.Promoter demethylation of specific genes, such as MAGE and synuclein y, can occur during the progressive stages of both histological types, and is associated with patient prognosis. Thus, while the molecular pathways of gastric carcinogenesis are dependent on histological background, specific genetic alterations can still be used for risk assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  18. A POTENTIAL TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE:Doc-1R

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    生秀杰; 周伟强; 姜莉; 张梅英; 王太一; 张学

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expression and the genomic sequence of Doc-1R gene in mice. Methods: The gene specific primers were designed and synthesized according to the eDNA sequence of Doc-1R gene. The sequence of Doc-1R gene was cloned by nested PCR. The expression of Doe-1R gene was examined by RT-PCR in thirteen kinds of tissues of mice. Results: The mouse Doc-1R gene has been obtained by two times genomic walking, which spans 2787bp and contains four exons and three introns. All of the splice donor/aeceptor site sequences are in accordance with the consensus "GT-AG" rule. There was expression of Doc-1R gene in the thirteen tissues. Conclusion: The mouse Doc-1R gene was cloned successfully. The expression pattern suggests that Doc-1R gene is a housekeeping gene,which is important to keep the function of tissues and organs.

  19. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  20. Arsenic exposure is associated with DNA hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guangming; Xu, Huiwen; Chang, De; Wu, Zhenglai; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Shiying; Li, Zhenlong; Bai, Jieben; Cai, Qing; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to inorganic arsenic leads to development of cancer and represents a significant health hazard in more than 70 countries. The underlying mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. Laboratory studies suggest that arsenic is a poor mutagen but may cause epigenetic silencing of key tumor suppressor genes such as p16 through DNA hypermethylation. However, the evidence for an association between human arsenic exposure and abnormal DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes is lacking. Paired case-control studies were conducted involving 40 individuals with high arsenic exposure and arsenicosis, 40 individuals with similarly high exposure to arsenic but without arsenicosis, and 40 individuals with normal exposure to arsenic. DNA methylation status of p16 was determined using methylation-specific PCR. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that DNA hypermethylation of p16 gene was significantly associated with high arsenic exposure (Odds Ratio = 10.0, P = 0.0019) independently of the development of arsenicosis (Odds Ratio = 2.0, P = 0.1343). High exposure of arsenic in human is positively linked to DNA hypermethylation of p16 gene, suggesting that epigenetic silencing of key tumor suppressor may be an important mechanism by which arsenic promotes cancer initiation.

  1. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Den Otter 1990). In a preliminary report (Windle et al. 1990), a transgenic mouse that develops intraocular neoplasms similar to human retinoblastoma...et al. 1974; McFall et al. 1978; Bogenmann and Mark 1983), and a very recent report of heritable ocular tumors in transgenic mice (Windle et al. 1990...additional pair of forceps (fine Halstead Mosquito hemostatic curved forceps 12.7 cm) were used to clamp off the retracted liver transversely just anterior to

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of DLC-1, a Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene, in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan PENG; Cai-Ping REN; Hong-Mei YI; Liang ZHOU; Xu-Yu YANG; Hui LI; Kai-Tai YAO

    2006-01-01

    The DLC-1 gene, located at the human chromosome region 8p22, behaves like a tumor suppressor gene and is frequently deleted in diverse tumors. The deletion of 8p22 is not an uncommon event in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), therefore we explored the expression levels of the DLC-1 gene in NPCs and NPC cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed the mRNA level of DLC-1 was downregulated. To identify the mechanism of DLC-1 downregulation in NPC, we investigated the methylation status of the DLC-1 gene using methylation-specific PCR, and found that 79% (31 of 39) of the NPC tissues and two DLC-1 nonexpressing NPC cell lines, 6-10B and 5-8F, were methylated in the DLC-1 CpG island. Microsatellite PCR was also carried out, and loss of heterozygosity was found at four microsatellite sites (D8S552, D8S1754, D8S1790 and D8S549) covering the whole DLC-1 gene with ratios of 33% (4 of 12 informative cases), 18% (2 of 11), 5% (1 of 18), and 25% (3 of 12), respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that DLC-1 might be an NPC-related tumor suppressor gene affected by aberrant promoter methylation and gene deletion.

  3. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu ShihHsin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber experiments were utilized to examined the effects of ECRG4 expression on ESCC cells migration, invasion and adhesion. And flow cytometric analysis was used to observe the impact of ECRG4 expression on cell cycle regulation. Finally, the expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins p53 and p21 in human ESCC cells transfected with ECRG4 gene were evaluated by Western blotting. Results The restoration of ECRG4 expression in ESCC cells inhibited cancer cells migration and invasion (P P > 0.05. Furthermore, ECRG4 could cause cell cycle G1 phase arrest in ESCC (P Conclusion ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which suppressed tumor cells migration and invasion without affecting cell adhesion ability in ESCC. Furthermore, ECRG4 might cause cell cycle G1 phase block possibly through inducing the increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins in ESCC.

  4. Characterize RAP80, a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    cycle checkpoints and DNA repair systems (1–3). Many proteins [including the protein kinase ataxia - telangiectasia mutated (ATM), g-H2AX, mediator of...phosphorylation of BRCA1. Cancer Res. 60, 3299–3304 (2000). 25. Gatei, M. et al. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3 related kinase...et al. Functional link of BRCA1 and ataxia telangiectasia gene product in DNA damage response. Nature 406, 210–215 (2000). 40. Kim, H., Chen, J. & Yu

  5. Markers for sebaceoma show a spectrum of cell cycle regulators, tumor suppressor genes, and oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC, such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1, C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27 kip1 , p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30. The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27 kip1 , and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30. Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate

  6. Molecular Cloning of a Novel Bovine Homologue of the Drosophila Tumor Suppressor Gene, Lats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pervious studies demonstrate that lats, also known as warts, is a tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila[1,2]. Mutations of lats lead to an increase in cell number and organ size in Drosophila, indicating lats may be involved in organ size control. Furthermore, the high conservation of sequence and tumor suppression function of lats between Drosophila and human suggests that it may be also involved in organ size control of higher animals[3]. So here we isolated the bovine homologue of Drosophila lats. Sequence analysis indicates the bovine LATS1 to be very similar to other lats proteins.

  7. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  8. High mutability of the tumor suppressor genes RASSF1 and RBSP3 (CTDSPL in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I Kashuba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many different genetic alterations are observed in cancer cells. Individual cancer genes display point mutations such as base changes, insertions and deletions that initiate and promote cancer growth and spread. Somatic hypermutation is a powerful mechanism for generation of different mutations. It was shown previously that somatic hypermutability of proto-oncogenes can induce development of lymphomas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an exceptionally high incidence of single-base mutations in the tumor suppressor genes RASSF1 and RBSP3 (CTDSPL both located in 3p21.3 regions, LUCA and AP20 respectively. These regions contain clusters of tumor suppressor genes involved in multiple cancer types such as lung, kidney, breast, cervical, head and neck, nasopharyngeal, prostate and other carcinomas. Altogether in 144 sequenced RASSF1A clones (exons 1-2, 129 mutations were detected (mutation frequency, MF = 0.23 per 100 bp and in 98 clones of exons 3-5 we found 146 mutations (MF = 0.29. In 85 sequenced RBSP3 clones, 89 mutations were found (MF = 0.10. The mutations were not cytidine-specific, as would be expected from alterations generated by AID/APOBEC family enzymes, and appeared de novo during cell proliferation. They diminished the ability of corresponding transgenes to suppress cell and tumor growth implying a loss of function. These high levels of somatic mutations were found both in cancer biopsies and cancer cell lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of high frequencies of somatic mutations in RASSF1 and RBSP3 in different cancers suggesting it may underlay the mutator phenotype of cancer. Somatic hypermutations in tumor suppressor genes involved in major human malignancies offer a novel insight in cancer development, progression and spread.

  9. SUMOylation of the ING1b tumor suppressor regulates gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Guérillon, Claire; Kim, Tae-Sun;

    2014-01-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are encoded as multiple isoforms in five ING genes (ING1 -5) and act as type II tumor suppressors. They are growth inhibitory when overexpressed and are frequently mislocalized or downregulated in several forms of cancer. ING1 and ING2 are stoichiometric mem......1b E195A), we further demonstrate that ING1b SUMOylation regulates the binding of ING1b to the ISG15 and DGCR8 promoters, consequently regulating ISG15 and DGCR8 transcription. These results suggest a role for ING1b SUMOylation in the regulation of gene transcription....

  10. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  11. Tumor suppressor and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliette Martin; Jean-Frangois Dufour

    2008-01-01

    A few signaling pathways are driving the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. Each of these pathways possesses negative regulators. These enzymes, which normally suppress unchecked cell proliferation, are circumvented in the oncogenic process, either the over-activity of oncogenes is sufficient to annihilate the activity of tumor suppressors or tumor suppressors have been rendered ineffective. The loss of several key tumor suppressors has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we systematically review the evidence implicating tumor suppressors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. Effect of sulfur dioxide on expression of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes from rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Juli; Meng, Ziqiang

    2010-06-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a ubiquitous air pollutant that is present in low concentrations in the urban air, and in higher concentrations in the working environment. In the present study, male Wistar rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated with 14.00 +/- 1.01, 28.00 +/- 1.77 and 56.00 +/- 3.44 mg m(-3) SO(2) for 6 h/day for 7 days, while control group was exposed to filtered air in the same condition. The mRNA and protein levels of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, and Ki-ras) and tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and p16) were analyzed in lungs using a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay and Western blot analysis. The results showed that mRNA and protein levels of c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Ki-ras, and p53 in lungs were increased in a dose-dependent manner, while mRNA and protein levels of Rb and p16 were decreased in lungs of rats after SO(2) inhalation. These results lead to a conclusion that SO(2) exposure could activate expressions of proto-oncogenes and suppress expressions of tumor suppressor genes, which might relate to the molecular mechanism of cocarcinogenic properties and potential carcinogenic effects of SO(2). According to previous studies, the results also indicated that promoter genes of apoptosis and tumor suppressor genes could produce apoptotic signals to antagonize the growth signals that arise from oncogenes. Understanding its molecular controls will benefit development of treatments for many diseases.

  13. TSGene 2.0: an updated literature-based knowledgebase for tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Kim, Pora; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a major type of gatekeeper genes in the cell growth. A knowledgebase with the systematic collection and curation of TSGs in multiple cancer types is critically important for further studying their biological functions as well as for developing therapeutic strategies. Since its development in 2012, the Tumor Suppressor Gene database (TSGene), has become a popular resource in the cancer research community. Here, we reported the TSGene version 2.0, which has substantial updates of contents (e.g. up-to-date literature and pan-cancer genomic data collection and curation), data types (noncoding RNAs and protein-coding genes) and content accessibility. Specifically, the current TSGene 2.0 contains 1217 human TSGs (1018 protein-coding and 199 non-coding genes) curated from over 9000 articles. Additionally, TSGene 2.0 provides thousands of expression and mutation patterns derived from pan-cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. A new web interface is available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/TSGene/. Systematic analyses of 199 non-coding TSGs provide numerous cancer-specific non-coding mutational events for further screening and clinical use. Intriguingly, we identified 49 protein-coding TSGs that were consistently down-regulated in 11 cancer types. In summary, TSGene 2.0, which is the only available database for TSGs, provides the most updated TSGs and their features in pan-cancer.

  14. PRDM1/BLIMP1: a tumor suppressor gene in B and T cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Michela; Zucca, Emanuele; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The gene encoding the human BLIMP1, prdm1, is located on chromosome 6q21, a locus frequently deleted in lymphoid tumors. BLIMP1 is able to silence its target genes in a context-dependent manner through different mechanisms. BLIMP1 is expressed in both B and T cells, in which it plays important functions. In B cells, BLIMP1 acts as the master regulator of plasma cell differentiation, repressed by BCL6 and repressing both BCL6 and PAX5. In T cells, BLIMP1 is a critical factor for most terminal effector cell differentiation in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. BLIMP1 is frequently inactivated in a variety of lymphomas, including diffuse large B cell lymphomas, Natural Killer cell lymphoma and anaplastic large T cell lymphoma. In this review, we will summarize the role of BLIMP1 in normal cells, focusing on lymphoid cells, and on its function as tumor suppressor gene in lymphomas.

  15. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

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    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  16. MFSD2A is a novel lung tumor suppressor gene modulating cell cycle and matrix attachment

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    Shames David S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MFSD2A (major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2 gene maps on chromosome 1p34 within a linkage disequilibrium block containing genetic elements associated with progression of lung cancer. Results Here we show that MFSD2A expression is strongly downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines of different histotypes and in primary lung adenocarcinomas. Experimental modulation of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells is associated with alteration of mRNA levels of genes involved in cell cycle control and interaction with the extracellular matrix. Exogenous expression of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells induced a G1 block, impaired adhesion and migration in vitro, and significantly reduced tumor colony number in vitro (4- to 27-fold, P in vivo (~3-fold, P Conclusion Together these data suggest that MFSD2A is a novel lung cancer tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell cycle progression and matrix attachment.

  17. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

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    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  18. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate genes (Fisher's exact P genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  19. Dnmt3b is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Lepore, Janet B; Zegarek, Matthew H; Kocherginsky, Masha; Singh, Mahi; Davis, Elizabeth M; Link, Petra A; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M; Karpf, Adam R; Godley, Lucy A

    2013-03-14

    The drivers of abnormal DNA methylation in human cancers include widespread aberrant splicing of the DNMT3B gene, producing abnormal transcripts that encode truncated proteins that may act as dominant negative isoforms. To test whether reduced Dnmt3b dosage can alter tumorigenesis, we bred Dnmt3b(+/-) mice to Eµ-Myc mice, a mouse model susceptible to B-cell lymphomas. Eµ-Myc/Dnmt3b(+/-) mice showed a dramatic acceleration of lymphomagenesis, greater even than that observed in Eµ-Myc mice that express a truncated DNMT3B isoform found in human tumors, DNMT3B7. This finding indicates that Dnmt3b can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Although reduction in both Dnmt3b dosage and expression of DNMT3B7 within the Eµ-Myc system had similar effects on tumorigenesis and DNA hypermethylation, different molecular mechanisms appear to underlie these changes. This study offers insight into how de novo DNA methyltransferases function as tumor suppressors and the sensitivity of Myc-induced lymphomas to DNA methylation.

  20. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  1. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  2. Neurons and Tumor Suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas W Zochodne

    2014-01-01

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to e...

  3. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  4. Phenotype diversity in familial cylindromatosis: a frameshift mutation in the tumor suppressor gene CYLD underlies different tumors of skin appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete Gutiérrez, Pamela; Eggermann, Thomas; Höller, Daniela; Jugert, Frank K; Beermann, Torsten; Grussendorf-Conen, Elke-Ingrid; Zerres, Klaus; Merk, Hans F; Frank, Jorge

    2002-08-01

    Familial cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome; Brooke-Spiegler syndrome) (OMIM numbers 123850, 132700, 313100, and 605041) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited tumor syndrome. The disorder can present with cutaneous adnexal tumors such as cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas, and spiradenomas, and tumors preferably develop in hairy areas of the body such as head and neck. In affected families, mutations have been demonstrated in the CYLD gene located on chromosome 16q12-13 and reveal the characteristic attributes of a tumor suppressor. Here, we studied familial cylindromatosis in a multigeneration family of German origin. Clinically, some individuals only revealed discrete small skin-colored tumors localized in the nasolabial region whereas one family member showed expansion of multiple big tumors on the trunk and in a turban-like fashion on the scalp. Histologically, cylindromas as well as epithelioma adenoides cysticum were found. We detected a frameshift mutation in the CYLD gene, designated 2253delG, underlying the disorder and were able to show that a single mutation can result in distinct clinical and histologic expression in familial cylindromatosis. The reasons for different expression patterns of the same genetic defect in this disease remain elusive, however. Identification of mutations in the CYLD gene enable us to rapidly confirm putative diagnoses on the genetic level and to provide affected families with genetic counseling.

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation indicates silencing of tumor suppressor genes in uterine leiomyoma.

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    Antonia Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids, represent the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. Fibroids become symptomatic in 30% of all women and up to 70% of African American women of reproductive age. Epigenetic dysregulation of individual genes has been demonstrated in leiomyoma cells; however, the in vivo genome-wide distribution of such epigenetic abnormalities remains unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized and compared genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiles in uterine leiomyoma and matched adjacent normal myometrial tissues from 18 African American women. We found 55 genes with differential promoter methylation and concominant differences in mRNA expression in uterine leiomyoma versus normal myometrium. Eighty percent of the identified genes showed an inverse relationship between DNA methylation status and mRNA expression in uterine leiomyoma tissues, and the majority of genes (62% displayed hypermethylation associated with gene silencing. We selected three genes, the known tumor suppressors KLF11, DLEC1, and KRT19 and verified promoter hypermethylation, mRNA repression and protein expression using bisulfite sequencing, real-time PCR and western blot. Incubation of primary leiomyoma smooth muscle cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor restored KLF11, DLEC1 and KRT19 mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a possible functional role of promoter DNA methylation-mediated gene silencing in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyoma in African American women.

  6. Alterations of tumor suppressor gene p16INK4a in pancreatic ductal carcinoma

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    Radotra Bishan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor gene p16 / MTS-1 has been reported to be altered in a variety of human tumors. The purpose of the study was to evaluate primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas for potentially inactivating p16 alterations. Methods We investigated the status of p16 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, nonradioisotopic single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP, DNA sequencing and hypermethylation analysis in 25 primary resected ductal adenocarcinomas. In addition, we investigated p16 protein expression in these cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC using a monoclonal antibody clone (MS-887-PO. Results Out of the 25 samples analyzed and compared to normal pancreatic control tissues, the overall frequency of p16 alterations was 80% (20/25. Aberrant promoter methylation was the most common mechanism of gene inactivation present in 52% (13/25 cases, followed by coding sequence mutations in 16% (4/25 cases and presumably homozygous deletion in 12% (3/25 cases. These genetic alterations correlated well with p16 protein expression as complete loss of p16 protein was found in 18 of 25 tumors (72%. Conclusion These findings confirm that loss of p16 function could be involved in pancreatic cancer and may explain at least in part the aggressive behaviour of this tumor type.

  7. Alterations of tumor suppressor gene p16INK4a in pancreatic ductal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Jyotika; Srinivasan, Radhika; Majumdar, Siddhartha; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Wig, Jaidev

    2005-01-01

    Background Cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor gene p16 / MTS-1 has been reported to be altered in a variety of human tumors. The purpose of the study was to evaluate primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas for potentially inactivating p16 alterations. Methods We investigated the status of p16 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nonradioisotopic single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), DNA sequencing and hypermethylation analysis in 25 primary resected ductal adenocarcinomas. In addition, we investigated p16 protein expression in these cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a monoclonal antibody clone (MS-887-PO). Results Out of the 25 samples analyzed and compared to normal pancreatic control tissues, the overall frequency of p16 alterations was 80% (20/25). Aberrant promoter methylation was the most common mechanism of gene inactivation present in 52% (13/25) cases, followed by coding sequence mutations in 16% (4/25) cases and presumably homozygous deletion in 12% (3/25) cases. These genetic alterations correlated well with p16 protein expression as complete loss of p16 protein was found in 18 of 25 tumors (72%). Conclusion These findings confirm that loss of p16 function could be involved in pancreatic cancer and may explain at least in part the aggressive behaviour of this tumor type. PMID:15985168

  8. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    catenin. Nuclear staining beta-catenin 36 72 Breast Carcinoma Phyllodes tumor 73 74 75 Reduced...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0309 TITLE: The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 MAR 2007 - 29 FEB 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of Tumor Metastases

  9. Tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle regulatory checkpoints, and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms "tumor suppressor′s genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.

  10. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

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    John H Ludes-Meyers

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  12. A phase I study of hydralazine to demethylate and reactivate the expression of tumor suppressor genes

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    Trejo-Becerril Catalina

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antihypertensive compound hydralazine is a known demethylating agent. This phase I study evaluated the tolerability and its effects upon DNA methylation and gene reactivation in patients with untreated cervical cancer. Methods Hydralazine was administered to cohorts of 4 patients at the following dose levels: I 50 mg/day, II 75 mg/day, III 100 mg/day and IV 150 mg/day. Tumor biopsies and peripheral blood samples were taken the day before and after treatment. The genes APC, MGMT; ER, GSTP1, DAPK, RARβ, FHIT and p16 were evaluated pre and post-treatment for DNA promoter methylation and gene expression by MSP (Methylation-Specific PCR and RT-PCR respectively in each of the tumor samples. Methylation of the imprinted H19 gene and the "normally methylated" sequence clone 1.2 was also analyzed. Global DNA methylation was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis and cytosine extension assay. Toxicity was evaluated using the NCI Common Toxicity Criteria. Results Hydralazine was well tolerated. Toxicities were mild being the most common nausea, dizziness, fatigue, headache and palpitations. Overall, 70% of the pretreatment samples and all the patients had at least one methylated gene. Rates of demethylation at the different dose levels were as follows: 50 mg/day, 40%; 75 mg/day, 52%, 100 mg/day, 43%, and 150 mg/day, 32%. Gene expression analysis showed only 12 informative cases, of these 9 (75% re-expressed the gene. There was neither change in the methylation status of H19 and clone 1.2 nor changes in global DNA methylation. Conclusion Hydralazine at doses between 50 and 150 mg/day is well tolerated and effective to demethylate and reactivate the expression of tumor suppressor genes without affecting global DNA methylation

  13. Hypermethylation of p16 tumor-suppressor gene in ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastoma, and dental follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojasteh, Arash; Khodayari, Abbas; Rahimi, Farzaneh; Ghaderian, Mohamad Hossain; Jafarian, Mohamad; Nayebi, Alireza; Akbarzadeh Najar, Reza; Tabatabayipanah, Akram; Jahangirnia, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The high rate of p16 gene alterations in malignant neoplasms suggests the important effect of this tumor-suppressor gene mutation on the malignant behavior of tumoral lesions. The present study investigated the possible methylation of the p16 tumor in ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastoma, and dental follicles. Eighteen samples of ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastoma, and dental follicles of mandibular impacted third molar were selected from available documents in the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Taleghani Hospital and the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. After confirming the initial diagnosis, 6-μm sections were used for DNA extraction. A CpG island methylation of p16 was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Although CpG methylation of p16 was observed in all ameloblastic carcinoma samples, only 1 ameloblastoma specimen exhibited the mutation. The mutation was not detected in other ameloblastoma specimens or in any dental follicle sample. The p16 alteration might play a role in the malignant progression of ameloblastic carcinoma. It is worth mentioning that ameloblastoma can be further differentiated from ameloblastic carcinoma based on molecular observations. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The tumor suppressor gene Trp53 protects the mouse lens against posterior subcapsular cataracts and the BMP receptor Acvr1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the lens

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    Luke A. Wiley

    2011-07-01

    We previously found that lenses lacking the Acvr1 gene, which encodes a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP receptor, had abnormal proliferation and cell death in epithelial and cortical fiber cells. We tested whether the tumor suppressor protein p53 (encoded by Trp53 affected this phenotype. Acvr1 conditional knockout (Acvr1CKO mouse fiber cells had increased numbers of nuclei that stained for p53 phosphorylated on serine 15, an indicator of p53 stabilization and activation. Deletion of Trp53 rescued the Acvr1CKO cell death phenotype in embryos and reduced Acvr1-dependent apoptosis in postnatal lenses. However, deletion of Trp53 alone increased the number of fiber cells that failed to withdraw from the cell cycle. Trp53CKO and Acvr1;Trp53DCKO (double conditional knockout, but not Acvr1CKO, lenses developed abnormal collections of cells at the posterior of the lens that resembled posterior subcapsular cataracts. Cells from human posterior subcapsular cataracts had morphological and molecular characteristics similar to the cells at the posterior of mouse lenses lacking Trp53. In Trp53CKO lenses, cells in the posterior plaques did not proliferate but, in Acvr1;Trp53DCKO lenses, many cells in the posterior plaques continued to proliferate, eventually forming vascularized tumor-like masses at the posterior of the lens. We conclude that p53 protects the lens against posterior subcapsular cataract formation by suppressing the proliferation of fiber cells and promoting the death of any fiber cells that enter the cell cycle. Acvr1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the lens. Enhancing p53 function in the lens could contribute to the prevention of steroid- and radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataracts.

  15. Methylation of HPV and a tumor suppressor gene reveals anal cancer and precursor lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Attila T.; Nathan, Mayura; Reuter, Caroline; Warman, Rhian; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Sheaff, Michael; Vasiljevic, Natasa; Ahmad, Amar; Cuzick, Jack; Sasieni, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We studied DNA methylation patterns of human papillomavirus (HPV) and tumor suppressor gene EPB41L3 in 148 anal and perianal biopsies to determine whether high levels of methylation would be associated with anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). The most prevalent HPV type was HPV16, detected in 54% of the 30 benign biopsies, 33% of the 43 low-grade AIN (lgAIN), 82% of the 59 high grade AIN (hgAIN) and 4 of the 5 anal cancers. A methylation score was developed (0.561*HPV16me+0.439*EPB41L3) which had increasing values with severity of disease: the mean was 8.1% in benign, 13.2% in lgAIN, 22.3% in hgAIN and 49.3% in cancers (p anal disease. PMID:28881579

  16. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  17. Characterization of the novel tumor-suppressor gene CCDC67 in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, De Tao; Xu, Jianhui; Lei, Mengyuan; Li, Hongqiang; Wang, Yongfei; Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Yubing; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-02-02

    Some studies showed an association of coiled-coil domain-containing (CCDC) genes with cancers. Our previous limited data specifically suggested a possible pathogenic role of CCDC67 in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), but this has not been firmly established. The present study was to further investigate and establish this role of CCDC67 in PTC. The expression of CCDC67, both at mRNA and protein levels, was sharply down-regulated in PTC compared with normal thyroid tissues. Lower CCDC67 expression was significantly associated with aggressive tumor behaviors, such as advanced tumor stages and lymph node metastasis, as well as BRAF mutation. Introduced expression of CCDC67 in TPC-1 cells robustly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration, induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest, and increased cell apoptosis. Primary PTC tumors and matched normal thyroid tissues were obtained from 200 unselected patients at the initial surgery for detection of CCDC67 mRNA and protein by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses, respectively. Genomic DNA sequencing was performed to detect BRAF mutation in PTC tumors. Clinicopathological data were retrospectively reviewed for correlation analyses. PTC cell line TPC-1 with stable transfection of CCDC67 was used to investigate the functions of CCDC67. This large study demonstrates down-regulation of CCDC67 in PTC, an inverse relationship between CCDC67 expression and PTC aggressiveness and BRAF mutation, and a robust inhibitory effect of CCDC67 on PTC cellular activities. These results are consistent with CCDC67 being a novel and impaired tumor suppressor gene in PTC, providing important prognostic and therapeutic implications for this cancer.

  18. In vivo functional analysis of the human NF2 tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather S Gavilan

    Full Text Available The proper control of tissue growth is essential during normal development and an important problem in human disease. Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis 2 tumor suppressor gene, has been extensively studied to understand its functions in growth control. Here we describe experiments in which we used Drosophila as an in vivo system to test the functions of the normal human NF2 gene products and patient-derived mutant alleles. Although the predominant NF2 gene isoform, isoform 1, could functionally replace the Drosophila Merlin gene, a second isoform with a distinct C-terminal tail could not. Immunofluorescence studies show that the two isoforms have distinct subcellular localizations when expressed in the polarized imaginal epithelium, and function in genetic rescue assays correlates with apical localization of the NF2 protein. Interestingly, we found that a patient-derived missense allele, NF2L64P, appears to be temperature sensitive. These studies highlight the utility of Drosophila for in vivo functional analysis of highly conserved human disease genes.

  19. Down-regulation of ECRG4, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, in human breast cancer.

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    Renaud Sabatier

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: ECRG4/C2ORF40 is a potential tumor suppressor gene (TSG recently identified in esophageal carcinoma. Its expression, gene copy number and prognostic value have never been explored in breast cancer. METHODS: Using DNA microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, we examined ECRG4 mRNA expression and copy number alterations in 353 invasive breast cancer samples and normal breast (NB samples. A meta-analysis was done on a large public retrospective gene expression dataset (n = 1,387 in search of correlations between ECRG4 expression and histo-clinical features including survival. RESULTS: ECRG4 was underexpressed in 94.3% of cancers when compared to NB. aCGH data revealed ECRG4 loss in 18% of tumors, suggesting that DNA loss is not the main mechanism of underexpression. Meta-analysis showed that ECRG4 expression was significantly higher in tumors displaying earlier stage, smaller size, negative axillary lymph node status, lower grade, and normal-like subtype. Higher expression was also associated with disease-free survival (DFS; HR = 0.84 [0.76-0.92], p = 0.0002 and overall survival (OS; HR = 0.72 [0.63-0.83], p = 5.0E-06. In multivariate analysis including the other histo-clinical prognostic features, ECRG4 expression remained the only prognostic factor for DFS and OS. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that ECRG4 is a candidate TSG in breast cancer, the expression of which may help improve the prognostication. If functional analyses confirm this TSG role, restoring ECRG4 expression in the tumor may represent a promising therapeutic approach.

  20. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  1. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  2. The tumor suppressor gene RBM5 inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cell growth and induces apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of tumor suppressor gene (TSG function is a critical step in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. RBM5 (RNA-binding motif protein 5, also named H37/LUCA-15 gene from chromosome 3p21.3 demonstrated tumor suppressor activity. However, the role of RBM5 played in the occurrence and development of lung cancer is still not well understood. Method Paired non-tumor and tumor tissues were obtained from 30 adenocarcinomas. The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. A549 cell line was used to determine the apoptotic function of RBM5 in vitro. A549 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5. AnnexinV analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Expression of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PAPP proteins in A549 lung cancer cells and the A549 xenograft BALB/c nude mice model was determined by Western blot. Tumor suppressor activity of RBM5 was also examined in the A549 xenograft model treated with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 plasmid carried by attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a. Result The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was decreased significantly in adenocarcinoma tissues compared to that in the non-tumor tissues. In addition, as compared to the vector control, a significant growth inhibition of A549 lung cancer cells was observed when transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 as determined by cell proliferation assay. We also found that overexpression of RBM5 induced both early and late apoptosis in A549 cells using AnnexinV/PI staining as determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased, whereas the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP proteins was significantly increased in the RBM5 transfected cells; similarly, expression of decreased Bcl-2 and increased cleaved caspase-3 proteins was also examined in the A549 xenograft model. More importantly, we showed that accumulative and stable overexpression of RBM5 in the A549 xenograft BALB

  3. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer.

  4. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  5. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs.

  6. Cellular retinol binding protein 1 could be a tumor suppressor gene in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rodriguez, Mónica; Arreola, Hugo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Peralta, Raúl; Serna, Humberto; Villegas, Vanessa; Romero, Pablo; Alvarado-Hernández, Beatriz; Paniagua, Lucero; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Meraz, Marco A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the most important health problems in women. It frequently presents genetic changes at chromosome region 3q21. This region contains the Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 gene (CRBP1) which has been implicated as an important element in the development of other types of cancer. The main goal of the present work was to determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 and its relationship to CC. Methods: To determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 gene in CC; twenty-six CC and twenty-six healthy cervix samples were evaluated for: 1) Copy number gain by real-time PCR analysis, 2) expression levels by an immunohistochemistry assay on tissue microarray, and 3) the methylation status of the CRBP1 promoter region. Results: The increase in CRBP1 copy number was observed in 10 out of the 26 CC samples analyzed, while healthy cervices samples showed no changes in the copy number. In addition, there was a lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene in an important number of the CC samples (17/26), and the CRBP1 gene promoter was methylated in 15/26 of the CC samples. Interestingly, there was a significant association between the lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene and its methylation status. Conclusions: The data indicates that, both activating and inactivating changes in the CRBP1 gene could be significant events in the development and progression of CC, and the lack of expression of the CRBP1 protein could be related with to the development of CC. We believe that there is enough evidence to consider to CRBP1 gene as a tumor suppressor gene for CC. PMID:24040446

  7. The tumor suppressor gene retinoblastoma-1 is required for retinotectal development and visual function in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gyda

    Full Text Available Mutations in the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (rb1 cause both sporadic and familial forms of childhood retinoblastoma. Despite its clinical relevance, the roles of rb1 during normal retinotectal development and function are not well understood. We have identified mutations in the zebrafish space cadet locus that lead to a premature truncation of the rb1 gene, identical to known mutations in sporadic and familial forms of retinoblastoma. In wild-type embryos, axons of early born retinal ganglion cells (RGC pioneer the retinotectal tract to guide later born RGC axons. In rb1 deficient embryos, these early born RGCs show a delay in cell cycle exit, causing a transient deficit of differentiated RGCs. As a result, later born mutant RGC axons initially fail to exit the retina, resulting in optic nerve hypoplasia. A significant fraction of mutant RGC axons eventually exit the retina, but then frequently project to the incorrect optic tectum. Although rb1 mutants eventually establish basic retinotectal connectivity, behavioral analysis reveals that mutants exhibit deficits in distinct, visually guided behaviors. Thus, our analysis of zebrafish rb1 mutants reveals a previously unknown yet critical role for rb1 during retinotectal tract development and visual function.

  8. [Correlation of size of the primary tumor and axillary node status with the p53 tumor suppressor gene in carcinoma of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topić, Brano; Stanković, N; Savjak, D; Grbić, S

    2002-01-01

    Correlation of standard pathomorphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  9. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohan; Kikuchi, Keiji; Takano, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING) family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  10. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Zheng; Li-Xin Jiang; Zhong-Chuan Lv; Da-Peng Li; Chong-Zhi Zhou; Jian-Jun Gao; Lin He; Zhi-Hai Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. METHODS: Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were eletrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by . RESULTS: Data were collected from all informative loci.The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (< 30%) by detailed deletion mapping. Significant opposite difference was observed between LOH frequency and tumor diameter on D4S412 and D4S1546 locus (0% vs 16.67%, P = 0.041; 54.55% vs 11.11%, P = 0.034, respectively). On D4S403 locus, LOH was significantly associated with tumor gross pattern (11.11%, 0, 33.33%, P = 0.030). No relationship was detected on other loci compared with clinicopathologial features. CONCLUSION: By deletion mapping, two obvious high frequency LOH regions spanning D4S3013 (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  11. Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome l7p13.3: Assessment of their Roles in Breast and Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    also been reported in primitive neuroectodermal tumors , carcinoma of the cervix uteri, medulloblastoma, osteosarcoma, astrocytoma (22), and acute...AD______ GRANT NUMBER: DAMD17-96-1-6088 TITLE: Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17p13.3: Assessment of their...Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17 p13 .3 : Assessment of their Roles in Breast... DAMD17-96-1-6088 6. AUTHOR(S

  12. Interaction of hepatitis B virus with tumor suppressor gene p53: its significance and biological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with tumor suppressor p53 and its role in the hepatocarcinogenesis have been studied by PCR-directed sequencing, gel shift assays and in situ ultraviolet cross-linking assay. The biological function of the interaction of HBV with p53 gene was investigated by co-transfection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene, p53 and HBV DNA, and quantitative PCR. Among the 16 primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC) samples, 13 were HBV-DNA positive,10 HBxAg positive and 9 p53 protein positive. The p53 gene point mutation was found in 5 samples, one of which had a G to T substitution located at codon 249. After analyzing the HBV genome by a computer program, a p53 response element binding sequence was found in HBV genome at upstream of enhancer I, from 1047 to 1059 nucleotides. This sequence could specifically bind to p53 protein, increase p53 protein accumulation in the PHC cells and stimulate the transactivating activity of p53 and HBV replication .The results also revealed that HBxAg could combine with p53 protein to form a complex in the cells and enhance CAT expression. Immunocytochemical staining showed that p53 protein complex was located in the cytoplasm and the process of p53 entry to nuclei was, in part, blocked. From our results, we conclude that the mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 is infrequent in HBV-associated PHC, the DNA-protein binding between HBV and p53, and the protein-protein binding between HBxAg and p53 might lead to the reduction or inactivation of p53 protein, which in turn resulting in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  13. Epigenetic silencing of MAL, a putative tumor suppressor gene, can contribute to human epithelium cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify new and useful candidate biomarkers in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, we performed a genome-wide survey and found that Myelin and lymphocyte-associated protein (MAL was a gene that was markedly down-regulated in HNSCC. Hence, we investigated the mechanism of MAL silencing and the effects of MAL on the proliferation, invasion, and apoptotic potential in HNSCC. Results MAL was significantly down-regulated in 91.7% of HNSCC specimens at the mRNA level as compared with adjacent normal tissues (P = 0.0004. Moreover, the relative transcript levels of the MAL gene were remarkably decreased by five-fold in nine HNSCC cell lines as compared with normal head and neck epithelium cells. MAL gene expression was restored in 44%, 67%, and 89% in HNSCC cell lines treated with TSA, 5-Aza-dC, and TSA plus 5-Aza-dC, respectively. Furthermore, bisulfate-treated DNA sequencing demonstrated that the two CpG islands (that is, M1 and M2 located in MAL promoter region were completely methylated in the HNSCC cell lines (CpG methylated ratio was more than 90%, and only one CpG island (that is, M1 was partially methylated in HNSCC tissues (CpG methylated ratio between 20% and 90%. A significant reduction in cell proliferation and a change in the cell cycle profile were also observed in MAL transfectants. Matrigel assay demonstrated that the invasiveness of HNSCC cells significantly decreased. A significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells was observed in MAL transfected cells. The exogenous expression of the MAL gene suppressed malignant phenotypes, while the cell death induced by MAL gene transfer was a result of apoptosis as demonstrated by the induction of cleavage of the poly (that is, ADP-ribose polymerase. Additionally, tumor growth was suppressed in cells expressing MAL as compared with cells not expressing MAL. Conclusion Our data suggest that the epigenetic inactivation of MAL, as a candidate tumor

  14. A single-copy Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis screen identifies new PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Weber, Julia; Friedrich, Mathias Josef; Li, Yilong; Rad, Lena; Ponstingl, Hannes; Liang, Qi; de Quirós, Sandra Bernaldo; Noorani, Imran; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alexander; Li, Meng Amy; Astudillo, Aurora; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Fernández-García, María Soledad; Hoffman, Gary J; Fuente, Rocío; Vassiliou, George S; Rad, Roland; López-Otín, Carlos; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan

    2017-03-20

    The overwhelming number of genetic alterations identified through cancer genome sequencing requires complementary approaches to interpret their significance and interactions. Here we developed a novel whole-body insertional mutagenesis screen in mice, which was designed for the discovery of Pten-cooperating tumor suppressors. Toward this aim, we coupled mobilization of a single-copy inactivating Sleeping Beauty transposon to Pten disruption within the same genome. The analysis of 278 transposition-induced prostate, breast and skin tumors detected tissue-specific and shared data sets of known and candidate genes involved in cancer. We validated ZBTB20, CELF2, PARD3, AKAP13 and WAC, which were identified by our screens in multiple cancer types, as new tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer. We demonstrated their synergy with PTEN in preventing invasion in vitro and confirmed their clinical relevance. Further characterization of Wac in vivo showed obligate haploinsufficiency for this gene (which encodes an autophagy-regulating factor) in a Pten-deficient context. Our study identified complex PTEN-cooperating tumor suppressor networks in different cancer types, with potential clinical implications.

  15. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  16. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted.

  17. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardendra Manvikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted.

  18. [Hypermethylation and downregulation of tumor suppressor gene p16 in benzene poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Caihong; Wang, Qianfei; Tian, Haoyuan; Li, Bin; Ni, Yune; Yin, Songnian; Guo, Xinbiao; Li, Guilan

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether benzene negatively affects the expression of p16 through DNA methylation. We carried out a case-control study in Chinese occupational benzene poisoning patients. Eleven cases of BP and 8 controls who were matched for age (+/- 5 years), sex, working duration and job title with BP were recruited. Expression level was examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Bisulfite-PCR pyrosequencing was used to quantitate the level of DNA methylation. The expression levels of p16 are down-regulated in BP patients compared to the control group (0.53 versus 2.06, P = 0.064). The average percentage of methylated cytosines of p16 was higher in BP group than in controls (12.4%, 11.3%, respectively, P > 0.05). p16 mRNA level decreased with increasing methylation (Pearson r = -0.64, P > 0.05). The fourth CpG site in p16 promoter is located within the consensus binding sequence for olfactory neuron-specific transcription factor. A significant negative correlation between mRNA level and the fourth CpG site was exhibited (Pearson r = - 0.88, P p16 is significantly downregulated in BP patients. Hypermethylation in promoter CpG islands is likely to contribute to the downregulation of p16. Further in-depth studies, utilizing large number of samples, are needed to fully understand the molecular mechanism involved in the tumor-suppressor gene inactivation in benzene-related diseases.

  19. CHROMOSOME 3 MAY HARBOR MULTIPLE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES ASSOCIATED WITH PRIMARY GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君; 陈商群

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether deletion of chromosome 3 is involved in the carcinogenesis of primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to localize the possible common deletion region in the aforementioned chromosome. Methods: PCR based microsatellite polymorphism analyses were performed to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Twenty-three loci on chromosome 3 were examined in 20 cases of GBM. Fluorescence-labeled primers and Perkin Elmer 377 DNA Sequencer were applied. Results: 50% informative cases of GBM displayed LOH on chromosome 3. 50% of informative cases displayed LOH on 3q and 35% on 3p. 25.6% of informative loci showed LOH in our series, in which frequent LOH were observed in the chromosomal region from loci D3S1614 (42.9%) to D3S1565 (35.3%) on 3q24(27 and at loci D3S1569 (35.3%) on 3q22(23 and D3S1289 (33.3%) on 3p14.1(14.3. Conclusion: Loss of genetic material on chromosome 3 may play an important part in the tumorigenesis of GBM. The chromosomal regions from loci D3S1614 to D3S1565 on 3q24(27 and at loci D3S1569 on 3q22(23 and D3S1289 on 3p14.1(14.3 are potential sites for novel tumor suppressor genes associated with GBM.

  20. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-03-06

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios.

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Endometriosis: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Juan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Ningzhu; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can cause dysmenorrhea and infertility. Its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified and its treatment continues to pose enormous challenges. The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and significance of PTEN protein in the occurrence, development, and treatment of endometriosis through changes in apoptosis rate, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Material/Methods PTEN was overexpressed and silenced in lentiviral vectors and inserted into primary endometrial cells. The changes in cell cycle and apoptosis in the different PTEN expression groups were evaluated using flow cytometry. Vessel growth mimicry was observed using 3-dimensional culture. A human-mouse chimeric endometriosis model was constructed using SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were used to detect pathological changes in ectopic endometrial tissues and the expression of VEGF protein in a human-mouse chimeric endometriosis mouse model. Results PTEN overexpression significantly increased apoptosis and inhibited the cell cycle compared with the silenced and control groups. Furthermore, cells expressing low PTEN levels were better able to undergo vasculogenic mimicry, and exhibited significantly increased angiogenesis compared to cells overexpressing PTEN. We found that ectopic foci were more easily formed in the endometrial tissue of SCID mice with low PTEN expression, and the VEGF expression in this group was relatively high. Conclusions PTEN inhibits the occurrence and development of endometriosis by regulating angiogenesis and the apoptosis and cell cycle of endometrial cells; therefore, we propose that the PTEN gene can be used to treat endometriosis. PMID:27744455

  2. KLF10, transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki-Duk [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Comparative Immunology, School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Jung [The Institute of Hankook Life Science, 7-9 Myungryun-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-521 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Cheol-Heui [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Comparative Immunology, School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woon Kyu, E-mail: wklee@inha.ac.kr [Laboratory of Developmental Genetics, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Center for Advanced Medical Education, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. -- Abstract: Krueppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription.

  3. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-express...

  4. Evolutionary history of the reprimo tumor suppressor gene family in vertebrates with a description of a new reprimo gene lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Ignacio A; Zavala, Kattina; Hoffmann, Federico G; Vandewege, Michael W; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Amigo, Julio D; Owen, Gareth I; Opazo, Juan C

    2016-10-10

    Genes related to human diseases should be natural targets for evolutionary studies, since they could provide clues regarding the genetic bases of pathologies and potential treatments. Here we studied the evolution of the reprimo gene family, a group of tumor-suppressor genes that are implicated in p53-mediated cell cycle arrest. These genes, especially the reprimo duplicate located on human chromosome 2, have been associated with epigenetic modifications correlated with transcriptional silencing and cancer progression. We demonstrate the presence of a third reprimo lineage that, together with the reprimo and reprimo-like genes, appears to have been differentially retained during the evolutionary history of vertebrates. We present evidence that these reprimo lineages originated early in vertebrate evolution and expanded as a result of the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred in the last common ancestor of vertebrates. The reprimo gene has been lost in birds, and the third reprimo gene lineage has been retained in only a few distantly related species, such as coelacanth and gar. Expression analyses revealed that the reprimo paralogs are mainly expressed in the nervous system. Different vertebrate lineages have retained different reprimo paralogs, and even in species that have retained multiple copies, only one of them is heavily expressed.

  5. An epigenetic genome-wide screen identifies SPINT2 as a novel tumor suppressor gene in pediatric medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkham, Paul N; Northcott, Paul A; Ra, Young Shin; Nakahara, Yukiko; Mainprize, Todd G; Croul, Sidney E; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2008-12-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a malignant cerebellar tumor that occurs primarily in children. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET pathway has an established role in both normal cerebellar development as well as the development and progression of human brain tumors, including MB. To identify novel tumor suppressor genes involved in MB pathogenesis, we performed an epigenome-wide screen in MB cell lines, using 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine to identify genes aberrantly silenced by promoter hypermethylation. Using this technique, we identified an inhibitor of HGF/MET signaling, serine protease inhibitor kunitz-type 2 (SPINT2/HAI-2), as a putative tumor suppressor silenced by promoter methylation in MB. In addition, based on single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis in primary MB samples, we identified hemizygous deletions targeting the SPINT2 locus in addition to gains on chromosome 7 encompassing the HGF and MET loci. SPINT2 gene expression was down-regulated and MET expression was up-regulated in 73.2% and 45.5% of tumors, respectively, by quantitative real-time PCR. SPINT2 promoter methylation was detected in 34.3% of primary MBs examined by methylation-specific PCR. SPINT2 reexpression in MB cell lines reduced proliferative capacity, anchorage independent growth, cell motility in vitro, and increased overall survival times in vivo in a xenograft model (P<0.0001). Taken together, these data support the role of SPINT2 as a putative tumor suppressor gene in MB, and further implicate dysregulation of the HGF/MET signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of MB.

  6. High frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in advanced breast tumors associated with aggressiveness of the tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The product of Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor, regulates the expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF and transforming growth factor (TGF systems, both of which are implicated in breast tumorigenesis and are known to facilitate angiogenesis. In the present study, WT1 allelic integrity was examined by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies in infiltrating breast carcinoma (n=60, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS (n=10 and benign breast disease (n=5 patients, to determine its possible association with tumor progression. Methods: LOH at the WT1 locus (11p13 as determined by PCR-RFLP for Hinf1 restriction site and was subsequently examined for its association with intratumoral expression of various growth factors i.e. TGF-β1, IGF-II, IGF-1R and angiogenesis (VEGF and Intratumoral micro-vessel density in breast carcinoma. Results: Six of 22 (27.2% genetically heterozygous of infiltrating breast carcinoma and 1 of 4 DCIS cases showed loss of one allele at WT1 locus. Histologically, the tumors with LOH at WT1 were Intraductal carcinoma (IDC and were of grade II and III. There was no correlation in the appearance of LOH at WT1 locus with age, tumor stage, menopausal status, chemotherapy status and lymph node metastasis. The expression of factor IGF-II and its receptor, IGF-1R was significantly higher in carcinoma having LOH at WT1 locus. A positive correlation was observed between the TGF-β1, VEGF expression and IMD scores in infiltrating carcinoma. Conclusions: The current study indicates that the high frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in high-graded breast tumors is associated with aggressiveness of the tumor.

  7. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo, E-mail: yutsudo@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-01-01

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL. PMID:25382611

  10. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  11. Tumor suppressor ARF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  12. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16(INK4a) and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Pathologic Link between Wilms Tumor Suppressor Gene, WT1, and IFI16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne K-H. Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wilms tumor gene (WT1 is mutated or deleted in patients with heredofamilial syndromes associated with the development of Wilms tumors, but is infrequently mutated in sporadic Wilms tumors. By comparing the microarray profiles of syndromic versus sporadic Wilms tumors and WT1-inducible Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells, we identified interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16, a transcriptional modulator, as a differentially expressed gene and a candidate WT1 target gene. WT1 induction in Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells led to strong induction of IFI16 expression and its promoter activity was responsive to the WT1 protein. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IFI16 and WT1 colocalized in WT1-replete Wilms tumors, but not in normal human midgestation fetal kidneys, suggesting that the ability of WT1 to regulate IFI16 in tumors represented an aberrant pathologic relationship. In addition, endogenous IFI16 and WT1 interacted in vivo in two Wilms tumor cell lines. Furthermore, IFI16 augmented the transcriptional activity of WT1 on both synthetic and physiological promoters. Strikingly, short hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated knockdown of either IFI16 or WT1 led to decreased growth of Wilms tumor cells. These data suggest that IFI16 and WT1, in certain cellular context including sporadic Wilms tumors, may support cell survival.

  14. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  15. Phytochemical Compositions of Immature Wheat Bran, and Its Antioxidant Capacity, Cell Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis Induction through Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jeong Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the phytochemical compositions and antioxidant capacity, cell growth inhibition, and apoptosis induction in extracts of immature wheat bran. Immature wheat bran (IWB was obtained from immature wheat harvested 10 days earlier than mature wheat. The phytochemical compositions of bran extract samples were analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography. The total ferulic acid (3.09 mg/g and p-coumaric acid (75 µg/g in IWB were significantly higher than in mature wheat bran (MWB, ferulic acid: 1.79 mg/g; p-coumaric acid: 55 µg/g. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC: 327 µM Trolox equivalents (TE/g and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA: 4.59 µM Quercetin equivalents (QE/g of the IWB were higher than those of the MWB (ORAC: 281 µM TE/g; CAA: 0.63 µM QE/g. When assessing cell proliferation, the IWB extracts resulted in the lowest EC50 values against HT-29 (18.9 mg/mL, Caco-2 (7.74 mg/mL, and HeLa cells (8.17 mg/mL among bran extract samples. Additionally, the IWB extracts increased the gene expression of p53 and PTEN (tumor suppressor genes in HT-29 cells, indicating inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis through tumor suppressor genes.

  16. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  17. Analysis of a new homozygous deletion in the tumor suppressor region at 3p12.3 reveals two novel intronic noncoding RNA genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angeloni, Debora; ter Elst, Arja; Wei, Ming Hui; van der Veen, Anneke Y.; Braga, Eleonora A.; Klimov, Eugene A.; Timmer, Tineke; Korobeinikova, Luba; Lerman, Michael I.; Buys, Charles H. C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Homozygous deletions or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at human chromosome band 3p12 are consistent features of lung and other malignancies, suggesting the presence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) (TSG) at this location. Only one gene has been cloned thus far from the overlapping region deleted in lung

  18. [Genetic tests in oncology practice with emphasis on the RET oncogene and VHL tumor suppressor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesković, Gorana; Stanojević, Boban; Palmar, Ivan; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2002-07-01

    Molecular oncogenetics is the study of two distinct gene classes participating in the pathogenesis of malignant diseases: proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressors genes. Stepwise alterations in their structure are the basis of malignancy. Structural abnormalities range widely: gross genetic rearrangements including insertions, deletions, gene amplifications and single nucleotide deleotide deletions and substitutions. These gene alterations are determined by gene testing that increasingly are part of clinical diagnosis. Among many applications of oncogene testing is detection of hereditary forms of malignant disease with outstanding prophylactic and therapeutic importance. Along this line, gene testing provided for effective prevention of specific hereditary tumour types. Analysis of hereditary pheochromocytoma two gene tests are established: detection of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) using mutational analysis of RET gene and detection of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome using mutational analysis of VHL gene. These genes were characterized about a decade ago and their structure determined in detail. Numerous studies focus on expression of these genes in different tissues and the function of respective proteins. In extensive epidemiology the following facts are established: hereditary mutations in the RET gene in > 92% of cases with MEN 2 syndrome while in patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome hereditary mutations were detected in VHL gene in > 95% of cases. Such a high genotype--phenotype correlation forms the basis for clinical applications. Gene testing in oncology offers numerous advantages. If a patient with pheochromocytoma presents with hereditary mutation in the RET or VHL gene, family gene testing is recommended. Family member with hereditary gene mutation is indicative of the risk level of nearly 100% for MEN 2 or von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. In such cases surgery is warranted (e.g. in MEN 2 total thyroidectomy by the age of (6). Negative findings

  19. Genetic analysis of the Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 gene: Potentiation of its tumor suppressor activity by specific point mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayama, Hitoshi (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan) Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Matsuzaki, Tomoko; Ikawa, Yoji; Noda, Makoto (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 (Krev-1) cDNA encodes a ras-related protein and exhibits an activity of inducing flat revertants at certain frequencies (2-5% of total transfectants) when introduced into a v-K-ras-transformed mouse NIH 3T3 cell line, DT. Toward understanding the mechanism of action of Krev-1 protein, the authors constructed a series of point mutants of Krev-1 cDNA and tested their biological activities in DT cells and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells harboring the activated N-ras gene. Substitutions of the amino acid residues in the putative guanine nucleotide-binding regions (Asp{sup 17} and Asn{sup 116}), in the putative effector-binding domain (residue 38), at the putative acylation site (Cys{sup 181}), and at the unique Thr{sup 61} all decreased the transformation suppressor activity. On the other hand, substitutions such as Gly{sup 12} to Val{sup 12} and Gln{sup 63} to Glu{sup 63} were found to significantly increase the transformation suppressor/tumor suppressor activity of Krev-1. These findings are consistent with the idea that Krev-1 protein is regulated like many other G proteins by the guanine triphosphate/guanine diphosphate-exchange mechanism probably in response to certain negative growth-regulatory signals.

  20. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Streb

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  1. CONVERGENCE OF P53 AND TGFβ SIGNALING ON ACTIVATING EXPRESSION OF THE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE MASPIN IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Narasanna, Archana; Whitell, Corbin W.; Wu, Frederick Y.; Friedman, David B.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, we identified the tumor suppressor gene maspin as a TGFβ target gene in human mammary epithelial cells. TGFβ upregulates maspin expression both at the RNA and protein levels. This upregulation required Smad2/3 function and intact p53 binding elements in the maspin promoter. DNA affinity immunoblot and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed the presence of both Smads and p53 at the maspin promoter in TGFβ-treated cells, suggesting that both transcription factors cooperate to induce maspin transcription. TGFβ did not activate maspin-luciferase reporter in p53-mutant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which exhibit methylation of the endogenous maspin promoter. Expression of ectopic p53, however, restored ligand-induced association of Smad2/3 with a transfected maspin promoter. Stable transfection of maspin inhibited basal and TGFβ-stimulated MDA-MB-231 cell motility. Finally, knockdown of endogenous maspin in p53 wild-type MCF10A/HER2 cells enhanced basal and TGFβ-stimulated motility. Taken together, these data support cooperation between the p53 and TGFβ tumor suppressor pathways in the induction of maspin expression, thus leading to inhibition of cell migration. PMID:17204482

  2. Genomic Analyses Reveal Global Functional Alterations That Promote Tumor Growth and Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Natural Killer-Cell Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Can; Iqbal, Javeed; J. deLeeuw, Ronald

    in cell proliferation, growth and energy metabolic processes important for the neoplastic cells. In deleted regions, genes showing decreased expression included transcription factors or repressors (e.g. SP4, PRDM1, NCOR1 and ZNF10), tumor suppressors or negative regulators of the cell cycle (e.g. CDKN2C...... treatment suggestive of a role of PRDM1 on the regulation of NK-cell activation. Conclusion: Combination of high resolution genomic and transcriptional profiling in NK-cell malignancies has provided evidence of a general tumor promoting effect of genomic copy number alterations as well as the identification...

  3. Tumor-associated methylation of the putative tumor suppressor AJAP1 gene and association between decreased AJAP1 expression and shorter survival in patients with glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Cogdell; Woonbok Chung; Yuexin Liu; Matthew McDonald; Kenneth Aldape; Jean-Pierre J. Issa; Gregory N. Fuller; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 has been observed frequently in a wide spectrum of cancers, most frequently in oligodendroglioma. In our previous studies, we evaluated 177 oligodendroglial tumor samples and identified the AJAP1 gene (formerly Shrew1) in the consensus region of deletion.AJAP1 is a transmembrane protein found in adheren junctions and functions to inhibit glioma cell adhesion and migration. Whereas a putative tumor suppressor gene, we did not detect AJAP1 gene mutations. In subsequent studies, we found that AJAP1 was underexpressed in oligodendrogliomas relative to normal brain tissues. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of CpG islands in the promoter of AJAP1.Methylation analysis of the AJAP1 promoter identified hypermethylation in 21% of oligodendrogliomas (n = 27), and the degree of methylation correlated with Iow levels of AJAP1 expression (P = 0.045). The AJAP1 promoter was also highly methylated in a wide spectrum of cell lines (n = 22), including cell lines of glioblastoma. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's REMBRANDT dataset, which contains 343 glioma samples, indicated that Iow AJAP1 gene expression was associated with decreased survival. Thus,both genetic (gene deletion) and epigenetic alterations (promoter methylation) are likely mechanisms that inactivate the putative tumor suppressor AJAP1 in gliomas, which contributes to poor prognosis.

  4. Tumor-associated methylation of the putative tumor suppressor AJAP1 gene and association between decreased AJAP1 expression and shorter survival in patients with glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, David; Chung, Woonbok; Liu, Yuexin; McDonald, J Matthew; Aldape, Kenneth; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    Allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 has been observed frequently in a wide spectrum of cancers, most frequently in oligodendroglioma. In our previous studies, we evaluated 177 oligodendroglial tumor samples and identified the AJAP1 gene (formerly Shrew1) in the consensus region of deletion. AJAP1 is a transmembrane protein found in adheren junctions and functions to inhibit glioma cell adhesion and migration. Whereas a putative tumor suppressor gene, we did not detect AJAP1 gene mutations. In subsequent studies, we found that AJAP1 was underexpressed in oligodendrogliomas relative to normal brain tissues. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of CpG islands in the promoter of AJAP1. Methylation analysis of the AJAP1 promoter identified hypermethylation in 21% of oligodendrogliomas (n =27), and the degree of methylation correlated with low levels of AJAP1 expression (P = 0.045). The AJAP1 promoter was also highly methylated in a wide spectrum of cell lines (n = 22), including cell lines of glioblastoma. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's REMBRANDT dataset, which contains 343 glioma samples, indicated that low AJAP1 gene expression was associated with decreased survival. Thus, both genetic (gene deletion) and epigenetic alterations (promoter methylation) are likely mechanisms that inactivate the putative tumor suppressor AJAP1 in gliomas, which contributes to poor prognosis.

  5. Aberrant large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene expression correlates with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Susan Y.; Sit, Ko-Yung; Sihoe, Alan D.L.; Suen, Wai-Sing; Au, Wing-Kuk; Tang, Ximing; Ma, Edmond S.K.; Chan, Wai-Kong; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minna, John D.; Tsao, George S.W.; Lam, David C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene with potential roles in regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in lung cancer. The aim of this study is to explore the association of aberrant LATS2 expression with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinoma (AD), and the effects of LATS2 silencing in both lung AD cell lines. Methods LATS2 mRNA and protein expression in resected lung AD were correlated with demographic characteristics, EGFR mutation and survival. LATS2-specific siRNA was transfected into four EGFR wild-type (WT) and three EGFR mutant AD cell lines and the changes in LATS2 expression and relevant signaling molecules before and after LATS2 knockdown were assayed. Results Fifty resected lung AD were included (M:F = 23:27, smokers:non-smokers = 19:31, EGFR mutant:wild-type = 21:29) with LATS2 mRNA levels showed no significant difference between gender, age, smoking and pathological stages while LATS2 immunohistochemical staining on an independent set of 79 lung AD showed similar trend. LATS2 mRNA level was found to be a significant independent predictor for survival status (disease-free survival RR = 0.217; p = 0.003; Overall survival RR = 0.238; p = 0.036). siRNA-mediated suppression of LATS2 expression resulted in augmentation of ERK phosphorylation in EGFR wild-type AD cell lines with high basal LATS2 expression, discriminatory modulation of Akt signaling between EGFR wild-type and mutant cells, and induction of p53 accumulation in AD cell lines with low baseline p53 levels. Conclusions LATS2 expression level is predictive of survival in patients with resected lung AD. LATS2 may modulate and contribute to tumor growth via different signaling pathways in EGFR mutant and wild-type tumors. PMID:24976335

  6. Mourning Dr. Alfred G. Knudson: the two-hit hypothesis, tumor suppressor genes, and the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Okio; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    On July 10, 2016, Alfred G. Knudson, Jr., MD, PhD, a leader in cancer research, died at the age of 93 years. We deeply mourn his loss. Knudson's two-hit hypothesis, published in 1971, has been fundamental for understanding tumor suppressor genes and familial tumor-predisposing syndromes. To understand the molecular mechanism of two-hit-initiated tumorigenesis, Knudson used an animal model of a dominantly inherited tumor, the Eker rat. From the molecular identification of Tsc2 germline mutations, the Eker rat became a model for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a familial tumor-predisposing syndrome. Animal models, including the fly, have greatly contributed to TSC research. Because the product of the TSC2/Tsc2 gene (tuberin) together with hamartin, the product of another TSC gene (TSC1/Tsc1), suppresses mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), rapalogs have been used as therapeutic drugs for TSC. Although significant activity of these drugs has been reported, there are still problems such as recurrence of residual tumors and adverse effects. Recent studies indicate that there are mTORC1-independent signaling pathways downstream of hamartin/tuberin, which may represent new therapeutic targets. The establishment of cellular models, such as pluripotent stem cells with TSC2/Tsc2 gene mutations, will facilitate the understanding of new aspects of TSC pathogenesis and the development of novel treatment options. In this review, we look back at the history of Knudson and animal models of TSC and introduce recent progress in TSC research.

  7. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  8. Detection of Tumor Suppressor Gene and Oncogene in SO-Rb_(50) Human Retinoblastoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common malignant'cancer of eye. So-Rb_(50) is the first Rb cell line established in China in 1988. It has passed to the 387th passage now. We collected cells of the 327th passage of SO-Rb_(50), purified its genomic DNA and detected it with Rb and c-myc cDNA probes respectively (normal human white blood cells DNA was the control). We found the Rb gene was deleted while c-myc gene was amplified three times. This provides a basis for further study of the regulation of tumor ...

  9. [Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Bojana; Perović, Milica; Novaković, Ivana; Atanacković, Jasmina; Popović, Branka; Luković, Ljiljana; Petković, Spasoje

    2006-09-01

    Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65%) cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7%) tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5%) tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO) classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IlIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.70), with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the association of this occurrence with a later phase of the disease.

  10. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luković Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. Methods. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Results. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65% cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7% tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5% tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IIIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.7%, with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. Conclusion. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the

  11. Genetic interactions between the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene ept and the stat92E transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101 promotes the endocytic degradation of transmembrane proteins and is implicated as a mutational target in cancer, yet the effect of TSG101 loss on cell proliferation in vertebrates is uncertain. By contrast, Drosophila epithelial tissues lacking the TSG101 ortholog erupted (ept develop as enlarged undifferentiated tumors, indicating that the gene can have anti-growth properties in a simple metazoan. A full understanding of pathways deregulated by loss of Drosophila ept will aid in understanding potential links between mammalian TSG101 and growth control. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have taken a genetic approach to the identification of pathways required for excess growth of Drosophila eye-antennal imaginal discs lacking ept. We find that this phenotype is very sensitive to the genetic dose of stat92E, the transcriptional effector of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and that this pathway undergoes strong activation in ept mutant cells. Genetic evidence indicates that stat92E contributes to cell cycle deregulation and excess cell size phenotypes that are observed among ept mutant cells. In addition, autonomous Stat92E hyper-activation is associated with altered tissue architecture in ept tumors and an effect on expression of the apical polarity determinant crumbs. CONCLUSIONS: These findings identify ept as a cell-autonomous inhibitor of the Jak-Stat pathway and suggest that excess Jak-Stat signaling makes a significant contribution to proliferative and tissue architectural phenotypes that occur in ept mutant tissues.

  12. Effects of sulfur dioxide derivatives on expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guohua; Meng, Ziqiang

    2009-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a major air pollutant suspected to act as a promoter or co-carcinogen. The present study was designed to investigate whether SO(2) derivatives (bisulfite and sulfite) had effects on the expression of several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in cultured human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells. The mRNA and protein levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, following exposure to differing SO(2)-derivative concentrations and exposure times. SO(2) derivatives caused mRNA and protein over-expression of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc at all tested doses (0.001-2mM). Over-expression of H-ras and p53 were observed in cells receiving the highest concentration (0.1-2mM), as well as the under-expression of p16 and Rb. The over-expression of c-fos and c-jun was observed after 24h recovery. The expression of c-myc and H-ras decreased to base line levels while the p53 expression decreased compared with control after 24h recovery. The mRNA and protein expression of p16 and Rb remained at initial levels after 24h recovery. The data support the hypothesis that SO(2) derivatives could cause the activation of proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and SO(2) derivatives may play a role in the pathogenesis of SO(2)-associated lung cancer.

  13. REC8 is a novel tumor suppressor gene epigenetically robustly targeted by the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingxie; Shen, Xiaopei; Zhu, Guangwu; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-11-17

    The role of the PI3K pathway in human cancer has been well established, but much of its molecular mechanism, particularly the epigenetic aspect, remains to be defined. We hypothesized that aberrant methylation and hence altered expression of certain unknown important genes induced by the genetically activated PI3K pathway signaling is a major epigenetic mechanism in human tumorigenesis. Through a genome-wide search for such genes that were epigenetically controlled by the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer cells, we found a wide range of genes with broad functions epigenetically targeted by the PI3K pathway. The most prominent among these genes was REC8, classically known as a meiotic-specific gene, which we found to be robustly down-regulated by the PI3K pathway through hypermethylation. REC8 hypermethylation was strongly associated with genetic alterations and activities of the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines, thyroid cancer tumors, and some other human cancers; it was also associated with poor clinicopathological outcomes of thyroid cancer, including advanced disease stages and patient mortality. Demethylating the hypermethylated REC8 gene restored its expression in thyroid cancer cells in which the PI3K pathway was genetically over-activated and induced expression of REC8 protein inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of these cells. These findings are consistent with REC8 being a novel major bona fide tumor suppressor gene and a robust epigenetic target of the PI3K pathway. Aberrant inactivation of REC8 through hypermethylation by the PI3K pathway may represent an important mechanism mediating the oncogenic functions of the PI3K pathway.

  14. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  15. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    19q13.1 126, 127 EGF Cell proliferation, mitogenicity Breast, Prostate 4q25 128, 129 PDGF Embryological development Breast, Prostate 22q13.1 130, 131...results of their study also ruled out the possibility of BRMS1 upregulating expression of other metastasis suppressors, such as NM23, KAI1, KiSS1 or E

  16. Impact of SNPs on CpG Islands in the MYC and HRAS oncogenes and in a wide variety of tumor suppressor genes: A multi-cancer approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Mohammad D; Yavorski, John M; Mauro, James A; Blanck, George

    2016-06-17

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that occur within CpG Islands may lead to increased hypermethylation if a SNP allele has the potential to form a CpG dinucleotide, as well as potentially lead to hypomethylation if a SNP allele eliminates a CpG dinucleotide. We analyzed CpG-related SNP allele frequencies in whole genome sequences (WGS) across 5 TCGA cancer datasets, thereby exploiting a more recent appreciation for signaling pathway degeneracy in cancer. The cancer data sets were analyzed for SNPs in CpG islands associated with the oncogenes, HRAS and MYC, and in the CpG islands associated with the tumor suppressor genes, APC, DCC, and RB1. We determined that one SNP allele (rs3824120) in a CpG island associated with MYC which eliminated a CpG was more common in the cancer datasets than in the 100Genomes databases (p < 0.01). For HRAS, 2 SNP alleles (rs112690925, rs7939028) that created CpG's occurred significantly less frequently in the cancer data sets than in the general SNP databases (e.g., rs7939028, p < 0.0002, in comparison with AllSNPs(142)). Also, one SNP allele (rs4940177) that created a CpG in a CpG island associated with the DCC tumor suppressor gene, was more common in the cancer datasets (p < 0.0007). To understand a broader picture of the potential of SNP alleles to create CpG's in CpG islands of tumor suppressor genes, we developed a scripted algorithm to assess the SNP alleles associated with the CpG islands of 43 tumor suppressor genes. The following tumor suppressor genes have the possibility of significant, percent increases in their CpG counts, depending on which SNP allele(s) is present: VHL, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PTEN and RB1.

  17. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4 tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryland Georgina L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. Methods We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. Results In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. Conclusions MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort.

  18. Construction and Expression of Human PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene Recombinant Adenovirus Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qingyong; WANG Chunyou; CHEN Daoda; CHEN Jianying; JIANG Chunfang; ZHENG Hai

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant defective adenovirus vector carrying human PTEN tumor suppres sor gene was constructed by using AdEasy-1 system and its expression was detected in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468. Human PTEN cDNA was cloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-PTEN, then homologeous recombination was carried out in the E. coli BJ5183 by contransforming linearized shuttle vector with adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1. The newly recombined defective adenovirus vector AdPTEN containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was packaged and propagated in 293 cells. After being purified by cesium chloride gradient centrifugation, the adenovirus was transfected into human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 in vitro. The expression of PTEN mRNA and protein in infected human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The recombinant defective adenovirus vector carrying PTEN gene was constructed successfully. The viral titer of purified adenovirus was 2.5×1010 pfu/mL, and about 70 % breast cancer cells were infected with Ad PTEN when multiplicity of infection (MOI) reached 50. The exogenous PTEN mRNA and protein were expressed in MDA-MB-468 cells infected with Ad-PTEN by RT-PCR and Western blot. The recombinant defective adenovirus vector of PTEN gene was constructed successfully using AdEasy-1 system rapidly, which paved a sound foundation for gene study of breast cancer.

  19. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor-suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis. Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The

  20. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic

  1. Waking up dormant tumor suppressor genes with zinc fingers, TALEs and the CRISPR/dCas9 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bloj, Benjamin; Moses, Colette; Sgro, Agustin; Plani-Lam, Janice; Arooj, Mahira; Duffy, Ciara; Thiruvengadam, Shreyas; Sorolla, Anabel; Rashwan, Rabab; Mancera, Ricardo L.; Leisewitz, Andrea; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Corvalan, Alejandro H.; Blancafort, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a major role during carcinogenesis and regaining these dormant functions by engineering of sequence-specific epigenome editing tools offers a unique opportunity for targeted therapies. However, effectively normalizing the expression and regaining tumor suppressive functions of silenced TSGs by artificial transcription factors (ATFs) still remains a major challenge. Herein we describe novel combinatorial strategies for the potent reactivation of two class II TSGs, MASPIN and REPRIMO, in cell lines with varying epigenetic states, using the CRISPR/dCas9 associated system linked to a panel of effector domains (VP64, p300, VPR and SAM complex), as well as with protein-based ATFs, Zinc Fingers and TALEs. We found that co-delivery of multiple effector domains using a combination of CRISPR/dCas9 and TALEs or SAM complex maximized activation in highly methylated promoters. In particular, CRISPR/dCas9 VPR with SAM upregulated MASPIN mRNA (22,145-fold change) in H157 lung cancer cells, with accompanying re-expression of MASPIN protein, which led to a concomitant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death. Consistently, CRISPR/dCas9 VP64 with SAM upregulated REPRIMO (680-fold change), which led to phenotypic reprogramming in AGS gastric cancer cells. Altogether, our results outlined novel sequence-specific, combinatorial epigenome editing approaches to reactivate highly methylated TSGs as a promising therapy for cancer and other diseases. PMID:27528034

  2. Waking up dormant tumor suppressor genes with zinc fingers, TALEs and the CRISPR/dCas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bloj, Benjamin; Moses, Colette; Sgro, Agustin; Plani-Lam, Janice; Arooj, Mahira; Duffy, Ciara; Thiruvengadam, Shreyas; Sorolla, Anabel; Rashwan, Rabab; Mancera, Ricardo L; Leisewitz, Andrea; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Corvalan, Alejandro H; Blancafort, Pilar

    2016-09-13

    The aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a major role during carcinogenesis and regaining these dormant functions by engineering of sequence-specific epigenome editing tools offers a unique opportunity for targeted therapies. However, effectively normalizing the expression and regaining tumor suppressive functions of silenced TSGs by artificial transcription factors (ATFs) still remains a major challenge. Herein we describe novel combinatorial strategies for the potent reactivation of two class II TSGs, MASPIN and REPRIMO, in cell lines with varying epigenetic states, using the CRISPR/dCas9 associated system linked to a panel of effector domains (VP64, p300, VPR and SAM complex), as well as with protein-based ATFs, Zinc Fingers and TALEs. We found that co-delivery of multiple effector domains using a combination of CRISPR/dCas9 and TALEs or SAM complex maximized activation in highly methylated promoters. In particular, CRISPR/dCas9 VPR with SAM upregulated MASPIN mRNA (22,145-fold change) in H157 lung cancer cells, with accompanying re-expression of MASPIN protein, which led to a concomitant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death. Consistently, CRISPR/dCas9 VP64 with SAM upregulated REPRIMO (680-fold change), which led to phenotypic reprogramming in AGS gastric cancer cells. Altogether, our results outlined novel sequence-specific, combinatorial epigenome editing approaches to reactivate highly methylated TSGs as a promising therapy for cancer and other diseases.

  3. Expression level of novel tumor suppressor gene FATS is associated with the outcome of node positive breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; GU Lin; ZHAO Lu-jun; ZHANG Xi-feng; QIU Li; LI Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the identification of a previously uncharacterized and evolutionarily conserved gene, fragile-site associated tumor suppressor (FATS), at a frequently deleted region in irradiation (IR)-induced tumors.However, the role of FATS in breast cancer development and its clinical significance has not been defined. The aim of this study was to determine the role of FA7S in breast cancer development and to evaluate its clinical significance in breast cancer.Methods The expression level of FATS mRNA was determined in 106 breast carcinomas and 23 paired normal breast tissues using quantitative real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The relationship between FATS expression and clinicopathological parameters were also analyzed.Results The mRNA level of FATS was down-regulated in breast cancer compared with paired normal tissues. Low expression of FATS was correlated with high nuclear grade. There was a tendency to a favorable outcome for patients with high expression of FATS (P=0.346). However, low expression of FATS was associated with poor outcome of breast cancer patients with node positive (P=0.011). Furthermore, the mRNA level of FATS showed an independent value in predicting the outcome of breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes.Conclusion FATS is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of breast cancer and could be a potential biomarker and prognostic factor for breast cancer therapy.

  4. The Neurofibromatosis 2 Tumor Suppressor Gene Product, Merlin, Regulates Human Meningioma Cell Growth by Signaling through YAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Striedinger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of schwannomas and meningiomas. Several studies have examined the ability of the NF2 gene product, merlin, to function as a tumor suppressor in diverse cell types; however, little is known about merlin growth regulation in meningiomas. In Drosophila, merlin controls cell proliferation and apoptosis by signaling through the Hippo pathway to inhibit the function of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. The Hippo pathway is conserved in mammals. On the basis of these observations, we developed human meningioma cell lines matched for merlin expression to evaluate merlin growth regulation and investigate the relationship between NF2 status and Yes-associated protein (YAP, the mammalian homolog of Yorkie. NF2 loss in meningioma cells was associated with loss of contact-dependent growth inhibition, enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation due to increased S-phase entry. In addition, merlin loss in both meningioma cell lines and primary tumors resulted in increased YAP expression and nuclear localization. Finally, siRNA-mediated reduction of YAP in NF2-deficient meningioma cells rescued the effects of merlin loss on cell proliferation and S-phase entry. Collectively, these results represent the first demonstration that merlin regulates cell growth in human cancer cells by suppressing YAP.

  5. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  6. Extensive analysis of D7S486 in primary gastric cancer supports TESTIN as a candidate tumor suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhiwei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH was found at D7S486 in primary gastric cancer (GC. And we found a high frequency of LOH region on 7q31 in primary GC from China, and identified D7S486 to be the most frequent LOH locus. This study was aimed to determine what genes were affected by the LOH and served as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in this region. Here, a high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs microarray fabricated in-house was used to analyze the LOH status around D7S486 on 7q31 in 75 patients with primary GC. Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR were used to assess the protein and mRNA expression of TESTIN (TES in 50 and 140 primary GC samples, respectively. MTS assay was used to investigate the effect of TES overexpression on the proliferation of GC cell lines. Mutation and methylation analysis were performed to explore possible mechanisms of TES inactivation in GC. Results LOH analysis discovered five candidate genes (ST7, FOXP2, MDFIC, TES and CAV1 whose frequencies of LOH were higher than 30%. However, only TES showed the potential to be a TSG associated with GC. Among 140 pairs of GC samples, decreased TES mRNA level was found in 96 (68.6% tumor tissues when compared with matched non-tumor tissues (p p = 0.001. In addition, immunohistochemical staining result was in agreement with that of RT-PCR and Western blot. Down regulation of TES was shown to be correlated with tumor differentiation (p = 0.035 and prognosis (p = 0.035, log-rank test. Its overexpression inhibited the growth of three GC cell lines. Hypermethylation of TES promoter was a frequent event in primary GC and GC cell lines. However, no specific gene mutation was observed in the coding region of the TES gene. Conclusions Collectively, all results support the role of TES as a TSG in gastric carcinogenesis and that TES is inactivated primarily by LOH and CpG island methylation.

  7. [Inhibitory effects of tumor suppressor gene PTEN on proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guan-Ping; Li, Xiang-Yong; Huang, Jin-Wen; Xiong, Liang; Zhou, Ke-Yuan

    2007-10-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN could not only inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, but also inhibit their metastasis. However, the mechanism is still unclear. This study was to investigate the effects of PTEN gene on the proliferation and metastasis of human breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells, and explore the mechanisms. Wild-type PTEN (wt-PTEN) plasmid and phosphatase-defective PTEN (G129R-PTEN) plasmid were transfected into ZR-75-1 cells by liposome, respectively. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay. Transfected cells were selected by puromycin. The expression of PTEN protein was detected by Western blot. Cell adhesion and invasion were tested by adhesion test and invasion test. The proliferation inhibition rate was significantly higher in wt-PTEN-transfected ZR-75-1 cells than in untransfected cells and G129R-PTEN-transfected cells (42.7% vs. 0% and 2.7%, P0.05). The proliferation inhibition of ZR-75-1 cells was enhanced along with the increase of culture time and concentration of wt-PTEN. wt-PTEN also induced cell apoptosis. PTEN protein was expressed efficiently in the cells transfected with either wt-PTEN or G129R-PTEN. The inhibition rates of adhesion and invasion were significantly higher in wt-PTEN-transfected cells than in G129R-PTEN-transfected cells (65.7% vs. 8.8%, 70.4% vs. 6.9%, PZR-75-1 cells.

  8. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  9. The Role of Tumor Suppressor Gene TIP30 in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHAO; Yajun GUO

    2009-01-01

    @@ Background: Malignant tumors are characterized by dysregulated growth control, the overcoming of replicative senescence, evasion of apoptnsis, tis-sue invasion and metastasis, and sustained angiogenesis.

  10. A novel tumor-suppressor candidate gene-ndr2 is differentially expressed between osteoarthritis synovium cells and rheumatoid arthritis synovium fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yan-chun; WANG Ji-cun; LIU Xin-ping; YAO Li-bo

    2004-01-01

    To test whether the novel tumor-suppressor candidate gene-ndr2 is also differentially expressed between osteoarthritis synovium cells (OASC) and rheumatoid arthritis synovium fibroblasts (RASF), and whether ndr2 can suppress the growth of RASF in vitro. Methods: Dot blotting, cell culture and gene transfection, cell cycle nalysis techniques were applied to investigate the effect of ndr2 on the cell phenotype and cell cycles. Results: ndr2 is expressed in OASC but absent in RASF. Transient transfection of ndr2 into RASF can suppress the growth of RASF from phenotype observation. Cell cycle analysis showed that apoptotic peaks can be detected in RASF cells transfected with ndr2 gene. Conclusion: Novel tumor suppressor candidate ndr2 is not only differentially expressed between OASC and RASF but also can induce the apoptosis of RASF in vitro.

  11. Loss of Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor Genes Expression Is Associated with Unfavorable Clinical Outcome in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Data from Retrospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishrat Mahjabeen

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial genes play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of these genes have long been suspected to contribute to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased proliferation and progression of cancer. A family of orthologues of yeast silent information regulator 3 (SIRT3, 4 (SIRT4 and mitochondrial tumor suppressor 1 (MTUS1 are important mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes which play an important role in the progression of multiple cancers. However, their role in the development of oxidative stress, enhanced proliferation and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC has not yet been studied. In this study we aimed to test the association between reduced mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes' activities and enhancement in tissue oxidative stress and cell proliferation in HNSCC cases. The expression of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes (SIRT3, SIRT4 and MTUS1, mitochondrial DNA repair gene (OGG1-2a and a proliferation marker (Ki-67 was studied in a study cohort of 120 HNSCC patients and controls with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and real-time PCR (qPCR in order to determine the potential prognostic significance of these genes. A statistically significant downregulation of SIRT3 (p<0.001, SIRT4 (p<0.0001, MTUS1 (p<0.002 and OGG1 (p<0.0001 was observed in HNSCC compared to control samples. Ki-67 was also overexpressed (p<0.0001 in HNSCC versus control samples. Additionally, to explore gene-gene relationship, we observed a positive spearmen correlation between SIRT3 versus SIRT4 (r = 0.523***, p<0.0001, SIRT3 versus MTUS1 (r = 0.273***, p<0.001, SIRT3 versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.213*, p<0.03, SIRT4 versus OGG1 (r = 0.338***, p<0.0001 and MTUS1 versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.215*, p<0.03 in HNSCC cases. A negative spearman correlation was observed between OGG1 versus Ki-67 (r = -0.224**, p<0.01 and OGG1-2a versus Ki-67 (r = -0.224**, p<0

  12. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  13. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    ceramide level in the tumor cells, and this increase was abrogated by acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor. In addition, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1...Type Culture Collection (Rockville, MD). The cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FCS, 100 Ag/mL streptomycin, 100 units/mL...acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor), fumonisin B1 (ceramide synthase inhibitor), etomoxir [ carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) inhibitor], and C2

  14. The p202 Gene as a Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    murine p202 gene for clinical trials and to maintain the benefits of p202 therapeutic efficacy, we have screened human p202 family genes and identified the...metastatic disease frequently in an alternative, ligand-independent manner. develops even after potentially curative surgery or radiation Many phytochemicals ...an alternative and more effective approach. phytochemicals to prevent prostate cancer are ongoing (21). In A recent and exciting prevention trial for

  15. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine and Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Paraskeva, C. (Univ. of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  16. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF METHYLATION STATUS OF TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN PAIRED BIOPSY AND SERUM SAMPLES FROM CERVICAL CANCER PATIENTS AMONG NORTH INDIAN POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, A K; Sharma, V; Nikbakht, M; Jain, V; Sehgal, A; Capalash, N; Kaur, J

    2016-02-01

    Tumor-specific genetic or epigenetic alterations have been detected in serum DNA in case of various types of cancers. In breast cancer, the detection of tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation has been reported in several body fluids. Promoter hypermethylation of some genes like MYOD1, CALCA, hTERT etc. has also been detected in serum samples from cervical cancer. The present study is the first report on the comparison of promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes likep14, p15, p16, p21, p27, p57, p53, p73, RARβ2, FHIT, DAPK, STAT1 and-RB1 genes in paired biopsy and serum samples from cervical cancer patients among north Indian population. This is also the first report on the hypermethylation of these genes in serum samples from cervical cancer patients among north Indian population. According to the results of the present study, promoter hypermethylation of these genes can also be detected in serum samples of cervical cancer patients. The sensitivity of detection of promoter hypermethylation in serum samples of cervical cancer patients as compared to paired biopsy samples was found to be around 83.3%. It was observed that promoter hypermethylation was mainly observed in the serum samples in the higher stages and very rarely in the lower stages. The present study clearly showed that serum of patients with cervical cancer can also be used to study methylated genes as biomarkers.

  17. Isolation of a Breast Cancer Tumor Suppressor Gene from Chromosome 3p

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    on chromosome 8. The recent observation by Geurts et al., (34) that FHIT was fused to the HMGI(C) gene in a benign parotid adenoma suggested that a...adenoma of the parotid gland. Cancer Res., 57: 13-17, 1997. 35. Lucito, R., Nakimura, M., West, J.A., Han, Y., Chin, K., Jensen, K., McCombie, R., Gray

  18. CHROMOSOME 17P MAY HARBOR MULTIPLE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES ASSOCIATED WITH PRIMARY GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether deletion of chromosome 17 is involved in the carcinogenesis of primary glioblastoma multiforme and to localize the possible common deletion region in the aforementioned chromosome. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction-based microsatellite analysis was used to assess loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 17 in 20 primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Fifteen fluorescent dye-labeled polymorphic markers were used. Results: Thirteen of twenty (65%) GBM displayed LOH on at least one marker of chromosome 17p. Two tumors showed either LOH or non-informativeness on all markers tested. The most frequent LOH was observed at loci including D17s799 (53.3%), Dl7s1852 (53.8%), Dl7s938 (63.20/o), Dl7s831 (55.6%). The loci D17s831 (on 17pl3) and D17s799(Dl7sl852 (17p11.2(pl2) are distal and proximal to p53 respectively. The frequencies of LOH at all loci examined on chromosome 17q were relatively low (<30%). None of informative loci exhibited microsatellite instability in this study. Conclusion: Loss of genetic material on chromosome 17p may play an important role in the pathogenesis of GBM. Besides the well-known TSG p53 on 17p, other unknown TSCs associated with GBM may be present on the chromosomal regions 17pl3 and 17p11.2(pl2, which are distal and proximal to p53 respectively.

  19. The tumor suppressor gene hypermethylated in cancer 1 is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenal, Mathias; Trinh, Emmanuelle; Britschgi, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    The Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that cooperates with p53 to suppress cancer development. We and others recently showed that HIC1 is a transcriptional target of p53. To identify additional transcriptional regulators of HIC1, we screened...... to the HIC1 promoter was shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in human TIG3 fibroblasts expressing tamoxifen-activated E2F1. In agreement, activation of E2F1 in TIG3-E2F1 cells markedly increased HIC1 expression. Interestingly, expression of E2F1 in the p53(-/-) hepatocellular carcinoma cell line...

  20. Characterization of the novel tumor-suppressor gene CCDC67 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, De-Tao; Xu, Jianhui; Lei, Mengyuan; Li, Hongqiang; Wang, Yongfei; LIU Zhen; Zhou, Yubing; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-01-01

    Background Some studies showed an association of coiled-coil domain-containing (CCDC) genes with cancers. Our previous limited data specifically suggested a possible pathogenic role of CCDC67 in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), but this has not been firmly established. The present study was to further investigate and establish this role of CCDC67 in PTC. Results The expression of CCDC67, both at mRNA and protein levels, was sharply down-regulated in PTC compared with normal thyroid tissues. Lo...

  1. Rapid In Vivo Validation of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    containing an mCherry cDNA fused to the sgRNA target. As predicted, we observed variable efficiencies between sgRNAs. Our assay facilitated the rapid...efficiently disrupted a heterologous gene construct containing an mCherry cDNA fused to the sgRNA target. As predicted, we observed variable ...o rm a li z e d M F I p53 Figure 1. A. Schematic of CRISPRv2Cre and CRISPRv2GFP. Each vector expresses sgRNA, Cas9, and either Cre or GFP. B

  2. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  3. CDKN1C/p57kip2 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistey Robert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor previously implicated in several types of human cancer. Its family members (CDKN1A/p21CIP1 and B/p27KIP1 have been implicated in breast cancer, but information about CDKN1C's role is limited. We hypothesized that decreased CDKN1C may be involved in human breast carcinogenesis in vivo. Methods We determined rates of allele imbalance or loss of heterozygosity (AI/LOH in CDKN1C, using an intronic polymorphism, and in the surrounding 11p15.5 region in 82 breast cancers. We examined the CDKN1C mRNA level in 10 cancers using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR, and the CDKN1C protein level in 20 cancers using immunohistochemistry (IHC. All samples were obtained using laser microdissection. Data were analyzed using standard statistical tests. Results AI/LOH at 11p15.5 occurred in 28/73 (38% informative cancers, but CDKN1C itself underwent AI/LOH in only 3/16 (19% cancers (p = ns. In contrast, CDKN1C mRNA levels were reduced in 9/10 (90% cancers (p Conclusion CDKN1C is expressed in normal epithelium of most breast cancer cases, mainly in the myothepithelial layer. This expression decreases, at both the mRNA and protein level, in the large majority of breast cancers, and does not appear to be mediated by AI/LOH at the gene. Thus, CDKN1C may be a breast cancer tumor suppressor.

  4. High frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM signals) affect gene expression levels in tumor suppressor p53-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Guan, Kaomei; Zeng, Qinghua; Nikolova, Teodora; Meister, Armin; Schönborn, Frank; Schuderer, Jürgen; Kuster, Niels; Wobus, Anna M

    2004-05-01

    Effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) simulating exposure to the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) signals were studied using pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. Wild-type ES cells and ES cells deficient for the tumor suppressor p53 were exposed to pulse modulated EMF at 1.71 GHz, lower end of the uplink band of GSM 1800, under standardized and controlled conditions, and transcripts of regulatory genes were analyzed during in vitro differentiation. Two dominant GSM modulation schemes (GSM-217 and GSM-Talk), which generate temporal changes between GSM-Basic (active during talking phases) and GSM-DTX (active during listening phases thus simulating a typical conversation), were applied to the cells at and below the basic safety limits for local exposures as defined for the general public by the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). GSM-217 EMF induced a significant upregulation of mRNA levels of the heat shock protein, hsp70 of p53-deficient ES cells differentiating in vitro, paralleled by a low and transient increase of c-jun, c-myc, and p21 levels in p53-deficient, but not in wild-type cells. No responses were observed in either cell type after EMF exposure to GSM-Talk applied at similar slot-averaged specific absorption rates (SAR), but at lower time-averaged SAR values. Cardiac differentiation and cell cycle characteristics were not affected in embryonic stem and embryonic carcinoma cells after exposure to GSM-217 EMF signals. Our data indicate that the genetic background determines cellular responses to GSM modulated EMF. Bioelectromagnetics 25:296-307, 2004.

  5. ZEB-1, a Repressor of the Semaphorin 3F Tumor Suppressor Gene in Lung Cancer Cells

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    Jonathan Clarhaut

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available SEMA3F is a secreted semaphorin with potent antitumor activity, which is frequently downregulated in lung cancer. In cancer cell lines, SEMA3F overexpression decreases hypoxia-induced factor 1α protein and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, and inhibits multiple signaling components. Therefore, understanding how SEMA3F expression is inhibited in cancer cells is important. We previously defined the promoter organization of SEMA3F and found that chromatin remodeling by a histone deacetylase inhibitor was sufficient to activate SEMA3F expression. In lung cancer, we have also shown that ZEB-1, an E-box transcription repressor, is predominantly responsible for loss of E-Cadherin associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. In the present study, we demonstrated that ZEB-1 also inhibits SEMA3F in lung cancer cells. Levels of ZEB-1, but not ZEB-2, Snail or Slug, significantly correlate with SEMA3F inhibition, and overexpression or inhibition of ZEB-1 correspondingly affected SEMA3F expression. Four conserved E-box sites were identified in the SEMA3F gene. Direct ZEB-1 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays for two of these, and ZEB-1 binding was reduced when cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. These results demonstrate that ZEB-1 directly inhibits SEMA3F expression in lung cancer cells. SEMA3F loss was associated with changes in cell signaling: increased phospho-AKT in normoxia and increase of hypoxia-induced factor 1α protein in hypoxia. Moreover, exogenous addition of SEMA3F could modulate ZEB-1-induced angiogenesis in a chorioallantoic membrane assay. Together, these data provide further support for the importance of SEMA3F and ZEB-1 in lung cancer progression.

  6. HACE1 is a putative tumor suppressor gene in B-cell lymphomagenesis and is down-regulated by both deletion and epigenetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzelfen, Abdelilah; Alcantara, Marion; Kora, Hafid; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bohers, Elodie; Maingonnat, Catherine; Ruminy, Philippe; Adriouch, Sahil; Boyer, Olivier; Dubois, Sydney; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1, HACE1, located on chromosome 6q, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and is downregulated in many human tumors. Here, we report HACE1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene down-regulated by a combination of deletion and epigenetic mechanisms. HACE1 deletions were observed in 40% of B-cell lymphoma tumors. Hypermethylation of the HACE1 promoter CpG177 island was found in 60% (68/111) of cases and in all tested B-cell lymphoma lines. Using HDAC inhibitors, we observed predominantly inactive chromatin conformation (methylated H3 histones H3K9me2) in HACE1 gene promoter region. We demonstrated in Ramos and Raji cells that down-regulation of HACE1 expression was associated with a significant decrease in apoptosis and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. Our experiments indicate that HACE1 can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in most B-cell lymphomas and can be downregulated by deacetylation of its promoter region chromatin, which makes HACE1 a potential target for HDAC inhibitors.

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  8. E6 and E7 gene silencing results in decreased methylation of tumor suppressor genes and induces phenotype transformation of human cervical carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Xu, Cui; Long, Jia; Shen, Danbei; Zhou, Wuqing; Zhou, Qiyan; Yang, Jia; Jiang, Mingjun

    2015-09-15

    In SiHa and CaSki cells, E6 and E7-targeting shRNA specifically and effectively knocked down human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 at the transcriptional level, reduced the E6 and E7 mRNA levels by more than 80% compared with control cells that expressed a scrambled-sequence shRNA. E6 and E7 repression resulted in down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase mRNA and protein expression, decreased DNA methylation and increased mRNA expression levels of tumor suppressor genes, induced a certain apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in E6 and E7 shRNA-infected SiHa and CaSki cells compared with the uninfected cells. Repression of E6 and E7 oncogenes resulted in restoration of DNA methyltransferase suppressor pathways and induced apoptosis in HPV16-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the potential carcinogenic mechanism of HPV16 through influencing DNA methylation pathway to activate the development of cervical cancer exist, and maybe as a candidate therapeutic strategy for cervical and other HPV-associated cancers.

  9. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  10. Screening of candidate tumor-suppressor genes in 3p21.3 and investigation of the methylation of gene promoters in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ling, Tianyou; Wu, Hanjiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common type of head and neck malignant tumor. however, its pathological mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we screened for candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) related to OSCC among 10 candidate genes located in 3p21.3, a region abundant with TSGs based on previous studies, using semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Three genes, GNAT1, SEMA3B and AXUD1, with low or no expression in OSCC tissues and the cell line TCA8113 were selected, and the promoter methylation status was further analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR). Hypermethylation in the promoter regions of SEMA3B was found in OSCC tissues, and a significant difference in the frequency of methylation of SEMA3B was observed between OSCC and non-cancerous tissues. Furthermore, TCA8113 cells treated with 5-Aza-Cdc started to re-express SEMA3B at a concentration of 5 µM or higher. Our study confirmed that three candidate TSGs with low expression may be involved in OSCC and that hypermethylation in promoter regions may contribute to the low expression of SEMA3B. These findings offer novel insights for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis of OSCC as well as for aiding in its clinical diagnosis and therapeutic strategy.

  11. Primary microcephaly gene MCPH1 shows signatures of tumor suppressors and is regulated by miR-27a in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    Full Text Available Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1 gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72% informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22% and 19/25 (76% OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10% tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3'-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a.

  12. Molecular insights into the association of obesity with breast cancer risk: relevance to xenobiotic metabolism and CpG island methylation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Hussain, Tajamul; Al-Attas, Omar S; Prayaga, Aruna; Digumarti, Raghunadha Rao; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Obesity, genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolic pathway, hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes, and hypomethylation of proapoptotic genes are known to be independent risk factors for breast cancer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the combined effect of these environmental, genetic, and epigenetic risk factors on the susceptibility to breast cancer. PCR-RFLP and multiplex PCR were used for the genetic analysis of six variants of xenobiotic metabolic pathway. Methylation-specific PCR was used for the epigenetic analysis of four genetic loci. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis revealed a significant interaction between the body mass index (BMI) and catechol-O-methyl transferase H108L variant alone or in combination with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1m1 variant. Women with "Luminal A" breast cancer phenotype had higher BMI compared to other phenotypes and healthy controls. There was no association between the BMI and tumor grade. The post-menopausal obese women exhibited lower glutathione levels. BMI showed a positive association with the methylation of extracellular superoxide dismutase (r = 0.21, p obesity increases the breast cancer susceptibility by two possible mechanisms: (i) by interacting with xenobiotic genetic polymorphisms in inducing increased oxidative DNA damage and (ii) by altering the methylome of several tumor suppressor genes.

  13. Moringa oleifera Gold Nanoparticles Modulate Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Caspase-9 Splice Variants in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) facilitate cancer cell recognition and can be manufactured by green synthesis using nutrient rich medicinal plants such as Moringa oleifera (MO). Targeting dysregulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is crucial for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the antiproliferative effects of AuNP synthesized from MO aqueous leaf extracts (MLAuNP ) in A549 lung and SNO oesophageal cancer cells. A one-pot green synthesis technique was used to synthesise MLAuNP . A549, SNO cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to MLAuNP and CAuNP to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay); apoptosis was measured by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, mitochondrial depolarization (ΔΨm) (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7, -9 activity, and ATP levels (luminometry). The mRNA expression of c-myc, p53, Skp2, Fbw7α, and caspase-9 splice variants was determined using qPCR, while relative protein expression of c-myc, p53, SRp30a, Bax, Bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Hsp70, and PARP-1 were determined by Western blotting. MLAuNP and CAuNP were not cytotoxic to PBMCs, whilst its pro-apoptotic properties were confirmed in A549 and SNO cells. MLAuNP significantly increased caspase activity in SNO cells while MLAuNP significantly increased PS externalization, ΔΨm, caspase-9, caspase-3/7 activities, and decreased ATP levels in A549 cells. Also, p53 mRNA and protein levels, SRp30a (P = 0.428), Bax, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 24 kDa fragment levels were significantly increased. Conversely, MLAuNP significantly decreased Bcl-2, Hsp70, Skp2, Fbw7α, c-myc mRNA, and protein levels and activated alternate splicing with caspase-9a splice variant being significantly increased. MLAuNP possesses antiproliferative properties and induced apoptosis in A549 cells by activating alternate splicing of caspase-9. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2302-2314, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. "Ring-fencing" BRCA1 tumor suppressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan J; Crossan, Gerry P; Hodskinson, Michael R G

    2011-12-13

    BRCA1 is a crucial human breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor gene. The article by Drost et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell together with a recent paper in Science now provide a clearer picture of how this large and complex protein suppresses tumorigenesis.

  15. Validation of whole genome amplification for analysis of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in limited amounts of tumor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasmats, Johanna; Green, Henrik; Solnestam, Beata Werne; Zajac, Pawel; Huss, Mikael; Orear, Cedric; Validire, Pierre; Bjursell, Magnus; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2012-08-24

    Personalized cancer treatment requires molecular characterization of individual tumor biopsies. These samples are frequently only available in limited quantities hampering genomic analysis. Several whole genome amplification (WGA) protocols have been developed with reported varying representation of genomic regions post amplification. In this study we investigate region dropout using a φ29 polymerase based WGA approach. DNA from 123 lung cancers specimens and corresponding normal tissue were used and evaluated by Sanger sequencing of the p53 exons 5-8. To enable comparative analysis of this scarce material, WGA samples were compared with unamplified material using a pooling strategy of the 123 samples. In addition, a more detailed analysis of exon 7 amplicons were performed followed by extensive cloning and Sanger sequencing. Interestingly, by comparing data from the pooled samples to the individually sequenced exon 7, we demonstrate that mutations are more easily recovered from WGA pools and this was also supported by simulations of different sequencing coverage. Overall this data indicate a limited random loss of genomic regions supporting the use of whole genome amplification for genomic analysis.

  16. Tumor suppressor identified as inhibitor of inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a protein, FBXW7, which acts as a tumor suppressor, is also important for the reduction in strength of inflammatory pathways. It has long been recognized that a complex interaction exists between cancer causing mechanisms

  17. [Current status of p53 tumor suppressor gene as a possible molecular marker of cancer of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña González, J A; Morote Robles, J; de Torres Ramírez, I M; Martínez Cuenca, E

    1998-04-01

    Diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased over the last few years both in localized and in more advanced stages. At present, several groups are working in the search and evaluation of alternative tumoral markers as the current ones do not cover all the Urologist's needs. In this context, a number of studies on the mutation of the tumour suppressor gen p53 in both localized and metastatic prostate cancer are being carried out. When a noxa acts on the DNA, protein p53 inhibits the cell cycle allowing the repair systems to operate and, if the damage is significant enough, cell apoptosis. The loss of this control mechanism secondary to the synthesis of anomalous proteins can result in the proliferation of neoplastic cells. A revision of the most representative papers in the literature is presented here, addressing the surrounding controversy and the resulting future possibilities.

  18. Deficiency of a potential 3p21.3 tumor-suppressor gene UBE1L (UBA7) does not accelerate lung cancer development in K-rasLA2 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Xiaoyan; Cong, Xiuli; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2008-01-01

    Genetic lesions in chromosomal region 3p21.3 marks one of the earliest events in human lung cancer development. It is hypothesized that one or more tumor suppressor genes reside in this region. Identification and characterization of these genes are important for the understanding of lung cancer initiation. UBE1L (UBA7) is a long-suspected 3p21.3 residing tumor suppressor gene. It encodes the key enzyme that activates ISGylation, a novel, ubiquitination-like, post-translational protein modific...

  19. Detection of mutations within exons 4 to 8 of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M.B. Souza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen female canines with mammary tumors and 6 normal females were used to study mutations in exons 4 to 8 of the p53 gene. DNA samples from the tumors, respective adjacent normal mammary tissue and mammary glands from healthy animals were sequenced and analyzed for the presence of mutations. Mutations were found in 71.8% of the samples and the most frequent were missense mutations. The most attacked exons in the mammary tumor were 5, 7 and 8, with 23.4, 31.6 and 23.4% mutations, respectively. Canine mammary tumors are related to mutations in gene p53 and mutations mostly occur in the region of the protein that is linked to the DNA in the cell nucleus, which can change the functionality of the cell and propitiate tumor growth. Despite being macroscopically normal, the mammary tissue adjacent to the tumors has mutations that can lead to recurrence if not removed together with the tumor.

  20. Caffeine mediates sustained inactivation of breast cancer-associated myofibroblasts via up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysoon M Al-Ansari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2, and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/-migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts.

  1. Caffeine Mediates Sustained Inactivation of Breast Cancer-Associated Myofibroblasts via Up-Regulation of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Background Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. Methodology/Principal Findings We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2), and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/−migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. Conclusion/Significance The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts. PMID:24595168

  2. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expr...

  3. Alternative exon usage creates novel transcript variants of tumor suppressor SHREW-1 gene with differential tissue expression profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemmt, Petra A. B.; Resch, Eduard; Smyrek, Isabell; Engels, Knut; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shrew-1, also called AJAP1, is a transmembrane protein associated with E-cadherin-mediated adherence junctions and a putative tumor suppressor. Apart from its interaction with β-catenin and involvement in E-cadherin internalization, little structure or function information exists. Here we explored shrew-1 expression during postnatal differentiation of mammary gland as a model system. Immunohistological analyses with antibodies against either the extracellular or the cytoplasmic domains of shrew-1 consistently revealed the expression of full-length shrew-1 in myoepithelial cells, but only part of it in luminal cells. While shrew-1 localization remained unaltered in myoepithelial cells, nuclear localization occurred in luminal cells during lactation. Based on these observations, we identified two unknown shrew-1 transcript variants encoding N-terminally truncated proteins. The smallest shrew-1 protein lacks the extracellular domain and is most likely the only variant present in luminal cells. RNA analyses of human tissues confirmed that the novel transcript variants of shrew-1 exist in vivo and exhibit a differential tissue expression profile. We conclude that our findings are essential for the understanding and interpretation of future functional and interactome analyses of shrew-1 variants. PMID:27870635

  4. Tumor suppressor gene ING3 induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of AMPK and activation of p38 MAPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhiping; Feng, Xiaojun; Gao, Si; Xu, Suowen; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-11-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy, an adaptive growth process that occurs in response to various pathophysiological stimuli, constitutes an important risk factor for the development of heart failure. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate this cardiac growth response are not completely understood. Here we revealed that ING3 (inhibitor of growth family, member 3), a type II tumor suppressor, plays a critical role in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. ING3 expression was present in relatively high abundance in the heart, and was prominently upregulated in hypertrophic agonists angiotensin II (Ang II), phenylephrine (PE), or isoproterenol (ISO)-stimulated cardiomyocytes and in hearts of rat undergoing abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) surgery. In cardiomyocytes, overexpression of ING3 caused an increase in ANP, BNP and β-MHC mRNA levels and cell surface area, while depletion of ING3 attenuated PE-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Mechanistically, we have demonstrated that overexpression of ING3 could inactivate the AMPK and activate the canonical p38 MAPK signaling. Remarkably, AMPK agonist AICAR or p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 abrogated ING3-induced hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes. In summary, our data disclose a novel role of ING3 as an inducer of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that silencing of ING3 may be explored as a potential therapeutic target in preventing cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. MYC acts via the PTEN tumor suppressor to elicit autoregulation and genome-wide gene repression by activation of the Ezh2 methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The control of normal cell growth is a balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signals. MYC is a pleiotropic transcription factor that both activates and represses a broad range of target genes and is indispensable for cell growth. While much is known about gene activation by MYC, there is no established mechanism for the majority of MYC repressed genes. We report that MYC transcriptionally activates the PTEN tumor suppressor in normal cells to inactivate the PI3K pathway, thus suppressing AKT activation. Suppression of AKT enhances the activity of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase, a subunit of the epigenetic repressor Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), while simultaneously stabilizing the protein. MYC mediated enhancement in EZH2 protein level and activity results in local and genome-wide elevation in the repressive H3K27me3 histone modification, leading to widespread gene repression including feedback autoregulation of the MYC gene itself. Depletion of either PTEN or EZH2 and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway leads to gene derepression. Importantly, expression of a phospho-defective EZH2 mutant is sufficient to recapitulate nearly half of all MYC-mediated gene repression. We present a novel epigenetic model for MYC-mediated gene repression and propose that PTEN and MYC exist in homeostatic balance to control normal growth which is disrupted in cancer cells. PMID:23135913

  6. A prospective study of tumor suppressor gene methylation as a prognostic biomarker in surgically-resected stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilon, Alexander; Sugita, Hirofumi; Sima, Camelia S.; Zauderer, Marjorie; Rudin, Charles M.; Kris, Mark G.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While retrospective analyses support an association between early tumor recurrence and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) promoter methylation in early-stage non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), few studies have investigated this question prospectively. Methods Primary tumor tissue from patients with resected pathologic stage I-IIIA NSCLCs was collected at the time of surgery and analyzed for promoter methylation via methylation-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight). The primary objective was to determine an association between promoter methylation of 10 individual TSGs (CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1, APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, SOCS3, and ADAMTS8) and recurrence-free survival (RFS), with the secondary objectives of determining association with overall survival (OS), and relation to clinical or pathologic features. Results 107 patients had sufficient tumor tissue for successful promoter methylation analysis. Majority of patients were former/current smokers (88%) with lung adenocarcinoma (78%) and pathologic stage I disease (66%). Median follow-up was 4 years. When controlled for pathologic stage, promoter methylation of the individual genes CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1, APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, and ADAMTS8 was not associated with RFS. Promoter methylation of the same genes was not associated with OS except for DAPK1 which was associated with improved OS (p=0.03). The total number of genes with methylated promoters did not correlate with RFS (p=0.89) or OS (p=0.55). Conclusions Contrary to data established by previous retrospective series, TSG promoter methylation (CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1,APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, and ADAMTS8) was not prognostic for early tumor recurrence in this prospective study of resected NSCLCs. PMID:25122424

  7. 大肠癌与抑癌基因相关性的研究现状%Association between colorectal cancer and tumor suppressor genes: recent research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项芳芳; 毛高平

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common high-risk gastrointestinal cancer, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are diagnosed each year worldwide. In recent years, due to the improvement of people's living standards and changes in dietary habits and structure, the incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer increase rapidly in China. Moreover, patients have a significantly earlier age of onset. At present, the median age of colorectal cancer onset in China is 58 years old, 12 to 18 years earlier than other countries in Europe and America. The development of colorectal cancer is a complex multi-stage process involving multiple genetic alterations. Many studies have shown that colorectal carcinogenesis involves activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Tumor suppressor genes associated with colorectal carcinogenesis include p53, APC, DCC, and MMR, and proto-oncogenes include K-ras andc-myc. In this paper, we discuss the association between tumor suppressor genes and colorectal carcinogenesis.%大肠癌是常见的高危害消化系恶性肿瘤,全球每年新发病例约为120万例.近年来,随着人们生活水平的提高,饮食习惯和结构的改变,我国大肠癌的发病率和死亡率增长迅速,而且,发病年龄明显提前,目前,我国大肠癌中位发病年龄为58岁,比欧美等国家提前12-18年.大肠癌的发生是一个多阶段多步骤的、涉及多个基因改变的复杂过程.许多研究表明,结直肠癌变是一个涉及原癌基因激活、抑癌基因失活等多基因、多阶段、多步骤渐进演化的积累过程.与结直肠癌相关的抑癌基因有P53、APC、DCC、MMR等,原癌基因k-ras、c-myc等.本文就以上基因改变与大肠癌的发生发展相关性的研究现状作一简单复习.

  8. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between DNA hypermethylation and histone modification at a hypermethylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification.METHODS: We used chromatin immunoprecipitation(ChIP) assay to assess the status of histone acetylation and methylation in promoter regions of the p16 and mutL homolog 1(MLH1) genes in 2 gastric cancer cell lines, SGC-7901 and MGC-803. We used methylationspecific PCR (MSP) to evaluate the effect of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), trichostatin A (TSA) or their combination treatment on DNA methylation status.We used RT-PCR to determine whether alterations of histone modification status after 5-Aza-dC and TSA treatment are reflected in gene expression.RESULTS: For the p16 and MLH1 genes in two cell lines,silenced loci associated with DNA hypermethylation were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation and histone H3-K4 hypomethylation.Treatment with TSA resulted in moderately increased histone H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci with no effect on histone H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on gene expression. In contrast, treatment with 5-Aza-dC rapidly reduced histone H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci and resulted in reactivation of the two genes. Combined treatment with 5-Aza-dC and TSA was synergistic in reactivating gene expression at the loci showing DNA hypermethylation. Similarly, histone H3-K4 methylation was not affected after TSA treatment, and increased moderately at the silenced loci after 5-Aza-dC treatment.CONCLUSION: Hypermethylation of DNA in promoter CpG islands is related to transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Histone H3-K9 methylation in different regions of the promoters studied correlates with DNA methylation status of each gene in gastric cancer cells. However, histone H3-K9 acetylation and H3-K4 methylation inversely

  9. Functional Study of the Human BRCA2 Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Wang, Y., Lee, M. & Venkitaraman, A. R. Abnormal cytokinesis in cells deficient in the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2. Science 306, 876...tumor suppressor genes in mitotic and meiotic cells. Mol Cell 2, 317-28 (1998). 28. Fuks, F., Milner, J. & Kouzarides, T. BRCA2 associates with...Scully, R. et al. Association of BRCA1 with Rad5l in mitotic and meiotic cells. Cell 88, 265-75 (1997). 49. Nakanishi, K. et al. Human Fanconi anemia

  10. Cigarette Smoking, BPDE-DNA Adducts, and Aberrant Promoter Methylations of Tumor Suppressor Genes (TSGs) in NSCLC from Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Peiwei; Liu, Xinneng; Zhang, Chunye; Tan, Cong; Chen, Chunmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is related to the genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of this study was to determine association of cigarette smoking and BPDE-DNA adducts with promoter methylations of several genes in NSCLC. Methylation of the promoters of p16, RARβ, DAPK, MGMT, and TIMP-3 genes of tumor tissues from 199 lung cancer patients was analyzed with methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and BPDE-DNA adduct level in lung cancer tissue was obtained by ELISA. Level of BPDE-DNA adduct increased significantly in males, aged people (over 60 years), and smokers; however, no significant difference was found while comparing the BPDE-DNA adduct levels among different tumor types, locations, and stages. Cigarette smoking was also associated with increased BPDE-DNA adducts level (OR = 2.43, p > .05) and increased methylation level in at least 1 gene (OR = 5.22, p smoking also significantly increase the risk of p16 or DAPK methylation (OR = 3.02, p smoking for more than 40 pack-years (OR = 4.21, p smoking is significantly associated with the increase of BPDE-DNA adduct level, promoter hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK genes, while BPDE-DNA adduct was not significantly related to abnormal promoter hypermethylation in TSGs, suggesting that BPDE-DNA adducts and TSGs methylations play independent roles in NSCLC.

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in S-Phase of the Cell-Cycle and the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reisman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor induces the transcription of genes that negatively regulate progression of the cell cycle in response to DNA damage or other cellular stressors and thus participates in maintaining genome stability. Numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 transcription is activated before or during early S-phase in cells progressing from G0/G1 into S-phase through the combined action of two DNA-binding factors RBP-Jκ and C/EBPβ-2. Here, we review evidence that this induction occurs to provide available p53 mRNA in order to prepare the cell for DNA damage in S-phase, this ensuring a rapid response to DNA damage before exiting this stage of the cell cycle.

  12. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  13. Aberrant methylation of the 3q25 tumor suppressor gene PTX3 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Xiong Wang; Yuan-Long He; Sheng-Tao Zhu; Shuo Yang; Shu-Tian Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify the novel methylation-silenced gene pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: PTX3 mRNA expression was examined in six human ESCC cell lines, one human immortalized normal esophageal epithelial cell line, primary ESCC tumor tissue, and paired adjacent nontumor tissue using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to examine cellular localisation and protein levels. Methylation specific PCR and bisulphite genomic sequencing were employed to investigate the methylation of the candidate gene. RESULTS: In the majority of ESCC cell lines, we found that PTX3 expression was down-regulated due to gene promoter hypermethylation, which was further confirmed by bisulphite genomic sequencing. Demethyl-ation treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored PTX3 mRNA expression in ESCC cell lines. Methylation was more common in tumor tissues (85%) than in adjacent nontumor tissues (25%) (P < 0 .01). CONCLUSION: PTX3 is down-regulated through promoter hypermethylation in ESCC, and could potentially serve as a biomarker of ESCC.

  14. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity Through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L.; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1 and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1 and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are down-regulated in specific T-cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma compared to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. PMID:26004186

  15. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  16. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q23.3 and mutation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in gastric cancer and precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Li; Zhong Tian; Dong-Ying Wu; Bao-Yu Fu; Yan Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and mutation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in gastric cancer and precancerous lesions.METHODS: Thirty cases of normal gastric mucosa, advanced and early stage gastric cancer, intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis, and atypical hyperplasia were analyzed for PTEN LOH and mutations within the entire coding region of PTEN gene by PCR-SSCP denaturing PAGE gel electrophoresis,and PTEN mutation was detected by PCR-SSCP sequencing followed by silver staining.RESULTS: LOH rate found in respectively atrophic gastritis was 10% (3/30), intestinal metaplasia 10% (3/30), atypical hyperpiasia 13.3% (4/30), early stage gastric cancer 20%(6/30), and advanced stage gastric cancer 33.3% (9/30),None of the precancerous lesions and early stage gastric cancer showed PTEN mutations, but 10% (3/30) of the advanced stage gastric cancers, which were all positive for LOH, showed PTEN mutation.CONCLUSION: LOH of PTEN gene appears in precancerous lesions, and PTEN mutations are restricted to advanced gastric cancer, LOH and mutation of PTEN gene are closely related to the infiltration and metastasis of gastric cancer.

  17. The role of p53 tumor suppressor gene in the suppression of teratogenesis. Mechanism of suppression in the embryonic stage by p53-dependent apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Ohtsu, Yamaaki; Norimura, Toshiyuki [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    This review described the relationships between radiation-induced teratogenesis in the embryonic stage and p53-dependent apoptosis together with recent authors` findings. The p53 tumor suppressor gene in the embryonic and fetal stages: Thymocytes deficient of p53 gene are markedly resistant to radiation. While the survival rate of wild type cells decreased at 1 Gy irradiation, that of the deficient cells hardly changed even at 20 Gy. Starting from these facts, the role of p53 gene in the teratogenesis has been investigated with use of radiation-irradiated wild type and p53-deficient knock-out mice and of mdm2/p53 double knock-out mice. Types of malformation yielded were described. The relationships between radiation-induced teratogenesis and p53 in mouse fetus: Authors performed the following experiment in the p53 knock-out mice to elucidate how p53 participated in the radiation-induced teratogenesis: X-ray at 1 and 2 Gy (250 kVp, 12 mA, 0.5 mm Cu + 1.0 mm Al) was irradiated to the recipient mice at 3.5 days (early nidation) or 9.5 days (organogenesis) of gestation. Malformation in the alive and dead fetuses was observed at 18.5 days and classified according to the p53 genotype. The teratogenesis due to chemicals and radiation in p53 gene deficient mice was discussed. (K.H.)

  18. CARP Is a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Gastric Carcinoma and a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in CARP Gene Might Increase the Risk of Gastric Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-chang; Gan, Lu; Shi, Yi; Yang, Han-shuo; Wei, Yu-quan

    2014-01-01

    Background The caspase-associated recruitment domain-containing protein (CARP) is expressed in almost all tissues. Recently, the tumor-suppressive function of CARP was discovered and attracted increasing attention. This study aimed to investigate the role of CARP in the carcinogenesis of human gastric carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared with normal gastric tissue, the downregulation of CARP expression was observed in gastric carcinoma tissue by cDNA array and tissue microarray assay. In vitro, the gastric carcinoma cell line (BGC-823) was stably transfected with pcDNA3.1B-CARP or plus CARP siRNA, and we used MTT, flow cytometry, cell migration on type I collagen, cell-matrix adhesion assay and western blot analysis to investigate the potential anti-tumor effects of CARP. The data showed that overexpressing CARP suppressed the malignancy of gastric carcinoma BGC-823 cell line, including significant increases in apoptosis, as well as obvious decreases in cell proliferation, migration, adhesion ability, and tumor growth. The tumor-suppressive effects of CARP were almost restored by siRNA-directed CARP silence. In addition, overexpression of CARP induced G1 arrest, decreased the expressions of cyclin E and CDK2, and increased the expressions of p27, p53 and p21. In vivo, the tumor-suppressive effect of CARP was also verified. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype of CARP (rs2297882) was located in the Kozak sequence of the CARP gene. The reporter gene assay showed that rs2297882 TT caused an obvious downregulation of activity of CARP gene promoter in BGC-823 cells. Furthermore, the association between rs2297882 and human gastric carcinoma susceptibility was analyzed in 352 cases and 889 controls. It displayed that the TT genotype of rs2297882 in the CARP gene was associated with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma. Conclusions/Significance CARP is a potential tumor suppressor of gastric carcinoma and the rs2297882 C>T phenotype of CARP may

  19. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  20. SIRT1, Is It a Tumor Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Xia Deng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 has been considered as a tumor promoter because of its increased expression in some types of cancers and its role in inactivating proteins that are involved in tumor suppression and DNA damage repair. However, recent studies demonstrated that SIRT1 levels are reduced in some other types of cancers, and that SIRT1 deficiency results in genetic instability and tumorigenesis, while overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates cancer formation in mice heterozygous for tumor suppressor p53 or APC. Here, I review these recent findings and discuss the possibility that activation of SIRT1 both extends lifespan and inhibits cancer formation.

  1. BRCA1 tumor suppressor network: focusing on its tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germline mutations of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are a major cause of familial breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1 plays critical roles in the DNA damage response that regulates activities of multiple repair and checkpoint pathways for maintaining genome stability. The BRCT domains of BRCA1 constitute a phospho-peptide binding domain recognizing a phospho-SPxF motif (S, serine; P, proline; × varies; F, phenylalanine. The BRCT domains are frequently targeted by clinically important mutations and most of these mutations disrupt the binding surface of the BRCT domains to phosphorylated peptides. The BRCT domain and its capability to bind phosphorylated protein is required for the tumor suppressor function of BRCA1. Through its BRCT phospho-binding ability BRCA1 forms at least three mutually exclusive complexes by binding to phosphorylated proteins Abraxas, Bach1 and CTIP. The A, B and C complexes, at lease partially undertake BRCA1's role in mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair that maintain genome stability, thus may play important roles in BRCA1's tumor suppressor function.

  2. 肺癌相关抑癌基因的研究进展%Research advancement on tumor suppressor gene in lung caner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波; 吴剑卿

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lung cancer involves a multistep process of genetic and molecular changes in multigenes.Effects of conventional therapies are not obvious.therefore the critical-gene therapy comes into being because of demand.The defection of tumor suppressor genes is one of causative agents in lung cancer,which is also a key target in gene therapy.This article reviews the current research progresses in anti-oncogenes of lung cancer.%肺癌的发病是多基因共同作用的结果,涉及到多个基因的遗传与分子变化.传统疗法效果不佳,因此针对问题基因进行治疗的手段应运而生.抑癌基因的失活是肺癌的重要致病因素之一,是基因治疗的一个重要靶点.本文就肺癌中具有重要意义的抑癌基因的最新研究进展作一综述.

  3. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution.

  4. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Feldman

    Full Text Available Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution.

  5. The ING tumor suppressors in cellular senescence and chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Susann; Klitzsch, Alexandra; Baniahmad, Aria

    2011-07-18

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins represent a type II tumor suppressor family comprising five conserved genes, ING1 to ING5. While ING1, ING2 and ING3 proteins are stable components of the mSIN3a-HDAC complexes, the association of ING1, ING4 and ING5 with HAT protein complexes was also reported. Among these the ING1 and ING2 have been analyzed more deeply. Similar to other tumor suppressor factors the ING proteins are also involved in many cellular pathways linked to cancer and cell proliferation such as cell cycle regulation, cellular senescence, DNA repair, apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and modulation of chromatin.A common structural feature of ING factors is the conserved plant homeodomain (PHD), which can bind directly to the histone mark trimethylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me3). PHD mutants lose the ability to undergo cellular senescence linking chromatin mark recognition with cellular senescence. ING1 and ING2 are localized in the cell nucleus and associated with chromatin modifying enzymes, linking tumor suppression directly to chromatin regulation. In line with this, the expression of ING1 in tumors is aberrant or identified point mutations are mostly localized in the PHD finger and affect histone binding. Interestingly, ING1 protein levels increase in replicative senescent cells, latter representing an efficient pathway to inhibit cancer proliferation. In association with this, suppression of p33ING1 expression prolongs replicative life span and is also sufficient to bypass oncogene-induced senescence. Recent analyses of ING1- and ING2-deficient mice confirm a tumor suppressive role of ING1 and ING2 and also indicate an essential role of ING2 in meiosis.Here we summarize the activity of ING1 and ING2 as tumor suppressors, chromatin factors and in development.

  6. RB1: a prototype tumor suppressor and an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) was the first tumor suppressor gene to be molecularly defined. RB1 mutations occur in almost all familial and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma, and this gene is mutated at variable frequencies in a variety of other human cancers. Because of its early discovery, the recessive nature of RB1 mutations, and its frequency of inactivation, RB1 is often described as a prototype for the class of tumor suppressor genes. Its gene product (pRB) regulates transcription and is a negative regulator of cell proliferation. Although these general features are well established, a precise description of pRB's mechanism of action has remained elusive. Indeed, in many regards, pRB remains an enigma. This review summarizes some recent developments in pRB research and focuses on progress toward answers for the three fundamental questions that sit at the heart of the pRB literature: What does pRB do? How does the inactivation of RB change the cell? How can our knowledge of RB function be exploited to provide better treatment for cancer patients?

  7. RNA-binding protein HuR sequesters microRNA-21 to prevent translation repression of proinflammatory tumor suppressor gene programmed cell death 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poria, D K; Guha, A; Nandi, I; Ray, P S

    2016-03-31

    Translation control of proinflammatory genes has a crucial role in regulating the inflammatory response and preventing chronic inflammation, including a transition to cancer. The proinflammatory tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is important for maintaining the balance between inflammation and tumorigenesis. PDCD4 messenger RNA translation is inhibited by the oncogenic microRNA, miR-21. AU-rich element-binding protein HuR was found to interact with the PDCD4 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and prevent miR-21-mediated repression of PDCD4 translation. Cells stably expressing miR-21 showed higher proliferation and reduced apoptosis, which was reversed by HuR expression. Inflammatory stimulus caused nuclear-cytoplasmic relocalization of HuR, reversing the translation repression of PDCD4. Unprecedentedly, HuR was also found to bind to miR-21 directly, preventing its interaction with the PDCD4 3'-UTR, thereby preventing the translation repression of PDCD4. This suggests that HuR might act as a 'miRNA sponge' to regulate miRNA-mediated translation regulation under conditions of stress-induced nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of HuR, which would allow fine-tuned gene expression in complex regulatory environments.

  8. Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Genes p53 and RB in Lymphocytes from Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Evidence of Molecular Senescence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Kordinas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from renal failure exhibit an impaired immune system function. We wanted to investigate the transcription of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and RB to record, if these cells could be stimulated in vitro in order to divide, after the addition of antigenic and inflammatory factors. This expression was measured by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from three different groups: ten healthy individuals, ten patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and ten dialysis patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. The transcription rate of these genes was also measured after the cultivation of PBMCs under four different conditions: just with the culture medium, with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, with C-reactive protein (CRP, and with lipoxin A4 (LXA4-LPS. Our results show that in most cases after the cultivation with additives, the transcription levels were higher in dialysis patients compared to those of the other two groups. Our findings serve as indications of cellular senescence on a molecular level, while it seems that these cells are less easily stimulated in vitro in order to duplicate.

  9. Role of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene in tumor metabolic reprogramming%肿瘤代谢重编程中的癌基因与抑癌基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐欣元; 沈岚; 药立波

    2016-01-01

    目前对肿瘤特有的代谢模式的认识日益广泛深入,尤其是肿瘤细胞代谢重编程的过程和机制受到关注。癌基因与抑癌基因在影响肿瘤发生发展的过程中也不断改变着肿瘤的物质代谢途径和流量,使之适应肿瘤生长需求。本文讨论c-MYC、TP53、HIF-1α等癌基因或抑癌基因及其相关通路在肿瘤代谢重编程中的作用。%With the understanding of tumor metabolism, the process and mechanism of tumor metabolic reprogramming gradually attracted much attention in recent years.Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are constantly changing the pathway and flux of tumor metabolism in tumorigenesis to meet the needs of tumor growth and proliferation.The role of c-MYC, TP53, HIF-1αas well as the related signal pathways in tumor metabolic reprogramming would be discussed.

  10. Are there any more ovarian tumor suppressor genes? A new perspective using ultra high-resolution copy number and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Williams, Louise H; Sridhar, Anita; Boyle, Samantha E; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Li, Jason; Anglesio, Michael S; Campbell, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by complex genetic alterations, including copy number loss and copy number-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). These alterations are assumed to represent the "second hit" of the underlying tumor suppressor gene (TSG), however, relative to the number of LOH hotspots reported, few ovarian TSGs have been identified. We conducted a high-resolution LOH analysis using SNP arrays (500K and SNP6.0) of 106 primary ovarian tumors of various histological subtypes together with matching normal DNA. LOH was detected in at least 35% of samples on chromosomes 17, 19p, 22q, Xp, 13q, 8p, 6q, 4q, 5q, 1p, 16q, and 9q with a median minimal region of overlap of only 300 kb. Subtype-specific differences in LOH frequency were noted, particularly for mucinous cases. We also identified 192 somatic homozygous deletions (HDs). Recurrent HDs targeted known TSGs such as CDKN2A (eight samples), RB1 (five samples), and PTEN (three samples). Additional recurrent HDs targeted 16 candidate TSGs near minimal regions of LOH on chromosomes 17, 13, 8p, 5q, and X. Given the importance of HDs in inactivating known genes, these candidates are highly likely to be ovarian TSGs. Our data suggest that the poor success of previous LOH studies was due to the inability of previous technology to resolve complex genomic alterations and distinguish true LOH from allelic imbalance. This study shows that recurrent regions of LOH and HD frequently align with known TSGs suggesting that LOH analysis remains a valid approach to discovering new candidates.

  11. The Cell Death Inhibitor ARC Is Induced in a Tissue-Specific Manner by Deletion of the Tumor Suppressor Gene Men1, but Not Required for Tumor Development and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M McKimpson

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a genetic disorder characterized by tissue-specific tumors in the endocrine pancreas, parathyroid, and pituitary glands. Although tumor development in these tissues is dependent upon genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Men1, loss of both alleles of this gene is not sufficient to induce these cancers. Men1 encodes menin, a nuclear protein that influences transcription. A previous ChIP on chip analysis suggested that menin binds promoter sequences of nol3, encoding ARC, which is a cell death inhibitor that has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. We hypothesized that ARC functions as a co-factor with Men1 loss to induce the tissue-restricted distribution of tumors seen in MEN1. Using mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome, we found that biallelic deletion of Men1 results in selective induction of ARC expression in tissues that develop tumors. Specifically, loss of Men1 in all cells of the pancreas resulted in marked increases in ARC mRNA and protein in the endocrine, but not exocrine, pancreas. Similarly, ARC expression increased in the parathyroid with inactivation of Men1 in that tissue. To test if ARC contributes to MEN1 tumor development in the endocrine pancreas, we generated mice that lacked none, one, or both copies of ARC in the context of Men1 deletion. Studies in a cohort of 126 mice demonstrated that, although mice lacking Men1 developed insulinomas as expected, elimination of ARC in this context did not significantly alter tumor load. Cellular rates of proliferation and death in these tumors were also not perturbed in the absence of ARC. These results indicate that ARC is upregulated by loss Men1 in the tissue-restricted distribution of MEN1 tumors, but that ARC is not required for tumor development in this syndrome.

  12. The Cell Death Inhibitor ARC Is Induced in a Tissue-Specific Manner by Deletion of the Tumor Suppressor Gene Men1, but Not Required for Tumor Development and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimpson, Wendy M; Yuan, Ziqiang; Zheng, Min; Crabtree, Judy S; Libutti, Steven K; Kitsis, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a genetic disorder characterized by tissue-specific tumors in the endocrine pancreas, parathyroid, and pituitary glands. Although tumor development in these tissues is dependent upon genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Men1, loss of both alleles of this gene is not sufficient to induce these cancers. Men1 encodes menin, a nuclear protein that influences transcription. A previous ChIP on chip analysis suggested that menin binds promoter sequences of nol3, encoding ARC, which is a cell death inhibitor that has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. We hypothesized that ARC functions as a co-factor with Men1 loss to induce the tissue-restricted distribution of tumors seen in MEN1. Using mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome, we found that biallelic deletion of Men1 results in selective induction of ARC expression in tissues that develop tumors. Specifically, loss of Men1 in all cells of the pancreas resulted in marked increases in ARC mRNA and protein in the endocrine, but not exocrine, pancreas. Similarly, ARC expression increased in the parathyroid with inactivation of Men1 in that tissue. To test if ARC contributes to MEN1 tumor development in the endocrine pancreas, we generated mice that lacked none, one, or both copies of ARC in the context of Men1 deletion. Studies in a cohort of 126 mice demonstrated that, although mice lacking Men1 developed insulinomas as expected, elimination of ARC in this context did not significantly alter tumor load. Cellular rates of proliferation and death in these tumors were also not perturbed in the absence of ARC. These results indicate that ARC is upregulated by loss Men1 in the tissue-restricted distribution of MEN1 tumors, but that ARC is not required for tumor development in this syndrome.

  13. Molecular Characterization of the Tumor Suppressor Candidate 5 Gene: Regulation by PPARγ and Identification of TUSC5 Coding Variants in Lean and Obese Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina A. Knotts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor candidate 5 (TUSC5 is a gene expressed abundantly in white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, and peripheral afferent neurons. Strong adipocyte expression and increased expression following peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonist treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes suggested a role for Tusc5 in fat cell proliferation and/or metabolism. However, the regulation of Tusc5 in WAT and its potential association with obesity phenotypes remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the TUSC5 gene is a bona fide PPARγ target and evaluated whether its WAT expression or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the TUSC5 coding region are associated with human obesity. Induction of Tusc5 mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by troglitazone and GW1929 followed a dose-response consistent with these agents' binding affinities for PPARγ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments confirmed that PPARγ protein binds a ∼−1.1 kb promotor sequence of murine TUSC5 transiently during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis, concurrent with histone H3 acetylation. No change in Tusc5 mRNA or protein levels was evident in type 2 diabetic patients treated with pioglitazone. Tusc5 expression was not induced appreciably in liver preparations overexpressing PPARs, suggesting that tissue-specific factors regulate PPARγ responsiveness of the TUSC5 gene. Finally, we observed no differences in Tusc5 WAT expression or prevalence of coding region SNPs in lean versus obese human subjects. These studies firmly establish the murine TUSC5 gene locus as a PPARγ target, but the significance of Tusc5 in obesity phenotypes or in the pharmacologic actions of PPARγ agonists in humans remains equivocal.

  14. 抑癌基因CpG岛甲基化与结直肠癌关系的研究进展%CpG island methylation of tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭星宇

    2012-01-01

    CpG island methylation can lead to epigenetic transcription inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene, and in some circumstances it maybe the only mechanism of tumor suppressor gene inactivation, which directly results in the occurrence of the tumors. This paper overviews the relations of the CpG island methylation of the tumor suppressor gene such as Syk; and of pi5 with colorectal cancer, and also presents related problems and future considerations.%CpG岛甲基化可导致抑癌基因的表观遗传学转录失活,在某些情况下可能是抑癌基因失活的惟一机制,直接导致肿瘤的发生.笔者对Syk,p15,hMLH1,APC,DCC,p16等抑癌基因CpG岛甲基化与结直肠癌的关系进行简要综述,并提出存在的问题和展望.

  15. 视肉膜母细胞瘤(RB)抑癌基因治疗原理及策略%Principles and Strategies for Approaching Retinoblastoma (RB) Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐洪基; 缪庆; 胡诗学; 刘秉慈

    1999-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) gene was the first tumor suppressor gene identified.It encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein which is differentially phosphorylated during the cell cycle.And the RB gene apparently plays a key role in cell growth regulation.Mutations in RB are seen in virtually all cases of retinoblastoma,and loss of RB gene function has been implicated in the progression of many common human cancers.A number of studies have indicated that replacement of the normal RB gene in RB-defective tumor cells could suppress their tumorigenic activity in nude mice.Preclinical studies also demonstrated that treatment of established human xenograft tumors in nude mice by recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing RB protein resulted in regression of the treated tumor.These studies make the emerging RB gene therapy even more attraction.

  16. The tumor suppressor CDKN3 controls mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Grzegorz; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Enzor, Rikki; Dey, Dilip; He, Ying; Gehlhausen, Jeff R; Lehmann, Amalia S; Park, Su-Jung; Yang, Yanzhu; Yang, Xianlin; Chen, Shi; Guan, Xiaowei; Chen, Yanwen; Renbarger, Jamie; Yang, Feng-Chun; Parada, Luis F; Clapp, Wade

    2013-06-24

    Mitosis is controlled by a network of kinases and phosphatases. We screened a library of small interfering RNAs against a genome-wide set of phosphatases to comprehensively evaluate the role of human phosphatases in mitosis. We found four candidate spindle checkpoint phosphatases, including the tumor suppressor CDKN3. We show that CDKN3 is essential for normal mitosis and G1/S transition. We demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDKN3 changes throughout the cell cycle. We show that CDKN3 dephosphorylates threonine-161 of CDC2 during mitotic exit and we visualize CDC2(pThr-161) at kinetochores and centrosomes in early mitosis. We performed a phosphokinome-wide mass spectrometry screen to find effectors of the CDKN3-CDC2 signaling axis. We found that one of the identified downstream phosphotargets, CKβ phosphorylated at serine 209, localizes to mitotic centrosomes and controls the spindle checkpoint. Finally, we show that CDKN3 protein is down-regulated in brain tumors. Our findings indicate that CDKN3 controls mitosis through the CDC2 signaling axis. These results have implications for targeted anticancer therapeutics.

  17. Mutations in NOTCH1 PEST-domain orchestrate CCL19-driven homing of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells by modulating the tumor suppressor gene DUSP22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruga, F; Gizdic, B; Bologna, C; Cignetto, S; Buonincontri, R; Serra, S; Vaisitti, T; Gizzi, K; Vitale, N; Garaffo, G; Mereu, E; Diop, F; Neri, F; Incarnato, D; Coscia, M; Allan, J; Piva, R; Oliviero, S; Furman, R R; Rossi, D; Gaidano, G; Deaglio, S

    2016-12-26

    Even if NOTCH1 is commonly mutated in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), its functional impact in the disease remains unclear. Using CRISPR/Cas9-generated Mec-1 cell line models, we show that NOTCH1 regulates growth and homing of CLL cells by dictating expression levels of the tumor suppressor gene DUSP22. Specifically, NOTCH1 affects the methylation of DUSP22 promoter by modulating a nuclear complex, which tunes the activity of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A). These effects are enhanced by PEST-domain mutations, which stabilize the molecule and prolong signaling. CLL patients with a NOTCH1-mutated clone showed low levels of DUSP22 and active chemotaxis to CCL19. Lastly, in xenograft models, NOTCH1-mutated cells displayed a unique homing behavior, localizing preferentially to the spleen and brain. These findings connect NOTCH1, DUSP22, and CCL19-driven chemotaxis within a single functional network, suggesting that modulation of the homing process may provide a relevant contribution to the unfavorable prognosis associated with NOTCH1 mutations in CLL.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 26 December 2016. doi:10.1038/leu.2016.383.

  18. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawwar Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5 µM for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RARβ, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs and histone deacetylases (HDACs were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy.

  19. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Khan, Munawwar; Kedhari Sundaram, Madhumitha; Hamza, Amina; Quraishi, Uzma; Gunasekera, Dian; Ramesh, Laveena; Goala, Payal; Al Alami, Usama; Ansari, Mohammad Zeeshan; Rizvi, Tahir A; Sharma, Chhavi; Hussain, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5 µM) for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RARβ, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy.

  20. Induction of PDCD4 tumor suppressor gene expression by RAR agonists, antiestrogen and HER-2/neu antagonist in breast cancer cells. Evidence for a role in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonja, Olubunmi; Juste, Dominique; Das, Sharmistha; Matsuhashi, Sachiko; Samuels, Herbert H

    2004-10-21

    The growth of human breast tumor cells is regulated through signaling involving cell surface growth factor receptors and nuclear receptors of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor gene family. Retinoic acid receptors (RARs), members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor gene family, are ligand-dependent transcription factors, which have in vitro and in vivo growth inhibitory activity against breast cancer cells. RAR-agonists inhibit the proliferation of many human breast cancer cell lines, particularly those whose growth is stimulated by estradiol (E2) or growth factors. Additionally, RAR-agonists and synthetic retinoids such as Ferentinide have been shown to induce apoptosis in malignant breast cells but not normal breast cells. To better define the genes involved in RAR-mediated growth inhibition of breast cancer cells, we used oligonucleotide microarray analysis to create a database of genes that are potentially regulated by RAR-agonists in breast cancer cells. We found that PDCD4 (programmed cell death 4), a tumor suppressor gene presently being evaluated as a target for chemoprevention, was induced about three-fold by the RARalpha-selective agonist Am580, in T-47D breast cancer cells. RAR pan-agonists and Am580, but not retinoid X receptors (RXR)-agonists, stimulate the expression of PDCD4 in a wide variety of retinoid-inhibited breast cancer cell lines. RAR-agonists did not induce PDCD4 expression in breast cancer cell lines, which were not growth inhibited by retinoids. We also observed that antiestrogen and the HER-2/neu antagonist, Herceptin (Trastuzumab), also induced PDCD4 expression in T-47D cells, suggesting that PDCD4 may play a central role in growth inhibition in breast cancer cells. Transient overexpression of PDCD4 in T-47D (ER+, RAR+) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-, RAR-) cells resulted in apoptotic death, suggesting a role for PDCD4 in mediating apoptosis in breast cancer cells. PDCD4 protein expression has previously been reported in small ductal

  1. Tumor suppressor p53 and its gain-of-function mutants in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppression. p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its role in tumor suppression through transcriptional regulation of its downstream target genes. Thus, p53 and its target genes form a complex p53 signaling pathway to regulate a wide variety of biological processes to prevent tumorigenesis. Recent studies have revealed that in addition to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence, p...

  2. Differences in expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in different sites of head and neck squamous cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, R P; Baatenburg de Jong, R J; Schuuring, E; Litvinov, S V; Hermans, J; Van Krieken, J H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In most studies concerning chromosomal changes or protein expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) no distinction is made between the sites within this area. The behaviour of tumors arising in one site or the other, however, differs significantly, suggesting different

  3. Decreased expression of type Ⅱ tumor suppressor gene RARRES3 in tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Yuan Jiang; Jung-Mao Chou; Fur-Jiang Leu; Yu-Yen Hsu; Yu-Lung Shih; Jyh-Cherng Yu; Meei-Shyuan Lee; Rong-Yaun Shyu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression of retinoic acid receptor responder 3 (RARRES3) protein in paraffin-embedded tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma(CC), and the correlation of RARRES3 production with tumor differentiation.METHODS: Expression of RARRES3 in tissues from 21CC (10 well-, 7 moderately- and 4 poorly-differentiated)and 32 HCC was determined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Among 21 CC tissues, RARRES3 was detected in 8 (80%) of 10 well-differentiated tumors. Only 2 (18.2%)out of 11 tumors with moderate or poor differentiation showed positive RARRES3 expression. RARRES3 expression in well-differentiated CC was significantly higher than that in tumors with moderate or poor differentiation (Fisher exact test, P<0.01). Expression of RARRES3 was not different between early (Ⅰ and Ⅱ) and late (Ⅲ and Ⅳ) stages of CC.Among 30 HCC tissues, 17 (56.7%) weakly expressed RARRES3 in HCC cells, and 25 (83.3%) normal tissues adjacent to HCC expressed the protein. RARRES3 expression was significantly decreased in HCC tissues compared to that in adjacent normal tissues (logistic regression analysis, OR = 0.27, 95% CI (0.11-0.62), P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Expression of RARRES3 is positively correlated to well-differentiated CC, which supports the role of RARRES3 in malignant epithelial differentiation of the tumor. The decrease in RARRES3 expression in tissues of HCC and CC with moderate and poor differentiation suggests that altered RARRES3 expression may play a role in the carcinogenesis of the liver and biliary tract.

  4. TANGO is a tumor suppressor of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2006-12-15

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new family member of the melanoma inhibitory activity gene family. The gene codes for a 14 kDa protein of so far unknown function. In our study we revealed that TANGO was downregulated or lost in 9 melanoma cell lines when compared to normal melanocytes and in most of the 8 tumor samples analyzed. The losses were associated with advanced stage of the disease. These results were confirmed in situ by immunohistochemistry on 10 paraffin-embedded sections of human malignant melanoma primary tumors and melanoma skin metastases. A small reduction of TANGO was also seen in different benign and atypical nevi when compared to normal skin. For functional analysis of TANGO we evaluated TANGO re-expressing melanoma cell clones and antisense TANGO cell clones with a complete loss of TANGO. Functional assays with TANGO transfected or treated cell lines revealed that TANGO expression reduces motility, whereas reduction of TANGO enhances migration. Our studies, therefore, indicate that reduction of TANGO expression contributes to tumor progression. These results taken together provide the first indications for a tumor suppressor role of TANGO gene in human malignant melanoma.

  5. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated reductions in G9A histone methyltransferase and histone H3 K9 di-methylation levels are linked to tumor suppressor gene reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, R J; Klimecki, W T; Lau, S S; Feinstein, Y; Futscher, B W

    2007-01-04

    The epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common event during carcinogenesis, and often involves aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification of gene regulatory regions, resulting in the formation of a transcriptionally repressive chromatin state. Two examples include the antimetastatic, tumor suppressor genes, desmocollin 3 (DSC3) and MASPIN, which are frequently silenced in this manner in human breast cancer. Treatment of the breast tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231 and UACC 1179 with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) induced transcriptional reactivation of both genes in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, DSC3 and MASPIN reactivation was closely and consistently linked with significant decreases in promoter H3 K9 di-methylation. Moreover, 5-aza-CdR treatment also resulted in global decreases in H3 K9 di-methylation, an effect that was linked to its ability to mediate dose-dependent, post-transcriptional decreases in the key enzyme responsible for this epigenetic modification, G9A. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of G9A and DNMT1 led to increased MASPIN expression in MDA-MB-231 cells, to levels that were supra-additive, verifying the importance of these enzymes in maintaining multiple layers of epigenetic repression in breast tumor cells. These results highlight an additional, complimentary mechanism of action for 5-aza-CdR in the reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes, in a manner that is independent of its effects on DNA methylation, further supporting an important role for H3 K9 methylation in the aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

  6. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Changhua, E-mail: chkoukou@hotmail.com [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Zhou, Tian [Department of Gastroenterology, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Han, Xilin; Zhuang, Huijie [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Qian, Haixin, E-mail: qianhaixin@hotmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer.

  7. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  8. The role of tumor suppressor p53 in the antioxidant defense and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated in most cancers and the critical role of p53 in the suppression of carcinogenesis has been confirmed in many mouse models. The protein product of the tumor suppressor p53 gene works as a transcriptional regulator, activating expression of numerous genes involved in cell death, cell cycle arrest, senescence, DNA-repair and many other processes. In spite of the multiple efforts to characterize the functions of p53, the mechanisms of tumor suppression by p53 a...

  9. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu [Department of Pharmacy, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Research Center for Medicinal Biotechnology, Shandong Academy of Medicinal Sciences, Jinan 250012 (China); Ma, Quanping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Han, Bo, E-mail: boh@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  10. Deletions in chromosome 4 differentially associated with the development of cervical cancer: evidence of slit2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roy, Anup; Roychowdhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) loci in the chromosomal 4p15-16, 4q22-23 and 4q34-35 regions associated with the development of uterine cervical carcinoma (CA-CX). Deletion mapping of the regions by microsatellite markers identified six discrete areas with high frequency of deletions, viz. 4p16.2 (D1: 40%), 4p15.31 (D2: 35-38%), 4p15.2 (D3: 37-40%), 4q22.2 (D4: 34%), 4q34.2-34.3 (D5: 37-59%) and 4q35.1 (D6: 40-50%). Significant correlation was noted among the deleted regions D1, D2 and D3. The deletions in D1, D2, D5 and D6 regions are suggested to be associated with the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and deletions in the D2, D3, D5 and D6 regions seems to be associated with progression of CA-CX. The deletions in the D2 and D6 regions showed significant prognostic implications (P = 0.001; 0.02). The expression of the candidate TSG SLIT2 mapped to D2 region gradually reduced from normal cervix uteri -->CIN --> CA-CX. SLIT2 promoter hypermethylation was seen in 28% CIN samples and significantly increased with tumor progression (P = 0.04). Significant correlation was seen between SLIT2 deletion and its promoter methylation (P = 0.001), indicating that both these phenomena could occur simultaneously to inactivate this gene. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of SLIT2 in cervical lesions and CA-CX cell lines. Although no mutation was detected in the SLIT2 promoter region (-432 to + 55 bp), CC and AA haplotypes were seen in -227 and -195 positions, respectively. Thus, it indicates that inactivation of SLIT2-ROBO1 signaling pathway may have an important role in CA-CX development.

  11. The tumor suppressor gene TRC8/RNF139 is disrupted by a constitutional balanced translocation t(8;22(q24.13;q11.21 in a young girl with dysgerminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorio Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNF139/TRC8 is a potential tumor suppressor gene with similarity to PTCH, a tumor suppressor implicated in basal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. TRC8 has the potential to act in a novel regulatory relationship linking the cholesterol/lipid biosynthetic pathway with cellular growth control and has been identified in families with hereditary renal (RCC and thyroid cancers. Haploinsufficiency of TRC8 may facilitate development of clear cell-RCC in association with VHL mutations, and may increase risk for other tumor types. We report a paternally inherited balanced translocation t(8;22 in a proposita with dysgerminoma. Methods The translocation was characterized by FISH and the breakpoints cloned, sequenced, and compared. DNA isolated from normal and tumor cells was checked for abnormalities by array-CGH. Expression of genes TRC8 and TSN was tested both on dysgerminoma and in the proposita and her father. Results The breakpoints of the translocation are located within the LCR-B low copy repeat on chromosome 22q11.21, containing the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR involved in recurrent and non-recurrent translocations, and in an AT-rich sequence inside intron 1 of the TRC8 tumor-suppressor gene at 8q24.13. TRC8 was strongly underexpressed in the dysgerminoma. Translin is underexpressed in the dysgerminoma compared to normal ovary. TRC8 is a target of Translin (TSN, a posttranscriptional regulator of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau in postmeiotic male germ cells. Conclusion A role for TRC8 in dysgerminoma may relate to its interaction with Translin. We propose a model in which one copy of TRC8 is disrupted by a palindrome-mediated translocation followed by complete loss of expression through suppression, possibly mediated by miRNA.

  12. MicroRNA-375 Functions as a Tumor-Suppressor Gene in Gastric Cancer by Targeting Recepteur d’Origine Nantais

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Sen; Park, Jung Sun; Xia, Yong; Nguyen, Thi Thinh; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Kyung Keun; Kim, Hark Kyun; Jung, Young Do

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports a fundamental role for microRNAs (miRNA) in regulating cancer metastasis. Recently, microRNA-375 (miR-375) was reported to be downregulated in many types of cancers, including gastric cancer. Increase in the expression of Recepteur d’Origine Nantais (RON), a receptor tyrosine kinase, has been reported in tumors. However, the function of miR-375 and RON expression in gastric cancer metastasis has not been sufficiently studied. In silico analysis identified miR-375 binding sites in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR) of the RON-encoding gene. Expression of miR-375 resulted in reduced activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′-UTR fragments of RON-encoding mRNA, confirming that miR-375 directly targets the 3′-UTR of RON mRNA. Moreover, we found that overexpression of miR-375 inhibited mRNA and protein expression of RON, which was accompanied by the suppression of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in gastric cancer AGS and MKN-28 cells. Ectopic miR-375 expression also induced G1 cell cycle arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). Knockdown of RON by RNAi, similar to miR-375 overexpression, suppressed tumorigenic properties and induced G1 arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of Rb. Thus, our study provides evidence that miR-375 acts as a suppressor of metastasis in gastric cancer by targeting RON, and might represent a new potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer. PMID:27689991

  13. Utility of Serum miR-125b as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Indicator and Its Alliance with a Panel of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, Mariyam; Khan, Imran; Mir, Rashid; Gandhi, Gauri; Ray, Prakash Chandra; Saxena, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and may function as either tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) or as oncogenes. Hypermethylation of miRNA silences the tumour suppressive function of a miRNA or hypermethylation of a TSG regulating that miRNA (or vice versa) leads to its loss of function. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of aberrant microRNA-125b (miR-125b) expression on various clinicopathological features in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with anomalous methylation of several TSGs. We enrolled 70 newly diagnosed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer, recorded their clinical history and 70 healthy female volunteers. Serum miR-125b levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the methylation status of various TSGs was investigated by methylation specific PCR. ROC curves were constructed to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of miR-125b. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare survival curves. Expression of miR-125b was found to be significantly upregulated (pmiR-125b was found to be significantly associated with FIGO stage, lymph node and distant metastasis. ROC curve for diagnostic potential yielded significant AUC with an equitable sensitivity and specificity. ROC curves for prognosis yielded significant AUCs for histological grade, distal metastasis, lymph node status and survival. The expression of miR-125b also correlated significantly with the hypermethylation of TSGs. Our results indicate that DNA hypermethylation may be involved in the inactivation of miR-125b and miR-125b may function as a potential independent biomarker for clinical outcome in EOC.

  14. MiRNA-181b suppresses IGF-1R and functions as a tumor suppressor gene in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhu-Mei; Wang, Xie-Feng; Qian, Xu; Tao, Tao; Wang, Lin; Chen, Qiu-Dan; Wang, Xi-Rui; Cao, Lei; Wang, Ying-Yi; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Jiang, Tao; Kang, Chun-Sheng; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Liu, Ning; You, Yong-Ping

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded, 18- to 23-nt RNA molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Previous studies have shown that microRNAs play important roles in human cancers, including gliomas. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-181b were decreased in gliomas, and we identified IGF-1R as a novel direct target of miR-181b. MiR-181b overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis by targeting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways, PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK1/2. Overexpression of IGF-1R rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-181b. In clinical specimens, IGF-1R was overexpressed, and its protein levels were inversely correlated with miR-181b expression. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-181b functions in gliomas to suppress growth by targeting the IGF-1R oncogene and that miR-181b may serve as a novel therapeutic target for gliomas.

  15. Notch1 functions as a tumor suppressor in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michael; Wolfer, Anita; Raj, Kenneth; Kummer, J Alain; Mill, Pleasantine; van Noort, Mascha; Hui, Chi-chung; Clevers, Hans; Dotto, G Paolo; Radtke, Freddy

    2003-03-01

    Notch proteins are important in binary cell-fate decisions and inhibiting differentiation in many developmental systems, and aberrant Notch signaling is associated with tumorigenesis. The role of Notch signaling in mammalian skin is less well characterized and is mainly based on in vitro studies, which suggest that Notch signaling induces differentiation in mammalian skin. Conventional gene targeting is not applicable to establishing the role of Notch receptors or ligands in the skin because Notch1-/- embryos die during gestation. Therefore, we used a tissue-specific inducible gene-targeting approach to study the physiological role of the Notch1 receptor in the mouse epidermis and the corneal epithelium of adult mice. Unexpectedly, ablation of Notch1 results in epidermal and corneal hyperplasia followed by the development of skin tumors and facilitated chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. Notch1 deficiency in skin and in primary keratinocytes results in increased and sustained expression of Gli2, causing the development of basal-cell carcinoma-like tumors. Furthermore, Notch1 inactivation in the epidermis results in derepressed beta-catenin signaling in cells that should normally undergo differentiation. Enhanced beta-catenin signaling can be reversed by re-introduction of a dominant active form of the Notch1 receptor. This leads to a reduction in the signaling-competent pool of beta-catenin, indicating that Notch1 can inhibit beta-catenin-mediated signaling. Our results indicate that Notch1 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene in mammalian skin.

  16. Fibronectin is a hypoxia-independent target of the tumor suppressor VHL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluyssen, H.A.; Lolkema, M.P.; Beest, M. van; Boone, M.; Snijckers, C.M.; Los, M.; Gebbink, M.F.; Braam, B.; Holstege, F.C.; Giles, R.H.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene regulates the extracellular matrix by controlling fibronectin deposition. To identify novel VHL target genes, we subjected mRNA from VHL-deficient RCC cells (786-0-pRC) and a transfectant re-expressing wildtype VHL (786-0-VHL) to differential express

  17. Prognostic role and implications of mutation status of tumor suppressor gene ARID1A in cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Claudio; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J; Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Netto, George J; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Duck-Woo; Yousef, George M; Scorilas, Andreas; Nelson, Gregg S; Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E; Schaeffer, David F; Yan, Hai-Bo; Liu, Feng; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Zhang, Xianyu; Pang, Da; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Sergi, Giuseppe; Manzato, Enzo; Capelli, Paola; Wood, Laura D; Scarpa, Aldo; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-17

    Loss of the tumor suppressor gene AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) has been demonstrated in several cancers, but its prognostic role is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk associated with loss of ARID1A (ARID1A-) for all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and recurrence of disease in subjects with cancer. PubMed and SCOPUS search from database inception until 01/31/2015 without language restriction was conducted, contacting authors for unpublished data. Eligible were prospective studies reporting data on prognostic parameters in subjects with cancer, comparing participants with presence of ARID1A (ARID1A+) vs. ARID1A-, assessed either via immunohistochemistry (loss of expression) or with genetic testing (presence of mutation). Data were summarized using risk ratios (RR) for number of deaths/recurrences and hazard ratios (HR) for time-dependent risk related to ARID1A- adjusted for potential confounders. Of 136 hits, 25 studies with 5,651 participants (28 cohorts; ARID1A-: n = 1,701; ARID1A+: n = 3,950), with a mean follow-up period of 4.7 ± 1.8 years, were meta-analyzed. Compared to ARID1A+, ARID1A- significantly increased cancer-specific mortality (studies = 3; RR = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.00, I(2) = 31%). Using HRs adjusted for potential confounders, ARID1A- was associated with a greater risk of cancer-specific mortality (studies = 2; HR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.19-5.45, I(2) = 19%) and cancer recurrence (studies = 10; HR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.22-3.05, I(2) = 76%). On the basis of these results, we have demonstrated that loss of ARID1A shortened time to cancer-specific mortality, and to recurrence of cancer when adjusting for potential confounders. For its role, this gene should be considered as an important potential target for personalized medicine in cancer treatment.

  18. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui Feng; Cen Zhang; Rui Wu; Wenwei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed, small non-coding RNA molecules which play a key role in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs interact with p53 and its network at multiple levels. p53 regulates the transcription expression and the maturation of a group of miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNAs can regulate the activity and function of p53 through direct repression of p53 or its regulators in cells. These findings have demonstrated that miRNAs are important components in the p53 network, and also added another layer of complexity to the p53 network.

  19. Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, R.; Lee, B.M.; Debler, E.W.; Laity, J.H.; Wilson, I.A.; Dyson, H.J.; Wright, P.E.

    2009-06-04

    The zinc finger domain of the Wilms tumor suppressor protein (WT1) contains four canonical Cys{sub 2}His{sub 2} zinc fingers. WT1 binds preferentially to DNA sequences that are closely related to the EGR-1 consensus site. We report the structure determination by both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy of the WT1 zinc finger domain in complex with DNA. The X-ray structure was determined for the complex with a cognate 14 base-pair oligonucleotide, and composite X-ray/NMR structures were determined for complexes with both the 14 base-pair and an extended 17 base-pair DNA. This combined approach allowed unambiguous determination of the position of the first zinc finger, which is influenced by lattice contacts in the crystal structure. The crystal structure shows the second, third and fourth zinc finger domains inserted deep into the major groove of the DNA where they make base-specific interactions. The DNA duplex is distorted in the vicinity of the first zinc finger, with a cytidine twisted and tilted out of the base stack to pack against finger 1 and the tip of finger 2. By contrast, the composite X-ray/NMR structures show that finger 1 continues to follow the major groove in the solution complexes. However, the orientation of the helix is non-canonical, and the fingertip and the N terminus of the helix project out of the major groove; as a consequence, the zinc finger side-chains that are commonly involved in base recognition make no contact with the DNA. We conclude that finger 1 helps to anchor WT1 to the DNA by amplifying the binding affinity although it does not contribute significantly to binding specificity. The structures provide molecular level insights into the potential consequences of mutations in zinc fingers 2 and 3 that are associated with Denys-Drash syndrome and nephritic syndrome. The mutations are of two types, and either destabilize the zinc finger structure or replace key base contact residues.

  20. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  1. Hepatocarcinogenic potential of the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 in B6C3F1 mice: effect on apoptosis, expression of oncogenes and the tumor suppressor gene p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Mostafa Z

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids inhibit hepatocellular proliferation and modulate the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes via mechanisms involving the glucocorticoid receptor. Glucocorticoids also produce a receptor-mediated inhibitory effect on both basal and hormone-stimulated expression of a newly discovered family of molecules important for shutting off cytokine action. We therefore hypothesized that inhibiting glucocorticoid receptors may disturb hepatocellular growth and apoptosis. Consequently, we investigated the effect of RU486, a potent antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor, on basal levels of hepatocellular proliferation and apoptosis in male B6C3F1 mice. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of this compound on cellular genes involved in the regulation of these important processes. Results Data show that treatment of male B6F3C1 mice with RU486 (2 mg/kg/d, ip for 7 days dramatically inhibited liver cell proliferation by about 45% and programmed hepatocellular death by approximately 66%. RU 486 also significantly increased hepatic expression of the oncogenes mdm2 and JunB, while reducing that of the tumor suppressor gene p53. Conclusion Exposure to RU486 may ultimately enhance the susceptibility of the liver to cancer risk by diminishing its ability to purge itself of pre-cancerous cells via apoptosis. This effect may be mediated through increases in the hepatic expression of the oncogene mdm2, coupled with decreases in that of the tumor suppressor gene p53. The decrease in hepatocellular proliferation caused by RU 486 may be related to effects other than its anti-glucocorticoid activity.

  2. Tumor Suppressor Inactivation in the Pathogenesis of Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor functions are essential to control cellular proliferation, to activate the apoptosis or senescence pathway to eliminate unwanted cells, to link DNA damage signals to cell cycle arrest checkpoints, to activate appropriate DNA repair pathways, and to prevent the loss of adhesion to inhibit initiation of metastases. Therefore, tumor suppressor genes are indispensable to maintaining genetic and genomic integrity. Consequently, inactivation of tumor suppressors by somatic mutations or epigenetic mechanisms is frequently associated with tumor initiation and development. In contrast, reactivation of tumor suppressor functions can effectively reverse the transformed phenotype and lead to cell cycle arrest or death of cancerous cells and be used as a therapeutic strategy. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease associated with infection of CD4 T cells by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-I. HTLV-I-associated T-cell transformation is the result of a multistep oncogenic process in which the virus initially induces chronic T-cell proliferation and alters cellular pathways resulting in the accumulation of genetic defects and the deregulated growth of virally infected cells. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating the inactivation of tumor suppressors in the pathogenesis of HTLV-I.

  3. The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1: lessons from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saara Ollila; Tomi P. M(a)kel(a)

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 are important in hereditary Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,as well as in sporadic cancers including lung and cervical cancer.LKB1 is a kinase-activating Kinase,and a number of LKB1-dependent phosphorylation cascades regulate fundamental cellular and organismal processes in at least metabolism,polarity,cytoskeleton organization,and proliferation.Conditional targeting approaches are beginning to demonstrate the relevance and specificity of these signaling pathways in development and homeostasis of multiple organs.More than one of the pathways also appear to contribute to tumor growth following Lkb1 deficiencies based on a number of mouse tumor models.Lkb1-dependent activation of AMPK and subsequent inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling are implicated in several of the models,and other less well characterized pathways are also involved.Conditional targeting studies of Lkb1 also point an important role of LKB1 in epithelial-masenchymal interactions,significantly expanding knowledge on the relevance of LKB1 in human disease.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  5. Antiviral activity of tumor-suppressor pathways: clues from molecular piracy by KSHV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P S; Chang, Y

    1998-04-01

    A common feature of many tumor viruses is that they possess genes that produce specific proteins to inhibit major cellular tumor-suppressor pathways. Despite intensive studies, the reasons why these diverse and unrelated viruses have independently evolved oncogenes remains obscure. Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV8) has pirated a number of recognizable cellular genes that are key to cell survival and proliferation. In this review, we provide an overview of the known activities of these viral genes and show that many of these pirated proteins affect the same cellular pathways targeted by other, unrelated tumor viruses. We speculate that tumor-suppressor pathways are used by the cell as a primary defense against persistent virus infection, in addition to their well-known activity in regulating cell proliferation.

  6. Deciphering tumor-suppressor signaling in flies: Genetic link between Scribble/Dlg/Lgl and the Hippo pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masato Enomoto; Tatsushi Igaki

    2011-01-01

    Loss of apico-basal polarity is one of the crucial factors that drives epithelial tumor progression.scribble/discs large/lethal giant larvae (scrib/dlg/lgl),a group of apico-basal polarity genes,were initially identified as members of “neoplastic” tumor-suppressors in flies.The components of the Hippo signaling pathway,which is crucial for organ size control and cancer development,were also identified through Drosophila genetic screens as members of “hyperplastic” tumor-suppressors.Accumulating evidence in recent studies implies that these two tumor-suppressor signaling pathways are not mutually exclusive but rather cooperatively act to give rise to highly malignant tumors.The interaction of these tumor-suppressor pathways could include deregulations of actin cytoskeleton,cell-cell contact,and apical-domain size of the epithelial cell.

  7. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Very CIN-ful: whole chromosome instability promotes tumor suppressor loss of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Rocio; Schvartzman, Juan-Manuel; Benezra, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms by which whole chromosome instability lead to tumorigenesis have eluded the cancer research field. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Baker et al. show that CIN induced by a defective mitotic checkpoint, under certain genetic and tissue contexts, leads to accelerated loss of heterozygosity of a tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Macrophages, Inflammation, and Tumor Suppressors: ARF, a New Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paqui G. Través

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between tumor progression and innate immune system has been well established in the last years. Indeed, several lines of clinical evidence indicate that immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs interact with tumor cells, favoring growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers. In most tumors, TAMs show properties of an alternative polarization phenotype (M2 characterized by the expression of a series of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases that promote immunosuppression, tumor proliferation, and spreading of the cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes have been traditionally linked to the regulation of cancer progression; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that these genes also play essential roles in the regulation of innate immunity pathways through molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this paper, we provide an overview of the immunobiology of TAMs as well as what is known about tumor suppressors in the context of immune responses. Recent advances regarding the role of the tumor suppressor ARF as a regulator of inflammation and macrophage polarization are also reviewed.

  10. Macrophages, inflammation, and tumor suppressors: ARF, a new player in the game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between tumor progression and innate immune system has been well established in the last years. Indeed, several lines of clinical evidence indicate that immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) interact with tumor cells, favoring growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers. In most tumors, TAMs show properties of an alternative polarization phenotype (M2) characterized by the expression of a series of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases that promote immunosuppression, tumor proliferation, and spreading of the cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes have been traditionally linked to the regulation of cancer progression; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that these genes also play essential roles in the regulation of innate immunity pathways through molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this paper, we provide an overview of the immunobiology of TAMs as well as what is known about tumor suppressors in the context of immune responses. Recent advances regarding the role of the tumor suppressor ARF as a regulator of inflammation and macrophage polarization are also reviewed.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of histone H3 acetylation patterns in AML identifies PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Isken, Fabienne; Agelopoulos, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    With the use of ChIP on microarray assays in primary leukemia samples, we report that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts exhibit significant alterations in histone H3 acetylation (H3Ac) levels at > 1000 genomic loci compared with CD34+ progenitor cells. Importantly, core promoter regions tended......, which correlated with low mRNA and protein expression. We also observed DNA hypermethylation at the PRDX2 promoter in AML. Low protein expression of the antioxidant PRDX2 gene was clinically associated with poor prognosis in patients with AML. Functionally, PRDX2 acted as inhibitor of myeloid cell...... as an epigenetically silenced growth suppressor, suggesting a possible role of ROS in the malignant phenotype in AML....

  13. Caffeine activates tumor suppressor PTEN in sarcoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Hideji; Ohnari, Issei; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yachie, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Akt activation exerts a strong anti-apoptotic effect and inhibits key pro-apoptotic proteins. We investigated the effect of caffeine in the prevention of tumor cell proliferation and induction of cell death. We found that caffeine induced increased intracellular cAMP levels, PTEN activation and Akt inactivation, which to...

  14. Gene expression profile in a glioma cell line resistant to cell death induced by the chimeric tumor suppressor-1 (CTS-1), a dominant-positive variant of p53--the role of NFkappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seznec, Janina; Weit, Simone; Naumann, Ulrike

    2010-03-01

    The identification of genes involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression is of great interest since these genes might be feasible as candidates for new tumor-targeted therapy strategies. Chimeric tumor suppressor-1 (CTS-1), an artificial synthetic variant of p53, resists common p53 inactivation and could therefore be defined as a dominant-positive p53 variant. Overexpression of CTS-1 induces caspase-independent cell death. We used whole-genome microarray expression analysis in a parental (229(P)) and a CTS-1-resistant glioma cell line (229(Res)) to analyze alterations in gene expression in Ad-CTS-1-infected and in uninfected parental and resistant cells. In total, 700 genes were differentially expressed in infected and 313 genes in uninfected 229(Res) versus 229(P) cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis determined a variety of differentially expressed genes in Ad-CTS-1-infected cells that were members of intracellular networks with central tumor-involved players such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB), protein kinase B/AKT or transforming growth factor-beta. Here we focused on the function of NFkappaB in Ad-CTS-1-mediated cell death in glioma. NFkappaB was activated in Ad-CTS-1-infected 229(P) but not 229(Res) cells. NFkappaB activation was accompanied by the induction of cell death in parental cells. Inhibition of NFkappaB activity by expression of an IkappaB super repressor or upregulation of the NFkappaB-linked gene Bex protected parental cells to Ad-CTS-1-induced cell death, whereas knockdown of Bex sensitized both parental and resistant cells. Taken together, these data suggest that activation of the normally antiapoptotic protein NFkappaB does not always necessarily protect cells from apoptosis but, in the glioma cell lines tested so far, and in an environment where p53 is constitutively active, also leads to the induction of cell death.

  15. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Nan, Xu [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Xuefen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun, Lisha [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Han, Wenlin [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Tiejun, E-mail: litiejun22@vip.sina.com [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Features and Usage Areas of MicroRNAs as Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Seyda Seydel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA are small non-coding RNA of 19–24 nucleotides in length that were discovered 12 years ago by Victor Ambros and colleagues. They are important regulatory molecules in animals and plants. MicroRNAs are downregulate gene expression during various crucial cell processes such as apoptosis, differentiation and development. In addition, some miRNAs may function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. More than 50% of miRNA genes are located in cancer-associated genomic regions or in fragile sites. Overexpressed miRNAs in cancers, such as mir17–92, may function as oncogenes and promote cancer development by negatively regulating tumor suppressor genes and genes that control cell differentiation or apoptosis. Underexpressed miRNAs in cancers, such as let–7, function as tumor suppressor genes and may inhibit cancers by regulating oncogenes and genes that control cell differentiation or apoptosis. miRNA expression profiles may become useful biomarkers for cancer diagnostics. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(1.000: 1-12

  17. RASSF6; the Putative Tumor Suppressor of the RASSF Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Iwasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans have 10 genes that belong to the Ras association (RA domain family (RASSF. Among them, RASSF7 to RASSF10 have the RA domain in the N-terminal region and are called the N-RASSF proteins. In contradistinction to them, RASSF1 to RASSF6 are referred to as the C-RASSF proteins. The C-RASSF proteins have the RA domain in the middle region and the Salvador/RASSF/Hippo domain in the C-terminal region. RASSF6 additionally harbors the PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif. Expression of RASSF6 is epigenetically suppressed in human cancers and is generally regarded as a tumor suppressor. RASSF6 induces caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis. RASSF6 interacts with mammalian Ste20-like kinases (homologs of Drosophila Hippo and cross-talks with the Hippo pathway. RASSF6 binds MDM2 and regulates p53 expression. The interactions with Ras and Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP1 are also suggested by heterologous protein-protein interaction experiments. RASSF6 regulates apoptosis and cell cycle through these protein-protein interactions, and is implicated in the NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. We summarize our current knowledge about RASSF6 and discuss what common and different properties RASSF6 and the other C-RASSF proteins have.

  18. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  19. An immunohistochemical analysis of sex-steroid receptors, tumor suppressor gene p53 and Ki-67 in the normal and neoplastic uterine cervix squamous epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Malignant transformation of sex-steroid dependent tissues is associated with the loss of expression of sex steroid receptors as well as of the tumor suppression gene p53. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of sex-steroid receptors, p53 and Ki-67 in specimens from pre-malignant and malignant cervical epithelial lesions throughout the menstrual cycle. Material and Methods. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on formalin f...

  20. P53 and Rb tumor suppressor gene alterations in gastric cancer Alterações dos genes supressores tumorais p53 e Rb no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Mattar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes has been frequently observed in gastric carcinogenesis. Our purpose was to study the involvement of p53, APC, DCC, and Rb genes in gastric carcinoma. METHOD: Loss of heterozygosity of the p53, APC, DCC and Rb genes was studied in 22 gastric cancer tissues using polymerase chain reaction; single-strand conformation polymorphism of the p53 gene exons 5-6 and exons 7-8 was studied using 35S-dATP, and p53 expression was detected using a histological immunoperoxidase method with an anti-p53 clone. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No loss of heterozygosity was observed in any of these tumor suppressor genes; homozygous deletion was detected in the Rb gene in 23% (3/13 of the cases of intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Eighteen (81.8% cases showed band mobility shifts in exons 5-6 and/or 7-8 of the p53 gene. The presence of the p53 protein was positive in gastric cancer cells in 14 cases (63.6%. Normal gastric mucosa showed negative staining for p53; thus, the immunoreactivity was likely to represent mutant forms. The correlation of band mobility shift and the immunoreactivity to anti-p53 was not significant (P = .90. There was no correlation of gene alterations with the disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivation of Rb and p53 genes is involved in gastric carcinogenesis in our environment. Loss of the Rb gene observed only in the intestinal-type gastric cancer should be further evaluated in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The p53 gene was affected in both intestinal and diffuse histological types of gastric cancer.A inativação de genes supressores tumorais tem sido freqüentemente observada na carcinogênese gástrica. O nosso objetivo foi estudar o envolvimento dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb no câncer gástrico. MÉTODO: Vinte e dois casos de câncer gástrico foram estudados por PCR-LOH (reação de polimerase em cadeia- perda de alelo heterozigoto dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb; e por PCR-SSCP (rea

  1. Effects of si-DNMT1 to Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma%si-DNMT1对肝门部胆管癌细胞抑癌基因甲基化的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向吉锋; 罗放; 王济明; 李修红

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of RNA interference on hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes of hilar cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939,to explore its value in the treatment of rholangiocarcinoma. Methods hairpin siRNA expression vector targeting hDNMTl was constructed ,and then transfected into hilar cholangiocareinoma cell line QBC939 using liposome. The expression level of hDNMTl,CDH1 , pl5 was detected by RT-PCR at different time points. The methylation status of tumor suppressor genes CDH1 ,p15 was detected by MSP. The cell proliferation ability was detected by MTT. Results 1 ) Targeted gene knockout of hDNMTl restored the expression level of tumor suppressor genes CDH1 and pl5. 2 ) The expression silencing of CDH1 ,pl5 is caused by promoter hypermethylation. 3 ) Transfection with hairpin siR-NA plasmid expression vector targeting hDNMTl can effectively inhibit the cell proliferation ability of QBC939. Conclusion The transfection of hairpin siRNA plasmid expression vector targeting hDNMTl can play a effective,sustainable and stable role on gene silencing,and restore the expression level of tumor suppressor,thereby,inhibit the proliferation of QBC939.%目的 研究RNA干扰对肝门部胆管癌细胞株QBC939抑癌基因甲基化的影响,初步探讨其在胆管癌治疗中的价值.方法 构建靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体;运用脂质体介导法将其转染人胆管癌细胞QBC939;RT-PCR法检测不同时间点hDNMT1、CDH1、p15的表达水平;MSP方法检测转染前后抑癌基因CDH1、p15的甲基化状态;MTT检测各组细胞的增殖能力.结果1) hDNMT1的基因沉默恢复了抑癌基因CDH1、p15的表达水平;2)CDH1、p15的表达沉默是由启动予高甲基化导致的;3)转染靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体能有效地抑制QBC939的增殖能力.结论 靶向hDNMT1的发夹式siRNA表达载体能有效、持续、稳定发挥对hDNMT1的基因沉默作用,恢复抑癌基因CDH1、p15

  2. RASSF10 is epigenetically silenced and functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ziran [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Xia [Urology Department, Minhang District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Ji; Wang, Weimin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Xudong [Urology Department, Minhang District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Cai, Qingping, E-mail: qingping_caicz@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► Epigenetic silencing of RASSF10 gene expression in GC cells. ► RASSF10 overexpression inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. ► RASSF10 induces apoptosis in GC cells. ► RASSF10 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ras association domain family (RASSF) proteins are encoded by several tumor suppressor genes that are frequently silenced in human cancers. In this study, we investigated RASSF10 as a target of epigenetic inactivation and examined its functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. RASSF10 was silenced in six out of eight gastric cancer cell lines. Loss or downregulation of RASSF10 expression was associated with promoter hypermethylation, and could be restored by a demethylating agent. Overexpression of RASSF10 in gastric cancer cell lines (JRST, BGC823) suppressed cell growth and colony formation, and induced apoptosis, whereas RASSF10 depletion promoted cell growth. In xenograft animal experiments, RASSF10 overexpression effectively repressed tumor growth. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RASSF10 inhibited tumor growth by blocking activation of β-catenin and its downstream targets including c-Myc, cyclinD1, cyclinE1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ, transcription factor 4, transcription factor 1 and CD44. In conclusion, the results of this study provide insight into the role of RASSF10 as a novel functional tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4040 TITLE: Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Gould, Ph.D...Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat DAMDI7-94-J-4040 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Gould, Ph.D. Hong Lan, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  4. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...

  5. MLL3 is a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Rappaport, Amy R; Kitzing, Thomas; Schultz, Nikolaus; Zhao, Zhen; Shroff, Aditya S; Dickins, Ross A; Vakoc, Christopher R; Bradner, James E; Stock, Wendy; LeBeau, Michelle M; Shannon, Kevin M; Kogan, Scott; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-05-12

    Recurring deletions of chromosome 7 and 7q [-7/del(7q)] occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant tumor suppressors on 7q remains unclear. Using RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, we show that an ∼50% reduction in gene dosage of the mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) gene, located on 7q36.1, cooperates with other events occurring in -7/del(7q) AMLs to promote leukemogenesis. Mll3 suppression impairs the differentiation of HSPC. Interestingly, Mll3-suppressed leukemias, like human -7/del(7q) AMLs, are refractory to conventional chemotherapy but sensitive to the BET inhibitor JQ1. Thus, our mouse model functionally validates MLL3 as a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor and suggests a therapeutic option for this aggressive disease.

  6. MicroRNA-34a is a potent tumor suppressor molecule in vivo in neuroblastoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tivnan, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortalities. With regards to the role of miRNAs in neuroblastoma, miR-34a, mapping to a chromosome 1p36 region that is commonly deleted, has been found to act as a tumor suppressor through targeting of numerous genes associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  7. Cancer-associated p53 tetramerization domain mutants: quantitative analysis reveals a low threshold for tumor suppressor inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, R.; Anderson, C.; Nomura, T.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2011-01-07

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lower the tumor suppressor activity of p53. In this study, we explored the effects of known tumor-derived missense mutations on the stability and oligomeric structure of p53; our comprehensive, quantitative analyses encompassed the tetramerization domain peptides representing 49 such substitutions in humans. Their effects on tetrameric structure were broad, and the stability of the mutant peptides varied widely ({Delta}T{sub m} = 4.8 {approx} -46.8 C). Because formation of a tetrameric structure is critical for protein-protein interactions, DNA binding, and the post-translational modification of p53, a small destabilization of the tetrameric structure could result in dysfunction of tumor suppressor activity. We suggest that the threshold for loss of tumor suppressor activity in terms of the disruption of the tetrameric structure of p53 could be extremely low. However, other properties of the tetramerization domain, such as electrostatic surface potential and its ability to bind partner proteins, also may be important.

  8. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-11-19

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  9. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME. It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  10. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome. PMID:27869779

  11. OPCML is a broad tumor suppressor for multiple carcinomas and lymphomas with frequently epigenetic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    Full Text Available Identification of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs silenced by CpG methylation uncovers the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis and potential tumor biomarkers. Loss of heterozygosity at 11q25 is common in multiple tumors including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. OPCML, located at 11q25, is one of the downregulated genes we identified through digital expression subtraction.Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed frequent OPCML silencing in NPC and other common tumors, with no homozygous deletion detected by multiplex differential DNA-PCR. Instead, promoter methylation of OPCML was frequently detected in multiple carcinoma cell lines (nasopharyngeal, esophageal, lung, gastric, colon, liver, breast, cervix, prostate, lymphoma cell lines (non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma, nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and primary tumors, but not in any non-tumor cell line and seldom weakly methylated in normal epithelial tissues. Pharmacological and genetic demethylation restored OPCML expression, indicating a direct epigenetic silencing. We further found that OPCML is stress-responsive, but this response is epigenetically impaired when its promoter becomes methylated. Ecotopic expression of OPCML led to significant inhibition of both anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of carcinoma cells with endogenous silencing.Thus, through functional epigenetics, we identified OPCML as a broad tumor suppressor, which is frequently inactivated by methylation in multiple malignancies.

  12. Novel frameshift mutation in the p16/INK4A tumor suppressor gene in canine breast cancer alters expression from the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk M; Agarwal, Payal; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Zaman, Jishan; Bird, Allison Church; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKI) encode important cell cycle regulators that tightly control cell cycle during G1 to S phase. These related genes are considered tumor suppressors as loss of function contributes to the malignant phenotype. Expression of CKIs p16, p14ARF, or p15 were defective in six different canine mammary tumor (CMT) cell lines compared to normal thoracic canine fibroblasts. This suggests CKI defects are frequently responsible for neoplastic transformation in canine mammary carcinomas. p16 and p14ARF are two alternatively spliced products derived from the canine p16/INK4A/p14ARF gene locus. Despite omissions in the published p16 transcript and canine genome and the presence of GC-rich repeats, we determined the complete coding sequence of canine p16 revealing a deletion and frameshift mutation in p16 exon 1α in CMT28 cells. In addition, we determined canine p14ARF mRNA and protein sequences. Mapping of these mutations uncovered important aspects of p16 and p14ARF expression and defects in CMT28 cells shifting the p16 reading frame into p14ARF making a fusion protein that was predicted to be truncated, unstable and devoid of structural and functional integrity. This data describes an important neoplastic mechanism in the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Immunoexpression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27KIP1 in humam astrocystic tumors Imuno-expressão dos genes supressores tumorais p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 e p27KIP1 em tumores astrocíticos humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Henrique Girão Faria

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tumor suppressor genes p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27KIP1 expression in astrocytic tumors, correlating the findings with the histopathological grade (WHO. An immunohistochemical study of the p53, p21 and p27 proteins using the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method was performed in fifty-five astrocytomas (13 grade I, 14 grade II, 7 grade III and 21 grade IV and five samples of non-tumor brain tissue (negative control. p53 positive indices (PI and labeling indices (LI showed tendency to increase according to malignant progression. The nuclear expression of p27 presented similar inclination, except for the PI reduction verified in grade IV tumors. Otherwise, the cytoplasmic p27 staining was more evident between high-grade tumors (III and IV. p53 and nuclear p27 expression was correlated with the histological classification (pO presente estudo objetivou avaliar a expressão dos supressores tumorais p53, p21WAF1/CIP1 e p27KIP1 em tumores astrocíticos humanos, correlacionando os achados com a graduação histopatológica (OMS. Procedeu-se o estudo imuno-histoquímico para as proteínas p53, p21 e p27 utilizando o método da estreptavidina-biotina-peroxidase em 55 astrocitomas (13 do grau I, 14 do grau II, 7 do grau III e 21 do grau IV e 5 amostras de tecido cerebral não-tumoral (controle negativo. Os índices de positividade (PI e de marcação (LI para p53 demonstraram tendência de aumento conforme a progressão maligna. A expressão nuclear do p27 apresentou semelhante inclinação, exceto pela redução do PI verificada nos tumores do grau IV. Já a marcação citoplasmática do p27 foi mais evidente entre tumores de alto grau (III e IV. As expressões de p53 e p27 nuclear demonstraram correlação com a classificação histológica (p<0,01; teste H. Por outro lado, os índices para p21 manifestaram propensão à redução conforme a evolução maligna dos tumores astrocíticos, salvo significante

  14. The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor: definition of its consensus binding sequence and analysis of its DNA binding and repressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinte, Sébastien; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Deltour, Sophie; Rood, Brian R; Guérardel, Cateline; Leprince, Dominique

    2004-09-10

    HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p13.3, a region frequently hypermethylated or deleted in human tumors and in a contiguous-gene syndrome, the Miller-Dieker syndrome. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor containing five Krüppel-like C(2)H(2) zinc fingers and an N-terminal dimerization and autonomous repression domain called BTB/POZ. Although some of the HIC1 transcriptional repression mechanisms have been recently deciphered, target genes are still to be discovered. In this study, we determined the consensus binding sequence for HIC1 and investigated its DNA binding properties. Using a selection and amplification of binding sites technique, we identified the sequence 5'-(C)/(G)NG(C)/(G)GGGCA(C)/(A) CC-3' as an optimal binding site. In silico and functional analyses fully validated this consensus and highlighted a GGCA core motif bound by zinc fingers 3 and 4. The BTB/POZ domain inhibits the binding of HIC1 to a single site but mediates cooperative binding to a probe containing five concatemerized binding sites, a property shared by other BTB/POZ proteins. Finally, full-length HIC1 proteins transiently expressed in RK13 cells and more importantly, endogenous HIC1 proteins from the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line, repress the transcription of a reporter gene through their direct binding to these sites, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The definition of the HIC1-specific DNA binding sequence as well as the requirement for multiple sites for optimal binding of the full-length protein are mandatory prerequisites for the identification and analyses of bona fide HIC1 target genes.

  15. 3p21.3 tumor suppressor gene RBM5 inhibits growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells through apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lijing

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have indicated that the nuclear RNA-binding protein RBM5 has the ability to modulate apoptosis and suppress tumor growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of RBM5 in human prostate cancer and its mechanism of tumor suppression. Methods The expression of RBM5 protein in cancerous prostatic tissues and normal tissues was examined by IHC. PC-3 cell line was used to determine the apoptotic function of RBM5 in vitro. PC-3 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Rhodamine 123 staining and Annexin V analysis were performed to observe the apoptotic activity of PC-3 cells overexpressing RBM5. Expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by western blot. Results The expression of RBM5 protein was significantly decreased in cancerous prostatic tissues compared to the normal tissues. PC-3 cells overexpressing RBM5 showed not only significant growth inhibition compared with the vector controls, but also dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased apoptotic activity. To further define RBM5 function in apoptotic pathways, we investigated differential expression profiles of various BH3-only proteins including Bid, Bad, and Bim, and apoptosis regulatory proteins include P53, cleaved caspase9, and cleaved caspase3. We found that the expression of both BH3-only proteins and apoptosis regulatory proteins was increased in RBM5 transfected cells. Conclusion The expression of RBM5 protein was significantly decreased in cancerous prostatic tissues, which suggests that RBM5 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. RBM5 may induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer PC-3 cells by modulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thus RBM5 might be a promising target for gene therapy on prostate cancer.

  16. Tumor suppressor WWOX and p53 alterations and drug resistance in glioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu eChiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1 is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate a potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death.

  17. [Analyzed the molecular interaction network of tumor suppressor gene 14-3-3 sigma in lung cancer cell based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ting; Mi, Wei; Li, Min; Cao, Bang-rong; Feng, Lin; Cheng, Shu-jun; Gao, Yan-ning

    2013-08-01

    To analysis the molecular interaction network of 14-3-3 sigma in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Established stable over-expressed 14-3-3 sigma protein PG cells, MTT assay was used to assess the growth rate of PG cells. Though stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and Mass spectrometry (MS) technology, to identify difference expressed proteins caused by over expressed 14-3-3 sigma. The protein expressed >2 or encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG), established the molecular interaction network of tumor suppressor gene 14-3-3 sigma. The growth rate of over-expressed 14-3-3 sigma PG cell was obviously slower down compared to vector PG cells. A database including 147 differential protein was established. And a molecular interaction network of 14-3-3 sigma containing 26 protein was constructed.In this network, the expression of CSNK2A1 (casein kinase II subunit alpha), involved in numerous cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis and transcription, was the most significantly increased. A DNA repair protein, MEN1 (Menin) which functions as a transcriptional regulator was the most significantly decreased. After stable transfected with 14-3-3 sigma gene, growth rate of PG cells was inhibited, the proteins associated with cell cycle, DNA damage repair mechanisms were significantly changed, and constructed the molecular interaction network.

  18. A tumor suppressor role of the Bub3 spindle checkpoint protein after apoptosis inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho-Santos, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain aneuploid cells, indicating that the mitotic checkpoint is permissive to the proliferation of chromosomally aberrant cells. However, mutated or altered expression of mitotic checkpoint genes accounts for a minor proportion of human tumors. We describe a Drosophila melanogaster tumorigenesis model derived from knocking down spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) genes and preventing apoptosis in wing imaginal discs. Bub3-deficient tumors that were also deficient in apoptosis displayed neoplastic growth, chromosomal aneuploidy, and high proliferative potential after transplantation into adult flies. Inducing aneuploidy by knocking down CENP-E and preventing apoptosis does not induce tumorigenesis, indicating that aneuploidy is not sufficient for hyperplasia. In this system, the aneuploidy caused by a deficient SAC is not driving tumorigenesis because preventing Bub3 from binding to the kinetochore does not cause hyperproliferation. Our data suggest that Bub3 has a nonkinetochore-dependent function that is consistent with its role as a tumor suppressor. PMID:23609535

  19. Negative Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p53 by microRNA miR-504

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. p53 protein levels and activity are under a tight and complex regulation in cells to maintain the proper function of p53. microRNAs play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Here we report the regulation of p53 through microRNA miR-504. miR-504 acts as a negative regulator of human p53 through its direct binding to two sites in p53 3′-UTR. Overexpression of miR-504 decreases p53 protein levels and functions in cells, i...

  20. Amplification of Mdmx (or Mdm4) directly contributes to tumor formation by inhibiting p53 tumor suppressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danovi, Davide; Meulmeester, Erik; Pasini, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Human tumors are believed to harbor a disabled p53 tumor suppressor pathway, either through direct mutation of the p53 gene or through aberrant expression of proteins acting in the p53 pathway, such as p14(ARF) or Mdm2. A role for Mdmx (or Mdm4) as a key negative regulator of p53 function in vivo...... has been established. However, a direct contribution of Mdmx to tumor formation remains to be demonstrated. Here we show that retrovirus-mediated Mdmx overexpression allows primary mouse embryonic fibroblast immortalization and leads to neoplastic transformation in combination with HRas(V12......). Furthermore, the human Mdmx ortholog, Hdmx, was found to be overexpressed in a significant percentage of various human tumors and amplified in 5% of primary breast tumors, all of which retained wild-type p53. Hdmx was also amplified and highly expressed in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line harboring wild...

  1. An immunohistochemical analysis of sex-steroid receptors, tumor suppressor gene p53 and Ki-67 in the normal and neoplastic uterine cervix squamous epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaou Marinos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant transformation of sex-steroid dependent tissues is associated with the loss of expression of sex steroid receptors as well as of the tumor suppression gene p53. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of sex-steroid receptors, p53 and Ki-67 in specimens from pre-malignant and malignant cervical epithelial lesions throughout the menstrual cycle. Material and Methods. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections of normal squamous cervical epithelium, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive squamous cervical carcinoma, specimens utilizing antibodies against estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, p53 protein and Ki-67 antigen. Results. In the samples taken from the normal cervical tissue, basal cells were usually estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptornegative, p53-negative and Ki-67-negative throughout the menstrual cycle. In contrast, para-basal cells were estrogen receptorpositive and progesterone receptor-negative in the follicular phase, but estrogen receptor-negative and progesterone receptor -positive and Ki-67 positive in the luteal phase. In cervical precancerous and cancer tissue samples (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cervical carcinoma, the expression of estrogen receptors decreased. 31.15% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 11.5% of squamous cervical carcinoma were positive for estrogen receptors. However, the expression of progesterone receptors increased. 29.5% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 49.2% of squamous cervical carcinoma were positive for progesterone receptors. Positive staining for p53 was observed in 15 (24.59% cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and in 39 (64% of squamous cervical carcinoma. The expression Ki-67 index in squamous cervical carcinoma cases (47.60% was significantly higher than of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia cases (30.2% (p=0.041. Conclusion. The

  2. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  3. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the tumor suppressor function of LKB1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahua Fan; Chao Ma; Haitao Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations of the LKB1 tumor suppressor gene result in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) charac-terized by intestinal hamartomas and increased inci-dence of epithelial cancers. Inactivating mutations in LKB1 have also been found in certain sporadic human cancers and with particularly high frequency in lung cancer. LKB1 has now been demonstrated to play a crucial role in pulmonary tumorigenesis, controlling initiation, differentiation, and metastasis. Recent evi-dences showed that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with great potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in cell polarity, energy metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cell proliferation, all of which may require the tumor sup-pressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. This review focuses on remarkable recent find-ings concerning the molecular mechanism by which the LKB1 protein kinase operates as a tumor suppressor and discusses the rational treatment strategies to indi-viduals suffering from PJS and other common dis-orders related to LKB1 signaling.

  4. SMG1 Acts as a Novel Potential Tumor Suppressor with Epigenetic Inactivation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Du

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member (SMG1 belongs to a family of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases and is the main kinase involved in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Recently, SMG1 was suggested as a novel potential tumor suppressor gene, particularly in hypoxic tumors. To investigate the function of SMG1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, we performed methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and found that SMG1 was hypermethylated in the promoter region. SMG1 hypermethylation was found in 66% (33/50 of AML samples compared with none (0/14 of the normal controls. SMG1 mRNA was down-regulated in AML patients with hypermethylation status whereas it was readily expressed in patients without methylation. Moreover, treatment of AML cells with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine inhibited AML cell growth and induced apoptosis by reversing SMG1 methylation status and restoring SMG1 expression. On the other hand, knockdown of SMG1 by RNA interference inhibited apoptosis. We also found that mTOR expression level was negatively correlated to SMG1 expression in AML patients which indicated that SMG1 and mTOR maybe act antagonistically to regulate AML cell growth. In conclusion, our results indicate that SMG1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor with epigenetic regulation in AML.

  5. LATS1 tumor suppressor is a novel actin-binding protein and negative regulator of actin polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stacy Visser-Grieve; Zhonghua Zhou; Yi-Min She; He Huang; Terry D Cyr; Tian Xu; Xiaolong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,The LATS tumor suppressor,conserved from Drosophila (dlats) to humans (LATS1,LATS2),plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis in humans since loss of either LATS1 or LATS2 leads to the development of numerous cancer types such as breast cancer and leukemia [1].Apart from its roles as a Ser/Thr kinase within the emerging Hippo pathway regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis,ultimately leading to the control of organ size and tumorigenesis [2],LATS is also implicated in a broad range of functions including regulation of genetic stability,transcription,and protein stability [1 ].Recently,tumor suppressors have also been shown to affect the later stages of tumorigenesis,including metastasis.Among this group of metastasis regulators are genes that can directly affect actin dynamics by binding to F-actin,such as the tumor suppressors p53 [3],NF2 [4] and APC [5].

  6. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  7. von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor mutants faithfully model pathological hypoxia-driven angiogenesis and vascular retinopathies in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, E.; Voest, E.E.; Logister, I.; Bussmann, J.; Korving, J.; van Eeden, F.J.; Giles, R.H.; Schulte-Merker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene predisposes human patients to the development of highly vascularized neoplasms in multiple organ systems. We show that zebrafish vhl mutants display a marked increase in blood vessel formation throughout the embryo, starting

  8. Metastasis Suppressors Regulate the Tumor Microenvironment by Blocking Recruitment of Prometastatic Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Casey; Rabe, Daniel; Bainer, Russell; Sankarasharma, Devipriya; Chada, Kiran; Krausz, Thomas; Gilad, Yoav; Becker, Lev; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2015-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients have the highest risk of recurrence and metastasis. Because they cannot be treated with targeted therapies, and many do not respond to chemotherapy, they represent a clinically underserved group. TNBC is characterized by reduced expression of metastasis suppressors such as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), which inhibits tumor invasiveness. Mechanisms by which metastasis suppressors alter tumor cells are well characterized; however, their ability to regulate the tumor microenvironment and the importance of such regulation to metastasis suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we use species-specific RNA sequencing to show that RKIP expression in tumors markedly reduces the number and metastatic potential of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs isolated from nonmetastatic RKIP(+) tumors, relative to metastatic RKIP(-) tumors, exhibit a reduced ability to drive tumor cell invasion and decreased secretion of prometastatic factors, including PRGN, and shed TNFR2. RKIP regulates TAM recruitment by blocking HMGA2, resulting in reduced expression of numerous macrophage chemotactic factors, including CCL5. CCL5 overexpression in RKIP(+) tumors restores recruitment of prometastatic TAMs and intravasation, whereas treatment with the CCL5 receptor antagonist Maraviroc reduces TAM infiltration. These results highlight the importance of RKIP as a regulator of TAM recruitment through chemokines such as CCL5. The clinical significance of these interactions is underscored by our demonstration that a signature comprised of RKIP signaling and prometastatic TAM factors strikingly separates TNBC patients based on survival outcome. Collectively, our findings identify TAMs as a previously unsuspected mechanism by which the metastasis-suppressor RKIP regulates tumor invasiveness, and further suggest that TNBC patients with decreased RKIP activity and increased TAM infiltration may respond to macrophage

  9. Tumor suppressors in Zebrafish : From TP53 to PTEN and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly being used to study cancer. Almost all tumor types have been found in zebrafish. However, tumor incidence is relatively low and tumors develop late in life. Functional inactivation of tumor suppressors is a crucial step in cancer progression and more and more tumor

  10. Tumor Suppressors in Zebrafish : From TP53 to PTEN and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly being used to study cancer. Almost all tumor types have been found in zebrafish. However, tumor incidence is relatively low and tumors develop late in life. Functional inactivation of tumor suppressors is a crucial step in cancer progression and more and more tumor

  11. Tumor suppressors in Zebrafish : From TP53 to PTEN and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly being used to study cancer. Almost all tumor types have been found in zebrafish. However, tumor incidence is relatively low and tumors develop late in life. Functional inactivation of tumor suppressors is a crucial step in cancer progression and more and more tumor suppres

  12. Vitamin D receptor, a tumor suppressor in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are well-established regulators of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, it was not a great surprise that deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) should predispose the skin to tumor formation, and that the combination of deleting both the VDR and calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) should be especially pro-oncogenic. In this review I have examined 4 mechanisms that appear to underlie the means by which VDR acts as a tumor suppressor in skin. First, DNA damage repair is curtailed in the absence of the VDR, allowing mutations in DNA to accumulate. Second and third involve the increased activation of the hedgehog and β-catenin pathways in the epidermis in the absence of the VDR, leading to poorly regulated proliferation with reduced differentiation. Finally, VDR deletion leads to a shift in the expression of long noncoding RNAs toward a more oncogenic profile. How these different mechanisms interact and their relative importance in the predisposition of the VDR null epidermis to tumor formation remain under active investigation.

  13. Effect of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine on the P16 tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hua Liu; Wen Hua Xiao; Wei Wen Liu

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the mostcommon human malignancies worldwide[1,2], and isclosely associated with infection of HBV and HCVand contamination of aflatoxin B1[3-6]. Althoughthe molecular mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesisremain poorly understood, an increasing number ofgenetic abnormalities have been recognized[7-10],for example, the p16 gene[11,12] the p53gene[13-18], the E-cadherin gene[19], and the c-mycgene[20].

  14. A retroviral mutagenesis screen reveals strong cooperation between Bc111a overexpression and loss of the Nf1 tumor suppressor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Yin (Bin Cheng); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); M.R. Wallace (Margaret); M.L. Loh (Mignon); K.M. Shannon (Kevin); D.A. Largaespada (David)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNF1 inactivation occurs in specific human cancers, including juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, an aggressive myeloproliferative disorder of childhood. However, evidence suggests that Nf1 loss alone does not cause leukemia.We therefore hypothesized that inactivation of the Nf1 tumor suppr

  15. Regulation of transcription functions of the p53 tumor suppressor by the mdm-2 oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mdm-2, a zinc finger protein, negatively regulates the p53 tumor suppressor gene product by binding to it and preventing transcriptional activation (16). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Assays for p53 mediated transcription, repression and activation by mutant and wild-type p53 proteins were used to measure the ability of mdm-2 to block each activity. RESULTS: Mdm-2 was able to inhibit all three functions of the wild-type and mutant p53 activities; transcriptional activation by the wild-ty...

  16. Double-Stranded-RNA-Activated Protein Kinase PKR Enhances Transcriptional Activation by Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in inducing G1 arrest and apoptosis following DNA damage. The double-stranded-RNA-activated protein PKR is a serine/threonine interferon (IFN)-inducible kinase which plays an important role in regulation of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Since a cross talk between IFN-inducible proteins and p53 had already been established, we investigated whether and how p53 function was modulated by PKR. We analyzed p53 function in...

  17. The Regulatory Mechanisms of Tumor Suppressor P16INK4A and Relevance to Cancer†

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junan; Poi, Ming Jye; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2011-01-01

    P16INK4A (also known as P16 and MTS1), a protein consisting exclusively of four ankyrin repeats, is recognized as a tumor suppressor mainly due to the prevalence of genetic inactivation of the p16INK4A (or CDKN2A) gene in virtually all types of human cancers. However, it has also been shown that elevated expression (up-regulation) of P16 is involved in cellular senescence, aging, and cancer progression, indicating that the regulation of P16 is critical for its function. Here, we discuss the r...

  18. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  19. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  20. Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17p13.3: Assessment of Their Roles in Breast and Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other...Mutational Analysis of OVCA1 and OVCA2 by SSCP. Single-strand comformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was conducted on 75 ovarian tumors independent...and 75.4% similarity at the amino acid level, which makes it highly likely that the biochemical function of the BOV-1 homolog has been conserved from

  1. SIRT3: Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margalida Torrens-Mas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3, the major deacetylase in mitochondria, plays a crucial role in modulating oxygen reactive species (ROS and limiting the oxidative damage in cellular components. SIRT3 targets different enzymes which regulate mitochondrial metabolism and participate in ROS detoxification, such as the complexes of the respiratory chain, the isocitrate dehydrogenase, or the manganese superoxide dismutase. Thus, SIRT3 activity is essential in maintaining mitochondria homeostasis and has recently received great attention, as it is considered a fidelity protein for mitochondrial function. In some types of cancer, SIRT3 functions as a tumoral promoter, since it keeps ROS levels under a certain threshold compatible with cell viability and proliferation. On the contrary, other studies describe SIRT3 as a tumoral suppressor, as SIRT3 could trigger cell death under stress conditions. Thus, SIRT3 could have a dual role in cancer. In this regard, modulation of SIRT3 activity could be a new target to develop more personalized therapies against cancer.

  2. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  3. Using yeast to determine the functional consequences of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene: An introductory course-based undergraduate research experience in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Brownell, Sara E; Seawell, Patricia Chandler; Malladi, Shyamala; Imam, Jamie F Conklin; Singla, Veena; Bradon, Nicole; Cyert, Martha S; Stearns, Tim

    2017-03-04

    The opportunity to engage in scientific research is an important, but often neglected, component of undergraduate training in biology. We describe the curriculum for an innovative, course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) appropriate for a large, introductory cell and molecular biology laboratory class that leverages students' high level of interest in cancer. The course is highly collaborative and emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of original scientific data. During the course, students work in teams to characterize a collection of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene via expression and analysis in yeast. Initially, student pairs use both qualitative and quantitative assays to assess the ability of their p53 mutant to activate expression of reporter genes, and they localize their mutation within the p53 structure. Through facilitated discussion, students suggest possible molecular explanations for the transactivation defects displayed by their p53 mutants and propose experiments to test these hypotheses that they execute during the second part of the course. They use a western blot to determine whether mutant p53 levels are reduced, a DNA-binding assay to test whether recognition of any of three p53 target sequences is compromised, and fluorescence microscopy to assay nuclear localization. Students studying the same p53 mutant periodically convene to discuss and interpret their combined data. The course culminates in a poster session during which students present their findings to peers, instructors, and the greater biosciences community. Based on our experience, we provide recommendations for the development of similar large introductory lab courses. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):161-178, 2017.

  4. Analysis of aberrant methylation on promoter sequences of tumor suppressor genes and total DNA in sputum samples: a promising tool for early detection of COPD and lung cancer in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Leda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a disorder associated to cigarette smoke and lung cancer (LC. Since epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are clearly important in the development of LC. In this study, we hypothesize that tobacco smokers are susceptible for methylation in the promoter region of TSGs in airway epithelial cells when compared with non-smoker subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of detection of genes promoter methylation in sputum specimens, as a complementary tool to identify LC biomarkers among smokers with early COPD. Methods We determined the amount of DNA in induced sputum from patients with COPD (n = 23, LC (n = 26, as well as in healthy subjects (CTR (n = 33, using a commercial kit for DNA purification, followed by absorbance measurement at 260 nm. The frequency of CDKN2A, CDH1 and MGMT promoter methylation in the same groups was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP. The Fisher’s exact test was employed to compare frequency of results between different groups. Results DNA concentration was 7.4 and 5.8 times higher in LC and COPD compared to the (CTR (p  Conclusions We provide evidence that aberrant methylation of TSGs in samples of induced sputum is a useful tool for early diagnostic of lung diseases (LC and COPD in smoker subjects. Virtual slides The abstract MUST finish with the following text: Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1127865005664160

  5. NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor for oral squamous-cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Hiroshi; Kondo, Yuudai [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Nakahata, Shingo; Hamasaki, Makoto [Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Sakoda, Sumio [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Morishita, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kmorishi@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-gun, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common phenotype of oral cancer. Although patients with OSCC have poor survival rates and a high incidence of metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of OSCC development have not yet been elucidated. This study investigated whether N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) contributes to the carcinogenesis of OSCC, as NDRG2 is reported to be a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in a wide variety of cancers. The down-regulation of NDRG2 mRNA, which was dependent on promoter methylation, was seen in the majority of OSCC cases and in several cases of precancerous leukoplakia with dysplasia. Induction of NDRG2 expression in an HSC-3/OSCC cell line significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased colony formation ability on soft agar. The majority of OSCC cell lines showed an activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, and enforced expression of NDRG2 in HSC-3 cells decreased the level of phosphorylated Akt at Serine 473 (p-Akt). Immunohistochemical p-Akt staining was detected in 56.5% of the OSCC tumors, and 80.4% of the tumors were negative for NDRG2 staining. Moreover, positive p-Akt staining was inversely correlated with decreased NDRG2 expression in OSCC tumors with moderate to poor differentiation (p < 0.005). Therefore, NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor gene for OSCC development and probably contributes to the tumorigenesis of OSCC partly via the modulation of Akt signaling.

  6. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  7. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S.; Bajer, Magdalena M.; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J.; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H.; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2–4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted. PMID:26982744

  8. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S; Bajer, Magdalena M; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2-4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted.

  9. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schmid

    Full Text Available The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyldisulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2-4 or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6. We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted.

  10. Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17p13.3: Assessment of Their Roles in Breast and Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    the RNA. In Sxl this residue is an isoleu- lar interactions between these side chains and RNA. cine , making a hydrophobic interaction with a uracil For...interested in testing it at the National Center for Toxicogenomics). The results will be passed to the analysis system, which presently handles ImaGene

  11. The tumor suppressor Caliban regulates DNA damage-induced apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, Z; Joshi, B H; Puri, R K; Stultz, B; Yuan, Q; Bai, Y; Zhou, P; Yuan, Z; Hursh, D A; Bi, X

    2013-08-15

    We previously identified Caliban (Clbn) as the Drosophila homolog of human Serologically defined colon cancer antigen 1 gene and demonstrated that it could function as a tumor suppressor in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, although its mode of action was unknown. Herein, we identify roles for Clbn in DNA damage response. We generate clbn knockout flies using homologous recombination and demonstrate that they have a heightened sensitivity to irradiation. We show that normal Clbn function facilitates both p53-dependent and -independent DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Clbn coordinates different apoptosis pathways, showing a two-stage upregulation following DNA damage. Clbn has proapoptotic functions, working with both caspase and the proapoptotic gene Hid. Finally, ecotopic expression of clbn(+) in NSCLC cells suppresses tumor formation in athymic nude mice. We conclude that Caliban is a regulator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis, functioning as a tumor suppressor in both p53-dependent and -independent pathways.

  12. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, Misao [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ariumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ariumi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto [Department of Viral Oncology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Shimotohno, Kunitada [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-8516 (Japan); Kato, Nobuyuki [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  13. Lysine methylation-dependent binding of 53BP1 to the pRb tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Simon M; Munro, Shonagh; Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Fedorov, Oleg; Johansson, Catrine; Krojer, Tobias; Sagum, Cari A; Bedford, Mark T; Oppermann, Udo; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2014-08-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRb is a key regulator of cell cycle progression and mediator of the DNA damage response. Lysine methylation at K810, which occurs within a critical Cdk phosphorylation motif, holds pRb in the hypophosphorylated growth-suppressing state. We show here that methyl K810 is read by the tandem tudor domain containing tumor protein p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1). Structural elucidation of 53BP1 in complex with a methylated K810 pRb peptide emphasized the role of the 53BP1 tandem tudor domain in recognition of the methylated lysine and surrounding residues. Significantly, binding of 53BP1 to methyl K810 occurs on E2 promoter binding factor target genes and allows pRb activity to be effectively integrated with the DNA damage response. Our results widen the repertoire of cellular targets for 53BP1 and suggest a previously unidentified role for 53BP1 in regulating pRb tumor suppressor activity.

  14. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L.; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons—in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  15. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4 is a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jason PW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4, a member of the Id gene family is also a dominant negative regulator of basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factors. Some of the functions of Id4 appear to be unique as compared to its other family members Id1, Id2 and Id3. Loss of Id4 gene expression in many cancers in association with promoter hypermethylation has led to the proposal that Id4 may act as a tumor suppressor. In this study we provide functional evidence that Id4 indeed acts as a tumor suppressor and is part of a cancer associated epigenetic re-programming. Methods Data mining was used to demonstrate Id4 expression in prostate cancer. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP analysis was performed to understand molecular mechanisms associated with Id4 expression in prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 cells was determined by cell cycle analysis (3H thymidine incorporation and FACS, expression of androgen receptor, p53 and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 and p21 by a combination of RT-PCR, real time-PCR, western blot and immuno-cytochemical analysis. Results Id4 expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Id4 expression was also down-regulated in prostate cancer line DU145 due to promoter hyper-methylation. Ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 prostate cancer cell line led to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation due in part by an S-phase arrest. In addition to S-phase arrest, ectopic Id4 expression in PC3 cells also resulted in prolonged G2/M phase. At the molecular level these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR, p21, p27 and p53 expression in DU145 cells. Conclusion The results suggest that Id4 acts directly as a tumor suppressor by influencing a hierarchy of cellular processes at multiple levels that leads to a decreased cell proliferation and change in morphology that is possibly mediated through induction of previously

  16. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  17. Tumor Suppressor RARRES1 Regulates DLG2, PP2A, VCP, EB1, and Ankrd26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad J. Sahab, Michael D. Hall, Lihua Zhang, Amrita K. Cheema, Stephen W. Byers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic Acid Receptor Responder (RARRES1 initially identified as a novel retinoic acid receptor regulated gene in the skin is a putative tumor suppressor of unknown function. RARRES1 was knocked down in immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line PWR-1E cells and differential protein expression was identified using differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry and western Blot analysis excluding highly abundant proteins routinely identified in almost all proteomics projects. Knock-down of RARRES1: 1- down-regulates PP2A, an enzyme involved in the negative regulation of the growth hormone-stimulated signal transduction pathways; 2- down-regulates Valosin-containing protein causing impaired autophagy; 3- up-regulates the tumor suppressor disks large 2; 4- up-regulates Ankrd26 that belongs to the POTE family of genes that are highly expressed in cancer patients with poor outcome; and 5- down-regulates EB1, a protein that is involved in spindle dynamics and chromosome alignment during mitosis.

  18. Mutations in and Expression of the Tumor Suppressor Gene p53 in Egg-Type Chickens Infected With Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Q; Yulong, G; Liting, Q; Shuai, Y; Delong, L; Yubao, L; Lili, J; Sidang, L; Xiaomei, W

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic effects of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), we examined mutations in and the expression of p53 in the myelocytomas distributed in the liver, spleen, trachea, and bone marrow, as well as in fibrosarcomas in the abdominal cavity and hemangiomas in skin from chickens that were naturally or experimentally infected with ALV-J. Two types of mutations in the p53 gene were detected in myelocytomas of both the experimentally infected and the naturally infected chickens and included point mutations and deletions. Two of the point mutations have not been reported previously. Partial complementary DNA clones with a 122-bp deletion in the p53 gene ORF and a 15-bp deletion in the C-terminus were identified in the myelocytomas. In addition, moderate expression of the mutant p53 protein was detected in the myelocytomas that were distributed in the liver, trachea, spleen, and bone marrow. Mutant p53 protein was not detected in the subcutaneous hemangiomas or in the abdominal fibrosarcomas associated with natural and experimental ALV-J infection, respectively. These results identify mutations associated with abnormal expression of p53 in ALV-J-associated myelocytomas, suggesting a role in tumorigenesis.

  19. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  20. Frequent attenuation of the WWOX tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma is associated with increased tumorigenicity and aberrant RUNX2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Kyle C; Del Mare, Sara; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib; Sadiq, Hussain; Lee, Suk-Hee; Gaudio, Eugenio; Zanesi, Nicola; Jones, Kevin B; DeYoung, Barry; Amir, Gail; Gebhardt, Mark; Warman, Matthew; Stein, Gary S; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2010-07-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a tumor suppressor that is deleted or attenuated in most human tumors. Wwox-deficient mice develop osteosarcoma (OS), an aggressive bone tumor with poor prognosis that often metastasizes to lung. On the basis of these observations, we examined the status of WWOX in human OS specimens and cell lines. In human OS clinical samples, WWOX expression was absent or reduced in 58% of tumors examined (P < 0.0001). Compared with the primary tumors, WWOX levels frequently increased in tumors resected following chemotherapy. In contrast, tumor metastases to lung often exhibited reduced WWOX levels relative to the primary tumor. In human OS cell lines having reduced WWOX expression, ectopic expression of WWOX inhibited proliferation and attenuated invasion in vitro, and suppressed tumorigenicity in nude mice. Expression of WWOX was associated with reduced RUNX2 expression in OS cell lines, whereas RUNX2 levels were elevated in femurs of Wwox-deficient mice. Furthermore, WWOX reconstitution in HOS cells was associated with downregulation of RUNX2 levels and RUNX2 target genes, consistent with the ability of WWOX to suppress RUNX2 transactivation activity. In clinical samples, RUNX2 was expressed in the majority of primary tumors and undetectable in most tumors resected following chemotherapy, whereas most metastases were RUNX2 positive. Our results deepen the evidence of a tumor suppressor role for WWOX in OS, furthering its prognostic and therapeutic significance in this disease. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  1. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  2. Isoform-specific interactions of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Gabriella M.; Masiero, Alessandro; Sartori, Elena; Corrà, Samantha; Potenza, Emilio; Costa, Rodolfo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) is considered one of the main causes for malignant renal clear-cell carcinoma (ccRCC) insurgence. In human, pVHL exists in two isoforms, pVHL19 and pVHL30 respectively, displaying comparable tumor suppressor abilities. Mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been also correlated with ccRCC insurgence and ineffectiveness of treatment. A recent proteomic analysis linked full length pVHL30 with p53 pathway regulation through complex formation with the p14ARF oncosuppressor. The alternatively spliced pVHL19, missing the first 53 residues, lacks this interaction and suggests an asymmetric function of the two pVHL isoforms. Here, we present an integrative bioinformatics and experimental characterization of the pVHL oncosuppressor isoforms. Predictions of the pVHL30 N-terminus three-dimensional structure suggest that it may exist as an ensemble of structured and disordered forms. The results were used to guide Yeast two hybrid experiments to highlight isoform-specific binding properties. We observed that the physical pVHL/p14ARF interaction is specifically mediated by the 53 residue long pVHL30 N-terminal region, suggesting that this N-terminus acts as a further pVHL interaction interface. Of note, we also observed that the shorter pVHL19 isoform shows an unexpected high tendency to form homodimers, suggesting an additional isoform-specific binding specialization. PMID:26211615

  3. A Deacetylase-Deficient SIRT1 Variant Opposes Full-Length SIRT1 in Regulating Tumor Suppressor p53 and Governs Expression of Cancer-Related Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Zahid H.; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Ford, Jack R.; Allison, Simon J.; Knight, John R. P.

    2012-01-01

    SIRT1 is an NAD-dependent deacetylase and epigenetic regulator essential for normal mammalian development and homeostasis. Here we describe a human SIRT1 splice variant, designated SIRT1-Δ2/9, in which the deacetylase coding sequence is lost due to splicing between exons 2 and 9. This work aimed to determine if SIRT1-Δ2/9 is a novel functional product of the SIRT1 gene. Endogenous SIRT1-Δ2/9 protein was identified in human cell lysate by immunoblotting and splice variant-specific RNA interference (RNAi). SIRT1-Δ2/9 mRNA is bound by CUGBP2, which downregulates its translation. Using pulldown assays, we demonstrate that SIRT1-Δ2/9 binds p53 protein. SIRT1-Δ2/9 maintains basal p53 protein levels and supports p53 function in response to DNA damage, as evidenced by RNAi-mediated depletion of SIRT1-Δ2/9 prior to damage. In turn, basal p53 downregulates SIRT1-Δ2/9 RNA levels, while stress-activated p53 eliminates SIRT1-Δ2/9. Loss of wild-type (wt) p53 has been correlated with overexpression of SIRT1-Δ2/9 in a range of human cancers. Exogenous SIRT1-Δ2/9 protein associates with specific promoters in chromatin and can regulate cancer-related gene expression, as evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and RNAi/genomic array data. SIRT1 is of major therapeutic importance, and potential therapeutic drugs are screened against SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Our discovery of SIRT1-Δ2/9 identifies a new, deacetylase-independent therapeutic target for SIRT1-related diseases, including cancer. PMID:22124156

  4. The tumor suppressor homolog in fission yeast, myh1{sup +}, displays a strong interaction with the checkpoint gene rad1{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Kristina; Warringer, Jonas; Farewell, Anne [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corporation, 49-3, Munpyeong-dong, Daedeok-gu, Daejon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk [Functional Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hayles, Jacqueline [Cell Cycle Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln' s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX (United Kingdom); Sunnerhagen, Per [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden)], E-mail: per.sunnerhagen@cmb.gu.se

    2008-09-26

    The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1{sup +}, we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway.

  5. Basal and copper-induced expression of metallothionein isoform 1,2 and 3 genes in epithelial cancer cells: The role of tumor suppressor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrakhovitch, E A; Song, Y P; Cherian, M G

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a ubiquitous low-molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins with a high affinity for metal ions. The expression and induction of MTs have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Our past research had shown that p53 is an important factor in metal regulation of MTs. The present study was undertaken to explore further the interrelationship between p53 and MTs. We investigated whether silencing of p53 could affect expression pattern of basal and copper induced metallothioneins. The silencing of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) in epithelial breast cancer MCF7 cells affected the basal level of MT-2A RNA, whereas the levels of MT-1A and MT-1X RNA remained largely unchanged. The expression of MT-3 was undetectable in MCF7 with either functional or silenced p53. MCF7 cells with silenced wt-p53 failed to upregulate MT-2A in response to copper and showed a reduced sensitivity toward copper induced cell apoptotic death. Similarly in MCF7-E6 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the presence of inactive/mutated p53 halted MT-1A and MT-2A gene expression in response to copper. Constitutive expression of MT-3 RNA was detectable in the presence of mutated p53 (mtp53). Transient transfection of MDA-MB-231 cells with wt-p53 enabled copper induced upregulation of both MT-1A and MT-2A but not basal level of MT-2A, MT-1E, MT-1X and MT-3. Inactivation of p53 in HepG2 cells amplified the basal expression of studied MT isoforms, including MT-3, as well as copper-induced mRNA expression of MTs except MT-1H and MT-3. Presented data demonstrate a direct relation between p53 and MT-1A and MT-2A and they also indicate that wt-p53 might be a negative regulator of MT-3 in epithelial cancer cells.

  6. ERF is a Potential ERK Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0277 TITLE: ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rohit...Bose CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0277

  7. Unfurling of the band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain of the merlin tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogesha, S.D.; Sharff, Andrew J.; Giovannini, Marco; Bricogne, Gerard; Izard, Tina (House Ear); (Globel Phasing); (Scripps)

    2014-10-02

    The merlin-1 tumor suppressor is encoded by the Neurofibromatosis-2 (Nf2) gene and loss-of-function Nf2 mutations lead to nervous system tumors in man and to several tumor types in mice. Merlin is an ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family cytoskeletal protein that interacts with other ERM proteins and with components of cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). Merlin stabilizes the links of AJs to the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, its loss destabilizes AJs, promoting cell migration and invasion, which in Nf2{sup +/-} mice leads to highly metastatic tumors. Paradoxically, the 'closed' conformation of merlin-1, where its N-terminal four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain binds to its C-terminal tail domain, directs its tumor suppressor functions. Here we report the crystal structure of the human merlin-1 head domain when crystallized in the presence of its tail domain. Remarkably, unlike other ERM head-tail interactions, this structure suggests that binding of the tail provokes dimerization and dynamic movement and unfurling of the F2 motif of the FERM domain. We conclude the 'closed' tumor suppressor conformer of merlin-1 is in fact an 'open' dimer whose functions are disabled by Nf2 mutations that disrupt this architecture.

  8. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) gene: Toward the cloning of the ANLL/MDS tumor-suppressor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Ing-Ming; Gilmore, E.C.; Liu, Yang; Payson, R.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1994-02-01

    The region surrounding the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) locus on chromosome 5q31 is of particular interest since it represents a critical region consistently lost in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients who have a demonstrable deletion of the distal portion of the long arm of chromosome 5. It is proposed that an ANLL/MDS leukemia suppressor gene resides on 5q31. The authors have previously shown that the gene is most likely localized between FGF1 and PDGFRB/CSF1R loci. The region has also been linked to at least four other genetic diseases, Treacher Collins syndrome, diastrophic dysplasia, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and an autosomal dominant deafness, by linkage analysis. Here, they describe yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) spanning 450 kb around the FGF1 gene. Six YAC clones were isolated from a human YAC library and their restriction enzyme maps were determined. The overlap of the clones with each other and with FGF1 cosmid and phage clones was characterized. Three of the YAC clones were found to contain the entire FGF1 gene, which spans more than 100 kb. Proximal and distal ends of several of these YAC clones were isolated for further overlap cloning. The proximal ends of both Y2 and Y4 were localized to previously isolated FGF1 DNA by sequence analysis. The distal ends of these two clones also hybridized to a human-hamster hybrid containing chromosome 5 as the only human genetic material. These results suggest that these YAC clones represent colinear DNA around the FGF1 locus. None of the YAC clones were found to contain the CD 14 and GRL genes, the closest known proximal and distal markers (relative to the centromere) to the FGF1 gene, respectively. This contig is useful for the overlap cloning of the 5q31 region and for reverse genetic strategies for the isolation of disease genes in the region. 46 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  10. PHF2 histone demethylase acts as a tumor suppressor in association with p53 in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-H; Park, J-W; Sung, H-S; Choi, Y-J; Kim, W H; Lee, H S; Chung, H-J; Shin, H-W; Cho, C-H; Kim, T-Y; Li, S-H; Youn, H-D; Kim, S J; Chun, Y-S

    2015-05-28

    Plant homeodomain finger 2 (PHF2) has a role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression by demethylating H3K9-Me2. Several genome-wide studies have demonstrated that the chromosomal region including the PHF2 gene is often deleted in some cancers including colorectal cancer, and this finding encouraged us to investigate the tumor suppressive role of PHF2. As p53 is a critical tumor suppressor in colon cancer, we tested the possibility that PHF2 is an epigenetic regulator of p53. PHF2 was associated with p53, and thereby, promoted p53-driven gene expression in cancer cells under genotoxic stress. PHF2 converted the chromatin that is favorable for transcription by demethylating the repressive H3K9-Me2 mark. In an HCT116 xenograft model, PHF2 was found to be required for the anticancer effects of oxaliplatin and doxorubicin. In PHF2-deficient xenografts, p53 expression was profoundly induced by both drugs, but its downstream product p21 was not, suggesting that p53 cannot be activated in the absence of PHF2. To find clinical evidence about the role of PHF2, we analyzed the expressions of PHF2, p53 and p21 in human colon cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from patients. PHF2 was downregulated in cancer tissues and PHF2 correlated with p21 in cancers expressing functional p53. Colon and stomach cancer tissue arrays showed a positive correlation between PHF2 and p21 expressions. Informatics analyses using the Oncomine database also supported our notion that PHF2 is downregulated in colon and stomach cancers. On the basis of these findings, we propose that PHF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in association with p53 in cancer development and ensures p53-mediated cell death in response to chemotherapy.

  11. Split End Family RNA Binding Proteins: Novel Tumor Suppressors Coupling Transcriptional Regulation with RNA Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairui Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Split End (SPEN family proteins have three members: SPEN, RBM15, and RBM15B. SPEN family proteins contain three conserved RNA recognition motifs on the N-terminal region and an SPOC domain on the C-terminal region. RBM15 is fused to MKL1 in chromosome translocation t (1;22, which causes childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL. Haploinsufficiency of RBM15 in AMKL indicates that RBM15 is a tumor suppressor. Both SPEN and RBM15 are mutated in a variety of cancer types, implying that they are tumor suppressors. SPEN and RBM15are required for the development of multiple organs including hematopoiesis partly via regulating the NOTCH signaling pathway, as well as the WNT signaling pathway in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. Besides transcriptional regulation, RBM15 regulates RNA export and RNA splicing. In this review, we summarized data in the literature on how the members in SPEN family regulate gene expression at transcription and RNA processing steps. The crosstalk between epigenetic regulation and RNA metabolism is increasingly appreciated in understanding tumorigenesis. Studying the SPEN family of RNA binding proteins will create new perspectives for cancer therapy.

  12. Vitamin C protects against UV irradiation-induced apoptosis through reactivating silenced tumor suppressor genes p21 and p16 in a Tet-dependent DNA demethylation manner in human skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-ran; Qin, Hai-hong; Wu, Wen-yu; He, Shu-juan; Xu, Jin-hua

    2014-08-01

    -induced apoptosis through regulation of Tet activity, DNA demethylation, and subsequent tumor suppressor gene activation in skin cancer cells.

  13. Discovery of novel tumor suppressor p53 response elements using information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhov, Ilya G.; Krishnamachari, Annangarachari; Schneider, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate method for locating genes under tumor suppressor p53 control that is based on a well-established mathematical theory and built using naturally occurring, experimentally proven p53 sites is essential in understanding the complete p53 network. We used a molecular information theory approach to create a flexible model for p53 binding. By searching around transcription start sites in human chromosomes 1 and 2, we predicted 16 novel p53 binding sites and experimentally demonstrated that 15 of the 16 (94%) sites were bound by p53. Some were also bound by the related proteins p63 and p73. Thirteen of the adjacent genes were controlled by at least one of the proteins. Eleven of the 16 sites (69%) had not been identified previously. This molecular information theory approach can be extended to any genetic system to predict new sites for DNA-binding proteins. PMID:18495754

  14. Negative regulation of NF-κB by the ING4 tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Byron

    Full Text Available Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB is a key mediator of normal immune response but contributes to aggressive cancer cell phenotypes when aberrantly activated. Here we present evidence that the Inhibitor of Growth 4 (ING4 tumor suppressor negatively regulates NF-κB in breast cancer. We surveyed primary breast tumor samples for ING4 protein expression using tissue microarrays and a newly generated antibody. We found that 34% of tumors expressed undetectable to low levels of the ING4 protein (n = 227. Tumors with low ING4 expression were frequently large in size, high grade, and lymph node positive, suggesting that down-regulation of ING4 may contribute to breast cancer progression. In the same tumor set, we found that low ING4 expression correlated with high levels of nuclear phosphorylated p65/RelA (p-p65, an activated form of NF-κB (p = 0.018. Fifty seven percent of ING4-low/p-p65-high tumors were lymph node-positive, indicating a high metastatic tendency of these tumors. Conversely, ectopic expression of ING4 inhibited p65/RelA phosphorylation in T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, ING4 suppressed PMA-induced cell invasion and NF-κB-target gene expression in T47D cells, indicating that ING4 inhibited NF-κB activity in breast cancer cells. Supportive of the ING4 function in the regulation of NF-κB-target gene expression, we found that ING4 expression levels inversely correlated with the expression of NF-κB-target genes in primary breast tumors by analyzing public gene expression datasets. Moreover, low ING4 expression or high expression of the gene signature composed of a subset of ING4-repressed NF-κB-target genes was associated with reduced disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Taken together, we conclude that ING4 negatively regulates NF-κB in breast cancer. Consequently, down-regulation of ING4 leads to activation of NF-κB, contributing to tumor progression and reduced disease-free patient survival in

  15. ERK5/BMK1 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL: Implication in clear cell renal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Leticia, Serrano-Oviedo; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well a...

  16. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma12

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well a...

  17. Lgl2 executes its function as a tumor suppressor by regulating ErbB signaling in the zebrafish epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Reischauer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in tissue homeostasis, acquisition of invasive cell characteristics, and tumor formation can often be linked to the loss of epithelial cell polarity. In carcinogenesis, the grade of neoplasia correlates with impaired cell polarity. In Drosophila, lethal giant larvae (lgl, discs large (dlg, and scribble, which are components of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity machinery, act as tumor suppressors, and orthologs of this evolutionary conserved pathway are lost in human carcinoma with high frequency. However, a mechanistic link between neoplasia and vertebrate orthologs of these tumor-suppressor genes remains to be fully explored at the organismal level. Here, we show that the pen/lgl2 mutant phenotype shares two key cellular and molecular features of mammalian malignancy: cell autonomous epidermal neoplasia and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT of basal epidermal cells including the differential expression of several regulators of EMT. Further, we found that epidermal neoplasia and EMT in pen/lgl2 mutant epidermal cells is promoted by ErbB signalling, a pathway of high significance in human carcinomas. Intriguingly, EMT in the pen/lgl2 mutant is facilitated specifically by ErbB2 mediated E-cadherin mislocalization and not via canonical snail-dependent down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. Our data reveal that pen/lgl2 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vertebrates, establishing zebrafish pen/lgl2 mutants as a valuable cancer model.

  18. Breast carcinoma metastasis suppressor gene 1 (BRMS1): update on its role as the suppressor of cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodura, Magdalena Anna; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2015-12-01

    BRMS1 was discovered over a decade ago as a potential tumor suppressor gene. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about the structure of BRMS1, mechanisms of its action and a role of BRMS1 in the cancer progression. As a suppressor of metastasis, BRMS1 has demonstrated a variety of ways to act on the cell functions, such as cell migration, invasiveness, angiogenesis, cell survival, cytoskeleton rearrangements, cell adhesion, and immune recognition. This variety of effects is a likely reason behind the robustness of anti-metastatic influence of BRMS1. Intracellular signaling mechanisms employed by BRMS1 include regulation of transcription, EGF/HER2 signaling, and expression of NF-kB, fascin, osteopontin, and IL-6. Recently reported clinical studies confirm that BRMS1 can indeed be used as a prognostic marker. Approaches to employ BRMS1 in a development of anti-cancer treatment have also been made. The studies reviewed here with respect to BRMS1 structure, cellular effects, intracellular signaling, and clinical value consolidate the importance of BRMS1 in the development of metastasis.

  19. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2016-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF-/- macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  20. Genomic annotation of the meningioma tumor suppressor locus on chromosome 1p34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Erik P; White, Peter S; Brodeur, Garrett M

    2004-01-29

    Meningioma is a frequently occurring tumor of the meninges surrounding the central nervous system. Loss of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p) is the second most frequent chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. Previously, we identified a 3.7 megabase (Mb) region of consistent deletion on 1p33-p34 in a panel of 157 tumors. Loss of this region was associated with advanced disease and predictive for tumor relapse. In this report, a high-resolution integrated map of the region was constructed (CompView) to identify all markers in the smallest region of overlapping deletion (SRO). A regional somatic cell hybrid panel was used to more precisely localize those markers identified in CompView as within or overlapping the region. Additional deletion mapping using microsatellites localized to the region narrowed the SRO to approximately 2.8 Mb. The 88 markers remaining in the SRO were used to screen genomic databases to identify large-insert clones. Clones were assembled into a physical map of the region by PCR-based, sequence-tagged site (STS) content mapping. A sequence from clones was used to validate STS content by electronic PCR and to identify transcripts. A minimal tiling path of 43 clones was constructed across the SRO. Sequence data from the most current sequence assembly were used for further validation. A total of 59 genes were ordered within the SRO. In all, 17 of these were selected as likely candidates based on annotation using Gene Ontology Consortium terms, including the MUTYH, PRDX1, FOXD2, FOXE3, PTCH2, and RAD54L genes. This annotation of a putative tumor suppressor locus provides a resource for further analysis of meningioma candidate genes.

  1. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhan, Qian [The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical Detection, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xu, Hongying [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili; Li, Chen [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: larissaxiang@163.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rengs726@126.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-10

    The KRAB–zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. -- Highlights: •Downregulated ZNF545 in MM tissues and cell lines and ectopic expression of ZNF545 suppresses tumor growth. •Tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 represents an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. •ZNF545 exerts its tumor suppressive effects via transcriptional activating p53 pathway.

  2. 脂肪组织源性肿瘤与抑癌基因p53关系的研究%Relationship between tumor suppressor gene p53 and tumors of adipose tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娅兰; 丘钜世; 熊敏

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between p53 gene and tumors of adipose tissue at the level of protein and gene. Methods Immunohistochemical LSAB, PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used in 82 cases. Results p53 protein is expressed only in liposarcomas, in which the positive staining rate was 48.08% (25/52). In different subtypes of liposarcomas, the positive staining rate in well differentiated liposarcomas was 30.00% (9/30), which is much lower than that of the poorly differentiated liposarcomas (P<0.005). Abnormality in the single-stranded DNA pattern was determined in 2 samples (pleomophic liposarcomas) by PCR-SSCP analysis. Missense mutations in exon 8 codon 268 of p53 gene (AAC→ATC) were detected by DNA sequencing. Another heterozygotic cosense mutation may exist at exon 6 codon 221 of p53 gene (GAG→GAA). Conclusions The data suggest that the p53 protein has a relationship with development, differentiation and malignancy of liposarcoma. Detecting the level of p53 protein expression may be valuable in evaluating the level of differentiation and malignancy of liposarcoma. There appear point mutation on exon 8,6 of p53 gene.%目的从蛋白表达及基因水平探讨脂肪组织源性肿瘤与p53基因的关系。 方法 LSAB免疫组化法, PCR-SSCP及DNA序列分析方法。 结果 p53蛋白只在脂肪肉瘤中表达,阳性率为48.08%(25/52)。不同类型脂肪肉瘤,分化良好者阳性率30.00%(9/30),低于分化较低者(P<0.005).p53第6、7、8外显子PCR-SSCP分析,2例多形性脂肪肉瘤出现异常泳动带。DNA序列分析证实1例第8外显子第268位编码区出现错义突变(AACATC),另1例第6外显子第221位编码区出现可疑杂合同义突变(GAGGAA)。 结论 p53蛋白与脂肪肉瘤的形成及分化和恶性程度有关。p53蛋白表达可作为判断脂肪肉瘤分化程度及恶性程度参考指标之一。脂肪肉瘤中p53 基因第6、8外显子分别存在点突变。

  3. Fusion of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene CHEK2 and the Gene for the Regulatory Subunit B of Protein Phosphatase 2 PPP2R2A in Childhood Teratoma

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    Yuesheng Jin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the molecular genetic consequences of a balanced chromosome translocation t(8;22(p21; q12, which occurred as the sole cytogenetic aberration in short-term cultured cells from an intrathoracic mature teratoma in a 15-year-old girl. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction disclosed that t(8;22 resulted in the fusion of the genes PPP2R2A and CHEK2, with an inserted fragment belonging to class I endogenous retrovirus-related sequences at the junction. Sequencing of the two genes did not reveal any additional mutation. None of the three detected PPP2R2A/CHEK2 fusion transcripts resulted in an in-frame PPP2R2A/CHEK2 chimerical open reading frame; however, in all of them, the known open reading frame of CHEK2 was preserved. Thus, promoter swapping leading to deregulated CHEK2 expression would be the most likely oncogenic mechanism. Whereas inactivating mutations of CHEK2 previously have been described in a variety of sporadic tumors and in inherited cancer-predisposing syndromes, PPP2R2A, encoding a regulatory subunit of the multimeric enzyme phosphatase 2, has not been directly implicated in tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that deregulation of CHEK2 and/or PPP2R2A is of pathogenetic importance in at least a subset of germ cell tumors.

  4. Cdh11 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor in a Murine Retinoblastoma Model by Facilitating Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchong, Mellone N.; Yurkowski, Christine; Ma, Clement; Spencer, Clarellen; Pajovic, Sanja; Gallie, Brenda L.

    2010-01-01

    CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01). Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8) (p = 0.01) and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016), compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003). In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers), while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121). Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and β-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death. PMID:20421947

  5. Cdh11 acts as a tumor suppressor in a murine retinoblastoma model by facilitating tumor cell death.

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    Mellone N Marchong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01. Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8 (p = 0.01 and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016, compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003. In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers, while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121. Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and beta-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Maria

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA, an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA's primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  8. The Regulatory Mechanisms of Tumor Suppressor P16INK4A and Relevance to Cancer†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junan; Poi, Ming Jye; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2011-01-01

    P16INK4A (also known as P16 and MTS1), a protein consisting exclusively of four ankyrin repeats, is recognized as a tumor suppressor mainly due to the prevalence of genetic inactivation of the p16INK4A (or CDKN2A) gene in virtually all types of human cancers. However, it has also been shown that elevated expression (up-regulation) of P16 is involved in cellular senescence, aging, and cancer progression, indicating that the regulation of P16 is critical for its function. Here, we discuss the regulatory mechanisms of P16 function at the DNA level, the transcription level, and the posttranscriptional level, as well as their implications in the structure-function relationship of P16 and in human cancers. PMID:21619050

  9. Genomic characterization of Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 targets in nephron progenitor cells during kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Sunny; Ho, Jacqueline; Pandey, Priyanka; Macisaac, Kenzie; Taglienti, Mary; Xiang, Michael; Alterovitz, Gil; Ramoni, Marco; Fraenkel, Ernest; Kreidberg, Jordan A

    2010-04-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) gene encodes a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in nephron progenitor differentiation during renal development. To identify WT1 target genes that might regulate nephron progenitor differentiation in vivo, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled to mouse promoter microarray (ChIP-chip) using chromatin prepared from embryonic mouse kidney tissue. We identified 1663 genes bound by WT1, 86% of which contain a previously identified, conserved, high-affinity WT1 binding site. To investigate functional interactions between WT1 and candidate target genes in nephron progenitors, we used a novel, modified WT1 morpholino loss-of-function model in embryonic mouse kidney explants to knock down WT1 expression in nephron progenitors ex vivo. Low doses of WT1 morpholino resulted in reduced WT1 target gene expression specifically in nephron progenitors, whereas high doses of WT1 morpholino arrested kidney explant development and were associated with increased nephron progenitor cell apoptosis, reminiscent of the phenotype observed in Wt1(-/-) embryos. Collectively, our results provide a comprehensive description of endogenous WT1 target genes in nephron progenitor cells in vivo, as well as insights into the transcriptional signaling networks controlled by WT1 that might direct nephron progenitor fate during renal development.

  10. The tumor suppressor HHEX inhibits axon growth when prematurely expressed in developing central nervous system neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew T; Venkatesh, Ishwariya; Callif, Ben L; Thiel, Laura K; Coley, Denise M; Winsor, Kristen N; Wang, Zimei; Kramer, Audra A; Lerch, Jessica K; Blackmore, Murray G

    2015-09-01

    Neurons in the embryonic and peripheral nervous system respond to injury by activating transcriptional programs supportive of axon growth, ultimately resulting in functional recovery. In contrast, neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS) possess a limited capacity to regenerate axons after injury, fundamentally constraining repair. Activating pro-regenerative gene expression in CNS neurons is a promising therapeutic approach, but progress is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the relevant transcription factors. An emerging hypothesis is that factors implicated in cellular growth and motility outside the nervous system may also control axon growth in neurons. We therefore tested sixty-nine transcription factors, previously identified as possessing tumor suppressive or oncogenic properties in non-neuronal cells, in assays of neurite outgrowth. This screen identified YAP1 and E2F1 as enhancers of neurite outgrowth, and PITX1, RBM14, ZBTB16, and HHEX as inhibitors. Follow-up experiments are focused on the tumor suppressor HHEX, one of the strongest growth inhibitors. HHEX is widely expressed in adult CNS neurons, including corticospinal tract neurons after spinal injury, but is present only in trace amounts in immature cortical neurons and adult peripheral neurons. HHEX overexpression in early postnatal cortical neurons reduced both initial axonogenesis and the rate of axon elongation, and domain deletion analysis strongly implicated transcriptional repression as the underlying mechanism. These findings suggest a role for HHEX in restricting axon growth in the developing CNS, and substantiate the hypothesis that previously identified oncogenes and tumor suppressors can play conserved roles in axon extension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 抑癌基因PTEN蛋白在肾癌细胞中的表达及病变评估中的意义%Expression of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN in Renal Cell Carcinoma and Its Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金雨; 谢庆祥; 韩聪祥; 赵力; 林吓聪

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To explore the expression of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and its impact on cell cycle. [Methods] Totally 44 cases of RCC tissues confirmed by pathology after operation, 15 cases of adjacent normal renal cell tissues and 10 cases of non-tumor normal renal tissues were collected. Immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect PTEN protein. Fifteen RCC tissues were selected respectively from renal tissues with positive and negative PTEN protein. Flow cytometry was used to examine the cell cycle. [Results]The expression of PTEN protein mostly located in the renal cell cytoplasm. The positive expression of PTEN protein in RCC tissues was 36. 3% , which was prominently lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues(77. 3%) and the normal tissues(100%) ( P <0. 01). The expression of PTEN in RCC tissues with stage I and H were much higher than those in RCC tissues with stage HI and IV ( P <0. 05). The percentage of Go/Gi phase in renal cancer with positive expression of PTEN protein was mush higher than that in renal cancer with negative expression of PTEN protein( P <0. 01) , but the percentage of G2/M and S phase in renal cancer with positive expression of PTEN protein was mush lower than that in renal cancer with negative expression of PTEN protein( P <0. 01). [Conclusion]The positive expression of PTEN protein in RCC tissues significantly decreases. PTEN protein may suppress renal carcinoma through inducing the cell cycle to be arrested in G0/G1 phase. The expression of PTEN protein can evaluate the development and prognosis of RCC.%[目的]探讨肾细胞癌(renal cell carcinoma,RCC)中的抑癌基因PTEN蛋白的表达及其对肾癌细胞周期的影响.[方法]收集44例手术后并经病理学检查证实的RCC组织、15 例癌旁非癌肾组织及10例非瘤正常肾组织,采用免疫组化SP法进行PTEN蛋白检测,按PTEN蛋白阴、阳性各选15例RCC组织,用流式细胞仪检测细胞周期.[结果]PTEN蛋白

  12. Influence of suppressor gene p16 on retinoic acid inducing cancer cell A549 differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of suppressor gene p16 in the process of differential regulation of retinoic acid (RA) on the A549 lung cancer cells.Methods Tumor suppressor gene p16 was transferred into A549 cells and the cells were treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATR) at the dosage of 5×10-6 mol/L for 4 d. After that, the proliferation and differentiation of A549 cells were examined by growth curve and cytometry analysis, the change of lung lineage-specific marker MUC1 was tested by immunohistochemical staining. Meanwhile, Western blot was used to observe the change of p16 protein expression in A549 cells treated with ATRA.Results ATRA could obviously inhibit the growth and induce the differentiation of A549 Cells that were transferred with p16 gene. There were more cells arrested in G1/G0 phase and the expression of MUG1 was markedly down-regulated than in control cells. The expression of p16 protein was up-regulated in A549 cells treated with ATRA.Conclusion Suppressor gene p16 could enhance the effects of RA and proliferated suppression and differential induction of A549 cells.

  13. The human LIS1 is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and plays a tumor suppressor function

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    Xing, Zhen; Tang, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Da, Liang; Song, Hai; Wang, Suiquan [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Tiollais, Pierre [Unite' d' Organisation Nucleaire et Oncogenese, INSERM U.579, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Li, Tsaiping [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Mujun, E-mail: mjzhao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} LIS1 mRNA and protein levels are decreased in 70% HCC tissues. {yields} Downregulation of LIS1 expression induces oncogenic transformation of QSG7701 and NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LIS1 downregulation leads to mitotic errors including spindle and chromosome defects. {yields} Ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. {yields} Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and progression of HCC. -- Abstract: The human lissencephaly-1 gene (LIS1) is a disease gene responsible for Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDL). LIS1 gene is located in the region of chromosome 17p13.3 that is frequency deleted in MDL patients and in human liver cancer cells. However, the expression and significance of LIS1 in liver cancer remain unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of LIS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of LIS1 were downregulated in about 70% of HCC tissues, and this downregulation was significantly associated with tumor progression. Functional studies showed that the reduction of LIS1 expression in the normal human liver cell line QSG7701 or the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 by shRNA resulted in colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor formation in nude mice, demonstrating that a decrease in the LIS1 level can promote the oncogenic transformation of cells. We also observed that the phenotypes of LIS1-knockdown cells displayed various defective mitotic structures, suggesting that the mechanism by which reduced LIS1 levels results in tumorigenesis is associated with its role in mitosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the

  14. The ARF Tumor Suppressor Regulates Bone Remodeling and Osteosarcoma Development in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John C.; Deng, Hongju; Shea, Lauren K.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Lairmore, Michael D.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rosol, Thomas J.; Weber, Jason D.; Ratner, Lee; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2010-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor regulates p53 as well as basic developmental processes independent of p53, including osteoclast activation, by controlling ribosomal biogenesis. Here we provide evidence that ARF is a master regulator of bone remodeling and osteosarcoma (OS) development in mice. Arf-/- mice displayed increased osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) activity with a significant net increase in trabecular bone volume. The long bones of Arf-/- mice had increased expression of OB genes while Arf-/- OB showed enhanced differentiation in vitro. Mice transgenic for the Tax oncogene develop lymphocytic tumors with associated osteolytic lesions, while Tax+Arf-/- mice uniformly developed spontaneous OS by 7 months of age. Tax+Arf-/- tumors were well differentiated OS characterized by an abundance of new bone with OC recruitment, expressed OB markers and displayed intact levels of p53 mRNA and reduced Rb transcript levels. Cell lines established from OS recapitulated characteristics of the primary tumor, including the expression of mature OB markers and ability to form mineralized tumors when transplanted. Loss of heterozygosity in OS tumors arising in Tax+Arf+/- mice emphasized the necessity of ARF-loss in OS development. Hypothesizing that inhibition of ARF-regulated bone remodeling would repress development of OS, we demonstrated that treatment of Tax+Arf-/- mice with zoledronic acid, a bisphosphonate inhibitor of OC activity and repressor of bone turnover, prevented or delayed the onset of OS. These data describe a novel role for ARF as a regulator of bone remodeling through effects on both OB and OC. Finally, these data underscore the potential of targeting bone remodeling as adjuvant therapy or in patients with genetic predispositions to prevent the development of OS. PMID:21209895

  15. Genistein up-regulates tumor suppressor microRNA-574-3p in prostate cancer.

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    Takeshi Chiyomaru

    Full Text Available Genistein has been shown to inhibit cancers both in vitro and in vivo, by altering the expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs. In this study, we focused on tumor suppressor miRNAs regulated by genistein and investigated their function in prostate cancer (PCa and target pathways. Using miRNA microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR we observed that miR-574-3p was significantly up-regulated in PCa cells treated with genistein compared with vehicle control. The expression of miR-574-3p was significantly lower in PCa cell lines and clinical PCa tissues compared with normal prostate cells (RWPE-1 and adjacent normal tissues. Low expression level of miR-574-3p was correlated with advanced tumor stage and higher Gleason score in PCa specimens. Re-expression of miR-574-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. miR-574-3p restoration induced apoptosis through reducing Bcl-xL and activating caspase-9 and caspase-3. Using GeneCodis software analysis, several pathways affected by miR-574-3p were identified, such as 'Pathways in cancer', 'Jak-STAT signaling pathway', and 'Wnt signaling pathway'. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-574-3p directly binds to the 3' UTR of several target genes (such as RAC1, EGFR and EP300 that are components of 'Pathways in cancer'. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the three target genes in PCa cells were markedly down-regulated with miR-574-3p. Loss-of-function studies demonstrated that the three target genes significantly affect cell proliferation, migration and invasion in PCa cell lines. Our results show that genistein up-regulates tumor suppressor miR-574-3p expression targeting several cell signaling pathways. These findings enhance understanding of how genistein regulates with miRNA in PCa.

  16. BRCA1 and p53 tumor suppressor molecules in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Atsuko; Minami, Akari; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Matsuda, Satoru

    2015-01-28

    Tumor suppressor molecules play a pivotal role in regulating DNA repair, cell proliferation, and cell death, which are also important processes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, however, the precise molecular events that control the death of neuronal cells are unclear. Recently, a fundamental role for tumor suppressor molecules in regulating neurons in Alzheimer's disease was highlighted. Generally, onset of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease may be delayed with use of dietary neuro-protective agents against oxidative stresses. Studies suggest that dietary antioxidants are also beneficial for brain health in reducing disease-risk and in slowing down disease-progression. We summarize research advances in dietary regulation for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with a focus on its modulatory roles in BRCA1 and p53 tumor suppressor expression, in support of further therapeutic research in this field.

  17. Functional interactions between Lmo2, the Arf tumor suppressor, and Notch1 in murine T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, Louise M; Volanakis, Emmanuel J; Zhou, Sheng; Lu, Taihe; Sherr, Charles J; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2011-05-19

    LMO2 is a target of chromosomal translocations in T-cell tumors and was activated by retroviral vector insertions in T-cell tumors from X-SCID patients in gene therapy trials. To better understand the cooperating genetic events in LMO2-associated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we investigated the roles of Arf tumor suppressor loss and Notch activation in murine models of transplantation. Lmo2 overexpression enhanced the expansion of primitive DN2 thymocytes, eventually facilitating the stochastic induction of clonal CD4(+)/CD8(+) malignancies. Inactivation of the Arf tumor suppressor further increased the self-renewal capacity of the primitive, preleukemic thymocyte pool and accelerated the development of aggressive, Lmo2-induced T-cell lympholeukemias. Notch mutations were frequently detected in these Lmo2-induced tumors. The Arf promoter was not directly engaged by Lmo2 or mutant Notch, and use of a mouse model in which activation of a mutant Notch allele depends on previous engagement of the Arf promoter revealed that Notch activation could occur as a subsequent event in T-cell tumorigenesis. Therefore, Lmo2 cooperates with Arf loss to enhance self-renewal in primitive thymocytes. Notch mutation and Arf inactivation appear to independently cooperate in no requisite order with Lmo2 overexpression in inducing T-ALL, and all 3 events remained insufficient to guarantee immediate tumor development.

  18. Regulatory roles of tumor-suppressor proteins and noncoding RNA in cancer and normal cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, Alan; Song, Xu

    2008-04-15

    We describe a mechanism for reversible regulation of gene transcription, mediated by a family of tumor-suppressor proteins (TSP) containing a DNA-binding domain (DBD) that binds to a gene and represses transcription, and RNA-binding domains (RBDs) that bind RNA, usually a noncoding RNA (ncRNA), forming a TSP/RNA complex that releases the TSP from a gene and reverses repression. This mechanism appears to be involved in the regulation of embryogenesis, oncogenesis, and steroidogenesis. Embryonic cells express high levels of RNA that bind to a TSP and prevent repression of proto-oncogenes that drive cell proliferation. The level of the RNA subsequently decreases in most differentiating cells, enabling a TSP to repress proto-oncogenes and stop cell proliferation. Oncogenesis can result when the level of the RNA fails to decrease in a proliferating cell or increases in a differentiated cell. This mechanism also regulates transcription of P450scc, the first gene in the steroidogenic pathway.

  19. Is Rab25 a tumor promoter or suppressor--context dependency on RCP status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2010-08-01

    Conflicting reports in the literature suggest that Rab25 could either be a context dependent promoter or suppressor of tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that whether Rab25 acts as a promoter or suppressor in tumor progression depends on the expression status of its effector, the Rab coupling protein (RCP). An elevated expression of RCP resulting from genomic amplification may enhance Rab25's tumor progression activity. Elevation of Rab25 alone may sequester endogenous RCP, and attenuates its activating effect on other oncogenic products, such as mutant Ras.

  20. Tumor suppressor ARF: The new player of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-09-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses.

  1. The milk protein α-casein functions as a tumor suppressor via activation of STAT1 signaling, effectively preventing breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Capozza, Franco; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Xuanmao, Jiao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-11-01

    Here, we identified the milk protein α-casein as a novel suppressor of tumor growth and metastasis. Briefly, Met-1 mammary tumor cells expressing α-casein showed a ~5-fold reduction in tumor growth and a near 10-fold decrease in experimental metastasis. To identify the molecular mechanism(s), we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Interestingly, our results show that α-casein upregulates gene transcripts associated with interferon/STAT1 signaling and downregulates genes associated with "stemness." These findings were validated by immunoblot and FACS analysis, which showed the upregulation and hyperactivation of STAT1 and a decrease in the number of CD44(+) "cancer stem cells." These gene signatures were also able to predict clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that a lactation-based therapeutic strategy using recombinant α-casein would provide a more natural and non-toxic approach to the development of novel anticancer therapies.

  2. Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes and Clinical Significance in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma%多种抑癌基因在食管鳞状细胞癌中的甲基化状态及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王长春; 毛伟敏; 凌志强

    2012-01-01

    背景:抑癌基因甲基化与食管癌相关,目前多种抑癌基因与肿瘤家族史相关性的报道少见.目的:研究多种抑癌基因在食管鳞状细胞癌(ESCC)中的甲基化状态及其临床意义.方法:选取2010年2~7月浙江省肿瘤医院76例ESCC患者.应用MSP技术检测肿瘤组织和相应癌旁正常组织中APC、RARβ2、CDH1、p16INK4a、RASSF1A等5个抑癌基因的甲基化状态,并分析抑癌基因甲基化状态与肿瘤家族史的关系及其对预后的影响.结果:ESCC组织APC、RARβ2、CDH1、p16INK4a、RASSF1A的甲基化率均显著高于相应癌旁正常组织(P<0.05).ESCC组织中APC、RAR32、CDH1、RASSF1A甲基化与肿瘤家族史相关(P<0.05);CDH1、RASSF1A甲基化患者的生存期明显低于非甲基化患者(P=0.015、P=0.016).结论:ESCC患者存在抑癌基因APC、RARβ2、CDH1、p16INK4a、RASSF1A高甲基化;且APC、RARβ2、CDH1、RASSF1A甲基化与肿瘤家族史显著相关,CDH1、RASSF1A甲基化患者的预后可能较差.%Background: There is a correlation between methylation of tumor suppressor genes and esophageal carcinoma, but studies on relationship between methylation of tumor suppressor genes and family history of carcinoma are few. Aims: To study the methylation of tumor suppressor genes and clinical significance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: Seventy-six patients with ESCC from Feb. To July 2010 at Zhejiang Cancer Hospital were enrolled. MSP technique was used to detect methylation status of APC, RAR(32, CDH1, plG?4" and RASSF1A in tumor tissue and paracancerous normal tissue. Relationship of methylation status of tumor suppressor genes with family history of carcinoma was analyzed, and their influences on prognosis was estimated. Results: The methylation rates of APC, RAR|32, CDH1, pjfjiM?a and RASSF1A were significantly higher in tumor tissue than those in paracancerous normal tissue (P<0.05). Methylation of APC, RARp2, CDH1, RASSF1A genes in

  3. Tumor suppressor roles of CENP-E and Nsl1 in Drosophila epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Muzzopappa, Mariana; Milán, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Depletion of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) genes in Drosophila epithelial tissues leads to JNK-dependent programmed cell death and additional blockade of the apoptotic program drives tumorigenesis. A recent report proposes that chromosomal instability (CIN) is not the driving force in the tumorigenic response of the SAC-deficient tissue, and that checkpoint proteins exert a SAC-independent tumor suppressor role. This notion is based on observations that the depletion of CENP-E levels or prevention of Bub3 from binding to the kinetochore in Drosophila tissues unable to activate the apoptotic program induces CIN but does not cause hyperproliferation. Here we re-examined this proposal. In contrast to the previous report, we observed that depletion of CENP-E or Nsl1-the latter mediating kinetochore targeting of Bub3-in epithelial tissues unable to activate the apoptotic program induces significant levels of aneuploidy and drives tumor-like growth. The induction of the JNK transcriptional targets Wingless, a mitogenic molecule, and MMP1, a matrix metaloproteinase 1 involved in basement membrane degradation was also observed in these tumors. An identical response of the tissue was previously detected upon depletion of several SAC genes or genes involved in spindle assembly, chromatin condensation, and cytokinesis, all of which have been described to cause CIN. All together, these results reinforce the role of CIN in driving tumorigenesis in Drosophila epithelial tissues and question the proposed SAC-independent roles of checkpoint proteins in suppressing tumorigenesis. Differences in aneuploidy rates might explain the discrepancy between the previous report and our results.

  4. Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeSano Jeffrey

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs, some of which function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, are involved in carcinogenesis via regulating cell proliferation and/or cell death. MicroRNA miR-34 was recently found to be a direct target of p53, functioning downstream of the p53 pathway as a tumor suppressor. miR-34 targets Notch, HMGA2, and Bcl-2, genes involved in the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. The role of miR-34 in gastric cancer has not been reported previously. In this study, we examined the effects of miR-34 restoration on p53-mutant human gastric cancer cells and potential target gene expression. Methods Human gastric cancer cells were transfected with miR-34 mimics or infected with the lentiviral miR-34-MIF expression system, and validated by miR-34 reporter assay using Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter. Potential target gene expression was assessed by Western blot for proteins, and by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for mRNAs. The effects of miR-34 restoration were assessed by cell growth assay, cell cycle analysis, caspase-3 activation, and cytotoxicity assay, as well as by tumorsphere formation and growth. Results Human gastric cancer Kato III cells with miR-34 restoration reduced the expression of target genes Bcl-2, Notch, and HMGA2. Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter assay showed that the transfected miR-34s were functional and confirmed that Bcl-2 is a direct target of miR-34. Restoration of miR-34 chemosensitized Kato III cells with a high level of Bcl-2, but not MKN-45 cells with a low level of Bcl-2. miR-34 impaired cell growth, accumulated the cells in G1 phase, increased caspase-3 activation, and, more significantly, inhibited tumorsphere formation and growth. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that in p53-deficient human gastric cancer cells, restoration of functional miR-34 inhibits cell growth and induces chemosensitization and apoptosis, indicating that miR-34 may restore p53 function. Restoration of miR-34 inhibits

  5. Hsf1 Is Required for the Nuclear Translocation of p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the p53 tumor suppressor is most frequently inactivated by genetic mutations, exclusion from the nucleus is also seen in human tumors. We have begun to examine p53 nuclear importation by isolating a series of mutant cells in which the temperature-sensitive murine p53Val135 mutant is sequestered in the cytoplasm. We previously showed that that three of them (ALTR12, ALTR19, and ALTR25 constituted a single complementation group. Here, we found that ALTR12 cells are more sensitive to heat stress than either ALTR19 or ALTR25 and that there was a complete lack of induction of Hsp70 in response to heat shock. Western blot analysis showed no expression of the Hsf1 transcription factor, and neither heat shock nor azetidine could induce p53 nuclear localization in ALTR12 cells but did in parental A1–5 cells. Suppression of Hsf1 in A1–5 cells with quercetin or an Hsf1 siRNA reduced p53 nuclear importation and inhibited p53-mediated activation of a p21 reporter. Most convincingly, p53 nuclear importation could be restored in ALTR12 cells by introducing an exogenous Hsf1 gene. Collectively, our result suggests that Hsf1 is required for p53 nuclear importation and activation and implies that heat shock factors play a role in the regulation of p53.

  6. The JNK inhibitor SP600129 enhances apoptosis of HCC cells induced by the tumor suppressor WWOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderca, Ileana; Moser, Catherine D.; Veerasamy, Manivannan; Bani-Hani, Ahmad H.; Bonilla-Guerrero, Ruben; Ahmed, Kadra; Shire, Abdirashid; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Montoya, Damian P.; Mettler, Teresa A.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Nagorney, David M.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Lai, Jin-Ping; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The FRA16D fragile site gene WWOX is a tumor suppressor that participates in p53-mediated apoptosis. The c-jun N-terminal kinase JNK1 interacts with WWOX and inhibits apoptosis. We investigated the function of WWOX in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the effect of JNK inhibition on WWOX-mediated apoptosis. Methods Allelic imbalance on chromosome 16 was analyzed in 73 HCCs using 53 microsatellite markers. WWOX mRNA in HCC cell lines and primary HCCs was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Effects of WWOX on proliferation and apoptosis and the interaction between WWOX and JNK inhibition were examined. Results Loss on chromosome 16 occurred in 34 of 73 HCCs. Of 11 HCC cell lines, 2 had low, 7 intermediate, and 2 had high WWOX mRNA. Of 51 primary tumors, 23 had low WWOX mRNA. Forced expression of WWOX in SNU387 cells decreased FGF2-mediated proliferation and enhanced apoptosis induced by staurosporine and the JNK inhibitor SP600129. Conversely, knockdown of WWOX in SNU449 cells using shRNA targeting WWOX increased proliferation and resistance to SP600129 induced apoptosis. Conclusions WWOX induces apoptosis and inhibits human HCC cell growth through a mechanism enhanced by JNK inhibition. PMID:18620777

  7. Does Notch play a tumor suppressor role across diverse squamous cell carcinomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Biswas, Sangita; Qin, Xin; Gong, Wenrong; Deng, Wenbing; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-08-01

    The role of Notch pathway in tumorigenesis is highly variable. It can be tumor suppressive or pro-oncogenic, typically depending on the cellular context. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a cancer of the squamous cell, which can occur in diverse human tissues. SCCs are one of the most frequent human malignancies for which the pathologic mechanisms remain elusive. Recent genomic analysis of diverse SCCs identified marked levels of mutations in NOTCH1, implicating Notch signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of SCCs. In this review, evidences highlighting NOTCH's role in different types of SCCs are summarized. Moreover, based on accumulating structural information of the NOTCH receptor, the functional consequences of NOTCH1 gene mutations identified from diverse SCCs are analyzed, emphasizing loss of function of Notch in these cancers. Finally, we discuss the convergent view on an intriguing possibility that Notch may function as tumor suppressor in SCCs across different tissues. These mechanistic insights into Notch signaling pathways will help to guide the research of SCCs and development of therapeutic strategies for these cancers.

  8. Tumor suppressor ataxia telangiectasia mutated functions downstream of TGF-β1 in orchestrating profibrotic responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overstreet, Jessica M; Samarakoon, Rohan; Cardona-Grau, Diana; Goldschmeding, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102376069; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Effective therapy to prevent organ fibrosis, which is associated with more than half of all mortalities, remains elusive. Involvement of tumor suppressor ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in the TGF-β1 pathway related to renal fibrosis is largely unknown. ATM activation (pATM(Ser1981)) increased 4

  9. Regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by the Lgl neoplastic tumor suppressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portela, Marta; Parsons, Linda M.; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Richardson, Helena E.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved neoplastic tumor suppressor protein, Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl), plays roles in cell polarity and tissue growth via regulation of the Hippo pathway. In our recent study, we showed that in the developing Drosophila eye epithelium, depletion of Lgl leads to increased li

  10. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  11. Androgen receptor is the key transcriptional mediator of the tumor suppressor SPOP in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chuandong; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Shah, Shrijal S; Shou, John; Eedunuri, Vijay Kumar; Foley, Christopher; Fiskus, Warren; Rajendran, Mahitha; Chew, Sue Anne; Zimmermann, Martin; Bond, Richard; He, Bin; Coarfa, Cristian; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Somatic missense mutations in the substrate-binding pocket of the E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor SPOP are present in up to 15% of human prostate adenocarcinomas, but are rare in other malignancies, suggesting a prostate-specific mechanism of action. SPOP promotes ubiquitination and degradation of several protein substrates, including the androgen receptor (AR) coactivator SRC-3. However, the relative contributions that SPOP substrates may make to the pathophysiology of SPOP-mutant (mt) prostate adenocarcinomas are unknown. Using an unbiased bioinformatics approach, we determined that the gene expression profile of prostate adenocarcinoma cells engineered to express mt-SPOP overlaps greatly with the gene signature of both SRC-3 and AR transcriptional output, with a stronger similarity to AR than SRC-3. This finding suggests that in addition to its SRC-3-mediated effects, SPOP also exerts SRC-3-independent effects that are AR-mediated. Indeed, we found that wild-type (wt) but not prostate adenocarcinoma-associated mutants of SPOP promoted AR ubiquitination and degradation, acting directly through a SPOP-binding motif in the hinge region of AR. In support of these results, tumor xenografts composed of prostate adenocarcinoma cells expressing mt-SPOP exhibited higher AR protein levels and grew faster than tumors composed of prostate adenocarcinoma cells expressing wt-SPOP. Furthermore, genetic ablation of SPOP was sufficient to increase AR protein levels in mouse prostate. Examination of public human prostate adenocarcinoma datasets confirmed a strong link between transcriptomic profiles of mt-SPOP and AR. Overall, our studies highlight the AR axis as the key transcriptional output of SPOP in prostate adenocarcinoma and provide an explanation for the prostate-specific tumor suppressor role of wt-SPOP.

  12. The Drosophila Netrin receptor frazzled/DCC functions as an invasive tumor suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duman-Scheel Molly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity at 18q, which includes the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC gene, has been linked to many human cancers. However, it is unclear if loss of DCC is the specific underlying cause of these cancers. The Drosophila imaginal discs are excellent systems in which to study DCC function, as it is possible to model human tumors through the generation of somatic clones of cells bearing multiple genetic lesions. Here, these attributes of the fly system were utilized to investigate the potential tumor suppressing functions of the Drosophila DCC homologue frazzled (fra during eye-antennal disc development. Results Most fra loss of function clones are eliminated during development. However, when mutant clone cells generated in the developing eye were rescued from death, partially differentiated eye cells were found outside of the normal eye field, and in extreme cases distant sites of the body. Characterization of these cells during development indicates that fra mutant cells display characteristics of invasive tumor cells, including increased levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, and Mmp-1, changes in cadherin expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and loss of polarity. Mutation of fra promotes basement membrane degradation and invasion which are repressed by inhibition of Rho1 signaling. Although inhibition of JNK signaling blocks invasive phenotypes in some metastatic cancer models in flies, blocking JNK signaling inhibits fra mutant cell death, thereby enhancing the fra mutant phenotype. Conclusions The results of this investigation provide the first direct link between point mutations in fra/DCC and metastatic phenotypes in an animal model and suggest that Fra functions as an invasive tumor suppressor during Drosophila development.

  13. Tumor-derived lactate and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Linking metabolism to cancer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zaheed; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2013-11-01

    Many malignant cells produce increased amounts of lactate, which promotes the development of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs, lactate, and a low pH in the tumor microenvironment inhibit the function of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, hence allowing for disease progression. Ketogenic diets can deplete tumor-bearing animals from MDSCs and regulatory T cells, thereby improving their immunological profile.

  14. Context-dependent activation of Wnt signaling by tumor suppressor RUNX3 in gastric cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoli; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Naka, Kazuhito; Ito, Kosei; Ito, Yoshiaki; Oshima, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    RUNX3 is a tumor suppressor for a variety of cancers. RUNX3 suppresses the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by binding to the TCF4/β-catenin complex, resulting in the inhibition of binding of the complex to the Wnt target gene promoter. Here, we confirmed that RUNX3 suppressed Wnt signaling activity in several gastric cancer cell lines; however, we found that RUNX3 increased the Wnt signaling activity in KatoIII and SNU668 gastric cancer cells. Notably, RUNX3 expression increased the ratio of the Wnt signaling-high population in the KatoIII cells. although the maximum Wnt activation level of individual cells was similar to that in the control. As found previously, RUNX3 also binds to TCF4 and β-catenin in KatoIII cells, suggesting that these molecules form a ternary complex. Moreover, the ChIP analyses revealed that TCF4, β-catenin and RUNX3 bind the promoter region of the Wnt target genes, Axin2 and c-Myc, and the occupancy of TCF4 and β-catenin in these promoter regions is increased by the RUNX3 expression. These results suggest that RUNX3 stabilizes the TCF4/β-catenin complex on the Wnt target gene promoter in KatoIII cells, leading to activation of Wnt signaling. Although RUNX3 increased the Wnt signaling activity, its expression resulted in suppression of tumorigenesis of KatoIII cells, indicating that RUNX3 plays a tumor-suppressing role in KatoIII cells through a Wnt-independent mechanism. These results indicate that RUNX3 can either suppress or activate the Wnt signaling pathway through its binding to the TCF4/β-catenin complex by cell context-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24447505

  15. Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Migration and Proliferation of Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells%肿瘤抑制基因 PTEN对人气道平滑肌细胞迁移和增殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝海兵; 罗雅玲; 赖文岩; 龚园其

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To investigate the mechanism for the effect of tumor suppressor gene PTEN on migration and proliferation of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs).Methods HASMCs were transfected with recombinant adenoviruses encoding human wild-type PTEN cDNA (Ad-PTEN group),GFP-labeled adenovirus vectors (Ad-GFP group)and mock adenoviru-ses (MOCK group),respectively.Cell proliferation was assessed by MTS assay.Cell migration was analyzed using Transwell chamber apparatus.The rearrangement of cell actin cytoskeleton was observed by laser scanning confocal microscope.The protein expression of PTEN,p-Akt, Akt,p-FAK and FAK were measured by Western blotting.Results Compared with Ad-GFP group or MOCK group,the absorbance value,number of migrated cells per unit area and levels of p-Akt and p-FAK protein significantly decreased in Ad-PTEN group (P 0.05).In addition,Ad-PTEN transfection diminished cell outline and reduced the pseudopodium and stress fibers.However,cells in Ad-GFP group and MOCK group had a small amount of short and thin stress fibers with few filiform pseudopodia.Conclusion The overex-pression of PTEN gene inhibits the migration and proliferation of HASMCs through down-regu-lating the expression of p-Akt and p-FAK.Therefore,PTEN may be involved in the regulation of airway remodeling in asthma.%目的:观察肿瘤抑制基因 PTEN 对人气道平滑肌细胞(HASMCs)迁移和增殖的影响机制。方法用重组PTEN 腺病毒转染体外培养的 HASMCs(Ad-PTEN 组),并与携带绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)的腺病毒空载体(Ad-GFP组)和空白对照(MOCK)组对比,采用 MTS 测定细胞增殖、Transwell 法观察细胞迁移、共聚焦显微镜观测细胞骨架的变化、免疫印迹法检测 PTEN、p-Akt、Akt、p-FAK、FAK 蛋白的表达。结果Ad-PTEN 组的吸光度(A)值和每单位面积迁移的细胞数显著低于 Ad-GFP 及 MOCK 组(均 P <0.05),Ad-GFP 和 MOCK 两对照组间

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Binds to Tumor Suppressor p53 and Protects Cells against p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The nef gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is important for the induction of AIDS, and key to its function is its ability to manipulate T-cell function by targeting cellular signal transduction proteins. We reported that Nef coprecipitates a multiprotein complex from cells which contains tumor suppressor protein p53. We now show that Nef interacts directly with p53. Binding assays showed that an N-terminal, 57-residue fragment of Nef (Nef 1-57) contains the p53-bindin...

  17. MOLECULAR GENETIC DISORDERS IN THE VHL GENE AND METHYLATION OF SOME SUPPRESSOR GENES IN SPORADIC CLEAR-CELL RENAL CARCINOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhailenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal carcinoma (RC is one of ten most common malignancies in adults and an urgent problem of modern oncology. The purpose of the study was to make a molecular genetic analysis of a number of suppressor genes in RC, which was aimed at searching for and characterizing the potential markers of the disease. Two hundred and nine RC samples were examined, of them there were 192 clear-cell carcinomas. VHL gene mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analyses while the methylation of suppressor genes was by the methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction. Somatic VHL mutations were determined in 35.4% of cases of clear-cell RC (CCRC. VHL gene disorders were found in 53.7% of patients with Stage 1, which counts in favor of VHL inactivation in early-stage CCRC. The methylation of the VHL, RASSF1, FHIT, and CDH1 genes was identified in 12, 56, 58.4, and 46.4% of primary tumors, respectively; that of at least one gene was in 84.1% of the samples. The hypermethylation of the RASSF1 gene was associated with late stages (p = 0.015 and the presence of metastases (p = 0.036; that of the CDH1 gene was related to the progression, invasion, and dissemination of primary tumors (p = 0.009, 0.039, and 0.002, respectively. The findings show it possible to use an analysis of abnormalities in the VHL gene and the methylation of the RASSF1 and CDH1 genes to develop a system of molecular genetic markers of RC.

  18. Expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Martin; Bobbala, Diwakar; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Khan, Md Gulam Musawwir; Ramanathan, Sheela; Saucier, Caroline; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Geha, Sameh; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2017-02-24

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is considered a tumor suppressor due to frequent epigenetic and micro-RNA-mediated repression of its gene expression in diverse cancers. In prostate cancer (PCa), elevated expression of miR-30d that targets SOCS1 mRNA is associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. SOCS1 can mediate its tumor suppressor functions by diverse mechanisms such as inhibiting the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, promoting the tumor suppressor functions of p53, attenuating MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and blocking the oncogenic potential of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP1) (p21). Here, we studied the expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions (p53, MET and p21) in human PCa specimens to evaluate their significance as markers of disease prognosis. Tissue microarrays were constructed of 78 archived prostatectomy specimens that were grouped according to the recommendations of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) based on the Gleason patterns. SOCS1, p53, MET and p21 protein expression were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining alongside the common prostate cancer-related markers Ki67, prostein and androgen receptor. Statistical correlations between the staining intensities of these markers and ISUP grade groups, local invasion or lymph node metastasis were evaluated. SOCS1 showed diffuse staining in the prostatic epithelium. SOCS1 staining intensity correlated inversely with the ISUP grade groups (ρ = -0.4687, p <0.0001) and Ki67 (ρ = -0.2444, p = 0.031), and positively with prostein (ρ = 0.3511, p = 0.0016). Changes in SOCS1 levels did not significantly associate with those of p53, MET or p21. However, p21 positively correlated with androgen receptor expression (ρ = -0.1388, p = 0.0003). A subset of patients with regional lymph node metastasis, although small in number, showed reduced SOCS1 expression and increased expression of

  19. A kinase shRNA screen links LATS2 and the pRB tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschöp, Katrin; Conery, Andrew R; Litovchick, Larisa; Decaprio, James A; Settleman, Jeffrey; Harlow, Ed; Dyson, Nicholas

    2011-04-15

    pRB-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation is a complex process that depends on the action of many proteins. However, little is known about the specific pathways that cooperate with the Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the variables that influence pRB's ability to arrest tumor cells. Here we describe two shRNA screens that identify kinases that are important for pRB to suppress cell proliferation and pRB-mediated induction of senescence markers. The results reveal an unexpected effect of LATS2, a component of the Hippo pathway, on pRB-induced phenotypes. Partial knockdown of LATS2 strongly suppresses some pRB-induced senescence markers. Further analysis shows that LATS2 cooperates with pRB to promote the silencing of E2F target genes, and that reduced levels of LATS2 lead to defects in the assembly of DREAM (DP, RB [retinoblastoma], E2F, and MuvB) repressor complexes at E2F-regulated promoters. Kinase assays show that LATS2 can phosphorylate DYRK1A, and that it enhances the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate the DREAM subunit LIN52. Intriguingly, the LATS2 locus is physically linked with RB1 on 13q, and this region frequently displays loss of heterozygosity in human cancers. Our results reveal a functional connection between the pRB and Hippo tumor suppressor pathways, and suggest that low levels of LATS2 may undermine the ability of pRB to induce a permanent cell cycle arrest in tumor cells.

  20. A GATA4-regulated tumor suppressor network represses formation of malignant human astrocytomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Wolf, Amparo; Munoz, Diana M.; Smith, Christopher J.; Gajadhar, Aaron; Restrepo, Andres; Clarke, Ian D.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Kesari, Santosh; Dirks, Peter B.; McGlade, C. Jane; Stanford, William L.; Aldape, Kenneth; Mischel, Paul S.; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal primary human brain tumor, exhibits multiple molecular aberrations. We report that loss of the transcription factor GATA4, a negative regulator of normal astrocyte proliferation, is a driver in glioma formation and fulfills the hallmarks of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Although GATA4 was expressed in normal brain, loss of GATA4 was observed in 94/163 GBM operative samples and was a negative survival prognostic marker. GATA4 loss occurred through promoter hypermethylation or novel somatic mutations. Loss of GATA4 in normal human astrocytes promoted high-grade astrocytoma formation, in cooperation with other relevant genetic alterations such as activated Ras or loss of TP53. Loss of GATA4 with activated Ras in normal astrocytes promoted a progenitor-like phenotype, formation of neurospheres, and the ability to differentiate into astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Re-expression of GATA4 in human GBM cell lines, primary cultures, and brain tumor–initiating cells suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo through direct activation of the cell cycle inhibitor P21CIP1, independent of TP53. Re-expression of GATA4 also conferred sensitivity of GBM cells to temozolomide, a DNA alkylating agent currently used in GBM therapy. This sensitivity was independent of MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase), the DNA repair enzyme which is often implicated in temozolomide resistance. Instead, GATA4 reduced expression of APNG (alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase), a DNA repair enzyme which is poorly characterized in GBM-mediated temozolomide resistance. Identification and validation of GATA4 as a TSG and its downstream targets in GBM may yield promising novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21464220

  1. Hypermethylation and downregulation of tumor suppressor gene p16 in benzene poisoning%苯中毒患者中抑癌基因p16高甲基化及其表达下调

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢彩虹; 王前飞; 田昊渊; 李斌; 倪蕴娥; 尹松年; 郭新彪; 李桂兰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether benzene negatively affects the expression of pi6 through DNA methylation. Methods We carried out a case-control study in Chinese occupational benzene poisoning patients. Eleven cases of BP and 8 controls who were matched for age ( ± 5years) , sex, working duration and job title with BP were recruited. Expression level was examined by quantitative real-time PCR. Bisulfite-PCR pyrosequencing was used to quantitate the level of DNA methylation. Results The expression levels of p16 are down-regulated in BP patients compared to the control group (0.53 versus 2.06, P =0.064). The average percentage of methylated cytosines of pl6 was higher in BP group than in controls (12.4% , 11.3% , respectively, P >0. 05) . p16 mRNA level decreased with increasing methylation (Pearson r = -0. 64, P >0. 05) .The fourth CpG site in pl6 promoter is located within the consensus binding sequence for olfactory neuron-specific transcription factor. A significant negative correlation between mRNA level and the fourth CpG site was exhibited ( Pearson r = - 0.88, P < 0.05 ) . Conclusion Our report demonstrated that mRNA expression of pi6 is significantly downregulated in BP patients. Hypermethylation in promoter CpG islands is likely to contribute to the downregulation of pi6. Further in-depth studies, utilizing large number of samples, are needed to fully understand the molecular mechanism involved in the tumor-suppressor gene inactivation in benzene-related diseases.%目的 研究苯是否通过引起DNA甲基化使抑癌基因p16转录失活.方法 应用病例-对照研究对11名苯中毒患者和8名与苯中毒患者年龄(±5岁)、性别匹配,并且同工种同工龄的接苯但无苯中毒的对照进行检测.分别用实时荧光定量PCR及焦磷酸测序检测基因表达及甲基化水平.结果 p16的表达水平在苯中毒组(0.53)低于对照组(2.06) (P =0.064).p16启动子区CpG位点甲基化平均水平苯中毒组(12.4

  2. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (P<0.001), expression level and breadth (P<0.01), DNA methylation signature (P<0.001) and evolutionary rate (P<0.001). The similar selection pressures and epigenetic trajectories of GKs and POs so implied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell role in tumor-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Marigo, Ilaria; Mantelli, Barbara; Peranzoni, Elisa; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2008-08-28

    Chronic inflammatory state can create a proper environment for neoplastic onset and sustain cancer growth. The inflammatory state that arises at the tumor edge could contribute to immune escape phenomena in many ways. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a cell population that contributes to tumor escape, immune tolerance, and suppression, respond to a variety of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory stimuli, which drive their recruitment and activation. Understanding how the inflammatory milieu favours tumor escape through the accumulation of MDSCs could be very useful to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  4. MicroRNA-31 functions as an oncogenic microRNA in mouse and human lung cancer cells by repressing specific tumor suppressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Ouyang, Haoxu;

    2010-01-01

    confirmed them as direct targets in human and mouse lung cancer cell lines. These targets included the tumor-suppressive genes large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) and PP2A regulatory subunit B alpha isoform (PPP2R2A), and expression of each was augmented by miR-31 knockdown. Their engineered repression...... normal and malignant human lung tissues. Together, these findings revealed that miR-31 acts as an oncogenic miRNA (oncomir) in lung cancer by targeting specific tumor suppressors for repression.......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression. It has been suggested that obtaining miRNA expression profiles can improve classification, diagnostic, and prognostic information in oncology. Here, we sought to comprehensively identify the miRNAs that are overexpressed in lung cancer by conducting mi...

  5. Nanoparticle-mediated p53 gene therapy for tumor inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Blanka; Ma, Wenxue; Adjei, Isaac Morris; Panyam, Jayanth; Dimitrijevic, Sanja; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is mutated in 50% of human cancers, resulting in more aggressive disease with greater resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Advances in gene therapy technologies offer a promising approach to restoring p53 function. We have developed polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid), that provide sustained intracellular delivery of plasmid DNA, resulting in sustained gene expression without vector-associated toxicity. Our previous...

  6. The vitamin D receptor: a tumor suppressor in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous malignancies including melanomas and non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common types of cancer, occurring at a rate of over 1 million per year in the United States. The major cell in the epidermis, the keratinocyte, not only produces vitamin D but contains the enzymatic machinery to metabolize vitamin D to its active metabolite, 1,25(OH)2D, and expresses the receptor for this metabolite, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), allowing the cell to respond to the 1,25(OH)2D that it produces. In vitro, 1,25(OH)2D stimulates the differentiation and inhibits the proliferation of these cells and so would be expected to be tumor suppressive. However, epidemiologic evidence demonstrating a negative relationship between circulating levels of the substrate for CYP27B1, 25OHD, and the incidence of these malignancies is mixed, raising the question whether vitamin D is protective in the in vivo setting. UV radiation (UV), both UVB and UVA, as occurs with sunlight exposure is generally regarded as causal for these malignancies, but UVB is also required for vitamin D synthesis in the skin. This complicates conclusions reached from epidemiologic studies in that UVB is associated with higher 25OHD levels as well as increased incidence of cutaneous malignancies. Based on our own data and that reported in the literature we hypothesize that vitamin D signaling in the skin suppresses UVR induced epidermal tumor formation. In this chapter we will first discuss recent data regarding potential mechanisms by which vitamin D signaling suppresses tumor formation, then focus on three general mechanisms that mediate tumor suppression by VDR in the skin: inhibition of proliferation and stimulation of differentiation, immune regulation, and stimulation of DNA damage repair (DDR).

  7. miR-137 Modulates a Tumor Suppressor Network-Inducing Senescence in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Neault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating K-Ras mutations occurs frequently in pancreatic cancers and is implicated in their development. Cancer-initiating events, such as oncogenic Ras activation, lead to the induction of cellular senescence, a tumor suppressor response. During senescence, the decreased levels of KDM4A lysine demethylase contribute to p53 activation, however, the mechanism by which KDM4A is downregulated is unknown. We show that miR-137 targets KDM4A mRNA during Ras-induced senescence and activates both p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Restoring the KDM4A expression contributed to bypass of miR-137-induced senescence and inhibition of endogenous miR-137 with an miRNA sponge-compromised Ras-induced senescence. miR-137 levels are significantly reduced in human pancreatic tumors, consistent with previous studies revealing a defective senescence response in this cancer type. Restoration of miR-137 expression inhibited proliferation and promoted senescence of pancreatic cancer cells. These results suggest that modulating levels of miR-137 may be important for triggering tumor suppressor networks in pancreatic cancer.

  8. Distinct tumor suppressor mechanisms evolve in rodent species that differ in size and lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seluanov, Andrei; Hine, Christopher; Bozzella, Michael; Hall, Amelia; Sasahara, Tais H. C.; Ribeiro, Antonio A. C. M.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Presgraves, Daven C.; Gorbunova, Vera

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Large, long-lived species experience more lifetime cell divisions and hence a greater risk of spontaneous tumor formation than smaller, short-lived species. Large, long-lived species are thus expected to evolve more elaborate tumor suppressor systems. In previous work, we showed that telomerase activity coevolves with body mass, but not lifespan, in rodents: telomerase activity is repressed in the somatic tissues of large rodent species but remains active in small ones. Without telomerase activity, the telomeres of replicating cells become progressively shorter until, at some critical length, cells stop dividing. Our findings therefore suggested that repression of telomerase activity mitigates the increased risk of cancer in larger bodied species but not necessarily longer-lived ones. These findings imply that other tumor suppressor mechanisms must mitigate increased cancer risk in long-lived species. Here, we examined the proliferation of fibroblasts from 15 rodent species with diverse body sizes and lifespans. We show that, consistent with repressed telomerase activity, fibroblasts from large rodents undergo replicative senescence accompanied by telomere shortening and overexpression of p16Ink4a and p21Cip1/Waf1 cycline dependent kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, small rodents with different lifespans show a striking difference: cells from small shorter-lived species display continuous rapid proliferation, whereas cells from small long-lived species display continuous slow proliferation. We hypothesize that cells of small long-lived rodents, lacking replicative senescence, have evolved alternative tumor-suppressor mechanisms that prevent inappropriate cell division in vivo and slow cell growth in vitro. Thus, large-bodied species and small but long-lived species have evolved distinct tumor suppressor mechanisms. PMID:18778411

  9. The influence of tumor immunity suppressors on the effector stage of human and animal lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abronina, I F; Indrova, M; Bubenic, J; Figurin, K M; Malakhova, N V; Bykovskaya, S N

    1993-01-01

    Spleen cells of tumor-bearing mice suppressed the cytolytic activity of syngeneic LAK cells when added to the mixture of LAK cells and target cells at the beginning of the cytotoxicity test. Spleen cells of MC 14 tumor-bearing mice acquired the suppressor potential as early as 10 days after tumor transplantation; the suppressor activity in the EL 4 and X63-Ag8.653 tumor-bearing animals was first revealed at the 30th day and manifested itself up to the 120th day. The suppressor activity was expressed in a dose-dependent manner, both by unfractionated spleen cells and nylon wool-passed and plastic-adherent sub-populations. Similar results were obtained during the analysis of anti-tumor immunity suppressors in bladder cancer patients. MNC, nylon wool-passed and plastic-adherent cells of patients with stages I-II disease suppressed the cytotoxicity of autologous LAK cells in 2/6 cases; all patients [4] with III-IV stage possessed such suppressor activity. Presumably, the tumor growth induces the activity of suppressor T cells and monocytes/macrophages. The suppressor activity can interfere with the antitumor effect of autologous (syngeneic) LAK cells at the effector stage.

  10. The tumor suppressor role of miR-124 in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Geng

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have crucial roles in development and progression of human cancers, including osteosarcoma. Recent studies have shown that miR-124 was down-regulated in many cancers; however, the role of miR-124 in osteosarcoma development is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of miR-124 is significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines, compared to the adjacent tissues. The expression of miR-124 in the metastases osteosarcoma tissues was lower than that in non- metastases tissues. We identified and confirmed Rac1 as a novel, direct target of miR-124 using prediction algorithms and luciferase reporter gene assays. Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed Rac1 protein expression and attenuated cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis in MG-63 and U2OS in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of Rac1 in miR-124-transfected osteosarcoma cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell invasion caused by miR-124. Therefore, our results demonstrate that miR-124 is a tumor suppressor miRNA and suggest that this miRNA could be a potential target for the treatment of osteosarcoma in future.

  11. SUSD2 is frequently downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in RCC and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingying; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Pingzhang; Li, Ting; Hu, Fengzhan; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jun; Xu, Tao; Han, Wenling

    2016-07-01

    Sushi domain containing 2 (SUSD2) is type I membrane protein containing domains inherent to adhesion molecules. There have been few reported studies on SUSD2, and they have mainly focused on breast cancer, colon cancer, and HeLa cells. However, the expression and function of SUSD2 in other cancers remain unclear. In the present study, we conducted an integrated bioinformatics analysis based on the array data from the GEO database and found a significant downregulation of SUSD2 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and lung cancer. Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that SUSD2 was frequently decreased in RCC and lung cancer tissues compared with the corresponding levels in normal adjacent tissues. The restoration of SUSD2 expression inhibited the proliferation and clonogenicity of RCC and lung cancer cells, whereas the knockdown of SUSD2 promoted A549 cell growth. Our findings suggested that SUSD2 functions as a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in RCC and lung cancer.

  12. miR-339-5p regulates the p53 tumor-suppressor pathway by targeting MDM2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, M D; Djodji Damas, Nkerorema; Lees, M

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many key cancer-relevant pathways and may themselves possess oncogenic or tumor-suppressor functions. Consequently, miRNA dysregulation has been shown to be a prominent feature in many human cancers. The p53 tumor suppressor acts as a negative regulator of cell...... proliferation in response to stress and represents the most commonly lost and mutated gene in human cancers. The function of p53 is inhibited by the MDM2 oncoprotein. Using a high-throughput screening approach, we identified miR-339-5p as a regulator of the p53 pathway. We demonstrate that this regulation...... inhibition of miR-339-5p function perturbs the p53 response in cancer cells, allowing an increased proliferation rate. In addition, miR-339-5p expression is downregulated in tumors harboring wild-type TP53, suggesting that reduction of miR-339-5p level helps to suppress the p53 response in p53-competent...

  13. The retinoblastoma protein: a master tumor suppressor acts as a link between cell cycle and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel BE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brienne E Engel,1 W Douglas Cress,1 Pedro G Santiago-Cardona2 1Molecular Oncology Program, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry, Ponce School of Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico, USA Abstract: RB1 was the first tumor suppressor gene discovered. Over 4 decades of work have revealed that the Rb protein (Rb is a master regulator of biological pathways influencing virtually every aspect of intrinsic cell fate including cell growth, cell-cycle checkpoints, differentiation, senescence, self-renewal, replication, genomic stability, and apoptosis. While these many processes may account for a significant portion of RB1's potency as a tumor suppressor, a small but growing stream of evidence suggests that RB1 also significantly influences how a cell interacts with its environment, including cell-to-cell and cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. This review will highlight Rb’s role in the control of cell adhesion and how alterations in the adhesive properties of tumor cells may drive the deadly process of metastasis. Keywords: cadherin, integrin, Rb, cancer, aggressiveness, metastasis

  14. MicroRNA-34a is a potent tumor suppressor molecule in vivo in neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcock Leah C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortalities. With regards to the role of miRNAs in neuroblastoma, miR-34a, mapping to a chromosome 1p36 region that is commonly deleted, has been found to act as a tumor suppressor through targeting of numerous genes associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods A synthetic miR-34a (or negative control precursor molecule was transfected into NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cells. Quantitative PCR was used to verify increased miR-34a levels in NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc cell lines prior to in vitro and in vivo analysis. In vitro analysis of the effects of miR-34a over expression on cell growth, cell cycle and phosphoprotein activation in signal transduction pathways was performed. Neuroblastoma cells over expressing miR-34a were injected retroperitoneally into immunocompromised CB17-SCID mice and tumor burden was assessed over a 21 day period by measuring bioluminescence (photons/sec/cm2. Results Over expression of miR-34a in both NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cell lines led to a significant decrease in cell number relative to premiR-negative control treated cells over a 72 hour period. Flow cytometry results indicated that miR-34a induced cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis activation. Phosphoprotein analysis highlighted key elements involved in signal transduction, whose activation was dysregulated as a result of miR-34a introduction into cells. As a potential mechanism of miR-34a action on phosphoprotein levels, we demonstrate that miR-34a over-expression results in a significant reduction of MAP3K9 mRNA and protein levels. Although MAP3K9 is a predicted target of miR-34a, direct targeting could not be validated with luciferase reporter assays. Despite this fact, any functional effects of reduced MAP3K9 expression as a result of miR-34a would

  15. MicroRNA-34a is a potent tumor suppressor molecule in vivo in neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tivnan, Amanda

    2011-01-25

    ABSTRACT Background Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortalities. With regards to the role of miRNAs in neuroblastoma, miR-34a, mapping to a chromosome 1p36 region that is commonly deleted, has been found to act as a tumor suppressor through targeting of numerous genes associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods A synthetic miR-34a (or negative control) precursor molecule was transfected into NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cells. Quantitative PCR was used to verify increased miR-34a levels in NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc cell lines prior to in vitro and in vivo analysis. In vitro analysis of the effects of miR-34a over expression on cell growth, cell cycle and phosphoprotein activation in signal transduction pathways was performed. Neuroblastoma cells over expressing miR-34a were injected retroperitoneally into immunocompromised CB17-SCID mice and tumor burden was assessed over a 21 day period by measuring bioluminescence (photons\\/sec\\/cm2). Results Over expression of miR-34a in both NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cell lines led to a significant decrease in cell number relative to premiR-negative control treated cells over a 72 hour period. Flow cytometry results indicated that miR-34a induced cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis activation. Phosphoprotein analysis highlighted key elements involved in signal transduction, whose activation was dysregulated as a result of miR-34a introduction into cells. As a potential mechanism of miR-34a action on phosphoprotein levels, we demonstrate that miR-34a over-expression results in a significant reduction of MAP3K9 mRNA and protein levels. Although MAP3K9 is a predicted target of miR-34a, direct targeting could not be validated with luciferase reporter assays. Despite this fact, any functional effects of reduced MAP3K9 expression as a result of miR-34a would be expected to

  16. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, D C T; Ho, Y M; Rudduck, C; Chin, K; Kuo, W-L; Lie, D K H; Chua, C L M; Tan, P H; Eu, K W; Seow-Choen, F; Wong, C Y; Hong, G S; Gray, J W; Lee, A S G

    2009-11-26

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, using both loss of heterozygosity analysis and customized microarray comparative genomic hybridization. LARG (leukemia-associated Rho guanine-nucleotide exchange factor) (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analysed region, is frequently underexpressed in breast and colorectal carcinomas with a reduced expression observed in all breast cancer cell lines (n=11), in 12 of 38 (32%) primary breast cancers, 5 of 10 (50%) colorectal cell lines and in 20 of 37 (54%) primary colorectal cancers. Underexpression of the LARG transcript was significantly associated with genomic loss (P=0.00334). Hypermethylation of the LARG promoter was not detected in either breast or colorectal cancer, and treatment of four breast and four colorectal cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or trichostatin A did not result in a reactivation of LARG. Enforced expression of LARG in breast and colorectal cancer cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced cell proliferation and colony formation, as well as in a markedly slower cell migration rate in colorectal cancer cells, providing functional evidence for LARG as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  17. Repression of estrogen receptor {beta} function by putative tumor suppressor DBC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Satoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Wada-Hiraike, Osamu, E-mail: osamuwh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Hiraike, Haruko; Miyamoto, Yuichiro; Sone, Kenbun; Oda, Katsutoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Fukuhara, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kato, Shigeaki [SORST, Japan Science and Technology, Honcho 4-1-8, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034 (Japan); Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    It has been well established that estrogen is involved in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} appears to promote the proliferation of cancer tissues, while ER{beta} can protect against the mitogenic effect of estrogen in breast tissue. The expression status of ER{alpha} and ER{beta} may greatly influence on the development, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1/KIAA1967) gene product has roles in regulating functions of nuclear receptors. The gene encoding DBC1 is a candidate for tumor suppressor identified by genetic search for breast cancer. Caspase-dependent processing of DBC1 promotes apoptosis, and depletion of the endogenous DBC1 negatively regulates p53-dependent apoptosis through its specific inhibition of SIRT1. In addition, DBC1 modulates ER{alpha} expression and promotes breast cancer cell survival by binding to ER{alpha}. Here we report an ER{beta}-specific repressive function of DBC1. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies show that ER{beta} and DBC1 interact in a ligand-independent manner similar to ER{alpha}. In vitro pull-down assays revealed a direct interaction between DBC1 amino-terminus and activation function-1/2 domain of ER{beta}. Although DBC1 shows no influence on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{alpha}, the expression of DBC1 negatively regulates the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{beta}in vivo, and RNA interference-mediated depletion of DBC1 stimulates the transactivation function of ER{beta}. These results implicate the principal role of DBC1 in regulating ER{beta}-dependent gene expressions.

  18. RGS6 is an essential tumor suppressor that prevents bladder carcinogenesis by promoting p53 activation and DNMT1 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqi; Platt, Lance T; Maity, Biswanath; Ahlers, Katelin E; Luo, Zili; Lin, Zhibo; Chakravarti, Bandana; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita; Askeland, Ryan W; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Fisher, Rory A

    2016-10-25

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is largely caused by exposure to toxic chemicals including those in cigarette smoke (i.e. BBN). An activating SNP in RGS6 is associated with a pronounced reduction in UBC risk, especially among smokers. However, the mechanism underlying this reduction remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that RGS6 is robustly expressed in human urothelium, where urothelial cell carcinoma originates, and is downregulated in human UBC. Utilizing RGS6-/- mice we interrogated a possible role for RGS6 as a tumor suppressor using the BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis model that closely recapitulates human disease. As in humans, RGS6 is robustly expressed in mouse urothelium. RGS6 loss dramatically accelerates BBN-induced bladder carcinogenesis, with RGS6-/- mice consistently displaying more advanced pathological lesions than RGS6+/+ mice. Furthermore, BBN treatment promotes urothelial RGS6 mRNA and protein downregulation. RGS6 loss impairs p53 activation and promotes aberrant accumulation of oncogenic protein DNMT1 in urothelium. Tumor suppressor RASSF1A, a DNMT1-regulated gene, is also silenced, likely via methylation of its promoter during BBN exposure. We hypothesize that this BBN-induced RGS6 loss represents a critical hit in UBC as it irrevocably impairs the anti-proliferative actions of the ATM/p53 and RASSF1A pathways. Consistent with these findings, RGS6-/- mice treated with CP-31398, a p53-stablizing agent, and/or 5-Aza, a DNMT1 inhibitor, are protected from BBN-induced tumorigenesis. Together, our data identify RGS6 as a master tumor suppressor modulating two critical signaling pathways that are often dysregulated in UBC; therefore, RGS6 represents a potential novel biomarker for UBC diagnosis/prognosis and an appealing new target in its treatment.

  19. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbotham, David A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Martinez, Victor D.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Stewart, Greg L.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation. PMID:25298778

  20. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rowbotham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytomas (PCC are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  1. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbotham, David A; Enfield, Katey S S; Martinez, Victor D; Thu, Kelsie L; Vucic, Emily A; Stewart, Greg L; Bennewith, Kevin L; Lam, Wan L

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  2. Activation of β-catenin/TCF targets following loss of the tumor suppressor SNF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Blanco, E L; Mishina, Y; Tillman, E J; Cho, Y-J; Thom, C S; Pomeroy, S L; Shao, W; Roberts, C W M

    2014-02-13

    The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is a master regulator of developmental cell-fate decisions, although the key target pathways are poorly characterized. Here, we interrogated the contribution of the SWI/SNF subunit and tumor suppressor SNF5 to the regulation of developmental pathways using conditional mouse and cell culture models. We find that loss of SNF5 phenocopies β-catenin hyperactivation and that SNF5 is essential for regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway target expression. These data provide insight into chromatin-based mechanisms that underlie developmental regulation and elucidate the emerging theme that mutation of this tumor suppressor complex can activate developmental pathways by uncoupling them from upstream control.

  3. Metastatic suppressor genes inactivated by aberrant methylation in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To screen out the differentially methylated DNA sequences between gastric primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, test the methylation difference of gene PTPRG between primary gastric tumor and metastatic lymph nodes, and test the regulatory function of 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine which is an agent with suppression on methylation and the level of methylation in gastric cancer cell line.METHODS: Methylated DNA sequences in genome were enriched with methylated CpG islands amplification (MCA)to undergo representational difference analysis (RDA),with MCA production of metastatic lymph nodes as tester and that of primary tumor as driver. The obtained differentially methylated fragments were cloned and sequenced to acquire the base sequence, which was analyzed with bioinformatics. With methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and RT-PCR, methylation difference of gene PTPRG was detected between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes in 36 cases of gastric cancer.Methylation of gene PTPRG and its regulated expression were observed in gastric cancer cell line before and after being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.RESULTS: Nineteen differentially methylated sequences were obtained and located at 5' end, exons, introns and 3' end, in which KL59 was observed to be located at 9p21 as the first exon of gene p16 and KL22 to be located at promoter region of PRPRG. KL22, aS the probes, was hybridized with driver, tester and 3-round RDA products respectively with all positive signals except with the driver. Significant difference was observed in both methylation rate of gene PTPRG and PTPRG mRNA expression rate between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes. Demethylation of gene PTPRG, with recovered expression of PTPRG mRNA, was observed after gastric cancer cell line being treated with methylation-suppressive agent.CONCLUSION: Difference exists in DNA methylation between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes of gastric cancer, with MCA-RDA as one of the good analytical

  4. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Activates Tumor Suppressor p53 Independent of Enzymatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Glasgow, Wayne; George, Margaret D.; Chrysovergis, Kali; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.; Eling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    15-LOX-1 and its metabolites are involved in colorectal cancer. Recently, we reported that 15-LOX-1 overexpression in HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells inhibited cell growth by induction of p53 phosphorylation (4). To determine whether the 15-LOX-1 protein or its metabolites are responsible for phosphorylation of p53 in HCT-116 cells, we used HCT-116 cells that expressed a mutant 15-LOX-1. The mutant 15-LOX-1 enzyme, with a substitution of Leu at residue His361, was devoid of enzymatic activity. HCT-116 cells transiently transfected with either native or mutant 15-LOX-1 showed an increase in p53 phosphorylation and an increase in the expression of downstream genes. Thus 15-LOX-1 induces p53 phosphorylation independent of enzymatic activity. Treatment of A549 human lung carcinoma cells with IL-4 increased the expression of 15-LOX-1 and also increased the expression of downstream targets of p53. This confirmed that the activation of p53 was also observed in wild type cells expressing physiological 15-LOX-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that 15-LOX-1 interacts with, and binds to, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The binding of 15-LOX-1 to DNA-PK caused an approximate 3.0 fold enhancement in kinase activity, resulting in increased p53 phosphorylation at Ser15. Knockdown of DNA-PK by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced p53 phosphorylation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy demonstrated a co-localization of 15-LOX and DNA-PK in the cells. We propose that the 15-LOX-1 protein binds to DNA-PK, increasing its kinase activity, and results in downstream activation of the tumor suppressor p53, thus revealing a new mechanism by which lipoxygenases may influence the phenotype of tumor cells. PMID:18785202

  5. Effect of hydroxyurea on the promoter occupancy profiles of tumor suppressor p53 and p73

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor and its related protein, p73, share a homologous DNA binding domain, and mouse genetics studies have suggested that they have overlapping as well as distinct biological functions. Both p53 and p73 are activated by genotoxic stress to regulate an array of cellular responses. Previous studies have suggested that p53 and p73 independently activate the cellular apoptotic program in response to cytotoxic drugs. The goal of this study was to compare the ...

  6. Role of the Rb and p53 Tumor Suppressor Pathways in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    kinase screen and off-patent drug screen) REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Jones, Robert., Jiang, Zhe ., Deng, Tao., Schimmer, AD., Moffat, J and...Robert., Jiang, Zhe ., Deng, Tao., Schimmer, AD., Moffat, J and Zacksenhaus, E. Role of the RB and p53 tumor suppressor pathways in mammary tumorigenesis...CDMRP 2011 Era of Hope Conference Jiang Z, Jones R, Liu JC, Deng T, Robinson T, Chung PE, Wang S, Herschkowitz Jl, Egan SE, Perou CM

  7. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  8. Molecular definition of a chromosome 9p21 germ-line deletion in a woman with multiple melanomas and a plexiform neurofibroma: implications for 9p tumor-suppressor gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, E M; Gibson, L H; Fountain, J W; Bolognia, J L; Yang-Feng, T L; Housman, D E; Bale, A E

    1993-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is often familial, but the mode of inheritance and the chromosomal location of melanoma susceptibility locus are controversial. Identification of a 34-year-old woman with eight primary malignant melanomas, multiple atypical moles, and a de novo constitutional cytogenetic rearrangement involving chromosomes 5p and 9p suggested the presence of a melanoma predisposition gene at one of these locations. A high-resolution karyotype showed a partial deletion of a dark-staining Giemsa band, either 5p14 or 9p21. The patient was heterozygous for five 5p14 RFLPs. In situ hybridization with D9S3 indicated that this 9p21 marker was deleted. Gene dosage studies demonstrated the deletion of two more distal 9p21 markers, D9S126 and IFNA. In addition, she was hemizygous for the more proximal 9p21 short tandem-repeat polymorphism at D9S104. D9S18, D9S19, and D9S33 were retained, localizing the deletion to 9p21 between D9S19 on the proximal side and D9S33 on the distal side. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with D9S19 and D9S33 did not reveal any junction fragments in the patient's DNA. This germ-line deletion suggests that mutations in a 9p21 gene may initiate melanoma tumorigenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8317504

  9. Molecular definition of a chromosome 9p21 germ-line deletion in a woman with multiple melanomas and a plexiform neurofibroma: Implications for 9p tumor-suppressor gene(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, E.M.; Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Bale, A.E.; Bolognia, J.L. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Fountain, J.W.; Housman, D.E. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is often familial, but the mode of inheritance and the chromosomal location of a melanoma susceptibility locus are controversial. Identification of a 34-year-old woman with eight primary malignant melanomas, multiple atypical moles, and a de novo constitutional cytogenetic rearrangement involving chromosomes 5p and 9p suggested the presence of a melanoma predisposition gene at one of these locations. A high-resolution karyotype showed a partial deletion of a dark-staining Giemsa band, either 5p14 or 9p21. The patient was heterozygous for five 5p14 RFLPs. In situ hybridization with D9S3 indicated that this 9p21 marker was deleted. Gene dosage studies demonstrated the deletion of two more distal 9p21 markers, D9S126 and IFNA. In addition, she was hemizygous for the more proximal 9p21 short tandem-repeat polymorphism at D9S104. D9S18, D9S19, and D9S33 were retained, localizing the deletion to 9p21 between D9S19 on the proximal side and D9S33 on the distal side. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with D9S19 and D9S33 did not reveal any junction fragments in the patient's DNA. This germ-line deletion suggests that mutations in a 9p21 gene may initiate melanoma tumorigenesis. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Receptor FGFRL1 acts as a tumor suppressor in nude mice when overexpressed in HEK 293 Tet-On cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lei; Steinberg, Florian; Trueb, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1) is a transmembrane receptor that interacts with heparin and FGF ligands. In contrast to the classical FGF receptors, FGFR1 to FGFR4, it does not appear to affect cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, an inducible gene expression system was utilized in combination with a xenograft tumor model to investigate the effects of FGFRL1 on cell adhesion and tumor formation. It was determined that recombinant FGFRL1 promotes the adhesion of HEK 293 Tet-On® cells in vitro. Moreover, when such cells are induced to express FGFRL1ΔC they aggregate into huge clusters. If injected into nude mice, the cells form large tumors. Notably, this tumor growth is completely inhibited when the expression of FGFRL1 is induced. The forced expression of FGFRL1 in the tumor tissue may restore contact inhibition, thereby preventing growth of the cells in nude mice. The results of the present study demonstrate that FGFRL1 acts as a tumor suppressor similar to numerous other cell adhesion proteins. It is therefore likely that FGFRL1 functions as a regular cell-cell adhesion protein. PMID:28101211

  11. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376. PMID:26484135

  12. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Maria Cristina Mazza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC, which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB precursors (Zoso et al., 2014. This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376.

  13. MTUS1 tumor suppressor and its miRNA regulators in fibroadenoma and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Murat; Kaplan, Mehmet; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Onder; Celik, Ozgur Ilhan; Bozgeyik, Esra; Yumrutas, Onder

    2016-08-10

    Breast cancer is major public health problem predominantly effects female population. Current therapeutic approaches to deal with breast cancer are still lack of effectiveness. Thus, identifying/developing novel strategies to fight against breast cancer is very important. The frequent deletions at 8p21.3-22 chromosomal location nearby D8S254 marker enabled the discovery of a novel tumor suppressor gene, MTUS1. Subsequently, MTUS1 was demonstrated to be less expressed in a variety cancer types including breast cancer. Also, it is obvious that gene expression is widely regulated by miRNAs. Here, we aimed to report differential expression of MTUS1 and its regulatory miRNAs in breast cancer and fibroadenoma tissues. Dynamic analysis of MTUS1 expression levels and its miRNAs regulators were attained by Fluidigm 96×96 Dynamic Array Expression chips and reactions were performed in Fluidigm BioMark™ HD System qPCR. Consequently, MTUS1 mRNA levels were significantly diminished in breast cancer tissues and elevated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, among MTUS1 targeting miRNAs, miR-183-5p was identified to be overexpressed in breast cancer and down-regulated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, expression levels of MTUS1 and miR-183-5p were well correlated with clinical parameters. In particular, MTUS1 expression was found to be diminished and miR-183-5p expression was elevated with the advancing stage. In conclusion, as a potential therapeutic target, miR-183-5p can be a chief regulator of MTUS1 and MTUS1-miR-183-5p axis may have significant influence in the pathology of breast cancer.

  14. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) tumor suppressor function by PME-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in maintaining cellular signaling homeostasis by dephosphorylation of a variety of signaling proteins and acts as a tumor suppressor. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) negatively regulates PP2A activity by highly complex mechanisms that are reviewed here. Importantly, recent studies have shown that PME-1 promotes oncogenic MAPK/ERK and AKT pathway activities in various cancer types. In human glioma, high PME-1 expression correlates with tumor progression and kinase inhibitor resistance. We discuss the emerging cancer-associated function of PME-1 and its potential clinical relevance.

  15. The ING family tumor suppressors: from structure to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguissa-Touré, Almass-Houd; Wong, Ronald P C; Li, Gang

    2011-01-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins belong to a well-conserved family which presents in diverse organisms with several structural and functional domains for each protein. The ING family members are found in association with many cellular processes. Thus, the ING family proteins are involved in regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, tumorigenesis, apoptosis, cellular senescence and cell cycle arrest. The ING proteins have multiple domains that are potentially capable of binding to many partners. It is conceivable, therefore, that such proteins could function similarly within protein complexes. In this case, within this family, each function could be attributed to a specific domain. However, the role of ING domains is not definitively clear. In this review, we summarize recent advances in structure-function relationships in ING proteins. For each domain, we describe the known biological functions and the approaches utilized to identify the functions associated with ING proteins.

  16. BOK displays cell death-independent tumor suppressor activity in non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcikova, Erika; Krepela, Evzen; Donnenberg, Vera S; Donnenberg, Albert D; Benkova, Kamila; Rabachini, Tatiana; Fernandez-Marrero, Yuniel; Bachmann, Daniel; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2017-11-15

    As the genomic region containing the Bcl-2-related ovarian killer (BOK) locus is frequently deleted in certain human cancers, BOK is hypothesized to have a tumor suppressor function. In the present study, we analyzed primary non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors and matched lung tissues from 102 surgically treated patients. We show that BOK protein levels are significantly downregulated in NSCLC tumors as compared to lung tissues (p < 0.001). In particular, we found BOK downregulation in NSCLC tumors of grades two (p = 0.004, n = 35) and three (p = 0.031, n = 39) as well as in tumors with metastases to hilar (pN1) (p = 0.047, n = 31) and mediastinal/subcarinal lymph nodes (pN2) (p = 0.021, n = 18) as opposed to grade one tumors (p = 0.688, n = 7) and tumors without lymph node metastases (p = 0.112, n = 51). Importantly, in lymph node-positive patients, BOK expression greater than the median value was associated with longer survival (p = 0.002, Mantel test). Using in vitro approaches, we provide evidence that BOK overexpression is inefficient in inducing apoptosis but that it inhibits TGFβ-induced migration and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung adenocarcinoma-derived A549 cells. We have identified epigenetic mechanisms, in particular BOK promoter methylation, as an important means to silence BOK expression in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our data point toward a novel mechanism by which BOK acts as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC by inhibiting EMT. Consequently, the restoration of BOK levels in low-BOK-expressing tumors might favor the overall survival of NSCLC patients. © 2017 UICC.

  17. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel; Salinas-Sánchez, Antonio S; Pandiella, Atanasio; del Peso, Luis; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas. PMID:23730213

  18. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias-González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5, also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas.

  19. Reverse engineering of TLX oncogenic transcriptional networks identifies RUNX1 as tumor suppressor in T-ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gatta, Giusy; Palomero, Teresa; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Bansal, Mukesh; Carpenter, Zachary W; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Sole, Xavier; Xu, Luyao; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H; Rowe, Jacob M; Meijerink, Jules P; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2012-02-26

    The TLX1 and TLX3 transcription factor oncogenes have a key role in the pathogenesis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we used reverse engineering of global transcriptional networks to decipher the oncogenic regulatory circuit controlled by TLX1 and TLX3. This systems biology analysis defined T cell leukemia homeobox 1 (TLX1) and TLX3 as master regulators of an oncogenic transcriptional circuit governing T-ALL. Notably, a network structure analysis of this hierarchical network identified RUNX1 as a key mediator of the T-ALL induced by TLX1 and TLX3 and predicted a tumor-suppressor role for RUNX1 in T cell transformation. Consistent with these results, we identified recurrent somatic loss-of-function mutations in RUNX1 in human T-ALL. Overall, these results place TLX1 and TLX3 at the top of an oncogenic transcriptional network controlling leukemia development, show the power of network analyses to identify key elements in the regulatory circuits governing human cancer and identify RUNX1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in T-ALL.

  20. Absence of mutations in the coding sequence of the potential tumor suppressor 3pK in metastatic melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houben Roland

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of Ras or Raf contributes to tumorigenesis of melanoma. However, constitutive Raf activation is also a characteristic of the majority of benign melanocytic nevi and high intensity signaling of either Ras or Raf was found to induce growth inhibition and senescence rather than transformation. Since the chromosome 3p kinase (3pK is a target of the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway which antagonizes the function of the oncogene and anti-differentiation factor Bmi-1, 3pK may function as a tumor suppressor in tumors with constitutive Ras/Raf activation. Consequently, we tested whether inactivating 3pK mutations are present in melanoma. Methods 30 metastatic melanoma samples, which were positive for activating mutations of either BRaf or NRas, were analyzed for possible mutations in the 3pk gene. The 10 coding exons and their flanking intron sequences were amplified by PCR and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results This analysis revealed that besides the presence of some single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3pk gene, we could not detect any possible loss of function mutation in any of these 30 metastatic melanoma samples selected for the presence of activating mutations within the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. Conclusion Hence, in melanoma with constitutively active Ras/Raf inactivating mutations within the 3pk gene do not contribute to the oncogenic phenotype of this highly malignant tumor.

  1. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  2. TRIM26 functions as a novel tumor suppressor of hepatocellular carcinoma and its downregulation contributes to worse prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyichenben@163.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); He, Du, E-mail: hdu1234@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous of Prefecture, Enshi Clinical College of Wuhan University, Enshi, Hubei, 445000 (China); Yang, Liang, E-mail: yliang0689@163.com [Department of Oncology, Qianjiang Central Hospital, Qianjiang, Hubei, 433100 (China); Wen, Bo, E-mail: tjwb001@126.com [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); Dai, Jinfen, E-mail: brilliant_510@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); Zhang, Qian, E-mail: anny9655@126.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Kang, Jian, E-mail: 984190619@qq.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, Weiyang, E-mail: 996114664@qq.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Ding, Qianshan, E-mail: iamdqs@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, De, E-mail: 18938027146@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the most common malignancies worldwide and its prognosis is extremely poor. Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play crucial roles in cancer cell biology but the function of tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26) has not been investigated. We demonstrated that low expression level of TRIM26 in tumor samples was significantly correlated with worse prognosis in HCC patients. We also demonstrated its expression level was associated with several clinicopathologic features such as AFP level and T stage of HCC patients. Furthermore, we validated that TRIM26 was significantly downregulated in HCC tissue compared with normal liver tissue. To further clarify the functional role of TRIM26 in HCC, We confirmed that TRIM26 silencing can promote cancer cell proliferation, colony forming, migration and invasion in vitro with HCC cell lines HepG2 and Bel-7402. Then we utilized bioinformatic tool to predict gene influenced by TRIM26, showing TRIM26 could modulate gene sets about cancer cell metabolism. In conclusion, we proved that TRIM26 is a novel tumor suppressor modulating multiple metabolism-related pathways in HCC. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the function of TRIM26 in cancer biology. Our findings provide useful insight into the mechanism of HCC origin and progression. Moreover, TRIM26 may represent a novel therapeutic target for HCC. - Highlights: • TRIM26 is down-regulated in liver cancer samples and functions as a novel tumor suppressor. • Down-regulation of TRIM26 is associated with worse prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Knockdown of TRIM26 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of HCC cells. • TRIM26 may function in abnormal metabolic progress of HCC.

  3. Methylation and Immunoexpression of p16(INK4a) Tumor Suppressor Gene in Primary Breast Cancer Tissue and Their Quantitative p16(INK4a) Hypermethylation in Plasma by Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Ko, Eunkyung; Cho, Junhun; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Cho, Eun Yoon

    2012-12-01

    The p16(INK4a) gene methylation has been reported to be a major tumorigenic mechanism. We evaluated the methylation status of the p16(INK4a) genes in 231 invasive breast cancer and 90 intraductal carcinoma specimens using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and p16 protein expression using immunohistochemistry. The quantity of cell-free methylated p16(INK4a) DNA in the plasma samples of 200 patients with invasive breast cancer was also examined using a fluorescence-based real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The frequencies of p16(INK4a) methylation in invasive and intraductal tumors were 52.8% (122/231) and 57.8% (52/90), respectively. The p16 protein was overexpressed in 145 of the 231 invasive carcinomas (62.8%) and 63 of the 90 intraductal carcinomas (70%). High p16 expression in invasive carcinomas correlated significantly with a high histologic grade, a negative estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, p53 immunoreactivity and high Ki-67 expression with immunohistochemistry. In addition, the methylation index of p16(INK4a) was significantly higher in the cancer patients than the normal controls (pp16 immunoreactivity correlated with a loss of differentiation in breast carcinomas and high frequency of p16(INK4a) promoter methylation in both invasive and intraductal carcinomas, suggesting it may be involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  4. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

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    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  5. A CRISPR/Cas9 Functional Screen Identifies Rare Tumor Suppressors

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    Katigbak, Alexandra; Cencic, Regina; Robert, Francis; Sénécha, Patrick; Scuoppo, Claudio; Pelletier, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of tumor sequencing data has been generated through large scale sequencing efforts. The functional consequences of the majority of mutations identified by such projects remain an open, unexplored question. This problem is particularly complicated in the case of rare mutations where frequency of occurrence alone or prediction of functional consequences are insufficient to distinguish driver from passenger or bystander mutations. We combine genome editing technology with a powerful mouse cancer model to uncover previously unsuspected rare oncogenic mutations in Burkitt’s lymphoma. We identify two candidate tumor suppressors whose loss cooperate with MYC over-expression to accelerate lymphomagenesis. Our results highlight the utility of in vivo CRISPR/Cas9 screens combined with powerful mouse models to identify and validate rare oncogenic modifier events from tumor mutational data. PMID:27982060

  6. MicroRNA-542-5p as a novel tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma.

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    Bray, Isabella; Tivnan, Amanda; Bryan, Kenneth; Foley, Niamh H; Watters, Karen M; Tracey, Lorraine; Davidoff, Andrew M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-04-01

    Several studies have implicated the dysregulation of microRNAs in neuroblastoma pathogenesis, an often fatal paediatric cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Our group and others have demonstrated that lower expression of miR-542-5p is highly associated with poor patient survival, indicating a potential tumor suppressive function. Here, we demonstrate that ectopic over-expression of this miRNA decreases the invasive potential of neuroblastoma cell lines in vitro, along with primary tumor growth and metastases in an orthotopic mouse xenograft model, providing the first functional evidence for the involvement of miR-542-5p as a tumor suppressor in any type of cancer.

  7. The Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p63 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

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    Stephen R. Armstrong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The protein p63 has been identified as a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and is capable of inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or senescence. p63 has at least six isoforms, which can be divided into two major groups: the TAp63 variants that contain the N-terminal transactivation domain and the ΔNp63 variants that lack the N-terminal transactivation domain. The TAp63 variants are generally considered to be tumor suppressors involved in activating apoptosis and suppressing metastasis. ΔNp63 variants cannot induce apoptosis but can act as dominant negative inhibitors to block the function of TAp53, TAp73, and TAp63. p63 is rarely mutated in human tumors and is predominately regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This review focuses primarily on regulation of p63 by the ubiquitin E-3 ligase family of enzymes via ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and introduces a new key regulator of the p63 protein.

  8. SERS-based nanobiosensing for ultrasensitive detection of the p53 tumor suppressor

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    Domenici F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabio Domenici, Anna Rita Bizzarri, Salvatore Cannistraro Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Faculty of Science, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy Background: One of the main challenges in biomedicine is improvement of detection sensitivity to achieve tumor marker recognition at a very low concentration when the disease is not significantly advanced. A pivotal role in cancer defense is played by the p53 tumor suppressor, therefore its detection with high sensitivity may contribute considerably to early diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present a new analytical method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which could significantly increase the sensitivity of traditional bioaffinity techniques. p53 molecules were anchored to gold nanoparticles by means of the bifunctional linker 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP. The characteristic vibrational bands of the p53-4-ATP nanoparticle system were then used to identify the p53 molecules when they were captured by a recognition substrate comprising a monolayer of azurin in molecules possessing significant affinity for this tumor suppressor. The Raman signal enhancement achieved by 4-ATP-mediated crosslinking of p53 to 50 nm gold nanoparticles enabled detect of this protein at a concentration down to 5 × 10-13 M. Keywords: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, p53, ultrasensitive detection, atomic force microscopy

  9. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qiu, Yongming, E-mail: qiuzhoub@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China); Mao, Qing, E-mail: maoq@netease.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  10. Nfkb1 is a haploinsufficient DNA damage-specific tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Voce, David J; Schmitt, Adam M.; Uppal, Abhineet; McNerney, Megan E.; Bernal, Giovanna M; Cahill, Kirk E.; Wahlstrom, Joshua S.; Nassiri, Ashley; Yu, Xiaohong; Crawley, Clayton D.; White, Kevin P.; Onel, Kenan; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Yamini, Bakhtiar

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB proteins play a central and subunit-specific role in the response to DNA damage. Previous work identified p50/NF-κB1 as being necessary for cytotoxicity in response to DNA alkylation damage. Given the importance of damage-induced cell death for maintenance of genomic stability, we examined whether Nfkb1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the setting of alkylation damage. Hprt mutation analysis demonstrates that Nfkb1−/− cells accumulate more alkylator-induced, but not ionizing radiation (IR)...

  11. The milk protein α-casein functions as a tumor suppressor via activation of STAT1 signaling, effectively preventing breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Capozza, Franco; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Xuanmao, Jiao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Here, we identified the milk protein α-casein as a novel suppressor of tumor growth and metastasis. Briefly, Met-1 mammary tumor cells expressing α-casein showed a ~5-fold reduction in tumor growth and a near 10-fold decrease in experimental metastasis. To identify the molecular mechanism(s), we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Interestingly, our results show that α-casein upregulates gene transcripts associated with interferon/STAT1 signaling and downregulates genes associated with “stemness.” These findings were validated by immunoblot and FACS analysis, which showed the upregulation and hyperactivation of STAT1 and a decrease in the number of CD44(+) “cancer stem cells.” These gene signatures were also able to predict clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that a lactation-based therapeutic strategy using recombinant α-casein would provide a more natural and non-toxic approach to the development of novel anticancer therapies. PMID:23047602

  12. Discovery of Prostate Cancer Tumor Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance Through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0084 TITLE: Discovery of Prostate Cancer Tumor Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance through in Vivo...Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0084 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We set out to identify factors that mediate resistance to enzalutamide

  13. Enzymological analysis of the tumor suppressor A-C1 reveals a novel group of phospholipid-metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Naoki; Uyama, Toru; Jin, Xing-Hua; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Tonai, Takeharu; Houchi, Hitoshi; Ueda, Natsuo

    2011-11-01

    A-C1 protein is the product of a tumor suppressor gene negatively regulating the oncogene Ras and belongs to the HRASLS (HRAS-like suppressor) subfamily. We recently found that four members of this subfamily expressed in human tissues function as phospholipid-metabolizing enzymes. Here we examined a possible enzyme activity of A-C1. The homogenates of COS-7 cells overexpressing recombinant A-C1s from human, mouse, and rat showed a phospholipase A½ (PLA½) activity toward phosphatidylcholine (PC). This finding was confirmed with the purified A-C1. The activity was Ca²⁺ independent, and dithiothreitol and Nonidet P-40 were indispensable for full activity. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was also a substrate and the phospholipase A₁ (PLA₁) activity was dominant over the PLA₂ activity. Furthermore, the protein exhibited acyltransferase activities transferring an acyl group of PCs to the amino group of PEs and the hydroxyl group of lyso PCs. As for tissue distribution in human, mouse, and rat, A-C1 mRNA was abundantly expressed in testis, skeletal muscle, brain, and heart. These results demonstrate that A-C1 is a novel phospholipid-metabolizing enzyme. Moreover, the fact that all five members of the HRASLS subfamily, including A-C1, show similar catalytic properties strongly suggests that these proteins constitute a new class of enzymes showing PLA½ and acyltransferase activities.

  14. Snail transcription factor negatively regulates maspin tumor suppressor in human prostate cancer cells

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    Neal Corey L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maspin, a putative tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in breast and prostate cancer, has been associated with decreased cell motility. Snail transcription factor is a zinc finger protein that is increased in breast cancer and is associated with increased tumor motility and invasion by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Snail increases tumor motility and invasion utilizing prostate cancer cells. Methods Expression levels were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Cell motility and invasion assays were performed, while Snail regulation and binding to maspin promoter was analyzed by luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. Results Snail protein expression was higher in different prostate cancer cells lines as compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, which correlated inversely with maspin expression. Snail overexpression in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells inhibited maspin expression and led to increased migration and invasion. Knockdown of Snail in DU145 and C4-2 cancer cells resulted in up-regulation of maspin expression, concomitant with decreased migration. Transfection of Snail into 22Rv1 or LNCaP cells inhibited maspin promoter activity, while stable knockdown of Snail in C4-2 cells increased promoter activity. ChIP analysis showed that Snail is recruited to the maspin promoter in 22Rv1 cells. Conclusions Overall, this is the first report showing that Snail can negatively regulate maspin expression by directly repressing maspin promoter activity, leading to increased cell migration and invasion. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may be useful to re-induce expression of maspin tumor suppressor and prevent prostate cancer tumor progression.

  15. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

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    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  16. Newcomers to the WW Domain-Mediated Network of the Hippo Tumor Suppressor Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudol, Marius

    2010-11-01

    The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway regulates the size of organs by controlling 2 opposing processes: proliferation and apoptosis. The pathway was originally defined in Drosophila, but it is well conserved in mammals. One of the unique features of Hippo signaling is the unusually wide occurrence of WW domains and its cognate PPxY ligand motifs within components of this pathway. Recently, it was proposed that the prevalence of WW domain-mediated complexes in the Hippo signaling pathway should facilitate its molecular analysis and help in the identification of new components of the Hippo-centered network. Indeed, several new members of the Hippo pathway, which form functional complexes with WW domains of YAP and TAZ effectors, were recently described. We focus here on 2 families of such proteins, angiomotins and SMADs, plus 1 regulatory factor, WBP-2, which together shed new light on the rapidly expanding Hippo network. Since the Hippo pathway acts as a tumor suppressor pathway, the complexes described here, which assemble on WW domains of YAP and TAZ, represent potential targets of cancer therapy.

  17. Frameshift mutation of UVRAG: Switching a tumor suppressor to an oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanshan; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. It has a nearly 50% metastasis rate and only a subset of patients respond to current treatment strategy. UVRAG, a key autophagy effector and a guardian of chromosomal stability, is truncated by a frameshift (FS) mutation in CRC with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the pathological and clinical significance of this UVRAG truncation remains less understood. Our recent study discovered that this FS mutation yields a much shortened form of the UVRAG protein, which counteracts most of the tumor-suppressor functions of wild-type (WT) UVRAG in autophagy, centrosome stability, and DNA repair in a dominant-negative fashion. Whereas this truncated mutation of UVRAG promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis, it appears to sensitize CRC tumors to adjuvant chemotherapy, making it a potential molecular marker to individualize therapeutic approach in CRC.

  18. Tricyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from the Marine Sponge Acanthella cavernosa that Stabilize the Tumor Suppressor PDCD4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovic, Tanja; Blees, Johanna S.; Bayer, Magdalena M.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Thomas, Cheryl L.; Henrich, Curtis J.; Peach, Megan L.; McMahon, James B.; Schmid, Tobias; Gustafson, Kirk R.

    2014-01-01

    A cell-based high-throughput screen that assessed the cellular stability of a tumor suppressor protein PDCD4 (Programmed cell death 4) was used to identify a new guanidine-containing marine alkaloid mirabilin K (3), as well as the known compounds mirabilin G (1) and netamine M (2). The structures of these tricyclic guanidine alkaloids were established from extensive spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited cellular degradation of PDCD4 with EC50 values of 1.8 μg/mL and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. Mirabilin G (1) and netamine M (2) are the first marine natural products reported to stabilize PDCD4 under tumor promoting conditions. PMID:25196934

  19. HOXB13, a target of DNMT3B, is methylated at an upstream CpG island, and functions as a tumor suppressor in primary colorectal tumors.

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    Kalpana Ghoshal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A hallmark of cancer cells is hypermethylation of CpG islands (CGIs, which probably arises from upregulation of one or more DNA methyltransferases. The purpose of this study was to identify the targets of DNMT3B, an essential DNA methyltransferase in mammals, in colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromatin immunoprecipitation with DNMT3B specific antibody followed by CGI microarray identified genes with or without CGIs, repeat elements and genomic contigs in RKO cells. ChIP-Chop analysis showed that the majority of the target genes including P16, DCC, DISC1, SLIT1, CAVEOLIN1, GNA11, TBX5, TBX18, HOXB13 and some histone variants, that harbor CGI in their promoters, were methylated in multiple colon cancer cell lines but not in normal colon epithelial cells. Further, these genes were reactivated in RKO cells after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent. COBRA showed that the CGIs encompassing the promoter and/or coding region of DCC, TBX5, TBX18, SLIT1 were methylated in primary colorectal tumors but not in matching normal colon tissues whereas GNA11 was methylated in both. MassARRAY analysis demonstrated that the CGI located approximately 4.5 kb upstream of HOXB13 +1 site was tumor-specifically hypermethylated in primary colorectal cancers and cancer cell lines. HOXB13 upstream CGI was partially hypomethylated in DNMT1(-/- HCT cells but was almost methylation free in cells lacking both DNMT1 and DNMT3B. Analysis of tumor suppressor properties of two aberrantly methylated transcription factors, HOXB13 and TBX18, revealed that both inhibited growth and clonogenic survival of colon cancer cells in vitro, but only HOXB13 abolished tumor growth in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that identifies several important tumor suppressors and transcription factors as direct DNMT3B targets in colon cancer and as potential biomarkers for this cancer. Further, this study shows that

  20. Rnd3 in Cancer: A Review of the Evidence for Tumor Promoter or Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paysan, Lisa; Piquet, Léo; Saltel, Frédéric; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-11-01

    Rho-GTPases are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases and are general modulators of important cellular processes in tumor biology such as migration and proliferation. Among these proteins, Rnd3/RhoE, an atypical Rho-GTPase devoid of GTP hydrolytic activity, has recently been studied for its putative role in tumorigenesis. Indeed, Rnd3 is implicated in processes, such as proliferation and migration, whose deregulation is linked to cancer development and metastasis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the data surrounding Rnd3 deregulation in cancers, its origin, and consequences. Presented here is a comprehensive account of the expression status and biological output obtained in prostate, liver, stomach, colon, lung, and brain cancers as well as in melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Although there appears to be no general consensus about Rnd3 expression in cancers as this protein is differently altered according to the tumor context, these alterations overwhelmingly favor a protumorigenic role. Thus, depending on the tumor type, it may behave either as a tumor suppressor or as a tumor promoter. Importantly, the deregulation of Rnd3, in most cases, is linked to patient poor outcome.

  1. Uterine leiomyomas/fibroids are the most common pelvic tumors of the female genital tract. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF β family members are multi-functional cytokines that play a key role in cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TGF β1 - 509 C/T polymorphism could be used as a susceptibility marker in Uterine fibroids pathogenesis. ARMS PCR was carried out for controls and patients (n=103 to identify the specific genotypes. Genotypes and allelic frequencies in both groups were compared. Proportions of C homozygote, heterozygote and T homozygote for TGF β1gene polymorphisms were 37.9%, 44.7%, 17.5% in the control individuals and 37%, 51.5%, 11.7% in the uterine fibroid patients. There was no significant difference between the controls and the patients thus indicating the tumor suppressor effect of TGF β1 in the early stages of tumor pathogenesis. The study was found to be in association with the earlier reported data wherein TGF β1 acts as tumor suppressor in the early stages and as a tumor promoter in the later stages of tumor pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Veronica

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyomas/fibroids are the most common pelvic tumors of the female genital tract. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF β family members are multi-functional cytokines that play a key role in cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TGF β1 - 509 C/T polymorphism could be used as a susceptibility marker in Uterine fibroids pathogenesis. ARMS PCR was carried out for controls and patients (n=103 to identify the specific genotypes. Genotypes and allelic frequencies in both groups were compared. Proportions of C homozygote, heterozygote and T homozygote for TGF β1gene polymorphisms were 37.9%, 44.7%, 17.5% in the control individuals and 37%, 51.5%, 11.7% in the uterine fibroid patients. There was no significant difference between the controls and the patients thus indicating the tumor suppressor effect of TGF β1 in the early stages of tumor pathogenesis. The study was found to be in association with the earlier reported data wherein TGF β1 acts as tumor suppressor in the early stages and as a tumor promoter in the later stages of tumor pathogenesis

  2. TMSB4Y is a candidate tumor suppressor on the Y chromosome and is deleted in male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hong Yuen; Wang, Grace M; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J; Chu, David; Garay, Joseph P; Cidado, Justin; Cochran, Rory L; Beaver, Julia A; Aggarwal, Anita; Liu, Min-Ling; Argani, Pedram; Meeker, Alan; Hurley, Paula J; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-12-29

    Male breast cancer comprises less than 1% of breast cancer diagnoses. Although estrogen exposure has been causally linked to the development of female breast cancers, the etiology of male breast cancer is unclear. Here, we show via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) that the Y chromosome was clonally lost at a frequency of ~16% (5/31) in two independent cohorts of male breast cancer patients. We also show somatic loss of the Y chromosome gene TMSB4Y in a male breast tumor, confirming prior reports of loss at this locus in male breast cancers. To further understand the function of TMSB4Y, we created inducible cell lines of TMSB4Y in the female human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Expression of TMSB4Y resulted in aberrant cellular morphology and reduced cell proliferation, with a corresponding reduction in the fraction of metaphase cells. We further show that TMSB4Y interacts directly with β-actin, the main component of the actin cytoskeleton and a cell cycle modulator. Taken together, our results suggest that clonal loss of the Y chromosome may contribute to male breast carcinogenesis, and that the TMSB4Y gene has tumor suppressor properties.

  3. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33) with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Rincic, Martina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Alhourani, Eyad; Hunstig, Friederike; Glaser, Anita; Liehr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33). Besides a translocation t(10;14)(q24;q11) was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95).

  4. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  5. Evidence that selenium binding protein 1 is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer.

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    Emmanuel Ansong

    Full Text Available Selenium-Binding Protein 1 (SBP1, SELENBP1, hSP56 is a selenium-associated protein shown to be at lower levels in tumors, and its lower levels are frequently predictive of a poor clinical outcome. Distinguishing indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is a major challenge in disease management. Associations between SBP1 levels, tumor grade, and disease recurrence following prostatectomy were investigated by duplex immunofluorescence imaging using a tissue microarray containing tissue from 202 prostate cancer patients who experienced biochemical (PSA recurrence after prostatectomy and 202 matched control patients whose cancer did not recur. Samples were matched by age, ethnicity, pathological stage and Gleason grade, and images were quantified using the Vectra multispectral imaging system. Fluorescent labels were targeted for SBP1 and cytokeratins 8/18 to restrict scoring to tumor cells, and cell-by-cell quantification of SBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm was performed. Nuclear SBP1 levels and the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio were inversely associated with tumor grade using linear regression analysis. Following classification of samples into quartiles based on the SBP1 levels among controls, tumors in the lowest quartile were more than twice as likely to recur compared to those in any other quartile. Inducible ectopic SBP1 expression reduced the ability of HCT-116 human tumor cells to grow in soft agar, a measure of transformation, without affecting proliferation. Cells expressing SBP1 also demonstrated a robust induction in the phosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor at serine 15. These data indicate that loss of SBP1 may play an independent contributing role in prostate cancer progression and its levels might be useful in distinguishing indolent from aggressive disease.

  6. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 epigenetically controls oncogenic microRNA-155

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Suhwan; Wang, Rui-Hong; Akagi, Keiko; Kim, Kyung-Ae; Martin, Betty K; Cavallone, Luca; Haines, Diana C; Basik, Mark; Mai, Phuong; Poggi, Elizabeth; Isaacs, Claudine; Looi, Lai M; Mun, Kein S; Greene, Mark H; Byers, Stephen W; Teo, Soo H; Deng, Chu-Xia; Sharan, Shyam K

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1, a well-known tumor suppressor with multiple interacting partners, is predicted to have diverse biological functions. However, so far its only well-established role is in the repair of damaged DNA and cell cycle regulation. In this regard, the etiopathological study of low-penetrant variants of BRCA1 provides an opportunity to uncover its other physiologically important functions. Using this rationale, we studied the R1699Q variant of BRCA1, a potentially moderate-risk variant, and found that it does not impair DNA damage repair but abrogates the repression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), a bona fide oncomir. Mechanistically, we found that BRCA1 epigenetically represses miR-155 expression via its association with HDAC2, which deacetylates histones H2A and H3 on the miR-155 promoter. We show that overexpression of miR-155 accelerates whereas the knockdown of miR-155 attenuates the growth of tumor cell lines in vivo. Our findings demonstrate a new mode of tumor suppression by BRCA1 and suggest that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target for BRCA1-deficient tumors. PMID:21946536

  7. Tumor-Suppressor Function of SPARC-Like Protein 1/Hevin in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Esposito

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available SPARC-like protein 1 (SPARCL1, a member of the SPARC family, is downregulated in various tumors. In the present study, the expression and localization of SPARCL1 were analyzed in a wide range of nontumorous and neopla