WorldWideScience

Sample records for generation iv reactors

  1. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  2. An Economic Analysis of Generation IV Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J S; Lamont, A D; Rothwell, G S; Smith, C F; Greenspan, E; Brown, N; Barak, A

    2002-03-01

    This report examines some conditions necessary for Generation IV Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) to be competitive in the world energy market. The key areas that make nuclear reactors an attractive choice for investors are reviewed, and a cost model based on the ideal conditions is developed. Recommendations are then made based on the output of the cost model and on conditions and tactics that have proven successful in other industries. The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS), a specific SMR design concept, is used to develop the cost model and complete the analysis because information about the ENHS design is readily available from the University of California at Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Department. However, the cost model can be used to analyze any of the current SMR designs being considered. On the basis of our analysis, we determined that the nuclear power industry can benefit from and SMRs can become competitive in the world energy market if a combination of standardization and simplification of orders, configuration, and production are implemented. This would require wholesale changes in the way SMRs are produced, manufactured and regulated, but nothing that other industries have not implemented and proven successful.

  3. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  4. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  5. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  6. Sargent-IV Project. Development of new methodologies for safety analysis of Generation IV reactors; Proyecto SARGEB-IV. Desarrollo de nuevas metodologias de analisis de seguridad para reactores de Generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queral, C.; Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G.

    2013-07-01

    The main result of this paper is the proposal for the addition of new ingredients in the safety analysis methodologies for Generation-IV reactors that integrates the features of probabilistic safety analysis within deterministic. This ensures a higher degree of integration between the classical deterministic and probabilistic methodologies.

  7. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  8. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory

  9. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  10. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Bock Lee; Jin Sik Cheon; Sung Ho Kim; Jeong-Yong Park; Hyung-Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU)–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochem...

  11. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  12. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  13. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  14. Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, F.; Carmack, J.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Pelletier, M.; Somers, J.

    2013-10-01

    The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

  15. Simplified Design Criteria for Very High Temperature Applications in Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreevy, TE

    2004-12-15

    The goal of this activity is to provide simplified criteria which can be used in rapid feasibility assessments of the structural viability of very high temperature components in conceptual and early preliminary design phases for Generation IV reactors. The current criteria in ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, hereafter referred to as NH, (and Code Case N-201 for core support structures) are difficult and require a complex deconstruction of finite element analysis results for their implementation. Further, and most important, times, temperatures and some materials of interest to the very high temperature Generation IV components are not covered by the current provisions of NH. Future revisions to NH are anticipated that will address very high temperature Generation IV components and materials requirements but, until that occurs interim guidance is required for design activities to proceed. These simplified criteria are for design guidance and are not necessarily in rigorous compliance with NH methodology. Rather, the objective is for criteria which address the early design needs of very high temperature Generation IV components and materials. The intent is to provide simplified but not overly conservative design methods. When more rigorous criteria and methods are incorporated in NH, the degree of conservatism should obviously be reduced. These criteria are based on currently available information. Although engineering judgments have been made in the formulation of these criteria they are not intended to require additional development or testing prior to implementation as a tool for use in conceptual and early preliminary design. Appendices are provided herein that contain useful information. The simplified methods were developed specifically with Alloy 617 in mind; however, they could be applied for the same intended purpose for other materials such as 9Cr-1Mo, Alloy 800H, etc. However, supporting design curves, stress allowables, and isochronous curves may

  16. Contribution of the IV generation fast reactors to the sustainable development; Contribucion de los reactores rapidos de IV Generacion al desarrollo sustentable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza G, G.; Klapp E, J.L. [ININ, Centro Nuclear ' Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores' Carretera Mexico Toluca, S/N. 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gmg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    During the XXI century all the energy forms are necessary for the sustainable development. A balanced energy politics has to use a mixture of energy sources that completes the objective of responding to the increase in the demand and that it uses non emitting gases sources of greenhouse effect like the nuclear one. It is evident the great existent difficulty to turn the objectives of emissions for the coming years without having the nuclear energy. Later on, the process continued outlining serious commitments among the development necessity, the improvement of the level of life and the competitiveness, and the execution from the established environmental requirements to world level. It is very foregone that the energy nuclear become the best energy source to improve the environmental conditions and that new initiatives are determined in those that this energy will have an important paper. The solution is to build a nuclear central of advanced design, using technologies that its help to brake the diffusion of the nuclear weapons. The nucleo electric energy at great scale should be developed on the base of designs of reactors and innovative processes of fuel that can lend technological support to the not nuclear proliferation regime, and that at the same time they contribute to satisfy the electricity demand in the world. In a scenario of increase of energy demand, mainly in the development countries, and of growing interest in the pollutants reduction originated by the use of fossil fuels, the nuclear reactors of IV Generation arise as proposal and challenge. Meanwhile the search of new technologies and innovations become imperative, translating an enormous evolution, not only in the conceptual projects, as well as in the fuel cycle so that, in a scenario of open economy, turn its more competitive. Inside the reactors of fourth generation, the quick reactors are configured as those that more assist to such demands and they will be, without a doubt, the reactors in

  17. Nordic Forum for Generation IV Reactors,Status and activities in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risø, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many as-pects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activi-ties within this fi...

  18. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  19. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway))

    2012-01-15

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  20. Nordic forum for generation IV reactors, status and activities in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. [Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, Kjeller (Norway); Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risoe, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many aspects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activities within this field at the various institutes and universities. The present report contains book of abstracts. The individual Power Point presentations are indexed in INIS and may be found at http://nordic-gen4.org/seminars/nordic-gen4-riso-2012-2/ (LN)

  1. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  2. Evaluation of a sodium-water reaction event caused by steam generator tubes break in the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang June; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Lee, Seung Won; Yoo, Jin; Jeong, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Kyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This reactor uses sodium as a reactor coolant to transfer the core heat energy to the turbine. Sodium has chemical characteristics that allow it to violently react with materials such as a water or steam. When a sodium–water reaction (SWR) occurs due to leakage or breakage of steam generator tubes, high-pressure waves and corrosive reaction products are produced, which threaten the structural integrity of the components of the intermediate heat-transfer system (IHTS) and the safety of the primary heat-transfer system (PHTS). In the PGSFR, SWR events are included in the design-basis event. This event should be analyzed from the viewpoint of the integrities of the IHTS and fuel rods. To evaluate the integrity of the IHTS based on the consequences of the SWR, the behaviors of the generated high-pressure waves are analyzed at the major positions of a failed IHTS loop using a sodium–water advanced analysis method-II code. The integrity of the fuel rods must be consistently maintained below the safety acceptance criteria to avoid the consequences of the SWR. The integrity of the PHTS is evaluated using the multidimensional analysis of reactor safety-liquid metal reactor code to model the whole plant.

  3. Eugene P. Wigner’s Visionary Contributions to Generations-I through IV Fission Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Frank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among Europe’s greatest scientists who fled to Britain and America in the 1930s, Eugene P. Wigner made instrumental advances in reactor physics, reactor design and technology, and spent nuclear fuel processing for both purposes of developing atomic weapons during world-war II and nuclear power afterwards. Wigner who had training in chemical engineering and self-education in physics first gained recognition for his remarkable articles and books on applications of Group theory to Quantum mechanics, Solid state physics and other topics that opened new branches of Physics.

  4. Eugene P. Wigner's Visionary Contributions to Generations-I through IV Fission Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Among Europe's greatest scientists who fled to Britain and America in the 1930s, Eugene P. Wigner made instrumental advances in reactor physics, reactor design and technology, and spent nuclear fuel processing for both purposes of developing atomic weapons during world-war II and nuclear power afterwards. Wigner who had training in chemical engineering and self-education in physics first gained recognition for his remarkable articles and books on applications of Group theory to Quantum mechanics, Solid state physics and other topics that opened new branches of Physics.

  5. Stability analysis of the Korean prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor using linear frequency domain approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ji; Ha, Pham Nhu Viet; Lim, Jae Yong; Hahn, Do Hee; Kang, Chang Mu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Fast Reactor Development Div.

    2016-03-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing the 150 MWe Prototype Generation-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR). The design concept is highly based on passive safety mechanisms, minimizing the need for engineered safety systems. Presently, it is of primary importance to assure the reactor dynamics and stability against small reactivity disturbances under power operating conditions. KAERI has therefore developed the NuSTAB code for stability analysis of the PGSFR. In NuSTAB, the neutron-kinetic and thermal-hydraulic coupling equations are linearized to form the characteristic equation, which is solved as a generalized eigenvalue problem for determining the decay ratio, an indicator of the system stability. In this paper, the stability of the PGSFR was analyzed by applying the point kinetic and spatial kinetic options in the NuSTAB code. System responses to temperature feedbacks including the Doppler effect, thermal expansion, coolant density change, and overall feedback were studied. The results indicate that the initial U and final TRU cores of the PGSFR are both inherently stable thanks to the temperature feedbacks.

  6. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle

  7. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle

  8. Tritium permeation characterization of materials for fusion and generation IV very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, S.; Pilatzke, K.; McCrimmon, K.; Castillo, I.; Suppiah, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    The objective of this work is to establish the tritium-permeation properties of structural alloys considered for Fusion systems and very high temperature reactors (VHTR). A description of the work performed to set up an apparatus to measure permeation rates of hydrogen and tritium in 304L stainless steel is presented. Following successful commissioning with hydrogen, the test apparatus was commissioned with tritium. Commissioning tests with tritium suggest the need for a reduction step that is capable of removing the oxide layer from the test sample surfaces before accurate tritium-permeation data can be obtained. Work is also on-going to clearly establish the temperature profile of the sample to correctly estimate the tritium-permeability data.

  9. Generation IV nuclear energy system initiative. Large GFR core subassemblydesign for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Therios, I. U.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    2006-07-31

    Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) designs are being developed to meet Gen IV goals of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection as part of an International Generation IV Nuclear Energy System Research Initiative effort. Different organizations are involved in the development of a variety of GFR design concepts. The current analysis has focused on the evaluation of low-pressure drop, pin-core designs with favorable passive cooling properties. Initial evaluation of the passive cooling safety case for the GFR during depressurized decay heat removal accidents with concurrent loss of electric power have resulted in requirements for a reduction of core power density to the 100 w/cc level and a low core pressure drop of 0.5 bars. Additional design constraints and the implementation of their constraints are evaluated in this study to enhance and passive cooling properties of the reactor. Passive cooling is made easier by a flat radial distribution of the decay heat. One goal of this study was to evaluate the radial power distribution and determine to what extent it can be flattened, since the decay heat is nearly proportional to the fission power at shutdown. In line with this investigation of the radial power profile, an assessment was also made of the control rod configuration. The layout provided a large number of control rod locations with a fixed area provided for control rods. The number of control rods was consistent with other fast reactor designs. The adequacy of the available control rod locations was evaluated. Future studies will be needed to optimize the control rod designs and evaluate the shutdown system. The case for low pressure drop core can be improved by the minimization of pressure drop sources such as the number of required fuel spacers in the subassembly design and by the details of the fuel pin design. The fuel pin design is determined by a number of neutronic, thermal-hydraulic (gas dynamics

  10. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  11. Improvement of Sodium Neutronic Nuclear Data for the Computation of Generation IV Reactors; Contribution a l'amelioration des donnees nucleaires neutroniques du sodium pour le calcul des reacteurs de generation IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archier, P.

    2011-09-14

    The safety criteria to be met for Generation IV sodium fast reactors (SFR) require reduced and mastered uncertainties on neutronic quantities of interest. Part of these uncertainties come from nuclear data and, in the particular case of SFR, from sodium nuclear data, which show significant differences between available international libraries (JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0). The objective of this work is to improve the knowledge on sodium nuclear data for a better calculation of SFR neutronic parameters and reliable associated uncertainties. After an overview of existing {sup 23}Na data, the impact of the differences is quantified, particularly on sodium void reactivity effects, with both deterministic and stochastic neutronic codes. Results show that it is necessary to completely re-evaluate sodium nuclear data. Several developments have been made in the evaluation code Conrad, to integrate new nuclear reactions models and their associated parameters and to perform adjustments with integral measurements. Following these developments, the analysis of differential data and the experimental uncertainties propagation have been performed with Conrad. The resolved resonances range has been extended up to 2 MeV and the continuum range begins directly beyond this energy. A new {sup 23}Na evaluation and the associated multigroup covariances matrices were generated for future uncertainties calculations. The last part of this work focuses on the sodium void integral data feedback, using methods of integral data assimilation to reduce the uncertainties on sodium cross sections. This work ends with uncertainty calculations for industrial-like SFR, which show an improved prediction of their neutronic parameters with the new evaluation. (author) [French] Les criteres de surete exiges pour les reacteurs rapides au sodium de Generation IV (RNR-Na) se traduisent par la necessite d'incertitudes reduites et maitrisees sur les grandeurs neutroniques d'interet. Une part

  12. Core physics and safety analysis of Generation-IV Sodium Fast Reactors using existing and newly developed computational tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa Valero, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    El futuro de la energía nuclear de fisión dependerá, entre otros factores, de la capacidad que las nuevas tecnologías demuestren para solventar los principales retos a largo plazo que se plantean. Los principales retos se pueden resumir en los siguientes aspectos: la capacidad de proporcionar una solución final, segura y fiable a los residuos radiactivos; así como dar solución a la limitación de recursos naturales necesarios para alimentar los reactores nucleares; y por último, una mejora rob...

  13. Advanced Non-Destructive Assessment Technology to Determine the Aging of Silicon Containing Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T. W.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.; King, J. C.; Fletcher, J.; Gerstenberger, L.; Lawrence, S.; Martin, A.; Mejia, C.; Meyer, M. K.; Kennedy, R.; Hu, L.; Kohse, G.; Terry, J.

    2011-06-01

    To create an in-situ, real-time method of monitoring neutron damage within a nuclear reactor core, irradiated silicon carbide samples are examined to correlate measurable variations in the material properties with neutron fluence levels experienced by the silicon carbide (SiC) during the irradiation process. The reaction by which phosphorus doping via thermal neutrons occurs in the silicon carbide samples is known to increase electron carrier density. A number of techniques are used to probe the properties of the SiC, including ultrasonic and Hall coefficient measurements, as well as high frequency impedance analysis. Gamma spectroscopy is also used to examine residual radioactivity resulting from irradiation activation of elements in the samples. Hall coefficient measurements produce the expected trend of increasing carrier concentration with higher fluence levels, while high frequency impedance analysis shows an increase in sample impedance with increasing fluence.

  14. System and safety studies of accelerator driven systems and generation IV reactors for transmutation of minor actinides. Annual report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergloef, Calle; Fokau, Andrei; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Tesinsky, Milan; Wallenius, Janne; Youpeng Zhang (Div. of Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    During 2009, the reactor physics division has made a design study of a source efficient ADS with nitride fuel and 15/15Ti cladding, based on the EFIT design made within the EUROTRANS project. It was shown that the source efficiency may be doubled as compared to the reference design with oxide fuel and T91 cladding. Transient analysis of a medium sized sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel allowed to define criteria in terms of power penalty for americium introduction. It was shown that for each percent of americium added to the fuel, the linear rating must be reduced by 6% in order for the fuel to survive postulated unprotected transients. The Sjoestrand area ratio method for reactivity determination has been evaluated experimentally in the strongly heterogeneous subcritical facility YALINA-Booster. Surprisingly, it has been found that the area ratio reactivity estimates may differ by a factor of two depending on detector position. It is shown that this strong spatial dependence can be explained based on a two-region point kinetics model and rectified by means of correction factors obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. For the purpose of measuring high energy neutron cross sections at the SCANDAL facility in Uppsala, Monte Carlo simulations of neutron to proton conversion efficiencies in CsI detectors have been performed. A uranium fuel fabrication laboratory has been taken into operation at KTH in 2009. Uranium and zirconium nitride powders have been fabricated by hydridation/nitridation of metallic source materials. Sample pellets have been pressed and ZrN discs have been sintered to 93% density by means of spark plasma sintering methods

  15. Development and Validation of Temperature Dependent Thermal Neutron Scattering Laws for Applications and Safety Implications in Generation IV Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari

    2008-06-20

    The overall obljectives of this project are to critically review the currently used thermal neutron scattering laws for various moderators as a function of temperature, select as well documented and representative set of experimental data sensitive to the neutron spectra to generate a data base of benchmarks, update models and models parameters by introducing new developments in thermalization theory and condensed matter physics into various computational approaches in establishing the scattering laws, benchmark the results against the experimentatl set. In the case of graphite, a validation experiment is performed by observing nutron slowing down as a function of temperatures equal to or greater than room temperature.

  16. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  17. 四代核电技术(高温堆)产业化探讨%Chinese Development of Generation IV Nuclear Power Technology--High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊; 肖国平; 鲁盛会; 张见营; 王芝芬; 李金英

    2015-01-01

    该文综述了四代核电技术(高温堆)的发展现状和技术特点,对中国高温气冷堆的产业化提出了建议,供政府及相关行业集团公司等参考。%The author reviewed the development of generation IV nuclear power technology --Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor(HTR) . Some The advice of industrialization of HTR in China was proposed.The article can give some advice for the government and relevant company.

  18. Comparison of open and closed U-Pu equilibrium fuel cycles for Generation-IV fast reactors with the EQL3D procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krepel, Jiri, E-mail: Jiri.Krepel@psi.ch [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pelloni, Sandro; Mikityuk, Konstantin [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze open and closed fuel cycle of GFR, SFR, and LFR cores by means of ERANOS based EQL3D procedure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equilibrium of open and closed fuel cycles were compared in terms of their performance and safety parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All three cores act in equilibrium closed cycle as iso-breeder and have similar fuel composition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In spite of the same fuel composition the Dopper constants and void reactivities strongly differ between the cores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All three systems seem capable, from neutronics point of view, for the fuel cycle closure. - Abstract: The advanced fast reactors of the fourth generation should enable an indirect burning of poorly fissile {sup 238}U through {sup 239}Pu breeding and recycling of the actinides from their own spent fuel. The recycling or actually the fuel cycle closure can significantly reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste and the {sup 238}U burning can multiply the sustainability of the uranium fueled reactors. Regular periodic operation with the fuel recycling converges to an equilibrium cycle. To enable its simulation a numerical tool named equilibrium fuel cycle procedure for fast reactors (EQL3D) was developed in the FAST group of LRS at Paul Scherrer Institut. The procedure is based on the ERANOS code and can be used to yield the description of two basic situations: the equilibrium of an open fuel cycle and the equilibrium of a closed fuel cycle. The goals of the present study are (i) to apply EQL3D to the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), and Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), (ii) to simulate and confirm the GFR, SFR, and LFR neutronics capability for closed fuel cycle, and (iii) to evaluate and compare the equilibrium cycle safety and performance parameters. The EQL3D capability enables to characterize the equilibrium cycle for complex reloading patterns

  19. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  20. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of wh

  1. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor; Amelioration des caracteristiques de la dissipation de la chaleur de decroissance pour les reacteurs a neutrons rapides de quatrieme generation refroidi au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-09-07

    The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be powered either by the power grid or by batteries for at least 24 hours. The specific contributions of the present research - aimed at achieving enhanced passivity of the DHR system for the GFR - are design and analysis related to (1) the injection of heavy gas into the primary circuit after a LOCA, to enable natural convection cooling at an intermediate-pressure level, and (2) an autonomous Brayton loop to evacuate decay heat at low primary pressure in case of a loss of the guard containment pressure. Both these developments reduce the dependence on blower power availability considerably. First, the thermal-hydraulic codes used in the study - TRACE and CATHARE - are validated for gas cooling. The validation includes benchmark comparisons between the codes, serving to identify the sensitivity of the results to the different modeling assumptions. The parameters found to be the most sensitive in this analysis, such as heat transfer and friction models, are then validated via a

  2. Structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, K. L.; Charit, I.

    2008-12-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater toward a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-IV reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This paper presents a summary of various Gen-IV reactor concepts, with emphasis on the structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas. This paper also discusses the challenges involved in using the existing materials under both service and off-normal conditions. Tasks become increasingly complex due to the operation of various fundamental phenomena like radiation-induced segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion, precipitation, interactions between impurity elements and radiation-produced defects, swelling, helium generation and so forth. Further, high temperature capability (e.g. creep properties) of these materials is a critical, performance-limiting factor. It is demonstrated that novel alloy and microstructural design approaches coupled with new materials processing and fabrication techniques may mitigate the challenges, and the optimum system performance may be achieved under much demanding conditions.

  3. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  4. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  5. Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, M; Marian, J; Martinez, E; Erhart, P

    2009-02-27

    Within the LDRD on 'Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors' basic thermodynamics of the Fe-Cr alloy and accurate atomistic modeling were used to help develop the capability to predict hardening, swelling and embrittlement using the paradigm of Multiscale Materials Modeling. Approaches at atomistic and mesoscale levels were linked to build-up the first steps in an integrated modeling platform that seeks to relate in a near-term effort dislocation dynamics to polycrystal plasticity. The requirements originated in the reactor systems under consideration today for future sources of nuclear energy. These requirements are beyond the present day performance of nuclear materials and calls for the development of new, high temperature, radiation resistant materials. Fe-Cr alloys with 9-12% Cr content are the base matrix of advanced ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels envisaged as fuel cladding and structural components of Gen-IV reactors. Predictive tools are needed to calculate structural and mechanical properties of these steels. This project represents a contribution in that direction. The synergy between the continuous progress of parallel computing and the spectacular advances in the theoretical framework that describes materials have lead to a significant advance in our comprehension of materials properties and their mechanical behavior. We took this progress to our advantage and within this LDRD were able to provide a detailed physical understanding of iron-chromium alloys microstructural behavior. By combining ab-initio simulations, many-body interatomic potential development, and mesoscale dislocation dynamics we were able to describe their microstructure evolution. For the first time in the case of Fe-Cr alloys, atomistic and mesoscale were merged and the first steps taken towards incorporating ordering and precipitation effects into dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies of the transport of self

  6. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Development of next generation reactor in Korea -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1993-09-01

    The project, development of next generation reactor, aims overall related technology development and obtainment of related license in 2001. The development direction is to determine the reactor type and to build up the design concept in 1994. For development trend analysis of foreign next generation reactor, level-1 PSA, fuel cycle analysis and computer code development are performed on System 80+ and AP 600. Especially for design characteristics analysis and volume upgrade of AP 600, nuclear fuel and reactor core design analysis, coolant circuit design analysis, mechanical structure design analysis and safety analysis etc. are performed. (Author).

  7. Innovative reactor development strategy-focusing on generation 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Kazuaki [The Inst. of Applied Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) has been established at the USDOE in 2000. Japan joined the GIF in July 2001 and now ten countries have joined to develop the nuclear power plant aiming at its realization in 2030's, which should be economically competitive with natural gas combined cycle power plant, proliferation-resistant, lower waste and safer system. These international activities claim for more efficient and accountable efforts of the next-generation reactor development. 94 reactor types of four kinds (water, gas, liquid metal and non classical) have been proposed from 12 countries and 20% proposals are from Japan. USNERAC (Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee) have selected three main indices to established the load map; sustainable development, safety and credibility and economics. The author reviewed the significance of GIF activities as a member of the team and commented how to relate them with Japanese internal activities. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  10. A Cylindrical Shielding Design Concept for the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sunghwan; Kim, Sang Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR), a metal fueled, blanket-free, pool type SFR concept is adopted to acquire the inherent safety characteristics and high proliferation-resistance. In the pool type fast reactor, the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), which transfer heat from the primary sodium pool to a secondary sodium loop, are placed inside of the reactor vessel. Hence, secondary sodium passing the IHXs can be radioactivated by a {sup 23}Na(n,g){sup 24}Na reaction, and radioactivated secondary sodium causes a significant dose in the Steam Generator Building (SGB). Therefore, a typical core of a pool type fast reactor is usually surrounded by a massive quantity of shields. In addition, the blanket composed of depleted uranium plays a role as superior shielding material; a significant increase in shields is required in the blanket-free pool type SFR. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR. In a conventional shielding design, massive axial shields are required to prevent irradiation of secondary sodium passing IHXs and they should be replaced according to the subassembly replacement in spite of negligible depletion of the shielding material. The proposed shielding design concept minimizes the quantity of shields without their replacement. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR such as a PGSFR. The proposed design concept satisfied the dose limit in the steam generator building successfully without introducing a large quantity of B{sub 4}C shielding inside the subassembly.

  11. Progress reports for Gen IV sodium fast reactor activities FY 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Tentner, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-04

    An important goal of the US DOE Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) program is to develop the technology necessary to increase safety margins in future fast reactor systems. Although no decision has been made yet about who will build the next demonstration fast reactor, it seems likely that the construction team will include a combination of international companies, and the safety design philosophy for the reactor will reflect a consensus of the participating countries. A significant amount of experience in the design and safety analysis of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) using oxide fuel has been developed in both Japan and France during last few decades. In the US, the traditional approach to reactor safety is based on the principle of defense-in-depth, which is usually expressed in physical terms as multiple barriers to release of radioactive material (e.g. cladding, reactor vessel, containment building), but it is understood that the 'barriers' may consist of active systems or even procedures. As implemented in a reactor design, defense-in-depth is classed in levels of safety. Level 1 includes measures to specify and build a reliable design with significant safety margins that will perform according to the intentions of the designers. Level 2 consists of additional design measures, usually active systems, to protect against unlikely accidental events that may occur during the life of the plant. Level 3 design measures are intended to protect the public in the event of an extremely unlikely accident not foreseen to occur during the plant's life. All of the design measures that make up the first three levels of safety are within the design basis of the plant. Beyond Level 3, and beyond the normal design basis, there are accidents that are not expected to occur in a whole generation of plants, and it is in this class that severe accidents, i.e. accidents involving core melting, are included. Beyond design basis measures to address severe accidents are usually

  12. European cross-cutting research on structural materials for Generation IV and transmutation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazio, C., E-mail: concetta.fazio@nuklear.fzk.d [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Program Nuklear, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alamo, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Almazouzi, A. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre D' Etude de L' Energie Nucleaire, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Grandis, S. [Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie l' Energia e l' Ambiente, CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano Bologna (Italy); Gomez-Briceno, D. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Henry, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Malerba, L. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre D' Etude de L' Energie Nucleaire, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Rieth, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Program Nuklear, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    It has been internationally recognized that materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV and advanced fuel cycle initiatives. In Europe, materials studies are considered within the Strategic Research Agenda of the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform. Moreover, the European Commission has recently launched a 7th Framework Programme Research Project, named 'Generation IV and Transmutation Materials', that has the objective of addressing materials issues which are cross-cutting for more than one type of innovative reactor systems. The present work has been prepared with the aim of describing the rationale, the objectives, the work plan and the expected results of this research project.

  13. JUNO: A Next Generation Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The mass hierarchy and the CP phase are the main focus of the next generation neutrino oscillation experiments. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), as a medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment, can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy independent of the CP phase. The physics potential on the mass hierarchy, and other measurements are reviewed. The preliminary design options for a 20~kton detector with an energy resolution of $3\\%/\\sqrt{E_{vis}}$ are illustrated. The main technical challenges on the PMT and scintillator are discussed and the corresponding R\\&D efforts are presented.

  14. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  15. Development of the Plan for Improvement of the Competitiveness of KALIMER Design against the Competing Reactor Design in Gen IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Yeong Il; Hong, Ser Gi (and others)

    2005-11-15

    A fast reactor has a good transmutation capability and it enables breeding of fuel and use of a closed fuel cycle. By these characteristics of a fast reactor, the limited uranium resources of the world can be much more effectively utilized and the nuclear wastes of a high level of radioactivity and toxicity from the current nuclear power reactors of LWRs and HWRs can be drastically reduced in its volume and the management of the wastes can be easily treated. Also electricity can be generated more effectively since a fast reactor has the feature of high operation temperature. These features of a fast reactor makes it inevitable on a long term basis to construct fast reactors in Korea. The domestic fast reactor technology level, however, is at the level of coming out of a beginning stage and needs utilization of international expertise. Recently an international cooperation program called GIF has been formulated and our KALIMER was selected as one of the two reference designs for the international joint R and D works with JSFR of Japan. In the current frame of the GIF program, the two selected reference designs are supposed to be evaluated against each other in future and one design is to be finally selected. To make the international cooperation program directed more useful to our fast reactor technology development, it is required to strengthen the competitiveness of KALIMER so that it can be selected. To meet the necessity, a study was made to enhance the competitiveness of KALIMER. The design characteristics of JSFR was investigated and relatively weak points and strong points of KALIMER were identified. Also the GenIV SFR design requirements were applied to two designs to evaluate the level of requirements satisfaction. Based on these investigation results, a plan for improving the weak features and strengthening the strong points of the KALIMER design has been developed.

  16. A preliminary safety analysis for the prototype Gen IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwi Lim; Ha, Kwi Seok; Jeong, Jae Ho; Choi, Chi Woong; Jeong, Tae Kyeong; Ahn, Sang June; Lee, Seung Won; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Yoo, Jae Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing a pool-type sodium-cooled fast reactor of the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR). To assess the effectiveness of the inherent safety features of the PGSFR, the system transients during design basis accidents and design extended conditions are analyzed with MARS-LMR and the subchannel blockage events are analyzed with MATRA-LMR-FB. In addition, the in-vessel source term is calculated based on the super-safe, small, and simple reactor methodology. The results show that the PGSFR meets safety acceptance criteria with a sufficient margin during the events and keeps accidents from deteriorating into more severe accidents.

  17. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors; Etude des materiaux sacrificiels absorbants et diluants pour le controle de la reactivite dans le cas d'un accidnet hypothetique de fusion du coeur de reacteurs de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-12-16

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B{sub 4}C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B{sub 4}C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B{sub 4}C - UO{sub 2} system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B{sub 4}C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO{sub 2}, first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} - UO{sub 2} system, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} - UO{sub 2} mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [French] Resume: Afin de limiter les consequences d'un accident grave avec la fusion du coeur dans un reacteur a neutrons rapides de generation IV refroidi au sodium, la recriticite doit

  18. LMFBR type reactor and power generation system using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsubo, Akira.

    1994-02-25

    A reactor core void reactivity of a reactor main body is set to negative or zero. A heat insulation structure is disposed on the inner wall surface of a reactor container. Oxide fuels or nitride fuels are used. A fuel pin cladding tube has a double walled structure having an outer side of stainless steel and an inner side of niobium alloy. Upon imaginary event, boiling is allowed. Even if boiling of coolants should occur by temperature elevation of fuels upon imaginary event, since reactor core fuels comprises oxides or nitrides, they have a heat resistance, further, and since the fuel pin cladding tube has super heat resistance, it has a high temperature strength, so that it is not ruptured and durable to the coolant boiling temperature. Since the reactor core void reactivity is negative or zero, the reactor core is in a subcritical state by the boiling, and the reactor core power is reduced to several % of the rated power. Accordingly, boiling and non-boiling are repeated substantially permanently in the reactor core, during which safety can be kept with no operator's handling. Further, heat generated in the reactor core is gradually removed by an air cooling system for the reactor container. (N.H.).

  19. Technological status of reactor coolant pumps in generation III+ pressurized nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, Bernhard; Bross, Stephan [KSB Aktiengesellschaft, Frankenthal (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    KSB has been developing and producing pumps for thermal power plants for nearly 90 years. Consequently, KSB also started to develop and manufacture pumps for all kinds of nuclear power plants from the very beginning of the civil use of nuclear energy. This is especially true for reactor coolant pumps for pressurized water reactors. For the generation of advanced evolutionary reactors (Generation III+ reactors), KSB developed an advanced shaft seal system which is also able to fulfill the requirements of station blackout conditions. The tests in the KSB test rigs, which were successfully completed in December 2015, proved the full functionality of the new design. For generation III+ passive plant reactors KSB developed a new reactor coolant pump type called RUV, which is based on the experience of classic reactor coolant pumps and reactor internal pumps. It is a very compact, hermetically sealed vertical pump-motor unit with a wet winding motor. A full scale prototype successfully passed the 1st stage qualification test program in October 2015.

  20. Uranium droplet nuclear reactor core with MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Kumar, Ratan

    An innovative concept employing liquid uranium droplets as fuel in an ultrahigh-temperature vapor core reactor (UTVR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator power system for space power generation has been studied. Metallic vapor in superheated form acts as a working fluid for a closed-Rankine-type thermodynamic cycle. Usage of fuel and working fluid in this form assures certain advantages. The major technical issues emerging as a result involve a method for droplet generation, droplet transport in the reactor core, heat generation in the fuel and transport to the metallic vapor, and materials compatibility. A qualitative and quantitative attempt to resolve these issues has indicated the promise and tentative feasibility of the system.

  1. Mechanical Design Concept of Fuel Assembly for Prototype GEN-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K. H.; Lee, C. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The prototype GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) is an advanced fast reactor plant design that utilizes compact modular pool-type reactors sized to enable factory fabrication and an affordable prototype test for design certification at minimum cost and risk. The design concepts of the fuel assembly (FA) were introduced for a PGSFR. Unlike that for the pressurized water reactor, there is a neutron shielding concept in the FA and recycling metal fuel. The PGSFR core is a heterogeneous, uranium-10% zirconium (U-10Zr) metal alloy fuel design with 112 assemblies: 52 inner core fuel assemblies, 60 outer core fuel assemblies, 6 primary control assemblies, 3 secondary control assemblies, 90 reflector assemblies and 102 B4C shield assemblies. This configuration is shown in Fig. 1. The core is designed to produce 150 MWe with an average temperature rise of 155 .deg. C. The inlet temperature is 390 .deg. C and the bulk outlet temperature is 545 .deg. C. The core height is 900 mm and the gas plenum length is 1,250 mm. A mechanical design of a fuel assembly for a PGSFR was established. The mechanical design concepts are well realized in the design. In addition to this, the analytical and experimental works will be carries out for verifying the design soundness.

  2. Overall system description and safety characteristics of Prototype Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Woon; Chang, Jin Wook; Lim, Jae Yong; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Sung Kyun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Prototype Gen IV sodium cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed for the last 4 years, fulfilling the technology demonstration of the burning capability of transuranic elements included in light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. The PGSFR design has been focused on the robustness of safety systems by enhancing inherent safety characteristics of metal fuel and strengthening passive safety features using natural circulation and thermal expansion. The preliminary safety information document as a major outcome of the first design phase of PGSFR development was issued at the end of 2015. The project entered the second design phase at the beginning of 2016. This paper summarizes the overall structures, systems, and components of nuclear steam supply system and safety characteristics of the PGSFR. The research and development activities to demonstrate the safety performance are also briefly introduced in the paper.

  3. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap-Yan Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  4. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  5. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Pekarcikova, M.; Simko, F.; Petriska, M.; Skarba, M.; Mikula, P.; Pupala, M.

    2016-11-01

    Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeg Veternikova, J., E-mail: jana.veternikova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Degmova, J. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pekarcikova, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Simko, F. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Petriska, M. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Skarba, M. [Slovak University of Technology, Vazovova 5, 812 43 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pupala, M. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Thermal resistance of advanced stainless steels were observed at 1000 °C. • GEN IV candidate steels were confronted to classic AISI steels. • ODS AISI 316 has weaker thermal resistance than classic AISI steel. • Ferritic ODS steels and NF 709 has better thermal resistance than AISI steels. - Abstract: Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  7. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  8. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  9. Temperature Fluctuation Characteristics Analysis for Steam Generator of Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Li-na; WU; Zhi-guang

    2015-01-01

    In the case of boiling heat transfer deterioration,temperature fluctuating may accelerate the corrosion of heat transfer tubes and can also lead to thermal stress on the tubes.In this paper,dryout-induced temperature fluctuation for the fast reactor steam generator is investigated.The impacts of water flow rate,sodium inlet temperature and the outlet steam

  10. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2). Detailed structure and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    A light water reactor fuel behavior analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2) was developed as an improved version of FEMAXI-IV. Development of FEMAXI-IV has been already finished in 1992, though a detailed structure and input manual of the code have not been open to users yet. Here, the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied to FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), and the material properties adopted in the code are described in detail. In FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), programming bugs in previous FEMAXI-IV were eliminated, renewal of the pellet thermal conductivity was performed, and a model of thermal-stress restraint on FP gas release was incorporated. For facilitation of effective and wide-ranging application of the code, methods of input/output of the code are also described in detail, and sample output is included. (author)

  11. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  12. Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

    2009-09-01

    Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving

  13. Non-destructive research methods applied on materials for the new generation of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Veterníková, J.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Bouhaddane, A.

    2014-06-01

    The paper is aimed on non-destructive experimental techniques applied on materials for the new generation of nuclear reactors (GEN IV). With the development of these reactors, also materials have to be developed in order to guarantee high standard properties needed for construction. These properties are high temperature resistance, radiation resistance and resistance to other negative effects. Nevertheless the changes in their mechanical properties should be only minimal. Materials, that fulfil these requirements, are analysed in this work. The ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels and ODS steels are studied in details. Microstructural defects, which can occur in structural materials and can be also accumulated during irradiation due to neutron flux or alpha, beta and gamma radiation, were analysed using different spectroscopic methods as positron annihilation spectroscopy and Barkhausen noise, which were applied for measurements of three different FM steels (T91, P91 and E97) as well as one ODS steel (ODS Eurofer).

  14. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors. Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  15. Optimized transition from the reactors of second and third generations to the thorium molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Ghetta, V.; Le Brun, C.; Mathieu, L.; Brissot, R.; Liatard, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC/IN2P3/CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present in this article a very promising, simple and feasible concept of Molten Salt Reactor with no moderator in the core, operated in the Th/U{sup 233} fuel cycle with fluoride salts and called non-moderated Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR). We have detailed in this article some parametric studies, related to the system reprocessing constraints, and the heavy nuclei composition of the salt which modifies the neutron spectrum of the reactor. Since U{sup 233} does not exist on earth and is not being produced today, we aim at designing a critical MSR able to burn the Plutonium and the Minor Actinides produced in the current operating reactors, and consequently to convert this Plutonium into U{sup 233}. This leads to closing the current fuel cycle thanks to TMSRs started with transuranic elements on a Thorium base, i.e. started in the Th/Pu fuel cycle, similarly to fast neutron reactors operated in the U/Pu fuel cycle. The burning of transuranic elements in these Pu-started TMSRs results in high waste reduction rates, up to 95-97% for all TMSR configurations assessed. We particularly point out in our analyses the excellent level of deterministic safety of all the TMSR configurations studied, for the U{sup 233}-started TMSRs as well as for the Pu-started TMSRs. We will detail optimizations of this transition between the reactors of second and third generations to the Thorium cycle. Such a transition is based on a fleet of TMSRs with no moderator in the core, including TMSRs started with Plutonium and TMSRs directly started with U{sup 233}. We have analyzed the characteristics of each reactor configuration, in terms of deterministic safety parameters, fissile matter inventory, salt reprocessing, radiotoxicity and waste production, and finally deployment capacities.

  16. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  17. Studies on advanced water-cooled reactors beyond generation Ⅲ for power generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xu

    2007-01-01

    China's ambitious nuclear power program motivates the country's nuclear community to develop advanced reactor concepts beyond generation Ⅲ to ensure a long-term, stable, and sustainable development of nuclear power. The paper discusses some main criteria for the selection of future water-cooled reactors by considering the specific Chinese situation. Based on the suggested selection criteria, two new types of water-cooled reactors are recommended for future Chinese nuclear power generation. The high conversion pressurized water reactor utilizes the present PWR technology to a large extent. With a conversion ratio of about 0.95, the fuel utilization is increased about 5 times. This significantly improves the sustainability of fuel resources. The supercritical water-cooled reactor has favorable features in economics,sustainability and technology availability. It is a logical extension of the generation Ⅲ PWR technology in China.The status of international R&D work is reviewed. A new supercritieal water-cooled reactor (SCWR) core structure (the mixed reactor core) and a new fuel assembly design (two-rows FA) are proposed. The preliminary analysis using a coupled neutron-physics/thermal-hydranlics method is carded out. It shows good feasibility for the new design proposal.

  18. Documentation for MeshKit - Reactor Geometry (&mesh) Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rajeev [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mahadevan, Vijay [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This report gives documentation for using MeshKit’s Reactor Geometry (and mesh) Generator (RGG) GUI and also briefly documents other algorithms and tools available in MeshKit. RGG is a program designed to aid in modeling and meshing of complex/large hexagonal and rectilinear reactor cores. RGG uses Argonne’s SIGMA interfaces, Qt and VTK to produce an intuitive user interface. By integrating a 3D view of the reactor with the meshing tools and combining them into one user interface, RGG streamlines the task of preparing a simulation mesh and enables real-time feedback that reduces accidental scripting mistakes that could waste hours of meshing. RGG interfaces with MeshKit tools to consolidate the meshing process, meaning that going from model to mesh is as easy as a button click. This report is designed to explain RGG v 2.0 interface and provide users with the knowledge and skills to pilot RGG successfully. Brief documentation of MeshKit source code, tools and other algorithms available are also presented for developers to extend and add new algorithms to MeshKit. RGG tools work in serial and parallel and have been used to model complex reactor core models consisting of conical pins, load pads, several thousands of axially varying material properties of instrumentation pins and other interstices meshes.

  19. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  20. An EBSD investigation on flow localization and microstructure evolution of 316L stainless steel for Gen IV reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianglin; Pan, Xiao; Mabon, James C.; Li, Meimei; Stubbins, James F.

    2007-09-01

    Type 316L stainless steel has been selected as a candidate structural material in a series of current accelerator driven systems and Generation IV reactor conceptual designs. The material is sensitive to irradiation damage in the temperature range of 150-400 °C: even low levels of irradiation exposure, as small as 0.1 dpa, can cause severe loss of ductility during tensile loading. This process, where the plastic flow becomes highly localized resulting in extremely low overall ductility, is referred as flow localization. The process controlling this confined flow is related to the difference between the yield and ultimate tensile strengths such that large irradiation-induced increases in the yield strength result in very limited plastic flow leading to necking after very small levels of uniform elongation. In this study, the microstructural evolution controlling flow localization is examined. It is found that twinning is an important deformation mechanism at lower temperatures since it promotes the strain hardening process. At higher temperatures, twinning becomes energetically impossible since the activation of twinning is determined by the critical twinning stress, which increases rapidly with temperature. Mechanical twinning and dislocation-based planar slip are competing mechanisms for plastic deformation.

  1. Versatile thin-film reactor for photochemical vapor generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chengbin; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Brophy, Christine; Hou, Xiandeng

    2010-04-01

    A novel thin-film reactor is described and evaluated for its analytical performance with photochemical vapor generation (TF-PVG). The device, comprising both the generator and a gas-liquid separator, utilizes a vertical central quartz rod onto which the sample is pumped to yield a thin liquid film conducive to the rapid escape of generated hydrophobic species. The rod is housed within a concentric quartz tube through which a flow of argon carrier/stripping gas is passed to remove and transport the generated species to a detector, which in this study is an inductively coupled argon plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The concentric quartz tube is itself surrounded by a 78-turn 0.5 m long quartz coil low-pressure mercury discharge lamp operating at 20 W. The performance of this thin-film photoreactor was evaluated through comparison of analytical figures of merit for detection of a number of elements undergoing PVG in the presence of formic or acetic acid with those arising from conventional solution nebulization under optimized conditions. The TF-PVG reactor provided sensitivity enhancements, of 110-, 120-, 130-, 250-, 120-, 230-, 78-, 1.3-, 16-, and 32-fold for As, Sb, Bi, Se, Te, Hg, Ni, Co, Fe, and I, respectively, and detection limit enhancements of 110-, 140-, 170-, 270-, 200-, 300-, 160-, 2.7-, 50-, and 44-fold for these same elements. Vapor generation efficiencies ranged from 20-100% for this suite of analytes. The utility of this technique was demonstrated by the determination of Fe and Ni in Certified Reference Materials DORM-3 (fish protein) and DOLT-4 (dogfish liver tissue).

  2. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbalm, K.F. [comp.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  3. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-04

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  4. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  5. "A New Class od Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain; Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Gordon E. Khose; Mrs. Judith Maro, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT

    2008-05-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 oC. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  6. Development of the control assembly pattern and dynamic analysis of the generation IV large gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR); Developpement du design d'un assemblage de controle et analyse dynamique des reacteurs a neutrons rapides de quatrieme generation refroidis au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardin, G.

    2009-07-09

    Among the systems selected by the GIF, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is a highly innovative system with advanced fuel geometry and materials. It is in the context of the large, 2400 MWth reference GFR design that the present doctoral research has been conducted, the principal aim having been to develop and qualify the control assembly (CA) pattern and corresponding CA implementation scheme for this system. The work has been carried out in three successive and complementary phases: (1) validation of the neutronics tools, (2) the CA pattern development and related static analysis, and (3) dynamic core behavior studies for hypothetical CA driven transients. During the first phase of the thesis, the reference PROTEUS test lattice from these experiments has been analyzed with ERANOS-2.0 and its associated, adjusted nuclear data library ERALIB1. Additionally, benchmark calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, allowing one to both check the deterministic results and to analyze the sensitivity to different modern data libraries. It has been found that, for the main reaction rate ratios, the new analysis of the GCFR-PROTEUS reference lattice generally yields good agreement - within 1{sigma} measurement uncertainty - with experimental values and with the Monte Carlo simulations. As shown by the analysis, the predictions were in somewhat better agreement in the case of the adjusted ERALIB1 library. The applicability of ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 as the reference neutronics tool for the GFR analysis could thus be demonstrated. Furthermore, neutronics aspects related to the novel features of the GFR, for which new experimental investigations are needed, were highlighted. In the second phase of the research, the CA pattern was developed for the GFR, based on iterative neutronics and thermal-hydraulics calculations, 2D and 3D neutronics models for the reactor core having first been set up using the reference ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 computational scheme. For the thermal

  7. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinsky, Paul J [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Abdel-Khalik, Hany S [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Stover, Tracy E [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-03-01

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  8. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinsky, Paul J; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S; Stover, Tracy E

    2011-03-31

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  9. Improved safety fast reactor with “reservoir” for delayed neutrons generating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Apse, V. A.; Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility to improve safety of fast reactors by using weak neutron absorber with large atomic weight as a material for external neutron reflector and for internal cavity in the reactor core (the neutron “reservoir”) where generation of some additional “delayed” neutron takes place. The effects produced by the external neutron reflector and the internal neutron “reservoir” on kinetic behavior of fast reactors are inter-compared. It is demonstrated that neutron kinetics of fast reactors with such external and internal zones becomes the quieter as compared with neutron kinetics of thermal reactors.

  10. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  11. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  12. Research and development on next generation reactor (phase I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyoon; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the study is to improve the volume of nuclear power plant which adopts passive safety system concept. The passive safety system reactor is characterized by excellent safety and reliability. But the volume of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) of the passive safety system reactor is so small that it should be upgraded for commercial operation. For volume upgrade, detailed analyses are performed as follows; core design, hydraulics, design and mechnical structures, and safety analysis. In addition to above analysis, some investigations must be supplied as follows: power density vs. DNB margin decrease, outlet temperature vs. EPRI-URD, additional tests for upgraded reactor, dynamic analysis of mechanical vibration according to expanded reactor vessel and expanded in-core structures, and Merit loss of passive safety system reactor according to design margin decrease. (Author).

  13. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  14. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  15. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  16. What went Right: Resilience of Existing Reactors to - for Generation III+ Reactor Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2014-07-01

    To quote Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, "All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." So the reactors that have been working well in the world don't get a lot of attention...

  17. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  18. SARGEN-IV: Consideration on the possible content of the safety analysis report for innovative ESNII reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammirabile, L., E-mail: Luca.AMMIRABILE@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten (Netherlands); Tuček, K. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten (Netherlands); Blanc, D. [Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Pabarcius, R.; Kaliatka, A. [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Mansani, L. [ANSALDO Nucleare, Genova (Italy); Carluec, B. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Dufour, P. [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique, Cadarache (France); Homann, C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We present considerations on the content of the safety analysis report for innovative ESNII reactors. • The innovative ESNII reactor concepts require identification of safety objectives and engineering design requirements. • For innovative plant designs the SAR should clearly address all safety aspects to help the regulatory's safety evaluation. • It is recommended that parts of the SAR be discussed with the regulatory body at an early stage. - Abstract: In view of the potential deployment of demonstrators and prototypes associated with the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII), the present licensing framework, based on the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology, will have to adjust as necessary taking into account to the new safety aspects introduced by these innovative technologies. Within the SARGEN-IV project under the Euratom Framework Programme FP7, an extensive work has been done to review the critical safety features of the reactor concepts developed under ESNII. This review has also been used as a reference to provide guidelines on the structure and content of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the innovative ESNII reactors. Structure and content of a SAR generally differ among countries. The approach followed to give recommendations and guidance was to adopt as far as possible the format of the current practices for LWR based on the US NRC Reg Guide 1.70 together with IAEA publication GS-G-4.1 and to identify those chapters whose subjects need to be adapted to the specific design. Due to the innovative nature of the design, the licensing process for new ESNII concepts may take longer. The early involvement of regulators in defining safety objectives and criteria and acceptable solutions to meet these criteria may be beneficial to shorten this process. Therefore, it is recommended that parts of the SAR should be submitted to the regulatory body at an early stage and in accordance with an agreed

  19. The Generation in Between: A Perspective from the Keystone IV Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frederick M; Bliss, Erika; Dunn, Aaron; Edgoose, Jennifer; Elliott, Tricia C; Maxwell, Lisa C; Morris, Carl G; Phillips, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Keystone IV affirmed the value of relationships in family medicine, but each generation of family physicians took away different impressions and lessons. "Generation III," between the Baby Boomers and Millennials, reported conflict between their professional ideal of family medicine and the realities of current practice. But the Keystone conference also helped them appreciate core values of family medicine, their shared experience, and new opportunities for leadership.

  20. An experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from an experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode are presented. The obtained empirical dependence for calculating the power of heat exchangers operating in the steam condensation mode is presented.

  1. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  2. Next generation fuel irradiation capability in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetterer, Michael A., E-mail: michael.fuetterer@jrc.n [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); D' Agata, Elio; Laurie, Mathias; Marmier, Alain; Scaffidi-Argentina, Francesco [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Raison, Philippe [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), D-76334 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bakker, Klaas; Groot, Sander de; Klaassen, Frodo [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    This paper describes selected equipment and expertise on fuel irradiation testing at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands. The reactor went critical in 1961 and holds an operating license up to at least 2015. While HFR has initially focused on Light Water Reactor fuel and materials, it also played a decisive role since the 1970s in the German High Temperature Reactor (HTR) development program. A variety of tests related to fast reactor development in Europe were carried out for next generation fuel and materials, in particular for Very High Temperature Reactor (V/HTR) fuel, fuel for closed fuel cycles (U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycle) and transmutation, as well as for other innovative fuel types. The HFR constitutes a significant European infrastructure tool for the development of next generation reactors. Experimental facilities addressed include V/HTR fuel tests, a coated particle irradiation rig, and tests on fast reactor, transmutation and thorium fuel. The rationales for these tests are given, results are provided and further work is outlined.

  3. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  4. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  5. Simple evaluations of fluid-induced vibrations for steam generator tube arrays in advanced marine reactors (MRX, DRX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    Advanced Marine Reactor (MRX) and Deep Sea Research Reactor (DRX) are the integral-type PWR, and the steam generators are installed in the reactor vessels. Steam generators are of the once-through, helical-coil tube types. Heat transfer tubes surround inner shroud in annular space of the reactor vessel. Flow-induced vibrations are calculated by simple methods, and the arrangement of tube support structures are evaluated. (author)

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Materials Issues for Generation IV Systems : Status, Open Questions and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Gorse, Dominique; Mazière, Dominique; Pontikis, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    Global warming, shortage of low-cost oil resources and the increasing demand for energy are currently controlling the world's economic expansion while often opposing desires for sustainable and peaceful development. In this context, atomic energy satisfactorily fulfills the criteria of low carbon gas production and high overall yield. However, in the absence of industrial fast-breeders the use of nuclear fuel is not optimal, and the production of high activity waste materials is at a maximum. These are the principal reasons for the development of a new, fourth generation of nuclear reactors, minimizing the undesirable side-effects of current nuclear energy production technology while increasing yields by increasing operation temperatures and opening the way for the industrial production of hydrogen through the decomposition of water. The construction and use of such reactors is hindered by several factors, including performance limitations of known structural materials, particularly if the life of the project...

  7. Coupling of a RF generator to a plasma reactor; Acoplamiento de un generador RF a un reactor de plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar T, J.A

    2003-07-01

    The following thesis presents the development of the generation from a capacitive plasma through of radiofrequency discharges, for their realization it was needed of a series of elements capable of development such task, as they are it: the RF generator, the couple circuit of impedances and a plasma reactor. The main characteristics of each part is also described that composes the one system, as well as the results obtained experimentally, calculations and the devices used and designed to generate the capacitive thermal plasma. Moreover, is sought that this joining system is the base for later developments in those that intervene the generation of a capacitive plasma and one can to consider for practical and theoretical developments in the improvement of other processes as they are it: the generation of particles of carbon with different gases and hydrocarbons, the polymerization of metals, to synthesize pure molecules, for illumination purposes, etc. (Author)

  8. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  9. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  10. A Study on the Planning of Technology Development and Research for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-08-15

    This study aimed at the planning the domestic technology development of the Gen IV and the formulating the international collaborative project contents and executive plan for 'A Validity Assessment and Policies of the R and D of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'. The results of the study include follows; - Survey of the technology state in the fields of the Gen IV system specific technologies and the common technologies, and the plans of the international collaborative research - Drawing up the executive research and development plan by the experts of the relevant technology field for the systems which Korean will participate in. - Formulating the effective conduction plan of the program reflecting the view of the experts from the industry, the university and the research institute. - Establishing the plan for estimation of the research fund and the manpower for the efficient utilization of the domestic available resources. This study can be useful material for evaluating the appropriateness of the Korea's participation in the international collaborative development of the Gen IV, and can be valuably utilized to establish the strategy for the effective conduction of the program. The executive plan of the research and development which was produced in this study will be used to the basic materials for the establishing the guiding direction and the strategic conduction of the program when the research and development is launched in the future.

  11. Development of Blumlein Line Generator and Reactor for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainuddin Nawawi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the harm effects of wastewater from industrial sectors toward the environment become one of public major concern. There are several wastewater treatment methods and techniques which have been introduced such as by using biological, chemical, and physical process. However, it is found that there are some shortcomings in the current available methods and techniques. For instance, the application of chlorine can cause bacterial disinfection but produce secondary harmful carcinogenic disinfection.  And the application of ozone treatment –  which is one of the most reliable technique – requires improvement in term of ozone production and treatment system. In order to acquire a better understanding in wastewater treatment process, a study of wastewater treatment system and Hybrid Discharge reactor – to acquire gas-liquid phase corona like discharge – is carried out. In addition to the laboratory experiment, designing and development of the Blumlein pulse power circuit, and modification of reactor for wastewater treatment are accomplished as well.

  12. Uranium enrichment reduction in the Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) with PBO reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The Korean Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) is supposed to be loaded with a relatively-costly low-enriched U fuel, while its envisaged transuranic fuels are not available for transmutation. In this work, the U-enrichment reduction by improving the neutron economy is pursued to save the fuel cost. To improve the neutron economy of the core, a new reflector material, PbO, has been introduced to replace the conventional HT9 reflector in the current PGSFR core. Two types of PbO reflectors are considered: one is the conventional pin-type and the other one is an inverted configuration. The inverted PbO reflector design is intended to maximize the PbO volume fraction in the reflector assembly. In addition, the core radial configuration is also modified to maximize the performance of the PbO reflector. For the baseline PGSFR core with several reflector options, the U enrichment requirement has been analyzed and the fuel depletion analysis is performed to derive the equilibrium cycle parameters. The linear reactivity model is used to determine the equilibrium cycle performances of the core. Impacts of the new PbO reflectors are characterized in terms of the cycle length, neutron leakage, radial power distribution, and operational fuel cost.

  13. Development of source term evaluation method for Korean Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keon Jae; Cheong, Jae Hak; Park, Jin Baek; Kim, Guk Gee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-15

    This project had investigate several design features of radioactive waste processing system and method to predict nuclide concentration at primary coolant basic concept of next generation reactor and safety goals at the former phase. In this project several prediction methods of source term are evaluated conglomerately and detailed contents of this project are : model evaluation of nuclide concentration at Reactor Coolant System, evaluation of primary and secondary coolant concentration of reference Nuclear Power Plant(NPP), investigation of prediction parameter of source term evaluation, basic parameter of PWR, operational parameter, respectively, radionuclide removal system and adjustment values of reference NPP, suggestion of source term prediction method of next generation NPP.

  14. Oxygen transport membrane reactor based method and system for generating electric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Chakravarti, Shrikar; Li, Juan

    2017-02-07

    A carbon capture enabled system and method for generating electric power and/or fuel from methane containing sources using oxygen transport membranes by first converting the methane containing feed gas into a high pressure synthesis gas. Then, in one configuration the synthesis gas is combusted in oxy-combustion mode in oxygen transport membranes based boiler reactor operating at a pressure at least twice that of ambient pressure and the heat generated heats steam in thermally coupled steam generation tubes within the boiler reactor; the steam is expanded in steam turbine to generate power; and the carbon dioxide rich effluent leaving the boiler reactor is processed to isolate carbon. In another configuration the synthesis gas is further treated in a gas conditioning system configured for carbon capture in a pre-combustion mode using water gas shift reactors and acid gas removal units to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas that fuels an integrated gas turbine and steam turbine system to generate power. The disclosed method and system can also be adapted to integrate with coal gasification systems to produce power from both coal and methane containing sources with greater than 90% carbon isolation.

  15. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  16. A study on the regulatory approach of safety issues for Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Keun Seon; Choi, Jeong Tae; Kim, In Joon [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Korea Association of Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Gee Sik [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Uk; Kim, Yun Il; Yang, Soo Hyeong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-15

    The project aims to provide the regulatory direction of major technical issues related to the quantitative criteria for probabilistic risk analysis, establishment of containment performance criteria, design of additional water source for long-term corium cooling of core debris, protection against common mode failure of digital I and C system, criteria for safety-related operator action, quantitative reliability targets, classification of plant conditions and acceptance criteria and development of graded QA. These issues are parts of major technical issues resulted from the safety regulation R and D on the next generation reactor. Regulatory directions to be applied to the Korea Next Generation Reactors in this study are developed by analyzing the state-of-the-art of the development of local and foreign regulatory requirements, research trends, and the design features and safety goals of advanced reactors.

  17. Experimental and modelling evaluation of an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reactor for hydrogen generation / Steven Chiuta

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuta, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, ammonia (NH3) decomposition was assessed as a fuel processing technology for producing on-demand hydrogen (H2) for portable and distributed fuel cell applications. This study was motivated by the present lack of infrastructure to generate H2 for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. An overview of past and recent worldwide research activities in the development of reactor technologies for portable and distributed hydrogen generation via NH3 decomposition wa...

  18. Design by theoretical and CFD analyses of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid lead for a Generation IV LFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrini, Marcello [GeNERG - DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); Borreani, Walter [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso F.M. Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy); INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lomonaco, Guglielmo, E-mail: guglielmo.lomonaco@unige.it [GeNERG - DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Magugliani, Fabrizio [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso F.M. Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) has both a long history and a penchant of innovation. With early work related to its use for submarine propulsion dating to the 1950s, Russian scientists pioneered the development of reactors cooled by heavy liquid metals (HLM). More recently, there has been substantial interest in both critical and subcritical reactors cooled by lead (Pb) or lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE), not only in Russia, but also in Europe, Asia, and the USA. The growing knowledge of the thermal-fluid-dynamic properties of these fluids and the choice of the LFR as one of the six reactor types selected by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for further research and development has fostered the exploration of new geometries and new concepts aimed at optimizing the key components that will be adopted in the Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator (ALFRED), the 300 MW{sub t} pool-type reactor aimed at proving the feasibility of the design concept adopted for the European Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (ELFR). In this paper, a theoretical and computational analysis is presented of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid Lead as primary pump for the adopted reference conceptual design of ALFRED. The pump is at first analyzed at design operating conditions from the theoretical point of view to determine the optimal geometry according to the velocity triangles and then modeled with a 3D CFD code (ANSYS CFX). The choice of a 3D simulation is dictated by the need to perform a detailed spatial simulation taking into account the peculiar geometry of the pump as well as the boundary layers and turbulence effects of the flow, which are typically tri-dimensional. The use of liquid Lead impacts significantly the fluid dynamic design of the pump because of the key requirement to avoid any erosion affects. These effects have a major impact on the performance, reliability and lifespan of the pump. Albeit some erosion-related issues remain to be fully addressed, the results

  19. Study of hydrogen generation plant coupled to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas Robert

    Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Several thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. Eight unique case studies are performed based on a thorough literature review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without SCRAM, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, and (8) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric

  20. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  1. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARI, R.; ET AL.

    2006-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include

  2. Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

    2006-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include

  3. Generation of XS library for the reflector of VVER reactor core using Monte Carlo code Serpent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usheva, K. I.; Kuten, S. A.; Khruschinsky, A. A.; Babichev, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    A physical model of the radial and axial reflector of VVER-1200-like reactor core has been developed. Five types of radial reflector with different material composition exist for the VVER reactor core and 1D and 2D models were developed for all of them. Axial top and bottom reflectors are described by the 1D model. A two-group XS library for diffusion code DYN3D has been generated for all types of reflectors by using Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code. Power distribution in the reactor core calculated in DYN3D is flattened in the core central region to more extent in the 2D model of the radial reflector than in its 1D model.

  4. SuPer-Homogenization (SPH) Corrected Cross Section Generation for High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hummel, Andrew John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hiruta, Hikaru [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The deterministic full core simulators require homogenized group constants covering the operating and transient conditions over the entire lifetime. Traditionally, the homogenized group constants are generated using lattice physics code over an assembly or block in the case of prismatic high temperature reactors (HTR). For the case of strong absorbers that causes strong local depressions on the flux profile require special techniques during homogenization over a large volume. Fuel blocks with burnable poisons or control rod blocks are example of such cases. Over past several decades, there have been a tremendous number of studies performed for improving the accuracy of full-core calculations through the homogenization procedure. However, those studies were mostly performed for light water reactor (LWR) analyses, thus, may not be directly applicable to advanced thermal reactors such as HTRs. This report presents the application of SuPer-Homogenization correction method to a hypothetical HTR core.

  5. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Doh; Kil, Chung Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Data testing of ENDF/B-VI.2 was performed and ACE-format continuous point-wise cross section library from ENDF/B-VI.2 for MCNP was validated through CSEWG benchmark and power plant mockup experiments. The calculated k-effective of ORNL-1, -2, -3, -4 and -10 with ENDF/B-VI are low by about 0.5% but those of L-7, -8, -9, -10 and -11 show good agreement with experiments. Overall results for uranium core with ENDF/B-VI is low in critically than with ENDF/B-V. The calculated results with ENDF/B-VI for PNL-6 {approx} 12 of plutonium core and PNL-30 {approx} 35 of mixed oxide core show good agreement with the experiments. The results of critically calculation for fast core benchmark do not show large difference between ENDF/B-VI and -V. But the calculated results of reaction rate ratio with ENDF/B-VI are improved, compared with ENDF/B-V. The calculated power distribution for VENUS PWR mockup core and typical BWR core of GE with both of ENDF/B-VI and -V agree well with measured values. From the above results, newly generated MCNP library from ENDF/B-VI is useful for nuclear and shielding design and analysis. 5 figs, 13 tabs, 11 refs. (Author).

  6. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of

  7. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different D.O levels. The strain rate was 1.5X10{sup -7} or 0.8X10{sup -7}/sec. In comparison with the stress-strain curve of T92 in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O) T92 appeared to experience SCC in SCW of 100 or 500 D.O, showing the decrease of the elongation and the tensile strength. A part of the fracture surface reveals a brittle fracture manner. (3) Crack growth rate (CGR) of T91 specimen under cyclic strain in a SCW was investigated using CT specimens. The CGR's in 370 .deg. C water and 500 .deg. C SCW were about 40% faster than those in the atmosphere. (4) In SCW of 25 ppb D.O the corrosion resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel (D9) at 500 .deg. C was significantly better than that of type 316 stainless steel, and 9Cr Fe-base ODS alloy also showed a clearly better corrosion resistance than T92 (NF616) and T122 (HCM12A) steels. (by UW) Characterization of the Irradiation Behavior (1) Using the accelerator at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources), T91 and ODS alloy (MA956) specimens were irradiated with 8 MeV Fe{sup 4+} ions up to 1 dpa at room temperature. Nano-indentation tests were done on the cross sections of the irradiated specimens, and the hardness increase of T91 was about 15%, and that of MA956 was about 25%. (2) T122 and alloy 800H were irradiated with Ni ions at 500 .deg. C up to 5 dpa and 50 dpa respectively. In the case of T122 fine precipitates of V-Nb (about 50%V-17%Cr-12%Nb) were found in addition to the frequently observed M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. In alloy 800H faulted dislocation loops were frequently observed with the fine precipitates containing Cr, Si and Al. However, cavities were not observed in both specimens. (3) One sides of the T91, T91CSL, T122 and HT 9 specimens were irradiated with 3 MeV protons at 400 and 500 .deg. C respectively, and the SCC tested in SCW. Only the irradiated HT9 specimen showed some clue to SCC through the decrease of the elongation and the reduction of area, but the fracture surface did not show it very clearly due to the very limited irradiation layer and the ox

  8. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different D.O levels. The strain rate was 1.5X10{sup -7} or 0.8X10{sup -7}/sec. In comparison with the stress-strain curve of T92 in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O) T92 appeared to experience SCC in SCW of 100 or 500 D.O, showing the decrease of the elongation and the tensile strength. A part of the fracture surface reveals a brittle fracture manner. (3) Crack growth rate (CGR) of T91 specimen under cyclic strain in a SCW was investigated using CT specimens. The CGR's in 370 .deg. C water and 500 .deg. C SCW were about 40% faster than those in the atmosphere. (4) In SCW of 25 ppb D.O the corrosion resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel (D9) at 500 .deg. C was significantly better than that of type 316 stainless steel, and 9Cr Fe-base ODS alloy also showed a clearly better corrosion resistance than T92 (NF616) and T122 (HCM12A) steels. (by UW) Characterization of the Irradiation Behavior (1) Using the accelerator at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources), T91 and ODS alloy (MA956) specimens were irradiated with 8 MeV Fe{sup 4+} ions up to 1 dpa at room temperature. Nano-indentation tests were done on the cross sections of the irradiated specimens, and the hardness increase of T91 was about 15%, and that of MA956 was about 25%. (2) T122 and alloy 800H were irradiated with Ni ions at 500 .deg. C up to 5 dpa and 50 dpa respectively. In the case of T122 fine precipitates of V-Nb (about 50%V-17%Cr-12%Nb) were found in addition to the frequently observed M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. In alloy 800H faulted dislocation loops were frequently observed with the fine precipitates containing Cr, Si and Al. However, cavities were not observed in both specimens. (3) One sides of the T91, T91CSL, T122 and HT 9 specimens were irradiated with 3 MeV protons at 400 and 500 .deg. C respectively, and the SCC tested in SCW. Only the irradiated HT9 specimen showed some clue to SCC through the decrease of the elongation and the reduction of area, but the fracture surface did not show it very clearly due to the very limited irradiation layer and the oxidation layer of the fracture surface. Experimental Fe-base ODS alloys and the Characterization After confirming the thermal embrittlement problem of the commercially available 20Cr Fe-base ODS allys, some experimental 9Cr Fe-base ODS alloys were fabricated by MA (mechanical alloying) and HIP (hot isostatic pressing) processes. The yield stress of the hot rolled specimen was about 540 MPa at 600 .deg. C, and 330 MPa at 700 .deg. C.

  9. Aging management program of the reactor building concrete at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, C.-M.; Shenton, B.; Demerchant, M. M.; Gendron, T.

    2011-04-01

    In order for New Brunswick Power Nuclear (NBPN) to control the risks of degradation of the concrete reactor building at the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) the development of an aging management plan (AMP) was initiated. The intention of this plan was to determine the requirements for specific structural components of concrete of the reactor building that require regular inspection and maintenance to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the plant. The document is currently in draft form and presents an integrated methodology for the application of an AMP for the concrete of the reactor building. The current AMP addresses the reactor building structure and various components, such as joint sealant and liners that are integral to the structure. It does not include internal components housed within the structure. This paper provides background information regarding the document developed and the strategy developed to manage potential degradation of the concrete of the reactor building, as well as specific programs and preventive and corrective maintenance activities initiated.

  10. Aging management program of the reactor building concrete at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendron T.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In order for New Brunswick Power Nuclear (NBPN to control the risks of degradation of the concrete reactor building at the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS the development of an aging management plan (AMP was initiated. The intention of this plan was to determine the requirements for specific structural components of concrete of the reactor building that require regular inspection and maintenance to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the plant. The document is currently in draft form and presents an integrated methodology for the application of an AMP for the concrete of the reactor building. The current AMP addresses the reactor building structure and various components, such as joint sealant and liners that are integral to the structure. It does not include internal components housed within the structure. This paper provides background information regarding the document developed and the strategy developed to manage potential degradation of the concrete of the reactor building, as well as specific programs and preventive and corrective maintenance activities initiated.

  11. Experimental and computational studies of thermal mixing in next generation nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Douglas Tyler

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a proposed next generation nuclear power plant. The VHTR utilizes helium as a coolant in the primary loop of the reactor. Helium traveling through the reactor mixes below the reactor in a region known as the lower plenum. In this region there exists large temperature and velocity gradients due to non-uniform heat generation in the reactor core. Due to these large gradients, concern should be given to reducing thermal striping in the lower plenum. Thermal striping is the phenomena by which temperature fluctuations in the fluid and transferred to and attenuated by surrounding structures. Thermal striping is a known cause of long term material failure. To better understand and predict thermal striping in the lower plenum two separate bodies of work have been conducted. First, an experimental facility capable of predictably recreating some aspects of flow in the lower plenum is designed according to scaling analysis of the VHTR. Namely the facility reproduces jets issuing into a crossflow past a tube bundle. Secondly, extensive studies investigate the mixing of a non-isothermal parallel round triple-jet at two jet-to-jet spacings was conducted. Experimental results were validation with an open source computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAMRTM. Additional care is given to understanding the implementation of the realizable k-a and Launder Gibson RSM turbulence Models in OpenFOAMRTM. In order to measure velocity and temperature in the triple-jet experiment a detailed investigation of temperature compensated hotwire anemometry is carried out with special concern being given to quantify the error with the measurements. Finally qualitative comparisons of trends in the experimental results and the computational results is conducted. A new and unexpected physical behavior was observed in the center jet as it appeared to spread unexpectedly for close spacings (S/Djet = 1.41).

  12. Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  13. Cooperative retraction of bundled type IV pili enables nanonewton force generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Biais

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of gonorrhea, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bears retractable filamentous appendages called type IV pili (Tfp. Tfp are used by many pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria to carry out a number of vital functions, including DNA uptake, twitching motility (crawling over surfaces, and attachment to host cells. In N. gonorrhoeae, Tfp binding to epithelial cells and the mechanical forces associated with this binding stimulate signaling cascades and gene expression that enhance infection. Retraction of a single Tfp filament generates forces of 50-100 piconewtons, but nothing is known, thus far, on the retraction force ability of multiple Tfp filaments, even though each bacterium expresses multiple Tfp and multiple bacteria interact during infection. We designed a micropillar assay system to measure Tfp retraction forces. This system consists of an array of force sensors made of elastic pillars that allow quantification of retraction forces from adherent N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. Electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used in combination with this novel assay to assess the structures of Tfp. We show that Tfp can form bundles, which contain up to 8-10 Tfp filaments, that act as coordinated retractable units with forces up to 10 times greater than single filament retraction forces. Furthermore, single filament retraction forces are transient, whereas bundled filaments produce retraction forces that can be sustained. Alterations of noncovalent protein-protein interactions between Tfp can inhibit both bundle formation and high-amplitude retraction forces. Retraction forces build over time through the recruitment and bundling of multiple Tfp that pull cooperatively to generate forces in the nanonewton range. We propose that Tfp retraction can be synchronized through bundling, that Tfp bundle retraction can generate forces in the nanonewton range in vivo, and that such high forces could affect infection.

  14. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-09-15

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

  15. Generation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV-Inhibiting Peptides from β-Lactoglobulin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Shigemori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) for nuclear energy generation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Kapoor

    2002-12-01

    In this talk we present an overview of accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor systems (ADS), and bring out their attractive features for the elimination of troublesome long-lived components of the spent fuel, as well as for nuclear energy generation utilizing thorium as fuel. In India, there is an interest in the programmes of development of high-energy and high-current accelerators due to the potential of ADS in utilizing the vast resources of thorium in the country for nuclear power generation. The accelerator related activities planned in this direction will be outlined.

  17. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  18. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  19. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  20. Control, Co-generation, and Sensor Placement Strategy for Integral Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Belle-R.; Fan, Li; Hines, J.-Wesley [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Perillo, Sergio-R. P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    The development of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) has multiple applications for electricity generation, process heat, hydrogen production, and others. The results of research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of load-following control design for multiple modules, nuclear desalination, and sensor placement strategy for enhanced fault detection and isolation, are presented in this paper. The technologies are demonstrated with application to an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR) such as the IRIS reactor. The outcomes of this RD and D include the development of a complete dynamic model of the IRIS system, load following control under dual-module steam mixing, nuclear desalination with a multi-stage flash (MSF) desalination plant, and automated technique for sensor allocation in a combined reactor and balance-of-plant system. The dynamic performance of a nuclear power station comprised of two IRIS reactor modules, operating simultaneously with a common steam header with steam mixing, was evaluated. The control problem addressed 'load-following' scenarios, such as varying load during the day or reduced consumption during the weekend. To solve this problem, a single-module IRIS MATLAB-Simulink model was developed and used to quantify the responses from both modules. The resulting model was subjected to eight different perturbation cases to analyze its capability of detecting small perturbations, therefore testing its robustness and sensitivity. The prospects of using nuclear energy for seawater desalination on a large scale can be very attractive since desalination is an energy intensive process that can utilize the heat from a nuclear reactor and/or the electricity produced by such plants. Small modular reactors, ranging from 50 MWe to 300 MWe, offer the largest potential as coupling options to nuclear desalination systems. However, coupling a nuclear plant and a desalination plant involves a number of issues that have to be addressed. Among these

  1. Production of tungsten-188 and osmium-194 in a nuclear reactor for new clinical generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Callahan, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Rhenium-188 and iridium-194 are potential candidates for radioimmunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens. Both nuclei are short-lived and decay by high energy {Beta}{minus} emission. In addition, both nuclei emit {gamma}-rays with energy suitable for imaging. An important characteristics is availability of {sup 188}Re and {sup 194}Ir from decay of reactor-produced parents ({sup 188}W and {sup 194}Os, respectively) in convenient generator systems. The {sup 188}W and {sup 194}Os are produced by double neutron capture of {sup 186}W and {sup 192}Os, respectively. The large scale production yields of {sup 188}W in several nuclear reactors will be presented. We also report a new management for the cross-section of {sup 193}Os(n,{gamma}){sup 194}Os reaction and discuss the feasibility of producing sufficient quantities of {sup 194}Os. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-08-13

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  4. Using Flow Electrodes in Multiple Reactors in Series for Continuous Energy Generation from Capacitive Mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-09

    Efficient conversion of “mixing energy” to electricity through capacitive mixing (CapMix) has been limited by low energy recoveries, low power densities, and noncontinuous energy production resulting from intermittent charging and discharging cycles. We show here that a CapMix system based on a four-reactor process with flow electrodes can generate constant and continuous energy, providing a more flexible platform for harvesting mixing energy. The power densities were dependent on the flow-electrode carbon loading, with 5.8 ± 0.2 mW m–2 continuously produced in the charging reactor and 3.3 ± 0.4 mW m–2 produced in the discharging reactor (9.2 ± 0.6 mW m–2 for the whole system) when the flow-electrode carbon loading was 15%. Additionally, when the flow-electrode electrolyte ion concentration increased from 10 to 20 g L–1, the total power density of the whole system (charging and discharging) increased to 50.9 ± 2.5 mW m–2.

  5. Distribution of liquid sodium in the inlet plenum of steam generator in a Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Laxman T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, N. M. Parikh Marg, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Patwardhan, A.W., E-mail: awp@udct.or [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, N. M. Parikh Marg, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Padmakumar, G.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Experimental Thermal Hydraulics Section, Separation Technology and Hydraulics Division, Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2010-04-15

    Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigations have been carried out on a 1/5th scale model of the inlet plenum of steam generator (SG) used in the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) technology. The distribution of liquid sodium in the inlet plenum of the steam generator strongly affects the thermal as well as mechanical performance of the steam generator. In the present work, flow distribution in a scaled down model has been investigated. Various strategies adopted for obtaining uniform flow distribution have been evaluated. Experiments have been conducted to measure the axial and radial velocity distributions using Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) under a variety of geometries. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies have been carried out for various geometries. On the basis of these experiments and CFD simulations, various flow distribution devices have been compared.

  6. Efficient Generation of Chemiluminescence during the reduction of manganese(IV) ions with lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaplev, Yu. B.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of chemiluminescence during the reduction of manganese(IV) ions with lactic acid in an H2SO4-AcOH medium are studied. Kinetic spectrophotometric measurements are used to determine the profiles of change in the concentrations of Mn(IV) and Mn(III) ions during the reaction. The results from kinetic spectrophotometric measurements are compared to the light yield kinetics. The quantum chemiluminescence and chemiexcitation yields reach record values.

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  8. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  9. Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Caro, M S

    2007-10-30

    Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

  10. Lessons Learned From Gen I Carbon Dioxide Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Shropshire

    2004-04-01

    This paper provides a review of early gas cooled reactors including the Magnox reactors originating in the United Kingdom and the subsequent development of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). These early gas cooled reactors shared a common coolant medium, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). A framework of information is provided about these early reactors and identifies unique problems/opportunities associated with use of CO2 as a coolant. Reactor designers successfully rose to these challenges. After years of successful use of the CO2 gas cooled reactors in Europe, the succeeding generation of reactors, called the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), were designed with Helium gas as the coolant. Again, in the 21st century, with the latest reactor designs under investigation in Generation IV, there is a revived interest in developing Gas Cooled Fast Reactors that use CO2 as the reactor coolant. This paper provides a historical perspective on the 52 CO2 reactors and the reactor programs that developed them. The Magnox and AGR design features and safety characteristics were reviewed, as well as the technologies associated with fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. Lessons-learned from these programs are noted to benefit the designs of future generations of gas cooled nuclear reactors.

  11. Transient analysis of a PV power generator charging a capacitor for measurement of the I-V characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Marwan M. [Energy Research Centre, An Najah National University, P.O. Box 721 Nablus (PS)

    2006-10-15

    Measuring the I-V characteristics is of high importance since it can be considered as a quality and performance certificate for each PV generator. The most precise and inexpensive measuring method is represented in capacitor charging by the PV generator. Using the equivalent circuit of the PV generator with a capacitor as load and applying transient analysis on the circuit, we obtain the capacitor charging voltage and current as a function of time, as well as their differentials as a function of short circuit current and capacitor size. The derived equations facilitate the calculation of proper capacitance size for measuring the I-V characteristics, and considers the acquisition speed of the measuring system as demonstrated through two measurement samples in this paper. The capacitor size is directly and indirectly proportional to the short circuit current and open circuit voltage of the PV generator, respectively. Accordingly, the paper presents a capacitance calculation chart, which enables selecting the correct capacitance for measuring the I-V characteristics by a computerized data acquisition system. (author)

  12. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  14. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  15. CO2 emission free co-generation of energy and ethylene in hydrocarbon SOFC reactors with a dehydrogenation anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Lin, Jie-Yuan; Xu, Shihong; Luo, Jing-Li; Chuang, Karl T; Sanger, Alan R; Krzywicki, Andrzej

    2011-11-21

    A dehydrogenation anode is reported for hydrocarbon proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A Cu-Cr(2)O(3) nanocomposite is obtained from CuCrO(2) nanoparticles as an inexpensive, efficient, carbon deposition and sintering tolerant anode catalyst. A SOFC reactor is fabricated using a Cu-Cr(2)O(3) composite as a dehydrogenation anode and a doped barium cerate as a proton conducting electrolyte. The protonic membrane SOFC reactor can selectively convert ethane to valuable ethylene, and electricity is simultaneously generated in the electrochemical oxidative dehydrogenation process. While there are no CO(2) emissions, traces of CO are present in the anode exhaust when the SOFC reactor is operated at over 700 °C. A mechanism is proposed for ethane electro-catalytic dehydrogenation over the Cu-Cr(2)O(3) catalyst. The SOFC reactor also has good stability for co-generation of electricity and ethylene at 700 °C.

  16. Laboratory-Scale Membrane Reactor for the Generation of Anhydrous Diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Doris; Pinho, Vagner D; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2016-07-15

    A configurationally simple and robust semibatch apparatus for the in situ on-demand generation of anhydrous solutions of diazomethane (CH2N2) avoiding distillation methods is presented. Diazomethane is produced by base-mediated decomposition of commercially available Diazald within a semipermeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing and subsequently selectively separated from the tubing into a solvent- and substrate-filled flask (tube-in-flask reactor). Reactions with CH2N2 can therefore be performed directly in the flask without dangerous and labor-intensive purification operations or exposure of the operator to CH2N2. The reactor has been employed for the methylation of carboxylic acids, the synthesis of α-chloro ketones and pyrazoles, and palladium-catalyzed cyclopropanation reactions on laboratory scale. The implementation of in-line FTIR technology allowed monitoring of the CH2N2 generation and its consumption. In addition, larger scales (1.8 g diazomethane per hour) could be obtained via parallelization (numbering up) by simply wrapping several membrane tubings into the flask.

  17. On the safety and performance demonstration tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and validation and verification of computational codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jeong, Ji Young; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Sung Kyun; Euh, Dong Jin; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) has been developed and the validation and verification (V and V) activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1), produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V and V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs) have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  18. Improvement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor for Ozone Generation by Electrode Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masaki; Sato, Tohru; Kato, Shoji; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    An effect of electrode shape on ozone generation in dielectric barrier discharge reactor is described in this article. Three different shape electrodes were employed as ground electrodes. A plane electrode is 6 cm in width, and 20 cm in length. A trench electrode has large number of knife-edge rails. A multipoint electrode has large number of four-sided pyramid projections on the plane. A high voltage plane electrode is covered with 0.5 mm thickness alumina layer worked as dielectric barrier. The experimental results show that the breakdown for the multipoint electrode occurs at 7.0 kVpp. This value is lower than 8.4 kVpp that is the breakdown voltage of the plane electrode. The ozone yield increases from 80 g/kWh to 130 g/kWh by changing the electrode shape from the plane to the multipoint. The ozone generation efficiency decreased with increase of the ozone concentration.

  19. Hydrogen generation and storage from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A.M.F.R.; Falcao, D.S. [Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Silva, R.A.; Rangel, C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia e Inovacao, Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    The catalytic hydrolysis of alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution was studied using a non-noble; nickel-based powered catalyst exhibiting strong activity even after long time storage. This easy-to-prepare catalyst showed an enhanced activity after being recovered from previous use. The effects of temperature, NaBH{sub 4} concentration, NaOH concentration and pressure on the hydrogen generation rate were investigated. Particular importance has the effect of pressure, since the maximum reached pressure of hydrogen is always substantially lower than predictions (considering 100% conversion) due to solubility effects. The solubility of hydrogen is greatly enhanced by the rising pressure during reaction, leading to storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase. This effect can induce new ways of using this type of catalyst and reactor for the construction of hydrogen generators and even containers for portable and in situ applications. (author)

  20. Metallic fuels for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Porter, D. L.; Chang, Y. I.; Hayes, S. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Burkes, D. E.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Somers, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. This paper presents an evaluation of metallic alloy fuels. Early US fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high fissile density and compatibility with sodium. The goal of fast reactor fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. This will provide a mechanism for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels are candidates for this application, based on documented performance of metallic fast reactor fuels and the early results of tests currently being conducted in US and international transmutation fuel development programs.

  1. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  2. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  3. Minimizing the fissile inventory of the molten salt fast reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Doligez, X.; Ghetta, V.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Molten salt reactors in the configurations presented here, called Molten Salt Fast Reactors (MSFR), have been selected for further studies by the Generation IV International Forum. These reactors may be operated in simplified and safe conditions in the Th/233U fuel cycle with fluoride salts. We present here the concept, before focusing on a possible optimization in term of minimization of the initial fissile inventory. Our studies demonstrate that an inventory of 233U ...

  4. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  6. Evaluation of the potential for fish passage through the N Reactor and the Hanford generating project discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauble, D.D.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The potential for juvenile downstream-migrating salmonids to encounter both the Hanford Generating Project (HGP) and N Reactor discharges was evaluated. Three general scenarios were assessed for fish exposure: (1) HGP plume centerline passage followed by N Reator plum centerline passage, (2) HGP plume centerline passage including intersection with the N Reactor plume, and (3) noncenterline plume passage through the edge of first the HGP and then the N Reactor plume. It is highly unlikely that a fish would pass through both plume centerlines because of the location of the two discharges and because of river-mixing characteristics near the discharges. For the set of conditions that we evaluated, exposure to elevated temperatures would be of insufficient duration to result in mortalities to fish that might encounter both the HGP and N Reactor plumes.

  7. On the Safety and Performance Demonstration Tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Validation and Verification of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Bum Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR has been developed and the validation and verification (V&V activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1, produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V&V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  8. Plan for IER-443 Testing of the Y-12 and AWE Criticality Accident Alarm System Detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorby, J. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hudson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Garbett, S. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Auld, G. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Horrne, A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Beller, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goda, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haught, C. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Woodrow, C. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ward, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This document provides the scope and details of the “Plan for Testing the Y-12 and AWE Criticality Accident Alarm System Detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor”. Due to the relative simplicity of the testing goals, scope, and methodology, the NCSP Manager approved execution of the test when ready. No preliminary CED-1 or final design CED-2 reports were required or issued. The test will subject Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors supplied by Y- 12 and AWE to very intense and short duration mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. The goals of the test will be to (1) substantiate functionality, for both existing and newly acquired Y- 12 CAAS detectors, and (2) the ability of the AWE detectors to provide quality temporal dose information after a hypothetical criticality accident. ANSI/ANS-8.3.1997 states that the “system shall be sufficiently robust as to actuate an alarm signal when exposed to the maximum radiation expected”, which has been defined at Y-12, in Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs), to be a dose rate of 10 Rad/s. ANSI/ANS-8.3.1997 further states that “alarm actuation shall occur as a result of a minimum duration transient” which may be assumed to be 1 msec. The pulse widths and dose rates which will be achieved in this test will exceed these requirements. Pulsed radiation fields will be produced by the Godiva IV fast metal burst reactor at the National Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The magnitude of the pulses and the relative distances to the detectors will be varied to afford a wide range of radiation fluence and pulse widths. The magnitude of the neutron and gamma fields will be determined by reactor temperature rise to fluence and dose conversions which have been previously established through extensive measurements performed under IER-147. The requirements for CAAS systems to detect and alarm under a “minimum accident of concern” as well as other

  9. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-12-29

    at a temperature of 80 C, the risk will again be very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  10. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-09

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive.

  11. New RELAP5-3D Lead and LBE Thermophysical Properties Implementation for Safety Analysis of Gen IV Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Balestra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest versions of RELAP5-3D© code allow the simulation of thermodynamic system, using different type of working fluids, that is, liquid metals, molten salt, diathermic oil, and so forth, thanks to the ATHENA code integration. The RELAP5-3D© water thermophysical properties are largely verified and validated; however there are not so many experiments to generate the liquid metals ones in particular for the Lead and the Lead Bismuth Eutectic. Recently, new and more accurate experimental data are available for liquid metals. The comparison between these state-of-the-art data and the RELAP5-3D© default thermophysical properties shows some discrepancy; therefore a tool for the generation of new properties binary files has been developed. All the available data came from experiments performed at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, to extend the pressure domain below and above this pressure, the tool fits a semiempirical model (soft sphere model with inverse-power-law potential, specific for the liquid metals. New binary files of thermophysical properties, with a detailed mesh grid of point to reduce the code mass error (especially for the Lead, were generated with this tool. Finally, calculations using a simple natural circulation loop were performed to understand the differences between the default and the new properties.

  12. Study on the Neutrino Oscillation with a Next Generation Medium-Baseline Reactor Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Dong Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For over fifty years, reactor experiments have played an important role in neutrino physics, in both discoveries and precision measurements. One of the methods to verify the existence of neutrino is the observation of neutrino oscillation phenomena. Electron antineutrinos emitted from a reactor provide the measurement of the small mixing angle θ13, providing rich programs of neutrino properties, detector development, nuclear monitoring, and application. Using reactor neutrinos, future reactor neutrino experiments, more precise measurements of θ12,  Δm122, and mass hierarchy will be explored. The precise measurement of θ13 would be crucial for measuring the CP violation parameters at accelerators. Therefore, reactor neutrino physics will assist in the complete understanding of the fundamental nature and implications of neutrino masses and mixing. In this paper, we investigated several characteristics of RENO-50, which is a future medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment, by using the GloBES simulation package.

  13. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) neat transport system dynamics and steam generator control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Loop type LMFBR heat transport system dynamics after reactor shutdown and during subsequent decay heat removal are considered with emphasis on steam generator dynamics including the development and evaluation of various post-scram steam generator control systems, and natural circulation of the sodium coolant, including the influence of superimposed free convection on forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop. The normal operating and decay heat removal functions of the overall heat transport system are described.

  14. Simulation of Reactor Transient and Design Criteria of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Gottfridsson, Filip

    2010-01-01

    The need for energy is growing in the world and the market of nuclear power is now once more expanding. Some issues of the current light-water reactors can be solved by the next generation of nuclear power, Generation IV, where sodium-cooled reactors are one of the candidates. Phénix was a French prototype sodium-cooled reactor, which is seen as a success. Although it did encounter an earlier unexperienced phenomenon, A.U.R.N., in which a negative reactivity transient followed by an oscillati...

  15. ZONE: a finite element mesh generator. [In FORTRAN IV for CDC 7600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, M. J.

    1976-05-01

    The ZONE computer program is a finite-element mesh generator which produces the nodes and element description of any two-dimensional geometry. The geometry is subdivided into a mesh of quadrilateral and triangular zones arranged sequentially in an ordered march through the geometry. The order of march can be chosen so that the minimum bandwidth is obtained. The node points are defined in terms of the x and y coordinates in a global rectangular coordinate system. The zones generated are quadrilaterals or triangles defined by four node points in a counterclockwise sequence. Node points defining the outside boundary are generated to describe pressure boundary conditions. The mesh that is generated can be used as input to any two-dimensional as well as any axisymmetrical structure program. The output from ZONE is essentially the input file to NAOS, HONDO, and other axisymmetric finite element programs. 14 figures. (RWR)

  16. New modelling method for fast reactor neutronic behaviours analysis; Nouvelles methodes de modelisation neutronique des reacteurs rapides de quatrieme Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.

    2011-05-23

    Due to safety rules running on fourth generation reactors' core development, neutronics simulation tools have to be as accurate as never before. First part of this report enumerates every step of fast reactor's neutronics simulation implemented in current reference code: ECCO. Considering the field of fast reactors that meet criteria of fourth generation, ability of models to describe self-shielding phenomenon, to simulate neutrons leakage in a lattice of fuel assemblies and to produce representative macroscopic sections is evaluated. The second part of this thesis is dedicated to the simulation of fast reactors' core with steel reflector. These require the development of advanced methods of condensation and homogenization. Several methods are proposed and compared on a typical case: the ZONA2B core of MASURCA reactor. (author) [French] Les criteres de surete qui regissent le developpement de coeurs de reacteurs de quatrieme generation implique l'usage d'outils de calcul neutronique performants. Une premiere partie de la these reprend toutes les etapes de modelisation neutronique des reacteurs rapides actuellement d'usage dans le code de reference ECCO. La capacite des modeles a decrire le phenomene d'autoprotection, a representer les fuites neutroniques au niveau d'un reseau d'assemblages combustibles et a generer des sections macroscopiques representatives est appreciee sur le domaine des reacteurs rapides innovants respectant les criteres de quatrieme generation. La deuxieme partie de ce memoire se consacre a la modelisation des coeurs rapides avec reflecteur acier. Ces derniers necessitent le developpement de methodes avancees de condensation et d'homogenisation. Plusieurs methodes sont proposees et confrontees sur un probleme de modelisation typique: le coeur ZONA2B du reacteur maquette MASURCA

  17. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any

  18. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Y. C. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage.

  19. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  20. A survey on the human reliability analysis methods for the design of Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, J. W.; Park, J. C.; Kwack, H. Y.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K.; Kim, I. S.; Jung, K. W

    2000-03-01

    Enhanced features through applying recent domestic technologies may characterize the safety and efficiency of KNGR(Korea Next Generation Reactor). Human engineered interface and control room environment are expected to be beneficial to the human aspects of KNGR design. However, since the current method for human reliability analysis is not up to date after THERP/SHARP, it becomes hard to assess the potential of human errors due to both of the positive and negative effect of the design changes in KNGR. This is a state of the art report on the human reliability analysis methods that are potentially available for the application to the KNGR design. We surveyed every technical aspects of existing HRA methods, and compared them in order to obtain the requirements for the assessment of human error potentials within KNGR design. We categorized the more than 10 methods into the first and the second generation according to the suggestion of Dr. Hollnagel. THERP was revisited in detail. ATHEANA proposed by US NRC for an advanced design and CREAM proposed by Dr. Hollnagel were reviewed and compared. We conclude that the key requirements might include the enhancement in the early steps for human error identification and the quantification steps with considerations of more extended error shaping factors over PSFs(performance shaping factors). The utilization of the steps and approaches of ATHEANA and CREAM will be beneficial to the attainment of an appropriate HRA method for KNGR. However, the steps and data from THERP will be still maintained because of the continuity with previous PSA activities in KNGR design.

  1. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume IV. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in Biological Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    the result of a photochemical rather tha a phototherml 3 mob~aim. The specific concern of this chesis is the generation of optical eecoed-harmoi...local fundamental field at frequency w and a, 0 and * are complex coefficients . While 9q. (3) is a scalar equation, it still reflects an important...aniso- tropic property of a nonlinear dipole. That is, the coefficient 8 and all other even order term coefficients vanish if )j simply changes sign

  2. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

    2004-02-28

    The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

  3. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Machet, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations of quarks is extended to 8 composite Higgs multiplets, with no adjunction of extra fermions. It is the minimal number of Higgs doublets required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the spectrum of pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. These masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons (which all potentially contribute to the W and quark masses), and on the mixing (Cabibbo) angle, leaving the study of couplings to a subsequent work. The Higgs bosons fall into one triplet, two doublets and one singlet. In the triplet stand three states with masses \\sqrt{2} x that of heaviest pseudoscalar meson D_s, which, for 2 generations, pushes them up to 2.80 GeV. The 2 components of the first doublet have masses close to 1.25 GeV. The singlet has a mas...

  4. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4(th) and 5(th) generation) to self-etch (6(th), 7(th) and 8(th) generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes.

  5. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  6. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all H

  7. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all

  8. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all H

  9. Teaching Sodium Fast Reactor Technology and Operation for the Present and Future Generations of SFR Users

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Latge; Rodriguez, Gilles; Baque, Francois; Leclerc, Arnaud; Martin, Laurent; Vray, Bernard; Romanetti, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper provides a description of the education and training activities related to sodium fast reactors, carried out respectively in the French Sodium and Liquid Metal School (ESML) created in 1975 and located in France (at the CEA Cadarache Research Centre), in the Fast Reactor Operation and Safety School (FROSS) created in 2005 at the Phenix plant, and in the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucle'aires (INSTN). It presents their recent developments an...

  10. FORIG: a computer code for calculating radionuclide generation and depletion in fusion and fission reactors. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    In this manual we describe the use of the FORIG computer code to solve isotope-generation and depletion problems in fusion and fission reactors. FORIG runs on a Cray-1 computer and accepts more extensive activation cross sections than ORIGEN2 from which it was adapted. This report is an updated and a combined version of the previous ORIGEN2 and FORIG manuals. 7 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  12. Sodium fast reactor evaluation: Core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byoung Oon; Raison, J. P.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Carmack, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Program the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper the status of available and developmental materials for SFR core cladding and duct applications is reviewed. To satisfy the Generation IV SFR fuel requirements, an advanced cladding needs to be developed. The candidate cladding materials are austenitic steels, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. A large amount of irradiation testing is required, and the compatibility of cladding with TRU-loaded fuel at high temperatures and high burnup must be investigated. The more promising F/M steels (compared to HT9) might be able to meet the dose requirements of over 200 dpa for ducts in the GEN-IV SFR systems.

  13. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  14. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. NGC 4216: A BOMBARDED SPIRAL IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferriere, Etienne [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; MacArthur, Lauren A. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Vollmer, Bernd [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg and CNRS UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Balogh, Michael L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Durrell, Patrick R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Emsellem, Eric; Michel-Dansac, Leo [Universite de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5574, 9 av. Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); Mei, Simona; Van Driel, Wim, E-mail: sanjaya.paudel@cea.fr [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place J. Janssen, F-92190 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-20

    The final stages of mass assembly of present-day massive galaxies are expected to occur through the accretion of multiple satellites. Cosmological simulations thus predict a high frequency of stellar streams resulting from this mass accretion around the massive galaxies in the Local Volume. Such tidal streams are difficult to observe, especially in dense cluster environments, where they are readily destroyed. We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution, and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already cataloged Virgo Cluster Catalog dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g - i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf galaxies being born inside the filament from the debris of an original dwarf. The observed complex structures, including in particular a stream apparently emanating from a satellite of a satellite, point to a high rate of ongoing dwarf destruction/accretion in the region of the Virgo Cluster where NGC 4216 is located. We discuss the age of the interactions and whether they occurred in a group that is just falling into the cluster and shows signs of the so-called pre-processing before it gets affected by the cluster environment, or in a

  15. Fuel development for gas-cooled fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. K.; Fielding, R.; Gan, J.

    2007-09-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, US DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee and the Generation IV International Forum, December 2002]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the US and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic 'honeycomb' structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  16. FLUOMEG: a planar finite difference mesh generator for fluid flow problems with parallel boundaries. [In FORTRAN IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, C.; Patterson, M.R.

    1980-05-01

    A two- or three-dimensional finite difference mesh generator capable of discretizing subrectangular flow regions (planar coordinates) with arbitrarily shaped bottom contours (vertical dimension) was developed. This economical, interactive computer code, written in FORTRAN IV and employing DISSPLA software together with graphics terminal, generates first a planar rectangular grid of variable element density according to the geometry and local kinematic flow patterns of a given fluid flow problem. Then subrectangular areas are deleted to produce canals, tributaries, bays, and the like. For three-dimensional problems, arbitrary bathymetric profiles (river beds, channel cross section, ocean shoreline profiles, etc.) are approximated with grid lines forming steps of variable spacing. Furthermore, the code works as a preprocessor numbering the discrete elements and the nodal points. Prescribed values for the principal variables can be automatically assigned to solid as well as kinematic boundaries. Cabinet drawings aid in visualizing the complete flow domain. Input data requirements are necessary only to specify the spacing between grid lines, determine land regions that have to be excluded, and to identify boundary nodes. 15 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    OpenAIRE

    Sungjoo Lee; Byungun Yoon; Juneseuk Shin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indic...

  18. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Shun; Ebitani, Kohki, E-mail: ebitani@jaist.ac.jp [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Miyazato, Akio [Nanotechnology Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H{sub 2}O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, {sup 13}C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    operations in the R-reactor vessel is low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk is again low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.97 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  20. The application of a pulsed compression reactor for the generation of syngas from methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Existing chemical reactors are approaching their technological limits. In order to make more significant progress in the energy efficiency of bulk chemical production processes, a radical shift in technology is needed. The research was aimed at gaining some fundamental insight in the operation of th

  1. Decision-support tool for assessing future nuclear reactor generation portfolios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Jain (Shashi); F Roelofs; C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractCapital costs, fuel, operation and maintenance (O&M) costs, and electricity prices play a key role in the economics of nuclear power plants. Often standardized reactor designs are required to be locally adapted, which often impacts the project plans and the supply chain. It then becomes

  2. Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}) - advanced small modular reactor for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, T.; Schleicher, R.; Choi, H.; Rawls, J., E-mail: timothy.bertch@ga.com [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide cost effective nuclear energy in other than large reactor, large grid applications, fission technology needs to make further advances. 'Convert and burn' fast reactors offer long life cores, improved fuel utilization, reduced waste and other benefits while achieving cost effective energy production in a smaller reactor. General Atomics' Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}), a helium-cooled compact fast reactor that augments its fissile fuel load with either depleted uranium (DU) or used nuclear fuel (UNF). The convert and burn in-situ provides 250 MWe with a 30 year core life. High temperature provides a simple, high efficiency direct cycle gas turbine which along with modular construction, fewer systems, road shipment and minimum on site construction support cost effectiveness. Additional advantages in fuel cycle, non-proliferation and siting flexibility and its ability to meet all safety requirements make for an attractive power source, especially in remote and small grid regions. (author)

  3. Decision-support tool for assessing future nuclear reactor generation portfolios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S.; Roelofs, F; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Capital costs, fuel, operation and maintenance (O&M) costs, and electricity prices play a key role in the economics of nuclear power plants. Often standardized reactor designs are required to be locally adapted, which often impacts the project plans and the supply chain. It then becomes difficult to

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-10-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as

  5. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA. In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will

  6. Proposal and analysis of the benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the calculation accuracy of the nuclear characteristics of LWR next generation fuels, the Research Committee on Reactor Physics organized by JAERI has established the Working Party on Reactor Physics for LWR Next Generation Fuels. The next generation fuels mean the ones aiming for further extended burn-up such as 70 GWd/t over the current design. The Working Party has proposed six benchmark problems, which consists of pin-cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly geometries loaded with uranium and MOX fuels, respectively. The specifications of the benchmark problem neglect some of the current limitations such as 5 wt% {sup 235}U to achieve the above-mentioned target. Eleven organizations in the Working Party have carried out the analyses of the benchmark problems. As a result, status of accuracy with the current data and method and some problems to be solved in the future were clarified. In this report, details of the benchmark problems, result by each organization, and their comparisons are presented. (author)

  7. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  8. A 3-dimensional model for inductively coupled plasma etching reactors: Coil generated plasma asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, M.J.; Collison, W.Z.; Grapperhaus, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed as high plasma density, low gas pressure sources for etching and deposition of semiconductor materials. In this paper, the authors describe a 3-dimensional, time dependent model for ICP reactors whose intent is to provide an infrastructure to investigate asymmetries in plasma etching and deposition tools. The model is a 3-dimensional extension of a previously described 2-dimensional simulation called the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). HPEM-3D consists of an electromagnetics module (EMM), a Boltzmann-electron energy module (BEM) and a fluid-chemical kinetics simulation (FKS). The inductively coupled electromagnetic fields are produced by the EMM. Results from HPEM-3D will be discussed for reactors using etching (Cl{sub 2}, BCl{sub 3}) and non-etching (Ar, Ar/N{sub 2}) gas mixtures, and which have geometrical asymmetries such as wafer clamps and load-lock bays. The authors show how details in the design of the coil, such as the value of the termination capacitance or number of turns, lead to azimuthal variations in the inductive electric field.

  9. Method for accounting for macroscopic heterogeneities in reactor material balance generation in fuel cycle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdatlioglu, Cem, E-mail: cemb@utexas.edu; Schneider, Erich

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Describes addition of spatially dependent power sharing to a previous methodology. • The methodology is used for calculating the input and output isotopics and burnup. • Generalizes to simulate reactors with strong spatial and flux heterogeneities. • Presents cases where the old approach would not have been sufficient. - Abstract: This paper describes the addition of spatially dependent power sharing to a methodology used for calculating the input and output isotopics and burnup of nuclear reactors within a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. Neutron balance and depletion calculations are carried out using pre-calculated fluence-based libraries. These libraries track the transmutation and neutron economy evolution of unit masses of nuclides available in input fuel. The work presented in the paper generalizes the method to simulate reactors that contain more than one type of fuel as well as strong spatial and flux heterogeneities, for instance breeders with a driver–blanket configuration. To achieve this, spatial flux calculations are used to determine the fluence-dependent relative average fluxes inside macroscopic spatial regions. These fluxes are then used to determine the average power of macroscopic spatial regions as well as to more accurately calculate region-specific transmutation rates. The paper presents several cases where the fluence based approach alone would not have been sufficient to determine results.

  10. Determination of the Sensitivity of the Antineutrino Probe for Reactor Core Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormon, S.; Fallot, M.; Bui, V.-M.; Cucoanes, A.; Estienne, M.; Lenoir, M.; Onillon, A.; Shiba, T.; Yermia, F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the use of the detection of reactor-antineutrinos (νbare) for non proliferation purpose. To proceed, we have started to study different reactor designs with our simulation tools. We use a package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE), initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3 labs to study Generation IV reactors. The MURE package has been coupled to fission product beta decay nuclear databases for studying reactor antineutrino emission. This method is the only one able to predict the antineutrino emission from future reactor cores, which don't use the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu. It is also the only way to include off-equilibrium effects, due to neutron captures and time evolution of the fission product concentrations during a reactor cycle. We will present here the first predictions of antineutrino energy spectra from innovative reactor designs (Generation IV reactors). We will then discuss a summary of our results of non-proliferation scenarios involving the latter reactor designs, taking into account reactor physics constraints.

  11. Determination of the Sensitivity of the Antineutrino Probe for Reactor Core Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cormon, S.; Fallot, M., E-mail: fallot@subatech.in2p3.fr; Bui, V.-M.; Cucoanes, A.; Estienne, M.; Lenoir, M.; Onillon, A.; Shiba, T.; Yermia, F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the use of the detection of reactor-antineutrinos (ν{sup ¯}{sub e}) for non proliferation purpose. To proceed, we have started to study different reactor designs with our simulation tools. We use a package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE), initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3 labs to study Generation IV reactors. The MURE package has been coupled to fission product beta decay nuclear databases for studying reactor antineutrino emission. This method is the only one able to predict the antineutrino emission from future reactor cores, which don't use the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu. It is also the only way to include off-equilibrium effects, due to neutron captures and time evolution of the fission product concentrations during a reactor cycle. We will present here the first predictions of antineutrino energy spectra from innovative reactor designs (Generation IV reactors). We will then discuss a summary of our results of non-proliferation scenarios involving the latter reactor designs, taking into account reactor physics constraints.

  12. Effect of pre-treatment on the generation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV- and prolyl endopeptidase-inhibitory hydrolysates from bovine lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafarga T.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of two different pre-treatments, high temperature (100 °C, 5 min and high pressure (600 MPa, 3 min, on the potential of the enzymes papain, collagenase and Alcalase® to generate bioactive hydrolysates containing dipeptidyl peptidase-IV- (DPP-IV; EC 3.4.14.5 and prolyl endopeptidase- (PEP; EC 3.4.21.26 inhibitory peptides from bovine lung. Both pre-treatments resulted in an increase in the degree of hydrolysis over a 24 h period (P < 0.001 and significantly increased the DPP-IV- and PEP-inhibitory activities of the generated hydrolysates (P < 0.001. Generated hydrolysates included an Alcalase hydrolysate of pressure-treated bovine lung, which was the most active, and showed DPP-IV and PEP half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 1.43 ± 0.06 and 3.62 ± 0.07 mg/ mL, respectively. The major peptides contained in this hydrolysate were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and results demonstrated that bovine lung is a good substrate for the release of bioactive peptides when proper pre-treatment and enzymatic treatment are applied.

  13. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V. L., E-mail: vdov@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute,' (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  14. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V. L.

    2013-02-01

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) ≥ 2 and q( a) ≥ 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β N > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  15. Physico-chemical properties of the new generation IV iron preparations ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside 1000 and ferric carboxymaltose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiser, Susann; Rentsch, Daniel; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Weidler, Peter G; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Wilhelm, Maria; Braitsch, Michaela; Funk, Felix; Philipp, Erik; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    The advantage of the new generation IV iron preparations ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), ferumoxytol (FMX), and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) is that they can be administered in relatively high doses in a short period of time. We investigated the physico-chemical properties of these preparations and compared them with those of the older preparations iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), and low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID). Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy indicated akaganeite structures (β-FeOOH) for the cores of FCM, IIM and IS, and a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) structure for that of FMX. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies confirmed the structure of the carbohydrate of FMX as a reduced, carboxymethylated, low molecular weight dextran, and that of IIM as a reduced Dextran 1000. Polarography yielded significantly different fingerprints of the investigated compounds. Reductive degradation kinetics of FMX was faster than that of FCM and IIM, which is in contrast to the high stability of FMX towards acid degradation. The labile iron content, i.e. the amount of iron that is only weakly bound in the polynuclear iron core, was assessed by a qualitative test that confirmed decreasing labile iron contents in the order SFG ≈ IS > LMWID ≥ FMX ≈ IIM ≈ FCM. The presented data are a step forward in the characterization of these non-biological complex drugs, which is a prerequisite to understand their cellular uptake mechanisms and the relationship between the structure and physiological safety as well as efficacy of these complexes.

  16. Development of source term evaluation method for Korean Next Generation Reactor(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Park, Jin Baek; Lee, Yeong Il; Song, Min Cheonl; Lee, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-15

    This project had investigated irradiation characteristics of MOX fuel method to predict nuclide concentration at primary and secondary coolant using a core containing 100% of all MOX fuel and development of source term evaluation tool. In this study, several prediction methods of source term are evaluated. Detailed contents of this project are : an evaluation of model for nuclear concentration at Reactor Coolant System, evaluation of primary and secondary coolant concentration of reference Nuclear Power Plant using purely MOX fuel, suggestion of source term prediction method of NPP with a core using MOX fuel.

  17. Integrity evaluation for steam generator tube of system integrated modular advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Jin, T. E. [KOPEC, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, M. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Jeo, J. C. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    In this study, the structural integrity for SG tube of system integrated modular advanced reactor, which is subjected to dominant external pressure as well as helical type, is evaluated using the commercial finite element package ABAQUS and the American petrochemical industry code API 579 Appendix B. First of all, the crack behavior under the assumption of local heating is assessed using ABAQUS. And, the buckling behavior of tube with 40% wall thinning is assessed using API 579 Appendix B. As a result, it is found that the crack closure phenomenon occurs under external pressure and the buckling doesn't occur even if 40% wall thinning exists in tube.

  18. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  19. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  20. Neutron cross-sections for next generation reactors: new data from n_TOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, N; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; de Albornoz, A Carrillo; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; González-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marques, L; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vicente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, an innovative neutron time-of-flight facility started operation at CERN: n_TOF. The main characteristics that make the new facility unique are the high instantaneous neutron flux, high resolution and wide energy range. Combined with state-of-the-art detectors and data acquisition system, these features have allowed to collect high accuracy neutron cross-section data on a variety of isotopes, many of which radioactive, of interest for Nuclear Astrophysics and for applications to advanced reactor technologies. A review of the most important results on capture and fission reactions obtained so far at n_TOF is presented, together with plans for new measurements related to nuclear industry.

  1. Neutron cross-sections for next generation reactors: New data from n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Tain, J L; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Abbondanno, U; Vannini, G; Konovalov, V; Marques, L; Wiescher, M; de Albornoz, A Carrillo; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Duran, I; Rauscher, T; Ketlerov, V; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Pigni, M T; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Kaeppeler, F; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Voss, F; Pretel, C; Berthoumieux, E; Dolfini, R; Vaz, P; Griesmayer, E; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Wendler, H; Milazzo, P M; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; O'Brien, S; Gunsing, F; Reifarth, R; Perrot, L; Lindote, A; Neves, F; Poch, A; Gramegna, F; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Koehler, P; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Fujii, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Dillman, I; Assimakopoulos, P; Ferrant, L; Lozano, M; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Kadi, Y; Baumann, P; Moreau, C; Oshima, M; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Paradela, C; Vicente, M C; Tassan-Got, L; Cano-Ott, D; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Alvarez, H; Haight, R; Goverdovski, A; Chepel, V; Rosetti, M; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Frais-Koelbl, H; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, an innovative neutron time-of-flight facility started operation at CERN: n\\_TOF. The main characteristics that make the new facility unique are the high instantaneous neutron flux, high resolution and wide energy range. Combined with state-of-the-art detectors and data acquisition system, these features have allowed to collect high accuracy neutron cross-section data on a variety of isotopes, many of which radioactive, of interest for Nuclear Astrophysics and for applications to advanced reactor technologies. A review of the most important results on capture and fission reactions obtained so far at n\\_TOF is presented, together with plans for new measurements related to nuclear industry. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The Next Generation of Pressurized Water Reactor: A Joint Fermate/Siemens Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruess, Fritz [Nuclear Power International, Paris (France)

    1992-04-15

    Within this Franco-German cooperation, we have combined the experience in design, manufacture, construction and operation of nuclear power plants of Fermate and Siemens. The total plant capacity in operation, under construction or on order covered by this combination amounts to more than 100,000 MW, by far the largest in the world for any vendor. Together, the NPP units supplied by the two partners now have an operating experience of over 900 reactor years. For the purpose of that cooperation, they created a joint subsidiary, Nuclear Power International. Together with the export marketing of PWR units based on existing technologies of the two parent companies, the responsibilities of N PI cover mainly the development of a joint French-German PWR technology.

  4. Model biogas steam reforming in a thin Pd-supported membrane reactor to generate clean hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulianelli, A.; Liguori, S.; Huang, Y.; Basile, A.

    2015-01-01

    Steam reforming of a model biogas mixture is studied for generating clean hydrogen by using an inorganic membrane reactor, in which a composite Pd/Al2O3 membrane separates part of the produced hydrogen through its selective permeation. The characteristics of H2 perm-selectivity of the fresh membrane is expressed in terms of H2/N2 ideal selectivity, in this case equal to 4300. Concerning biogas steam reforming reaction, at 380 °C, 2.0 bar H2O:CH4 = 3:1, GHSV = 9000 h-1 the permeate purity of the recovered hydrogen is around 96%, although the conversion (15%) and hydrogen recovery (>20%) are relatively low; on the contrary, at 450 °C, 3.5 bar H2O:CH4 = 4:1, GHSV = 11000 h-1 the conversion is increased up to more than 30% and the recovery of hydrogen to about 70%. This novel work constitutes a reference study for new developments on biogas steam reforming reaction in membrane reactors.

  5. Development of a reactor with carbon catalysts for modular-scale, low-cost electrochemical generation of H 2 O 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Shucheng; Siahrostami, Samira; Chakthranont, Pongkarn; Hahn, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Dimosthenis, Sokaras; Nørskov, Jens K.; Bao, Zhenan; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2017-03-01

    The development of small-scale, decentralized reactors for H2O2 production that can couple to renewable energy sources would be of great benefit, particularly for water purification in the developing world. Herein, we describe our efforts to develop electrochemical reactors for H2O2 generation with high Faradaic efficiencies of >90%, requiring cell voltages of only ~1.6 V. The reactor employs a carbon-based catalyst that demonstrates excellent performance for H2O2 production under alkaline conditions, as demonstrated by fundamental studies involving rotating-ring disk electrode methods. The low-cost, membrane-free reactor design represents a step towards a continuous, modular-scale, de-centralized production of H2O2.

  6. Analysis of two-phase flow instability in helical tube steam generator in high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yu; Lv, Xuefeng; Wang, Shengfei; Niu, Fenglei; Tian, Li [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (Switzerland)

    2012-03-15

    The steam generator composed of multi-helical tubes is used in high temperature gas cooled reactors and two-phase flow instability should be avoided in design. And density-wave oscillation which is mainly due to flow, density and the relationship between the pressure drop delays and feedback effects is one of the two-phase flow instability phenomena easily to occur. Here drift-flux model is used to simulate the performance of the fluid in the secondary side and frequency domain and time domain methods are used to evaluate whether the density-wave oscillation will happen or not. Several operating conditions with nominal power from 15% to 30% are calculated in this paper. The results of the two methods are in accordance, flow instability will occur when power is less than 20% nominal power, which is also according with the result of the experiments well.

  7. Updates to the Generation of Physics Data Inputs for MAMMOTH Simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility - FY2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, Javier [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin Allen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schunert, Sebastian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick Nathan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, Mark David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The INL is currently evolving the modeling and simulation (M&S) capability that will enable improved core operation as well as design and analysis of TREAT experiments. This M&S capability primarily uses MAMMOTH, a reactor physics application being developed under Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. MAMMOTH allows the coupling of a number of other MOOSE-based applications. This second year of work has been devoted to the generation of a deterministic reference solution for the full core, the preparation of anisotropic diffusion coefficients, the testing of the SPH equivalence method, and the improvement of the control rod modeling. In addition, this report includes the progress made in the modeling of the M8 core configuration and experiment vehicle since January of this year.

  8. The Westinghouse AP1000 plant design: a generation III+ reactor with unique proven passive safety technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demetri, K. J.; Leipner, C. I.; Marshall, M. L., E-mail: demetrkj@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The AP1000 plant is an 1100-M We pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications and standardization that simplify construction, operation, maintenance, safety, and cost. The AP1000 plant is based on proven pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology, with an emphasis on safety features that rely solely on natural forces. These passive safety features are combined with simple, active, defense-in-depth systems used during normal plant operations which also provide the first level of defense against more probable events. This paper focuses on specific safety and licensing topics: the AP1000 plant robustness to be prepared for extreme events that may lead to catastrophic loss of infrastructure, such as the Fukushima Dai-ichi event, and the AP1000 plant compliance with the safety objectives for new plants. The first deployment of the AP1000 plant formally began in July 2007 when Westinghouse Electric Company and its consortium partner, the Shaw Group, signed contracts for four AP1000 units on coastal sites of Sanmen and Haiyang, China. Both sites have the planned ability to accommodate at least six AP1000 units; construction is largely concurrent for all four units. Additionally, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued combined licenses (COLs) to allow Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNC) and South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE and G) to construct and operate AP1000 plants. Within this paper, the various factors that contribute to an unparalleled level of design, construction, delivery, and licensing certainty for any new AP1000 plant projects are described. These include: 1) How the AP1000 plant design development and reviews undertaken in the United States, China and Europe increase licensing certainty. 2) How the AP1000 passive plant robustness against extreme events that result in large loss of infrastructure further contributes to the licensing certainty in a post

  9. Instruction by virtual reality to operation and security of a nuclear power plant of IV generation; Instruccion por realidad virtual a la operacion y seguridad de una central nuclear de generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri O, J. C.; Baltasar M, J.; Valle H, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Campus Morelos, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)], e-mail: neriunam@ieee.org

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of LaNuVi project which is developing in the Engineering Faculty of National Autonomous University of Mexico, to have a virtual laboratory of nuclear reactors as tool of multidisciplinary education at basic and advanced levels in nuclear engineering area, involves training resources in audio visual and interactive form that allow to form a comprehension more realistic of operation of different systems and components. In this work is proposed to use educational resources, as the employees in the U.S. Army and in some centers of advanced education of medicine, where have been come proving concepts like projected reality, increased reality, tele transparency and others that present big benefits to learning-education process. The proposal here is to include the resource knew as serious game based learning. The focal point of stage that is presented is of a nuclear reactor PBMR like desalination and generator of controlled alternating energy and efficient that should put on in operation to allow the subsistence of a community in a desolated region of beginning second quarter of X XI century. For this purpose the designs are initiated and programmed several subsystems that allow the three-dimensional modeling of main components of a PBMR as well as of surrounding facilities. The obtained results and reaches of this design are presented. The product is in tests for a first version and it is hope to achieve a free and integral resource of national distribution for different cultural groups, interested in this type of advanced technology. (Author)

  10. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P., E-mail: pradip.saha@ge.com [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Aksan, N. [GRNSPG Group, University of Pisa (Italy); Andersen, J. [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Columbia, SC (United States); Simoneau, J.P. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Leung, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Bertrand, F. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aoto, K.; Kamide, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs.

  11. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent Descotes

    2011-03-01

    The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the

  12. Influence of electrical parameters on H2O2 generation in DBD non-thermal reactor with water mist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Xiao, Zehua; Hao, Chunjing; Qiu, Jian; Liu, Kefu

    2017-06-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor is introduced to generate H2O2 by non-thermal plasma with a mixture of oxygen and water mist produced by an ultrasonic atomizer. The results of our experiment show that the energy yield and concentration of the generated H2O2 in the pulsed discharge are much higher than that in AC discharge, due to its high energy efficiency and low heating effect. Micron-sized liquid droplets produced by an ultrasonic atomizer in water mist have large specific surface area, which greatly reduces mass transfer resistance between hydroxyl radicals and water liquids, leading to higher energy yield and H2O2 concentration than in our previous research. The influence of applied voltage, discharge frequency, and environmental temperature on the generated H2O2 is discussed in detail from the viewpoint of the DBD mechanism. The H2O2 concentration of 30 mg l-1, with the energy yield of 2 g kW-1h-1 is obtained by pulsed discharge in our research.

  13. The Role of Expansion and Fragmentation Phenomena on the Generation and Chemical Composition of Dust Particles in a Flash Converting Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Ruiz, Cirilo Andrés; Pérez-Tello, Manuel; Parra-Sánchez, Víctor Roberto; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2016-10-01

    A compositional fragmentation model was used to clarify the effect of expansion and fragmentation phenomena on the generation and chemical composition of dust particles in a flash converting reactor. A fragmentation index is introduced to represent the fraction of particles undergoing fragmentation, as opposed to expansion, within the particle population. Under typical operating conditions, the local dust content and the net amount of dust generated compared with the dust content in the feed first decreased and then increased along the reactor length, whereas the amount of particles undergoing fragmentation (fragmentation index) increased steadily. Dust generation was found to be the result of two competing phenomena, i.e., the expansion of dust particles in the feed and the production of dust from fragmentation of large particles. At short distance from the burner tip, the dust mostly consists of particles in the feed undergoing oxidation and expansion, whereas farther down the reactor it mostly consists of fragments of partially reacted particles. Based on the computer simulations under a variety of experimental conditions, a map of dust generation against fragmentation index was developed. For most practical purposes, dust generation may be approximated by the change in the mass fraction of dust in the population. At the reactor exit, the composition of the dust is approximately the same as the entire particle population.

  14. Triggering the Generation of an Iron(IV)-Oxo Compound and Its Reactivity toward Sulfides by Ru-II Photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; Gonzalez-Bejar, Maria; Gomez, Laura; Clemancey, Martin; Blondin, Genevieve; Jasniewski, Andrew J.; Puri, Mayank; Browne, Wesley R.; Latour, Jean-Marc; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miguel; Perez-Prieto, Julia; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of [Fe-IV(O)(MePy(2)tacn)](2+) (2, MePy(2)tacn = N-methyl-N,N-b is (2-picolyl)- 1,4,7-triazacy-clononane) by reaction of [Fe-II(MePy(2)tacn)(solvent)](2+) (1) and PhIO in CH3CN and its full characterization are described. This compound can also be prepared photochemically from its ir

  15. Triggering the Generation of an Iron(IV)-Oxo Compound and Its Reactivity toward Sulfides by Ru-II Photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; Gonzalez-Bejar, Maria; Gomez, Laura; Clemancey, Martin; Blondin, Genevieve; Jasniewski, Andrew J.; Puri, Mayank; Browne, Wesley R.; Latour, Jean-Marc; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miguel; Perez-Prieto, Julia; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of [Fe-IV(O)(MePy(2)tacn)](2+) (2, MePy(2)tacn = N-methyl-N,N-b is (2-picolyl)- 1,4,7-triazacy-clononane) by reaction of [Fe-II(MePy(2)tacn)(solvent)](2+) (1) and PhIO in CH3CN and its full characterization are described. This compound can also be prepared photochemically from its

  16. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of a reactor system for the generation of white liquor of a pulp and paper industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andreola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An industrial system for the production of white liquor of a pulp and paper industry, Klabin Paraná Papéis, formed by ten reactors was modeled, simulated, and analyzed. The developed model considered possible water losses by the evaporation and reaction, in addition to variations in the volumetric flow of lime mud across the reactors due to the composition variations. The model predictions agreed well with the process measurements at the plant and the results showed that the slaking reaction was nearly complete at the third causticizing reactor, while causticizing ends by the seventh reactor. Water loss due to slaking reaction and evaporation occurred more pronouncedly in the slaker reactor than in the final causticizing reactors; nevertheless, the lime mud flow remained nearly constant across the reactors.

  17. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. In a membrane reactor process, the thermal energy needed for the endothermic hydrocarbon reforming may be provided by combustion of the membrane reject gas. The energy efficiency of the overall hydrogen generation is maximized by controlling the hydrogen product yield such that the heat value of the membrane reject gas is sufficient to provide all of the heat necessary for the integrated process. Optimization of the system temperature, pressure and operating parameters such as net hydrogen recovery is necessary to realize an efficient integrated membrane reformer suitable for compact portable hydrogen generation. This paper presents results of theoretical model simulations of the integrated membrane reformer concept elucidating the effect of operating parameters on the extent of fuel conversion to hydrogen and hydrogen product yield. Model simulations indicate that the net possible hydrogen product yield is strongly influenced by the efficiency of heat recovery from the combustion of membrane reject gas and from the hot exhaust gases. When butane is used as a fuel, a net hydrogen recovery of 68% of that stoichiometrically possible may be achieved with membrane reformer operation at 600 °C (873 K) temperature and 100 psig (0.791 MPa) pressure provided 90% of available combustion and exhaust gas heat is recovered. Operation at a greater pressure or temperature provides a marginal improvement in the performance whereas operation at a significantly lower temperature or pressure will not be able to achieve the optimal hydrogen yield. Slightly higher, up to 76%, net hydrogen recovery is possible when methanol is used as a fuel due to the lower heat

  18. Divertor conditions relevant for fusion reactors achieved with linear plasma generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Kleyn, A. W.; Lof, A.; van der Meiden, H. J.; van Rooij, G. J.; Scholten, J.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2012-01-01

    Intense magnetized hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been produced with electron densities up to 3.6 × 1020 m−3 and electron temperatures up to 3.7 eV with a linear plasma generator. Exposure of a W target has led to average heat and particle flux densities well in excess of 4 MW m−2 and 1024 m−2

  19. Divertor conditions relevant for fusion reactors achieved with linear plasma generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.N. van Eck; A.W. Kleijn; A. Lof; H.J. van der Meiden; G.J. van Rooij; J. Scholten; P.A. Zeijlmans van Emmichoven

    2012-01-01

    Intense magnetized hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been produced with electron densities up to 3.6 × 10 20 m−3 and electron temperatures up to 3.7 eV with a linear plasma generator. Exposure of a W target has led to average heat and particle flux densities well in excess of 4 MW m−2 and 10 24 m−

  20. Behaviour of palladium(II), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in artificial and natural waters: influence of reactor surface and geochemistry on metal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelo-Garcia, Antonio; Turner, Andrew; Millward, Geoffrey E; Couceiro, Fay

    2007-03-07

    The recovery of dissolved platinum group elements (PGE: Pd(II), Pt(IV) and Rh(III)) added to Milli-Q water, artificial freshwater and seawater and filtered natural waters has been studied, as a function of pH and PGE concentration, in containers of varying synthetic composition. The least adsorptive and/or precipitative loss was obtained for borosilicate glass under most of the conditions employed, whereas the greatest loss was obtained for low-density polyethylene. Of the polymeric materials tested, the adsorptive and/or precipitative loss of PGE was lowest for fluorinated ethylene propylene (Teflon). The loss of Pd(II) in freshwater was significant due to its affinity for surface adsorption and its relatively low solubility. The presence of natural dissolved organic matter increases the recovery of Pd(II) but enhances the loss of Pt(IV). The loss of Rh(III) in seawater was significant and was mainly due to precipitation, whereas Pd(II) recovery was enhanced, compared to freshwater, because of its complexation with chloride. The results have important implications regarding protocols employed for sample preservation and controlled laboratory experiments used in the study of the speciation and biogeochemical behaviour of PGE.

  1. Silver Recovery and Power Generation from Ammonia Chelated Silver Solution in a Bio-Electrochemical Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, N. A. D.; Babel, S.

    2017-06-01

    Silver has valuable features and limited availability, and thus recovery from wastewater or aqueous solutions plays an important role in environmental protection and economic profits. In this study, silver recovery along with power generation and COD removal were investigated in a bio-electrochemical system (BES). The BES comprised of an anode and a cathode chamber which were separated by a cation exchange membrane to prevent the cross-over of electrolytes. During the biological oxidation of acetate as an electron donor in the anode chamber, the reduction of ammonia chelated silver ions as electron acceptors in the cathode side occurred spontaneously. Results showed that a silver recovery of 99% and COD removal efficiency of 60% were achieved at the initial silver concentration of 1,000 mg/L after 48 hours of operation. The power generation improved 4.66%, from 3,618 to 3,795 mW/m3, by adding NaNO3 of 850 mg/L to the catholyte containing 2,000 mg/L of silver ions. Deposits on the cathode surface were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Metallic silver with dendritic structures and high purity were detected. This study demonstrated that BES technology can be employed to recover silver from complex chelating solution, produce electricity, and treat wastewater.

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  3. Application of a new operating license for the Finnish FiR 1 reactor and the change of generation of the reactor personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenhaara, Seppo; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Otaniemi, Espoo (Finland)

    2008-10-29

    The FiR 1 epithermal BNCT facility is a TRIGA Mark II reactor: 250 kW; 15 kg U containing 3 kg {sup 235}U (20% enrichment) in the special TRIGA uranium-zirconium hydride fuel (8-12 w% U, 91% Zr, 1% H); epithermal neutrons are created by the FLUENTAL{sup TM} neutron moderator; Neutron collimation: Bi + Li-Poly cone; epithermal neutron flux: 1.1 10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}s; fast neutron dose: 2 Gy/10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. The schedule of the Operating License Application is as follows: - 2009 decision to apply a new license; - 2010 preparation of the documents needed for the application; - 2011 the documents will be checked by the authorities and at the end of the year the new license should be granted by the Government; - 2012-2016 probable period of the new license The supplementary documents to the application for an operating license are: 1. Details of the site; 2. The quality and maximum amounts of the nuclear material 3. An outline of the technical operating principles and arrangements whereby the safety has been ensured; 4. A description of the safety principles that have been observed, and an evaluation of the fulfillment of the principles; 5. A description of the measures to restrict the burden caused by the nuclear facility on the environment; 6. The expertise available to the applicant and the operating organization; 7. Plans for arranging nuclear waste management. The applicant submits to the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority: 1. The final safety analysis report; 2. A probabilistic safety analysis; 3. A quality assurance programme for the operation of the nuclear facility; 4. Technical specifications; 5. A summary programme for periodic inspections; 6. A description of the arrangements for physical protection and emergencies; 7. A description on how to arrange the safeguards that are necessary to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons; 8. Administrative rules; 9. A programme for radiation monitoring in the environment. Reactor key persons and the

  4. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  5. Large-scale experimental facility for emergency condition investigation of a new generation NPP WWER-640 reactor with passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniskevich, Y.N.; Vasilenko, V.A.; Zasukha, V.K.; Migrov, Y.A.; Khabensky, V.B. [Research Inst. of Technology NITI (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The creation of the large-scale integral experimental facility (KMS) is specified by the programme of the experimental investigations to justify the engineering decisions on the safety of the design of the new generation NPP with the reactor WWER-640. The construction of KMS in a full volume will allow to conduct experimental investigations of all physical phenomena and processes, practically, occurring during the accidents on the NPPs with the reactor of WWER type and including the heat - mass exchange processes with low rates of the coolant, which is typical during the utilization of the passive safety systems, process during the accidents with a large leak, and also the complex intercommunicated processes in the reactor unit, passive safety systems and in the containment with the condition of long-term heat removal to the final absorber. KMS is being constructed at the Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russia. (orig.). 5 refs.

  6. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  7. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security.

  8. Development and optimization of new generation Start-Up Instrumentation systems (SUI) for domestic CANDU reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasimi, Elnara

    Due to the age and operating experience of Bruce Power units, equipment ageing and obsolescence has become one of the main challenges that need to be resolved for all systems, structures and components in order to ensure a safe and reliable production of energy. The research objectives of this thesis will focus on methodology for modernization of Start-Up Instrumentation (SUI), both in-core and Control Room equipment, using a new generation of detectors and cables in order to manage obsolescence. The main objective of this thesis is to develop a new systematic approach to SUI installation/replacement procedure development and optimization. Although some additional features, such as real-time data monitoring and storage/archiving solutions for SUI systems are also examined to take full advantage of today's digital technology, the objective of this thesis does not include detailed parametrical studies of detector or system performance. Instead, a number of technological, operational and maintenance issues associated with Start-Up Instrumentation systems at Bruce Power will be identified in this project and a structured approach to developing a replacement/installation procedure that can be standardized and used across all of the domestic CANDU stations is proposed. Finally, benefits of Hierarchical Control Chart (HCC) methodology for all stages of plant life management, such as system design, development, operation and maintenance are demonstrated. Keywords: Task Breakdown and Analysis methodology, installation/removal procedure development and optimization, risk-based analysis and optimization, Hierarchical Control Chart (HCC) methodology for system maintenance and troubleshooting, Start-Up Instrumentation (SUI), Ion Chambers, Fission Chambers, proportional counters, Shutdown System 1 (SDS1), Shutdown System 2 (SDS2).

  9. Evaluation of two processes of hydrogen production starting from energy generated by high temperature nuclear reactors; Evaluacion de dos procesos de produccion de hidrogeno a partir de energia generada por reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J., E-mail: jvalle@upmh.edu.mx [Universidad Politecnica Metropolitana de Hidalgo, Boulevard Acceso a Tolcayuca 1009, Ex-Hacienda San Javier, 43860 Tolcayuca, Hidalgo (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work an evaluation to two processes of hydrogen production using energy generated starting from high temperature nuclear reactors (HTGR's) was realized. The evaluated processes are the electrolysis of high temperature and the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur. The electrolysis of high temperature, contrary to the conventional electrolysis, allows reaching efficiencies of up to 60% because when increasing the temperature of the water, giving thermal energy, diminishes the electric power demand required to separate the molecule of the water. However, to obtain these efficiencies is necessary to have water vapor overheated to more than 850 grades C, temperatures that can be reached by the HTGR. On the other hand the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur, developed by General Atomics in the 1970 decade, requires two thermal levels basically, the great of them to 850 grades C for decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and another minor to 360 grades C approximately for decomposition of H I, a high temperature nuclear reactor can give the thermal energy required for the process whose products would be only hydrogen and oxygen. In this work these two processes are described, complete models are developed and analyzed thermodynamically that allow to couple each hydrogen generation process to a reactor HTGR that will be implemented later on for their dynamic simulation. The obtained results are presented in form of comparative data table of each process, and with them the obtained net efficiencies. (author)

  10. Fuel management inside the reactor. Report of generation of the nuclear bank for the fuel of the initial load of the Laguna Verde U-1 reactor with the FMS codes; Administracion de combustible dentro del reactor. Reporte de generacion del banco nuclear para el combustible de la carga inicial del reactor de Laguna Verde U-1 con los codigos del FMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso V, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Torres A, C. [CFE, Veracruz (Mexico)

    1991-06-15

    In this work in a general way the form in that it was generated the database of the initial fuel load of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 reactor is described. The initial load is formed with fuel of the GE6 type. The obtained results during the formation of the database in as much as to the behavior of the different cell parameters regarding the one burnt of the fuel and the variation of vacuums in the coolant channel its are compared very favorably with those reported by the General Electric fuel supplier and reported in the design documents of the same one. (Author)

  11. Molecular characterization and polyclonal antibody generation against core component CagX protein of Helicobacter pylori type IV secretion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Gopal Jee; Kumar, Awanish; Pal, Jagannath; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori cause gastric ulcer, duodenal cancer, and found in almost half of the world’s residents. The protein responsible for this disease is secreted through type IV secretion system (TFSS) of H. pylori. TFSS is encoded by 40-kb region of chromosomal DNA known as cag-pathogenicity island (PAI). TFSS comprises of three major components: cytoplasmic/inner membrane ATPase, transmembrane core-complex and outer membranous pilli, and associated subunits. Core complex consists of CagX, CagT, CagM, and Cag3(δ) proteins as per existing knowledge. In this study, we have characterized one of the important component of core-complex forming sub-unit protein, i.e., CagX. Complete ORF of CagX except signal peptide coding region was cloned and expressed in pET28a vector. Purification of CagX protein was performed, and polyclonal anti-sera against full-length recombinant CagX were raised in rabbit model. We obtained a very specific and high titer, CagX anti-sera that were utilized to characterize endogenous CagX. Surface localization of CagX was also seen by immunofluorescence microscopy. In short for the first time a full-length CagX was characterized, and we showed that CagX is the part of high molecular weight core complex, which is important for assembly and function of H. pylori TFSS. PMID:24637488

  12. Legal obstacles to the construction of high temperature reactors for heat generation on the example of Polish regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczurek, Jan; Koszuk, Lukasz; Klisinska, Malgorzata; Andrzejewski, Krzysztof [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock (Poland). Nuclear Energy Div.

    2016-07-15

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) can produce high temperature process heat. This extends their potential range of application. In recent decades, the practice of licensing reactors of HTR technology, caused by the need of streamlining of this process, has placed the main emphasis on the adaptation of existing regulations by formulating appropriate guidelines. Currently, in-depth analyses of usefulness and shortcomings of the existing regulations are required. The article analyzes the possibility of licensing of high-temperature reactors with cogeneration based on the Polish Atomic Law and the three resolutions of the Council of Ministers.

  13. Some Movement Mechanisms and Characteristics in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pebblebed-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor is considered to be one of the promising solutions for generation IV advanced reactors, and the two-region arranged reactor core can enhance its advantages by flattening neutron flux. However, this application is held back by the existence of mixing zone between central and peripheral regions, which results from pebbles’ dispersion motions. In this study, experiments have been carried out to study the dispersion phenomenon, and the variation of dispersion region and radial distribution of pebbles in the specifically shaped flow field are shown. Most importantly, the standard deviation of pebbles’ radial positions in dispersion region, as a quantitative index to describe the size of dispersion region, is gotten through statistical analysis. Besides, discrete element method has been utilized to analyze the parameter influence on dispersion region, and this practice offers some strategies to eliminate or reduce mixing zone in practical reactors.

  14. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the si

  15. JAERI's contribution to the IAEA coordinated research programme on assuring structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels' (CRP-IV). Final report (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onizawa, Kunio; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-05-01

    According to the Research Agreement No. 9736 between the IAEA and the JAERI, we commenced the test program for the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on 'Assuring Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels' at JAERI in September 1997. For the program, we received one block of the IAEA reference material JRQ from the IAEA CRP coordinator in June 1997. The test program has been conducted using the JRQ block and additional materials (Steels A and B) from our own program having a similar object with the CRP. The CRP consists of two parts; a mandatory part and an optional part. For the mandatory part of the JAERI program, instrumented Charpy impact tests and fracture toughness tests using precracked Charpy-v (PCCv) specimens were performed. As the optional part, neutron irradiation to specimens of JRQ was conducted at JMTR by using two capsules. In this report, the results of the mandatory part and irradiated Charpy and PCCv specimens of JRQ from capsule No.1 as well as those of Steel A and Steel B were described. The following conclusions were drawn; (1) the data form Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests of JRQ agreed well with the data in the CRP-3, (2) the scatter of fracture toughness of JRQ is relatively large, i. e., the Weibull slope 'b' is less than 3, (3) the reference temperature T{sub 0} from PCCv is in good agreement with T{sub 0} from 1T-Compact Tension (CT) when the tests are performed at the recommended temperature or the data has no invalid data, (4) the reference temperature T{sub 0} after neutron irradiation can be determined with six to eight specimens at the recommended temperature and (5) the shift of the reference temperature T{sub 0} is almost equivalent to the shift of Charpy transition temperature, but affected by the treatment of the highest data and testing temperature. Further studies on the fracture toughness evaluation are necessary concerning the treatment of outlier, temperature dependence after

  16. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  18. Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

    1980-06-25

    Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

  19. Generation of nuclear constants of the TRIGA reactor with the Leopard code; Generacion de constantes nucleares del reactor TRIGA con el codigo Leopard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1983-09-15

    The reactor core was divided in 12 regions, this was made in function of the composition and temperature and its are: 1) central thimble, 2) B ring, 3) C ring, 4) D ring, 5) E ring, 6) F ring, 7) G ring, 8) superior caps of fuel elements (E.C. s) standard, 9) inferior caps of E.C.'s standard, 10) superior and inferior reflector of the core, 11) lateral reflector and 12) superior and inferior caps of the E.C.'s graphite. Likewise the constants of the followers' of fuel cell, of the empty follower and of the conduits of the gamma camera were obtained. For the obtaining of the enter data of the LEOPARD the dimensions and the composition of the different regions are required, this is consigned in the IT/E21-83 report. (Author)

  20. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  1. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

    2002-11-26

    OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

  2. Neutronic/Thermalhydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean Ragusa; Andrew Siegel; Jean-Michel Ruggieri

    2010-09-28

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  3. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  4. Generation of a Mn(IV)-Peroxo or Mn(III)-Oxo-Mn(III) Species upon Oxygenation of Mono- and Binuclear Thiolate-Ligated Mn(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ming; Wu, Wun-Yan; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Bohle, D Scott; Lee, Gene-Hsiang

    2017-09-05

    A thiolate-bridged binuclear complex [PPN]2[(Mn(II)((TMS)PS3))2] (1, PPN = bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium and (TMS)PS3H3 = (2,2',2″-trimercapto-3,3',3″-tris(trimethylsilyl)triphenylphosphine)), prepared from the reaction of MnCl2/[PPN]Cl and Li3[(TMS)PS3], converts into a mononuclear complex [PPN][Mn(II)((TMS)PS3)(DABCO)] (2) in the presence of excess amounts of DABCO (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Variable temperature studies of solution containing 1 and DABCO by UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that 1 and 2 exist in significant amounts in equilibrium and mononuclear 2 is favored at low temperature. Treatment of 1 or 2 with the monomeric O2-side-on-bound [PPN][Mn(IV)(O2)((TMS)PS3)] (3) produces the mono-oxo-bridged dimer [PPN]2[(Mn(III)((TMS)PS3))2(μ-O)] (4). The electrochemistry of 1 and 2 reveals anodic peak(s) for a Mn(III/)Mn(II) redox couple at shifted potentials against Fc/Fc(+), indicating that both complexes can be oxidized by dioxygen. The O2 activation mediated by 1 and 2 is investigated in both solution and the solid state. Microcrystals of 2 rapidly react with air or dry O2 to generate the Mn(IV)-peroxo 3 in high yield, revealing a solid-to-solid transformation and two-electron reduction of O2. Oxygenation of 1 or 2 in solution, however, is affected by diffusion and transient concentration of dioxygen in the two different substrates, leading to generation of 3 and 4 in variable ratios.

  5. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  6. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  7. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  8. Sonochemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  9. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  10. An alternative solution for heavy liquid metal cooled reactors fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale Di Maio, Damiano, E-mail: damiano.vitaledimaio@uniroma1.it [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Cretara, Luca; Giannetti, Fabio [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Peluso, Vincenzo [“ENEA”, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Gandini, Augusto [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Manni, Fabio [“SRS Engineering Design S.r.l.”, Vicolo delle Palle 25-25/b, 00186 Rome (Italy); Caruso, Gianfranco [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new fuel assembly locking system for heavy metal cooled reactor is proposed. • Neutronic, mechanical and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the system behavior have been performed. • A comparison with other solutions has been presented. - Abstract: In the coming future, the electric energy production from nuclear power plants will be provided by both thermal reactors and fast reactors. In order to have a sustainable energy production through fission reactors, fast reactors should provide an increasing contribution to the total electricity production from nuclear power plants. Fast reactors have to achieve economic and technical targets of Generation IV. Among these reactors, Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs) have the greatest possibility to be developed as industrial power plants within few decades. Both SFRs and LFRs require a great R and D effort to overcome some open issues which affect the present designs (e.g. sodium-water reaction for the SFRs, erosion/corrosion for LFRs, etc.). The present paper is mainly focused on LFR fuel assembly (FA) design: issues linked with the high coolant density of lead or lead–bismuth eutectic cooled reactors have been investigated and an innovative solution for the core mechanical design is here proposed and analyzed. The solution, which foresees cylindrical fuel assemblies and exploits the buoyancy force due to the lead high density, allows to simplify the FAs locking system, to reduce their length and could lead to a more uniform neutron flux distribution.

  11. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V. [NRC Kurchatov Institute Tokamak Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-12

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  12. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-01

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure βN > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D - Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  13. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Wood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors.

  14. Deterministic and risk-informed approaches for safety analysis of advanced reactors: Part I, deterministic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Kyu [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Inn Seock, E-mail: innseockkim@gmail.co [ISSA Technology, 21318 Seneca Crossing Drive, Germantown, MD 20876 (United States); Oh, Kyu Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this paper and a companion paper in this issue (part II, risk-informed approaches) is to derive technical insights from a critical review of deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches that have been applied to develop licensing requirements for water-cooled reactors, or proposed for safety verification of the advanced reactor design. To this end, a review was made of a number of safety analysis approaches including those specified in regulatory guides and industry standards, as well as novel methodologies proposed for licensing of advanced reactors. This paper and the companion paper present the review insights on the deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches, respectively. These insights could be used in making a safety case or developing a new licensing review infrastructure for advanced reactors including Generation IV reactors.

  15. Optimization and simplification of the concept of non-moderated Thorium Molten Salt Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, Elsa; Heuer, Daniel; Allibert, Michel; Doligez, Xavier; Ghetta, Veronique; Le Brun, Christian [LPSC-IN2P3-CNRS/UJF/INPG, LPSC 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Molten salt reactors, in the configuration presented here and called Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), are particularly well suited to fulfil the criteria defined by the Generation IV forum, and may be operated in simplified and safe conditions in the Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle with fluoride salts. The characteristics of the non-moderated TMSR based on a fast neutron spectrum are detailed in this paper: we aimed at designing an optimised TMSR with the simplest configuration. Using a simple kinetic-point model, we analyze the reactor's transient as the total reactivity margins are introduced in the core. We thus confirm, beyond the classical advantages of molten salt reactors, the satisfactory behaviour of the TMSR in terms of safety and the excellent level of stability which can be achieved in such reactors. (authors)

  16. Deployable nuclear fleet based on available quantities of uranium and reactor types – the case of fast reactors started up with enriched uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschwitz Anne

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available International organizations regularly produce global energy demand scenarios. To account for the increasing population and GDP trends, as well as to encompass evolving energy uses while satisfying constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, long-term installed nuclear power capacity scenarios tend to be more ambitious, even after the Fukushima accident. Thus, the amounts of uranium or plutonium needed to deploy such capacities could be limiting factors. This study first considers light-water reactors (LWR, GEN III using enriched uranium, like most of the current reactor technologies. It then examines the contribution of future fast reactors (FR, GEN IV operating with an initial fissile load and then using depleted uranium and recycling their own plutonium. However, as plutonium is only available in limited quantity since it is only produced in nuclear reactors, the possibility of starting up these Generation IV reactors with a fissile load of enriched uranium is also explored. In one of our previous studies, the uranium consumption of a third-generation reactor like an EPR™ was compared with that of a fast reactor started up with enriched uranium (U5-FR. For a reactor lifespan of 60 years, the U5-FR consumes three times less uranium than the EPR and represents a 60% reduction in terms of separative work units (SWU, though its requirements are concentrated over the first few years of operation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevance of U5-FRs in a nuclear fleet deployment configuration. Considering several power demand scenarios and assuming different finite quantities of available natural uranium, this paper examines what types of reactors must be deployed to meet the demand. The deployment of light-water reactors only is not sustainable in the long run. Generation IV reactors are therefore essential. Yet when started up with plutonium, the number of reactors that can be deployed is also limited. In a fleet deployment

  17. Development of PARA-ID Code to Simulate Inelastic Constitutive Equations and Their Parameter Identifications for the Next Generation Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H

    2006-03-15

    The establishment of the inelastic analysis technology is essential issue for a development of the next generation reactors subjected to elevated temperature operations. In this report, the peer investigation of constitutive equations in points of a ratcheting and creep-fatigue analysis is carried out and the methods extracting the constitutive parameters from experimental data are established. To perform simulations for each constitutive model, the PARA-ID (PARAmeter-IDentification) computer program is developed. By using this code, various simulations related with the parameter identification of the constitutive models are carried out.

  18. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  19. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  20. The long-term future for civilian nuclear power generation in France: The case for breeder reactors. Breeder reactors: The physical and physical chemistry parameters, associate material thermodynamics and mechanical engineering: Novelties and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautray, Robert

    2011-06-01

    , etc., radioprotection measures and treatment for the "transuranic" elements. For a long period of time, France was in the forefront of nuclear breeder power generation science, technological research and also in the knowledge base related to breeder reactors. It is in the country's interest to pursue these efforts and this could per se constitute one of the national priorities. Nous sommes naturellement bien conscients de l'énorme problème qui se pose au Japon actuellement comme suite au tremblement de terre et au tsunami de mars 2011 et leurs conséquences, notamment sur des installations électronucléaires. Le texte que nous présentons concerne des conditions totalement générales, indépendantes des problèmes spécifiques de sûreté qu'il faudra, de toute façon, traiter dans le cadre d'un développement éventuel de l'énergie nucléaire.We are aware, of course, of the huge problem that Japan has to deal with the aftermath of the quake and tsunami of March 2011 and their consequences on electronuclear power plants. The text that we present here concerns general physical topics independent of the specific safety problems, general physical topics which will have to be solved in the case of a contingent development of electronuclear power plants.

  1. I-V and DLTS study of generation and annihilation of deep-level defects in an oxygen-ion irradiated bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, K. V.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Damle, R.

    A commercial bipolar junction transistor (2N 2219A, npn) irradiated with 84 MeV O6+-ions with fluence of the order of 1013 ions cm-2 is studied for radiation-induced gain degradation and deep-level defects or recombination centers. I-V measurements are made to study the gain degradation as a function of ion fluence. Properties such as activation energy, trap concentration and capture cross section of deep levels are studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Minority carrier trap energy levels with energies ranging from EC -0.17 eV to EC -0.55 eV are observed in the base-collector junction of the transistor. Majority carrier defect levels are also observed with energies ranging from EV +0.26 eV to EV +0.44 eV. The irradiated device is subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing. The defects are seen to anneal above 250 °C. The defects generated in the base region of the transistor by displacement damage appear to be responsible for an increase in base current through Shockley-Read-Hall or multi-phonon recombination and consequent transistor gain degradation.

  2. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  3. Molten salt reactor: Deterministic safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, Elsa; Heuer, Daniel; Mathieu, Ludovic; Le Brun, Christian [Laboratory for Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC), 53, Avenue des Marthyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2006-07-01

    Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) are one of the systems retained by Generation IV as a candidate for the next generation of nuclear reactors. This type of reactor is particularly well adapted to the thorium fuel cycle (Th- {sup 233}U) which has the advantage of producing less minor actinides than the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle ({sup 238}U- {sup 239}Pu). In the frame of a major re-evaluation of the MSR concept and concentrating on some major constraints such as feasibility, breeding capability and, above all, safety, we have considered a particular reactor configuration that we call the 'unique channel' configuration in which there is no moderator in the core, leading to a quasi fast neutron spectrum. This reactor is presented in the first section. MSRs benefit from several specific advantages which are listed in a second part of this work. Beyond these advantages of the MSR, the level of the deterministic safety in such a reactor has to be assessed precisely. In a third section, we first draw up a list of the reactivity margins in our reactor configuration. We then define and quantify the parameters characterizing the deterministic safety of any reactor: the fraction of delayed neutrons, and the system's feedback coefficients that are here negative. Finally, using a simple point-kinetic evaluation, we analyze how these safety parameters impact the system when the total reactivity margins are introduced in the MSR. The results of this last study are discussed, emphasizing the satisfactory behavior of the MSR and the excellent level of deterministic safety which can be achieved. This work is based on the coupling of a neutron transport code called MCNP with a materials evolution code. The former calculates the neutron flux and the reaction rates in all the cells while the latter solves the Bateman equations for the evolution of the materials composition within the cells. These calculations take into account the input parameters (power released

  4. Effects of generation and optimization of libraries of effective sections in the analysis of transient in PWR reactors; Efectos de generacion y optimizacion de librerias de secciones eficaces en el analisis de transitorios en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cervera, S.; Garcia Herranz, N.; Cuervo, D.; Ahnert, C.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper evaluates the impact that has a certain mesh on a transient in a PWR reactor in the expulsion of a control bar. Have been used for this purpose the coupled codes neutronic and Thermo-hydraulic COBAYA3/COBRA-TF. This objective has been chosen the OECD/NEA PWR MOX/UO{sub 2} rod ejection transient benchmark provides isotopic compositions and defined geometric configurations that allow the use of codes lattice to generate own bookstores. The code used for this transport has been the code APOLLO2.8. The results show large discrepancies when using the benchmark library or libraries own by comparing them to the other participants solutions. The source of these discrepancies is the nodal effective sections provided in the benchmark. (Author)

  5. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Gas as a coolant in Gen-IV reactors, history and development. • Main physical parameters comparison of gas coolants: carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen with water. • Forced convection in turbulent pipe flow. • Gas cooled fast reactor concept comparisons to very high temperature reactor concept. • High temperature helium loop: concept, development, mechanism, design and constraints. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing energy and electricity demands, global concerns over the climate changes and strong dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies are powerfully influencing greater use of nuclear power. In order to establish the viability of next-generation reactor concepts to meet tomorrow's needs for clean and reliable energy production the fundamental research and development issues need to be addressed for the Generation-IV nuclear-energy systems. Generation-IV reactor concepts are being developed to use more advanced materials, coolants and higher burn-ups fuels, while keeping a nuclear reactor safe and reliable. One of the six Generation-IV concepts is a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The VHTR concept uses a graphite-moderated core with a once-through uranium fuel cycle, using high temperature helium as the coolant. Because helium is naturally inert and single-phase, the helium-cooled reactor can operate at much higher temperatures, leading to higher efficiency. Current VHTR concepts will use fuels such as uranium dioxide, uranium carbide, or uranium oxycarbide. Since some of these fuels are new in nuclear industry and due to their unknown properties and behavior within VHTR conditions it is very important to address these issues by investigate their characteristics within conditions close to those in VHTRs. This research can be performed in a research reactor with in-pile helium loop designed and constructed in Research Center Rez Ltd. One of the topics analyzed in this article are also physical characteristic and benefits of gas

  6. Synthesis, stability and reactivity of the first mononuclear nonheme oxoiron(IV) species with monoamido ligation: a putative reactive species generated from iron-bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Yutaka; Arakawa, Kengo; Kodera, Masahito

    2014-07-18

    The preparation and characterisation of an oxoiron(IV) species with monoamido ligation are described. Reactivity studies revealed the important role of the amido ligand in enhancing the ability of oxoiron(IV) complexes to promote hydrogen atom transfer from external alkanes.

  7. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  8. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM AND ARSENIC COMPOUNDS BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW AND ON-LINE REDUCTION OF SELENIUM(VI) TO SELENIUM(IV) WITH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with hydride generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine four arsenicals and two selenium species. Selenate (SeVI) was reduced on-line to selenite (SeIV') by mixing the CE effluent with concentrated HCl. A microporo...

  9. Design of pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor for the generation of hydrogen from alkaline sulfide wastewater of sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, R; Kanmani, S

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted for photocatalytic generation of renewable fuel hydrogen from sulphide wastewater from the sewage treatment plant. In this study, pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was designed for treating 1 m3 of sulphide wastewater and also for the simultaneous generation of hydrogen. Bench-scale studies were conducted both in the batch recycle and continuous modes under solar irradiation at similar experimental conditions. The maximum of 89.7% conversion was achieved in the continuous mode. The length of the pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was arrived using the design parameters such as volumetric flow rate (Q) (11 x 10(-2) m3/s), inlet concentration of sulphide ion (C(in)) (28 mol/m3), conversion (89.7%) and average mass flow destruction rate (3.488 x 10(-6) mol/m2 s). The treatment cost of the process was estimated to be 6 US$/m3. This process would be suitable for India like sub-tropical country where sunlight is abundantly available throughout the year.

  10. Conversion of activated-sludge reactors to microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment coupled to electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Tomoya; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater can be treated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the aid of microbes that oxidize organic compounds using anodes as electron acceptors. Previous studies have suggested the utility of cassette-electrode (CE) MFCs for wastewater treatment, in which rice paddy-field soil was used as the inoculum. The present study attempted to convert an activated-sludge (AS) reactor to CE-MFC and use aerobic sludge in the tank as the source of microbes. We used laboratory-scale (1 L in capacity) reactors that were initially operated in an AS mode to treat synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and detergents. After the organics removal became stable, the aeration was terminated, and CEs were inserted to initiate an MFC-mode operation. It was demonstrated that the MFC-mode operation treated the wastewater at similar efficiencies to those observed in the AS-mode operation with COD-removal efficiencies of 75-80%, maximum power densities of 150-200 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiencies of 20-30%. These values were similar to those of CE-MFC inoculated with the soil. Anode microbial communities were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Comparative analyses revealed that anode communities enriched from the aerobic sludge were largely different from those from the soil, suggesting that similar reactor performances can be supported by different community structures. The study demonstrates that it is possible to construct wastewater-treatment MFCs by inserting CEs into water-treatment tanks.

  11. Research at the CEA in the field of safety in 2nd and 3rd generation light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    The research programs at the CEA in the field of safety in nuclear reactors are carried out in a framework of international partnerships. Their purpose is to develop studies on: The methods allowing for the determination of earthquake hazards and their consequences; The behaviour of fuel in an accident situation; The comprehension of deflagration and detonation phenomena of hydrogen and the search for effective prevention methods involving an explosion risk; The cooling of corium in order to stop its progression in and outside the vessel thereby reducing the risk of perforating the basemat; The behaviour of the different fission product families according to their volatility for the UO2 and MOX fuels.

  12. Numerical analysis on dynamic process of underwater hydrogen generation reactor%水下制氢反应室动态过程数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张方方; 张振山; 王晋忠

    2015-01-01

    To study the dynamic characteristics of hydrogen generation reactor,the reaction conversion rate of alloy and water was calculated by chemical reaction dynamic and kinematic analysis of reaction drip,and the mass variation of each substance in reactor was described by the law of mass conservation based on whose molar value was got by the minimum Gibbs free energy method.Based on the law of conservation of energy and a nonlinear moving-boundary model of helical tube,the dynamic process model of this reactor was established.The dynamic process simulation of an underwater hydrogen generation reactor was realized by using the calculation program based on the dynamic model.Results show that the simulation curves can reflect the variation law of parameters during the dynamic process,which proves the validation of the modeling and simulation.The reaction conversion rate determines the variation law of mass and the characteristics of releasing energy in reactor.The established model can be used as the basic foundation for performance analysis and control study of underwater hydrogen generation reactor.%为研究水下制氢反应室的动态过程规律,基于化学反应动力学和单液滴运动学得到合金/水反应转化率,并在最小自由能法计算得到生成物各组分摩尔数的基础上利用质量守恒方程得到室内各物质质量变化规律。在建立非线性移动边界螺旋管动态模型的前提下,利用能量守恒方程得到室内热力参数变化规律,进而完成制氢反应室动态过程详尽模型的建立。利用该模型编写计算程序,完成某水下制氢反应室动态过程仿真。结果表明,各仿真曲线较好地反映了对应参数的动态变化规律,验证了模型建立与仿真的正确性;合金/水反应转化率决定了反应室的物质质量变化规律及其能量释放特性。该模型可以作为制氢反应室动态特性分析及其过程控制研究的基础模型。

  13. Superiority of second over first generation chemotherapy in a randomized trial for stage III-IV intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): the 1980-1985 EORTC trial. The EORTC Lymphoma Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carde, P; Meerwaldt, J H; van Glabbeke, M; Somers, R; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; de Wolf-Peeters, C; de Pauw, B; Tanguy, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C

    1991-06-01

    A first-generation CHOP-like cyclic combination chemotherapy (CT) regimen using cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 IV d1, hydroxorubicin (doxorubicin) 50 mg/m2 IV d1, VM26 60 mg/m2 IV d1, and prednisone 40 mg/m2 PO d1-5 (CHVmP) was compared to a second-generation combination wherein vincristine 1.4 mg/m2 IV and bleomycin 6 mg/m2 IM/IV were added at mid-interval (d15) to the former drugs (CHVmP + VB) in the treatment of intermediate- and high-grade malignant NHL. From April 1980 to January 1986, 141 eligible patients with stage III-IV unfavorable histologies (except T lymphoblastic NHL) entered this EORTC randomized trial. In both arms adjuvant radiotherapy (30 Gy) was given in instances of bulky or residual disease. In all patient subsets the outcome favored the second-generation regimen. The difference was even greater in patients with Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL). At 5 years, overall survival was 53% with CHVmP + VB versus 29% (p = 0.002). The advantage was due to a higher complete remission (CR) rate (80% versus 50%, p = 0.01). Indeed, once CR was achieved the relapse-free survival (RFS) was not significantly influenced (59% versus 49%). No significant additional toxicity could be attributed to vincristine and bleomycin. This study demonstrates a clear benefit for intermediate- and high-risk malignant NHL and particularly DLCL from intercalating non-myelotoxic drugs at mid-cycle intervals, without adverse effects.

  14. Severe Accidents and New Reactors. Twenty Years of Research; Accidents severos y nuevos reactores. Veinte anos de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    2008-07-01

    A review was done on the main activities performed by the Programme for Nuclear Safety of CIEMAT in the field of nuclear reactor safety from 1985 to 2005. It covers the areas of severe accident and source term, advanced and passive reactors, containments analyses and plant applications. It is emphasized CIEMATs participation in national and international projects mainly in those supported by CSN, OECD and the EU. At the same time, experimental and analytical capabilities set up at CIEMAT, as PECA, RECA and GIRS for simulating aerosol pool scrubbing phenomena, hydrogen catalytic recombiner and sprays are been presented, together with an Annex on Generation IV. Two chapters were added, one on the nuclear power reactors in the world and another about the safety systems and principles. (Author)

  15. Analysis and selection of high pressure heaters design for a new generation of NPP with BN-1200 reactor plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Trifonov, N. N.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Esin, S. B.; Svyatkin, F. A.; Nikolaenkova, E. K.; Prikhod'ko, P. Yu.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    In the development of advanced high-power steam-turbine plants (STP), special attention is placed on the design of reliable and economical high-pressure heater (HPH) capable to maintain the specified thermal hydraulic performance during the entire service life. Comparative analysis of the known designs of HPH, such as the spiral-collector HPH, the collector-coiled HPH, the collector-platen HPH, modular HPH, and the chamber HPH, was carried out. The advantages and disadvantages of each design were pointed. For better comparison, the heaters are separated into two groups—horizontal and vertical ones. The weight and dimension characteristics, the materials and features of the basic elements, and operating features of variety HPH are presented. At operating the spiral-collector HPH used in the majority of regenerative schemes of high-pressure STP of thermal and nuclear power plants, the disadvantages reducing the economy and reliability of their operation were revealed. The recommendations directed to the reliability growth of HPH, the decrease of subcooling the feed water, the increase of compactness are stated. Some of these were developed by the specialists of OAO NPO TsKTI and are successfully implemented on the thermal power plants and nuclear power plants. Technical solutions to reduce the cost of regeneration system and the weight of chamber HPH, reduce the thickness of the tube plate of HPH, and reliability assurance of the cooler of steam and condensate built in the HPH casing under all operating conditions were proposed. Three types of feed water chambers for vertical and horizontal chamber HPH are considered in detail, the constructive solutions that have been implemented in HPH of the regeneration system of turbines of 1000 and 1200 MW capacity with water-moderated water-cooled power reactor (WMWCPR) are described. The optimal design of HPH for the regeneration system of high-pressure turbine plant with BN-1200 reactor was selected.

  16. Co3O4-based honeycombs as compact redox reactors/heat exchangers for thermochemical storage in the next generation CSP plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagkoura, Chrysoula; Karagiannakis, George; Halevas, Eleftherios; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2016-05-01

    Over the last years, several research groups have focused on developing efficient thermochemical heat storage (THS) systems, in-principle capable of being coupled with next generation high temperature Concentrated Solar Power plants. Among systems studied, the Co3O4/CoO redox system is a promising candidate. Currently, research efforts extend beyond basic level identification of promising materials to more application-oriented approaches aiming at validation of THS performance at pilot scale reactors. The present work focuses on the investigation of cobalt oxide based honeycomb structures as candidate reactors/heat exchangers to be employed for such purposes. In the evaluation conducted and presented here, cobalt oxide-based structures with different composition and geometrical characteristics were subjected to redox cycles in the temperature window between 800 and 1000°C under air flow. Basic aspects related to redox performance of each system are briefly discussed but the main focus lies on the evaluation of the segments structural stability after multi-cyclic operation. The latter is based on macroscopic visual observation and also supplemented by pre- (i.e. fresh samples) and post-characterization (i.e. after long term exposure) of extruded honeycombs via combined mercury porosimetry and SEM analysis.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of in situ generation of ammonia from urea in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning of thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, J.N.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-03-15

    Ammonia has long been known to be useful in the treatment of flue/tail/stack gases from industrial furnaces, incinerators, and electric power generation industries. In this study, urea hydrolysis for production of ammonia, in different application areas that require safe use of ammonia at in situ condition, was investigated in a batch reactor. The equilibrium and kinetic study of urea hydrolysis was done in a batch reactor at reaction pressure to investigate the effect of reaction temperature, initial feed concentration, and time on ammonia production. This study reveals that conversion increases exponentially with an increase in temperature but with increases in initial feed concentration of urea the conversion decreases marginally. Further, the effect of time on conversion has also been studied; it was found that conversion increases with increase in time. Using collision theory, the temperature dependency of forward rate constant developed from which activation energy of the reaction and the frequency factor has been calculated. The activation energy and frequency factor of urea hydrolysis reaction at atmospheric pressure was found to be 73.6 kJ/mol and 2.89 x 10{sup 7} min{sup -1}, respectively.

  18. The reprocessing of reactor core materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing, E-mail: wang-jing@nuaa.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanial Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Liu, Bing; Shao, Youlin; Lu, Zhenming; Liu, Malin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Generation IV high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) are preferentially fueled by spherical fuel elements, which are composed of a fuel zone of triso-coated uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) particles and a matrix graphite layer. Unqualified coated particles and spherical fuel elements unavoidablely occur during the processing of coating UO{sub 2} kernels and embedding the coated particles into the graphite matrix. So it is necessary to reprocess the UO{sub 2} in the unqualified coated particles and spherical fuel elements to maximize the use of the reactor core materials. In this work, we present several methods to: (1) separate the coated particles from the graphite matrix and, (2) expose and recover the UO{sub 2} kernels from the coated particles. The comparison of different methods shows that the thermal oxidation of graphite by a fixed bed burner and the jet grinding of the unqualified coated particles are prosing in practice for the separation of coated particles from the graphite matrix and recovering the uranium dioxide kernels, respectively. Some other methods, such as etching the SiC layer with the active fluorine species in plasma generated by the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) under the atmosphere also show their great potential values in the reprocessing of reactor core materials, especially for the activated and contaminated fuels.

  19. Enhanced electricity generation by triclosan and iron anodes in the three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin; Ren, Nanqi; Crittenden, John

    2013-11-01

    A three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR) was developed. The stainless steel membrane modules were used as cathodes and iron plates in the middle chamber served as the anode. The TC-MBCR was able to reduce fouling, remove triclosan (TCS) from a synthetic wastewater treatment and enhance electricity generation by ~60% compared with the cell voltage before TCS addition. The TC-MBCR system generated a relatively stable power output (cell voltage ~0.2V) and the corrosion of iron plates contributed to electricity generation together with microbes on iron anode. The permeation flow from anode to cathode chamber was considered important in electricity generation. In addition, the negatively charged cathode membrane and Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) released by iron plates mitigated membrane fouling by approximately 30%, as compared with the control. The removal of COD and total phosphorus was approximately 99% and 90%. The highest triclosan removal rate reached 97.9%. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  1. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  2. First remarks on the initiative of conception and evaluation of the safety of the reactors of the fourth generation; Premieres reflexions sur la demarche de conception et d'evaluation de la surete des reacteurs de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Ch.; Maliverney, B.; Mulet-Marquis, D.; Sauvage, J.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Guesdon, B. [Technical Secretary (France); Carluec, B.; Ehster, S. [AREVA NP, 92 - Paris la Defense (France); Greneche, D. [AREVA NC, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); Anzieu, P. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Fiorini, G.L. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Rozenholc, M.; Vitton, F.; Rouyer, J.L

    2007-09-15

    The objectives of the nuclear systems of the fourth generation impose ambitious requirements which concern the sustainable development, the competitiveness, the safety, the reliability, the resistance to proliferation and the physical protection. The examination of the policies of safety applicable to these systems is led at the same moment to the national and international levels. In France, thoughts on the safety is organized within the French consultative group of safety (G.C.F.S.) which collects the industrial actors and of research and development involved in the development of the new systems. Within the framework of the initiatives of international harmonization, the G.C.F.S. suggests defining recommendations common to all the concepts of the fourth generation reactors then on the basis of this neutral frame towards the technologies, establishing specific recommendations for each of the systems. (N.C.)

  3. Development of a multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    A multiphysics analysis system for sodium-water reaction phenomena in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors was newly developed. The analysis system consists of the mechanistic numerical analysis codes, SERAPHIM, TACT, and RELAP5. The SERAPHIM code calculates the multicomponent multiphase flow and sodium-water chemical reaction caused by discharging of pressurized water vapor. Applicability of the SERAPHIM code was confirmed through the analyses of the experiment on water vapor discharging in liquid sodium. The TACT code was developed to calculate heat transfer from the reacting jet to the adjacent tube and to predict the tube failure occurrence. The numerical models integrated into the TACT code were verified through some related experiments. The RELAP5 code evaluates thermal hydraulic behavior of water inside the tube. The original heat transfer correlations were corrected for the tube rapidly heated by the reacting jet. The developed system enables evaluation of the wastage environment and the possibility of the failure propagation.

  4. Potential for low fracture toughness and lamellar tearing on PWR steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. Resolution of generic technical activity A-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snaider, R.P.; Hodge, J.M.; Levin, H.A.; Zudans, J.J.

    1979-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its contractor, Sandia Laboratories, in the resolution of Generic Technical Activity A-12, ''Potential for Low Fracture Toughness and Lamellar Tearing in PWR Steam Generator and Reactor Coolant Pump Supports.'' The report describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia Laboratories, the NRC staff's technical positions based on these studies, and the staff's plan for implementing its technical positions. It also provides recommendations for further work. The complete technical input from Sandia Laboratories is appended to the report.

  5. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  6. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  7. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  8. Procedure of calculation of the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes in the steam generator of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, A. A.; Sedov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    A method for combined 3D/1D-modeling of thermohydraulics of a once-through steam generator (SG) based on the joint analysis of three-dimensional thermo- and hydrodynamics of a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and one-dimensional thermohydraulics of steam-generating channels (tubes) with the use of well-known friction and heat-transfer correlations under various boiling conditions is discussed. This method allows one to determine the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes of heat-exchange surfaces of SGs with a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and with steam generation within tubes. The method was applied in the analytical investigation of typical operation of a once-through SG of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron heavy-metal reactor that is being designed by Kurchatov Institute in collaboration with OKB GIDROPRESS and Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. Flow pattern and temperature fields were obtained for the heavy-metal heating coolant in the intertube space. Nonuniformities of heating of the steam-water coolant in different heat-exchange tubes and nonuniformities in the distribution of heat fluxes at SG heat-exchange surfaces were revealed.

  9. Steam generator collector integrity of WWER-1000 reactors. IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.; Strupczewski, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    At the Consultants` Meeting on `The Safety of WWER-1000 Model 320 Nuclear Power Plants` organized by the IAEA within the framework of its Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER-1000 NPPs, which was held in Vienna, 1-5 June 1992, the problem of WWER-1000 steam generator integrity was identified as an important issue of safety concern. Considering the safety importance of this issue, a Consultants` Meeting on `The Steam Generator Integrity of WWER-1000 Nuclear Power Plants` was convened in Vienna in May 1993, attended by 15 international experts in the area to compile information on the steam generator operating experience, deficiencies and corrective measures implemented and planned. In order to also include information from the main designer OKB Gidropress and to finalize the meeting report the IAEA convened a second meeting on the issue on 23-27 November 1993. The present paper summarizes the information and conclusions from those meetings.

  10. Design and manufacture of a D-shape coil-based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2nd generation HTS wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yoon-Su; Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The authors designed and fabricated a D-shape coil based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. • The toroid-type magnet consisted of 30 D-shape double pancake coil (DDC)s. The total length of the wire was 2.32 km. • The conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. • The maximum cooling temperature of reactor magnet is 5.5 K. • The inductance was 408 mH in the steady-state condition (300 A operating). - Abstract: This paper describes the design specifications and performance of a real toroid-type high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The target inductance of the HTS DC reactor was 400 mH. The expected operating temperature was under 20 K. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. Performances of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor were analyzed through experiments conducted under the steady-state and charge conditions. The fundamental design specifications and the data obtained from this research will be applied to the design of a commercial-type HTS DC reactor.

  11. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Bong Kim; Thierry Lasserre; Yifang Wang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  12. BOILING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  13. Future Reactor Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measure...

  14. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  15. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Future Scenarios for Fission Based Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S.

    2005-04-01

    The coming century will see the exhaustion of standard fossil fuels, coal, gas and oil, which today represent 75% of the world energy production. Moreover, their use will have caused large-scale emission of greenhouse gases (GEG), and induced global climate change. This problem is exacerbated by a growing world energy demand. In this context, nuclear power is the only GEG-free energy source available today capable of responding significantly to this demand. Some scenarios consider a nuclear energy production of around 5 Gtoe in 2050, wich would represent a 20% share of the world energy supply. Present reactors generate energy from the fission of U-235 and require around 200 tons of natural Uranium to produce 1GWe.y of energy, equivalent to the fission of one ton of fissile material. In a scenario of a significant increase in nuclear energy generation, these standard reactors will consume the whole of the world's estimated Uranium reserves in a few decades. However, natural Uranium or Thorium ore, wich are not themselves fissile, can produce a fissile material after a neutron capture ( 239Pu and 233U respectively). In a breeder reactor, the mass of fissile material remains constant, and the fertile ore is the only material to be consumed. In this case, only 1 ton of natural ore is needed to produce 1GWe.y. Thus, the breeding concept allows optimal use of fertile ore and development of sustainable nuclear energy production for several thousand years into the future. Different sustainable nuclear reactor concepts are studied in the international forum "generation IV". Different types of coolant (Na, Pb and He) are studied for fast breeder reactors based on the Uranium cycle. The thermal Thorium cycle requires the use of a liquid fuel, which can be reprocessed online in order to extract the neutron poisons. This paper presents these different sustainable reactors, based on the Uranium or Thorium fuel cycles and will compare the different options in term of fissile

  17. Thermolysis of Half-Sandwich Vanadium(V) Imido Complexes to Generate Vanadium(III) Imido Species via a Vanadium(IV) Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batinas, Aurora A.; Dam, Jeroen; Meetsma, Auke; Hessen, Bart; Bouwkamp, Marco W.

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of half-sandwich vanadium imido complexes Cp(RN)V(i-Pr(2)N)Me (R = p-Tol, 1a; R = t-Bu, 1b) results in a mixture of products, including vanadium(IV) dimers [CpVMe](2)(mu-RN)(2), i-Pr(2)NH, i-PrNCMe(2), CH(4), and one or more paramagnetic species. In the presence of dmpe (dmpe =

  18. Copper removal from an effluent generated by a plastics chromium-plating industry using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, F F; González, I; Nava, J L

    2008-08-01

    This work shows the application of a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) in the removal of Cu(II) content from an effluent generated by a plastics chromium-plating industry, on the laboratory scale; in particular, it deals with rinse water from the electrolytic copper process. This process was designed to convert cupric ions in solution to metal powder. The generation of metal powders in the RCE was achieved at Reynolds numbers between 52925 and 83183 and limiting current densities (J(L)) in the range of 17 to 25 mA cm(-2). The removal of Cu(II) (initially 922 ppm) reached 43 ppm in 10 minutes of electrolysis for Re = 83183 and J = 25 mA cm(-2), with a space-time yield of 88 mg Cu(II) L(-1) min(-1), 95% current efficiency, and energy consumption of 5.3 KWh m(-3). The electrochemical treatment applied to waste rinse water at the RCE allows this treated water to be recycled back to the same rinsing process, avoiding additional consumption and discharge of this liquid.

  19. Economic aspects of electricity and industrial heat generating reactors; Aspect economique des reacteurs produisant de l'electricite et de la chaleur industrielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaussens, J.; Moulle, N.; Dutheil, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Aldebert, J. [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN), CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1964-07-01

    The economic advantage of electricity-generating nuclear stations decreases when their size decreases. However, when a counter-pressure turbine is joined on to a reactor and the residual heat can be properly used, it can be shown that fairly low capacity nuclear equipment may compete with conventional equipment under certain realistic enough conditions. The aim of this paper is to define these special conditions under which nuclear energy can be profitable. They are connected with the location and the general economic environment of the station, the pattern of the electricity and heat demands it must meet, the level of fuel and specific capital costs, nuclear and conventional. These conditions entail certain technical and economic specifications for the reactors used in this way otherwise they are unlikely to be competitive. In addition, these results are referred to the potential steam and electricity market, which leads us to examine certain uses for the heat generated by double purpose power stations; for example, to supply combined industrial plants, various types of town heating and for removal of salt from sea water. (authors) [French] L'interet economique de centrales nucleaires productrices d'electricite decroit lorsque la puissance decroit. Cependant, lorsqu'on associe une turbine a contrepression a un reacteur et qu'il est possible d'utiliser dans de bonnes conditions la chaleur residuelle, on peut montrer que dans certaines conditions assez realistes, des equipements nucleaires d'une puissance unitaire peu elevee peuvent etre competitifs avec des equipements conventionnels. Cette communication a donc pour but de mettre en evidence quelles sont ces conditions particulieres de rentabilite de l'energie nucleaire. Elles sont liees a la localisation de la centrale et a son contexte economique general, a la structure de la demande d'energie electrique et thermique a laquelle elle doit satisfaire, au niveau des couts des

  20. Simulation tools and new developments of the molten salt fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Doligez, X.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Ghetta, V. [LPSC-IN2P3-CNRS / UJF / Grenoble INP, 53 avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    Starting from the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor project of Oak-Ridge, we have performed parametric studies in terms of safety coefficients, reprocessing requirements and breeding capabilities. In the frame of this major re-evaluation of the molten salt reactor (MSR), we have developed a new concept called Molten Salt Fast Reactor or MSFR, based on the Thorium fuel cycle and a fast neutron spectrum. This concept has been selected for further studies by the MSR steering committee of the Generation IV International Forum in 2009. Our reactor's studies of the MSFR concept rely on numerical simulations making use of the MCNP neutron transport code coupled with a code for materials evolution which resolves the Bateman's equations giving the population of each nucleus inside each part of the reactor at each moment. Because of MSR's fundamental characteristics compared to classical solid-fuelled reactors, the classical Bateman equations have to be modified by adding two terms representing the reprocessing capacities and the fertile or fissile alimentation. We have thus coupled neutronic and reprocessing simulation codes in a numerical tool used to calculate the extraction efficiencies of fission products, their location in the whole system (reactor and reprocessing unit) and radioprotection issues. (authors)

  1. Design and R&D Progress of China Lead-Based Reactor for ADS Research Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yican Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, the Chinese Academy of Sciences launched an engineering project to develop an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS for nuclear waste transmutation. The China Lead-based Reactor (CLEAR, proposed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, was selected as the reference reactor for ADS development, as well as for the technology development of the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor. The conceptual design of CLEAR-I with 10 MW thermal power has been completed. KYLIN series lead-bismuth eutectic experimental loops have been constructed to investigate the technologies of the coolant, key components, structural materials, fuel assembly, operation, and control. In order to validate and test the key components and integrated operating technology of the lead-based reactor, the lead alloy-cooled non-nuclear reactor CLEAR-S, the lead-based zero-power nuclear reactor CLEAR-0, and the lead-based virtual reactor CLEAR-V are under realization.

  2. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil; Reator nuclear rapido de altissima temperatura para producao de hidrogenio no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Ono, Shizuca; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados]. E-mail: jamil@ieav.cta.br

    2008-07-01

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, {approx} 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  3. Hydrogen Production in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M; Uenosono, C.

    1993-01-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated.

  4. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevacova, K.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V.; Poirier, J.

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U x, Zr y)O 2-z water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO 2, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO 2-Al 2O 3 below 2000 °C but does not resist to a UO 2-Eu 2O 3 mixture.

  5. Liquid metal reactor KALIMER development - Study on the high temperature properties of the steam generator tubing for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae; Park, Hui Sang; Kim, Soo Han [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    This work dealt with the evaluation of super stainless steels for steam generator tubing of LMFBR. The experimental alloys were designed to simulate the elimination of alloying elements, in special, C and N. Regardless of carbon contents, super stainless steels showed the excellent properties (tensile properties and corrosion resistance) than those of 9Cr-1Mo steel. Nitrogen content has affected positively the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength by TT(Thermal Treatment), but the elongation was reduced by TT in case of nitrogen free alloy and the elongation was largely increased by TT in case of nitrogen bearing alloys. In acidic chloride environment, nitrogen has influenced a little on corrosion potential and critical current density, but largely on passive current density, especially, at high potential. However, the trend of corrosion potential and critical current density by nitrogen was similar to the results in acidic solutions, but passive current density was largely affected by nitrogen content of stainless steels. 29 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  6. Optimized hydrogen generation in a semicontinuous sodium borohydride hydrolysis reactor for a 60 W-scale fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzac, G. M.; Fernández, A.; Justo, A.; Sarmiento, B.; Jiménez, M. A.; Jiménez, M. M.

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (SBH) is a promising method for the hydrogen supply of fuel cells. In this study a system for controlled production of hydrogen from aqueous sodium borohydride (SBH) solutions has been designed and built. This simple and low cost system operates under controlled addition of stabilized SBH solutions (fuel solutions) to a supported CoB catalyst. The system works at constant temperature delivering hydrogen at 1 L min -1 constant rate to match a 60-W polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). For optimization of the system, several experimental conditions were changed and their effect was investigated. A simple model based only on thermodynamic considerations was proposed to optimize system parameters at constant temperature and hydrogen evolution rate. It was found that, for a given SBH concentration, the use of the adequate fuel addition rate can maximize the total conversion and therefore the gravimetric storage capacity. The hydrogen storage capacity was as high as 3.5 wt% for 19 wt% SBH solution at 90% fuel conversion and an operation temperature of 60 °C. It has been demonstrated that these optimized values can also be achieved for a wide range of hydrogen generation rates. Studies on the durability of the catalyst showed that a regeneration step is needed to restore the catalytic activity before reusing.

  7. Generation of Renewable Power from Biodegradation of Anthracene in a Microbial Fuel Cell Reactor Using Different Bacterial Inocula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N.Z. Alshehri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are increasingly attracting attention as a sustainable technology as they convert chemical energy in organic pollutants to renewable electricity. Anthracene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH that presents a high pollution and health risk. In this study, anthracene degradation with electricity production in Single – chamber air cathode MFC was investigated with respect to values of its biodegradation and MFC performance using different inocula combinations (Anaerobic sludge (AS, Pseudomonas putida (PP, Geobacter sulfurreducens (GS, Shewanella putrefaciens(SP, mixed cultures, and combinations thereof. All the inocula showed high potentials for anthracene degradation efficiency and power density, ranged 41 – 98 % within 120 – 216h and 110.08 – 156.06 mW/m2, respectively. The best overall performing inoculum was anaerobic sludge supplemented with P. putida (AS+PP, having a degradation rate, degradation efficiency, COD removal, maximum power density and coulombic efficiency of 38 μM/d, 98 %, 83 %, 156.06 mW/m2 and 21, respectively. Effect of initial anthracene concentration was also investigated. Results indicated that increasing of initial anthracene concentration to 40 mg/L has a positive effect on both the anthracene degradation rate and the power density by 79 and 83.93 %, respectively, which attained by the best inoculum AS+PP (degradation rate of 41 μM/d and a maximum power density of 287.04 mW/m2.This study highlights the possibility of using MFCs technology to generate renewable electricity and achieve high degradation rates of anthracene simultaneously, through co-metabolism.

  8. Automated scoping methodology for liquid metal natural circulation small reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung M.; Suh, Kune Y., E-mail: kysuh@snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Automated scoping methodology for natural circulation small modular reactor is developed. • In-house code is developed to carry out system analysis and core geometry generation during scoping. • Adjustment relations are obtained to correct the critical core geometry out of diffusion theory. • Optimized design specification is found using objective function value. • Convex hull volume is utilized to quantify the impact of different constraints on the scope range. - Abstract: A novel scoping method is proposed that can automatically generate design variable range of the natural circulation driven liquid metal cooled small reactor. From performance requirements based upon Generation IV system roadmap, appropriate structure materials are selected and engineering constraints are compiled based upon literature. Utilizing ASME codes and standards, appropriate geometric sizing criteria on constituting components are developed to ensure integrity of the system during its lifetime. In-house one dimensional thermo-hydraulic system analysis code is developed based upon momentum integral model and finite element methods to deal with non-uniform descritization of temperature nodes for convection and thermal diffusion equation of liquid metal coolant. In order to quickly generate critical core dimensions out of given unit cell information, an adjustment relation that relates the critical geometry estimated from one-group diffusion and that from MCNP code is constructed and utilized throughout the process. For the selected unit cell dimension ranges, burnup calculations are carried out to check the cores can generate energy over the reactor lifetime. Utilizing random method, sizing criteria, and in-house analysis codes, an automated scoping methodology is developed. The methodology is applied to nitride fueled integral type lead cooled natural circulation reactor concept to generate design scopes which satisfies given constraints. Three dimensional convex

  9. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  10. Bulky N(,N)-(di)alkylethane-1,2-diamineplatinum(II) compounds as precursors for generating unsymmetrically substituted platinum(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Verena; Göschl, Simone; Meier, Samuel M; Roller, Alexander; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2013-07-15

    Investigations of the influence of bulky groups in the equatorial ligand sphere of platinum(IV) compounds on the complexes' stability and reaction pattern were performed. Four dihydroxidoplatinum(IV) complexes were reacted with anhydrides, cinnamoyl chloride, and n-propyl isocyanate and yielded the symmetric dicarboxylated products or, if steric hindrance was observed, unsymmetrically substituted monocarboxylated analogues. With the aim of raising the steric demand, the following ligands were chosen: N-cyclohexylethane-1,2-diamine, N,N-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine, N,N-diethylethane-1,2-diamine, and N,N-diisopropylethane-1,2-diamine. All of the novel complexes were characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and reversed-phase HPLC; complexes B3, C3, C6, and D4 were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the cytotoxicities of 10 compounds toward the cisplatin-sensitive cell line CH1 and the intrinsically cisplatin-resistant cell lines A549 and SW480 were investigated, and IC50 values down to the nanomolar range were found. To aid in the interpretation of structure-activity relationships, log k(w) values as a measure for the lipophilicity were determined for all of the new complexes, and the rates of reduction of C1, C3, and C4 relative to satraplatin were determined by means of NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS.

  11. Site-Specific, Covalent Immobilization of Dehalogenase ST2570 Catalyzed by Formylglycine-Generating Enzymes and Its Application in Batch and Semi-Continuous Flow Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formylglycine-generating enzymes can selectively recognize and oxidize cysteine residues within the sulfatase sub motif at the terminus of proteins to form aldehyde-bearing formylglycine (FGly residues, and are normally used in protein labeling. In this study, an aldehyde tag was introduced to proteins using formylglycine-generating enzymes encoded by a reconstructed set of the pET28a plasmid system for enzyme immobilization. The haloacid dehalogenase ST2570 from Sulfolobus tokodaii was used as a model enzyme. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 (ST2570CQ exhibited significant enzymological properties, such as new free aldehyde groups, a high level of protein expression and improved enzyme activity. SBA-15 has widely been used as an immobilization support for its large surface and excellent thermal and chemical stability. It was functionalized with amino groups by aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 was immobilized to SBA-15 by covalent binding. The site-specific immobilization of ST2570 avoided the chemical denaturation that occurs in general covalent immobilization and resulted in better fastening compared to physical adsorption. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 showed 3-fold higher thermal stability, 1.2-fold higher catalytic ability and improved operational stability than free ST2570. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 retained 60% of its original activity after seven cycles of batch operation, and it was superior to the ST2570 immobilized to SBA-15 by physical adsorption, which loses 40% of its original activity when used for the second time. It is remarkable that the site-specific immobilized ST2570 still retained 100% of its original activity after 10 cycles of reuse in the semi-continuous flow reactor. Overall, these results provide support for the industrial-scale production and application of site-specific, covalently immobilized ST2570.

  12. Roles of individual radicals generated by a submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor during Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Saiful Islam [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Ji, E-mail: yunji@kfri.re.kr [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD) has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150). Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml). E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES) shows that OH and NO (α, β) radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA) OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml) than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β) radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.

  13. Prediction and modeling of the two-dimensional separation characteristic of a steam generator at a nuclear power station with VVER-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchevsky, V. M.; Guryanova, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    A computational and experimental procedure for construction of the two-dimensional separation curve (TDSC) for a horizontal steam generator (SG) at a nuclear power station (NPS) with VVER-reactors. In contrast to the conventional one-dimensional curve describing the wetness of saturated steam generated in SG as a function of the boiler water level at one, usually rated, load, TDSC is a function of two variables, which are the level and the load of SGB that enables TDSC to be used for wetness control in a wide load range. The procedure is based on two types of experimental data obtained during rated load operation: the nonuniformity factor of the steam load at the outlet from the submerged perforated sheet (SPS) and the dependence of the mass water level in the vicinity of the "hot" header on the water level the "cold" end of SG. The TDSC prediction procedure is presented in the form of an algorithm using SG characteristics, such as steam load and water level as the input and giving the calculated steam wetness at the output. The zoneby-zone calculation method is used. The result is presented in an analytical form (as an empirical correlation) suitable for uploading into controllers or other controls. The predicted TDSC can be used during real-time operation for implementation of different wetness control scenarios (for example, if the effectiveness is a priority, then the minimum water level, minimum wetness, and maximum turbine efficiency should be maintained; if safety is a priority, then the maximum level at the allowable wetness and the maximum water inventory should be kept), for operation of NPS in controlling the frequency and power in a power system, at the design phase (as a part of the simulation complex for verification of design solutions), during construction and erection (in developing software for personnel training simulators), during commissioning tests (to reduce the duration and labor-intensity of experimental activities), and for training.

  14. Roles of individual radicals generated by a submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor during Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Islam Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150. Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml. E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES shows that OH and NO (α, β radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.

  15. Treatment of industrial effluents by electrochemical generation of H2O2 using an RVC cathode in a parallel plate reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Yaneth A; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús Gabriel; Rojas-Valencia, Ma Neftalí; Bandala, Erick R; Álvarez-Gallegos, Alberto; Vargas-Estrada, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques have been used for the discolouration of synthetic textile industrial wastewater by Fenton's process using a parallel plate reactor with a reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) cathode. It has been shown that RVC is capable of electro-generating and activating H2O2 in the presence of Fe(2+) added as catalyst and using a stainless steel mesh as anode material. A catholyte comprising 0.05 M Na2SO4, 0.001 M FeSO4.7H2O, 0.01 M H2SO4 and fed with oxygen was used to activate H2O2.The anolyte contained only 0.8 M H2SO4. The operating experimental conditions were 170 mA (2.0 V dyes, Blue Basic 9 (BB9), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Acid Orange 7 (AO7), were evaluated for discolouration using the electro-assisted Fenton reaction. Water discolouration was measured by UV-VIS absorbance reduction. Dye removal by electrolysis was a function of time: 90% discolouration of 0.08, 0.04 and 0.02 mM BB9 was obtained at 14, 10 and 6 min, respectively. In the same way, 90% discolouration of 0.063, 0.031 and 0.016 mM RB5 was achieved at 90, 60 and 30 min, respectively. Finally, 90% discolouration of 0.14, 0.07 and 0.035 mM AO7 was achieved at 70, 40 and 20 min, respectively. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of electro-assisted Fenton reaction as a strong oxidizing process in water discolouration and the ability of RVC cathode to electro-generate and activate H2O2 in situ.

  16. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Research and Development in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stainsby

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR research is directed towards fulfilling the ambitious goals of Generation IV (Gen IV, that is, to develop a safe, sustainable, reliable, proliferation-resistant and economic nuclear energy system. The research is directed towards developing the GFR as an economic electricity generator, with good safety and sustainability characteristics. Fast reactors maximise the usefulness of uranium resources by breeding plutonium and can contribute to minimising both the quantity and radiotoxicity nuclear waste by actinide transmutation in a closed fuel cycle. Transmutation is particularly effective in the GFR core owing to its inherently hard neutron spectrum. Further, GFR is suitable for hydrogen production and process heat applications through its high core outlet temperature. As such GFR can inherit the non-electricity applications that will be developed for thermal high temperature reactors in a sustainable manner. The Euratom organisation provides a route by which researchers in all European states, and other non-European affiliates, can contribute to the Gen IV GFR system. This paper summarises the achievements of Euratom's research into the GFR system, starting with the 5th Framework programme (FP5 GCFR project in 2000, through FP6 (2005 to 2009 and looking ahead to the proposed activities within the 7th Framework Programme (FP7.

  17. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  18. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  19. The recent development of fabrication of ODS ferritic steels for supercritical water-cooled reactors core application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Li, M.; Liao, L.; Liu, X.; He, P.; Xu, Y.; Chen, W.; Ge, C. [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    Development of cladding materials which can work at high temperature is crucial to realize highly efficient and high-burnup operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is one of the most promising cladding materials for advanced nuclear reactors, such as supercritical water-cooled reactor. ODS ferritic steels with Cr content of 12, 14 and 18% were designed and fabricated in China through the mechanical alloying (MA) route. The process parameters were discussed and optimized. Mechanical properties were measured at room temperature and high temperature. (author)

  20. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  1. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...

  2. Test problem for thermal-hydraulics and neutronic coupled calculation fore ALFREAD reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, A.; Darie, G.; Saldikov, I. S.; Smirnov, A. D.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    The beginning of a new era of nuclear reactor requires technological advances and also multiples studies. The European Liquid metal cooled Fast breeder Reactor is one of the designs for the generation IV nuclear reactor, selected by ENEA. A pioneer of its time, ELFR needs a demonstrator in order to prove the feasibility of this project and to acquire more data and experience in operating a LFR. For this reason the ALFRED project was started and it is expected to be under operation by the year 2030. This paper has the objective of analyzing the neutronic and thermohydraulics of the ALFRED core by the means of a coupled scheme. The selected code for neutronic simulation is MCNP and the selected code for thermohydraulics is ANSYS.

  3. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

  4. Sample problems for the novice user of the AMPX-II system. [For generating coupled multigroup neutron--gamma libraries, in FORTRAN IV for IBM 360/91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, W.E. III; Roussin, R.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Diggs, B.R.; Comolander, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    Contents of the IBM version of the APMX system distributed by the Radiation Shielding Information Center (APMX-II) are described. Sample problems which demonstrate the procedure for implementing AMPX-II modules to generate point cross sections; generate multigroup neutron, photon production, and photon interaction cross sections for various transport codes; collapse multigroup cross sections; check, edit, and punch multigroup cross sections; and execute a one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculation are detailed. 25 figures, 9 tables.

  5. Small modular reactor (SMR) development plan in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sangrok; Kim, Byong Sup; Choi, Swongho; Hwang, Il Soon

    2015-04-01

    Since the first nuclear power was engaged in Korean electricity grid in 1978, intensive research and development has been focused on localization and standardization of large pressurized water reactors (PWRs) aiming at providing Korean peninsula and beyond with economical and safe power source. With increased priority placed on the safety since Chernobyl accident, Korean nuclear power R&D activity has been diversified into advanced PWR, small modular PWR and generation IV reactors. After the outbreak of Fukushima accident, inherently safe small modular reactor (SMR) receives growing interest in Korea and Europe. In this paper, we will describe recent status of evolving designs of SMR, their advantages and challenges. In particular, the conceptual design of lead-bismuth cooled SMR in Korea, URANUS with 40˜70 MWe is examined in detail. This paper will cover a framework of the program and a strategy for the successful deployment of small modular reactor how the goals would entail and the approach to collaboration with other entities.

  6. MAIL3.1 : a computer program generating cross section sets for SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Komuro, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Ouchi, Keisuke

    1998-02-01

    This report is a user`s manual of the computer program MAIL3.1 which generates various types of cross section sets for neutron transport programs such as SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0. MAIL3.1 is a revised version of MAIL3.0 that was opened in 1990. It has all of abilities of MAIL3.0 and has two more functions as shown in following. 1. AMPX-type cross section set generating function for KENO V. 2. Enhanced function for user of 16 group Hansen-Roach library. (author)

  7. Synthesis of superior fast charging-discharging nano-LiFePO4/C from nano-FePO4 generated using a confined area impinging jet reactor approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-min; Yan, Pen; Xie, Yin-Yin; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-dong; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2013-06-14

    LiFePO4/C nanocomposites with excellent electrochemical performance is synthesized from nano-FePO4, generated by a novel method using a confined area impinging jet reactor (CIJR). When discharged at 80 C (13.6 Ag(-1)), the LiFePO4/C delivers a discharge capacity of 95 mA h g(-1), an energy density of 227 W h kg(-1) and a power density of 34 kW kg(-1).

  8. Generation of continuous packed bed reactor with PVA-alginate blend immobilized Ochrobactrum sp. DGVK1 cells for effective removal of N,N-dimethylformamide from industrial effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjeev Kumar, S.; Kumar, M. Santosh [Department of Biochemistry, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106, Karnataka (India); Siddavattam, D. [Department of Animal Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Karegoudar, T.B., E-mail: goudartbk@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106, Karnataka (India)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Removal of DMF was compared by free and immobilized cells of Ochrobactrum sp. DGVK1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ochrobactrum sp. DGVK1 cells entrapped in PVA-alginate have shown more tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PVA-alginate beads removed DMF even in the presence of other organic solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Removal of DMF from industrial effluents by PVA-alginate blended batch operations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of industrially feasible remediation strategy for DMF removal. - Abstract: Effective removal of dimethylformamide (DMF), the organic solvent found in industrial effluents of textile and pharma industries, was demonstrated by using free and immobilized cells of Ochrobactrum sp. DGVK1, a soil isolate capable of utilizing DMF as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen. The free cells have efficiently removed DMF from culture media and effluents, only when DMF concentration was less than 1% (v/v). Entrapment of cells either in alginate or in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) failed to increase tolerance limits. However, the cells of Ochrobactrum sp. DGVK1 entrapped in PVA-alginate mixed matrix tolerated higher concentration of DMF (2.5%, v/v) and effectively removed DMF from industrial effluents. As determined through batch fermentation, these immobilized cells have retained viability and degradability for more than 20 cycles. A continuous packed bed reactor, generated by using PVA-alginate beads, efficiently removed DMF from industrial effluents, even in the presence of certain organic solvents frequently found in effluents along with DMF.

  9. Improvement of thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composites for 4. generation nuclear reactors; Amelioration de la conductivite thermique des composites a matrice ceramique pour les reacteurs de 4. generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrero, J.

    2009-11-15

    This study deals with thermal conductivity improvement of SiCf/SiC ceramic matrix composites materials to be used as cladding material in 4. generation nuclear reactor. The purpose of the study is to develop a composite for which both the temperature and irradiation effect is less pronounced on thermal conductivity of material than for SiC. This material will be used as matrix in CMC with SiC fibers. Some TiC-SiC composites with different SiC volume contents were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintering process enables to fabricate specimens very fast, with a very fine microstructure and without any sintering aids. Neutron irradiation has been simulated using heavy ions, at room temperature and at 500 C. Evolution of the thermal properties of irradiated materials is measured using modulated photothermal IR radiometry experiment and was related to structural evolution as function of dose and temperature. It appears that such approach is reliable to evaluate TiC potentiality as matrix in CMC. Finally, CMC with TiC matrix and SiC fibers were fabricated and both mechanical and thermal properties were measured and compare to SiCf/SiC CMC. (author)

  10. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  11. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  12. Reactor vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and comprising connections for supplying (9, 10, 11) and discharging (13, 14, 15) via the channels (3) gases and/or liquids entering into a reaction with each other and substances formed upon this reactio...

  13. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  14. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  15. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  17. Reactor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, Juan M.; López, Carmen; Eibes, Gemma; Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    In this chapter, the engineering aspects of processes catalyzed by peroxidases will be presented. In particular, a discussion of the existing technologies that utilize peroxidases for different purposes, such as the removal of recalcitrant compounds or the synthesis of polymers, is analyzed. In the first section, the essential variables controlling the process will be investigated, not only those that are common in any enzymatic system but also those specific to peroxidative reactions. Next, different reactor configurations and operational modes will be proposed, emphasizing their suitability and unsuitability for different systems. Finally, two specific reactors will be described in detail: enzymatic membrane reactors and biphasic reactors. These configurations are especially valuable for the treatment of xenobiotics with high and poor water solubility, respectively.

  18. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Lasserre, T.; Sobel, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrin...

  19. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) processing speed scores as measures of noncredible responding: The third generation of embedded performance validity indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdodi, Laszlo A; Abeare, Christopher A; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D; Tyson, Bradley T; Kucharski, Brittany; Zuccato, Brandon G; Roth, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that select processing speed measures can also serve as embedded validity indicators (EVIs). The present study examined the diagnostic utility of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests as EVIs in a mixed clinical sample of 205 patients medically referred for neuropsychological assessment (53.3% female, mean age = 45.1). Classification accuracy was calculated against 3 composite measures of performance validity as criterion variables. A PSI ≤79 produced a good combination of sensitivity (.23-.56) and specificity (.92-.98). A Coding scaled score ≤5 resulted in good specificity (.94-1.00), but low and variable sensitivity (.04-.28). A Symbol Search scaled score ≤6 achieved a good balance between sensitivity (.38-.64) and specificity (.88-.93). A Coding-Symbol Search scaled score difference ≥5 produced adequate specificity (.89-.91) but consistently low sensitivity (.08-.12). A 2-tailed cutoff on the Coding/Symbol Search raw score ratio (≤1.41 or ≥3.57) produced acceptable specificity (.87-.93), but low sensitivity (.15-.24). Failing ≥2 of these EVIs produced variable specificity (.81-.93) and sensitivity (.31-.59). Failing ≥3 of these EVIs stabilized specificity (.89-.94) at a small cost to sensitivity (.23-.53). Results suggest that processing speed based EVIs have the potential to provide a cost-effective and expedient method for evaluating the validity of cognitive data. Given their generally low and variable sensitivity, however, they should not be used in isolation to determine the credibility of a given response set. They also produced unacceptably high rates of false positive errors in patients with moderate-to-severe head injury. Combining evidence from multiple EVIs has the potential to improve overall classification accuracy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  1. Characteristics of a different fuel cycle in a PBMR-400 for burning reactor grade plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, Eben [M-TECH Industrial (Pty) Ltd., PO Box 54620, Wierdapark 0149 (South Africa)], E-mail: ejm@mtechindustrial.com; Teuchert, Eberhard [M-TECH Industrial (Pty) Ltd., PO Box 54620, Wierdapark 0149 (South Africa)

    2008-11-15

    An outstanding feature of the high temperature, gas-cooled, version of a Generation IV type reactor is its versatility in application. Apart from the capacity in high temperature gas-cooled reactors to generate electricity it could desalinate (multi-effect distillation [MED] by deploying excess heat or reverse osmosis by deploying excess electricity), produce hydrogen (by deploying excess electricity), whereas this article showcases the on-line fuelling characteristics of a pebble bed reactor concept for the incineration of reactor grade plutonium, whilst producing electricity. The VSOP-A system of codes is employed to demonstrate by calculation how the standard PBMR-400 commercial reactor design offers similar inherent safety characteristics with a Pu-Th/U advanced fuel cycle. This implies that no significant design changes are necessary to implement such a fuel cycle. Furthermore, the flexibility of the pebble fuel concept is deployed to house the fertile material in one type of pebble, whilst a second type will contain the fissile or driver material.

  2. Progress of China Experimental Fast Reactor in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    1 Background Fast reactor is the reactor which realized the chain fission with fast neutron.As an optional type of generationreactor,fast reactor has three characters:1) It can change 238U to 239Pu and raise the uranium resource utilization

  3. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  4. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  5. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, Alexander Matthew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jaegers, Peter James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.

  6. The 25 MW Super Near Boiling nuclear reactor (SNB25) for supplying co-generation energy to an Arctic Canadian Forces Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W.; Paquette, S.; Boucher, P.J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Nuclear energy represents a better alternative for the supply of heat and electricity to the Canadian Forces bases in the Arctic (CFS Alert and CFB Nanisivik). In this context, the Super Near-Boiling 25-MWth reactor (SNB25) has been designed as a small unpressurized LWR that displays inherent safety and is intended to run in automatic mode. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles (20% enrichment) in zirconium-sheathed fuel rods, and is light water cooled and moderated with a normal output temperature is 95 {sup o} C at atmospheric pressure. Control is via 133 control rods and six adjustable radial reflector plates. The design work used the probabilistic simulation code MCNP 5 and the deterministic code WIMS-AECL Version 3.1, permitting a code-to-code comparison of the results. Inherent safety was confirmed and is mostly due to the large negative void reactivity coefficient of -5.17 mk per % void. A kinetic model that includes thermal-hydraulics calculations was developed to determine the reactor's behaviour in transient states, and the results further confirm the inherent safety. Large power excursions temperatures that could compromise structural integrity cannot be produced. If the coolant/moderator temperature exceeds the saturation temperature of 100 {sup o} C, the coolant begins to boil and the large negative void coefficient causes the reactor to become subcritical in 0.84 seconds. The SNB25 reactor's core life exceeds 12 years between refuellings. A group of 4 SNB25 reactors meets both the heating and electricity requirements of a base like CFB Nanisivik via a hot water network and through an organic Rankine cycle conversion plant. (author)

  7. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  8. A Tubular Electrochemical Reactor for Continuous Generation of Sodium Hypochlorite for Anti-Microbial Applications%一种连续产生次氯酸钠的管状电化学反应杀菌器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾新安; 秦贯丰; 李忠彦

    2005-01-01

    介绍了一种中试规模的用于原位清洗(CIP)或原位灭菌(SIP)的次氯酸钠连续发生器.其电解槽采用带尼龙隔膜的管式电化学反应器结构,并在钛阳极管的表面采用稀土金属氧化物二氧化钌(RuO2)作为电化学反应的活性催化涂层.文中从反应工程的角度分析了该发生器的性能.试验结果表明,该反应器的电流效率在82%以上.微生物学研究表明,有效氯含量范围内的消毒水可有效杀灭大部分食品工业设备表面所发现的微生物.%A pilot-scale reactor for continuously generating sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), which is applied to the cleaning-in-place (CIP) and the sterilizing-in-place (SIP), is introduced in this paper. The electrolytic cell of the reactor is constructed as a tubular electrochemical reactor with a nylon net membrane between the electrodes and with a layer of rare-earth metallic oxide, RuO2, as the active catalytic coating on the titanium anode surface. The performance of this generator is then analyzed from the point of view of reaction engineering.Experimental results indicate that the electric current efficiency of the reactor is above 82%. Biological study shows that the sterilizing water with the available chlorine content can effectively kill most microorganisms on the walls of food equipment.

  9. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Poullikkas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are ...

  10. Scaled Facility Design Approach for Pool-Type Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Small Modular Reactor Utilizing Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangrok; Shin, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In low carbon era, nuclear energy is the most prominent energy source of electricity. For steady ecofriendly nuclear energy supply, Generation IV reactors which are future nuclear reactor require safety, sustainability, economics and non-proliferation as four criteria. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of these reactor type and Generation IV international forum (GIF) adapted three reference LFR systems which are a small and movable systems with long life without refueling, intermediate size and huge electricity generation system for power grid. NUTRECK (Nuclear Transmutation Energy Center of Korea) has been designed reactor called URANUS (Ubiquitous, Rugged, Accident-forgiving, Non-proliferating, and Ultra-lasting Sustainer) which is small modular reactor and using lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. To prove natural circulation capability of URANUS and analyze design based accidents, scaling mock-up experiment facility will be constructed. In this paper, simple specifications of URANUS will be presented. Then based on this feature, scaling law and scaled facility design results are presented. To validate safety feature and thermodynamics characteristic of URANUS, scaled mockup facility of URANUS is designed based on the scaling law. This mockup adapts two area scale factors, core and lower parts of mock-up are scaled for 3D flow experiment. Upper parts are scaled different size to reduce electricity power and LBE tonnage. This hybrid scaling method could distort some thermal-hydraulic parameters, however, key parameters for experiment will be matched for up-scaling. Detailed design of mock-up will be determined through iteration for design optimization.

  11. The integral fast reactor and its role in a new generation of nuclear power plants, Tokai, Japan, November 19-21, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information on the Integral Fast Reactor and its role in the future. Information is presented in the areas of: inherent safety; other virtues of sodium-cooled breeder; and solving LWR fuel cycle problems with IFR technologies. (JDB)

  12. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  13. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  14. The 25 MW super near boiling nuclear reactor (SNB25) for supplying co-generation energy to an Arctic Canadian Forces base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W.; Paquette, S.; Boucher, P.J., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear energy represents a better alternative for the supply of heat and electricity to the Canadian Forces bases in the Arctic (CFS Alert and CFB Nanisivik). In this context, the Super Near-Boiling 25-MWth reactor (SNB25) has been designed as a small unpressurized LWR that displays inherent safety and is intended to run in automatic mode. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles (20% enrichment) in zirconium-sheathed fuel rods, and is light water cooled and moderated with a normal output temperature is 95{sup o}C at atmospheric pressure. Control is via 133 control rods and six adjustable radial reflector plates. The design work used the probabilistic simulation code MCNP 5 and the deterministic code WIMS-AECL Version 3.1, permitting a code-to-code comparison of the results. Inherent safety was confirmed and is mostly due to the large negative void reactivity coefficient of -5.17 mk per % void. A kinetic model that includes thermal-hydraulics calculations was developed to determine the reactor's behaviour in transient states, and the results further confirm the inherent safety. Large power excursions temperatures that could compromise structural integrity cannot be produced. If the coolant/moderator temperature exceeds the saturation temperature of 100{sup o}C, the coolant begins to boil and the large negative void coefficient causes the reactor to become subcritical in 0.84 seconds. The SNB25 reactor’s core life exceeds 12 years between refuellings. A group of 4 SNB25 reactors meets both the heating and electricity requirements of a base like CFB Nanisivik via a hot water network and through an organic Rankine cycle conversion plant. (author)

  15. Design Concept of Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Related R&D in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-il Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Korea imports about 97% of its energy resources due to a lack of available energy resources. In this status, the role of nuclear power in electricity generation is expected to become more important in future years. In particular, a fast reactor system is one of the most promising reactor types for electricity generation, because it can utilize efficiently uranium resources and reduce radioactive waste. Acknowledging the importance of a fast reactor in a future energy policy, the long-term advanced SFR development plan was authorized by KAEC in 2008 and updated in 2011 which will be carried out toward the construction of an advanced SFR prototype plant by 2028. Based upon the experiences gained during the development of the conceptual designs for KALIMER, KAERI recently developed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR design concepts of TRU burner that can better meet the generation IV technology goals. The current status of nuclear power and SFR design technology development program in Korea will be discussed. The developments of design concepts including core, fuel, fluid system, mechanical structure, and safety evaluation have been performed. In addition, the advanced SFR technologies necessary for its commercialization and the basic key technologies have been developed including a large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test facility, super-critical Brayton cycle system, under-sodium viewing techniques, metal fuel development, and developments of codes, and validations are described as R&D activities.

  16. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV. Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, B.J.; Tannenbaum, E.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1987-05-01

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature oil-prone kerogens mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the effects of minerals on the generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes during laboratory-simulated catagenesis of kerogen. The influence of clay minerals on the aliphatic hydrocarbons is critically dependent on the water concentration during laboratory thermal maturation. Under extremely low contents of water, C/sub 12+/-range n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are mostly destroyed by montmorillonite but undergo only a minor alteration with illite. Both clay minerals significantly reduce alkene formation during dry pyrolysis. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water = 2:1), the effects of the clay minerals are substantially reduced. In addition, the dry-pyrolysis experiments show that illite and montmorillonite preferentially retain large amounts of the polar constituents of bitumen, but not n-alkanes of acyclic isoprenoids. Therefore, bitumen fractionation according to polarity differences occurs in the presence of these clay minerals. By this process, n-alkanes, and acyclic isoprenoids are concentrated in the bitumen fraction that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. In contrast, calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons. In addition, calcite is incapable of retaining bitumen. Therefore, the fractionation of n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids relative to the polar constituents of bitumen is insignificant in the presence of calcite.

  17. Thermal-hydraulics of internally heated molten salts and application to the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, Carlo; Cammi, Antonio; Luzzi, Lelio; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Ninokata, Hisashi; Ricotti, Marco E.

    2014-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) are an innovative kind of nuclear reactors and are presently considered in the framework of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF-IV) for their promising performances in terms of low resource utilization, waste minimization and enhanced safety. A unique feature of MSRs is that molten fluoride salts play the distinctive role of both fuel (heat source) and coolant. The presence of an internal heat generation perturbs the temperature field and consequences are to be expected on the heat transfer characteristics of the molten salts. In this paper, the problem of heat transfer for internally heated fluids in a straight circular channel is first faced on a theoretical ground. The effect of internal heat generation is demonstrated to be described by a corrective factor applied to traditional correlations for the Nusselt number. It is shown that the corrective factor can be fully characterized by making explicit the dependency on Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. On this basis, a preliminary correlation is proposed for the case of molten fluoride salts by interpolating the results provided by an analytic approach previously developed at the Politecnico di Milano. The experimental facility and the related measuring procedure for testing the proposed correlation are then presented. Finally, the developed correlation is used to carry out a parametric investigation on the effect of internal heat generation on the main out-of-core components of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR), the reference circulating-fuel MSR design in the GIF-IV. The volumetric power determines higher temperatures at the channel wall, but the effect is significant only in case of large diameters and/or low velocities.

  18. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  19. Interaction of radiation-generated radicals with myoglobin in aqueous solution—IV. Mechanism of interaction of hydroxyl radicals with oxymyoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitburn, Kevin D.; Hoffman, Morton Z.

    The interaction of radiation-generated ·OH/H· with oxymyoglobin (MbO 2) has been studied in the presence of catalase at pH 7.3 over the range of 5-510microM O 2. The conversion of MbO 2 to heme-modified products has been examined under conditions where depletion of O 2 in irradiated solutions both can and cannot be compensated by O 2-transfer across the solution phase boundary. In the theoretical limit of [O 2] → 0 in bulk solution, MbO 2 is converted stoichiometrically to ferri- and ferromyoglobin with G( MbO 2) ⋍ 6.0, G(ferroMb) ⋍ 3.0, and G(ferriMb) ⋍ 3.0. An increase in [O 2] in bulk solution beyond the zero-limit progressively suppresses the conversion of MbO 2 to the heme-modified derivatives. At [O 2] ⩾ 300 microM, an O 2-independent path of ferriMb formation with G ⋍ 0.6 is evident. Two sources of ferriMb induced by ·OH/H· are proposed: an O 2-independent path involving direct oxidative attack of ·OH at the oxyferroheme, and O 2-dependent paths of production of ferriMb and ferroMb involving the mediation of O 2-scavengable secondary hemeprotein radicals. It is suggested that the modifications of the heme group in the absence of O 2 are accompanied by redox modifications on the globin moiety. With increasing [O 2], similar redox modifications on the globin can occur without a mediating involvement of the prosthetic group. At high [O 2], involvement of the heme in modification of the globin is eliminated.

  20. CDF modeling of flow and transport processes in the reactor core of a modular high temperature reactor during an air ingress accident; CFD-Modellierung der Stroemungs- und Transportprozesse im Reaktorkern eines modularen Hochtemperaturreaktors waehrend eines Lufteinbruchstoerfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggemann, Johannes

    2015-05-22

    Generation IV of reactor design is supposed to include inherent safety systems that allow accident management using passive processes (without external energy). The VTR (very high temperature reactor) is graphite moderated with helium cooling. The design concept assumes that in any operational situation the after heat is removed by thermal conduction and radiation. Air ingress is beyond-design accident assuming a leak in the primary circuit triggering oxygen reaction with the hot graphite that could damage the barriers for fission product release. Using 3D CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes the air ingress scenario is simulated, the flow and transport processes in the reactor core are analyzed. For validation of the modeling heat transport processes were investigated in specific test facilities.

  1. STAR: The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor System - Encapsulated Fission Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2003-10-31

    OAK-B135 The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a novel 125 MWth fast spectrum reactor concept that was selected by the 1999 DOE NERI program as a candidate ''Generation-IV'' reactor. It uses Pb-Bi or other liquid-metal coolant and is intended to be factory manufactured in large numbers to be economically competitive. It is anticipated to be most useful to developing countries. The US team studying the feasibility of the ENHS reactor concept consisted of the University of California, Berkeley, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Westinghouse. Collaborating with the US team were three Korean organizations: Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korean Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (KAIST) and the University of Seoul, as well as the Central Research Institute of the Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan. Unique features of the ENHS include at least 20 years of operation without refueling; no fuel handling in the host country; no pumps and valves; excess reactivity does not exceed 1$; fully passive removal of the decay heat; very small probability of core damaging accidents; autonomous operation and capability of load-following over a wide range; very long plant life. In addition it offers a close match between demand and supply, large tolerance to human errors, is likely to get public acceptance via demonstration of superb safety, lack of need for offsite response, and very good proliferation resistance. The ENHS reactor is designed to meet the requirements of Generation IV reactors including sustainable energy supply, low waste, high level of proliferation resistance, high level of safety and reliability, acceptable risk to capital and, hopefully, also competitive busbar cost of electricity.

  2. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  4. On the oxidation of uraninite from natural reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.; Eklund, U.B.

    1999-07-01

    Natural nuclear reactors provide unique evidence in helping to understand the processes that might occur over long timescales in radioactive waste disposal sites. In the presented work, the extent and kinetics of oxidation of core material from the Oklo-Bangombe natural reactors are investigated. The X-ray powder diffraction analysis shows that the uraninites core samples from the Bangombe Reactor and Oklo Reactor 2, and Oklo Reactor 13 have the same unit-cell parameters as synthetic UO{sub 2.25}. A significant amount of fourmarierite, Pb(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O, was identified in the core samples from two shallow reactors Bangombe and Oklo 2, but not in the deeper reactor Oklo 13. The results of U(IV)/U(IV) measurements indicate that the extent of oxidative weathering of shallow reactors (Bangombe and Oklo 2) is greater than for the deeper reactor Oklo 13. Evaporable organic compounds found in the uraninite inclusion containing bitumen at the edge of Okelobondo Reactor (400 C) and in the black shale immediately above the Bangombe Reactor (260 C) may work as a reducing buffer or/and a hydrophobic water shield to depress the oxidative dissolution of the uraninite cores.

  5. Neutronics calculations for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tokamak Reactor Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T.; Baker, V.C.; Barnes, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutronics calculations have been carried out to analyze the nuclear performance of conceptual blanket and shield designs for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and the Tokamak Demonstration Reactor Plant (DRP) being considered at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These reactor designs represent a sequence in the commercialization of fusion-generated electrical power. All of the calculations were carried out using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN and the latest available ENDF/B-IV coupled neutron-gamma-ray transport cross-section data, fluence-to-kerma conversion factors, and radiation damage cross-section data. The calculations include spatial and integral heating-rate estimates in the reactor with emphasis on the recovery of fusion neutron energy in the blanket and limiting the heat-deposition rate in the superconducting toroidal field coils. Radiation damage due to atomic displacements and gas production produced in the reactor structural material and in the toroidal field coil windings were also estimated. The tritium-breeding ratio when natural lithium is used as the fertile material in the DRP blanket and in the experimental breeding modules in the EPR is also given.

  6. The long-term future for civilian nuclear power generation in France: The case for breeder reactors. Breeder reactors: The physical and physical chemistry parameters, associate material thermodynamics and mechanical engineering: Novelties and issues; La production d'electricite d'origine nucleaire en France, dans le futur a long terme: Le cas des surgenerateurs: Les reacteurs nucleaires surgenerateurs: Les parametres physique et physico-chimiques, la thermodynamique associee des materiaux et de l'ingenierie mecanique: Nouveautes et options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dautray, R. [Academie des sciences, 23, quai de Conti, 75270 Paris cedex 06 (France)

    2011-06-15

    The author gives a summary overview of the knowledge base acquired since the first breeder reactors became operational in the fifties. Neutron transport theory, thermal phenomena, reactor core cooling, various coolants used and envisioned for this function, fuel fabrication from separated materials, main equipment (pumps, valves, heat exchanges...) have now attained maturity, sufficient to implement sodium cooling circuits. However, the use of metallic sodium still raises certain severe questions in terms of safe handling and security considerations. The structural components, both inside the reactor core and outside (i.e. heat exchangers) are undergoing in-depth research so as to last longer. The fuel cycle, notably the re-fabrication of fuel elements and fertile elements, the case of transuranic elements, etc., call for studies into radiation induced phenomena, chemistry separation, separate or otherwise treatments for materials that have different radioactive, physical, thermodynamical, chemical and biological properties. The concerns that surround the definitive disposal of certain radioactive wastes could be qualitatively improved with respect to the pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in service today. Lastly, the author notes that breeder reactors eliminate the need for an isotope separation facility, and this constitutes a significant contribution to contain nuclear proliferation. France was in the forefront of nuclear breeder power generation science, technological research and also in the knowledge base related to breeder reactors. It is in the country's interest to pursue these efforts. (author)

  7. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  8. Deterministic and risk-informed approaches for safety analysis of advanced reactors: Part II, Risk-informed approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inn Seock, E-mail: innseockkim@gmail.co [ISSA Technology, 21318 Seneca Crossing Drive, Germantown, MD 20876 (United States); Ahn, Sang Kyu; Oh, Kyu Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Technical insights and findings from a critical review of deterministic approaches typically applied to ensure design safety of nuclear power plants were presented in the companion paper of Part I included in this issue. In this paper we discuss the risk-informed approaches that have been proposed to make a safety case for advanced reactors including Generation-IV reactors such as Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR), Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), or Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Also considered herein are a risk-informed safety analysis approach suggested by Westinghouse as a means to improve the conventional accident analysis, together with the Technology Neutral Framework recently developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a high-level regulatory infrastructure for safety evaluation of any type of reactor design. The insights from a comparative review of various deterministic and risk-informed approaches could be usefully used in developing a new licensing architecture for enhanced safety of evolutionary or advanced plants.

  9. 76 FR 78096 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design.... Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (U.S. ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft impact...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis A...

  10. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis A...

  11. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  12. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  13. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  14. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  15. Impact of thorium based molten salt reactor on the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Safwan Qasim Mohammad

    Molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of six reactors selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) is a MSR concept based on thorium fuel cycle. LFTR uses liquid fluoride salts as a nuclear fuel. It uses 232Th and 233U as the fertile and fissile materials, respectively. Fluoride salt of these nuclides is dissolved in a mixed carrier salt of lithium and beryllium (FLiBe). The objective of this research was to complete feasibility studies of a small commercial thermal LFTR. The focus was on neutronic calculations in order to prescribe core design parameter such as core size, fuel block pitch (p), fuel channel radius, fuel path, reflector thickness, fuel salt composition, and power. In order to achieve this objective, the applicability of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to MSR modeling was verified. Then, a prescription for conceptual small thermal reactor LFTR and relevant calculations were performed using MCNP to determine the main neutronic parameters of the core reactor. The MCNP code was used to study the reactor physics characteristics for the FUJI-U3 reactor. The results were then compared with the results obtained from the original FUJI-U3 using the reactor physics code SRAC95 and the burnup analysis code ORIPHY2. The results were comparable with each other. Based on the results, MCNP was found to be a reliable code to model a small thermal LFTR and study all the related reactor physics characteristics. The results of this study were promising and successful in demonstrating a prefatory small commercial LFTR design. The outcome of using a small core reactor with a diameter/height of 280/260 cm that would operate for more than five years at a power level of 150 MWth was studied. The fuel system 7LiF - BeF2 - ThF4 - UF4 with a (233U/ 232Th) = 2.01 % was the candidate fuel for this reactor core.

  16. Effects of reaction conditions on hydrogen production and carbon nanofiber properties generated by methane decomposition in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suelves, I.; Pinilla, J.L.; Lazaro, M.J.; Moliner, R. [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50015 Zaragoza (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the results obtained in the catalytic decomposition of methane in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst prepared by the fusion method are presented. The influences of reaction temperature and space velocity on hydrogen concentration in the outlet gases, as well as on the properties of the carbon produced, have been investigated. Reaction temperature and the space velocity both increase the reaction rate of methane decomposition, but also cause an increase in the rate of catalyst deactivation. Under the operating conditions used, the carbon product is mainly deposited as nanofibers with textural properties highly correlated with the degree of crystallinity. (author)

  17. On-Line NDE for Advanced Reactor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, N.; Inanc, F.; Thompson, R. B.; Junker, W. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Beatty, J. M.; Arlia, N. G.

    2003-03-01

    This expository paper introduces the concept of on-line sensor methodologies for monitoring the integrity of components in next generation power systems, and explains general benefits of the approach, while describing early conceptual developments of suitable NDE methodologies. The paper first explains the philosophy behind this approach (i.e. the design-for-inspectability concept). Specifically, we describe where and how decades of accumulated knowledge and experience in nuclear power system maintenance are utilized in Generation IV power system designs, as the designs are being actively developed, in order to advance their safety and economy. Second, we explain that Generation IV reactor design features call for the replacement of the current outage-based maintenance by on-line inspection and monitoring. Third, the model-based approach toward design and performance optimization of on-line sensor systems, using electromagnetic, ultrasonic, and radiation detectors, will be explained. Fourth, general types of NDE inspections that are considered amenable to on-line health monitoring will be listed. Fifth, we will describe specific modeling developments to be used for radiography, EMAT UT, and EC detector design studies.

  18. Testing of Passive Safety System Performance for Higher Power Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    brian G. Woods; Jose Reyes, Jr.; John Woods; John Groome; Richard Wright

    2004-12-31

    This report describes the results of NERI research on the testing of advanced passive safety performance for the Westinghouse AP1000 design. The objectives of this research were: (a) to assess the AP1000 passive safety system core cooling performance under high decay power conditions for a spectrum of breaks located at a variety of locations, (b) to compare advanced thermal hydraulic computer code predictions to the APEX high decay power test data and (c) to develop new passive safety system concepts that could be used for Generation IV higher power reactors.

  19. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of {sup 23{sup 5}}U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive

  20. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  1. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15

    Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

  2. In situ generation of Co(II) by use of a solid-phase reactor in an FIA assembly for the spectrophotometric determination of penicillamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, B Gómez-Taylor; Pferzschner, Julia; Icardo, M Catalá; Zamora, L Lahuerta; Martínez Calatayud, J

    2005-09-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) manifold for the determination of penicillamine in pharmaceutical preparations is proposed. The manifold includes a solid-phase reactor for the in situ production of the derivatizing reagent, Co(II) ion, which forms a coloured complex with penicillamine in an alkaline medium. The reactor is prepared by natural immobilization of cobalt carbonate on a polymer matrix, which endows it with a high mechanical and microbiological stability. The cobalt released by passage of a 5 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) sulphuric acid stream at a flow-rate of 2.3 ml min(-1) is merged with a volume of 314 microl of sample containing penicillamine in ammonium-ammonia buffer at pH 9.5 to measure the absorbance at 360 nm. Beer's law is obeyed over the penicillamine concentration range 5-60 mg l(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) of the method is 1 mg l(-1) and its throughput 70 samples h(-1).

  3. Fuel cycle: the transition between the third and the fourth generation of reactors; Cycle du combustible: faire la transition vers les 3eme et 4eme generations de reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Many challenges arrive today for the french research and development on the fuel cycle: promote the industrial technologies, improve the world increase of the nuclear and adapt the fuel cycle technologies to the future reactors. In this framework the report presents after a recall on the fuel cycle, the researches on the fuel, the optimization of the recycling, the wastes management, the simulation and Phenix an experimentation tool for the fuel. (A.L.B.)

  4. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: A Historical Overview and Future Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. G. van Rooijen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A review is given of developments in the area of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR in the period from roughly 1960 until 1980. During that period, the GCFR concept was expected to increase the breeding gain, the thermal efficiency of a nuclear power plant, and alleviate some of the problems associated with liquid metal coolants. During this period, the GCFR concept was found to be more challenging than liquid-metal-cooled reactors, and none were ever constructed. In the second part of the paper, we provide an overview of the investigations on GCFR since the year 2000, when the Generation IV Initiative rekindled interest in this reactor type. The new GCFR concepts focus primarily on sustainable nuclear power, with very efficient resource use, minimum waste, and a very strong focus on (passive safety. An overview is presented of the main design characteristics of these Gen IV GCFRs, and a literature list is provided to guide the interested reader towards more detailed publications.

  5. Corrosion mechanisms of candidate structural materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lefu ZHANG; Fawen ZHU; Rui TANG

    2009-01-01

    Nickel-based alloys, austenitic stainless steel, ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened steel are presently considered to be the candidate structural or fuel-cladding materials for supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), one of the promising generation IV reactor for large-scale electric power production. However, corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of these candidate alloys still remain to be a major problem in the selection of nuclear fuel cladding and other structural materials, such as water rod. Survey of literature and experimental results reveal that the general corrosion mechanism of those candidate materials exhibits quite complicated mechanism in high-temperature and high-pressure supercritical water. Formation of a stable protective oxide film is the key to the best corrosion-resistant alloys. This paper focuses on the mechanism of corrosion oxide film breakdown for SCWR candidate materials.

  6. Performance evaluation study of IHX-IV seal assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmakumar, G.; Venkatramanan, J.; Balasubramanian, V.; Prakash, V.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603102 (India); Konnur, M.S.; Ram Mohan, S.; Suresh, M.; Manikandan, S.; Rajesh, V. [Fluid Control Research Institute, Palakkad - 678 623 (India)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The construction of the 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has commenced at IGCAR, Kalpakkam. PFBR has four intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) and two primary Sodium Pumps. The secondary circuits consist of two loops with each loop having one secondary pump, two intermediate heat exchangers, one surge tank and four steam generators. Primary circuit has both hot and cold sodium and is separated into hot and cold pools by Inner Vessel(IV). IHX forms the interface between the primary circuit and secondary circuit of PFBR. The IHX and pumps are supported from at the top in the roof slab and penetrate through the conical portion of inner vessel. Proper sealing arrangements are necessary to prevent leakage of hot sodium into the cold pool through the penetration. The Mechanical Seal is employed to minimize the leakage through the penetration. This seal arrangement can facilitate Differential radial and thermal expansion between IHX and IV stand pipe at the region of penetration Relative tilting between the axis of IHX and IV stand pipe Smooth installation during commissioning and easy removal during maintenance Minimizes the forces transmitted to IV The hydraulic simulation study, of the IHX - IV mechanical seal assembly was undertaken at the Fluid Control Research Institute, Palghat. The seal has two leakage paths viz. Axial and radial. The leakage depends on the contact pressure on the sealing surface and the head causing the leakage. High leakage flow may lead to damage of inner vessel and may affect the thermal efficiency of the IHX. CFD analysis of the geometry was done in detail. This was done for prototype and the model condition. The optimized design obtained using CFD was employed for experimental evaluation. In the experimental set up, the leakage characteristics was studied for varying axial and radial clearance that prevails during the various stages of operation of the seal assembly in the reactor. A 1/2 scaled

  7. Naval reactors physics handbook. Volume 3: The physics of intermediate spectrum reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehn, J.R. [ed.] [Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1958-09-01

    The present volume has been prepared for persons with some knowledge of the physics of nuclear reactors. It is intended to make available the accumulated physics experience of the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in its work on intermediate spectrum reactors. Only those portions have been selected which were deemed to be most useful and significant to other physicists concerned with the problems of reactor design. The volume is divided into four parts which are more or less independent of one another. Part 1 (Chaps. 2--9), Investigation of Reactor Characteristics by Critical Assemblies, reflects the importance of the properties of critical assemblies and of the techniques for obtaining experimental information about such assemblies. Part 2 (Chaps. 10--20), Reactivity Effects Associated with Reactor Operation, details the use of both critical assemblies and reactor theory to make and test predictions of the manner in which the reactivity of an intermediate power reactor will vary during operation. Part 3 (Chaps. 21--26), Heat Generation and Nuclear Materials Problems, considers how reactor heat generation is spread out in space and time, and what nuclear effects result from the presence of beryllium or sodium in the reactor. Part 4 (Chaps. 27--38), Reactor Kinetics and Temperature Coefficients, relates to the transient or near-transient behavior of intermediate reactors.

  8. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  9. Radiochemical problems of fusion reactors. 1. Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.B.A.

    1984-02-01

    A list of fusion reactor candidate materials is given, for use in connection with blanket structure, breeding, moderation, neutron multiplication, cooling, magnetic field generation, electrical insulation and radiation shielding. The phenomena being studied for each group of materials are indicated. Suitable irradiation test facilities are discussed under the headings (1) accelerator-based neutron sources, (2) fission reactors, and (3) ion accelerators.

  10. Steam-Reheat Option for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltanov, Eugene

    SuperCritical-Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are being developed as one of the Generation-IV nuclear-reactor concepts. Main objectives of the development are to increase thermal efficiency of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and to decrease capital and operational costs. The first objective can be achieved by introducing nuclear steam reheat inside a reactor and utilizing regenerative feedwater heaters. The second objective can be achieved by designing a steam cycle that closely matches that of the mature supercritical fossil-fuelled power plants. The feasibility of these objectives is discussed. As a part of this discussion, heat-transfer calculations have been performed and analyzed for SuperCritical-Water (SCW) and SuperHeated-Steam (SHS) channels of the proposed reactor concept. In the calculations a uniform and three non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs) were considered for six different fuels (UO2, ThO 2, MOX, UC2, UC, and UN) and at average and maximum channel power. Bulk-fluid, sheath, and fuel centerline temperatures as well as the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were obtained along the fuel-channel length. The HTC values are within a range of 4.7--20 kW/m2·K and 9.7--10 kW/m2·K for the SCW and SHS channels respectively. The main conclusion is that while all the mentioned fuels may be used for the SHS channel, only UC2, UC, or UN are suitable for a SCW channel, because their fuel centerline temperatures are at least 1000°C below melting point, while that of UO2, ThO2 , and MOX may reach melting point.

  11. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  12. D and DR Reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The world's second full-scale nuclear reactor was the D Reactor at Hanford which was built in the early 1940's and went operational in December of 1944.D Reactor ran...

  13. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  14. Solar photocatalytic oxidation of pretreated wastewaters: laboratory scale generation of design data for technical-scale double-skin sheet reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyas, H; Jain, H B; Susanto, A L; Malekpur, M; Harasiuk, K; Krawczyk, I; Choromanski, P; Furmanska, M

    2005-05-01

    Batchwise heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of model wastewater (solutions of the azo dye "Acid Orange 7" in tap water) has been performed in a laboratory-scale stirred vessel reactor with non-submerged UV-A lamps using titanium dioxide "P25" as photocatalyst. Comparison to results of solar pilot-scale Plexiglass double-skin sheet reactor (DSSR) experiments indicates that the lab-scale method may predict area demand for technical-scale DSSR design. Characteristic UV-A fluences leading to TOC or COD reduction to e(-1) of the initial concentrations were determined in lab-scale stirred vessel experiments for treated effluents of seven different industrial branches, secondary municipal effluent and biologically treated greywater. Predicted areas for solar photocatalytic oxidation of these effluents in DSSRs yielding mineralization of 95% of organics in 100 m3 of the respective effluents for a TiO2 concentration of 2 g l(-1) and a sky and solar radiation of 3.9kWh m(-2) d(-1) within one day greatly varied from below 6,000 m2 (biologically treated lubricating oil refinery effluent) to more than 100,000 m2 (highly saline biologically treated effluent of chemical industry). Especially municipal and refinery effluents (except oil reclaiming) have been identified as promising candidates for reuse after solar photocatalytic oxidation. Mineralization efficiency was decreasing with increasing alkalinity of effluents. This was interpreted by competition of hydrogen carbonate anions with organics for binding sites on photocatalyst surface and by OH radical scavenging by hydrogen carbonate. Dependence on alkalinity was superimposed by salinity influence as some effluents with high alkalinity also exhibited high salt concentrations (especially chloride).

  15. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  16. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H.; Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France))

    1992-01-01

    Most of the first generation of fast reactors that were operated at significant power levels employed solid metal fuels. They were constructed in the United States and United Kingdom in the 1950s and included Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-I and -II operated by Argonne National Laboratory, United States, the Enrico Fermi Reactor operated by the Atomic Power Development Associates, United States and DFR operated by the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Their paper tracer pre-development of fast reactor fuel from these early days through the 1980s including ceramic fuels.

  17. High energy resolution and high count rate gamma spectrometry measurement of primary coolant of generation 4 sodium-cooled fast reactor; Spectrometrie gamma haute resolution et hauts taux de comptage sur primaire de reacteur de type generation 4 au sodium liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.

    2010-11-10

    Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors are under development for the fourth generation of nuclear reactor. Breeders reactors could gives solutions for the need of energy and the preservation of uranium resources. An other purpose is the radioactive wastes production reduction by transmutation and the control of non-proliferation using a closed-cycle. These thesis shows safety and profit advantages that could be obtained by a new generation of gamma spectrometry system for SFR. Now, the high count rate abilities, allow us to study new methods of accurate power measurement and fast clad failure detection. Simulations have been done and an experimental test has been performed at the French Phenix SFR of the CEA Marcoule showing promising results for these new measurements. (author) [French] Les reacteurs a neutrons rapides refroidis au sodium sont en developpement en vue d'assurer une quatrieme generation de reacteurs repondant a la demande energetique, tout en assurant la preservation des ressources d'uranium par un fonctionnement en surgenerateur. L'objectif de la filiere est egalement d'ameliorer la gestion de la radiotoxicite des dechets produits par transmutation des actinides mineurs et de controler la non-proliferation par un fonctionnement en cycle ferme. Une instrumentation de surveillance et de controle de ce type de reacteur a ete etudiee dans cette these. La spectrometrie gamma de nouvelle generation permet, par les hauts taux de traitement aujourd'hui accessibles, d'envisager de nouvelles approches pour suivre avec une precision accrue la puissance neutronique et de detecter plus precocement des ruptures de gaine combustible. Des simulations numeriques ont ete realisees et une campagne d'essai a ete menee a bien sur le reacteur Phenix de Marcoule. Des perspectives prometteuses ont ete mises en exergue pour ces deux problematiques

  18. Fuel burn analysis of a sodium fast reactor with KANEXT and Serpent; Analisis de quemado de combustible de un reactor rapido de sodio con KANEXT y SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: rcarlos.lope@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The fast reactors cooled by sodium are one of the options considered in the Generation IV. Since most of the reactors of Fourth Generation are still in development stage, is necessary to have efficient and reliable computational tools, this in order to obtain accurate results in reasonable computational times. In this paper is introduced and describes the deterministic code KANEXT (KArlsruhe Neutronic EXtended Tool) and is compared against a Monte Carlo code of more diffusion: Serpent. KANEXT, being a modular code requires the interaction of different modules to perform a job, this interaction of modules is described in this article. The parameters to be compared are the results of the neutron multiplication effective factor and the evolution of isotopes during the burning. The mentioned comparison is carried out for a fast reactor cooled by sodium of relatively small size compared to commercial size reactors. In this paper the particularities of the reactor are described, important for the analysis such as geometry, enrichments, reflector, etc. The considerations in the implementation in both codes are also described, as are simplifications, length of the burning steps, possible solutions of the Bateman equations for the burning fuel in Serpent and the solution options for transport (P3) and diffusion (P1) in KANEXT. The results show good correspondence between Serpent and KANEXT, which give confidence to continue using KANEXT as the main tool. Respect to computation time, time saving is evident with the use of deterministic codes instead of Monte Carlo codes, in this particular case, the time savings using KANEXT is about 98.5% of the time used by Serpent. (Author)

  19. Fundamentals, current state of the development of, and prospects for further improvement of the new-generation thermal-hydraulic computational HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code for simulation of fast reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipchenkov, V. M.; Anfimov, A. M.; Afremov, D. A.; Gorbunov, V. S.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.; Osipov, S. L.; Mosunova, N. A.; Strizhov, V. F.; Usov, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    The conceptual fundamentals of the development of the new-generation system thermal-hydraulic computational HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code are presented. The code is intended to simulate the thermalhydraulic processes that take place in the loops and the heat-exchange equipment of liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems under normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences and during accidents. The paper provides a brief overview of Russian and foreign system thermal-hydraulic codes for modeling liquid-metal coolants and gives grounds for the necessity of development of a new-generation HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code. Considering the specific engineering features of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) equipped with the BN-1200 and the BREST-OD-300 reactors, the processes and the phenomena are singled out that require a detailed analysis and development of the models to be correctly described by the system thermal-hydraulic code in question. Information on the functionality of the computational code is provided, viz., the thermalhydraulic two-phase model, the properties of the sodium and the lead coolants, the closing equations for simulation of the heat-mass exchange processes, the models to describe the processes that take place during the steam-generator tube rupture, etc. The article gives a brief overview of the usability of the computational code, including a description of the support documentation and the supply package, as well as possibilities of taking advantages of the modern computer technologies, such as parallel computations. The paper shows the current state of verification and validation of the computational code; it also presents information on the principles of constructing of and populating the verification matrices for the BREST-OD-300 and the BN-1200 reactor systems. The prospects are outlined for further development of the HYDRA-IBRAE/LM code, introduction of new models into it, and enhancement of its usability. It is shown that the program of development and

  20. BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, T.P.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

  1. Development of the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor R and D and Technology Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Won, Byung Chool; Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee

    2008-01-15

    This study presents a R and D performance monitoring system that is applicable for managing the generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor development. The prime goal of this system is to furnish project manager with reliable and accurate information of status of progress, performance and resource allocation, and attain traceability and visibility of project implementation for effective project management. In this study, the work breakdown structure, the related schedule and the expected outputs were established to derive the interfaces between projects and the above parameters was loaded PCs. The R and D performance monitoring system is composed of about 750 R and D activities within 'Development of Basic Key Technologies for Gen IV SFR' project in 2007. The Microsoft Project Professional software was used to monitor the progress, evaluate the results and analyze the resource distribution to activities.

  2. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  3. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  4. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  5. Investigation of molten salt fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Konomura, Mamoru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    On survey research for practicability strategy of fast reactor (FR) (phase 1), to extract future practicability image candidates of FR from wide options, in addition to their survey and investigation objects of not only solid fuel reactors of conventional research object but also molten salt reactor as a flowing fuel reactor, investigation on concept of molten salt FR plant was carried out. As a part of the first step of the survey research for practicability strategy, a basic concept on plant centered at nuclear reactor facility using chloride molten salt reactor capable of carrying out U-Pu cycle was examined, to perform a base construction to evaluate economical potential for a practical FBR. As a result, a result could be obtained that because of inferior fuel inventory and heat transmission to those in Na cooling reactor in present knowledge, mass of reactor vessel and intermediate heat exchanger were to widely increased to expect reduction of power generation unit price even on considering cheapness of its fuel cycle cost. Therefore, at present step further investigation on concept design of the chloride molten salt reactor plant system is too early in time, and it is at a condition where basic and elementary researches aiming at upgrading of economical efficiency such as wide reduction of fuel inventory, a measure expectable for remarkable rationalization effect of reprocessing system integrating a reactor to a processing facility, and so on. (G.K.)

  6. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2005-02-01

    Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. Successful in-situ resources utilization (ISRU) will require component technologies which provide optimal size, weight, volume, and power efficiency. Microchannel reactors enable the efficient chemical processing of in situ resources. The reactors can be designed for the processes that generate the most benefit for each mission. For instance, propellants (methane) can be produced from carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using the Sabatier reaction and ethylene can be produced from the partial oxidation of methane. A system that synthesizes ethylene could be the precursor for systems to synthesize ethanol and polyethylene. Ethanol can be used as a nutrient for Astrobiology experiments, as well as the production of nutrients for human crew (e.g. sugars). Polyethylene can be used in the construction of habitats, tools, and replacement parts. This paper will present recent developments in miniature chemical reactors using advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and microchannel technology to support ISRU of Mars and lunar missions. Among other applications, the technology has been demonstrated for the Sabatier process and for the partial oxidation of methane. Microchannel reactors were developed based on ceramic substrates as well as metal substrates. In both types of reactors, multiple layers coated with catalytic material are bonded, forming a monolithic structure. Such reactors are readily scalable with the incorporation of extra layers. In addition, this reactor structure minimizes pressure drop and catalyst settling, which are common problems in conventional packed bed reactors.

  7. High Temperature Stress Analysis on 61-pin Test Assembly for Reactor Core Sub-channel Flow Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwon; Kim, Hyungmo; Lee, Hyeongyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a high temperature heat transfer and stress analysis of a 61-pin test fuel assembly scaled down from the full scale 217-pin sub-assembly was conducted. The reactor core subchannel flow characteristic test will be conducted to evaluate uncertainties in computer codes used for reactor core thermal hydraulic design. Stress analysis for a 61-pin fuel assembly scaled down from Prototype Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor was conducted and structural integrity in terms of load controlled stress limits was conducted. In this study, The evaluations on load-controlled stress limits for a 61-pin test fuel assembly to be used for reactor core subchannel flow distribution tests were conducted assuming that the test assembly is installed in a Prototype Generation IV Sodium-cooled fast reactor core. The 61-pin test assembly has the geometric similarity on P/D and H/D with PGSFR and material of fuel assembly is austenitic stainless steel 316L. The stress analysis results showed that 4.05MPa under primary load occurred at mid part of the test assembly and it was shown that the value of 4.05Mpa was far smaller than the code allowable of 127MPa. , it was shown that the stress intensity due to due to primary load is very small. The stress analysis results under primary and secondary loads showed that maximum stress intensity of 84.08MPa occurred at upper flange tangent to outer casing and the value was well within the code allowable of 268.8MPa. Integrity evaluations based on strain limits and creep-fatigue damage are underway according to the elevated design codes.

  8. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  9. Analysis and application of a simulator of a nuclear reactor AP-600; Analisis y aplicacion de un simulador de un reactor nuclear AP-600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina S, V. S. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: medina_victor@comunidad.unam.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In front of the resurgence of interest in the nuclear power production, several national organizations have considered convenient to have highly specialized human resources in the technologies of nuclear reactors of III + and IV generation. For this task, the intensive and extensive applications of the computation should been considered, as the virtual instrumentation. The present work analyzes the possible applications of a nuclear simulator provided by the IAEA with base in the design of the reactor AP-600, using a focusing of modular model developed in FORTRAN. One part of the work that was made with the simulator includes the evaluation of 21 transitory events of operation, including the recreation of the accident happened in the nuclear power plant of Three Mile Island in 1979, comparing the actions flow and the answer of the systems under the intrinsic security of a III + generation reactor. The impact that had the mentioned accident was analyzed in the growing of the nuclear energy sector and in the public image with regard to the nuclear power plants. An application for this simulator was proposed, its use as tool for the instruction in the nuclear engineering courses using it to observe the operation of the different security systems and its interrelation inside the power plant as well as a theoretical/practical approach for the student. (Author)

  10. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  11. Entropy Production in Chemical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Diego; Razzitte, Adrián C.

    2017-06-01

    We have analyzed entropy production in chemically reacting systems and extended previous results to the two limiting cases of ideal reactors, namely continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and plug flow reactor (PFR). We have found upper and lower bounds for the entropy production in isothermal systems and given expressions for non-isothermal operation and analyzed the influence of pressure and temperature in entropy generation minimization in reactors with a fixed volume and production. We also give a graphical picture of entropy production in chemical reactions subject to constant volume, which allows us to easily assess different options. We show that by dividing a reactor into two smaller ones, operating at different temperatures, the entropy production is lowered, going as near as 48 % less in the case of a CSTR and PFR in series, and reaching 58 % with two CSTR. Finally, we study the optimal pressure and temperature for a single isothermal PFR, taking into account the irreversibility introduced by a compressor and a heat exchanger, decreasing the entropy generation by as much as 30 %.

  12. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  13. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  14. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Corneloup, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the French R&D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 °C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlabin order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  15. Determination of the reactivity coefficient of a sodium cooled reactor with metallic fuel; Bestimmung der Reaktivitaetskoeffizienten eines schnellen natriumgekuehlten Reaktors mit metallischem Brennstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilliard, N. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2013-07-01

    Fast sodium cooled breeding reactors are of interest in the frame of the Generation IV reactor design. Die to the experience in France and Japan the concept seems to be realizable in the near future. Due to the new design concepts the accident scenarios and the safety analyses based on modern simulation codes have to be adjusted in the frame of the European JASMIN project. The project is aimed to develop a European accident code for fast breeder reactors based on the modular LWR code ASTEC. Extensions with respect to sodium as coolant, improved physical models and the different design are necessary. Besides this a point kinetic model shall be implemented. The coupling of point kinetic neutronics to a thermal hydraulic code requires the determination of the reactivity coefficients of the respective system. Using the core design of a benchmark specification OECD/NEA SFR task force the reactivity coefficients are determined as an example.

  16. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  17. Fast reactor safety and related physics. Volume IV. Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 58 papers concerning single-phase flow and sodium boiling; sodium boiling and subassembly flow blockages; transient-overpower and loss-of-flow experiments; fuel and cladding behavior and relocation; fuel and cladding freezing; molten-fuel-coolant interaction; aerosols and fission product release, and post-accident heat removal. Thirteen papers have been perivously abstracted and included in ERA.

  18. Reactor and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  19. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas

  20. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  1. Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride To Purify Molten Salt Reactor Coolant and Heat Transfer Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2017-05-02

    Abstract: The molten salt cooled nuclear reactor is included as one of the Generation IV reactor types. One of the challenges with the implementation of this reactor is purifying and maintaining the purity of the various molten fluoride salts that will be used as coolants. The method used for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s molten salt experimental test reactor was to treat the coolant with a mixture of H2 and HF at 600°C. In this article we evaluate thermal NF3 treatment for purifying molten fluoride salt coolant candidates based on NF3’s 1) past use to purify fluoride salts, 2) other industrial uses, 3) commercial availability, 4) operational, chemical, and health hazards, 5) environmental effects and environmental risk management methods, 6) corrosive properties, and 7) thermodynamic potential to eliminate impurities that could arise due to exposure to water and oxygen. Our evaluation indicates that nitrogen trifluoride is a viable and safer alternative to the previous method.

  2. 高温气冷堆热电联产技术经济研究%Technical-Economic Study on High Temperature Reactor for Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永福; 孙玉良

    2016-01-01

    The market prospect of the combined heat and power generation in China was analyzed,and the feasibility of high temperature reactor for combined heat and power generation (HTR-CHP) was studied in technical and economic aspects.The results show that HTR-CHP can balance the operation safety and heating efficiency,and guarantee that the radiation effect on the surrounding people and the environment is sufficiently low.Through commercialization development,the economy of HTR can be improved remarkably,and has economic advantage over gas-fired plants,which reveals that the high temperature reactor has the potential to replace the gas-fired plants to supply combined heat and power.%分析我国热电联产的市场前景,并对高温气冷堆热电联产的技术和经济可行性进行分析.结果表明,高温气冷堆热电联产在保证运行安全性和供热效率的同时,对周围公众和环境影响足够小;通过商业化推广,高温气冷堆的经济性有显著的优化空间;高温气冷堆相比燃气机组具有经济性优势,具备替代燃气机组进行热电联产的潜力.

  3. Survey for the presence of Naegleria fowleri amebae in lake water used to cool reactors at a nuclear power generating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; Remmers, Kenneth; Cabral, Guy; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2009-04-01

    Water from Lake Anna in Virginia, a lake that is used to cool reactors at a nuclear power plant and for recreational activities, was assessed for the presence of Naegleria fowleri, an ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This survey was undertaken because it has been reported that thermally enriched water fosters the propagation of N. fowleri and, hence, increases the risk of infection to humans. Of 16 sites sampled during the summer of 2007, nine were found to be positive for N. fowleri by a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. However, total ameba counts, inclusive of N. fowleri, never exceeded 12/50 mL of lake water at any site. No correlation was obtained between the conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH of water and presence of N. fowleri. To date, cases of PAM have not been reported from this thermally enriched lake. It is postulated that predation by other protozoa and invertebrates, disturbance of the water surface from recreational boating activities, or the presence of bacterial or fungal toxins, maintain the number N. fowleri at a low level in Lake Anna.

  4. Hydrogen generation using a CuO/ZnO-ZrO₂ nanocatalyst for autothermal reforming of methanol in a microchannel reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Song; Pan, Cheng-Yu; Chowdhury, Sujan; Tu, Mu-Ting; Hong, Wan-Ting; Yeh, Chuin-Tih

    2011-01-07

    In the present work, a microchannel reactor for autothermal reforming of methanol using a synthesized catalyst porous alumina support-CuO/ZnO mixed with ZrO₂ sol washcoat has been developed and its fine structure and inner surface characterized. Experimentally, CuO/ZnO and alumina support with ZrO₂ sol washcoat catalyst (catalyst slurries) nanoparticles is the catalytically active component of the microreactor. Catalyst slurries have been dried at 298 K for 5 h and then calcined at 623 K for 2 h to increase the surface area and specific pore structures of the washcoat catalyst. The surface area of BET N₂ adsorption isotherms for the as-synthesized catalyst and catalyst/ZrO₂ sol washcoat samples are 62 and 108 ± 2 m²g⁻¹, respectively. The intensities of Cu content from XRD and XPS data indicate that Al₂O₃ with Cu species to form CuAl₂O₄. The EXAFS data reveals that the Cu species in washcoat samples have Cu-O bonding with a bond distance of 1.88 ± 0.02 Å and the coordination number is 3.46 ± 0.05, respectively. Moreover, a hydrogen production rate of 2.16 L h⁻¹ is obtained and the corresponding methanol conversion is 98% at 543 K using the CuO/ZnO with ZrO₂ sol washcoat catalyst.

  5. Hydrogen Generation Using a CuO/ZnO-ZrO2 Nanocatalyst for Autothermal Reforming of Methanol in a Microchannel Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin-Tih Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a microchannel reactor for autothermal reforming of methanol using a synthesized catalyst porous alumina support-CuO/ZnO mixed with ZrO2 sol washcoat has been developed and its fine structure and inner surface characterized. Experimentally, CuO/ZnO and alumina support with ZrO2 sol washcoat catalyst (catalyst slurries nanoparticles is the catalytically active component of the microreactor. Catalyst slurries have been dried at 298 K for 5 h and then calcined at 623 K for 2 h to increase the surface area and specific pore structures of the washcoat catalyst. The surface area of BET N2 adsorption isotherms for the as-synthesized catalyst and catalyst/ZrO2 sol washcoat samples are 62 and 108 ± 2 m2g−1, respectively. The intensities of Cu content from XRD and XPS data indicate that Al2O3 with Cu species to form CuAl2O4. The EXAFS data reveals that the Cu species in washcoat samples have Cu-O bonding with a bond distance of 1.88 ± 0.02 Å and the coordination number is 3.46 ± 0.05, respectively. Moreover, a hydrogen production rate of 2.16 L h−1 is obtained and the corresponding methanol conversion is 98% at 543 K using the CuO/ZnO with ZrO2 sol washcoat catalyst.

  6. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  7. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  8. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  9. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  10. Reactivity determination in accelerator driven reactors using reactor noise analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ljiljana 1

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Feynman-alpha and Rossi-alpha methods are used in traditional nuclear reactors to determine the subcritical reactivity of a system. The methods are based on the measurement of the mean value, variance and the covariance of detector counts for different measurement times. Such methods attracted renewed attention recently with the advent of the so-called accelerator driven reactors (ADS proposed some time ago. The ADS systems, intended to be used either in energy generation or transuranium transmutation, will use a subcritical core with a strong spallation source. A spallation source has statistical properties that are different from those traditionally used by radioactive sources. In such reactors the monitoring of the subcritical reactivity is very important, and a statistical method, such as the Feynman-alpha method, is capable of resolving this problem.

  11. Selection of sodium coolant for fast reactors in the US, France and Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sakamoto.yoshihiko@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan); Garnier, Jean-Claude; Rouault, Jacques [CEA, DEN, DER, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Grandy, Christopher; Fanning, Thomas; Hill, Robert [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Kotake, Shoji [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trilateral study was conducted on coolant selection of fast reactor concept. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fast reactor concepts are vital for nuclear fuel cycle sustainability goals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium, gas and lead cooled fast reactors are capable to achieve the goals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium cooled fast reactor is the most matured technology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas and lead cooled fast reactor require long term development. - Abstract: The joint paper presents a common view of fast reactor specific missions in the development of nuclear energy and a cross-analysis of merits and demerits of several Fast Reactors concepts studied worldwide and especially in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) framework. The paper provides the context for fast reactors development in the United States, France and Japan and focuses on the comparison on Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), and Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), i.e. the three fast reactor concepts that have the potential to meet the nuclear fuel cycle sustainability goals. The information provided in the article permits the reader to understand each country's objectives to see that not only the objectives searched for but also the technical orientations are converging. The authors underline that SFR technology evaluation relies significantly on the substantial base technology development programs within each country which is without comparison for the other two fast reactor technologies, e.g., SFR technology has already been developed to commercial or near commercial scale in each country whereas the performance of LFR and GFR technology is still uncertain. The main GFR merits are the potential for high temperatures and the easier possibilities for inspections and repairs. The main challenges are the fuel (fabrication, in-pile behavior), materials for high temperatures, and the implementation of

  12. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  13. Optimization of the burning efficiency and of the deployment capacities for the Non-Moderated Thorium Molten Salt Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Doligez, X.; Ghetta, V. [LPSC-IN2P3-CNRS/UJF/Grenoble INP, LPSC, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Starting from the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor project of Oak-Ridge, we have performed parametric studies in terms of safety coefficients, reprocessing requirements and breeding capabilities. In the frame of this major re-evaluation of the molten salt reactor (MSR), we have developed a new concept called Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), particularly well suited to fulfill the criteria of a generation 4 system. Amongst all TMSR configurations, our recent studies have highlighted the configurations with no moderator in the core as simple and very promising. Such a reactor presents many intrinsic advantages, avoiding the deterioration of the moderator while ensuring excellent safety characteristics. This concept, called non-moderated Thorium Molten Salt Reactor or TMSR-NM, has been selected for further studies by the MSR steering committee of the Generation IV International Forum. The standard TMSR-NM is a 2500 MWth reactor with a total fuel salt volume of 20 m{sup 3}, corresponding to a specific power of 125 W/m{sup 3} and operated between 700 and 800 deg. C. The core of the TMSR-NM looks like a single cylinder (in the standard version: 2.6 m high and 1.25 m radius) where the nuclear reactions occur within the flowing fuel salt. This salt considered in the simulations is a binary salt, LiF-(Heavy Nuclei)F{sub 4}, whose (HN)F{sub 4} proportion is set at 22.5 mole %, corresponding to a fast neutron spectrum. Our studies rely on numerical simulations making use of the MCNP neutron transport code coupled with the in-house code REM for materials evolution. Since {sup 233}U does not exist on earth and is not being directly produced today, we investigated the abilities of this TMSR concept to use the transuranic elements currently produced in the world as initial fissile load. We thus aim at designing the most efficient, robust and simple MSR being not only an excellent Thorium-based breeder reactor, but also able to burn the Plutonium and the Minor Actinides (MA

  14. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  15. A tubular focused sonochemistry reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU GuangPing; LIANG ZhaoFeng; LI ZhengZhong; ZHANG YiHui

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new sonochemistry reactor, which consists of a cylindrical tube with a certain length and piezoelectric transducers at tube's end with the longitudinal vibration. The tube can effectively transform the longitudinal vibration into the radial vibration and thereby generates ultrasound. Furthermore, ultrasound can be focused to form high-intensity ultrasonic field inside tube. The reactor boasts of simple structure and its whole vessel wall can radiate ultrasound so that the electroacoustic transfer efficiency is high. The focused ultrasonic field provides good condition for sonochemical reaction. The length of the reactor can be up to 2 meters, and liquids can pass through it continuously, so it can be widely applied in liquid processing such as sonochemistry.

  16. Nuclear Reactor Simulations for Unveiling Diversion Scenarios: capabilities of the antineutrino probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, V.M.; Fallot, M.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Martino, J.; Yermia, F. [SUBATECH - CNRS-IN2P3 - Univ. of Nantes - EMN, Nantes (France); Nuttin, A. [LPSC - CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France)

    2009-06-15

    After many years of fundamental research, physicists have a good understanding of the neutrinos detection techniques. It is now possible to apply neutrino physics as a new tool to monitor nuclear power plants. We already know that modest size detectors are achievable to fulfill that task such as the SONGS 1 and the future Nucifer detectors. In parallel, sophisticated simulations of reactors and their associated antineutrino flux and energy spectrum have been developed to predict the neutrino signature of the fuel burnup and of a diversion. Taking advantage of the tremendous quantity of information available nowadays in nuclear databases, the total {beta} spectrum of a reactor is built by adding the contributions of all the {beta} branches involved in the decay of all fission products (FP). A package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE) computes the fuel and FP inventories by simulating the neutronics and time evolution of a reactor core. MURE, initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3/LPSC Grenoble and IPN Orsay to study Generation IV reactors, is a precision code written in C++ which automates the preparation and computation of successive MCNP calculations either for precision burnup or thermal-hydraulics purpose. MURE will be soon available at NEA. The only user-defined inputs driving the time evolution of the isotopic composition of the core are the initial fuel composition, the refueling scheme, and the thermal power. The evolution of the antineutrino flux and energy spectrum with the fuel burnup, as well as the effect of neutron capture on various nuclei are taken into account. Nonproliferation scenarios and burnup monitoring with antineutrinos have been studied using these tools for PWR and Candu reactors. A full core simulation of an N4-PWR will be presented in a first part. Gross unveiling diversion scenarios using a PWR have been simulated in order to test the ability of the antineutrino probe. A channel of a Heavy Water Reactor (Candu 600) loaded with

  17. Preliminary analysis in support to the experimental activities on the mixing process in the pressurizer of a small modular reactor integrated primary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Samira R.V.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Bezerra, Jair L.; Silva, Mario A.B.; Silva, Willdauany C.F., E-mail: samiraruana@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lapa, Celso M.F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@crcn.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Otero, Maria E.M.; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: mmontesi@instec.cu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, InSTEC/CUBA, Higher Institute of Technology and Applied Science, La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, there is a renewed interest in the development of advanced/innovative small and medium sized modular reactors (SMRs). The SMRs are variants of the Generation IV systems and usually have attractive characteristics of simplicity, enhanced safety and require limited financial resources. The concept of the integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) is characterized by the inclusion of the entire primary system within a single pressure vessel, including the steam generator and pressurizer. The pressurizer is located within the reactor vessel top, this configuration involves changes on the techniques and is necessary investigate the boron mixing. The present work represents a contribution to the design of an experimental facility planned to provide data relevant for the mixing phenomena in the pressurizer of a compact modular reactor. In particular, in order to evaluate the boron concentration in the surge orifices to simulate the in-surge and out-surge in a facility, scaled 1:200, respect to the ¼ of the pressurizer. The facility behavior studied from one inlet and one outlet of the test section with represent one in-surge e one out-surge the pressurizer of a small modular reactor integrated primary system. (author)

  18. Biological nutrient removal with low nitrous oxide generation by cancelling the anaerobic phase and extending the idle phase in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinguang; Wang, Dongbo; Zheng, Xiong; Li, Xiang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Although wastewater biological nutrient removal can be achieved by alternating the anaerobic-oxic-anoxic phases, significant amount of nitrous oxide (N2O) is generated in oxic phases, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers are the main contributors. Here a new efficient strategy to remarkably reduce N2O generation was reported. It was found that by cancelling the anaerobic phase and extending the idle phase the N2O generation was reduced by 42% using synthetic wastewater, whereas the total nitrogen and phosphorus removals were unaffected. The mechanistic investigations revealed that the cancelling of anaerobic phase benefited heterotrophic denitrifiers instead of AOB to be responsible for nitrogen removal in the oxic phases, increased the ratio of total nitrogen removal driven by external carbon source, and decreased nitrite accumulation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses further showed that the new strategy increased the number of N2O reducing bacteria but decreased the abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms, with N2O as their primary denitrification product. It was also determined that the ratio of nitric oxide reductase activity to N2O reductase activity was significantly decreased after anaerobic phase was cancelled. All these observations were in accord with the reduction of N2O production. The feasibility of this strategy to minimize the generation of N2O was finally confirmed for a real municipal wastewater. The results reported in this paper provide a new viewpoint to reduce N2O generation from wastewater biological nutrient removal.

  19. An investigation into the origen of the interference generated during the measurement of the reactivity in a high burn-up reactor core%高燃耗堆芯反应性测量的干扰源研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雄月; 吕大军; 裘希春; 韩承慈; 夏应军; 邓朝平; 张仲元

    2012-01-01

    回顾了1980年9月实验前,在反应堆噪声分析领域的技术发展概况.展示了在实验动力堆燃耗末、卸料前,用双探测器互相关频谱分析法(CCFS)测得的一组数据;和经过离线去本底拟合计算后,获得的动力学参数测量结果:αc=(144.57±2.09)s-1.介绍了数据获取过程中出现的异常情况;离线处理的方法;本底谱选定;拟合计算程序;计算结果和结论.还简要介绍了干扰源的来源及其强度计算概况.数据处理结果证明:在长期燃耗后的堆芯上应用噪声分析法,除了要克服大γ场的干扰外,还要严格消除本底中子场产生的不相关噪声干扰.%After a general review for the technical development before 1980's in the area of nuclear reactor noise analysis,a reactor dynamic parameter,ac = (144. 57 + 2. 09)s~1 , obtained through off-line background processing, is shown. The processed data is measured through double- detector cross correlation frequency spectral analysis (CCFS) for the experimental nuclear power reactor at the burn-up end in sept. 1980. This paper also presents the abnormal situations for data acquisition, the off-line data processing method,the background spectra selection for data processing and the program for the least-squares fit calculation. Here also explains how neutron background is generated and how its strength is calculated. This verifies the fact that after a long-term burn-up run, large y field must be suppressed and also more attention must be paid to the uncorrelated neutron noise from the fuel burn-up.

  20. Pumps modelling of a sodium fast reactor design and analysis of hydrodynamic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordóñez Ródenas José

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of Generation IV reactors is to increase safety from those of previous generations. Different research platforms have been identified the need to improve the reliability of the simulation tools to ensure the capability of the plant to accommodate the design basis transients established in preliminary safety studies. The paper describes the modelling of primary pumps in advanced sodium cooled reactors using the TRACE code. Following the implementation of the models, the results obtained in the analysis of different design basis transients are compared with the simplifying approximations used in reference models. The paper shows the process to obtain a consistent pump model of the ESFR (European Sodium Fast Reactor design and the analysis of loss of flow transients triggered by pumps coast–down analyzing the thermal hydraulic neutronic coupled system response. A sensitivity analysis of the system pressure drops effect and the other relevant parameters that influence the natural convection after the pumps coast–down is also included.

  1. Opinion on serviceability of Bugey 3 reactor steam generators until their replacement foreseen in September 2010; Avis relatif a l'aptitude au service des generateurs de vapeur du reacteur de Bugey 3 jusqu'a leur remplacement, prevu en septembre 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-15

    This document briefly reports the damage characterization of tubular bundles in steam generators of the Bugey 3 reactor, discusses the actions which are foreseen to prevent a tube failure risk, and discusses the risk of leakage during operation. Recommendations are formulated about investigation on the corrosion, and about prediction computation to be performed

  2. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  3. Marketing produktu Karel IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikšů, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Goal of the thesis Marketing of the product Karel IV. is to propose chanels of marketing communication and indicate possibilities of next product's development. Theoretical part is based on marketing plan and it's partition. In the practical part you can find market analysis and competing products analysis, product's evolution description and marketing research.

  4. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  5. A comparative study of kinetics of nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman Khalilurrahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of reactivity initiated transients to investigate major differences in the kinetics behavior of various reactor systems under different operating conditions. The article also states guidelines to determine the safety limits on reactivity insertion rates. Three systems, light water reactors (pressurized water reactors, heavy water reactors (pressurized heavy water reactors, and fast breeder reactors are considered for the sake of analysis. The upper safe limits for reactivity insertion rate in these reactor systems are determined. The analyses of transients are performed by a point kinetics computer code, PKOK. A simple but accurate method for accounting total reactivity feedback in kinetics calculations is suggested and used. Parameters governing the kinetics behavior of the core are studied under different core states. A few guidelines are discussed to project the possible kinetics trends in the next generation reactors.

  6. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  7. Fast reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    There is a new generation of nuclear power stations on the drawing board. They must be sustainable as well as safe and cost-effective. Can these ambitions be realised? The sustainable power stations are less safe, and the safe ones are less sustainable.

  8. Dynamic model of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, G., E-mail: vaidya@igcar.gov.i [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-04-15

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 M Wt/13.2 MWe sodium cooled reactor operating since 1985. It is a loop type reactor. As part of the safety analysis the response of the plant to various transients is needed. In this connection a computer code named DYNAM was developed to model the reactor core, the intermediate heat exchanger, steam generator, piping, etc. This paper deals with the mathematical model of the various components of FBTR, the numerical techniques to solve the model, and comparison of the predictions of the code with plant measurements. Also presented is the benign response of the plant to a station blackout condition, which brings out the role of the various reactivity feedback mechanisms combined with a gradual coast down of reactor sodium flow.

  9. Oxidation efficiency of elemental mercury in two DBD plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuze; An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Jiang, Diwen; Li, Jie; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Configuration of plasma reactors influences the generation of active species including the energized electrons, active radicals and the distribution of active species in reactor, and thus influences the removal efficiency of pollutants. Oxidation efficiency of elemental mercury (Hg0) in two different DBD plasma reactors was studied in this paper. One plasma reactor is a surface discharge reactor (SDR) with a spiral stainless steel thread as the high voltage electrode, and the other plasma reactor is a concentric cylinder type DBD reactor (CCDR) with a copper screw rod as the high voltage electrode. The oxidation efficiencies of Hg0 under different specific energy density (SED), oxygen content, flue gas residence time and the temperature of flue gas indicate that SDR had a better performance than CCDR in oxidation of Hg0, which can be attributed to the higher generation efficiency of ozone in SDR than in CCDR.

  10. The Jules Horowitz Reactor - A new High Performance European Material Testing Reactor open to International Users Present Status and Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iracane, Daniel; Bignan, Gilles [CEA Atomic Energy Commission Saclay Batiment 121- 91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Lindbaeck, Jan-Erik; Blomgren, Jan [VATTENFALL AB Nuclear Power Jaemtlandsgatan 99 SE-16287 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The development of sustainable nuclear energy requires R and D on fuel and material behaviour under irradiation with a high level of performance in order to meet the needs and challenges for the benefit of industry, research and public bodies. These stakes require a sustainable and secured access to an up-to-date high performance Material Testing Reactor. Following a broad survey within the European Research Area, the international community agreed that the need for Material Test Reactors in support of nuclear power plant safety and operation will continue in the context of sustainable nuclear energy. The Jules Horowitz Reactor project (JHR) copes with this context. JHR is designed as a user facility addressing the needs of the international community. This means: - flexibility with irradiation loops able to reproduce a large variation in operation conditions of different power reactor technologies, - high flux capacity to address Generations II, III, and IV needs. JHR is designed, built and operated as an international user facility because: - Given the maturity and globalization of the industry, domestic tools have no more the required level of economic and technical efficiency. Meanwhile, countries with nuclear energy need an access to high performance irradiation experimental capabilities to support technical skill and guarantee the competitiveness and safety of nuclear energy. - Many research items related to safety or public policy (waste management, etc.) require international cooperation to share costs and benefits of resulting consensus. JHR design is optimised for offering high performance material and fuel irradiation capability for the coming decades. This project is driven and funded by an international consortium gathering vendors, utilities and public stakeholders. This consortium has been set up in March 2007 when the construction began. The construction is in progress and the start of operation is scheduled for 2014. The JHR is a research

  11. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  12. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  13. Validation of the TRACE code for the system dynamic simulations of the molten salt reactor experiment and the preliminary study on the dual fluid molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xun

    2016-06-14

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), which was confirmed as one of the six Generation IV reactor types by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum in 2008), recently draws a lot of attention all around the world. Due to the application of liquid fuels the MSR can be regarded as the most special one among those six GEN-IV reactor types in a sense. A unique advantage of using liquid nuclear fuel lies in that the core melting accident can be thoroughly eliminated. Besides, a molten salt reactor can have several fuel options, for instance, the fuel can be based on {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th-{sup 233}U, {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle or even the spent nuclear fuel (SNF), so the reactor can be operated as a breeder or as an actinides burner both with fast, thermal or epi-thermal neutron spectrum and hence, it has excellent features of the fuel sustainability and for the non-proliferation. Furthermore, the lower operating pressure not only means a lower risk of the explosion as well as the radioactive leakage but also implies that the reactor vessel and its components can be lightweight, thus lowering the cost of equipments. So far there is no commercial MSR being operated. However, the MSR concept and its technical validation dates back to the 1960s to 1970s, when the scientists and engineers from ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the United States managed to build and run the world's first civilian molten salt reactor called MSRE (Molten Salt Reactor Experiment). The MSRE was an experimental liquid-fueled reactor with 10 MW thermal output using {sup 4}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-UF{sub 4} as the fuel also as the coolant itself. The MSRE is usually taken as a very important reference case for many current researches to validate their codes and simulations. Without exception it works also as a benchmark for this thesis. The current thesis actually consists of two main parts. The first part is about the validation of the current code for the old MSRE concept, while the second

  14. Extension of the reactor dynamics code MGT-3D for pebblebed and blocktype high-temperature-reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Dunfu

    2015-07-01

    The High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an improved, gas cooled nuclear reactor. It was chosen as one of the candidates of generation IV nuclear plants [1]. The reactor can be shut down automatically because of the negative reactivity feedback due to the temperature's increasing in designed accidents. It is graphite moderated and Helium cooled. The residual heat can be transferred out of the reactor core by inactive ways as conduction, convection, and thermal radiation during the accident. In such a way, a fuel temperature does not go beyond a limit at which major fission product release begins. In this thesis, the coupled neutronics and fluid mechanics code MGT-3D used for the steady state and time-dependent simulation of HTGRs, is enhanced and validated [2]. The fluid mechanics part is validated by SANA experiments in steady state cases as well as transient cases. The fuel temperature calculation is optimized by solving the heat conduction equation of the coated particles. It is applied in the steady state and transient simulation of PBMR, and the results are compared to the simulation with the old overheating model. New approaches to calculate the temperature profile of the fuel element of block-type HTGRs, and the calculation of the homogeneous conductivity of composite materials are introduced. With these new developments, MGT-3D is able to simulate block-type HTGRs as well. This extended MGT-3D is used to simulate a cuboid ceramic block heating experiment in the NACOK-II facility. The extended MGT-3D is also applied to LOFC and DLOFC simulation of GT-MHR. It is a fluid mechanics calculation with a given heat source. This calculation result of MGT-3D is verified with the calculation results of other codes. The design of the Japanese HTTR is introduced. The deterministic simulation of the LOFC experiment of HTTR is conducted with the Monte-Carlo code Serpent and MGT-3D, which is the LOFC Project organized by OECD/NEA [3]. With Serpent the burnup

  15. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  16. Attrition reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  17. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  18. Transient analyses for a molten salt fast reactor with optimized core geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, R., E-mail: rui.li@kit.edu [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Wang, S.; Rineiski, A.; Zhang, D. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Merle-Lucotte, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie – IN2P3 – CNRS/Grenoble INP/UJF, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • MSFR core is analyzed by fully coupling neutronics and thermal-hydraulics codes. • We investigated four types of transients intensively with the optimized core geometry. • It demonstrates MSFR has a high safety potential. - Abstract: Molten salt reactors (MSRs) have encountered a marked resurgence of interest over the past decades, highlighted by their inclusion as one of the six candidate reactors of the Generation IV advanced nuclear power systems. The present work is carried out in the framework of the European FP-7 project EVOL (Evaluation and Viability Of Liquid fuel fast reactor system). One of the project tasks is to report on safety analyses: calculations of reactor transients using various numerical codes for the molten salt fast reactor (MSFR) under different boundary conditions, assumptions, and for different selected scenarios. Based on the original reference core geometry, an optimized geometry was proposed by Rouch et al. (2014. Ann. Nucl. Energy 64, 449) on thermal-hydraulic design aspects to avoid a recirculation zone near the blanket which accumulates heat and very high temperature exceeding the salt boiling point. Using both fully neutronics thermal-hydraulic coupled codes (SIMMER and COUPLE), we also re-confirm the efforts step by step toward a core geometry without the recirculation zone in particular as concerns the modifications of the core geometrical shape. Different transients namely Unprotected Loss of Heat Sink (ULOHS), Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF), Unprotected Transient Over Power (UTOP), Fuel Salt Over Cooling (FSOC) are intensively investigated and discussed with the optimized core geometry. It is demonstrated that due to inherent negative feedbacks, an MSFR plant has a high safety potential.

  19. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident analysis of the European Sodium Fast Reactor design. Part II: Optimised core and representative transients analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, A., E-mail: aulach@iqn.upv.es [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Schikorr, M. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mikityuk, K. [PSI, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ammirabile, L. [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bandini, G. [ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Darmet, G.; Schmitt, D. [EDF, 1 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A. [CEA, St. Paul lez Durance, 13108 Cadarache (France); Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G. [UPM, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R.; Struwe, D. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stempniewicz, M. [NRG, Utrechtseweg 310, P.O. Box-9034, 6800 ES Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Benchmarked models have been applied for the analysis of DBA transients of the ESFR design. • Two system codes are able to simulate the behavior of the system beyond sodium boiling. • The optimization of the core design and its influence in the transients’ evolution is described. • The analysis has identified peak values and grace times for the protection system design. - Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum require the development and validation of computational tools able to assess their safety performance. In the first part of this paper the models of the ESFR design developed by several organisations in the framework of the CP-ESFR project were presented and their reliability validated via a benchmarking exercise. This second part of the paper includes the application of those tools for the analysis of design basis accident (DBC) scenarios of the reference design. Further, this paper also introduces the main features of the core optimisation process carried out within the project with the objective to enhance the core safety performance through the reduction of the positive coolant density reactivity effect. The influence of this optimised core design on the reactor safety performance during the previously analysed transients is also discussed. The conclusion provides an overview of the work performed by the partners involved in the project towards the development and enhancement of computational tools specifically tailored to the evaluation of the safety performance of the Generation IV innovative nuclear reactor designs.

  20. Current status of fast reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The subject of calculation of reactivity coefficients for fast reactors is developed, starting with a discussion of the status of relevant nuclear data and proceeding to the subjects of group cross section generation and of methods of obtaining reactivity coefficients from group cross sections. Reactivity coefficients measured in critical experiments are compared with calculated values. Dependence of reactivity coefficients on reactor design is discussed. Finally, results of the recent international comparison of calculated reactivity coefficients are presented.

  1. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hiroto

    1995-02-07

    A reactor container of the present invention has a structure that the reactor container is entirely at the same temperature as that at the inlet of the reactor and, a hot pool is incorporated therein, and the reactor container has is entirely at the same temperature and has substantially uniform temperature follow-up property transiently. Namely, if the temperature at the inlet of the reactor core changes, the temperature of the entire reactor container changes following this change, but no great temperature gradient is caused in the axial direction and no great heat stresses due to axial temperature distribution is caused. Occurrence of thermal stresses caused by the axial temperature distribution can be suppressed to improve the reliability of the reactor container. In addition, since the laying of the reactor inlet pipelines over the inside of the reactor is eliminated, the reactor container is made compact and the heat shielding structures above the reac