WorldWideScience

Sample records for generation iv fission

  1. Nuclear fission today and tomorrow: from renaissance to technological breakthrough (Generation IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Goethem, G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the major scientific and technological challenges related to the very innovative nuclear fission reactor systems to be deployed at the horizon 2040 (called Generation IV). The paper focuses on the benefits of the Generation IV systems, according to criteria or technology goals established at the international level (Generation IV International Forum (GIF)). This goals are drastic improvements on four areas: sustainable development, industrial competitiveness, safety and reliability and proliferation resistance. The focus is on the design objectives and associated research issues that have been agreed upon internationally to meet these four ambitious goals. (author)

  2. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.; Aoto, K.

    2007-01-01

    Future fusion reactors or systems and Generation IV fission reactors are designed and developed in worldwide programmes mostly involving the same partners to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to meet the future energy needs beyond 2030. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactors or systems will be designed for helium and liquid metal cooling and higher temperatures similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches might create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in support of common technologies. (orig.)

  3. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.U.; Aoto, K.

    2008-01-01

    Future fusion reactor and Generation IV fission reactor systems are designed and developed in worldwide programmes to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to the future energy needs beyond 2030 mostly involving the same partners. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except for the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core, face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore, the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactor systems will be designed for high-temperature helium and liquid metal cooling but also water including supercritical water and molten salt similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches can create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore, an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in

  4. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, RE

    2004-07-15

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods

  5. FISA-2009 Conference on Euratom Research and Training Activities: Nuclear Fission - Past, Present and Future (Generation-II, -III and -IV + Partitioning and Transmutation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.; Deffrennes, M.; Hugon, M.; Manolatos, P.; Ptackova, K.; Van Goethem, G.; Webster, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the research and training activities carried out under the Euratom 7th Framework Programme (FP7, 2007-2011) in the field of nuclear fission science and technology, covering in particular nuclear systems and safety, and including innovative reactor systems and partitioning and transmutation. It is based on the more than 40 invited lectures that were delivered by Euratom project coordinators and keynote speakers at the FISA-2009 Conference (), organised by the European Commission DG Research, 22-24 June 2009, Prague, Czech Republic. The Euratom programme must be considered in the context of current and future nuclear technology and the respective research effort: ·Generation-II (i.e. yesterday, NPP construction 1970-2000): safety and reliability of nuclear facilities and energy independence in order to ensure security of supply worldwide; ·Generation-III (i.e. today, construction 2000-2040+): continuous improvement of safety and reliability, and increased industrial competitiveness in a growing energy market; ·Generation-IV (i.e. tomorrow, construction from 2040) for increased sustainability though optimal utilisation of natural resources and waste minimisation, and increased proliferation resistance. Consequently, the focus of the lectures devoted to Generation-II and -III is on the major scientific challenges and technological developments needed to guarantee safety and reliability, in particular issues associated with plant lifetime extension and operation. The focus of the lectures devoted to Generation-IV is on the design objectives and associated research issues that have been agreed upon internationally, in particular the ambitious criteria and technology goals established at the international level by the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). In the future, electricity must continue to be produced competitively, and in addition high temperature process heat may also be required, while exploiting a maximum of fissile and

  6. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  7. Generation IV reactors: economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupraz, B.; Bertel, E.

    2003-01-01

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  8. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO 2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  9. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  10. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  11. Generation IV reactors: international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Hittner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Generation IV international forum (GIF) was initiated in 2000 by DOE (American department of energy) in order to promote nuclear energy in a long term view (2030). GIF has selected 6 concepts of reactors: 1) VHTR (very high temperature reactor system, 2) GHR (gas-cooled fast reactor system), 3) SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor system, 4) SCWR (super-critical water-cooled reactor system), 5) LFR (lead-cooled fast reactor system), and 6) MFR (molten-salt reactor system). All these 6 reactor systems have been selected on criteria based on: - a better contribution to sustainable development (through their aptitude to produce hydrogen or other clean fuels, or to have a high energy conversion ratio...) - economic profitability, - safety and reliability, and - proliferation resistance. The 6 concepts of reactors are examined in the first article, the second article presents an overview of the results of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) within IAEA. The project finished its first phase, called phase-IA. It has produced an outlook into the future role of nuclear energy and defined the need for innovation. The third article is dedicated to 2 international cooperations: MICANET and HTR-TN. The purpose of MICANET is to propose to the European Commission a research and development strategy in order to develop the assets of nuclear energy for the future. Future reactors are expected to be more multiple-purposes, more adaptable, safer than today, all these developments require funded and coordinated research programs. The aim of HTR-TN cooperation is to promote high temperature reactor systems, to develop them in a long term perspective and to define their limits in terms of burn-up and operating temperature. (A.C.)

  12. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  13. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  14. Current status of NPP generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohanes Dwi Anggoro; Dharu Dewi; Nurlaila; Arief Tris Yuliyanto

    2013-01-01

    Today development of nuclear technology has reached the stage of research and development of Generation IV nuclear power plants (advanced reactor systems) which is an innovative development from the previous generation of nuclear power plants. There are six types of power generation IV reactors, namely: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). The purpose of this study is to know the development of Generation IV nuclear power plants that have been done by the thirteen countries that are members of the Gen IV International Forum (GIF). The method used is review study and refers to various studies related to the current status of research and development of generation IV nuclear power. The result of this study showed that the systems and technology on Generation IV nuclear power plants offer significant advances in sustainability, safety and reliability, economics, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In addition, based on the research and development experience is estimated that: SFR can be used optimally in 2015, VHTR in 2020, while NPP types GFR, LFR, MSR, and SCWR in 2025. Utilization of NPP generation IV said to be optimal if fulfill the goal of NPP generation IV, such as: capable to generate energy sustainability and promote long-term availability of nuclear fuel, minimize nuclear waste and reduce the long term stewardship burden, has an advantage in the field of safety and reliability compared to the previous generation of NPP and VHTR technology have a good prospects in Indonesia. (author)

  15. BIG-10 fission product generation and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission product generation rates for high quality fission foils and reaction rates of nonfission foils have been measured by gamma ray activation analyses. These foils were irradiated in the BIG-10 facility and the activities were measured by NaI counting techniques

  16. Safety assessment for Generation IV nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahy, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. ISAM is an integrated 'tool-kit' consisting of 5 analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development: 1) qualitative safety features review - QSR, 2) phenomena identification and ranking table - PIRT, 3) objective provision tree - OPT, 4) deterministic and phenomenological analyses - DPA, and 5) probabilistic safety analysis - PSA. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time

  17. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  18. FPDCYS and FPSPEC: computer programs for calculating fission-product beta and gamma multigroup spectra from ENDF/B-IV data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatelatos, M.G.; England, T.R.

    1977-05-01

    FPDCYS and FPSPEC are two FORTRAN computer programs used at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), in conjunction with the CINDER-10 program, for calculating cumulative fission-product beta and/or gamma multigroup spectra in arbitrary energy structures, and for arbitrary neutron irradiation periods and cooling times. FPDCYS processes ENDF/B-IV fission-product decay energy data to generate multigroup beta and gamma spectra from individual ENDF/B-IV fission-product nuclides. FPSPEC further uses these spectra and the corresponding nuclide activities calculated by the CINDER-10 code to produce cumulative beta and gamma spectra in the same energy grids in which FPDCYS generates individual isotope decay spectra. The code system consisting of CINDER-10, FPDCYS, and FPSPEC has been used for comparisons with experimental spectra and continues to be used at LASL for generating spectra in special user-oriented group structures. 3 figures

  19. Fission yield correlation generation and impact on nuclear problems - 15570

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.

    2015-01-01

    In our work we defined a scheme to update fission yields and their covariance matrices. We implemented a Generalised Linear Least Square (GLLS) updating procedure to produce inter-isotope fission yield correlations. At each update, a constraining equation was selected and the related set of observables calculated using the prior knowledge of the fission yield data and uncertainties. Then, available extra information on each observable was introduced into the system - e.g. a data set of direct measurements or uncertainties. Our GLLS-based updating tool calculates best-estimate posterior fission yields and covariance matrices which merge both the extra and prior data. The major result of the update is the generation of fission yield correlations. We created complete updated covariance matrices for 6 nuclides (Th 232 , U 233 , U 235 , U 238 , Pu 239 and Pu 241 ) and a total of 14 fissioning systems using the JEFF-3.1.1 files. The fission yield covariance matrices were tested against the criticality and nuclide inventory calculations of the REBUS single pin benchmark after one irradiation cycle. It appears that fission yield correlations reduce the uncertainties to a very great extent, which in many cases are 4 times smaller than those obtained with uncorrelated data

  20. Neutron lifetime and generation time by KENO IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1991-01-01

    It is believed that Monte Carlo method is suitable to the calculation of neutron lifetime and generation time with reference to the life cycle viewpoint. This paper illustrates that those times obtained by Monte Carlo method are quite different from the results by perturbation method. The neutron lifetime and the generation time for bare and reflected reactors were investigated by the Monte Carlo program, KENO IV. the Monte Carlo procedure is based on tracking and recording the life history of neutrons in a realistic fashion in a fissionable system with minimum nuclear and geometric approximations. The KENO IV provides the multiplication factor, neutron lifetime and generation time simultaneously. The thermal spherical reactors for both bare and reflected reactors were studied using the KENO IV. The reflected reactor is surrounded with 30 cm thick light water. The atomic densities in the regions and the calculated results of the multiplication factor, neutron lifetime and generation time are given. The different definitions of these times between the Monte Carlo method and perturbation theory caused the difference of the results. (K.I.)

  1. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of

  2. Monte-Carlo Generation of Time Evolving Fission Chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeke, Jerome M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kim, Kenneth S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Prasad, Manoj K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, Neal J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    About a decade ago, a computer code was written to model neutrons from their “birth” to their final “death” in thermal neutron detectors (3He tubes): SrcSim had enough physics to track the neutrons in multiplying systems, appropriately increasing and decreasing the neutron population as they interacted by absorption, fission and leakage. The theory behind the algorithms assumed that all neutrons produced in a fission chain were all produced simultaneously, and then diffused to the neutron detectors. For cases where the diffusion times are long compared to the fission chains, SrcSim is very successful. Indeed, it works extraordinarily well for thermal neutron detectors and bare objects, because it takes tens of microseconds for fission neutrons to slow down to thermal energies, where they can be detected. Microseconds are a very long time compared to the lengths of the fission chains. However, this inherent assumption in the theory prevents its use to cases where either the fission chains are long compared to the neutron diffusion times (water-cooled nuclear reactors, or heavily moderated object, where the theory starts failing), or the fission neutrons can be detected shortly after they were produced (fast neutron detectors). For these cases, a new code needs to be written, where the underlying assumption is not made. The purpose of this report is to develop an algorithm to generate the arrival times of neutrons in fast neutron detectors, starting from a neutron source such as a spontaneous fission source (252Cf) or a multiplying source (Pu). This code will be an extension of SrcSim to cases where correlations between neutrons in the detectors are on the same or shorter time scales as the fission chains themselves.

  3. Generation IV nuclear plant design strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altin, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation Generation IV nuclear reactor design criteria are examined under the light of known nuclear properties of fissile and fertile nuclei. Their conflicting nature is elucidated along with the resulting inevitability of a multitude of designs. The designs selected as candidates for further development are evaluated with respect to their potential to serve the different design criteria, thereby revealing their more difficult aspects of realization and the strong research challenges lying ahead

  4. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terranova N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reactor parameters. Since in modern nuclear data banks (such as JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 no correlations for fission yields are given, in the present work we propose a covariance generation methodology for fission product yields. The main goal is to reproduce the existing European library and to add covariance information to allow proper uncertainty propagation in depletion and decay heat calculations. To do so, we adopted the Generalized Least Square Method (GLSM implemented in CONRAD (COde for Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Data assimilation, developed at CEA-Cadarache. Theoretical values employed in the Bayesian parameter adjustment are delivered thanks to a convolution of different models, representing several quantities in fission yield calculations: the Brosa fission modes for pre-neutron mass distribution, a simplified Gaussian model for prompt neutron emission probability, theWahl systematics for charge distribution and the Madland-England model for the isomeric ratio. Some results will be presented for the thermal fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  5. Development of generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Ichimiya, Masakazu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    The fifth 'Generation IV International Forum (GIF), Policy Group Meetings' was held at the Zen-Nikku Hotel in Tokyo, on September 19-20, 2002, under participations of Abraham, Secretary of DOE in U.S.A., Columbani, Secretary of CEA in France, Fujiie, Chairman of CAE in Japan, Kano, Parliamental Minister of MIS in Japan, and so on. Ten nations entering GIF (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland, U.K., and U.S.A.) selected six next generation nuclear energy concepts for objects of international cooperative research and development aiming at its practice by 2030. These concepts applicable to not only power generation, but also hydrogen production, sea water purification, and so on, are sodium liquid metal cooled reactor (Japan), high temperature gas cooled reactor (France), Super-critical pressure water cooled reactor (SCWR: Canada), Lead metal cooled reactor (Switzerland), Gas cooled fast reactor (U.S.A.), and molten salts reactor. On the generation IV nuclear reactor systems aiming to further upgrade their sustainability, safety, economical efficiency, and nuclear non proliferation, the 'Plans on Technical Development' (Road-map) to decide priority of their R and Ds has been cooperatively discussed under frameworks of international research cooperation by the GIF members nations. Here were shared descriptions on nuclear fuel cycle as a remise of technical evaluation and adopted concepts by Japanese participants contributing to making up the Road-map. (G.K.)

  6. Metrology for New Generation Nuclear Power Plants - MetroFission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Lena; Dinsdale, Alan; Keightley, John; Filtz, Jean-Remy; Hay, Bruno; DeFelice, Pierino; Sadli, Mohamed; Plompen, Arjan; Heyse, Jan; Pomme, Stefaan; Cassette, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    MetroFission project has been looking at solving metrological problems related to a new generation of NPPs. The proposed Gen. IV NPPs are designed to run safely, make efficient use of natural resources, minimize the waste and maintain proliferation resistance. In order to reach these goals, the reactor operation involves higher temperatures, high-energy neutron fluence, different types of fuel where the minor actinides are included etc. The work has focused on improved temperature measurements, investigation of thermal properties of advanced materials, determination of new and relevant nuclear data and development of measurement techniques for radionuclides suitable for Gen. IV NPPs. The improved temperature measurement for nuclear power plant applications includes the development of a new Fe-C fixed point. Robust, repeatable and versatile cells have been constructed and compared with success among the project participants and their melting temperatures have been determined. Methodology of self-validating thermocouples has proven efficient at several fixed point temperatures using different designs. A practical acoustic thermometer has been tested at 1000 deg. C with success thanks to the use of innovative signal processing methods. Mo/Nb thermocouples have been obtained with different sheath materials and tested with the aim to achieve for the first time a reference function determined with the best possible uncertainties. Following reviews of designs and technology proposed for fourth generation nuclear plants effort within this project, with regards to thermal properties of advanced materials for nuclear design, has concentrated on provision of thermodynamic data to support the development of the sodium cooled fast reactor. Data has been critically assessed to represent the potential interaction between the Na coolant and the nuclear fuel taken to be based on (U, Pu)O 2 but incorporating minor actinides such as Np and Am. Data for the fission products and

  7. ENDF/B-IV fission-product files: summary of major nuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    The major fission-product parameters [sigma/sub th/, RI, tau/sub 1/2/, E-bar/sub β/, E-bar/sub γ/, E-bar/sub α/, decay and (n,γ) branching, Q, and AWR] abstracted from ENDF/B-IV files for 824 nuclides are summarized. These data are most often requested by users concerned with reactor design, reactor safety, dose, and other sundry studies. The few known file errors are corrected to date. Tabular data are listed by increasing mass number

  8. Fission product retention during faults involving steam generator tube rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.

    1983-08-01

    In some PWR fault conditions, such as stuck open safety relief valve in the secondary circuit or main steam line break, the release of fission products to the atmosphere may be increased by the leakage of primary coolant into the secondary circuit following steam generator tube rupture. The release may be reduced by retention either within the primary circuit or within the affected steam generator unit (SGU). The mechanisms leading to retention are reviewed and quantified where possible. The parameters on which any analysis will be most critically dependent are identified. Fission product iodine and caesium may be retained in the secondary side of a SGU either by partition to retained water or by droplet deposition on surfaces and subsequent evaporation to dryness. Two extreme simplifications are considered: SGU 'dry', i.e. the secondary side is steam filled, and SGU 'wet', i.e. the tube bundle is covered with water. Consideration is given to: the distribution of fission products between gaseous and aerosol forms; mechanisms for droplet formation, deposition and resuspension; fission product retention during droplet or film evaporation primary coolant mixing and droplet scrubbing in a wet SGU; and the performance of moisture separators and steam driers. (author)

  9. Fission multipliers for D-D/D-T neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, T.P.; Vujic, J.L.; Koivunoro, H.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2003-01-01

    A compact D-D/D-T fusion based neutron generator is being designed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to have a potential yield of 10 12 D-D n/s and 10 14 D-T n/s. Because of its high neutron yield and compact size (∼20 cm in diameter by 4 cm long), this neutron generator design will be suitable for many applications. However, some applications required higher flux available from nuclear reactors and spallation neutron sources operated with GeV proton beams. In this study, a subcritical fission multiplier with k eff of 0.98 is coupled with the compact neutron generators in order to increase the neutron flux output. We have chosen two applications to show the gain in flux due to the use of fission multipliers--in-core irradiation and out-of-core irradiation. For the in-core irradiation, we have shown that a gain of ∼25 can be achieved in a positron production system using D-T generator. For the out-of-core irradiation, a gain of ∼17 times is obtained in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using a D-D neutron generator. The total number of fission neutrons generated by a source neutron in a fission multiplier with k eff is ∼50. For the out-of-core irradiation, the theoretical maximum net multiplication is ∼30 due to the absorption of neutrons in the fuel. A discussion of the achievable multiplication and the theoretical multiplication will be presented in this paper

  10. The use of averages and other summation quantities in the testing of evaluated fission product yield and decay data. Applications to ENDF/B(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Averages of some fission product properties can be obtained by multiplying the fission product yield for each fission product by the value of the property (e.g. mass, atomic number, mass defect) for that fission product and summing all significant contributions. These averages can be used to test the reliability of the yield set or provide useful data for reactor calculations. The report gives the derivation of these averages and discusses their application using the ENDF/B(IV) fission product library. The following quantities are treated here: the number of fission products per fission ΣYsub(i); the average mass number and the average number of neutrons per fission; the average atomic number of the stable fission products and the average number of β-decays per fission; the average mass defect of the stable fission products and the total energy release per fission; the average decay energy per fission (beta, gamma and anti-neutrino); the average β-decay energy per fission; individual and group-averaged delayed neutron emission; the total yield for each fission product element. Wherever it is meaningful to do so, a sum is subdivided into its light and heavy mass components. The most significant differences between calculated values based on ENDF/B(IV) and measurements are the β and γ decay energies for 235 U thermal fission and delayed neutron yields for other fissile nuclides, most notably 238 U. (author)

  11. Generation IV international forum 2002 - remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, S.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses and forecasts underscore the important role of nuclear power in energy supply in the 21st century. Important aspects in this respect are the conservation of fossil resources, the protection of the world's climate, and the continuity of supply. Present 1st and 2nd generation nuclear power plants ensure an economical and technically mature electricity supply. Advanced systems offering, e.g., higher efficiency of fuel utilization, simplified systems technology, and advanced safety characteristics, can make available additional benefits in using nuclear power. Upon an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ten countries combine their efforts in developing such reactor concepts in the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States pursue the common objective in GIF to identify suitable nuclear power systems and promote their development up to the envisaged readiness for construction in 2030. Besides technical and economic questions of nuclear power generation, also other aspects must be considered with a view to the future use of nuclear power. The particularly relevant issues, such as the management of radioactive waste, the intensification of research and development, and international cooperation, have been taken up by the Bush administration at an early point in time and have been, or will be, incorporated in practical solutions, as in the case of the Yucca Mountain repository project. (orig.)

  12. Experimental facilities for Generation IV reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krecanova, E.; Di Gabriele, F.; Berka, J.; Zychova, M.; Macak, J.; Vojacek, A.

    2013-06-01

    Centrum Vyzkumu Rez (CVR) is research and development Company situated in Czech Republic and member of the UJV group. One of its major fields is material research for Generation IV reactor concepts, especially supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), very high temperature/gas-cooled fast reactor (VHTR/GFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The CVR is equipped by and is building unique experimental facilities which simulate the environment in the active zones of these reactor concepts and enable to pre-qualify and to select proper constructional materials for the most stressed components of the facility (cladding, vessel, piping). New infrastructure is founded within the Sustainable Energy project focused on implementation the Generation IV and fusion experimental facilities. The research of SCWR concept is divided to research and development of the constructional materials ensured by SuperCritical Water Loop (SCWL) and fuel components research on Fuel Qualification Test loop (SCWL-FQT). SCWL provides environment of the primary circuits of European SCWR, pressure 25 MPa, temperature 600 deg. C and its major purpose is to simulate behavior of the primary medium and candidate constructional materials. On-line monitoring system is included to collect the operational data relevant to experiment and its evaluation (pH, conductivity, chemical species concentration). SCWL-FQT is facility focused on the behavior of cladding material and fuel at the conditions of so-called preheater, the first pass of the medium through the fuel (in case of European SCWR concept). The conditions are 450 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL-FQT is unique facility enabling research of the shortened fuel rods. VHTR/GFR research covers material testing and also cleaning methods of the medium in primary circuit. The High Temperature Helium Loop (HTHL) enables exposure of materials and simulates the VHTR/GFR core environment to analyze the behavior of medium, especially in presence of organic compounds and

  13. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leahy, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated 'toolkit' consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  14. Generation-IV nuclear reactors, SFR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with development of sodium-cooled fast reactors and lead-cooled fast reactors. He concluded that: - SFR is a proved concept that has never achieved industrial deployment; - The GEN IV objectives need to reconsider the design of both the core and the reactor design : innovations are being analysed; Future design will benefit from considerable feedback of design, licensing, construction and operation of PX, SPX, etc.

  15. ESOL facility for the generation and radiochemical separation of short half-life fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Baker, J.D.; Anderl, R.A.; Novick, V.J.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A facility has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the generation and rapid radiochemical separation of short half-life mixed fission products. This facility, referred to as the Idaho Elemental Separation On Line (ESOL), consists of electro-plated sources of spontaneously fissioning 252 Cf with a helium jet transport arrangement to continuously deliver short half-life, mixed fission products to the radiochemistry laboratory for rapid, computer controlled, radiochemical separations. 18 refs., 13 figs

  16. Transient Analysis Needs for Generation IV Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Harvego, E.A.; Coryell, E.W.; Davis, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy as a vital and strategic resource in the U. S. and world's energy supply mix has led to an initiative, termed Generation IV by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to develop and demonstrate new and improved reactor technologies. These new Generation IV reactor concepts are expected to be substantially improved over the current generation of reactors with respect to economics, safety, proliferation resistance and waste characteristics. Although a number of light water reactor concepts have been proposed as Generation IV candidates, the majority of proposed designs have fundamentally different characteristics than the current generation of commercial LWRs operating in the U.S. and other countries. This paper presents the results of a review of these new reactor technologies and defines the transient analyses required to support the evaluation and future development of the Generation IV concepts. The ultimate objective of this work is to identify and develop new capabilities needed by INEEL to support DOE's Generation IV initiative. In particular, the focus of this study is on needed extensions or enhancements to SCDAP/RELAP5/3D code. This code and the RELAP5-3D code from which it evolved are the primary analysis tools used by the INEEL and others for the analysis of design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents in current generation light water reactors. (authors)

  17. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghel, C.; Penttilae, S.

    2010-03-01

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  18. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  19. Generation IV nuclear reactors: Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro; Todeschini, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Generation IV nuclear power plants (GEN IV NPPs) are supposed to become, in many countries, an important source of base load power in the middle–long term (2030–2050). Nowadays there are many designs of these NPPs but for political, strategic and economic reasons only few of them will be deployed. International literature proposes many papers and reports dealing with GEN IV NPPs, but there is an evident difference in the types and structures of the information and a general unbiased overview is missing. This paper fills the gap, presenting the state-of-the-art for GEN IV NPPs technologies (VHTR, SFR, SCWR, GFR, LFR and MSR) providing a comprehensive literature review of the different designs, discussing the major R and D challenges and comparing them with other advanced technologies available for the middle- and long-term energy market. The result of this research shows that the possible applications for GEN IV technologies are wider than current NPPs. The economics of some GEN IV NPPs is similar to actual NPPs but the “carbon cost” for fossil-fired power plants would increase the relative valuation. However, GEN IV NPPs still require substantial R and D effort, preventing short-term commercial adoption. - Highlights: • Generation IV reactors are the middle–long term technology for nuclear energy. • This paper provides an overview and a taxonomy for the designs under consideration. • R and D efforts are in the material, heat exchangers, power conversion unit and fuel. • The life cycle costs are competitive with other innovative technologies. • The hydrogen economy will foster the development of Generation IV reactors

  20. Separation of fission Molybdenum for production of technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, L.; Shaham, V.; Davarkha, R.

    2002-01-01

    There are two basically different methods for Mo-99 productions: Activation of Mo-99 contained at about 24% in natural isotopic mixtures. Mo-98 enriched targets are irradiated in high-flux reactors in order to achieve the highest possible specific activity of the product. Idolisation of fission molybdenum from irradiated nuclear fuel targets which have undergone short-term cooling. Maximum fission yield can be attained by irradiation of uranium-235 with the highest possible enrichment. On account of its approximately 1000 times higher specific activity. Fission molybdenum has almost replaced worldwide the product fabricated by activation. However, fission molybdenum-99 production has as its prerequisite a suitably advanced technology by which the production process taking place under high activity conditions can be controlled. An integral part of the process consist in the retention of the fission gases the recycling of non-consumed fuel and the treatment of the waste streams arising. This publication will deal with the individual steps in the process

  1. Improvement of Steam Generator Reliability for GEN-IV SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong O; Kim Se Yun; Kim, Seok Hoon; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2005-11-15

    The R and D items performed in this study were selected from the R and D task of ' Reliability improvement of Steam Generator' of GEN-IV SFR Component Design and BOP. Since this project deals with one of the most important issues for a GEN-IV SFR system, it needs to enhance the domestic technical backgrounds associated with the corresponding R and D items even for a very short period by 2005. This study provides the R and D results for i) Development of assessment methodology for dissimilar metal weld and ii) Development of multi-dimensional simulation methodology for a SWR event in a SFR steam generator.

  2. Improvement of Steam Generator Reliability for GEN-IV SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong O; Kim Se Yun; Kim, Seok Hoon; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2005-11-01

    The R and D items performed in this study were selected from the R and D task of ' Reliability improvement of Steam Generator' of GEN-IV SFR Component Design and BOP. Since this project deals with one of the most important issues for a GEN-IV SFR system, it needs to enhance the domestic technical backgrounds associated with the corresponding R and D items even for a very short period by 2005. This study provides the R and D results for i) Development of assessment methodology for dissimilar metal weld and ii) Development of multi-dimensional simulation methodology for a SWR event in a SFR steam generator

  3. Policy-induced market introduction of Generation IV reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, Aliki Irina van; Roelofs, Ferry

    2011-01-01

    Almost 10 years ago the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started the Generation IV Initiative (GenIV) with 9 other national governments with a positive ground attitude towards nuclear energy. Some of these Generation IV systems, like the fast reactors, are nearing the demonstration stage. The question on how their market introduction will be implemented becomes increasingly urgent. One main topic for future reactor technologies is the treatment of radioactive waste products. Technological solutions to this issue are being developed. One possible process is the transformation of long-living radioactive nuclides into short living ones; a process known as transmutation, which can be done in a nuclear reactor only. Various Generation IV reactor concepts are suitable for this process, and of these systems most experience has been gained with the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). However, both these first generation SFR plants and their Generation IV successors are designed as electricity generating plants, and therefore supposed to be commercially viable in the electricity markets. Various studies indicate that the generation costs of a combined LWR-(S)FR nuclear generating park (LWR: light water reactor) will be higher than that of an LWR-only park. To investigate the effects of the deployment of the different reactors and fuel cycles on the waste produced, resources used and costs incurred as a function of time, a dynamic fuel cycle assessment is performed. This study will focus on the waste impact of the introduction of a fraction of fast reactors in the European nuclear reactor park with a cost increase as described in the previous paragraph. The nuclear fuel cycle scenario code DANESS is used for this, as well as the nuclear park model of the EU-27 used for the previous study. (orig.)

  4. Fission yields data generation and benchmarks of decay heat estimation of a nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Do Heon; Yoo, Jae Kwon; Lee, Jounghwa

    2017-09-01

    Fission yields data with the ENDF-6 format of 235U, 239Pu, and several actinides dependent on incident neutron energies have been generated using the GEF code. In addition, fission yields data libraries of ORIGEN-S, -ARP modules in the SCALE code, have been generated with the new data. The decay heats by ORIGEN-S using the new fission yields data have been calculated and compared with the measured data for validation in this study. The fission yields data ORIGEN-S libraries based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.1, and JENDL/FPY-2011 have also been generated, and decay heats were calculated using the ORIGEN-S libraries for analyses and comparisons.

  5. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  6. Fission power: a search for a ''second-generation'' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report touches on the history of US fission reactors and explores the current technical status of such reactors around the world, including experimental reactors. Its purpose is to identify, evaluate, and rank the most promising concepts among existing reactors, proposed but unadopted designs, and what can be described as ''new'' concepts. Also discussed are such related concerns as utility requirements and design considerations. The report concludes with some recommendations for possible future LLNL involvement

  7. Generation IV nuclear energy systems: road map and concepts. 2. Generation II Measurement Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    need for substantial research. As we consider I and C systems in Generation IV reactors, we have the opportunity to take a much less 'timid' design philosophy than was taken in the design of I and C systems in the ALWRs. We need to make use of advanced technology to design an I and C system for the Generation IV multi-unit plant designs currently being considered. Such a design should accomplish the following: 1. provides for multi-unit control; 2. contributes to a plant design objective of a very low core damage frequency; 3. maximizes plant thermal efficiency (>50%); 4. maximizes plant capacity factor (>90%); 5. optimizes operability; 6. maximizes maintainability; 7. provides for on-line monitoring, calibration, and diagnostics; 8. provides optimum response to disturbances; 9. provides excellent load-following capability. When we consider the current situation in operating Generation I and II nuclear power plants and even Generation III ALWR design, we conclude that Generation IV reactors should employ at least Generation II measurement systems. Let us first consider data transmission, which is a form of communication, and ask the question: Do new communication-transferring methods by electrons flow in copper wires? The obvious answer is no. Virtually all new communication systems are using some electromagnetic method, such as light, microwaves, HF or VHF radio signals, and virtually no copper wires. When we envision Generation IV nuclear power plants, we should minimize the use of copper wires for data transmission. We should transmit data primarily by fiber optics and various wireless methods, some of which can penetrate thick barriers. Now let us consider sensors. If we use light for data transmission, then we should also use optical-based sensors. We should also take advantage of microprocessors, which provide opportunities to embed 'intelligence' in the sensor that can be used to increase accuracy, stability, and tolerance to external stressors (i.e., radiation

  8. The generation IV nuclear reactor systems - Energy of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru; Jianu, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Ten nations joined within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), agreeing on a framework for international cooperation in research. Their goal is to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in an economically competitive way while addressing the issues of safety, proliferation, and other public perception concerns. The objective is for the Gen IV systems to be available for deployment by 2030. Using more than 100 nuclear experts from its 10 member nations, the GIF has developed a Gen IV Technology Roadmap to guide the research and development of the world's most advanced, efficient and safe nuclear power systems. The Gen IV Technology Roadmap calls for extensive research and development of six different potential future reactor systems. These include water-cooled, gas-cooled, liquid metal-cooled and nonclassical systems. One or more of these reactor systems will provide the best combination of safety, reliability, efficiency and proliferation resistance at a competitive cost. The main goals for the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems are: - Provide sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel use for worldwide energy production; - Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and noticeably reduce the long-term stewardship burden in the future, improving the protection of public health and the environment; - Increase the assurance that these reactors are very unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased protection against acts of terrorism; - Have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; - Have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects; - Excel in safety and reliability; - Have a low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage. (authors)

  9. IRIS Responsiveness to Generation IV Road-map Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Paramonov, D.V.; Petrovic, B.

    2002-01-01

    The DOE Generation IV road-map process is in its second and final year. Almost one hundred concepts submitted from all over the world have been reviewed against the Generation IV goals of resources sustainability; safety and reliability; and, economics. Advanced LWRs are taken as the reference point. IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure), a 100-335 MWe integral light water reactor being developed by a vast international consortium led by Westinghouse, is one on the concepts being considered in the road-map and is perhaps the most visible representative of the concept set known as Integral Primary System Reactors (IPSR). This paper presents how IRIS satisfies the prescribed goals. The first goal of resource sustainability includes criteria like utilization of fuel resources, amount and toxicity of waste produced, environmental impact, proliferation and sabotage resistance. As a thermal reactor IRIS does not have the same fuel utilization as fast reactors. However, it has a significant flexibility in fuel cycles as it is designed to utilize either UO 2 or MOX with straight burn cycles of 4 to 10 years, depending on the fissile content. High discharge burnup and Pu recycling result in good fuel utilization and lower waste; IRIS has also attractive proliferation resistance characteristics, due to the reduced accessibility of the fuel. The safety and reliability goal include reliability, workers' exposure, robust safety features, models with well characterized uncertainty, source term and mechanisms of energy release, robust mitigation of accidents. IRIS is significantly better than advanced LWRs because of its safety by design which eliminates a variety of accidents such as LOCAs, its containment vessel coupled design which maintains the core safely covered during the accident sequences, its design simplification features such as no (or reduced) soluble boron, internal shielding and four-year refueling/maintenance interval which significantly reduce

  10. Review on Korea Participation of Generation IV International Forum (GIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jewhan; Jeong, Ji-Young; Hahn, Dohee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) originates from US proposal of an initiative in 2000. The vision was to leapfrog LWR technology and collaborate with international partners to share R and D on advanced nuclear systems. Nine countries and EU joined the initiative and Gen IV concept was defined via technology goals and legal framework. Two years study with more than 100 experts worldwide has evaluated nearly 100 reactor designs and down selected six most promising concepts. In 2005, the first signatures on Framework Agreement were collected and the first research projects were defined in 2006. Korea is one of the founding members of GIF and actively participating in various areas. In 2013, TD was assigned to Korean expert and Korea is endeavoring to enhance the benefit of participation since this turning point. In this paper, pros and cons of engaging with GIF were briefly introduced and items to maximize the benefit were suggested.

  11. Review on Korea Participation of Generation IV International Forum (GIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jewhan; Jeong, Ji-Young; Hahn, Dohee

    2015-01-01

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) originates from US proposal of an initiative in 2000. The vision was to leapfrog LWR technology and collaborate with international partners to share R and D on advanced nuclear systems. Nine countries and EU joined the initiative and Gen IV concept was defined via technology goals and legal framework. Two years study with more than 100 experts worldwide has evaluated nearly 100 reactor designs and down selected six most promising concepts. In 2005, the first signatures on Framework Agreement were collected and the first research projects were defined in 2006. Korea is one of the founding members of GIF and actively participating in various areas. In 2013, TD was assigned to Korean expert and Korea is endeavoring to enhance the benefit of participation since this turning point. In this paper, pros and cons of engaging with GIF were briefly introduced and items to maximize the benefit were suggested

  12. ASTRID, Generation IV advanced sodium technological reactor for industrial demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauche, F.

    2013-01-01

    ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is an integrated technology demonstrator designed to demonstrate the operability of the innovative choices enabling fast neutron reactor technology to meet the Generation IV criteria. ASTRID is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with an electricity generating power of 600 MWe. In order to meet the generation IV goals, ASTRID will incorporate the following decisive innovations: -) an improved core with a very low, even negative void coefficient; -) the possible installation of additional safety devices in the core. For example, passive anti-reactivity insertion devices are explored; -) more core instrumentation; -) an energy conversion system with modular steam generators, to limit the effects of a possible sodium-water reaction, or sodium-nitrogen exchangers; -) considerable thermal inertia combined with natural convection to deal with decay heat; -)elimination of major sodium fires by bunkerization and/or inert atmosphere in the premises; -) to take into account off-site hazards (earthquake, airplane crash,...) right from the design stage; -) a complete rethink of the reactor architecture in order to limit the risk of proliferation. ASTRID will also include systems for reducing the length of refueling outages and increasing the burn-up and the duration of the cycle. In-service inspection, maintenance and repair are also taken into account right from the start of the project. The ASTRID prototype should be operational by about 2023. (A.C.)

  13. CANDU technology for generation III + AND IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is the original developer of the CANDU?reactor, one of the three major commercial power reactor designs now used throughout the world. For over 60 years, AECL has continued to evolve the CANDU design from the CANDU prototypes in the 1950s and 1960s through to the second generation reactors now in operation, including the Generation II+ CANDU 6. The next phase of this evolution, the Generation III+ Advanced CANDU ReactorTM (ACRTM), continues the strategy of basing next generation technology on existing CANDU reactors. Beyond the ACR, AECL is developing the Generation IV CANDU Super Critical Water Reactor. Owing to the evolutionary nature of these advanced reactors, advanced technology from the development programs is also being applied to operating CANDU plants, for both refurbishments and upgrading of existing systems and components. In addition, AECL is developing advanced technology that covers the entire life cycle of the CANDU plant, including waste management and decommissioning. Thus, AECL maintains state-of-the-art expertise and technology to support both operating and future CANDU plants. This paper outlines the scale of the current core knowledge base that is the foundation for advancement and support of CANDU technology. The knowledge base includes advancements in materials, fuel, safety, plant operations, components and systems, environmental technology, waste management, and construction. Our approach in each of these areas is to develop the underlying science, carry out integrated engineering scale tests, and perform large-scale demonstration testing. AECL has comprehensive R and D and engineering development programs to cover all of these elements. The paper will show how the ongoing expansion of the CANDU knowledge base has led to the development of the Advanced CANDU Reactor. The ACR is a Generation III+ reactor with substantially reduced costs, faster construction, and enhanced passive safety and operating

  14. Corrosion of structural materials for Generation IV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Cabet, C.; Courouau, J.L.; Martinelli, L.; Arnoux, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum aims at developing future generation nuclear energy systems. Six systems have been selected for further consideration: sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). CEA, in the frame of a national program, of EC projects and of the GIF, contributes to the structural materials developments and research programs. Particularly, corrosion studies are being performed in the complex environments of the GEN IV systems. As a matter of fact, structural materials encounter very severe conditions regarding corrosion concerns: high temperatures and possibly aggressive chemical environments. Therefore, the multiple environments considered require also a large diversity of materials. On the other hand, the similar levels of working temperatures as well as neutron spectrum imply also similar families of materials for the various systems. In this paper, status of the research performed in CEA on the corrosion behavior of the structural material in the different environments is presented. The materials studied are either metallic materials as austenitic (or Y, La, Ce doped) and ferrito-martensitic steels, Ni base alloys, ODS steels, or ceramics and composites. In all the environments studied, the scientific approach is identical, the objective being in all cases the understanding of the corrosion processes to establish recommendations on the chemistry control of the coolant and to predict the long term behavior of the materials by the development of corrosion models. (author)

  15. Soliton fission and supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-17

    Oct 17, 2015 ... We present a practical design of novel photonic crystal fibre (PCF) to investigate the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond pulses for the application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) based on supercontinuum generation (SCG) process. In addition, this paper contains a brief introduction of the ...

  16. The concepts of liquid metal of IV generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonnier, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The concepts of liquid metals, due to their large spectrum, show important possibility of sustainable development: two concepts of liquid metal (Sodium and Lead) were engaged in the frame of the IV generation. The reactors with sodium benefit from considerable background of experience and of important work on projects to aim at the price diminution and the increase of safety (EFR, JSFR). The commitment of Japan as a leader of this concept and the support by France allow to contemplate an industrial deployment from 2015. The lead reactors offer some advantages in the domain of safety but otherwise require a highly important research and development binded to the control of the corrosion, the perspective of deployment of this concept are more hypothetical

  17. Methods and criterions for IV generation system choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F; Fiorini, G. L.

    2005-01-01

    The international forum of IV generation has been built up in 2000, initiated by the American Energy Department with an initial participation of nine countries (and of ten today). In a primary phase of these works, which was finished in October 2002, the forum objects were to define the list of nuclear systems conditions which could be ready to use in 2030 to make a sustainable energy development, and select previously the most promising technology to attain these purposes. This article presents, with its trumps and limits, the methodology which was used to select, starting from 120 propositions, one set of 6 systems which includes key technologies for the nuclears of the 21st century. (Authors)

  18. Euratom research and training in generation IV systems with emphasis on V/HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van; Manolatos, P.; Fuetterer, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this overview paper, the following questions are addressed: (1) What are the challenges facing the European Union nuclear fission research community in the short (today), medium (2010) and long term (2040)? (2) What kind of research and technological development (RTD) does Euratom offer to respond to these challenges, in particular in the area of reactor systems and fuel cycles? In the general debate about energy supply technologies there are challenges of both a scientific and technological (S/T) as well as an economic and political (E/P) nature. Though the Community research programme acts mainly on the former, there is nevertheless important links with Community policy. These not only exist in the specific area of nuclear policy. It is shown in the particular area of nuclear fission, to what extent Euratom research, education and innovation ('Knowledge Triangle: Education, Research, and Innovation') respond to the S/T challenges: (1) sustainability, (2) economics, (3) safety, and (4) proliferation resistance. At the European Commission (EC), the research related to nuclear reactor systems and fuel cycles is principally under the responsibility of the 2 Directorates Generals (DG) DG Research (RTD, located in Brussels), which implements and manages the programme of 'indirect actions', and the DG Joint Research Centre (JRC, headquarters in Brussels and 7 scientific institutes in 5 Member States) which carries out 'direct actions' in their own laboratories. In this HTR-2006 introductory paper, the emphasis is on the indirect and direct actions of the 6 th Euratom research framework programme 2003-2006, FP-6, with special emphasis on V/HTR Generation IV research. (orig.)

  19. Fluidized bed nuclear reactor as a IV generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    2002-01-01

    The object of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is seen that FBNR generally meets the goals of providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production; minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment; increase the assurance that it is a very unattractive and least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials; excel in safety and reliability; have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; eliminate the need for offsite emergency response; have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects. The other advantages of the proposed design are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (author)

  20. Overview of Generation IV (Gen IV) Reactor Designs - Safety and Radiological Protection Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudrand, Olivier; Blanc, Daniel; Ivanov, Evgeny; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Kissane, Martin; Meignen, Renaud; Monhardt, Daniel; Nicaise, Gregory; Bourgois, Thierry; Bruna, Giovanni; Hache, Georges; Repussard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an updated overview of specific safety and radiological protection issues for all the reactor concepts adopted by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum), independent of their advantages or disadvantages in terms of resource optimization or long-lived-waste reduction. In particular, this new document attempts to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each concept in terms of safety, taking into account the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) statement concerning safety objectives for new nuclear power plants. Using an identical framework for each reactor concept (sodium-cooled fast reactors or SFR, high / very-high temperature helium-cooled reactors of V/HTR, gas-cooled fast reactors or GFR, lead-or lead / bismuth-cooled fast reactors or LFR, molten salt reactors or MSR, and supercritical-water-cooled reactors or SCWR), this summary report provides some general conclusions regarding their safety and radiological protection issues, inspired by WENRA's safety objectives and on the basis of available information. Initial lessons drawn from the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 have also been taken into account in IRSN's analysis of each reactor concept

  1. Generation IV concepts - Presentation at ACRS workshop 'Regulatory challenges for future nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versluis, Rob M.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the Near-Term Deployment Working Group was to define a technical approach for Generation IV system with enough detail to allow evaluation against the goal, bur broad enough to allow for optional features and trade. The following concepts were taken into account: water coolant (water or heavy water), gas coolant, liquid metal coolants. Concepts were grouped according to concept sets of technology base share and design approach. Water coolant concepts were grouped as follows: PWR loop reactors, integral primary system PWRs, Integral BWRs, pressure tube reactors, high conversion cores, supercritical water reactors, advanced fuel cycle concepts. Gas coolant concepts were grouped as follows: pebble bed modular reactors; prismatic modular reactors, very high temperature reactors, fast spectrum reactors, others (fluidized bed, moving ignition zone concept). Liquid metal concepts were grouped in four major categories: Medium-to-large oxide-fueled systems; Medium-sized metal-fueled systems; Medium-sized Pb/Pb-Bi systems; Small-sized Pb/Pb-Bi systems. The three supporting technology areas were examined: Fuels (oxide, metal, nitride); Coolants (Na, Pb/Pb-Bi); Fuel Cycle (advanced aqueous, pyroprocess). Non-classical concepts were also grouped as follows: Eutectic metallic fuel; Molten salt fuel; Gas core reactor; Molten salt cooled/solid fuel; Organic cooled reactor; Solid conduction/heat pipe; Fission product direct energy conversion. The Technical working Groups are analyzing the candidate concepts for performance potential relative to the goals; and technology gaps

  2. Fission product data for thermal reactors. Final report. Part I. A data set for EPRI-CINDER using ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Stamatelatos, M.G.

    1976-12-01

    A four-group fission-product neutron absorption library, appropriate for use in thermal reactors, is described. All decay parameters are taken from ENDF/B-IV. The absorption cross sections are also processed from ENDF/B-IV files, first into a 154-group set and subsequently collapsed into the 4-group set described in this report. The decay and cross section data were used to form 84 linear chains in the CINDER code format. These chains contain all significant fission products having half-lives exceeding 4 hours--a total of 186 nuclides. A 12-chain set containing one pseudo-chain for use in spatial depletion calculations is described. This set accurately reproduces the aggregate absorption buildup of the 84 chains. This report describes the chains and processed data, results of comparison calculations for various fuels, and a comparison of calculated temporal fission-product absorption buildup with corresponding results from a long-term fuel irradiation and cooling integral experiment

  3. Transient Analysis of Generation IV quick reactors; Analisis de Transitorios en Reactores Rapidos de Generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2013-07-01

    As a complement to the attached code 3D neutron-CIEMAT thermohydraulic added a module to simulate transient. Temporary kinetics is resolved by factoring flow in a spatial part and another storm. MCNP provides the reactivity and updated spatial function and COBRA-IV calculates the temperature distribution. Temporary dependence of amplitude is calculated using time delayed neutron Kinetic equations. As an example of application, examines a transient loss of flow in MYRRHA, a lead-cooled experimental reactor.

  4. ARTIST: a cooperative safety project to study fission product retention in a ruptured steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.; Dehbi, A.; Suckow, D.; Birchley, J.

    2001-01-01

    Sequences such as a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) with stuck-open relief valve represent a significant public risk by virtue of the open path for release of radioactivity. The release may be lessened by deposition of fission products on the steam generator (SG) tubes and other structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. The absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry and controlling processes, however, make the retention difficult to quantify and credit for it is typically not taken in risk assessments. The ARTIST experimental program to be conducted at Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, will simulate the flow and retention of aerosol-borne fission products in the SG secondary, and thus provide a unique database to support safety assessments and analytical models. The project, foreseen in seven phases, will study phenomena at the separate effect and integral levels, and also address accident management (AM) issues. The prescribed values of the controlling parameters (aerosol size, aerosol type, gas flow velocity, residence time, etc) cover the range expected in severe and design basis accident scenarios. (authors)

  5. Nuclear data uncertainty analysis for the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Mikityuk, K.

    2012-01-01

    For the European 2400 MW Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GoFastR), this paper summarizes a priori uncertainties, i.e. without any integral experiment assessment, of the main neutronic parameters which were obtained on the basis of the deterministic code system ERANOS (Edition 2.2-N). JEFF-3.1 cross-sections were used in conjunction with the newest ENDF/B-VII.0 based covariance library (COMMARA-2.0) resulting from a recent cooperation of the Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. The basis for the analysis is the original GoFastR concept with carbide fuel pins and silicon-carbide ceramic cladding, which was developed and proposed in the first quarter of 2009 by the 'French alternative energies and Atomic Energy Commission', CEA. The main conclusions from the current study are that nuclear data uncertainties of neutronic parameters may still be too large for this Generation IV reactor, especially concerning the multiplication factor, despite the fact that the new covariance library is quite complete; These uncertainties, in relative terms, do not show the a priori expected increase with bum-up as a result of the minor actinide and fission product build-up. Indeed, they are found almost independent of the fuel depletion, since the uncertainty associated with 238 U inelastic scattering results largely dominating. This finding clearly supports the activities of Subgroup 33 of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC), i.e. Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data, attempting to reduce the present unbiased uncertainties on nuclear data through adjustments based on available experimental data. (authors)

  6. Application of a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method to generate correlations between independent neutron fission yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Fission product yields are fundamental parameters for several nuclear engineering calculations and in particular for burn-up/activation problems. The impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past and evaluations were released, although still incomplete. Recently, the nuclear community expressed the need for full fission yield covariance matrices to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. In this work, we studied and applied a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method for covariance generation, and compared the generated uncertainties to the original data stored in the JEFF-3.1.2 library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the library. The uncertainty quantification was performed with the Monte Carlo sampling technique. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the statistics of decay heat. (authors)

  7. Campbelling-type theory of fission chamber signals generated by neutron chains in a multiplying medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pál, L.; Pázsit, I.

    2015-01-01

    The signals of fission chambers are usually evaluated with the help of the co-called Campbelling techniques. These are based on the Campbell theorem, which states that if the primary incoming events, generating the detector pulses, are independent, then relationships exist between the moments of various orders of the signal in the current mode. This gives the possibility to determine the mean value of the intensity of the detection events, which is proportional to the static flux, from the higher moments of the detector current, which has certain advantages. However, the main application area of fission chambers is measurements in power reactors where, as is well known, the individual detection events are not independent, due to the branching character of the neutron chains (neutron multiplication). Therefore it is of interest to extend the Campbelling-type theory for the case of correlated neutron events. Such a theory could address two questions: partly, to investigate the bias when the traditional Campbell techniques are used for correlated incoming events; and partly, to see whether the correlation properties of the detection events, which carry information on the multiplying medium, could be extracted from the measurements. This paper is devoted to the investigation of these questions. The results show that there is a potential possibility to extract the same information from fission chamber signals in the current mode as with the Rossi- or Feynman-alpha methods, or from coincidence and multiplicity measurements, which so far have required detectors working in the pulse mode. It is also shown that application of the standard Campbelling techniques to neutron detection in multiplying systems does not lead to an error for estimating the stationary flux as long as the detector is calibrated in in situ measurements

  8. Building generation four: results of Canadian research program on generation IV energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.; Leung, L.K.H.; Guzonas, D.; Brady, D.; Poupore, J.; Zheng, W.

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative grant program has been established between Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to support research and development (R&D) for the Canadian SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) concept, which is one of six advanced nuclear reactor systems being studied under the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). The financial support for this grant program is provided by NSERC and NRCan. The grant fund has supported university research investigating the neutronic, fuel, thermal-hydraulics, chemistry and material properties of the Canadian SCWR concept. Twenty-two universities have actively collaborated with experts from AECL Nuclear Laboratories and NRCan's CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) Laboratory to advance the technologies, enhance their infrastructure, and train highly qualified personnel. Their R&D findings have been contributed to GIF fulfilling Canada's commitments. The unique collaborative structure and the contributions to Canada's nuclear science and technology of the NSERC/NRCan/AECL Generation IV Energy Technologies Program are presented. (author)

  9. Availability analysis of United States BWR IV electrical generation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renick, D.H.; Li, F.; Todreas, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Availability, as quantified by power output levels, from all active U.S. BWR IV plants were analyzed over a seven and a half year period to determine the operational characteristics of these plants throughout an operating cycle. The operational data were examined for infant mortality, end of cycle decreased availability, and seasonal availability variations. Scheduled outages were also examined to determine the industry's current approach to planning maintenance outages. The results of this study show that nuclear power plants do suffer significant infant mortality following a refueling outage. And while they do not suffer an end of cycle decrease in availability, a mid-cycle period of decreased availability is evident. This period of decreased availability is due to a combination of increased forced unavailability and seasonally scheduled maintenance and refueling outages. These findings form the start of a rational approach to increasing plant availability. (author)

  10. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-04

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  11. Eugene P. Wigner's Visionary Contributions to Generations-I through IV Fission Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Among Europe's greatest scientists who fled to Britain and America in the 1930s, Eugene P. Wigner made instrumental advances in reactor physics, reactor design and technology, and spent nuclear fuel processing for both purposes of developing atomic weapons during world-war II and nuclear power afterwards. Wigner who had training in chemical engineering and self-education in physics first gained recognition for his remarkable articles and books on applications of Group theory to Quantum mechanics, Solid state physics and other topics that opened new branches of Physics.

  12. Eugene P. Wigner’s Visionary Contributions to Generations-I through IV Fission Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Frank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among Europe’s greatest scientists who fled to Britain and America in the 1930s, Eugene P. Wigner made instrumental advances in reactor physics, reactor design and technology, and spent nuclear fuel processing for both purposes of developing atomic weapons during world-war II and nuclear power afterwards. Wigner who had training in chemical engineering and self-education in physics first gained recognition for his remarkable articles and books on applications of Group theory to Quantum mechanics, Solid state physics and other topics that opened new branches of Physics.

  13. Technology Road-map Update for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This Technology Road-map Update provides an assessment of progress made by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in the development of the six systems selected when the original Technology Road-map was published in 2002. More importantly, it provides an overview of the major R and D objectives and milestones for the coming decade, aiming to achieve the Generation IV goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident are taken into account to ensure that Generation IV systems attain the highest levels of safety, with the development of specific safety design criteria that are applicable across the six systems. Accomplishing the ten-year R and D objectives set out in this new Road-map should allow the more advanced Generation IV systems to move towards the demonstration phase. (authors)

  14. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-01-01

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning

  15. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  16. Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Bolotnov, I. A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Jansen, K. E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

  17. Survey of neutron spectra generated by the fission of heavy nuclei induced by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovchikova, G.N.; Trufanov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    A review of neutron fission spectra measurements is presented. This review and the results of this analysis was performed with the participation of the authors. It is shown that there is a need for additional measurements of the energy and angular distributions of secondary neutrons in order to improve the understanding of the neutron emission mechanism in fission. (author). 21 refs, 6 figs

  18. Controlling Long-Lived Triplet Generation from Intramolecular Singlet Fission in the Solid State

    KAUST Repository

    Pace, Natalie A.

    2017-11-30

    The conjugated polymer poly(benzothiophene dioxide) (PBTDO1) has recently been shown to exhibit efficient intramolecular singlet fission in solution. In this paper, we investigate the role of intermolecular interactions in triplet separation dynamics after singlet fission. We use transient absorption spectroscopy to determine the singlet fission rate and triplet yield in two polymers differing only by side chain motif in both solution and the solid state. Whereas solid-state films show singlet fission rates identical to those measured in solution, the average lifetime of the triplet population increases dramatically, and is strongly dependent on side-chain identity. These results show that it may be necessary to carefully engineer the solid-state microstructure of these “singlet fission polymers” in order to produce the long-lived triplets needed to realize efficient photovoltaic devices.

  19. Controlling Long-Lived Triplet Generation from Intramolecular Singlet Fission in the Solid State

    KAUST Repository

    Pace, Natalie A.; Zhang, Weimin; Arias, Dylan H.; McCulloch, Iain; Rumbles, Garry; Johnson, Justin C.

    2017-01-01

    The conjugated polymer poly(benzothiophene dioxide) (PBTDO1) has recently been shown to exhibit efficient intramolecular singlet fission in solution. In this paper, we investigate the role of intermolecular interactions in triplet separation dynamics after singlet fission. We use transient absorption spectroscopy to determine the singlet fission rate and triplet yield in two polymers differing only by side chain motif in both solution and the solid state. Whereas solid-state films show singlet fission rates identical to those measured in solution, the average lifetime of the triplet population increases dramatically, and is strongly dependent on side-chain identity. These results show that it may be necessary to carefully engineer the solid-state microstructure of these “singlet fission polymers” in order to produce the long-lived triplets needed to realize efficient photovoltaic devices.

  20. Exergy analysis for Generation IV nuclear plant optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.; Azzaro-Pantel, C.; Domenech, S.; Pibouleau, L.; Latge, Ch.; Haubensack, D.; Dumaz, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the exergy concept to an energy production system involving a very high temperature reactor coupled with an innovative electricity-generating cycle. The objective is to propose a general approach to quantify exergy destruction of the involved process components, modelled by a thermodynamic simulator (Proceedings of the Conference on High Temperature Reactors, Beijing, China, 22-24 September 2004, International Atomic Agency, Vienna (Austria), HTR-2004; 1-11). The minimization of exergy destruction is then identified as the optimization criterion used in an optimization framework based on a genetic algorithm, in which the model is embedded. Finally, the approach is applied to electrical production by a Brayton-Rankine combined cycle connected to a nuclear reactor. Some typical results are presented. The perspectives of this work including the cogeneration of hydrogen and electricity are highlighted. (authors)

  1. Exergy analysis for Generation IV nuclear plant optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.; Azzaro-Pantel, C.; Domenech, S.; Pibouleau, L. [Univ Toulouse, Lab Genie Chim, CNRS, UMR 5503, F-31700 Toulouse 1 (France); Latge, Ch. [CEA Cadarache DEN DTN DIR, St Paul Les Durance, (France); Haubensack, D.; Dumaz, P. [CEA Cadarache DEN DER SESI LCSI, St Paul Les Durance (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of the exergy concept to an energy production system involving a very high temperature reactor coupled with an innovative electricity-generating cycle. The objective is to propose a general approach to quantify exergy destruction of the involved process components, modelled by a thermodynamic simulator (Proceedings of the Conference on High Temperature Reactors, Beijing, China, 22-24 September 2004, International Atomic Agency, Vienna (Austria), HTR-2004; 1-11). The minimization of exergy destruction is then identified as the optimization criterion used in an optimization framework based on a genetic algorithm, in which the model is embedded. Finally, the approach is applied to electrical production by a Brayton-Rankine combined cycle connected to a nuclear reactor. Some typical results are presented. The perspectives of this work including the cogeneration of hydrogen and electricity are highlighted. (authors)

  2. Sargent-IV Project. Development of new methodologies for safety analysis of Generation IV reactors; Proyecto SARGEB-IV. Desarrollo de nuevas metodologias de analisis de seguridad para reactores de Generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queral, C.; Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G.

    2013-07-01

    The main result of this paper is the proposal for the addition of new ingredients in the safety analysis methodologies for Generation-IV reactors that integrates the features of probabilistic safety analysis within deterministic. This ensures a higher degree of integration between the classical deterministic and probabilistic methodologies.

  3. Technological studies for obtaining lead oxide compacts used in generation IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Benga, D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main concerns of the nuclear research at this moment is the development of the necessary technologies for Generation IV reactors. The main candidate as coolant agent in these reactors is molten lead but this material involves ensuring the oxygen control, due to potential contamination of coolant through the formation of solid oxides and the influence on the corrosion rate of structural parts and for this reason, the oxygen concentration must be kept in a well specified domain. One of the proposed methods for oxygen monitoring and control in the technology of Generation IV reactors, is the use of PbO compacts. For this paper technological tests were performed for developing and setting the optimal parameters in order to attain lead oxide compacts necessary for the oxygen control technology in Generation IV nuclear reactors. (authors)

  4. Computations of nuclear response functions with MACK-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Gohar, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The MACK computer program calculates energy pointwise and multigroup nuclear response functions from basic nuclear data in ENDF/B format. The new version of the program, MACK-IV, incorporates major developments and improvements aimed at maximizing the utilization of available nuclear data and ensuring energy conservation in nuclear heating calculations. A new library, MACKLIB-IV, of nuclear response functions was generated in the CTR energy group structure of 171 neutron groups and 36 gamma groups. The library was prepared using MACK-IV and ENDF/B-IV and is suitable for fusion, fusion-fission hybrids, and fission applications

  5. Computations of nuclear response functions with MACK-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M A; Gohar, Y

    1978-01-01

    The MACK computer program calculates energy pointwise and multigroup nuclear response functions from basic nuclear data in ENDF/B format. The new version of the program, MACK-IV, incorporates major developments and improvements aimed at maximizing the utilization of available nuclear data and ensuring energy conservation in nuclear heating calculations. A new library, MACKLIB-IV, of nuclear response functions was generated in the CTR energy group structure of 171 neutron groups and 36 gamma groups. The library was prepared using MACK-IV and ENDF/B-IV and is suitable for fusion, fusion-fission hybrids, and fission applications.

  6. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, William E.; Blandford, Edward; Kim, Lance

    2009-01-01

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public

  9. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A. S.

    2010-09-01

    The majority of NPPs worldwide are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. (...) For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, Research and Development is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Since the very beginning of the international cooperation on Generation IV, viz. the year 2000, the main research interest in Europe as regards the advanced fast-spectrum systems needed for achieving complete fuel cycle closure, has been for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). However, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is currently considered as the main back-up solution. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For depressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be

  10. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  11. FORIG: a computer code for calculating radionuclide generation and depletion in fusion and fission reactors. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    In this manual we describe the use of the FORIG computer code to solve isotope-generation and depletion problems in fusion and fission reactors. FORIG runs on a Cray-1 computer and accepts more extensive activation cross sections than ORIGEN2 from which it was adapted. This report is an updated and a combined version of the previous ORIGEN2 and FORIG manuals. 7 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Generation of ENDF/B-IV based 35 group neutron cross-section library and its application in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.B.; Sinha, A.

    1985-01-01

    A 35 group cross-section library with P/sub 3/-anisotropic scattering matrices and resonance self-shielding factors has been generated from the basic ENDF/B-IV cross-section files for 57 elements. This library covers the neutron energy range from 0.005 ev to 15 MeV and is well suited for the neutronics and safety analysis of fission, fusion and hybrid systems. The library is contained in two well known files, namely, ISOTXS and BRKOXS. In order to test the efficacy of this library and to bring out the importance of resonance self-shielding, a few selected fast critical assemblies representing large dilute oxide and carbide fueled uranium and plutonium based systems have been analysed. These assemblies include ZPPR/sub 2/, ZPR-3-48, ZPR-3-53, ZPR-6-6A, ZPR-6-7, ZPR-9-31 and ZEBRA-2 and are amongst those recommended by the US Nuclear Data Evaluation Working Group for testing the accuracy of cross-sections. The evaluated multiplication constants of these assemblies compare favourably with those calculated by others

  13. Comparative analysis of power conversion cycles optimized for fast reactors of generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Pichel, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    For the study, which is presented here, has been chosen as the specific parameters of each reactor, which are today the three largest projects within generation IV technology development: ESFR for the reactor's sodium, LEADER for the lead reactor's and finally, GoFastR in the case of reactor gas-cooled.

  14. AMZ, multigroup constant library for EXPANDA code, generated by NJOY code from ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.; Moraes, Marisa de

    1985-01-01

    It is described a library of multigroup constants with 70 energy groups and 37 isotopes to fast reactor calculation. The cross sections, scattering matrices and self-shielding factors were generated by NJOY code and RGENDF interface program, from ENDF/B-IV'S evaluated data. The library is edited in adequated format to be used by EXPANDA code. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2005-01-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R and D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R and D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan

  16. Generation of multigroup cross sections from ENDF/B-IV nuclear data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapot, J.L.C.; Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1980-04-01

    The generation of nuclear data compacted in energy groups is made. The nuclear data library ENDF/B-IV, Evaluated Nuclear Data File, and the new version of the codes ETOG-3 and ETOT-3 are utilized. The data obtained are compared with data from other sources. (L.F.) [pt

  17. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Gas cooling in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has a long history, the corresponding reactor types developed in France, the UK and the US having been thermal neutron spectrum systems using graphite as the moderator. The majority of NPPs worldwide, however, are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. These NPPs - of the so-called second generation - will soon need replacement, and a third generation is now being made available, offering increased safety while still based on light water technology. For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, R and D is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure

  18. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the {sup 56}Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the {sup 242}Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  19. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L.

    2017-01-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the 56 Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the 242 Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  20. Study of the prompt gamma ray signal from fissions in special nuclear materials induced using an associated particle neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltick, D. S.; Kane, S. Z.

    2009-01-01

    More than 42 million cargo containers entered the United States in 2005. To search for a few kilograms of special nuclear material (SNM) within this vast stream of cargo, an inspection system based on neutron-induced fission followed by the coincident detection of multiple prompt fission gamma rays is investigated using MCNP-Polimi code. The system utilizes two deuterium-tritium (DT) associated particle neutron generators, each capable of 10 9 neutrons/s at 14.1 MeV, with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ZnO:Ga alpha detectors internal to the generator. Because prompt fission signals are approximately 100 times stronger than the delayed signals, the neutron flux is greatly reduced compared to 10 11-12 neutrons/s required for systems based on delayed signals such as the 'nuclear car wash' [4]. In addition the system utilizes 30 cm deep liquid krypton (LKr) noble gas detectors having 94% detection efficiency for 1 MeV gamma rays, high solid angle coverage (∼ 50% of the total solid angle), and sub-nanosecond timing resolution (∼ 600 ps). An algorithm for distinguishing U-235 from U-238 is presented. (authors)

  1. Overview of Generation IV (Gen IV) Reactor Designs - Safety and Radiological Protection Considerations. Published on September 24, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Bruna, Giovanni; Baudrand, Olivier; Blanc, Daniel; Ivanov, Evgeny; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Kissane, Martin; Meignen, Renaud; Monhardt, Daniel; Nicaise, Gregory; Bourgois, Thierry; Hache, Georges

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an updated overview of specific safety and radiological protection issues for all the reactor concepts adopted by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum), independent of their advantages or disadvantages in terms of resource optimization or long-lived-waste reduction. In particular, this new document attempts to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each concept in terms of safety, taking into account the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) statement concerning safety objectives for new nuclear power plants. Using an identical framework for each reactor concept (sodium-cooled fast reactors or SFR, high / very-high temperature helium-cooled reactors of V/HTR, gas-cooled fast reactors or GFR, lead-or lead / bismuth-cooled fast reactors or LFR, molten salt reactors or MSR, and supercritical-water-cooled reactors or SCWR), this summary report provides some general conclusions regarding their safety and radiological protection issues, inspired by WENRA's safety objectives and on the basis of available information. Initial lessons drawn from the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 have also been taken into account in IRSN's analysis of each reactor concept

  2. Redox reactions of U(IV) and Pu(IV) with H2O2 generated in nitric acid media by power ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisy, P.; Venault, L.; Madic, C.; Nikitenko, S.

    1998-01-01

    Power ultrasound causes water molecule dissociation on H o and OH o radicals due to high local temperatures and pressures generated in the cavitation threshold. In nitric acid media scavenging of OH o radicals with NO 3 - followed by NO 3 o radicals hydrolysis leads to H 2 O 2 formation. It was shown that H 2 O 2 generated under the effect of ultrasound with the frequency 20 kHz and intensity 1-3 Wcm -2 (Ar atmosphere) oxidizes U(IV) to U(VI) or reduces Pu(IV) to Pu(III) in 1-4 M HNO 3 in the presence of antinitrous reagents ( N 2 H 5 NO 3 or NH 2 SO 3 H). The effect of HNO 3 concentration and ultrasonic intensity on the kinetics of U(IV) oxidation and Pu(IV) reduction was studied. (author)

  3. First step towards a non-adiabatic description of the fission process based on the Generator Coordinate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacroix D.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the different theoretical approaches able to describe fission, microscopic ones can help us in the understanding of this process, as they have the advantage of describing the nuclear structure and the dynamics in a consistent manner. The sole input of the calculations is the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Such a microscopic time-dependent and quantum mechanical formalism has already been used, based on the Gaussian Overlap Approximation of the Generator Coordinate Method with the adiabatic approximation, to analyze the collective dynamics of low-energy fission in 238U [1]. However, at higher energies, a few MeV above the barrier, the adiabatic approximation doesn’t seem valid anymore. Indeed, manifestations of proton pair breaking have been observed in 238U and 239U for an excitation energy of 2.3 MeV above the barrier [2–4]. Taking the intrinsic excitations into account during the fission process will enable us to determine the coupling between collective and intrinsic degrees of freedom, in particular from saddle to scission. Guidelines of the new formalism under development are presented and some preliminary results on overlaps between non excited and excited states are discussed.

  4. First Step Towards a Non-Adiabatic Description of the Fission Process Based on the Generator Coordinate Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, R.; Goutte, H.; Gogny, D.; Dubray, N.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-01-01

    Among the different theoretical approaches able to describe fission, microscopic ones can help us in the understanding of this process, as they have the advantage of describing the nuclear structure and the dynamics in a consistent manner. The sole input of the calculations is the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Such a microscopic time-dependent and quantum mechanical formalism has already been used, based on the Gaussian Overlap Approximation of the Generator Coordinate Method with the adiabatic approximation, to analyze the collective dynamics of low-energy fission in 238 U. However, at higher energies, a few MeV above the barrier, the adiabatic approximation doesn't seem valid anymore. Indeed, manifestations of proton pair breaking have been observed in 238 U and 239 U for an excitation energy of 2.3 MeV above the barrier. Taking the intrinsic excitations into account during the fission process will enable us to determine the coupling between collective and intrinsic degrees of freedom, in particular from saddle to scission. Guidelines of the new formalism under development are presented and some preliminary results on overlaps between non excited and excited states are discussed.

  5. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF) haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning approaches. PMID:22554201

  6. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo-Ruei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHODOLOGY TO ASSESS PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, R.; Bari, R.; Peterson, P.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Kalenchuk, D.

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) is one of the technology goals for advanced nuclear concepts, such as Generation IV systems. Under the auspices of the Generation IV International Forum, the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology of the U.S. DOE, the Office of Nonproliferation Policy of the National Nuclear Security Administration, and participating organizations from six other countries are sponsoring an international working group to develop an evaluation methodology for PR and PP. This methodology will permit an objective PR and PP comparison between alternative nuclear systems (e.g., different reactor types or fuel cycles) and support design optimization to enhance robustness against proliferation, theft and sabotage. The paper summarizes the proposed assessment methodology including the assessment framework, measures used to express the PR and PP characteristics of the system, threat definition, system element and target identification, pathway identification and analysis, and estimation of the measures

  8. Optimisation of the mechanical alloying process for odsferritic steels for generation IV reactors application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciulescu, M.; Carlan, P.; Mihalache, M.; Abrudeanu, M.

    2016-01-01

    ODS ferritic steels appear as promising materials for fusion and Gen IV fission reactors, offering high temperature performance, corrosion and irradiation resistance and meeting low activation criteria. Mechanical alloying (MA) is a powder metallurgy technique efficient for fabricating advanced materials, and has been used for strengthening structural materials including Fe-Cr alloys. In this paper a high-energy ball mill is used to study the microstructural evolution of 14YW alloy during the mechanical alloying process. The elemental powders are milled at a rotation speed of 250rot/min in cycles of 10min milling and 5min pause, with a ball-to-powder ration of 10:1 and in argon protective atmosphere. After 72 hours milling, the morphology and element distribution of the MA powders is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, respectively. It is observed that the particles size increases in the first milling stages and then decreases with the milling time. Changes in the material composition are analysed by X-ray diffraction (DRX). It seems that after milling part of the W remains non-dissolved in the Fe-Cr matrix retarding the solid solution formation. (authors)

  9. The fission yeast spindle orientation checkpoint: a model that generates tension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, Yannick; Reyes, Céline; Goldstone, Sherilyn; Tournier, Sylvie

    2006-10-15

    In all eukaryotes, the alignment of the mitotic spindle with the axis of cell polarity is essential for accurate chromosome segregation as well as for the establishment of cell fate, and thus morphogenesis, during development. Studies in invertebrates, higher eukaryotes and yeast suggest that astral microtubules interact with the cell cortex to position the spindle. These microtubules are thought to impose pushing or pulling forces on the spindle poles to affect the rotation or movement of the spindle. In the fission yeast model, where cell division is symmetrical, spindle rotation is dependent on the interaction of astral microtubules with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In these cells, a bub1-dependent mitotic checkpoint, the spindle orientation checkpoint (SOC), is activated when the spindles fail to align with the cell polarity axis. In this paper we review the mechanism that orientates the spindle during mitosis in fission yeast, and discuss the consequences of misorientation on metaphase progression. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Report on generation IV technical working group 3 : liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M. J.; Rosen, S. L.; Sagayama, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the first round of R and D roadmap activities of the Generation IV (Gen IV) Technical Working Group (TWG) 3, on liquid metal-cooled reactors. Liquid metal coolants give rise to fast spectrum systems, and thus the reactor systems considered in this TWG are all fast reactors. Gas-cooled fast reactors are considered in the context of TWG 2. As is noted in other Gen IV papers, this first round activity is termed ''screening for potential'', and includes collecting the most complete set of liquid metal reactor/fuel cycle system concepts possible and evaluating the concepts against the Gen IV principles and goals. Those concepts or concept groups that meet the Gen IV principles and which are deemed to have reasonable potential to meet the Gen IV goals will pass to the next round of evaluation. Although we sometimes use the terms ''reactor'' or ''reactor system'' by themselves, the scope of the investigation by TWG 3 includes not only the reactor systems, but very importantly the closed fuel recycle system inevitably required by fast reactors. The response to the DOE Request for Information (RFI) on liquid metal reactor/fuel cycle systems from principal investigators, laboratories, corporations, and other institutions, was robust and gratifying. Thirty three liquid metal concept descriptions, from eight different countries, were ultimately received. The variation in the scope, depth, and completeness of the responses created a significant challenge for the group, but the TWG made a very significant effort not to screen out concepts early in the process

  11. Fission-gas release in fuel performing to extended burnups in Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, M.R.; Novak, J.; Truant, P.T.

    1992-06-01

    The average discharge burnup of CANDU fuel is about 200 MWh/kgU. A significant number of 37-element bundles have achieved burnups in excess of 400 MWh/kgU. Some of these bundles have experienced failures related to their extended operation. To date, hot-cell examinations have been performed on fuel elements from nine 37-element bundles irradiated in Bruce NGS-A that have burnups in the range of 300-800 MWh/kgU. 1 Most of these have declining power histories from peak powers of up to 59 kW/m. Fission-gas releases of up to 26% have been observed and exhibit a strong dependence on fuel power. This obscures any dependence on burnup. The extent of fission-gas release at extended burnups was not predicted by low-burnup code extrapolations. This is attributed primarily to a reduction in fuel thermal conductivity which results in elevated operating temperatures. Reduced conductivity is due, at least in part, to the buildup of fission products in the fuel matrix. Some evidence of hyperstoichiometry exists, although this needs to be further investigated along with any possible relation to CANLUB graphite coating behaviour and sheath oxidation. Residual tensile sheath strains of up to 2% have been observed and can be correlated with fuel power/fission-gas release. SCC 2 -related defects have been observed in the sheath and endcaps of elements from bundles experiencing declining power histories to burnups in excess of 500 MWh/kgU. This indicates that the current recommended burnup limit of 450 MWh/kgU is justified. SCC-related defects have also been observed in ramped bundles having burnups < 450 MWh/kgU. Hence, additional guidelines are in place for power ramping extended-burnup fuel

  12. Singlet-Fission-Sensitized Hybrid Thin-Films For Next-Generation Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-12

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This grant enabled the acquisition of equipment for the fabrication of organic and nanocrystal based photovoltaic (PV... Photovoltaics . The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 singlet fission, nanocrystal, triplet, hybrid, photovoltaic REPORT

  13. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  14. Functional performance of the helical coil steam generator, Consolidated Nuclear Steam Generator (CNSG) IV system. Executive summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.B.

    1975-10-01

    The objective of this project was to study the functional performance of the CNSG - IV helical steam generator to demonstrate that the generator meets steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic performance specifications and that secondary flow instability will not be a problem. Economic success of the CNSG concepts depends to a great extent on minimizing the size of the steam generator and the reactor vessel for ship installation. Also, for marine application the system must meet stringent specifications for operating stability, transient response, and control. The full-size two-tube experimental unit differed from the CNSG only in the number of tubes and the mode of primary flow. In general, the functional performance test demonstrated that the helical steam generator concept will exceed the specified superheat of 35F at 100% load. The experimental measured superheat at comparable operating conditions was 95F. Testing also revealed that available computer codes accurately predict trends and overall performance characteristics

  15. A Study on the Planning of Technology Development and Research for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-08-15

    This study aimed at the planning the domestic technology development of the Gen IV and the formulating the international collaborative project contents and executive plan for 'A Validity Assessment and Policies of the R and D of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'. The results of the study include follows; - Survey of the technology state in the fields of the Gen IV system specific technologies and the common technologies, and the plans of the international collaborative research - Drawing up the executive research and development plan by the experts of the relevant technology field for the systems which Korean will participate in. - Formulating the effective conduction plan of the program reflecting the view of the experts from the industry, the university and the research institute. - Establishing the plan for estimation of the research fund and the manpower for the efficient utilization of the domestic available resources. This study can be useful material for evaluating the appropriateness of the Korea's participation in the international collaborative development of the Gen IV, and can be valuably utilized to establish the strategy for the effective conduction of the program. The executive plan of the research and development which was produced in this study will be used to the basic materials for the establishing the guiding direction and the strategic conduction of the program when the research and development is launched in the future.

  16. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-01-01

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models

  17. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  18. Approaches for the generation of a covariance matrix for the Cf-252 fission-neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannhart, W.

    1983-01-01

    After a brief retrospective glance is cast at the situation, the evaluation of the Cf-252 neutron spectrum with a complete covariance matrix based on the results of integral experiments is proposed. The different steps already taken in such an evaluation and work in progress are reviewed. It is shown that special attention should be given to the normalization of the neutron spectrum which must be reflected in the covariance matrix. The result of the least-squares adjustment procedure applied can easily be combined with the results of direct spectrum measurements and should be regarded as the first step in a new evaluation of the Cf-252 fission-neutron spectrum. (author)

  19. Fast reactor development and worldwide cooperation in Generation-IV International Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Objectives of Gen-IV systems development: Goals: Four challenging technology goals have been defined to be applied to innovative nuclear reactor concepts in the 21st century: 1) Safety and Reliability (safe and reliable operation, no offsite emergency response); 2) Sustainability (effective fuel utilization, minimization of nuclear waste); 3) Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection (to assure unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased physical protection against acts of terrorism); 4) Economic Competitiveness (life-cycle cost advantage over other energy resources). Phase: Each Generation-IV reactor system is one of three stages. 1) Viability Phase; 2) Performance Phase; 3) Demonstration Phase. Target: Commercial Deployment is expected around 2030s or beyond

  20. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  1. Comparative analysis of power conversion cycles optimized for fast reactors of generation IV; Analisis comparativo de ciclos de conversion de potencia optimizados para reactores rapidos de generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Pichel, G. D.

    2011-07-01

    For the study, which is presented here, has been chosen as the specific parameters of each reactor, which are today the three largest projects within generation IV technology development: ESFR for the reactor's sodium, LEADER for the lead reactor's and finally, GoFastR in the case of reactor gas-cooled.

  2. IRIS - Generation IV Advanced Light Water Reactor for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse, is developing a Generation IV Reactor, International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS). IRIS is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. It features innovative, advanced engineering, but it does not require new technology development since it relies on the proven technology of light water reactors. This paper presents the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and four-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. The path forward for possible future extension to a eight-year cycle will be also discussed. IRIS has a large potential worldwide market because of its proven technology, modularity, low financing, compatibility with existing grids and very limited infrastructure requirements. It is especially appealing to developing countries because of ease of operation and because its medium power is more adaptable to smaller grids. (author)

  3. Electrochemically Generated cis-Carboxylato-Coordinated Iron(IV) Oxo Acid-Base Congeners as Promiscuous Oxidants of Water Pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sousa, David P; Miller, Christopher J; Chang, Yingyue

    2017-01-01

    The nonheme iron(IV) oxo complex [FeIV(O)(tpenaH)]2+ and its conjugate base [FeIV(O)(tpena)]+ [tpena- = N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate] have been prepared electrochemically in water by bulk electrolysis of solutions prepared from [FeIII2(μ-O)(tpenaH)2](ClO4)4 at potentials...... of the electrochemically generated iron(IV) oxo complexes, in terms of the broad range of substrates examined, represents an important step toward the goal of cost-effective electrocatalytic water purification....

  4. Generation IV and transmutation materials (GETMAT) project: First assessment of selected results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Concetta; Serrano, Marta; Gessi, Alessandro; Henry, Jean; Malerba, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Generation IV and Transmutation Material (GETMAT) project has been initiated within the 7. EURATOM framework programme with the objective to support the development of innovative reactor designs. Emphasis has been put on the investigation, both in the theoretical and experimental domains, of selected material properties that are cross-cutting among the various Generation IV and Transmutation systems. The selection of the properties to be investigated has been performed by identifying relevant conditions of key components as cores and primary systems. Moreover, taking into account the envisaged conditions of these components it turned out that innovative materials might be a better choice with respect to conventional nuclear grade steels. Therefore, ODS alloys and 9-12 Cr Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels have been selected as reference for the GETMAT project. The R and D activities have been focused on basic characterisation of ODS alloys produced ad hoc for the project and on an extensive PIE programme of F/M steels irradiated in previous programmes. Finally, first principle modelling studies to explain irradiation hardening and embrittlement of F/M alloys were an additional important task. The objective of this manuscript is to make a first assessment of the results obtained within GETMAT. (authors)

  5. Generation IV reactors and the ASTRID prototype: lessons from the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauche, F.

    2012-01-01

    In France, the ASTRID prototype is an industrial demonstrator of a sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor (SFR), fulfilling the criteria for Generation IV reactors. ASTRID will meet safety requirements as stringent as for third generation reactors, and it takes into account lessons from the Fukushima accident. The objectives are to reinforce the robustness of the safety demonstration for all safety functions. ASTRID will feature an innovative core with a negative sodium void coefficient, it will take advantage of the large thermal inertia of SFR for decay heat removal, and will provide for a design either eliminating the sodium-water reaction, or guaranteeing no consequences for safety in case such reaction would take place. (author)

  6. The SGR Multipurpose - Generation IV - Transportable Cogeneration Nuclear Reactor with Innovative Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahladsingh, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Deregulation and liberalization are changing the global energy-markets. At the same time innovative technologies are introduced in the electricity industry; often as a requirement from the upcoming Digital Society. Energy solutions for the future are more seen as a mix of energy-sources for generation-, transmission- and distribution energy-services. The Internet Energy-web based 'Virtual' enterprises are coming up and will gradually change our society. It the fast changing world we have to realize that there will be less time to look for the adequate solutions to anticipate on global developments and the way they will influence our own societies. Global population may reach 9 billion people by 2030; this will put tremendous pressure on energy-, water- and food supply in the global economy. It is time to think about some major issues as described below and come up with the right answers. These are needed on very short term to secure a humane global economic growth and the sustainable global environment. The DOE (Department of Energy - USA) has started the Generation IV initiative for the new generation of nuclear reactors that must lead to much better safety, economics and public acceptance the new reactors. The SGR (Simplified Gas-cooled Reactor) is being proposed as a Generation IV modular nuclear reactor, using graphite pebbles as fuel, whereby an attempt has been made to meet all the DOE requirements, to be used for future nuclear reactors. The focus in this paper is on the changing and emerging global energy-markets and shows some relevant criteria to the nuclear industry and how we can anticipate with improved and new designs towards the coming Digital Society. (author)

  7. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  8. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  9. MACKLIB-IV: a library of nuclear response functions generated with the MACK-IV computer program from ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1978-03-01

    MACKLIB-IV employs the CTR energy group structure of 171 neutron groups and 36 gamma groups. A retrieval computer program is included with the library to permit collapsing into any other energy group structure. The library is in the new format of the ''MACK-Activity Table'' which uses a fixed position for each specific response function. This permits the user when employing the library with present transport codes to obtain directly the nuclear responses (e.g. the total nuclear heating) summed for all isotopes and integrated over any geometrical volume. The response functions included in the library are neutron kerma factor, gamma kerma factor, gas production and tritium-breeding functions, and all important reaction cross sections. Pertinent information about the library and a graphical display of six response functions for all materials in the library are given

  10. Basis for the safety approach for design and assessment of Generation IV nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.; Leahy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the RSWG is the implementation of a harmonized approach on long-term safety, and to address risk and regulatory issues in development of the next generation of nuclear systems. To this end, the group is proposing safety goals and evaluation methodology applicable for the design and assessment of future systems. The paper resumes the content of the first RSWG report which provides insights for the safety approach and assists the GIF Systems Steering Committee as well as the GIF Experts Group and the GIF Policy Group for the definition of the most adequate safety related Gen IV R and D. The document is also an essential contributor to help identifying the needed supportive crosscut R and D effort (i.e. applicable to all the innovative nuclear technologies). Although the report presents a number of thoughts and recommendations, it really represents only the start of the efforts for the RSWG. (author)

  11. Microscopy investigation on the corrosion of Canadian generation IV SCWR materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, X. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Zeng, Y.; Zheng, W. [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Woo, O.T.; Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Selection of fuel cladding materials for the Canadian Generation-IV Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) concept faces major challenges due to the severe operating conditions (650 {sup o}C and 25 MPa). High temperature microstructure stability and excellent resistance to general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking are key criteria. While corrosion resistance are generally assessed using weight change measurements and surface oxide examinations by optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques, for materials exposed to SCW conditions, advanced analytical techniques that involve the use of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques are required. This paper provides examples of such work conducted at CanmetMATERIALS and AECL to provide an in-depth understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of alloys exposed under SCW conditions. (author)

  12. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  13. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs

  14. Cross sections of the lumped fission products for the AMZ library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Corcueca, R.P.; Nascimento, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The preparation of the lumped fission product cross section for the AMZ library is described. For this purpose 100 nuclides were selected. The cross sections for each nuclide were generated by the NJOY code with evaluated nuclear data from ENDF/B-V, complemented with ENDF/B-IV data. A comparison is performed between the data obtained and the lumped fission product cross section of JFS-II [pt

  15. Hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter using multivariate optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscoso-Perez, Carmen; Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernandez-Fernandez, Esther; Prada-Rodriguez, Dario

    2004-01-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method, based on hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection, has been developed for the determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter samples. Atmospheric particulates matter was collected on glass fiber filters using a medium volume sampler (PM1 particulate matter). Two-level factorial designs have been used to optimise the hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) procedure. The effects of several parameters affecting the hydride generation efficiency (hydrochloric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and potassium iodide concentrations and flow rates) have been evaluated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. In addition, parameters affecting the hydride measurement (delay, analysis and memory times) have been also investigated. The significant parameters obtained (sodium tetrahydroborate concentration, sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate and analysis time for As; hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Se(IV); and sodium tetrahydroborate concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Te(IV)) have been optimized by using 2 n + star central composite design. Hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate were the significant parameters obtained for Sb and Bi determination, respectively. Using a univariate approach these parameters were optimized. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using several certified reference materials: SRM 1648 (urban particulate matter) and SRM 1649a (urban dust). Detection limits in the range of 6 x 10 -3 to 0.2 ng m -3 have been achieved. The developed methods were applied to several atmospheric particulate matter samples corresponding to A Coruna city (NW Spain)

  16. Pebble bed modular reactor - The first Generation IV reactor to be constructed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, S.; Nicholls, D.; Matzie, R.; Matzner, D.

    2004-01-01

    Substantial interest has been generated in advanced reactors over the past few years. This interest is motivated by the view that new nuclear power reactors will be needed to provide low carbon generation of electricity and possibly hydrogen to support the future growth in demand for both of these commodities. Some governments feel that substantially different designs will be needed to satisfy the desires for public perception, improved safety, proliferation resistance, reduced waste and competitive economics. This has motivated the creation of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems programme in which ten countries have agreed on a framework for international cooperation in research for advanced reactors. Six designs have been selected for continued evaluation, with the objective of deployment by 2030. One of these designs is the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is a thermal neutron spectrum system with a helium-cooled core utilising carbon-based fuel. The pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR), being developed in South Africa through a worldwide international collaborative effort led by Eskom, the national utility, will represent a key milestone on the way to achievement of the VHTR design objectives, but in the much nearer term. This paper outlines the design objectives, safety approach and design details of the PBMR, which is already at a very advanced stage of development. (author)

  17. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  18. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory peptides during the enzymatic hydrolysis of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongonierma, Alice B; Lamoureux, Candice; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2018-01-24

    Tropical banded crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were studied for their ability to yield hydrolysates with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory properties. A cricket protein isolate (CPI) was prepared following extraction of the water soluble proteins from G. sigillatus powder (CP). The extraction yield and purity were 20.90 ± 0.35% and 57.0 ± 2.23%, respectively. Endogenous proteinase activities were detected in the CP, which were linked to the significant protein breakdown seen in this sample. Fifteen CPI hydrolysates (H1-H15) were generated with Protamex™ using a design of experiments (DOE) approach combining three parameters, temperature (40, 50 and 60 °C), enzyme to substrate ratio (E : S, 0.50, 1.25 and 2.00% (w/w)) and hydrolysis time (60, 150 and 240 min). The DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of the CPI hydrolysates ranged from 0.40 ± 0.03/0.40 ± 0.02 (H2/H3) to 1.01 ± 0.07 mg mL -1 (H7). Following simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID), the DPP-IV IC 50 of CPI decreased (>3.57 vs. 0.78 ± 0.04 mg mL -1 ) while that of H5 increased (0.47 ± 0.03 vs. 0.71 ± 0.06 mg mL -1 ). This study has demonstrated for the first time that G. sigillatus protein hydrolysates are able to inhibit DPP-IV. The study of these hydrolysates in vivo is needed to evaluate their potential role in glycaemic management.

  19. Nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.) [pt

  20. Estimation, comparison, and evaluation of advanced fission power reactor generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddell, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The study compares the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR), the molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR), the light water breeder reactor (LWBR), and the heavy water reactor (HWR) with proposed light water reactors (LWR) and liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The relative electrical generation costs, including the effects of the introduction of advanced reactor fuel cycles into the U.S. nuclear power economy, were projected through the year 2030. The study utilized the NEEDS computer code which is a simulation of the U.S. nuclear power economy. The future potential electrical generation costs and cumulative consumption of uranium ore were developed using characterizations of the advanced systems. The reactor-fuel cycle characterizations were developed from literature reviews and personal discussions with the proponents of the various systems. The study developed a ranking of the concepts based on generation costs and uranium consumption

  1. Overview of the CEA R and D support to generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, Frank; Anzieu, Pascal; Billot, Philippe; Brossard, Philippe; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi

    2004-01-01

    As a result of an early technology road-map performed at the end of 2000, the CEA selected a sequenced development of advanced gas cooled high temperature nuclear systems as main focus for its R and D programme on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objectives originates both from the significance of fast neutrons and high temperature for nuclear energy to meet the needs anticipated beyond 2020/2030, and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR likely to meet international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor (> 950 deg. C) to efficiently produce, among others, hydrogen though thermo-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program launched in 2001 by the CEA with industrial partners on the 'Gas Technology Path', which is destined to become the contribution of France to the development of the VHTR and the GFR within the next phase of the Generation IV Forum

  2. Overview of the CEA R and D support to generation IV nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carre, Frank; Anzieu, Pascal; Billot, Philippe; Brossard, Philippe; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi

    2004-07-01

    As a result of an early technology road-map performed at the end of 2000, the CEA selected a sequenced development of advanced gas cooled high temperature nuclear systems as main focus for its R and D programme on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objectives originates both from the significance of fast neutrons and high temperature for nuclear energy to meet the needs anticipated beyond 2020/2030, and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR likely to meet international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor (> 950 deg. C) to efficiently produce, among others, hydrogen though thermo-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program launched in 2001 by the CEA with industrial partners on the 'Gas Technology Path', which is destined to become the contribution of France to the development of the VHTR and the GFR within the next phase of the Generation IV Forum.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-01-01

    The project entitled, 'Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors', was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A and M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  4. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  5. Generation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV-Inhibiting Peptides from β-Lactoglobulin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Shigemori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Calculation of neutron interior source distribution within subcritical fission-chain reacting systems for a prescribed power density generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Leonardo R.C.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are sub-critical systems stabilized by stationary external sources of neutrons. A system is subcritical when the removal by absorption and leakage exceeds the production by fission and tends to shut down. On the other hand, any subcritical system can be stabilized by including time-independent external sources of neutrons. The goal of this work is to determine the intensity of uniform and isotropic sources of neutrons that must be added inside all fuel regions of a subcritical system so that it becomes stabilized, generating a prescribed distribution of electric power. A computer program has been developed in Java language to estimate the intensity of stationary sources of neutrons that must be included in the fuel regions to drive the subcritical system with a fixed power distribution prescribed by the user. The mathematical model used to achieve this goal was the energy multigroup, slab-geometry neutron transport equation in the discrete ordinates (S N ) formulation and the response matrix method was applied to solve the forward and the adjoint S N problems. Numerical results are given to verify the present. (author)

  7. Calculation of neutron interior source distribution within subcritical fission-chain reacting systems for a prescribed power density generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Leonardo R.C.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: lrcmoraes@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: ricardob@iprj.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Modelagem Computacional

    2017-07-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are sub-critical systems stabilized by stationary external sources of neutrons. A system is subcritical when the removal by absorption and leakage exceeds the production by fission and tends to shut down. On the other hand, any subcritical system can be stabilized by including time-independent external sources of neutrons. The goal of this work is to determine the intensity of uniform and isotropic sources of neutrons that must be added inside all fuel regions of a subcritical system so that it becomes stabilized, generating a prescribed distribution of electric power. A computer program has been developed in Java language to estimate the intensity of stationary sources of neutrons that must be included in the fuel regions to drive the subcritical system with a fixed power distribution prescribed by the user. The mathematical model used to achieve this goal was the energy multigroup, slab-geometry neutron transport equation in the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) formulation and the response matrix method was applied to solve the forward and the adjoint S{sub N} problems. Numerical results are given to verify the present. (author)

  8. Temporal evolution of a granitic rock under thermal loads generated by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.; Ferreri, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal time history of a granitic mass under thermal loads, generated by the terminal subproducts arising from the Argentine nuclear programme is analyzed. This rock will be the final repository of those subproducts. The analysis is based on the consideration of a representative unit cell of the rock's centre using the Heating 5 programme. A preliminary analysis is made in order to obtain criteria with respect to the accuracy of the problem. Temporal evolution curves of the temperature on zones of interest of the unit cell considered are shown. Under the thermal loads considered, 500W by container, a maximum temperature of 55 deg C at the wall of the orifice subproducts' deposit is obtained. (Author) [es

  9. Methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection of Generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.; Peterson, P.; Nishimura, R.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    2005-01-01

    Enhanced proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) is one of the technology goals for advanced nuclear concepts. Under the auspices of the Generation IV International Forum an international experts group has been chartered to develop an evaluation methodology for PR and PP. This methodology will permit an objective PR and PP comparison between alternative nuclear systems and support design optimization to enhance robustness against proliferation, theft and sabotage. The assessment framework consists of identifying the threats to be considered, defining the PR and PP measures required to evaluate the resistance of a nuclear system to proliferation, theft or sabotage, and establishing quantitative methods to evaluate the proposed measures. The defined PR and PP measures are based on the design of the system (e.g., materials, processes, facilities), and institutional measures (e.g., safeguards, access control). The assessment methodology uses analysis of pathways' with respect to specific threats to determine the PR and PP measures. Analysis requires definition of the threats (i.e. objective, capability, strategy), decomposition of the system into its relevant elements (e.g., reactor core, fuel recycle facility, fuel storage), and identification of targets. (author)

  10. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  11. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  12. Improvement of Sodium Neutronic Nuclear Data for the Computation of Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archier, P.

    2011-01-01

    The safety criteria to be met for Generation IV sodium fast reactors (SFR) require reduced and mastered uncertainties on neutronic quantities of interest. Part of these uncertainties come from nuclear data and, in the particular case of SFR, from sodium nuclear data, which show significant differences between available international libraries (JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0). The objective of this work is to improve the knowledge on sodium nuclear data for a better calculation of SFR neutronic parameters and reliable associated uncertainties. After an overview of existing 23 Na data, the impact of the differences is quantified, particularly on sodium void reactivity effects, with both deterministic and stochastic neutronic codes. Results show that it is necessary to completely re-evaluate sodium nuclear data. Several developments have been made in the evaluation code Conrad, to integrate new nuclear reactions models and their associated parameters and to perform adjustments with integral measurements. Following these developments, the analysis of differential data and the experimental uncertainties propagation have been performed with Conrad. The resolved resonances range has been extended up to 2 MeV and the continuum range begins directly beyond this energy. A new 23 Na evaluation and the associated multigroup covariances matrices were generated for future uncertainties calculations. The last part of this work focuses on the sodium void integral data feedback, using methods of integral data assimilation to reduce the uncertainties on sodium cross sections. This work ends with uncertainty calculations for industrial-like SFR, which show an improved prediction of their neutronic parameters with the new evaluation. (author) [fr

  13. The nuclear fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty years after its discovery, the nuclear fission phenomenon is of recurring interest. When its fundamental physics aspects are considered, fission is viewed in a very positive way, which is reflected in the great interest generated by the meetings and large conferences organized for the 50th anniversary of its discovery. From a purely scientific and practical point of view, a new book devoted to the (low energy) nuclear fission phenomenon was highly desirable considering the tremendous amount of new results obtained since the publication of the book Nuclear Fission by Vandenbosch and Huizenga in 1973 (Academic Press). These new results could be obtained thanks to the growth of technology, which enabled the construction of powerful new neutron sources, particle and heavy ion accelerators, and very performant data-acquisition and computer systems. The re-invention of the ionization chamber, the development of large fission fragment spectrometers and sophisticated multiparameter devices, and the production of exotic isotopes also contributed significantly to an improved understanding of nuclear fission. This book is written at a level to introduce graduate students to the exciting subject of nuclear fission. The very complete list of references following each chapter also makes the book very useful for scientists, especially nuclear physicists. The book has 12 chapters covering the fission barrier and the various processes leading to fission as well as the characteristics of the various fission reaction products. In order to guarantee adequate treatment of the very specialized research fields covered, several distinguished scientists actively involved in some of these fields were invited to contribute their expertise as authors or co-authors of the different chapters

  14. Generation and testing of the shielding data library EURLIB for fission and fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caglioti, E.; Hehn, G.; Herrnberger, V.; Mattes, M.; Nicks, R.; Penkuhn, H.

    1977-01-01

    For the common field of core physics and shielding, the CSEWG group structure of 239 fast neutron groups had been proposed, of which the 100 neutron groups of the EURLIB Library is a sub-set for shielding. This standard group Library EURLIB had been initiated by the NEA-specialist group on shielding benchmarks in 1974. The wide acceptance of the Library for interpretation of benchmarks in the NEA program represents an important step forward in the standardization of group data which is the basic requirement for a useful collaboration. On the other side the interpretation of a series of different benchmark experiments with the EURLIB Library provides the best check of the cross section data for neutron and gamma-rays showing the needs for further improvements. The paper describes the joint work of IKE, Stuttgart and EURATOM, Ispra in generating multigroup libraries for neutron and gamma-rays. Special effort has been devoted to improve the flux weighting for both types of radiation and proper treatment of thermal neutrons. The coupled multigroup Library of 100 neutron and 20 gamma groups is collapsed into few group structures for typical designs of LWR, LMFBR, gas cooled and thermonuclear reactors. The work for optimal few group representation is done in cooperation with EIR, Wurenlingen. The testing of the EURLIB Library is a common effort of several institutions participating in the NEA shielding benchmark program

  15. Anomalies in the Charge Yields of Fission Fragments from the ^{238}U(n,f) Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J N; Lebois, M; Qi, L; Amador-Celdran, P; Bleuel, D; Briz, J A; Carroll, R; Catford, W; De Witte, H; Doherty, D T; Eloirdi, R; Georgiev, G; Gottardo, A; Goasduff, A; Hadyńska-Klęk, K; Hauschild, K; Hess, H; Ingeberg, V; Konstantinopoulos, T; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lorusso, G; Lozeva, R; Lutter, R; Marini, P; Matea, I; Materna, T; Mathieu, L; Oberstedt, A; Oberstedt, S; Panebianco, S; Podolyák, Zs; Porta, A; Regan, P H; Reiter, P; Rezynkina, K; Rose, S J; Sahin, E; Seidlitz, M; Serot, O; Shearman, R; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Smith, A G; Tveten, G M; Verney, D; Warr, N; Zeiser, F; Zielinska, M

    2017-06-02

    Fast-neutron-induced fission of ^{238}U at an energy just above the fission threshold is studied with a novel technique which involves the coupling of a high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer (MINIBALL) to an inverse-kinematics neutron source (LICORNE) to extract charge yields of fission fragments via γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy. Experimental data and fission models are compared and found to be in reasonable agreement for many nuclei; however, significant discrepancies of up to 600% are observed, particularly for isotopes of Sn and Mo. This indicates that these models significantly overestimate the standard 1 fission mode and suggests that spherical shell effects in the nascent fission fragments are less important for low-energy fast-neutron-induced fission than for thermal neutron-induced fission. This has consequences for understanding and modeling the fission process, for experimental nuclear structure studies of the most neutron-rich nuclei, for future energy applications (e.g., Generation IV reactors which use fast-neutron spectra), and for the reactor antineutrino anomaly.

  16. Electron Transfer from Triplet State of TIPS-Pentacene Generated by Singlet Fission Processes to CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangsu; Hwang, Daesub; Jung, Seok Il; Kim, Dongho

    2017-02-16

    To reveal the applicability of singlet fission processes in perovskite solar cell, we investigated electron transfer from TIPS-pentacene to CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 (MAPbI 3 ) perovskite in film phase. Through the observation of the shorter fluorescence lifetime in TIPS-pentacene/MAPbI 3 perovskite bilayer film (5 ns) compared with pristine MAPbI 3 perovskite film (20 ns), we verified electron-transfer processes between TIPS-pentacene and MAPbI 3 perovskite. Furthermore, the observation of singlet fission processes, a faster decay rate, TIPS-pentacene cations, and the analysis of kinetic profiles of the intensity ratio between 500 and 525 nm in the TA spectra of the TIPS-pentacene/MAPbI 3 perovskite bilayer film indicate that electron transfer occurs from triplet state of TIPS-pentacene generated by singlet fission processes to MAPbI 3 perovskite conduction band. We believe that our results can provide useful information on the design of solar cells sensitized by singlet fission processes and pave the way for new types of perovskite solar cells.

  17. Some consideration on nuclear power development. Topics aroused by U.S. proposed 'Generation IV Nuclear Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuanying; Chen Shiqi

    2001-01-01

    U.S. proposed 'Generation IV Nuclear Power System' concept. Its origin and proposed goals for it are analyzed; goals are compared with requirements of URD. In particular, discussed issues on nuclear fuel cycle and Non-proliferation. A well-considered nuclear power development plan, paying close attention to international trend and considering comprehensively domestic situation, is expected

  18. Safety approach and research and development presentation for the selected systems of the International forum Generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the six projects of the Generation IV forum: Sodium Fast reactor, lead fast reactor, gas fast reactor, very high temperature reactor, supercritical water reactor, molten salt reactor. The technical objectives of the reactor safety and the design/evaluation approach are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  19. PUFF-IV, Code System to Generate Multigroup Covariance Matrices from ENDF/B-VI Uncertainty Files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The PUFF-IV code system processes ENDF/B-VI formatted nuclear cross section covariance data into multigroup covariance matrices. PUFF-IV is the newest release in this series of codes used to process ENDF uncertainty information and to generate the desired multi-group correlation matrix for the evaluation of interest. This version includes corrections and enhancements over previous versions. It is written in Fortran 90 and allows for a more modular design, thus facilitating future upgrades. PUFF-IV enhances support for resonance parameter covariance formats described in the ENDF standard and now handles almost all resonance parameter covariance information in the resolved region, with the exception of the long range covariance sub-subsections. PUFF-IV is normally used in conjunction with an AMPX master library containing group averaged cross section data. Two utility modules are included in this package to facilitate the data interface. The module SMILER allows one to use NJOY generated GENDF files containing group averaged cross section data in conjunction with PUFF-IV. The module COVCOMP allows one to compare two files written in COVERX format. 2 - Methods: Cross section and flux values on a 'super energy grid,' consisting of the union of the required energy group structure and the energy data points in the ENDF/B-V file, are interpolated from the input cross sections and fluxes. Covariance matrices are calculated for this grid and then collapsed to the required group structure. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: PUFF-IV cannot process covariance information for energy and angular distributions of secondary particles. PUFF-IV does not process covariance information in Files 34 and 35; nor does it process covariance information in File 40. These new formats will be addressed in a future version of PUFF

  20. Comparative study of 99Mo/99mTc generators at base of synthesized gels starting from activation and fission 99Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, I.Z.; Monroy G, F.; Rivero G, T.; Rojas N, P.

    2007-01-01

    The 99m Tc is used for diagnostic and therapy. It is produced starting from 99 Mo, absorbed in chromatographic columns, loaded with alumina that absorb only 0.2% of 99 Mo with high specific activities of 99 Mo, obtained from the 235 U fission. Given these conditions and limitations, new preparation procedures of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators, its have been developed, using zirconium molybdates gels that incorporates until 30% of 99 Mo, conserve similar characteristics of quality and purity that the traditional generator. The radiochemical characteristics of the 99m Tc elution, depend strongly on the gel preparation conditions. In particular, the present work has by object to determine the influence of the 99 Mo used type, fission or activation product, during the gels synthesis, as well as the used air flow for the agitation in the gels preparation and its influence in the 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators quality. When diminishing the flow of agitation air the efficiency it increases and in the radionuclide purity of the eluates and when using 99 Mo from fission for the gels production it increases in an important way the elutriation efficiency, the radiochemical and radionuclide purity of the 99m Tc eluates. (Author)

  1. Production of a pulseable fission-like neutron flux using a monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltick, D.; McConchie, S.; Sword, E.

    2008-04-01

    The design and performance of a pulseable neutron source utilizing a D-T neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector are presented. Approximately half the generator's 14 MeV neutron flux is used to produce a fission-like neutron spectrum similar to 252Cf. For every 14 MeV neutron entering the reflector, more than one fission-like neutron is reflected back across the surface of the reflector. Because delayed neutron production is more than two orders of magnitude below the prompt neutron production, the source takes full advantage of the generator's pulsed mode capability. Applications include all elemental characterization systems using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy. The source simultaneously emits 14 MeV neutrons optimal to excite fast neutron-induced gamma-ray signals, such as from carbon and oxygen, and fission-like neutrons optimal to induce neutron capture gamma-ray signals, such as from hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine. Experiments were performed, which compare well to Monte Carlo simulations, showing that the uranium reflector enhances capture signals by up to a factor of 15 compared to the absence of a reflector.

  2. Contribution of the IV generation fast reactors to the sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza G, G.; Klapp E, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    During the XXI century all the energy forms are necessary for the sustainable development. A balanced energy politics has to use a mixture of energy sources that completes the objective of responding to the increase in the demand and that it uses non emitting gases sources of greenhouse effect like the nuclear one. It is evident the great existent difficulty to turn the objectives of emissions for the coming years without having the nuclear energy. Later on, the process continued outlining serious commitments among the development necessity, the improvement of the level of life and the competitiveness, and the execution from the established environmental requirements to world level. It is very foregone that the energy nuclear become the best energy source to improve the environmental conditions and that new initiatives are determined in those that this energy will have an important paper. The solution is to build a nuclear central of advanced design, using technologies that its help to brake the diffusion of the nuclear weapons. The nucleo electric energy at great scale should be developed on the base of designs of reactors and innovative processes of fuel that can lend technological support to the not nuclear proliferation regime, and that at the same time they contribute to satisfy the electricity demand in the world. In a scenario of increase of energy demand, mainly in the development countries, and of growing interest in the pollutants reduction originated by the use of fossil fuels, the nuclear reactors of IV Generation arise as proposal and challenge. Meanwhile the search of new technologies and innovations become imperative, translating an enormous evolution, not only in the conceptual projects, as well as in the fuel cycle so that, in a scenario of open economy, turn its more competitive. Inside the reactors of fourth generation, the quick reactors are configured as those that more assist to such demands and they will be, without a doubt, the reactors in

  3. Use of thorium in the generation IV Molten Salt reactors and perspectives for Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seneda, Jose A.; Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in thorium stems mainly from the fact that it is expected a substantial increase in uranium prices over the next fifty years. The reactors currently in operation consume 65,500 tons of uranium per year. Each electrical gigawatt (GWe) additional need about 200 tU mined per year. So advanced fuel cycles, which increase the reserves of nuclear materials are interesting, particularly the use of thorium to produce the fissile isotope 233 U. It is important to mention some thorium advantages. Thorium is three to five times more abundant than uranium in the earth's crust. Thorium has only one oxidation state. Additionally, thoria produces less radiotoxicity than the UO 2 because it produces fewer amounts of actinides, reducing the radiotoxicity of long life nuclear waste. ThO 2 has higher corrosion resistance than UO 2 , besides being chemically stable due to their low water solubility. The burning of Pu in a reactor based in thorium also decreases the inventories of Pu from the current fuel cycles, resulting in lower risks of material diversion for use in nuclear weapons. There are some ongoing projects in the world, taking into consideration the proposed goals for Generation IV reactors, namely: sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Some developments on the use of thorium in reactors are underway, with the support of the IAEA and some governs. Can be highlighted some reactor concepts using thorium as fuel: CANDU; ADTR -Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor; AHWR -Advanced Heavy Water Reactor proposed by India (light water cooled and moderated by heavy water) and the MSR -Molten Salt Reactor. The latter is based on a reactor concept that has already been successfully tested in the U.S. in the 50s, for use in aircrafts. In this paper, we discuss the future importance of thorium, particularly for Brazil, which has large mineral reserves of this strategic element, the characteristics of the molten salt

  4. Use of thorium in the generation IV Molten Salt reactors and perspectives for Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seneda, Jose A.; Lainetti, Paulo E.O., E-mail: jaseneda@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Interest in thorium stems mainly from the fact that it is expected a substantial increase in uranium prices over the next fifty years. The reactors currently in operation consume 65,500 tons of uranium per year. Each electrical gigawatt (GWe) additional need about 200 tU mined per year. So advanced fuel cycles, which increase the reserves of nuclear materials are interesting, particularly the use of thorium to produce the fissile isotope {sup 233}U. It is important to mention some thorium advantages. Thorium is three to five times more abundant than uranium in the earth's crust. Thorium has only one oxidation state. Additionally, thoria produces less radiotoxicity than the UO{sub 2} because it produces fewer amounts of actinides, reducing the radiotoxicity of long life nuclear waste. ThO{sub 2} has higher corrosion resistance than UO{sub 2}, besides being chemically stable due to their low water solubility. The burning of Pu in a reactor based in thorium also decreases the inventories of Pu from the current fuel cycles, resulting in lower risks of material diversion for use in nuclear weapons. There are some ongoing projects in the world, taking into consideration the proposed goals for Generation IV reactors, namely: sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Some developments on the use of thorium in reactors are underway, with the support of the IAEA and some governs. Can be highlighted some reactor concepts using thorium as fuel: CANDU; ADTR -Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor; AHWR -Advanced Heavy Water Reactor proposed by India (light water cooled and moderated by heavy water) and the MSR -Molten Salt Reactor. The latter is based on a reactor concept that has already been successfully tested in the U.S. in the 50s, for use in aircrafts. In this paper, we discuss the future importance of thorium, particularly for Brazil, which has large mineral reserves of this strategic element, the

  5. AMZ, library of multigroup constants for EXPANDA computer codes, generated by NJOY computer code from ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalhoub, E.S.; Moraes, M. de.

    1984-01-01

    A 70-group, 37-isotope library of multigroup constants for fast reactor nuclear design calculations is described. Nuclear cross sections, transfer matrices, and self-shielding factors were generated with NJOY code and an auxiliary program RGENDF using evaluated data from ENDF/B-IV. The output is being issued in a format suitable for EXPANDA code. Comparisons with JFS-2 library, as well as, test resuls for 14 CSEWG benchmark critical assemblies are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Library generation and tests for the HAMMER system from the ENDF/B-IV data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Bogado Leite, S. de; Chalhoub, E.S.; Moraes, Marisa de.

    1983-05-01

    The modifications made to a number of programs belonging to the HAMMER system in order to process data from ENDF/B-IV are presented. An alternate scheme of representing the resonance region by means of extensive tabulation of profiles is made available for selected materials. Numerical examples illustrate comparisons of the results obtained with these libraries against those from the literature. (Author) [pt

  7. Ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1946, light (charged) particle accompanied fission (ternary fission) has been extensively studied, for spontaneous as well as for induced fission reactions. The reason for this interest was twofold: the ternary particles being emitted in space and time close to the scission point were expected to supply information on the scission point configuration and the ternary fission process was an important source of helium, tritium, and hydrogen production in nuclear reactors, for which data were requested by the nuclear industry. Significant experimental progress has been realized with the advent of high-resolution detectors, powerful multiparameter data acquisition systems, and intense neutron and photon beams. As far as theory is concerned, the trajectory calculations (in which scission point parameters are deduced from the experimental observations) have been very much improved. An attempt was made to explain ternary particle emission in terms of a Plateau-Rayleigh hydrodynamical instability of a relatively long cylindrical neck or cylindrical nucleus. New results have also been obtained on the so-called open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission (fission in three about-equal fragments). The spontaneous emission of charged particles has also clearly been demonstrated in recent years. This chapter discusses the main characteristics of ternary fission, theoretical models, light particle emission probabilities, the dependence of the emission probabilities on experimental variables, light particle energy distributions, light particle angular distributions, correlations between light particle accompanied fission observables, open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission, and spontaneous emission of heavy ions. 143 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Comparative study of 99Mo/99mTc generators at base of synthesized gels starting from 99Mo of activation and of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, I.Z.; Monroy G, F.; Rivero G, T.; Rojas N, P.

    2007-01-01

    At the present time the more used and diffused radionuclide in nuclear medicine it is the Technetium 99 metastable ( 99 mTc) it is used for diagnostic and therapy. It is produced starting from molybdenum 99 ( 99 Mo), which is absorbed in chromatographic columns, loaded with alumina that absorb only 0.2% of 99 Mo situation that forces to use high specific activities of 99 Mo that it is obtained starting from the fission of the 235 U. Given these conditions and limitations, new preparation procedures of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators, of low or medium specific activity, its have been developed, using gels of zirconium molybdates that incorporates until 30% in weight of 99 Mo in the gel, and also conserve similar characteristics of quality and purity that those obtained by the traditional generator; reducing by this way the cost of production of the 99m Tc, when using 99 Mo of low specific activity, in the preparation of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators. The radiochemical characteristics of the elution of 99m Tc, depends strongly on the gel preparation conditions. In particular, the present work has for object to determine the influence of the used type of 99 Mo, fission or activation product, during the gels synthesis, as well as the used air flow for the agitation in the gels preparation and its influence in the quality of the 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators. When diminishing the agitation air flow the efficiency it increases and in the radionuclide purity of the eluates and when using 99 Mo of fission for the gels production it increases in an important way the elution efficiency, the radiochemical purity and radionuclide of the eluates of 99m Tc. (Author)

  9. A Study on planning of promotion for international collaborative development of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chang Moon; Yang, M. S.; Ha, J. J.

    2006-06-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U. S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study is mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; - Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies - Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U. S. and conducting the international cooperation - International cooperation activities for the INPRO This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Furthermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  10. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  11. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2012-01-01

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  12. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway))

    2012-01-15

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  13. Measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 240,242Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador-Castineira, P.; Hambsch, F.J.; Brys, T.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2014-01-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are in high demand in the nuclear data community. In particular, highly accurate data are needed for the new Generation-IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross-sections for 240 Pu and 242 Pu. In this context accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives have also been measured. To minimise the total uncertainty on the fission cross-sections the detector efficiency has been studied in detail. Both isotopes have been measured using a twin Frisch-grid ionisation chamber (TFGIC) due to its superiority compared to other detector systems in view of radiation hardness, 2 x 2π solid angle coverage and very good energy resolution. (authors)

  14. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e - ). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  15. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  16. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  17. Nordic forum for generation IV reactors, status and activities in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.; Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risoe, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many aspects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activities within this field at the various institutes and universities. The present report contains book of abstracts. The individual Power Point presentations are indexed in INIS and may be found at http://nordic-gen4.org/seminars/nordic-gen4-riso-2012-2/ (LN)

  18. Nordic forum for generation IV reactors, status and activities in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. [Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, Kjeller (Norway); Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risoe, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many aspects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activities within this field at the various institutes and universities. The present report contains book of abstracts. The individual Power Point presentations are indexed in INIS and may be found at http://nordic-gen4.org/seminars/nordic-gen4-riso-2012-2/ (LN)

  19. In-Pile Testing and Instrumentation for Development of Generation-IV Fuels and Materials. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    For many years, the increase in efficiency in the production of nuclear electricity has been an economic challenge in many countries which have developed this kind of energy. The increase in fuel burnup and fuel residence time leads to a reduction in the volume of fresh fuel loaded and spent fuel discharged, respectively. More demanding nuclear fuel cycle parameters are combined with a need to operate nuclear power plants with maximal availability and load factors, in load-follow mode and with longer fuel cycles. In meeting these requirements, fuel has to operate in a demanding environment of high radiation fields, high temperatures, high mechanical stresses and high coolant flow. Requirements of increased fuel reliability and minimal fuel failures also remain in force. Under such circumstances, continuous development of more radiation resistant fuel materials, especially advanced cladding, careful and incremental examinations, and improved understanding and modelling of high burnup fuel behaviour are required. Following a recommendation of the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, the Technical Meeting on In-pile Testing and Instrumentation for Development of Generation-IV Fuels and Materials was held in Halden, Norway, on 21-24 August 2012. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status and the progress in methods and technologies used for the in-pile testing of nuclear fuel achieved since the previous IAEA meeting on In-core Instrumentation and Reactor Core Assessment, also held in Halden in 2007. Emphasis was placed on advanced techniques applied for the understanding of high burnup fuel behaviour of water cooled power reactors that represent the vast majority of the current nuclear reactor fleet. However, the meeting also included papers and discussion on testing techniques applied or developed specifically for new fuel and structural materials considered for Generation-IV systems. The meeting was attended by 43

  20. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  1. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of a Spanish energy scenario with Generation IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Raquel; Jimenez, Gonzalo; Perez-Martin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Spanish energy scenario for the hypothetical deployment of Gen-IV SFR reactors. • Availability of national resources is assessed, considering SFR’s breeding. • An assessment of the impact of transmuting MA on the final repository. • SERPENT code with own pre- and post-processing tools were employed. • The employed SFR core design is based on the specifications of the CP-ESFR. - Abstract: The advantages of fast-spectrum reactors consist not only of an efficient use of fuel through the breeding of fissile material and the use of natural or depleted uranium, but also of the potential reduction of the amount of actinides such as americium and neptunium contained in the irradiated fuel. The first aspect means a guaranteed future nuclear fuel supply. The second fact is key for high-level radioactive waste management, because these elements are the main responsible for the radioactivity of the irradiated fuel in the long term. The present study aims to analyze the hypothetical deployment of a Gen-IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fleet in Spain. A nuclear fleet of fast reactors would enable a fuel cycle strategy different than the open cycle, currently adopted by most of the countries with nuclear power. A transition from the current Gen-II to Gen-IV fleet is envisaged through an intermediate deployment of Gen-III reactors. Fuel reprocessing from the Gen-II and Gen-III Light Water Reactors (LWR) has been considered. In the so-called advanced fuel cycle, the reprocessed fuel used to produce energy will breed new fissile fuel and transmute minor actinides at the same time. A reference case scenario has been postulated and further sensitivity studies have been performed to analyze the impact of the different parameters on the required reactor fleet. The potential capability of Spain to supply the required fleet for the reference scenario using national resources has been verified. Finally, some consequences on irradiated final fuel inventory are assessed

  3. Basic research in support of innovative fuels design for the Generation IV systems (F-BRIDGE project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, Carole; Bertolus, Marjorie; Konings, Rudy; Somers, Joe; Groot, Sander de

    2010-01-01

    F-BRIDGE (Basic Research in support of Innovative Fuels Design for the GEN IV systems) is a 4-year project which started in 2008. It seeks to bridge the gap between basic research and technological applications for generation IV nuclear reactor systems. One of the challenges for the next generation of reactors is to significantly increase the efficiency in designing innovative fuels. The object of the F-BRIDGE project is to complement the empirical approach by a physically-based description of fuel and cladding materials to enable a rationalization of the design process and a better selection of promising fuel systems. Advanced modelling and separate effects experiments are carried out in order to obtain more exact physical descriptions of ceramic fuels and cladding, at relevant scales from the atomic to the macroscopic scale. Research is also focused on assessing and improving 'sphere-pac' fuel, a composite-ceramics concept which has shown promise. The project activities can be broken down into four main areas: (i) Basic research investigations using a multi-scale approach in both experimentation and modelling to enable the generation of missing basic data, the identification of relevant mechanisms and the development of appropriate models; (ii) Transfer between technological issues and basic research by bringing together within the same project materials scientists, engineers and end-users; (iii) Assessment of the drawbacks and benefits of the sphere-pac fuel application to various Generation IV systems; (iv) Education and training to promote research in the field of fuel materials, to ensure the exchange of results and ideas among the participants and to link the project with other related European or international initiatives. The project relies on the complementary expertise of 19 partners: nuclear and non nuclear research organisations, universities, a nuclear engineering company, as well as technology and project management consultancy small and medium

  4. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  5. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions

  6. Non-electrical uses of thermal energy generated in the production of fissile fuel in fusion--fission reactors: a comparative economic parametric analysis for a hybrid with or without synthetic fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technologic quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plant, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission--fusion--synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion--fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. Assuming an electricity cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per power unit of 4.2 to 6 $/GJ (132 to 189 k$/MWty) for the fission--fusion complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ (47 to 95 k$/MWty) for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production net cost (i.e., revenue = cost) varies between 6.5 and 8.6 $/GJ. These costs can compete with those obtained by other processes (natural gas reforming, resid partial oxidation, coal gasification, nuclear fission, solar electrolysis, etc.). This study points out a potential use of the fusion--fission hybrid other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation

  7. Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound: Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fenglian; Lu, Jianwei; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the performance and application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) assisted by ultrasonic irradiation for the removal of selenite (Se(IV)) in wastewater was evaluated and reaction mechanism of Se(IV) with ZVI in such systems was investigated. A series of batch experiments were conducted to determine the effects of ultrasound power, pH, ZVI concentration, N2 and air on Se(IV) removal. ZVI before and after reaction with Se(IV) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results indicated that ultrasound can lead to a significant synergy in the removal of Se(IV) by ZVI because ultrasound can promote the generation of OH and accelerate the advanced Fenton process. The primary reaction products of ZVI and Se(IV) were Se(0), ferrihydrite, and Fe2O3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ZONE: a finite element mesh generator. [In FORTRAN IV for CDC 7600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, M. J.

    1976-05-01

    The ZONE computer program is a finite-element mesh generator which produces the nodes and element description of any two-dimensional geometry. The geometry is subdivided into a mesh of quadrilateral and triangular zones arranged sequentially in an ordered march through the geometry. The order of march can be chosen so that the minimum bandwidth is obtained. The node points are defined in terms of the x and y coordinates in a global rectangular coordinate system. The zones generated are quadrilaterals or triangles defined by four node points in a counterclockwise sequence. Node points defining the outside boundary are generated to describe pressure boundary conditions. The mesh that is generated can be used as input to any two-dimensional as well as any axisymmetrical structure program. The output from ZONE is essentially the input file to NAOS, HONDO, and other axisymmetric finite element programs. 14 figures. (RWR)

  9. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in fission induced by neutrons generated by the p+ sup 1 sup 3 C reaction at 55 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, L; Andrighetto, A; Tecchio, L B; Dendooven, P; Huikari, J; Pentillä, H; Peraejaervi, K; Wang, Y

    2003-01-01

    Cross-sections for the production of neutron-rich nuclei obtained by neutron-induced fission of natural uranium have been measured. The neutrons were generated by bombarding a sup 1 sup 3 C target with 55 MeV protons. The results, position of the maximum in the (Z, A)-plane, width and magnitude, are very comparable with those where the neutrons are generated by bombardment of natural sup 1 sup 2 C graphite with 50 MeV deuterons. Depending on the geometry of the converter/target assembly the isotope yields, however, are a factor of 2-3 lower due to less efficient production of neutrons per primary projectile, especially at small forward angles. (orig.)

  10. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, IV Deo IV - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from the irradiated fuel of the reactor in Vinca; Prerada ozracenog urana. Zavrsni izvestaj - I-VI, IV Deo - Odvajanje urana, plutonijuma i fisionih produkata iz isluzenog goriva reaktora u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This study describes the technology for separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from the radioactive water solution which is obtained by dissolving the spent uranium fuel from the reactor in Vinca. The procedure should be completed in a hot cell, with the maximum permitted activity of 10 Ci.

  11. Ternary fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the energy minimization of all possible ternary breakups of a heavy radioactive nucleus. Further, within the TCM we have analysed the competition between different geometries as well as different positioning of the fragments. Also, an attempt was made to calculate the mass distribution of ternary fission process within the ...

  12. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    OpenAIRE

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bon...

  13. Fluorescent Hydrogel Generated Conveniently from a Perylene Tetracarboxylate Derivative of Titanium(IV) Alkoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dan-Hong; Wang, Peng; Luo, Wen; Hou, Jin-Le; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2018-02-05

    Organic gelators and metal-coordination frameworks based on perylene derivatives as functional materials have attracted great attention because of their intense fluorescence emission as well as unique electronic and photonic properties. We report here the structures and properties of a luminescent titanium(IV) coordination compound of a perylene tetracarboxylate (PTC) derivative, [Ti 2 (O i Pr) 6 (L 1 )(phen) 2 ] (1), along with its two naphthalene analogues, [Ti 2 (O i Pr) 6 (L 2 )(phen) 2 ] (2) and [Ti 2 (O i Pr) 6 (L 2 )(bpy) 2 ] (3), where L 1 = 3,9-dicarboxylate-(4,10-diisopropanolcarboxylate)perylene, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, L 2 = 1,5-dicarboxylate-(2,6-diisopropanolcarboxylate)naphthalene, and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine. Compound 1 is a rare early-transition-metal PTC coordination compound that can be simply prepared in one pot as crystals by a low-heat synthesis. Unlike those of paramagnetic late-transition-metal PTC compounds, compound 1 showed intense fluorescence emission. More remarkably, the crystals of 1 can be turned immediately to a fluorescent hydrogel just through a simple procedure, putting the crystals in water and then treating with ultrasound. No acid catalyst or pH adjustment is needed. Hydrolysis of the titanium isopropanol group in water and π-π interaction of the perylene and phen play important roles in the gelation process. The film prepared from the gel can be used as a visual fluorescence sensor for aromatic amines and phenols, which are hazards for the human and environment.

  14. JSFR design progress related to development of safety design criteria for Generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactors. (1) Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Hideki; Ando, Masato; Ito, Takaya

    2015-01-01

    JAEA, JAPC and MFBR have been conducting design study for the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR), which is a design concept aiming at future commercial use as sustainable electric power source. As the result of the design study and R and D activity related the innovative technologies incorporated in the design in the Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT) project up to 2010, basic design concept of JSFR was established and its development process to the commercialization including construction and operation of a demonstration version of JSFR was outlined. JSFR is a looptype next generation sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), which is aiming at achieving development targets of Generation IV reactors concerning sustainability, safety and reliability, economics and proliferation resistance and physical protection by introducing the innovative technologies such as shortened high-chromium steel piping. The output power is assumed for the design study as 1,500 MWe for the commercial version and 750 MWe for the demonstration version. In FaCT phase I up to 2010, in order to evaluate feasibility to achieve the development targets, the design study has been conducted on the main components and systems. Since 2011, in order to contribute to the development of safety design criteria (SDC) and safety design guideline (SDG), which include the lessons learned from the TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants accident, in the frame work of Generation IV International Forum (GIF), the design study is focusing on the design measures against severe external events such as earthquake and tsunami. At the same time, the design study is going into detail and paying much attention to the maintenance and repair to make surer its feasibility. This paper summarizes the design concept of the demonstration version of JSFR in which progress of design work was incorporated for the safety issues on SDC and SDG of a SFR. (author)

  15. Multiobjective genetic algorithm strategies for electricity production from generation IV nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Adrien; Pibouleau, Luc; Azzaro-Pantel, Catherine; Domenech, Serge [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, 31700 Toulouse Cedex 1 (France); Latge, Christian [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DTN/DIR, Bat. 710, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Haubensack, David [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DER/SESI/LCSI, Bat. 212, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2010-04-15

    Development of a technico-economic optimization strategy of cogeneration systems of electricity/hydrogen, consists in finding an optimal efficiency of the generating cycle and heat delivery system, maximizing the energy production and minimizing the production costs. The first part of the paper is related to the development of a multiobjective optimization library (MULTIGEN) to tackle all types of problems arising from cogeneration. After a literature review for identifying the most efficient methods, the MULTIGEN library is described, and the innovative points are listed. A new stopping criterion, based on the stagnation of the Pareto front, may lead to significant decrease of computational times, particularly in the case of problems involving only integer variables. Two practical examples are presented in the last section. The former is devoted to a bicriteria optimization of both exergy destruction and total cost of the plant, for a generating cycle coupled with a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The second example consists in designing the heat exchanger of the generating turbomachine. Three criteria are optimized: the exchange surface, the exergy destruction and the number of exchange modules. (author)

  16. Multiobjective genetic algorithm strategies for electricity production from generation IV nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Adrien; Pibouleau, Luc; Azzaro-Pantel, Catherine; Domenech, Serge; Latge, Christian; Haubensack, David

    2010-01-01

    Development of a technico-economic optimization strategy of cogeneration systems of electricity/hydrogen, consists in finding an optimal efficiency of the generating cycle and heat delivery system, maximizing the energy production and minimizing the production costs. The first part of the paper is related to the development of a multiobjective optimization library (MULTIGEN) to tackle all types of problems arising from cogeneration. After a literature review for identifying the most efficient methods, the MULTIGEN library is described, and the innovative points are listed. A new stopping criterion, based on the stagnation of the Pareto front, may lead to significant decrease of computational times, particularly in the case of problems involving only integer variables. Two practical examples are presented in the last section. The former is devoted to a bicriteria optimization of both exergy destruction and total cost of the plant, for a generating cycle coupled with a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The second example consists in designing the heat exchanger of the generating turbomachine. Three criteria are optimized: the exchange surface, the exergy destruction and the number of exchange modules.

  17. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

    2004-02-28

    The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

  18. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project

  19. Fission meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  20. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  1. Fault diagnosis of generation IV nuclear HTGR components – Part II: The area error enthalpy–entropy graph approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, C.P. du; Schoor, G. van

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Different uncorrelated fault signatures are derived for HTGR component faults. ► A multiple classifier ensemble increases confidence in classification accuracy. ► Detailed simulation model of system is not required for fault diagnosis. - Abstract: The second paper in a two part series presents the area error method for generation of representative enthalpy–entropy (h–s) fault signatures to classify malfunctions in generation IV nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The second classifier is devised to ultimately address the fault diagnosis (FD) problem via the proposed methods in a multiple classifier (MC) ensemble. FD is realized by way of different input feature sets to the classification algorithm based on the area and trajectory of the residual shift between the fault-free and the actual operating h–s graph models. The application of the proposed technique is specifically demonstrated for 24 single fault transients considered in the main power system (MPS) of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). The results show that the area error technique produces different fault signatures with low correlation for all the examined component faults. A brief evaluation of the two fault signature generation techniques is presented and the performance of the area error method is documented using the fault classification index (FCI) presented in Part I of the series. The final part of this work reports the application of the proposed approach for classification of an emulated fault transient in data from the prototype Pebble Bed Micro Model (PBMM) plant. Reference data values are calculated for the plant via a thermo-hydraulic simulation model of the MPS. The results show that the correspondence between the fault signatures, generated via experimental plant data and simulated reference values, are generally good. The work presented in the two part series, related to the classification of component faults in the MPS of different

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Materials Issues for Generation IV Systems : Status, Open Questions and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Gorse, Dominique; Mazière, Dominique; Pontikis, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    Global warming, shortage of low-cost oil resources and the increasing demand for energy are currently controlling the world's economic expansion while often opposing desires for sustainable and peaceful development. In this context, atomic energy satisfactorily fulfills the criteria of low carbon gas production and high overall yield. However, in the absence of industrial fast-breeders the use of nuclear fuel is not optimal, and the production of high activity waste materials is at a maximum. These are the principal reasons for the development of a new, fourth generation of nuclear reactors, minimizing the undesirable side-effects of current nuclear energy production technology while increasing yields by increasing operation temperatures and opening the way for the industrial production of hydrogen through the decomposition of water. The construction and use of such reactors is hindered by several factors, including performance limitations of known structural materials, particularly if the life of the project...

  3. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR and PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic

  4. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinsky, Paul J [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Abdel-Khalik, Hany S [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Stover, Tracy E [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-03-01

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  5. Instruction by virtual reality to operation and security of a nuclear power plant of IV generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri O, J. C.; Baltasar M, J.; Valle H, J.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of LaNuVi project which is developing in the Engineering Faculty of National Autonomous University of Mexico, to have a virtual laboratory of nuclear reactors as tool of multidisciplinary education at basic and advanced levels in nuclear engineering area, involves training resources in audio visual and interactive form that allow to form a comprehension more realistic of operation of different systems and components. In this work is proposed to use educational resources, as the employees in the U.S. Army and in some centers of advanced education of medicine, where have been come proving concepts like projected reality, increased reality, tele transparency and others that present big benefits to learning-education process. The proposal here is to include the resource knew as serious game based learning. The focal point of stage that is presented is of a nuclear reactor PBMR like desalination and generator of controlled alternating energy and efficient that should put on in operation to allow the subsistence of a community in a desolated region of beginning second quarter of X XI century. For this purpose the designs are initiated and programmed several subsystems that allow the three-dimensional modeling of main components of a PBMR as well as of surrounding facilities. The obtained results and reaches of this design are presented. The product is in tests for a first version and it is hope to achieve a free and integral resource of national distribution for different cultural groups, interested in this type of advanced technology. (Author)

  6. The fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    1990-01-01

    During the last decade fission track (FT) analysis has evolved as an important tool in exploration for hydrocarbon resources. Most important is this method's ability to yield information about temperatures at different times (history), and thus relate oil generation and time independently of other maturity parameters. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the basics of the method and give an example from the author's studies. (AB) (14 refs.)

  7. Electricity from MHD, 1968. Vol. IV. Open-Cycle MHD. Proceedings of a Symposium on Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    ); (j) Unconventional working fluids and concepts (11 papers); (k) Power plant concepts and economics (4 papers). (Vol. III). 2. Closed-Cycle MHD with liquid-Metal Working Fluids: (a) Diagnostics and fluid properties (7 papers); (b) Fluid acceleration (11 papers); (c) MHD losses (10 papers); (d) Generator design and performance studies (7 papers); (e) Generator experiments; Power plant concepts and economics (6 papers). (Vol. IV) 3. Open-Cycle MHD: (a) Diagnostics and fluid properties (14 papers); (b) Fields and flow in MHD channels; Boundary layers (10 papers); (c) Striated flow MHD systems (4 papers); (d) Generator design and performance studies (8 papers); (e) Power generation experiments (6 papers); (Vol. V) (f) Power plant concepts and economics (6 papers); (g) Electrodes and insulating materials (19 papers); (h) Auxiliary equipment (heat exchangers, combustion chambers, seeding techniques, magnets) (12 papers). (Vol. VI) Invited Lecture - Superconducting magnets for MHD generators; Rapporteurs Statements; Discussions; Round Table Discussions. The contributed papers are reproduced in their original languages (99 English, 38 French, 62 Russian, 1 Spanish). Each paper is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. The final volume, Vol. VI, containing the invited lecture, the 25 Rapporteurs’ Statements with the ensuing discussions, and the three Round Table Discussions, is entirely in English. In this volume also are repeated the contents lists of the preceding five volumes to simplify referencing, and there are a List of Participants, Author and Transliteration Indexes, and a Pre-Print Symbol Index. (author)

  8. Ideological Fission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    ; it is a materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However......, it is a being which is reminiscent of earlier monsters - from Godzilla to The Blob. It is evident that the Cloverfield monster is a paradoxical construction which attempts to articulate fear and loathing about terrorism, but ends up trapped in an ideological dead-end maze, unable to do anything other than...

  9. Drop performance test of conceptually designed control rod assembly for prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Lee, Jae Han; Kim, Hoe Woong; KIm, Sung Kyun; Kim, Jong Bum [Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor NSSS Design Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The control rod assembly controls reactor power by adjusting its position during normal operation and shuts down chain reactions by its free drop under scram conditions. Therefore, the drop performance of the control rod assembly is important for the safety of a nuclear reactor. In this study, the drop performance of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor that is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a next-generation nuclear reactor was experimentally investigated. For the performance test, the test facility and test procedure were established first, and several free drop performance tests of the control rod assembly under different flow rate conditions were then carried out. Moreover, performance tests under several types and magnitudes of seismic loading conditions were also conducted to investigate the effects of seismic loading on the drop performance of the control rod assembly. The drop time of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for 0% of the tentatively designed flow rate was measured to be 1.527 seconds, and this agrees well with the analytically calculated drop time. It was also observed that the effect of seismic loading on the drop time was not significant.

  10. Evaluation of a sodium-water reaction event caused by steam generator tubes break in the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang June; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Lee, Seung Won; Yoo, Jin; Jeong, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Kyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This reactor uses sodium as a reactor coolant to transfer the core heat energy to the turbine. Sodium has chemical characteristics that allow it to violently react with materials such as a water or steam. When a sodium–water reaction (SWR) occurs due to leakage or breakage of steam generator tubes, high-pressure waves and corrosive reaction products are produced, which threaten the structural integrity of the components of the intermediate heat-transfer system (IHTS) and the safety of the primary heat-transfer system (PHTS). In the PGSFR, SWR events are included in the design-basis event. This event should be analyzed from the viewpoint of the integrities of the IHTS and fuel rods. To evaluate the integrity of the IHTS based on the consequences of the SWR, the behaviors of the generated high-pressure waves are analyzed at the major positions of a failed IHTS loop using a sodium–water advanced analysis method-II code. The integrity of the fuel rods must be consistently maintained below the safety acceptance criteria to avoid the consequences of the SWR. The integrity of the PHTS is evaluated using the multidimensional analysis of reactor safety-liquid metal reactor code to model the whole plant.

  11. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  12. Neutron-induced fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the history of fission research, neutron-induced fission has always played the most important role. The practical importance of neutron-induced fission rests upon the fact that additional neutrons are produced in the fission process, and thus a chain reaction becomes possible. The practical applications of neutron-induced fission will not be discussed in this chapter, but only the physical properties of one of its characteristics, namely (n,f) cross sections. The most important early summaries on the subject are the monograph edited by Michaudon which also deals with the practical applications, the earlier review article on fission by Michaudon, and the review by Bjornholm and Lynn, in which neutron-induced fission receives major attention. This chapter will attempt to go an intermediate way between the very detailed theoretical treatment in the latter review and the cited monograph which emphasizes the applied aspects and the techniques of fission cross-section measurements. The more recent investigations in the field will be included. Section II will survey the properties of cross sections for neutron-induced fission and also address some special aspects of the experimental methods applied in their measurement. Section Ill will deal with the formal theory of neutron-induced nuclear reactions for the resolved resonance region and the region of statistical nuclear reactions. In Section IV, the fission width, or fission transmission coefficient, will be discussed in detail. Section V will deal with the broader structures due to incompletely damped vibrational resonances, and in particular will address the special case of thorium and neighboring isotopes. Finally, Section VI will briefly discuss parity violation effects in neutron-induced fission. 74 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Radionuclidic contamination of 99Mo, 131I and 103Ru in the eluate of 99Mo-99mTc chromatographic generator: comparision on fission produced 99Mo from RPC, Nordio and ARI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soenarjo, Sunarhadijoso; Gunawan, Adang Hardi

    1996-01-01

    The 99 Mo- 99m Tc Chromatographic generators is the most popular system to provide 99m Tc medical radioisotope. Radioisotope Production Centre (RPC)- BATAN has routinely produced the generator loaded with 99 Mo prepared by 235 U fission. By using fission produced 99 Mo, the resulting 99m Tc is potentially contaminated by other fission products which are difficult to eliminate completely. In order to study the characteristic of the generator and radionuclidic impurity pattern of the 99m Tc eluates, an evaluation of gamma spectrometric determination has been carried out. The bulk solutions of 99 Mo produced by RPC BATAN (Indonesia), Nordion (Canada) and ARI (Australia) were loaded to generators manufactured between July 1993 to May 1994. The saline-eluate 99m Tc, in a total volume of 10 ml each, was subjected to gamma spectrometric determination. The radiation of 99m Tc was eliminated by lead shield of 0.6913 cm thickness. The 99m Tc yield fluctuation from 28 generators indicated that the characteristics of the generator columns were very good. The 99m Tc eluates were consistently contaminated by 99 Mo, 131 I and 103 Ru, although the contamination level in all cases did not exceed the maximum permissible levels. The fluctuation of radionuclidic impurities were probably caused by variation in the irradiation parameter or by variation in the 99 Mo separation methods. (author), 23 refs, 1 tab, 3 figs

  14. Generation IV nuclear energy systems and hydrogen economy. New progress in the energy field in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Mingchang

    2004-01-01

    The concept of hydrogen economy was initiated by the United States and other developed countries in the turn of the century to mitigate anxiety of national security due to growing dependence on foreign sources of energy and impacts on air quality and the potential effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen economy integrates the primary energy used to produce hydrogen as a future energy carrier, hydrogen technologies including production, delivery and storage, and various fuel cells for transportation and stationary applications. A new hydrogen-based energy system would created as an important solution in the 21st century, flexible, affordable, safe, domestically produced, used in all sectors of the economy and in all regions of the country, if all the R and D plans and the demonstration come to be successful in 20-30 years. Among options of primary energy. Generation IV nuclear energy under development is particularly well suited to hydrogen production, offering the competitive position of large-scale hydrogen production with near-zero emissions. (author)

  15. A general overview of generation IV molten salt reactor (MSR) and the use of thorium as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Carlos H.; Stefani, Giovanni L.; Santos, Thiago A., E-mail: carlos.yamaguchi@usp.br, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    The molten salt reactors (MSRs) make use of fluoride salt as primary cooler, at low pressure. Although considered a generation IV reactor, your concept isn't new, since in the 1960 years the Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a little prototype of 8MWt. Over the 20{sup th} century, other countries, like UK, Japan, Russia, China and France also did research in the area, especially with the use of thorium as fuel. This goes with the fact that Brazil possess the biggest reserve of thorium in the world. In the center of nuclear engineering at IPEN is being created a study group connected to thorium reactors, which purpose is to investigate reactors using thorium to produce {sup 233}U and tailing burn, thus making the MSR using thorium as fuel, an object of study. This present work searches to do a general summary about the researches of MSR's, having as focus the utilization of thorium with the goal being to show it's efficiency and utilization is doable. (author)

  16. Fission theory and actinide fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1975-06-01

    The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and γ rays emitted in the resonances of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and γ-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n,γf) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for {sup 240}Pu.

  17. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  18. Neutronics of Laser Fission-Fusion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.

    1976-01-01

    Neutronics of Fission-Fusion microsystems inertially confined by Lasers are analysed by transport calculation, both stationary (DTF, TIHOC) and time dependent (TDA, TIHEX), discussing the results obtained for the basic parameters of the fission process (multiplication factor, neutron generation time and Rossi-∞). (Author) 14 refs

  19. Neutronics of Laser Fission-Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, G

    1976-07-01

    Neutronics of Fission-Fusion microsystems inertially confined by Lasers are analysed by transport calculation, both stationary (DTF, TIHOC) and time dependent (TDA, TIHEX), discussing the results obtained for the basic parameters of the fission process (multiplication factor, neutron generation time and Rossi-{infinity}). (Author) 14 refs.

  20. Measurements of fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    2000-01-01

    After some historical introductory remarks on the discovery of nuclear fission and early fission yield determinations, the present status of knowledge on fission yields is briefly reviewed. Practical and fundamental reasons motivating the pursuit of fission yield measurements in the coming century are pointed out. Recent results and novel techniques are described that promise to provide new interesting insights into the fission process during the next century. (author)

  1. Radiochemical studies on fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on nuclear chemistry; topics considered include: recoil range and kinetic energy distribution in the thermal neutron ftssion of /sup 245/Cm; mass distribution and recoil range measurements in the reactor neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U; fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of /sup 241/PU highly asymmetric binary fission of uranium induced by reactor neutrons; and nuclear charge distribution in low energy fission. ( DHM)

  2. Physico-chemical properties of the new generation IV iron preparations ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside 1000 and ferric carboxymaltose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiser, Susann; Rentsch, Daniel; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Weidler, Peter G; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Wilhelm, Maria; Braitsch, Michaela; Funk, Felix; Philipp, Erik; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    The advantage of the new generation IV iron preparations ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), ferumoxytol (FMX), and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) is that they can be administered in relatively high doses in a short period of time. We investigated the physico-chemical properties of these preparations and compared them with those of the older preparations iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), and low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID). Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy indicated akaganeite structures (β-FeOOH) for the cores of FCM, IIM and IS, and a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) structure for that of FMX. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies confirmed the structure of the carbohydrate of FMX as a reduced, carboxymethylated, low molecular weight dextran, and that of IIM as a reduced Dextran 1000. Polarography yielded significantly different fingerprints of the investigated compounds. Reductive degradation kinetics of FMX was faster than that of FCM and IIM, which is in contrast to the high stability of FMX towards acid degradation. The labile iron content, i.e. the amount of iron that is only weakly bound in the polynuclear iron core, was assessed by a qualitative test that confirmed decreasing labile iron contents in the order SFG ≈ IS > LMWID ≥ FMX ≈ IIM ≈ FCM. The presented data are a step forward in the characterization of these non-biological complex drugs, which is a prerequisite to understand their cellular uptake mechanisms and the relationship between the structure and physiological safety as well as efficacy of these complexes.

  3. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control the reactivity during a postulated core meltdown accident in generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic points of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author)

  4. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [fr

  5. Energy from nuclear fission()

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripani, M.

    2015-08-01

    The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  6. Development and characterization of the control assembly system for the large 2400 MWth Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Rimpault, G.; Morin, F.; Bosq, J.C.; Coddington, P.; Mikityuk, K.; Chawla, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is related to the design and neutronic characterization of the principal control assembly system for the reference large (2400 MWth) Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), which makes use of ceramic-ceramic (CERCER) plate-type fuel-elements with (U-Pu) carbide fuel contained within a SiC inert matrix. For the neutronic calculations, the deterministic code system ERANOS-2.0 has been used, in association with a full core model including a European fast reactor (EFR)-type pattern for the control assemblies as a starting point. More specifically, the core contains a total of 33 control (control system device: CSD) and safety (diverse safety device: DSD) assemblies implemented in three banks. In the design of the new control assembly system, particular attention was given to the heat generation within the assemblies, so that both neutronic and thermal-hydraulic constraints could be appropriately accounted for. The thermal-hydraulic calculations have been performed with the code COPERNIC, significant coolant mass flow rates being found necessary to maintain acceptable cladding temperatures of the absorber pins. Complementary to the design study, neutronic investigations have been performed to assess the impact of the control assemblies in the GFR core in greater detail (rod interactions, shift of the flux, peaking factors, etc.). Thus, considerable shadowing effects have been observed between the first bank and the safety bank, as also between individual assemblies within the first bank. Large anti-shadowing effects also occur, the most prominent being that between the two CSD banks, where the total assembly worth is almost doubled in comparison to the sum of the individual values. Additional investigations have been performed and, in this context, it has been found that computation of the first-order eigenvalue and the eigenvalue separation is a robust tool to anticipate control assembly interactions in a large fast-spectrum core. One interesting

  7. Fission products collecting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fission products trap with no contamination to coolants and cover gas by the provision of a fission products trap above the upper part of a nuclear power plant. Constitution: Upon fuel failures in a reactor core, nuclear fission products leak into coolants and move along the flow of the coolants to the coolants above the reactor core. The fission products are collected in a trap container and guided along a pipeline into fission products detector. The fission products detector monitors the concentration of the fission products and opens the downstream valve of the detector when a predetermined concentration of the fission products is detected to introduce the fission products into a waste gas processing device and release them through the exhaust pipe. (Seki, T.)

  8. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  9. Development of the control assembly pattern and dynamic analysis of the Generation IV large gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardin, G.

    2009-07-15

    During the past ten years, different independent factors, such as the rapidly increasing worldwide demand in energy, societal concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, and the high and volatile prices for fossil fuels, have contributed to the renewed interest in nuclear technology. In this context, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) launched the initiative to collaborate on the research and development efforts needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. A particular goal set for Generation IV systems is closure of the nuclear fuel cycle; they are expected to offer a better utilization of natural resources, as also a minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Among the systems selected by the GIF, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is a highly innovative system with advanced fuel geometry and materials. The principal aim of the present research is to develop and qualify the control assembly (CA) pattern and corresponding CA implementation scheme for the 2400 MWth reference GFR design. The work has been carried out in three successive phases: (1) validation of the neutronics tools, (2) the CA pattern development and related static analysis, and (3) dynamic core behaviour studies for hypothetical CA driven transients. The deterministic code system ERANOS and its associated nuclear data libraries for fast reactors were developed and validated for sodium-cooled reactors. In order to validate ERANOS for GFR applications, a systematic reanalysis of the GFR-relevant integral data generated at PSI during the GCFR-PROTEUS experimental program of the 1970’s was undertaken. The reference PROTEUS test lattice has been analyzed with ERANOS-2.0 and its associated, adjusted nuclear data library ERALIB1. Benchmark calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, allowing one to both check the deterministic results and to analyze the sensitivity to different modern data libraries. For the main reaction rate ratios, the new analysis of the GCFR

  10. Development of the control assembly pattern and dynamic analysis of the Generation IV large gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.

    2009-07-01

    During the past ten years, different independent factors, such as the rapidly increasing worldwide demand in energy, societal concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, and the high and volatile prices for fossil fuels, have contributed to the renewed interest in nuclear technology. In this context, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) launched the initiative to collaborate on the research and development efforts needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. A particular goal set for Generation IV systems is closure of the nuclear fuel cycle; they are expected to offer a better utilization of natural resources, as also a minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Among the systems selected by the GIF, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is a highly innovative system with advanced fuel geometry and materials. The principal aim of the present research is to develop and qualify the control assembly (CA) pattern and corresponding CA implementation scheme for the 2400 MWth reference GFR design. The work has been carried out in three successive phases: (1) validation of the neutronics tools, (2) the CA pattern development and related static analysis, and (3) dynamic core behaviour studies for hypothetical CA driven transients. The deterministic code system ERANOS and its associated nuclear data libraries for fast reactors were developed and validated for sodium-cooled reactors. In order to validate ERANOS for GFR applications, a systematic reanalysis of the GFR-relevant integral data generated at PSI during the GCFR-PROTEUS experimental program of the 1970’s was undertaken. The reference PROTEUS test lattice has been analyzed with ERANOS-2.0 and its associated, adjusted nuclear data library ERALIB1. Benchmark calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, allowing one to both check the deterministic results and to analyze the sensitivity to different modern data libraries. For the main reaction rate ratios, the new analysis of the GCFR

  11. The thermal evolution and timing of hydrocarbon generation in the Maritimes Basin of eastern Canada: evidence from apatite fission track data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grist, A.M.; Zentilli, M.

    1995-01-01

    Sandstone drill core and/or cuttings from six wells in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and cabot Strait have been analyzed using the apatite fission track (AFT) method. Measured AFT ages for the late Paleozoic sandstones range from 26 ±7 to 184 ±28 Ma (2-σ errors). The AFT data indicate that most Maritimes Basin strata were heated to temperatures in excess of 100-150 o C very soon after their deposition. The strata also attained significant vitrinite reflectance (R 0 ) levels (i.e., reaching the oil window) early in the burial history. These findings imply the generation of hydrocarbons and coalbed methane in the early basin history (pre-250 Ma). In the Maritimes Basin AFT and R 0 data provide complementary information about the integrated thermal history, including maximum burial temperatures (from R 0 data), and information on the subsequent cooling history from AFT analysis. The present study also supports the proposal made previously by others that substantial erosion of the Eastern Canadian margin (up to 4 km) has occurred since the Permian and extends the AFT evidence for this erosional event to include the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence area. Thermal models of the AFT data demonstrate that they are consistent with a history of exhumation of basin strata since late Permian time. The model-predicted AFT age and track length histograms closely correspond to the measured AFT parameters. AFT analysis also indicates present-day geothermal gradients of less than 40 o C/km. (author). 42 refs.,3 tabs., 7 figs

  12. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  13. The wastes of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubre, H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the problems of the radioactive wastes generated by the nuclear fission. The first part devoted to the fission phenomenon explains the incident neutron energy and the target nuclei role. The second part devoted to the nuclear wastes sources presents the production of wastes upstream of the reactors, in the reactors and why these wastes are dangerous. The third part discusses the radioactive wastes management in France (classification, laws). The last part details the associated research programs: the radionuclides separation, the disposal, the underground storage, the transmutation and the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  14. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lebois, M.; Oberstedt, A.; Wilson, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions 235U(n th , f), 239Pu(n th ,f) and 252Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on 235U and 241Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on 238U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on 235,238U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies.

  15. Future research program on prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberstedt, S.; Hambsch, F.J. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Billnert, R. [Joint Research Centre IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Lebois, M.; Wilson, J.N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Orsay, Orsay (France); Oberstedt, A. [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Ossolution Consulting, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    In recent years the measurement of prompt fission γ-ray spectra (PFGS) has gained renewed interest, after about forty years since the first comprehensive studies of the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f), {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) and {sup 252}Cf(sf). The renaissance was initiated by requests for new values especially for γ-ray multiplicity and average total energy release per fission in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. Both isotopes are considered the most important ones with respect to the modeling of innovative cores required for the Generation-IV reactors, the majority working with fast neutrons. During the last 5 years we have conducted a systematic study of spectral data for thermal-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu as well as for the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with unprecedented accuracy. From the new data we conclude that those reactions do not considerably contribute to the observed heat excess and suspect other reactions playing a significant role. Possible contributions may originate from fast-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 238}U, which is largely present in the fuel, or from γ-induced fission from neutron capture in the construction material. A first experiment campaign on prompt γ-ray emission from fast-neutron-induced fission on {sup 235,238}U was successfully performed in order to test our assumptions. In the following we attempt to summarize, what has been done in the field to date, and to motivate future measurement campaigns exploiting dedicated neutron and photon beams as well as upcoming highly efficient detector assemblies. (orig.)

  16. Induced-Fission Imaging of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blackston, Matthew A.; Mullens, James Allen; McConchie, Seth M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Bingham, Philip R.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results from development of the induced-fission imaging technique, which can be used for the purpose of measuring or verifying the distribution of fissionable material in an unopened container. The technique is based on stimulating fissions in nuclear material with 14 MeV neutrons from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (D-T) generator and counting the subsequent induced fast fission neutrons with an array of fast organic scintillation detectors. For each source neutron incident on the container, the neutron creation time and initial trajectory are known from detection of the associated alpha particle of the d + t → α + n reaction. Many induced fissions will lie along (or near) the interrogating neutron path, allowing an image of the spatial distribution of prompt induced fissions, and thereby fissionable material, to be constructed. A variety of induced-fission imaging measurements have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a portable, low-dose D-T generator, including single-view radiographic measurements and three-dimensional tomographic measurements. Results from these measurements will be presented along with the neutron transmission images that have been performed simultaneously. This new capability may have applications to a number of areas in which there may be a need to confirm the presence or configuration of nuclear materials, such as nuclear material control and accountability, quality assurance, treaty confirmation, or homeland security applications.

  17. Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package. A computer code for power generating system expansion planning. Version WASP-IV. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As a continuation of its efforts to provide methodologies and tools to Member States to carry out comparative assessment and analyse priority environmental issues related to the development of the electric power sector, the IAEA has completed a new version of the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package WASP-IV for carrying out power generation expansion planning taking into consideration fuel availability and environmental constraints. This manual constitutes a part of this work and aims to provide users with a guide to use effectively the new version of the model WASP-IV. WASP was originally developed in 1972 by the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA to meet the IAEA needs to analyse the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in comparison to other generation expansion alternatives for supplying the future electricity requirements of a country or region. Previous versions of the model were used by Member States in many national and regional studies to analyse the electric power system expansion planning and the role of nuclear energy in particular. Experience gained from its application allowed development of WASP into a very comprehensive planning tool for electric power system expansion analysis. New, improved versions were developed, which took into consideration the needs expressed by the users of the programme in order to address important emerging issues being faced by the electric system planners. In 1979, WASP-IV was released and soon after became an indispensable tool in many Member States for generation expansion planning. The WASP-IV version was continually upgraded and the development of version WASP-III Plus commenced in 1992. By 1995, WASP-III Plus was completed, which followed closely the methodology of the WASP-III but incorporated new features. In order to meet the needs of electricity planners and following the recommendations of the Helsinki symposium, development of a new version of WASP was

  18. Fission cross-section measurements on 233U and minor actinides at the CERN n-TOF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calviani, M.; Cennini, P.; Chiaveri, E.; Dahlfors, M.; Ferrari, A.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Kadi, Y.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Colonna, N.; Terlizzi, R.; Abbondanno, U.; Marrone, S.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K.; Moreau, C.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Alvarez, H.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Embid-Sesura, M.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Guerrero, C.; Martinez, T.; Vincente, M. C.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; David, S.; Ferrant, L.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M. T.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G.; Becvar, F.; Calvino, F.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Chepel, V.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Goncalves, I.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Neves, F.; Cortes, G.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Dillmann, I.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Furman, W.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P.; Praena, J.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Igashira, M.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Lozano, M.; Marganiec, J.; Massimi, C.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Plompen, A.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Savvidis, I.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of minor actinides have been measured at the white neutron source n-TOF at CERN, Geneva. The studied isotopes include 233 U, interesting for Th/U based nuclear fuel cycles, 241, 243 Am and 245 Cm, relevant for transmutation and waste reduction studies in new generation fast reactors (Gen-IV) or Accelerator Driven Systems. The measurements take advantage of the unique features of the n-TOF facility, namely the wide energy range, the high instantaneous neutron flux and the low background. Results for the involved isotopes are reported from ∼30 meV to around 1 MeV neutron energy. The measurements have been performed with a dedicated Fission Ionization Chamber (FIC), relative to the standard cross-section of the 235 U fission reaction, measured simultaneously with the same detector. Results are here reported. (authors)

  19. Fission Research at IRMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  20. Equilibrium fission model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.; Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to aid in understanding the systematics of heavy ion fission and fission-like reactions in terms of the target-projectile system, bombarding energy and angular momentum, fission widths are calculated using an angular momentum dependent extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory and particle emission widths using angular momentum coupling

  1. Development of microsecond generators with plasma current interrupting switch in I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy. Frequency operation of generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babykin, V.M.; Chikin, R.V.; Dolgachev, G.I.; Golovanov, Yu.P.; Kovalev, Yu.I.; Ushakov, A.G.; Zakatov, L.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a follow up to previously published work on microsecond plasma current interrupting switches (PCIS), which has been conducted in the I.V. Kurchatov Inst. Here the authors present some information on the practical implementation of such devices, and provide an overview of new research facilities

  2. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I. and others

    2000-05-01

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production.

  3. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I. and others

    2000-05-01

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production

  4. Efficient generation of volatile cadmium species using Ti(III) and Ti(IV) and application to determination of cadmium by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Zikri; Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a highly efficient chemical vapor generation (CVG) approach is reported for determination of cadmium (Cd). Titanium (III) and titanium (IV) were investigated for the first time as catalytic additives along with thiourea, L-cysteine and potassium cyanide (KCN) for generation of volatile Cd species. Both Ti(III) and Ti(IV) provided the highest enhancement with KCN. The improvement with thiourea was marginal (ca. 2-fold), while L-cysteine enhanced signal slightly only with Ti(III) in H2SO4. Optimum CVG conditions were 4% (v/v) HCl + 0.03 M Ti(III) + 0.16 M KCN and 2% (v/v) HNO3 + 0.03 M Ti(IV) + 0.16 M KCN with a 3% (m/v) NaBH4 solution. The sensitivity was improved about 40-fold with Ti(III) and 35-fold with Ti(IV). A limit of detection (LOD) of 3.2 ng L−1 was achieved with Ti(III) by CVG-ICP-MS. The LOD with Ti(IV) was 6.4 ng L−1 which was limited by the blank signals in Ti(IV) solution. Experimental evidence indicated that Ti(III) and Ti(IV) enhanced Cd vapor generation catalytically; for best efficiency mixing prior to reaction with NaBH4 was critical. The method was highly robust against the effects of transition metal ions. No significant suppression was observed in the presence of Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) up to 1.0 μg mL−1. Among the hydride forming elements, no interference was observed from As(III) and Se(IV) at 0.5 μg mL−1 level. The depressive effects from Pb(II) and Sb(III) were not significant at 0.1 μg mL−1 while those from Bi(III) and Sn(II) were marginal. The procedures were validated with determination of Cd by CVG-ICP-MS in a number certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4), Mussel tissue (SRM 2976) and Domestic Sludge (SRM 2781). PMID:26251554

  5. KENO IV: an improved Monte Carlo criticality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.; Cross, N.F.

    1975-11-01

    KENO IV is a multigroup Monte Carlo criticality program written for the IBM 360 computers. It executes rapidly and is flexibly dimensioned so the allowed size of a problem (i.e., the number of energy groups, number of geometry cards, etc., are arbitrary) is limited only by the total data storage required. The input data, with the exception of cross sections, fission spectra and albedos, may be entered in free form. The geometry input is quite simple to prepare and complicated three-dimensional systems can often be described with a minimum of effort. The results calculated by KENO IV include k-effective, lifetime and generation time, energy-dependent leakages and absorptions, energy- and region-dependent fluxes and region-dependent fission densities. Criticality searches can be made on unit dimensions or on the number of units in an array. A summary of the theory utilized by KENO IV, a section describing the logical program flow, a compilation of the error messages printed by the code and a comprehensive data guide for preparing input to the code are presented. 14 references

  6. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  7. Fission level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fission level densities (or fissioning nucleus level densities at fission saddle deformations) are required for statistical model calculations of actinide fission cross sections. Back-shifted Fermi-Gas Model, Constant Temperature Model and Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM) are widely used for the description of level densities at stable deformations. These models provide approximately identical level density description at excitations close to the neutron binding energy. It is at low excitation energies that they are discrepant, while this energy region is crucial for fission cross section calculations. A drawback of back-shifted Fermi gas model and traditional constant temperature model approaches is that it is difficult to include in a consistent way pair correlations, collective effects and shell effects. Pair, shell and collective properties of nucleus do not reduce just to the renormalization of level density parameter a, but influence the energy dependence of level densities. These effects turn out to be important because they seem to depend upon deformation of either equilibrium or saddle-point. These effects are easily introduced within GSM approach. Fission barriers are another key ingredients involved in the fission cross section calculations. Fission level density and barrier parameters are strongly interdependent. This is the reason for including fission barrier parameters along with the fission level densities in the Starter File. The recommended file is maslov.dat - fission barrier parameters. Recent version of actinide fission barrier data obtained in Obninsk (obninsk.dat) should only be considered as a guide for selection of initial parameters. These data are included in the Starter File, together with the fission barrier parameters recommended by CNDC (beijing.dat), for completeness. (author)

  8. JSFR design progress related to development of safety design criteria for generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactors. (3) Progress of component design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Orita, Junichi; Eto, Masao; Miyagawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    In the frame work of generation IV international forum (GIF), safety design criteria (SDC) and safety design guideline (SDG) for the generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactors have been developing in the circumstance of worldwide deployment of SFRs. JAEA, JAPC, MFBR have been investigating design study for JSFR to satisfy SDC in the feasibility study of SDG for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). In addition to the safety measures, maintainability, reparability and manufacturability are taken into account in the JSFR design study. This paper describes the design of main components. Enlargement of the access route for the inspection devices and addition of the access routes were carried out for the reactor structure. The pump-integrated IHX (pump/IHX) was modified for the primary heat exchanger (PHX), which was installed for the decay heat removal in the IHX at the upper plenum, to be removable for improved repair and maintenance. For the steam generator (SG), protective wall tube type design is under investigation as an option with less R and D risks. (author)

  9. Fast fission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Christian.

    1982-03-01

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted [fr

  10. The mechanism of Intralipid®-mediated cardioprotection complex IV inhibition by the active metabolite, palmitoylcarnitine, generates reactive oxygen species and activates reperfusion injury salvage kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing-How Lou

    Full Text Available Intralipid® administration at reperfusion elicits protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood.Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were exposed to 15 min of ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion in the absence or presence of Intralipid® 1% administered at the onset of reperfusion. In separate experiments, the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionyl-glycine was added either alone or with Intralipid®. Left ventricular work and activation of Akt, STAT3, and ERK1/2 were used to evaluate cardioprotection. ROS production was assessed by measuring the loss of aconitase activity and the release of hydrogen peroxide using Amplex Red. Electron transport chain complex activities and proton leak were measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized cardiac fibers. Titration experiments using the fatty acid intermediates of Intralipid® palmitoyl-, oleoyl- and linoleoylcarnitine served to determine concentration-dependent inhibition of complex IV activity and mitochondrial ROS release.Intralipid® enhanced postischemic recovery and activated Akt and Erk1/2, effects that were abolished by the ROS scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionylglycine. Palmitoylcarnitine and linoleoylcarnitine, but not oleoylcarnitine concentration-dependently inhibited complex IV. Only palmitoylcarnitine reached high tissue concentrations during early reperfusion and generated significant ROS by complex IV inhibition. Palmitoylcarnitine (1 µM, administered at reperfusion, also fully mimicked Intralipid®-mediated protection in an N-(2-mercaptopropionyl-glycine -dependent manner.Our data describe a new mechanism of postconditioning cardioprotection by the clinically available fat emulsion, Intralipid®. Protection is elicited by the fatty acid intermediate palmitoylcarnitine, and involves inhibition of complex IV, an increase in ROS production and activation of the RISK pathway.

  11. Innovative fission reactors for this century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that global trends indicate a rebirth of nuclear energy due to several items: the climate change and the use of energies that emits CO 2 , the cost and dependence of gas and oil, the new innovative reactors which are competitive, safer, and sustainable and can support the Kyoto Protocol. The Advanced Reactors have safer systems than those developed in the Generation II, which demonstrates that are sustainable for the present and nuclear industry has also developed new concepts for the future which also will be sustainable. Now the new power plants that have being constructed are classified in the Generation III. Several units of this technology are in operation in Japan and other countries of the Pacific. Europe is now constructing the first unit in Finland (Olkilouto) with European technology: the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR). France has announced the beginning of the construction of an EPR in Flamanville next year. In 2000, several countries with advanced nuclear technology established the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop and demonstrate nuclear energy systems that offer advantages in the following areas: sustainability, economics, safety and reliability and proliferation resistance and physical protection. These new systems will be deployed commercially after 2030. Six innovative concepts are under research, and the aim is not only produce electricity, but also hydrogen using the operational conditions of several concepts. Developed countries with NPPs in operation have strategies for the future of the nuclear energy. For the short term is to extend the operation of the NPPs until 60 years, or alternatively construction of new units of Generation III, to substitute those closed for decommissioning, keeping the percentage of contribution to the electricity generated. Between the period 2030-50, the solution is to operate the new innovative systems of the Generation IV, which uses the passive concept, and in the second part

  12. Calculated apparent yields of rare gas fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delucchi, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The apparent fission yield of the rare gas fission products from four mass chains is calculated as a function of separation time for six different fissioning systems. A plot of the calculated fission yield along with a one standard deviation error band is given for each rare gas fission product and for each fissioning system. Those parameters in the calculation that were major contributors to the calculated standard deviation at each separation time were identified and the results presented on a separate plot. To extend the usefulness of these calculations as new and better values for the input parameters become available, a third plot was generated for each system which shows how sensitive the derived fission yield is to a change in any given parameter used in the calculation. (U.S.)

  13. Fission product yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V.; Hep, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  14. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  15. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylten, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  16. Status of the design and safety project for the sodium-cooled fast reactor as a generation IV nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hajime; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi; Sim, Yoon-Sub; Lennox, Tom; Cahalan, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The Design and Safety Project Management Board (DSPMB) was established under the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) System Steering Committee (SSC) in the Generation IV international Forum. The DSPMB will promote collaborative R and D activities on reactor core design, and safety assessment for candidate systems, and also integrate these results together with those from other PMBs such as advanced fuel and component to a whole fast reactor system in order to develop high performance systems that will satisfy the goals of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The DSPMB has formulated the present R and D schedules for this purpose. Two SFR concepts were proposed: a loop-type system with primarily a MOX fuel core and a pool-type system with a metal fuel core. Study of innovative systems and their evaluation will also be included. The safety project will cover both the safety assessment of the design and the preparation of the methods/tools to be used for the assessment. After a rather short viability phase, the project will move to the performance phase for development of performance data and design optimization of conceptual designs. This paper describes the schedules, work packages and tasks for the collaborative studies of the member countries. (author)

  17. The nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, J.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear fission process considering initially the formation of compound nucleus and finishing with radioactive decay of fission products is studied. The process is divided in three parts which consist of the events associated to the nucleus of intermediate transitional state, the scission configuration, and the phenomenum of post scission. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Fission gas detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by failed fuel rods which device uses a filter adapted to pass coolant but to block passage of fission gas bubbles due to the surface tension of the bubbles. The coolant may be liquid metal. (author)

  19. Muon-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikanov, S.

    1980-01-01

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238 U and 232 Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238 U. (author)

  20. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  1. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  2. Radiation shielding for fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation shielding aspects relating fission reactors have been reviewed. Domestic activities in the past five years have been mainly described concerning nuclear data, calculation methods, shielding and skyshine experiments, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), Experimental and Prototype Fast Reactors (JOYO, MONJU), Demonstration FBR, core shroud replacement of BWR, and spent fuel transportation cask and vessel. These studies have valuable information in safety and cost reduction issues of fission reactor design for not only existing reactors but also new reactor concepts in the next century. It has been concluded that we should maintain existing shielding technologies and improve these data and methods for coming generations in the next millennium. (author)

  3. Study of hypernuclei fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, F.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about PS177 experience made on LEAR machine at CERN in 1988. The annihilation reaction of anti protons on a target of Bismuth or Uranium is studied. Lambda particles are produced by this reaction, in the nucleus in 2% of cases 7.1 10 -3 hypernuclei by stopped antiproton in the target are produced. The prompt hypernucleus fission probability of uranium is 75% and that of Bismuth 10%. The mass distribution of fission fragments is symmetrical ((≡ the excitation energy of the nucleus is very high). If the nucleus hasn't fissioned, the non-mesonic lambda decay, gives it an energy of 100 MeV, what allows to fission later. This fission is delayed because the hypernucleus lifetime is 1.3 +0.25 -0.21 10 -10 sec for Bismuth [fr

  4. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  5. Daniel Gogny's vision for a microscopic theory of fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, W.

    2017-05-01

    Daniel Gogny made many contributions to our understanding of nuclear fission over a span of 35 years. This paper reviews some of those contributions, focusing in particular on fission dynamics, the challenges of describing scission in a quantum-mechanical context, and the calculation of fragment properties such as their mass, kinetic, and excitation energy distributions. The generator coordinate method provides the common theoretical framework within which these various aspects of fission are formulated.

  6. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

    2002-01-01

    OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups

  7. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

    2002-11-26

    OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

  8. Scylla IV-P theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, A.G.; Chandler, G.I.; Ekdahl, C.A. Jr.; Lillberg, J.W.; Machalek, M.D.; Seibel, F.T.

    1976-01-01

    Scylla IV-P is a flexible, linear theta pinch designed to investigate high-density linear concepts, end-stoppering, alternate heating methods, and plasma injection techniques relevant to a pure fusion reactor and/or a fusion-fission hybrid system. The construction and experimental arrangement of the device are briefly described

  9. Fission gas in thoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah, E-mail: n.kuganathan@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ghosh, Partha S. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Galvin, Conor O.T. [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arya, Ashok K. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Dutta, Bijon K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Trombay, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Dey, Gautam K. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Grimes, Robin W. [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The fission gases Xe and Kr, formed during normal reactor operation, are known to degrade fuel performance, particularly at high burn-up. Using first-principles density functional theory together with a dispersion correction (DFT + D), in ThO{sub 2} we calculate the energetics of neutral and charged point defects, the di-vacancy (DV), different neutral tri-vacancies (NTV), the charged tetravacancy (CTV) defect cluster geometries and their interaction with Xe and Kr. The most favourable incorporation point defect site for Xe or Kr in defective ThO{sub 2} is the fully charged thorium vacancy. The lowest energy NTV in larger supercells of ThO{sub 2} is NTV3, however, a single Xe atom is most stable when accommodated within a NTV1. The di-vacancy (DV) is a significantly less favoured incorporation site than the NTV1 but the CTV offers about the same incorporation energy. Incorporation of a second gas atom in a NTV is a high energy process and more unfavourable than accommodation within an existing Th vacancy. The bi-NTV (BNTV) cluster geometry studied will accommodate one or two gas atoms with low incorporation energies but the addition of a third gas atom incurs a high energy penalty. The tri-NTV cluster (TNTV) forms a larger space which accommodates three gas atoms but again there is a penalty to accommodate a fourth gas atom. By considering the energy to form the defect sites, solution energies were generated showing that in ThO{sub 2−x} the most favourable solution equilibrium site is the NTV1 while in ThO{sub 2} it is the DV. - Highlights: • We have considered Xe and Kr in point defects and defect clusters (neutral and charged) using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with a dispersion correction. • The most favourable charge state for a point defect (vacancy or interstitial) is that with full ionic charge and we have found that in all cases gas atoms occupy the fully charged vacancy sites. • The number of fission gas atoms accommodated in ThO{sub 2} is

  10. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm FREYA 2.0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Randrup, J.; Vogt, R.

    2018-01-01

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a fission event generator which models complete fission events. As such, it automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations between observables, resulting from conservation of energy and momentum. The purpose of this paper is to present the main differences between FREYA versions 1.0 and 2.0.2 : additional fissionable isotopes, angular momentum conservation, Giant Dipole Resonance form factor for the statistical emission of photons, improved treatment of fission photon emission using RIPL database, and dependence on the incident neutron direction. FREYA 2.0.2 has been integrated into the LLNL Fission Library 2.0.2, which has itself been integrated into MCNP6.2, TRIPOLI-4.10, and can be called from Geant4.10.

  11. The Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS). IV. Mass and Age Bimodality of Nuclear Clusters in the Fornax Core Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Taylor, Matthew A.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Zhang, Hongxin; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ribbeck, Karen X.; Grebel, Eva K.; Ángel, Simón; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Rong, Yu; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben

    2018-06-01

    We present the analysis of 61 nucleated dwarf galaxies in the central regions (≲R vir/4) of the Fornax galaxy cluster. The galaxies and their nuclei are studied as part of the Next Generation Fornax Survey using optical imaging obtained with the Dark Energy Camera mounted at Blanco/Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and near-infrared data obtained with VIRCam at VISTA/ESO. We decompose the nucleated dwarfs in nucleus and spheroid, after subtracting the surface brightness profile of the spheroid component and studying the nucleus using point source photometry. In general, nuclei are consistent with colors of confirmed metal-poor globular clusters, but with significantly smaller dispersion than other confirmed compact stellar systems in Fornax. We find a bimodal nucleus mass distribution with peaks located at {log}({{ \\mathcal M }}* /{M}ȯ )≃ 5.4 and ∼6.3. These two nucleus subpopulations have different stellar population properties: the more massive nuclei are older than ∼2 Gyr and have metal-poor stellar populations (Z ≤ 0.02 Z ⊙), while the less massive nuclei are younger than ∼2 Gyr with metallicities in the range 0.02 < Z/Z ⊙ ≤ 1. We find that the nucleus mass ({{ \\mathcal M }}nuc}) versus galaxy mass ({{ \\mathcal M }}gal}) relation becomes shallower for less massive galaxies starting around 108 M ⊙, and the mass ratio {η }n={{ \\mathcal M }}nuc}/{{ \\mathcal M }}gal} shows a clear anticorrelation with {{ \\mathcal M }}gal} for the lowest masses, reaching 10%. We test current theoretical models of nuclear cluster formation and find that they cannot fully reproduce the observed trends. A likely mixture of in situ star formation and star cluster mergers seems to be acting during nucleus growth over cosmic time.

  12. Fission in a Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A three-year theory project was undertaken to study the fission process in extreme astrophysical environments, such as the crust of neutron stars. In the first part of the project, the effect of electron screening on the fission process was explored using a microscopic approach. For the first time, these calculations were carried out to the breaking point of the nucleus. In the second part of the project, the population of the fissioning nucleus was calculated within the same microscopic framework. These types of calculations are extremely computer-intensive and have seldom been applied to heavy deformed nuclei, such as fissioning actinides. The results, tools and methodologies produced in this work will be of interest to both the basic-science and nuclear-data communities.

  13. Application of fission track analysis to hydrocarbon exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Marshallsea, S.; Tingate, P.; Laslett, G.M.; Hegarty, K.A.; Lovering, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature range over which fission tracks in apatite show observable annealing effects coincides with that responsible for the maximum generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Work is currently in progress in a number of Australian and overseas sedimentary basins, applying Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA) to investigate the thermal evolution of these hydrocarbon prospective regions

  14. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented

  15. Fusion-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Grotowski, K.

    1992-01-01

    Classical dynamical calculations of the heavy ion induced fission processes have been performed for the reactions 40 Ar+ 141 Pr, 20 Ne+ 165 Ho and 12 C+ 175 Lu leading to the iridium like nucleus. As a result prescission lifetimes were obtained and compared with the experimental values. The comparison between the calculated and experimental lifetimes indicates that the one-body dissipation picture is much more relevant in describing the fusion-fission dynamics than the two-body one. (orig.)

  16. Calculation of burnup and power dependence on fission gas released from PWR type reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy-Sulistyono

    1996-01-01

    Burn up dependence of fission gas released and variation power analysis have been conducted using FEMXI-IV computer code program for Pressure Water Reactor Fuel During steady-state condition. The analysis result shows that the fission gas release is sensitive to the fuel temperature, the increasing of burn up and power in the fuel element under irradiation experiment

  17. Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft 2 , the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft 2 -degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation

  18. Neutron induced current pulses in fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Buck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of neutron induced current pulse generation in fission chambers is discussed. By application of the calculated detector transfer function to proposed detector current pulse shapes, and by comparison with actually observed detector output voltage pulses, a credible, semi-empirical, trapezoidal pulse shape of chamber current is obtained

  19. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  20. New technique for synthesizing AMP : precipitation inside an ion-exchange resin and its application to separation of cesium from fission-products and to A137sub(m) Ba generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.T.; Abrao, A.

    1980-06-01

    A new technique for synthesizing ammonium molybdophosphate, an inorganic ion exchanger which retains selectively cesium-137 from a mixture of fission products, is dealt with. Normally the use of this exchanger in column operation requires the use of asbestos, silica-gel or organic polymers as binder, due to its microcrystalline form. The new process employs a strong anionic resin, saturated with molybdate anions. This method enables the precipitation of ammonium molybdophosphate directly into the resinous structure by adding dihydrogen ammonium phosphate in 7,5M HNO 3 . The reactants maintened at 60 0 C for a period of four hours has been found to be the optimum condition for a maximum yield of this compound (anionic resin-ammonium molybdophosphate=R-AMP). The tests performed for characterizing this compound are: molybdenum-phosphorus ratio determination, electronic absorption spectra, infra-red absorption spectra, reflection microscopy observations, electron probe micro-analysis and X-ray powder patterns. The mentioned analysis confirmed the presence of the ammonium molybdophosphate in the resinous structure, permitting, thereby, its use as a cation exchanger. R-AMP showed a capacity of 0,48mE/g of dry material. The cesium retention studies were made using columns charged with R-AMP compound. The behavior of some polivalent fission products was also studied. The R-AMP columns was finally applied to separate cesium from irradiated uranium solutions. A method for the isolation of sup(137m)Ba by successive elutions from R-AMP ( 137 Cs) exchanger (generator) is described. (Author) [pt

  1. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  2. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  3. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureau, A.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  4. Transmutation of fission products through accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Tani, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamura, O.

    1995-01-01

    The transmutation of fission products through particle accelerators has been studied under the OMEGA program. The photonuclear reaction has also been investigated to be applied to transmuting long-lived fission products, such as Cesium and Strontium, which have difficulties on reaction with neutrons due to its so small cross section. It is applicable for the transmutation if the energy balance can be improved with a monochromatic gamma rays in the range of the Giant Dipole Resonance generated through an excellent high current electron linear accelerator. The feasibility studies are being conducted on the transmutation system using it through an electron accelerator. (authors)

  5. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.D.; Lynn, J.E.; Michaudon, A.; Rowlands, J.; de Saussure, G.

    1981-01-01

    A general presentation of current knowledge of the fission process is given with emphasis on the low energy fission of actinide nuclei and neutron induced fission. The need for and the required accuracy of fission cross section data in nuclear energy programs are discussed. A summary is given of the steps involved in fission cross section measurement and the range of available techniques. Methods of fission detection are described with emphasis on energy dependent changed and detector efficiency. Examples of cross section measurements are given and data reduction is discussed. The calculation of fission cross sections is discussed and relevant nuclear theory including the formation and decay of compound nuclei and energy level density is introduced. A description of a practical computation of fission cross sections is given.

  6. Preparation of multigroup lumped fission product cross-sections from ENDF/B-VI for FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Sridharan, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Multigroup pseudo fission product cross-sections were computed from the American evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI, corresponding to various burnups of the proposed 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR), in India. The data were derived from the cross-sections of 111 selected fission products that account for almost complete capture of fission products in an FBR. The dependence of burnup on the pseudo fission product cross-sections, and comparison with other data sets, viz. JNDC, ENDF/B-IV and ABBN, are discussed. (author)

  7. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1988-09-01

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  8. The evaluation for reference fission yield of 238U fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Qichang; Liu Tingjin

    1998-01-01

    In the fission yield data evaluation and measurement, the reference yield is very important, good or poor recommended or measurement values depend upon the reference data to a great extent. According to the CRP's requirement, the evaluation of reference fission yields have been and will be carried out in CNDC, as a part of the whole work (contract No.9504/R 0 /Regular Budget Fund), the evaluation for 29 reference fission yields of 15 product nuclides from 238 U fission have been completed

  9. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Fission product detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liatard, E.; Akrouf, S.; Bruandet, J.F

    1987-01-01

    The response of photovoltaic cells to heavy ions and fission products have been tested on beam. Their main advantages are their extremely low price, their low sensitivity to energetic light ions with respect to fission products, and the possibility to cut and fit them together to any shape without dead zone. The time output signals of a charge sensitive preamplifier connected to these cells allows fast coincidences. A resolution of 12ns (F.W.H.M.) have been measured between two cells [fr

  11. Low energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1982-02-01

    In these lectures we present the liquid drop model of fission and compare some of its prediction with experiment. The liquid drop analogy allows to define in a rather simple and intuitive way a number of useful concepts and possible observables. We then discuss, using the example of the oscillator model, the generality of shell effects. We show how a synthesis of the liquid drop model and of the shell model can be made using the Strutinsky shell averaging procedure. Some experimental data related to the existence of shape isomers are presented and discussed. We conclude by discussing some aspects, both experimental and theoretical, of fission dynamics

  12. Fission of heavy hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1993-01-01

    The results on delayed and prompt fission of heavy hypernuclei obtained by the LEAR PS177 collaboration are recalled and discussed. It is shown that the hypernuclei life-times can be explained in term of a weak strangeness violating lambda-nucleon interaction with a cross section close to 6.0 10 -15 barns. The lambda attachment function is shown to be sensitive to the scission configuration, just before fission, and to the neck dynamics. This function provides a new way to study the nuclear scission process. (author)

  13. Fission gas measuring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Eun Ka; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Eun Pyo; Chun, Yong Bum; Seo, Ki Seog; Park, Dea Gyu; Chu, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok.

    1998-02-01

    Safety and economy of nuclear plant are greatly affected by the integrity of nuclear fuels during irradiation reactor core. A series of post-irradiation examination (PIE) including non-destructive and destructive test is to be conducted to evaluate and characterize the nuclear performance. In this report, a principle of the examination equipment to measure and analyse fission gases existing nuclear fuels were described and features of the component and device consisting the fission gas measuring equipment are investigated. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Fission gas measuring technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Eun Ka; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Eun Pyo; Chun, Yong Bum; Seo, Ki Seog; Park, Dea Gyu; Chu, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok

    1998-02-01

    Safety and economy of nuclear plant are greatly affected by the integrity of nuclear fuels during irradiation reactor core. A series of post-irradiation examination (PIE) including non-destructive and destructive test is to be conducted to evaluate and characterize the nuclear performance. In this report, a principle of the examination equipment to measure and analyse fission gases existing nuclear fuels were described and features of the component and device consisting the fission gas measuring equipment are investigated. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Low energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1980-08-01

    In these lectures the liquid drop model of fission is presented and some of its predictions compared with experiment. The liquid drop analogy allows to define in a rather simple and intuitive way a number of useful concepts and possible observables. It is shown how a synthesis of the liquid drop model and of the shell model can be made using the Strutinsky shell averaging procedure. Some experimental data related to the existence of shape isomers are presented and discussed. We conclude by discussing some aspects, both experimental and theoretical, of fission dynamics

  16. IVS Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  17. Fission Product Library and Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Padgett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Fission product yields can be extracted from an irradiated sample by performing gamma ray spectroscopy on the whole sample post irradiation. There are several pitfalls to avoid when trying to determine a specific isotope's fission product yield.

  18. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fission-like configurations are used for the total deformation energy calculations. A ... oscillator potential for the two fission fragment regions reads as ... Beyond this limit, the contribution of more remote levels is negligible. Once the density ...

  19. Mirror fusion--fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described

  20. Process for treating fission waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste

  1. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM AND ARSENIC COMPOUNDS BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW AND ON-LINE REDUCTION OF SELENIUM(VI) TO SELENIUM(IV) WITH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with hydride generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine four arsenicals and two selenium species. Selenate (SeVI) was reduced on-line to selenite (SeIV') by mixing the CE effluent with concentrated HCl. A microporo...

  2. Main orientations of the JRC nuclear fission programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The European Union has taken the lead in responding to climate change, announcing far-reaching initiatives from promoting energy efficient light bulbs and cars to new building codes, carbon trading schemes, the development of low carbon technologies and greater competition in energy markets. Nuclear energy remains central to the energy debate in Europe. One third of EU electricity is produced via nuclear fission, and eight new reactors are under construction. Traditionally non-nuclear countries are manifesting an interest in building nuclear power plants while the clock is ticking down on Belgium, Germany and the UK's decision to renew or close existing nuclear infrastructures. Sustainability in nuclear energy production is ensured in the medium term due to the large and diverse uranium resources available in politically stable countries around the world. The quantities available with high probability ensure more than hundred year of nuclear energy production. This extrapolation depends however on the forecast for the future nuclear energy production. The use of fast neutron breeder reactors would lead to a much more efficient utilisation of the uranium, extending the sustainable energy production to several thousands of years. The presentation will outline the fast reactors of the new generation currently being developed within the 'Generation IV' initiative. Broad conclusions of the presentation will be that: -There is a growing nuclear renaissance in Europe for good reason; - Nuclear energy is a green and sustainable option for Europe and indeed the world's energy needs; - Nuclear energy is a competitive energy that makes economic sense; - Nuclear fission reactors have a safety and environmental track record that is second to none, yet public misperceptions persist and must be tackled; - Waste management solutions exist while new developments hold great promise; - The evolution and promise of nuclear technologies must also be examined against the

  3. The G4-ECONS Economic Evaluation Tool for Generation IV Reactor Systems and its Proposed Application to Deliberately Small Reactor Systems and Proposed New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Annex IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    At the outset of the international Generation IV programme, it was decided that the six candidate reactor systems will ultimately be evaluated on the basis of safety, sustainability, non-proliferation attributes, technical readiness and projected economics. It is likely that the same factors will influence the evaluation of deliberately small reactor systems1 and new fuel cycle facilities, such as reprocessing plants that are being considered under the more recent Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This annex describes how the development of an economic modelling system has evolved to address the issue of economic competitiveness for both the Generation IV and GNEP programmes. In 2004, the Generation IV Economic Modelling Working Group (EMWG) commissioned the development of a Microsoft Excel based model capable of calculating the levelized unit electricity cost (LUEC) in mills/kW.h (1 mill = $10{sup -3}) or $/MW.h for multiple types of reactor system being developed under the Generation IV programme. This overall modelling system is now called the Generation IV spreadsheet calculation of nuclear systems (G4-ECONS), and is being expanded to calculate costs of energy products in addition to electricity, such as hydrogen and desalinated water. A version has also been developed to evaluate the costs of products or services from fuel cycle facilities. The cost estimating methodology and algorithms are explained in detail in the Generation IV Cost Estimating Guidelines and in the G4-ECONS User's Manual. The model was constructed with relatively simple economic algorithms such that it could be used by almost any nation without regard to country specific taxation, cost accounting, depreciation or capital cost recovery methodologies. It was also designed with transparency to the user in mind (i.e. all algorithms and cell contents are visible to the user). A short description of version 1.0 G4-ECONS-R (reactor economics model) has also been published in the

  4. The G4-ECONS Economic Evaluation Tool for Generation IV Reactor Systems and its Proposed Application to Deliberately Small Reactor Systems and Proposed New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. Annex IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    At the outset of the international Generation IV programme, it was decided that the six candidate reactor systems will ultimately be evaluated on the basis of safety, sustainability, non-proliferation attributes, technical readiness and projected economics. It is likely that the same factors will influence the evaluation of deliberately small reactor systems1 and new fuel cycle facilities, such as reprocessing plants that are being considered under the more recent Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This annex describes how the development of an economic modelling system has evolved to address the issue of economic competitiveness for both the Generation IV and GNEP programmes. In 2004, the Generation IV Economic Modelling Working Group (EMWG) commissioned the development of a Microsoft Excel based model capable of calculating the levelized unit electricity cost (LUEC) in mills/kW.h (1 mill = $10 -3 ) or $/MW.h for multiple types of reactor system being developed under the Generation IV programme. This overall modelling system is now called the Generation IV spreadsheet calculation of nuclear systems (G4-ECONS), and is being expanded to calculate costs of energy products in addition to electricity, such as hydrogen and desalinated water. A version has also been developed to evaluate the costs of products or services from fuel cycle facilities. The cost estimating methodology and algorithms are explained in detail in the Generation IV Cost Estimating Guidelines and in the G4-ECONS User's Manual. The model was constructed with relatively simple economic algorithms such that it could be used by almost any nation without regard to country specific taxation, cost accounting, depreciation or capital cost recovery methodologies. It was also designed with transparency to the user in mind (i.e. all algorithms and cell contents are visible to the user). A short description of version 1.0 G4-ECONS-R (reactor economics model) has also been published in the Proceedings of

  5. 50 years of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilscher, D.

    1989-01-01

    The article tells the story of the discovery of nuclear fission in Berlin 50 years ago by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in cooperation with Lise Meitner. 50 years later nuclear fission is still a subject of research. Some question remain unanswered. Selected new research results are used to discuss the dynamics of the collective movement of the elementary nuclear fission process. (orig.) [de

  6. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... across the fission barrier is very small or in other words, the fission barrier is much ... of this shape evolution, the gross features of the fissioning nucleus can be described ..... [7] Y Abe, C Gregoire and H Delagrange, J. Phys.

  7. Status of fission yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeck, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  8. The discovery of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.A.C.

    1978-01-01

    In this article by the retired head of the Separation Processes Group of the Chemistry Division, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, U.K., the author recalls what he terms 'an exciting drama, the unravelling of the nature of the atomic nucleus' in the years before the Second World War, including the discovery of fission. 12 references. (author)

  9. Development and application of an advanced fuel model for the safety analysis of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkevich, P.

    2008-09-01

    Until about the year 2030, current-day nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be replaced by so-called Gen-III or Gen-III+ units, which are mainly based on light water reactor technology. The principal new features are increased safety and improved economical effectiveness. However, these systems use the same fuel forms and are based on the same fuel cycle. Beyond 2030, the interest is likely to shift towards fourth generation NPPs, which offer the possibility of complete fuel cycle closure. Generation-IV reactor concepts include both thermal and fast systems, and involve a wide range of fuel forms and compositions. The present research has been focused on the development of a thermo-mechanical model for the innovative fuel design of the Generation-IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). The principal distinctive feature of the fuel is that the fuel pellets are arranged within plates which enclose an inner honeycomb structure. Apart from the geometry, the usage of new materials is foreseen. Thus, the fuel pellets are of mixed uranium-plutonium carbide, and the cladding is bulk or fiber-reinforced SiC. The setting up of an appropriate materials database was thus the very first task which had to be carried out in the current work. The main purpose of the currently developed model is to provide reliable data, in the context of transient analysis, for the calculation of the principal neutronic feedbacks in the GFR core, viz. the fuel temperature for the Doppler effect and the fuel plate deformation for the axial core expansion effect. None of the available fuel modeling codes is suitable for a realistic simulation of the GFR fuel, as the inner honeycomb structure cannot be explicitly taken into account. The development work has been carried out largely in the context of PSI’s generic code system for fast reactor safety analysis, FAST. Thereby, it has mainly involved extension of the thermo-mechanical code FRED, developed originally for the modeling of traditional rodded fuel

  10. Volatilization and reaction of fission products in flowing steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, I.; Steidl, D.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The principal risk to the public from nuclear power plants derives from the highly radioactive atoms (fission products) generated as energy is produced in the nuclear fuel. The revolatilization of fission products from reactor system surfaces due to self-heating by radioactive decay has become a complicating factor in the source-term redefinition effort. It has had a major impact on calculations of fission product distributions in accident safety analyses. The focus of this research effort was to investigate the volatilization and transport of fission products and control rod materials in a flowing gaseous steam-hydrogen mixture. Fission product and control rod materials in various combinations were studied including CsI, CsOH, TeO 2 , SrO, Ag, In, Cd and Mn. The vaporization behavior of the deposits were characterized with respect to vaporization rates, chemical species and downstream transport behavior

  11. Fission product and aerosol behaviour within the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, A.M.; Benson, C.G.; Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.

    1990-04-01

    Experimental studies have been undertaken to characterise the behaviour of fission products in the containment of a pressurised water reactor during a severe accident. The following aspects of fission product transport have been studied: (a) aerosol nucleation, (b) vapour transport processes, (c) chemical forms of high-temperature vapours, (d) interaction of fission product vapours with aerosols generated from within the reactor core, (e) resuspension processes, (f) chemistry in the containment. Chemical effects have been shown to be important in defining and quantifying fission product source terms in a wide range of accident sequences. Both the chemical forms of the fission product vapours and their interactions with reactor materials aerosols could have a major effect on the magnitude and physicochemical forms of the radioactive emission from a severe reactor accident. Only the main conclusions are presented in this summary document; detailed technical aspects of the work are described in separate reports listed in the annex

  12. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  13. A threshold for dissipative fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and γ-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T thresh to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E Bar (T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T thresh /E Bar (T) thresh /E Bar (T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems

  14. Behavior of solid fission products in irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ung Sup; Jung, Yang Hong; Kim, Hee Moon; Yoo, Byun Gok; Kim, Do Sik; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2004-01-01

    Many fission products are generated by fission events in UO 2 fuel under irradiation in nuclear reactor. Concentration of each fission product is changed by conditions of neutron energy spectrum, fissile material, critical thermal power, irradiation period and cooling time. Volatile materials such as Cs and I, the fission products, degrade nuclear fuel rod by the decrease of thermal conductivity in pellet and the stress corrosion cracking in cladding. Metal fission products (white inclusion) make pellet be swelled and decrease volume of pellet by densification. It seems that metal fission products are filled in the pore in pellet and placed between UO 2 lattices as interstitial. In addition, metal oxide state may change structural lattice volume. Considering behavior of fission products mentioned above, concentration of them is important. Fission products could be classified as bellows; solid solution in matrix : Sr, Zr, Nb, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm - metal precipitates : Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sb, Te - oxide precipitates : Ba, Zr, Nb, Mo, (Rb, Cs, Te) - volatile and gases : Kr, Xe, Br, I, (Rb, Cs, Te)

  15. Barium 139 as Fission Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1943-07-01

    This report is based on a measurement performed at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) by E. Broda in December 1943 where a technique has been worked out for measuring the fission density in a uranium containing medium in relative units by determining the amount of a suitable fission product formed. Generally a given fission product will be formed in natural uranium by slow neutron fission of U235 or by fast neutron fission of either U235 or U238. It is intended to translate the relative units into absolute units by comparison of the Ba yield with the indication of UF6 fission chamber in the same medium. This has to be done separately for fast and slow neutron fission as the yields may be different. Another application of the technique developed is the measurement of thermal neutron density in an uraniferous medium without using a detector subject to variations of sensitivity according to the properties of the medium. (nowak)

  16. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B.; Chernick, Erin T.; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S.; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  17. ENDF/B fission product decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.F.; Burrows, T.W.

    1976-08-01

    The fission product data have been organized by A-chains in order of ascending A from A = 72 to A = 167. The heading page is followed by more detailed information on the individual members of the chain in order of increasing Z and decreasing metastable state. The detailed information for each member includes the ENDF/B-IV File 1 comments and references if available and applicable to the decay data. Following the comments is a decay scheme of the nuclide tabulating the quantities T/sub 1 / 2 /, Q, branching ratio (BR), (E/sub γ/), (E/sub β/), and (E/sub α/). Uncertainties are given if available in the file. Independent fission yields are given, as well as thermal cross sections and resonance integrals as obtained from ENDF/B-IV. All energies listed in this publication are in keV, and all branching ratios (BR) sum to unity. If there are spectra in the decay data file, the decay scheme is followed by tables of photon, particle, and characteristic radiation. For cases in which the multipolarities could be obtained from the file the tables also contain information on x-rays, conversion electrons, and Auger electrons. Associated with the photon and particle radiation tables are the appropriate average energies per decay for each type of radiation, including neutrino radiation

  18. Fusion-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Grotowski, K.

    1991-04-01

    Classical dynamical calculations of the heavy ion induced fission process for the reactions 40 Ar+ 141 Pr, 20 Ne+ 165 Ho and 12 C+ 175 Lu leading to the iridium like nucleus have been performed. As a result prescission lifetimes were obtained and compared with the experimental values. The agreement between the calculated and experimental lifetimes indicates that the one-body dissipation picture is much more relevant in describing the fusion-fission dynamics than the two-body one. Somewhat bigger calculated times than the experimental ones in case of the C+Lu reaction at 16 MeV/nucleon may be a signal on the energy range applicability of the one-body dissipation model. (author)

  19. Simulation of fission products behavior in severe accidents for advanced passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.L.; Huang, G.F.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fission product analysis model based on thermal hydraulic module is developed. • An assessment method for fission product release and transport is constructed. • Fission products behavior during three modes of containment response is investigated. • Source term results for the three modes of containment response are obtained. - Abstract: Fission product behavior for common Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied for many years, and some analytical tools have developed. However, studies specifically on the behavior of fission products related to advanced passive PWR is scarce. In the current study, design characteristics of advanced passive PWR influencing fission product behavior are investigated. An integrated fission products analysis model based on a thermal hydraulic module is developed, and the assessment method for fission products release and transport for advanced passive PWR is constructed. Three modes of containment response are simulated, including intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure. Fission products release from the core and corium, fission products transport and deposition in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), fission products transport and deposition in the containment considering fission products retention in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) and in the secondary side of steam generators (SGs) are simulated. Source term results of intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure are obtained, which can be utilized to evaluate the radiological consequences

  20. Hemi-fused structure mediates and controls fusion and fission in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Dong; Hamid, Edaeni; Shin, Wonchul; Wen, Peter J; Krystofiak, Evan S; Villarreal, Seth A; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Kachar, Bechara; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-06-23

    Membrane fusion and fission are vital for eukaryotic life. For three decades, it has been proposed that fusion is mediated by fusion between the proximal leaflets of two bilayers (hemi-fusion) to produce a hemi-fused structure, followed by fusion between the distal leaflets, whereas fission is via hemi-fission, which also produces a hemi-fused structure, followed by full fission. This hypothesis remained unsupported owing to the lack of observation of hemi-fusion or hemi-fission in live cells. A competing fusion hypothesis involving protein-lined pore formation has also been proposed. Here we report the observation of a hemi-fused Ω-shaped structure in live neuroendocrine chromaffin cells and pancreatic β-cells, visualized using confocal and super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This structure is generated from fusion pore opening or closure (fission) at the plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the transition to full fusion or fission is determined by competition between fusion and calcium/dynamin-dependent fission mechanisms, and is notably slow (seconds to tens of seconds) in a substantial fraction of the events. These results provide key missing evidence in support of the hemi-fusion and hemi-fission hypothesis in live cells, and reveal the hemi-fused intermediate as a key structure controlling fusion and fission, as fusion and fission mechanisms compete to determine the transition to fusion or fission.

  1. The wastes of nuclear fission; Les dechets de la fission nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubre, H. [Paris-11 Univ., Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, IN2P3/CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper the author presents the problems of the radioactive wastes generated by the nuclear fission. The first part devoted to the fission phenomenon explains the incident neutron energy and the target nuclei role. The second part devoted to the nuclear wastes sources presents the production of wastes upstream of the reactors, in the reactors and why these wastes are dangerous. The third part discusses the radioactive wastes management in France (classification, laws). The last part details the associated research programs: the radionuclides separation, the disposal, the underground storage, the transmutation and the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  2. [Fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions]. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with the statement of work, I have examined the fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions. In co-authorship with the UTR (University Technical Representative) Talmadge R. England ''Evaluation and Compilation of Fission Product Yields 1993,'' LA-UR-94-3106(ENDF-349) October, (1994) was published. This is an evaluated set of fission product Yields for use in calculation of decay heat curves with improved accuracy has been prepared. These evaluated yields are based on all known experimental data through 1992. Unmeasured fission product yields are calculated from charge distribution, pairing effects, and isomeric state models developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The current evaluation has been distributed as the ENDF/B-VI fission product yield data set

  3. Chemical and technological investigations to establish the production of 99Mo/sup(99m)Tc-Generators from uranium fission in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munze, R.; El-Bayoumy, S.; Mosaad, K.; Hallaba, E.

    1980-01-01

    Different possibilities to meet the current estimated demand of sup(99m)Tc for medical uses in the Arab Republic of Egypt have been investigated using irradiation and separation experiments and theoretical calculations. The investigation includes the evaluation of the real present irradiation capability of the Egyptian Research Reactor as well as pilot runs suitable technological schemes for target design and chemical processing of irradiated uranium targets. The suitability of the produced 99 Mo for the preparation of 99 Mo/sup(99m)Tc-generators has been confirmed. Separation yield (80%) as well as the radiochemical and radionuclidic purity of the sup(99m)Tc (TcO 4 98%, sup(99m)Tc 99,9%) corresponds to comparable results for similar processes cited in recent literature. The necessary requirements, related to the irradiation capability of the reactor and the demands of the radiochemical facilities, have been derived. The present work is the fruit of three months cooperation between the Agency expert and the Egyptian Counterpart

  4. Fission Detection Using the Associated Particle Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.P. Keegan; J.P. Hurley; J.R. Tinsley; R. Trainham; S.C. Wilde

    2008-01-01

    A beam of tagged 14 MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction is used to induce fission in a target composed of depleted uranium. The generator yield is 10 7 neutrons/second radiated into a 4 x 4 in. NaI detectors are used for gamma-ray detection. The fission process is known to produce multiple gamma-rays and neutrons. Triple coincidences (α-γ-γ) are measured as a function of neutron flight time up to 90 ns after fission, where the α-particle arises from the DT reaction. A sudden increase in the triple coincidence rate at the location of the material is used to localize and detect fission in the interrogated target. Comparisons are made with experiment runs where lead, tungsten, and iron were used as target materials. The triple coincidence response profile from depleted uranium is noted to be different to those observed from the other target materials. The response from interrogation targets composed of fissile material is anticipated to be even more unique than that observed from depleted uranium

  5. Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Tanaka, Toru; Nitta, Shinnosuke; Itosu, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Shun; Oki, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Various characteristics such as size distribution, chemical component and radioactivity have been analyzed for radioactive aerosols released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Measured results for radioactive aerosols suggest that the potential transport medium for radioactive cesium was non-sea-salt sulfate. This result indicates that cesium isotopes would preferentially attach with sulfate compounds. In the present work the attachment behavior of fission products to aqueous solution aerosols of sodium salts has been studied using a generation system of solution aerosols and spontaneous fission source of {sup 248}Cm. Attachment ratios of fission products to the solution aerosols were compared among the aerosols generated by different solutions of sodium salt. A significant difference according as a solute of solution aerosols was found in the attachment behavior. The present results suggest the existence of chemical effects in the attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols.

  6. Design by theoretical and CFD analyses of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid lead for a Generation IV LFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrini, Marcello [GeNERG - DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); Borreani, Walter [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso F.M. Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy); INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lomonaco, Guglielmo, E-mail: guglielmo.lomonaco@unige.it [GeNERG - DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Magugliani, Fabrizio [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso F.M. Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) has both a long history and a penchant of innovation. With early work related to its use for submarine propulsion dating to the 1950s, Russian scientists pioneered the development of reactors cooled by heavy liquid metals (HLM). More recently, there has been substantial interest in both critical and subcritical reactors cooled by lead (Pb) or lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE), not only in Russia, but also in Europe, Asia, and the USA. The growing knowledge of the thermal-fluid-dynamic properties of these fluids and the choice of the LFR as one of the six reactor types selected by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for further research and development has fostered the exploration of new geometries and new concepts aimed at optimizing the key components that will be adopted in the Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator (ALFRED), the 300 MW{sub t} pool-type reactor aimed at proving the feasibility of the design concept adopted for the European Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (ELFR). In this paper, a theoretical and computational analysis is presented of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid Lead as primary pump for the adopted reference conceptual design of ALFRED. The pump is at first analyzed at design operating conditions from the theoretical point of view to determine the optimal geometry according to the velocity triangles and then modeled with a 3D CFD code (ANSYS CFX). The choice of a 3D simulation is dictated by the need to perform a detailed spatial simulation taking into account the peculiar geometry of the pump as well as the boundary layers and turbulence effects of the flow, which are typically tri-dimensional. The use of liquid Lead impacts significantly the fluid dynamic design of the pump because of the key requirement to avoid any erosion affects. These effects have a major impact on the performance, reliability and lifespan of the pump. Albeit some erosion-related issues remain to be fully addressed, the results

  7. Design by theoretical and CFD analyses of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid lead for a Generation IV LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrini, Marcello; Borreani, Walter; Lomonaco, Guglielmo; Magugliani, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) has both a long history and a penchant of innovation. With early work related to its use for submarine propulsion dating to the 1950s, Russian scientists pioneered the development of reactors cooled by heavy liquid metals (HLM). More recently, there has been substantial interest in both critical and subcritical reactors cooled by lead (Pb) or lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE), not only in Russia, but also in Europe, Asia, and the USA. The growing knowledge of the thermal-fluid-dynamic properties of these fluids and the choice of the LFR as one of the six reactor types selected by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for further research and development has fostered the exploration of new geometries and new concepts aimed at optimizing the key components that will be adopted in the Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator (ALFRED), the 300 MW t pool-type reactor aimed at proving the feasibility of the design concept adopted for the European Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (ELFR). In this paper, a theoretical and computational analysis is presented of a multi-blade screw pump evolving liquid Lead as primary pump for the adopted reference conceptual design of ALFRED. The pump is at first analyzed at design operating conditions from the theoretical point of view to determine the optimal geometry according to the velocity triangles and then modeled with a 3D CFD code (ANSYS CFX). The choice of a 3D simulation is dictated by the need to perform a detailed spatial simulation taking into account the peculiar geometry of the pump as well as the boundary layers and turbulence effects of the flow, which are typically tri-dimensional. The use of liquid Lead impacts significantly the fluid dynamic design of the pump because of the key requirement to avoid any erosion affects. These effects have a major impact on the performance, reliability and lifespan of the pump. Albeit some erosion-related issues remain to be fully addressed, the results of

  8. Applying the PR and PP Methodology for a qualitative assessment of a misuse scenario in a notional Generation IV Example Sodium Fast Reactor. Assessing design variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cojazzi, G.G.M.; Renda, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, TP 210, Via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027, Ispra - Va (Italy); Hassberger, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP) Working Group has developed a methodology for the PR and PP evaluation of advanced nuclear energy systems. The methodology is organised as a progressive approach applying alternative methods at different levels of thoroughness as more design information becomes available and research improves the depth of technical knowledge. The GIF Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP) Working Group developed a notional sodium cooled fast neutron nuclear reactor, named the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR), for use in developing and testing the methodology. The ESFR is a hypothetical nuclear energy system consisting of four sodium-cooled fast reactors of medium size, co-located with an on-site dry fuel storage facility and a Fuel Cycle Facility with pyrochemical processing of the spent fuel and re-fabrication of new ESFR fuel elements. The baseline design is an actinide burner, with LWR spent fuel elements as feed material processed on the site. In the years 2007 and 2008 the GIF PR and PP Working Group performed a case study designed to both test the methodology and demonstrate how it can provide useful feedback to designers even during pre-conceptual design. The Study analysed the response of the entire ESFR system to different proliferation and theft strategies. Three proliferation threats were considered: Concealed diversion, Concealed Misuse and Abrogation. An overt theft threat was also studied. One of the objectives of the case study is to confirm the capability of the methodology to capture PR and PP differences among varied design configurations. To this aim Design Variations (DV) have been also defined corresponding respectively to a) a small variation of the baseline design (DV0), b) a deep burner configuration (DV1), c) a self sufficient core (DV2), and c) a breeder configuration (DV3). This paper builds on the approach followed for the

  9. Coulomb fission and transfer fission at heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmele, G.

    1981-01-01

    In the present thesis the first direct evidence of nuclear fission after inelastic scattering of heavy ions (sup(183,184)W, 152 Sm → 238 U; 184 W → 232 Th; 184 W, 232 Th → 248 Cm) is reported. Experiments which were performed at the UNILAC of the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt show the observed heavy ion induced fission possesses significant properties of the Coulomb fission. The observed dependence of the fission probability for inelastic scattering on the projectile charge proves that the nuclear fission is mediated by the electromagnetic interaction between heavy ions. This result suggests moreover a multiple Coulomb-excitation preceding the fission. Model calculations give a first indication, that the Coulomb fission proceeds mainly from the higher β phonons. In the irradiation with 184 W the fission probability of 232 Th is for all incident energies about 40% smaller that at 238 U. The target dependence of the Coulomb fission however doesn't allow, to give quantitative statements about the position and B(E2)-values of higher lying β phonons. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  11. Application of mercury cathode electrolysis to fission-product separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, A.; Prigent, Y.; Van-Kote, F.

    1969-01-01

    A method involving controlled potential mercury cathode electrolysis has been developed to separate fission products. It allows the radiochemical determination of Ag, Cd, Pd, Rh, Ru, Sn, Te, Sb and Mo from solutions of fission products highly concentrated in mineral salts. The general procedure consists in three main steps: electrolytic amalgam generation, destruction of amalgams and ultimate purification of elements by other means. Electrolytic operations last about five hours. Chemical yields lie between 10 per cent and 70 per cent. (authors) [fr

  12. Laser solenoid fusion--fission design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of breeding performance on system engineering parameters is examined for laser solenoid fusion-fission reactors. Reactor performance is found to be relatively insensitive to most of the engineering parameters, and compact designs can be built based on reasonable technologies. Point designs are described for the prototype series of reactors (mid-term technologies) and for second generation systems (advanced technologies). It is concluded that the laser solenoid has a good probability of timely application to fuel breeding needs

  13. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates; Mesures de sections efficaces de fission et du nombre de neutrons prompts emis par fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, P; Clair, C; Gaudin, M; Genin, R; Joly, R; Leroy, J L; Michaudon, A; Ouvry, J; Signarbieux, C; Vendryes, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin {sup 10}B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of {sup 235}U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of {sup 235}U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF{sub 3} proportional counters. c) Mean number {nu} of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of {nu} for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) {alpha} reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author)Fren. [French] a) Mesures de sectionficaces de fission a basse energie. Nous avons mesure et analyse la variation de la section efficace de fission de divers isotopes fissiles pour des neutrons d'energie inferieure a 0,025 eV. Le monochromateur est constitue par un spectrometre a cristal auquel est associe un selecteur mecanique destine a eliminer les diffractions de Bragg d'ordre superieur au premier. Le materiau fissile est contenu dans une chambre a fission sous forme de depots realises par peinture; une chambre d'ionisation a depots minces de B{sub 10

  14. A small flat fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yijun; Wang Dalun; Chen Suhe

    1999-01-01

    With fission materials of depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, 239 Pu, and 237 Np, the authors have designed and made a series of small flat fission chamber. The authors narrated the construction of the fission chamber and its technological process of manufacture, and furthermore, the authors have measured and discussed the follow correct factor, self-absorption, boundary effect, threshold loss factor, bottom scatter and or so

  15. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems

  16. Tritium chemistry in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Masson, M.; Briec, M.

    1986-09-01

    We are interested in the behaviour of tritium inside the solids where it is generated both in the case of fission nuclear reactor fuel elements, and in that of blankets of future fusion reactor. In the first case it is desirable to be able to predict whether tritium will be found in the hulls or in the uranium oxide, and under what chemical form, in order to take appropriate steps for it's removal in reprocessing plants. In fusion reactors breeding large amounts of tritium and burning it in the plasma should be accomplished in as short a cycle as possible in order to limit inventories that are associated with huge activities. Mastering the chemistry of every step is therefore essential. Amounts generated are not of the same order of magnitude in the two cases studied. Ternary fissions produce about 66 10 13 Bq (18 000 Ci) per year of tritium in a 1000 MWe fission generator, i.e., about 1.8 10 10 Bq (0.5 Ci) per day per ton of fuel

  17. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2007-12-13

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either deexcite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission prefragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  18. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jørgen

    2008-04-01

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either de-excite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission pre-fragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  19. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Joergen

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either de-excite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission pre-fragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented

  20. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either deexcite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission prefragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented

  1. Comparative study of {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators at base of synthesized gels starting from activation and fission {sup 99}Mo; Estudio comparativo de generadores {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc a base de geles sintetizados a partir de {sup 99}Mo de activacion y de fision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, I Z [UAEM, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F; Rivero G, T; Rojas N, P [ININ, Carretera Mexico -Toluca S/N, 52045 La Marquesa Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The {sup 99m}Tc is used for diagnostic and therapy. It is produced starting from {sup 99}Mo, absorbed in chromatographic columns, loaded with alumina that absorb only 0.2% of {sup 99}Mo with high specific activities of {sup 99}Mo, obtained from the {sup 235}U fission. Given these conditions and limitations, new preparation procedures of {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators, its have been developed, using zirconium molybdates gels that incorporates until 30% of {sup 99}Mo, conserve similar characteristics of quality and purity that the traditional generator. The radiochemical characteristics of the {sup 99m}Tc elution, depend strongly on the gel preparation conditions. In particular, the present work has by object to determine the influence of the {sup 99}Mo used type, fission or activation product, during the gels synthesis, as well as the used air flow for the agitation in the gels preparation and its influence in the {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators quality. When diminishing the flow of agitation air the efficiency it increases and in the radionuclide purity of the eluates and when using {sup 99}Mo from fission for the gels production it increases in an important way the elutriation efficiency, the radiochemical and radionuclide purity of the {sup 99m}Tc eluates. (Author)

  2. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’ discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution.

  3. Micro plate fission chamber development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Wen Zhongwei; Lin Jufang; Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun

    2014-01-01

    To conduct the measurement of neutron flux and the fission rate distribution at several position in assemblies, the micro plate fission chamber was designed and fabricated. Since the requirement of smaller volume and less structure material was taken into consideration, it is convinient, commercial and practical to use fission chamber to measure neutron flux in specific condition. In this paper, the structure of fission chamber and process of fabrication were introduced and performance test result was presented. The detection efficiency is 91.7%. (authors)

  4. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  5. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  6. Fusion-fission type collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeschler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Three examples of fusion-fission type collisions on medium-mass nuclei are investigated whether the fragment properties are consistent with fission from equilibrated compound nuclei. Only in a very narrow band of angular momenta the data fulfill the necessary criteria for this process. Continuous evolutions of this mechnism into fusion fission and into a deep-inelastic process and particle emission prior to fusion have been observed. Based on the widths of the fragment-mass distributions of a great variety of data, a further criterion for the compound-nucleus-fission process is tentatively proposed. (orig.)

  7. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun; Wang Mei; Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural of the fission chamber, etc

  8. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  9. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene: from photophysics toward devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission is the process in conjugated organic molecules bywhich a photogenerated singlet exciton couples to a nearby chromophore in the ground state, creating a pair of triplet excitons. Researchers first reported this phenomenon in the 1960s, an event that sparked further studies in the following decade. These investigations used fluorescence spectroscopy to establish that exciton fission occurred in single crystals of several acenes. However, research interest has been recently rekindled by the possibility that singlet fission could be used as a carrier multiplication technique to enhance the efficiency of photovoltaic cells. The most successful architecture to-date involves sensitizing a red-absorbing photoactive layer with a blue-absorbing material that undergoes fission, thereby generating additional photocurrent from higher-energy photons. The quest for improved solar cells has spurred a drive to better understand the fission process, which has received timely aid from modern techniques for time-resolved spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and small-molecule device fabrication. However, the consensus interpretation of the initial studies using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was that exciton fission was suppressed in polycrystalline thin films of pentacene, a material that would be otherwise expected to be an ideal model system, as well as a viable candidate for fission-sensitized photovoltaic devices. In this Account, we review the results of our recent transient absorption and device-based studies of polycrystalline pentacene. We address the controversy surrounding the assignment of spectroscopic features in transient absorption data, and illustrate how a consistent interpretation is possible. This work underpins our conclusion that singlet fission in pentacene is extraordinarily rapid (∼80 fs) and is thus the dominant decay channel for the photoexcited singlet exciton. Further, we discuss our demonstration that triplet excitons

  10. MAIL3.1 : a computer program generating cross section sets for SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya; Komuro, Yuichi; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Ouchi, Keisuke

    1998-02-01

    This report is a user's manual of the computer program MAIL3.1 which generates various types of cross section sets for neutron transport programs such as SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0. MAIL3.1 is a revised version of MAIL3.0 that was opened in 1990. It has all of abilities of MAIL3.0 and has two more functions as shown in following. 1. AMPX-type cross section set generating function for KENO V. 2. Enhanced function for user of 16 group Hansen-Roach library. (author)

  11. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  12. Post-scission fission theory: Neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N (E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar ν p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the recent models. In particular, the dependencies of N (E) and bar ν p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N (E, E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of our ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limitations to current (and future) approaches

  13. RSAC, Gamma Doses, Inhalation and Ingestion Doses, Fission Products Inventory after Fission Products Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: RSAC generates a fission product inventory from a given set of reactor operating conditions and then computes the external gamma dose, the deposition gamma dose, and the inhalation-ingestion dose to critical body organs as a result of exposure to these fission products. Program output includes reactor operating history, fission product inventory, dosages, and ingestion parameters. 2 - Method of solution: The fission product inventory generated by the reactor operating conditions and the inventory remaining at various times after release are computed using the equations of W. Rubinson in Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 17, pages 542-547, June 1949. The external gamma dose and the deposition gamma dose are calculated by determining disintegration rates as a function of space and time, then integrating using Hermite's numerical techniques for the spatial dependence. The inhalation-ingestion dose is determined by the type and quantity of activity inhaled and the biological rate of decay following inhalation. These quantities are integrated with respect to time to obtain the dosage. The ingestion dose is related to the inhalation dose by an input constant

  14. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  15. Determination of 233U, 235U, 238U and 239Pu fission yields induced by fission and 14.7 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurec, Jean; Adam, Albert; Bruyne, Thierry de.

    1981-12-01

    The 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu fission yields have been determined by a radiochemical method. A target and a fission chamber made of same fissible material are irradied together. The total fission number is measured from the fission chamber. The fission product activities are directly measured on the target using calibrated Ge-Li detectors. The fissible material masses are determined by alpha and mass spectrometries. The irradiations were made on the critical assemblies PROSPERO and CALIBAN and on the 14 MeV neutron generator of C.E. VALDUC. 3 to 5% fission yield errors are got for the most measured nuclides: 95 Zr, 97 Zr, 99 Mo, 103 Ru, 131 I, 132 Te, 140 Ba, 141 Ce, 143 Ce, 144 Ce, 147 Nd [fr

  16. Fission gas release behaviour in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Anantharaman, S.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of plutonium recycling programme MOX (U,Pu)O 2 fuels will be used in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). Based on successful test irradiation of MOX fuel in CIRUS reactor, 10 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded in the BWR of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Some of these MOX fuel assemblies have successfully completed the initial target average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T. Enhancing the burnup target of the MOX fuels and increasing loading of MOX fuels in TAPS core will depend on the feedback information generated from the measurement of released fission gases. Fission gas release behaviour has been studied in the experimental MOX fuel elements (UO 2 - 4% PuO 2 ) irradiated in pressurised water loop (PWL) of CIRUS. Eight (8) MOX fuel elements irradiated to an average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T have been examined. Some of these fuel elements contained controlled porosity pellets and chamfered pellets. This paper presents the design details of the experimental set up for studying fission gas release behaviour including measurement of gas pressure, void volume and gas composition. The experimental data generated is compared with the prediction of fuel performance modeling codes of PROFESS and GAPCON THERMAL-3. (author)

  17. Isotopic composition of fission gases in LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Many fuel rods from power reactors and test reactors have been punctured during past years for determination of fission gas release. In many cases the released gas was also analysed by mass spectrometry. The isotopic composition shows systematic variations between different rods, which are much larger than the uncertainties in the analysis. This paper discusses some possibilities and problems with use of the isotopic composition to decide from which part of the fuel the gas was released. In high burnup fuel from thermal reactors loaded with uranium fuel a significant part of the fissions occur in plutonium isotopes. The ratio Xe/Kr generated in the fuel is strongly dependent on the fissioning species. In addition, the isotopic composition of Kr and Xe shows a well detectable difference between fissions in different fissile nuclides. (author)

  18. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  19. Neutron multiplicity of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Y S [Physics department, mu` rah university Al-Karak, (Jordan)

    1995-10-01

    The total average neutron multiplicity of the fission fragments produced by the spontaneous fission of {sup 248} Cm has been measured. This measurement has been done by using a new experimental technique. This technique mainly depends on {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence using a very high resolution high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. 2 figs.

  20. Fission throughout the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs

  1. Adjustment of the 235U Fission Spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.; WILLIAMS, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The latest nuclear data are used to examine the sensitivity of the least squares adjustment of the 235 U fission spectrum to the measured reaction rates, dosimetry cross sections, and prior spectrum covariance matrix. All of these parameters were found to be very important in the spectrum adjustment. The most significant deficiency in the nuclear data is the absence of a good prior covariance matrix. Covariance matrices generated from analytic models of the fission spectra have been used in the past. This analysis reveals some unusual features in the covariance matrix produced with this approach. Specific needs are identified for improved nuclear data to better determine the 235 U spectrum. An improved 235 U covariance matrix and adjusted spectrum are recommended for use in radiation transport sensitivity analyses

  2. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1984-09-01

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  3. Mechanisms of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.

    1991-01-01

    The time evolution in fission is the starting point for discussing not only the main mechanism of fission neutron emission, the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments, but also possible secondary ones connected with dynamical features of nuclear fission. ''Asymptotic'' conditions as relevant for describing the particle release from highly excited, rapidly moving fragments are defined. Corresponding statistical model approaches to fission neutron emission, based on the adequate consideration of the intricate fragment occurrence probability, reproduce most of the experimental data. The remarkable influence of fission modes on neutron observables is analyzed in the framework of a macroscopic-microscopic scission point model consistent with energy conservation. Finally, chances and deficiencies for solving the mechanism puzzle are summarized. (author). 87 refs, 21 figs

  4. Pairing correlations in a fissioning potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappe, H.J.; Fadeev, S.

    1999-01-01

    To describe pairing correlations in a fissioning system one commonly projects the BCS wave function separately onto good particle numbers in each fragment in the exit channel, but only onto the total number of particles in the parent system. We propose to interpolate between these limiting situations by the generator-coordinate method with the particle-number difference between the nascent fragments as the generator coordinate. Model calculations are presented for the Hill-Wheeler box potential with a δ-function diaphragm to mimic scission

  5. Impeding 99Tc(IV) mobility in novel waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Kruger, Albert A.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant, long-lived radioactive fission product whose mobility in the subsurface is largely governed by its oxidation state. Tc immobilization is crucial for radioactive waste management and environmental remediation. Tc(IV) incorporation in spinels has been proposed as a novel method to increase Tc retention in glass waste forms during vitrification. However, experiments under high-temperature and oxic conditions show reoxidation of Tc(IV) to volatile pertechnetate, Tc(VII). Here we examine this problem with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and propose that, at elevated temperatures, doping with first row transition metal can significantly enhance Tc retention in magnetite in the order Co>Zn>Ni. Experiments with doped spinels at 700 °C provide quantitative confirmation of the theoretical predictions in the same order. This work highlights the power of modern, state-of-the-art simulations to provide essential insights and generate theory-inspired design criteria of complex materials at elevated temperatures. PMID:27357121

  6. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  7. Utility market penetration assessment of fusion-fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.K.; Nour, N.E.; Piascik, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the utility generation expansion evaluation procedure and to present the results of a fusion-fission hybrid market penetration assessment in a model of a typical utility system. The analysis addresses the key factors and tradeoffs affecting the utility's evaluation of generation alternatives

  8. Daniel Gogny's vision for a microscopic theory of fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Daniel Gogny made many contributions to our understanding of nuclear fission over a span of 35 years. This paper reviews some of those contributions, focusing in particular on fission dynamics, the challenges of describing scission in a quantum-mechanical context, and the calculation of fragment properties such as their mass, kinetic, and excitation energy distributions. The generator coordinate method provides the common theoretical framework within which these various aspects of fission are formulated. (orig.)

  9. Safety approach and research and development presentation for the selected systems of the International forum Generation IV; Elements de l'approche de surete et themes de R et D specifiques pour les systemes selectionnes par le Forum International Generation 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, G.L. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    This paper deals with the six projects of the Generation IV forum: Sodium Fast reactor, lead fast reactor, gas fast reactor, very high temperature reactor, supercritical water reactor, molten salt reactor. The technical objectives of the reactor safety and the design/evaluation approach are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  10. How fission was discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, S.

    1989-01-01

    After the great survey of neutron induced radioactivity by Fermi and co-workers, the laboratories in Paris and Berlin-Dahlen tried to disentangle the complex results found in uranium. At that time neutron sources were small, activities low, and equipment very simple. Chemistry beyond uranium still was unknown. Hahn and Meitner believed to have observed three transuranic isomeric chains, a doubtful result even then. Early in 1938, Curie and Savic in Paris found an activity interpreted to be actinium, and Hahn and Meitner another to be radium. Both interpretations seemed impossible from energy considerations. Hahn and Strassmann, therefore, continued this work and succeeded to separate the new activity from radium. There remained no doubt that a barium isotope had been produced, the uranium nucleus splitting in the yet-unknown process we now call fission

  11. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  12. Instruction by virtual reality to operation and security of a nuclear power plant of IV generation; Instruccion por realidad virtual a la operacion y seguridad de una central nuclear de generacion IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri O, J. C.; Baltasar M, J.; Valle H, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Campus Morelos, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)], e-mail: neriunam@ieee.org

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of LaNuVi project which is developing in the Engineering Faculty of National Autonomous University of Mexico, to have a virtual laboratory of nuclear reactors as tool of multidisciplinary education at basic and advanced levels in nuclear engineering area, involves training resources in audio visual and interactive form that allow to form a comprehension more realistic of operation of different systems and components. In this work is proposed to use educational resources, as the employees in the U.S. Army and in some centers of advanced education of medicine, where have been come proving concepts like projected reality, increased reality, tele transparency and others that present big benefits to learning-education process. The proposal here is to include the resource knew as serious game based learning. The focal point of stage that is presented is of a nuclear reactor PBMR like desalination and generator of controlled alternating energy and efficient that should put on in operation to allow the subsistence of a community in a desolated region of beginning second quarter of X XI century. For this purpose the designs are initiated and programmed several subsystems that allow the three-dimensional modeling of main components of a PBMR as well as of surrounding facilities. The obtained results and reaches of this design are presented. The product is in tests for a first version and it is hope to achieve a free and integral resource of national distribution for different cultural groups, interested in this type of advanced technology. (Author)

  13. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  14. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-01

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of 235 U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10 -10 sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass

  15. Energy partition in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Maerten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1990-01-01

    A scission point model (two spheroid model TSM) including semi-empirical temperature-dependent shell correction energies for deformed fragments at scission is presented. It has been used to describe the mass-asymmetry-dependent partition of the total energy release on both fragments from spontaneous and induced fission. Characteristic trends of experimental fragment energy and neutron multiplicity data as function of incidence energy in the Th-Cf region of fissioning nuclei are well reproduced. Based on model applications, information on the energy dissipated during the descent from second saddle of fission barrier to scission point have been deduced. (author). 39 refs, 13 figs

  16. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-15

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10{sup -10} sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass.

  17. Fission-product source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    This presentation consists of a review of fission-product source terms for light water reactor (LWR) fuel. A source term is the quantity of fission products released under specified conditions that can be used to calculate the consequences of the release. The source term usually defines release from breached fuel-rod cladding but could also describe release from the primary coolant system, the reactor containment shell, or the site boundary. The source term would be different for each locality, and the chemical and physical forms of the fission products could also differ

  18. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  20. Development of fission Mo production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B. K.; Park, K. B.; Jun, B. J.; Park, J. H.; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I.; Woo, M. S.; Whang, D. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Yoo, J. H.; Sohn, D. S.; Lee, Y. W.; Na, S. H.; Koo, Y. H.; Hwang, D. H.; Joo, P. K.

    1997-08-01

    The feasibility study is accomplished in this project for the development of fission moly production. The KAERI process proposed for development in KAERI is discussed together with those of the American Cintichem and Russian IPPE, each of which would be plausible for introduction whenever the indigenous development is not much feasible. For the conceptual design of the KAERI irradiation target, analysis method is set up and some preliminary analysis is performed accordingly for the candidate design. To establish chemical process concepts for the afore-mentioned three processes, characteristics, operation conditions, and the management of the generated wastes are investigated. Basic requirements of hotcell facilities for chemical processing and a possible way of utilizing the existing hotcells are discussed in parallel with the counter-measures for the construction of new hotcell facilities. Various conditions of target irradiation for fission moly production in Hanaro are analyzed. Plan for introduction of the relevant technology introduction and for procurement of highly enriched uranium are considered. On the basis of assuming some conditions, the economic feasibility study for fission moly production is also overviewed. (author). 22 refs., 28 tabs., 24 figs

  1. Calculated fission properties of the heaviest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    A quantitative calculation is presented that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. For the macroscopic part a Yukawa-plus-exponential model is used and for the microscopic part a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential is used. The three-quadratic-surface parameterization generates shapes for which the potential-energy surfaces are calculated. The use of this parameterization and the use of the finite-range macroscopic model allows for the study of two touching spheres and similar shapes. The results of the calculations in terms of potential-energy surfaces and fission half-lives are presented for heavy even nuclei. The surfaces are displayed in the form of contour diagrams as functions of two moments of the shape. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  2. Fission blanket benchmark experiment on spherical assembly of uranium and PE with PE reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Tonghua; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Mei; Han, Zijie, E-mail: neutron_integral@aliyun.com; Jiang, Li; Wen, Zhongwei; Liu, Rong

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The fission rate distribution on two depleted uranium assemblies was measured with plate fission chambers. • We do calculations using MCNP code and ENDF/B-V.0 library. • The overestimation of calculations to the measured fission rates was found. • The observed discrepancy are discussed. - Abstract: New concept of fusion-fission hybrid for energy generation has been proposed. To validate the nuclear performance of fission blanket of hybrid, as part of series of validation experiment, two types of fission blanket assemblies were setup in this work and measurements were made of the reaction rate distribution for uranium fission in the spherical assembly of depleted uranium and polyethylene by Plate Fission Chamber (PFC). There are two PFCs in experiment, one is depleted uranium chamber and the other is enriched uranium chamber. The Monte-Carlo transport code MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections library ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution in the two types of assemblies. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The overestimation of fission rate for depleted uranium and enriched uranium were found in the inner boundary of the two assemblies. However, the C/E ratio tends to decrease for the distance from the core slightly and the results for enriched uranium are better than that for depleted uranium.

  3. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Aug 15, 2002 to Nov. 15, 2002) - DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Lawrence Townsend; Martin Williamson; Rupy Sawhney; Jacob Fife

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. This report covers the ninth quarter of the project. The three reactor concept teams have completed initial plant concept development, evaluation and layout. A significant design effort has proceeded with substantial change and evolution from original ideas. The concepts have been reviewed by the industry participants and improvements have been implemented. The third phase, industrial engineering simulation of reactor fabrication has begun

  4. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular ... alent to the assumption that fission is delayed, namely, that the fission probability is not .... parameters to be adjusted on the experimental data. ..... (b) Time distribution of all fission events for the 132Ce nucleus.

  5. A fission gas release model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, A; Piotrkowski, R [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The hypothesis contained in the model developed in this work are as follows. The UO{sub 2} is considered as a collection of spherical grains. Nuclear reactions produce fission gases, mainly Xe and Kr, within the grains. Due to the very low solubility of these gases in UO{sub 2}, intragranular bubbles are formed, of a few nanometers is size. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and to act as traps which capture gas atoms. Free atoms diffuse towards the grain boundaries, where they give origin to intergranular, lenticular bubbles, of the order of microns. The gas atoms in bubbles, either inter or intragranular, can re-enter the matrix through the mechanism of resolution induced by fission fragment impact. The amount of gas stored in intergranular bubbles grows up to a saturation value. Once saturation is reached, intergranular bubbles inter-connect and the gas in excess is released through different channels to the external surface of the fuel. The resolution of intergranular bubbles particularly affects the region of the grain adjacent to the grain boundary. During grain growth, the grain boundary traps the gas atoms, either free or in intragranular bubbles, contained in the swept volume. The grain boundary is considered as a perfect sink, i.e. the gas concentration is zero at that surface of the grain. Due to the spherical symmetry of the problem, the concentration gradient is null at the centre of the grain. The diffusion equation was solved using the implicit finite difference method. The initial solution was analytically obtained by the Laplace transform. The calculations were performed at different constant temperatures and were compared with experimental results. They show the asymptotic growth of the grain radius as a function of burnup, the gas distribution within the grain at every instant, the growth of the gas content at the grain boundary up to the saturation value and the fraction of gas released by the fuel element referred to the total gas generated

  6. Methodology and application of the WIMS-D4M fission product data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    The WIMS-D4 code has been modified (WIMS-D4m) to generate burn-up dependent microscopic cross sections for use in full core depletion calculations. The calculation of neutron absorption by fission products can be obtained from a reduced fission-product-chain model that includes the 135 Xe and 149 Sm chains, and a lumped fission product to account for the absorption by fission products not explicitly treated. Burn-up calculations were performed for the ANS MEU core using WIMS and EPRI-CELL cross sections. The calculated eigenvalues and material loadings are in good agreements

  7. Fission fragment simulation of fusion neutron radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Stuart, R.N.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    This research demonstrates the feasibility of using homogeneously-generated fission fragments to simulate high-fluence fusion neutron damage in niobium tensile specimens. This technique makes it possible to measure radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties at high damage states, using conveniently short irradiation times. The primary knock-on spectrum for a fusion reactor is very similar to that produced by fission fragments, and nearly the same ratio of gas atoms to displaced atoms is produced in niobium. The damage from fission fragments is compared to that from fusion neutrons and fission reactor neutrons in terms of experimentally measured yield strength increase, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and calculated damage energies

  8. Study of fission dynamics with the three-dimensional Langevin equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslamizadeh, H. [Persian Gulf University, Department of Physics, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The dynamics of fission has been studied by solving one- and three-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. The average prescission neutron multiplicities, fission probabilities and the mean fission times have been calculated in a broad range of the excitation energy for compound nuclei {sup 210}Po and {sup 224}Th formed in the fusion-fission reactions {sup 4}He+{sup 206}Pb, {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb and results compared with the experimental data. The analysis of the results shows that the average prescission neutron multiplicities, fission probabilities and the mean fission times calculated by one- and three-dimensional Langevin equations are different from each other, and also the results obtained based on three-dimensional Langevin equations are in better agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  9. Chemical effects of fission recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisels, G.G.; Freeman, J.P.; Gregory, J.P.; Richardson, W.C.; Sroka, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The production of nitrogen from nitrous oxide at high density was employed to investigate the energy deposition efficiency of fission recoils produced from fission of U 235 in uranium-palladium foils clad with platinum. Nitrogen production varied linearly with fission recoil dose from 1.1 x 10 20 to 9.0 x 10 20 eV, and was independent of density between 12.5 and 127.5 g l -1 N 2 O. 16.2 +- 0.8% of the fission recoil energy was deposited external to the foil. Electron microprobe analysis showed some unevenness of new foil and polymer buildup on the surface after irradiation of ethylene-oxygen mixtures. Subsequent irradiation in the presence of nitrous oxide restored some of the original efficiency. This is ascribed to chemical oxidation of the polymer induced by reactive intermediates produced from nitrous oxide. (author)

  10. Extraction chromatography of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevie-Svendsen, M.; Goon, K.

    1978-01-01

    Various cases of using extraction chromatography during analysis of fission products are reviewed. The use of the extraction chromatography method is considered while analysing reprocessed products of nuclear fuel for quantitative radiochemical analysis and control of fission product and actinoide separation during extraction and their chemical state in production solutions. The method is used to obtain pure fractions of typical burnup monitors (neodymium, molybdenum, cerium, cesium, europium, lanthanides) during determination of nuclear fuel burnup degree. While studying the nature of nuclear reactions the method is used to separate quickly short-life isotopes, to purify β-radiator fractions before measuring their half-life periods, to enrich isotopes forming with low output during fission. Examples of using extraction chromatography are given to separate long half-life or stable fission products from spent solutions, to control environment object contamination

  11. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J. K.; Moseley, F.

    1960-01-01

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author) [fr

  12. Physics and chemistry of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: In the pleasant and hospitable atmosphere of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich in the Federal Republic of Germany, the IAEA symposium on the Physics and Chemistry of Fission took place. Almost 200 scientists attended, 154 abstracts were submitted, and 57 papers presented, but more important than the numbers was the quality of the contributions and the progress reported at the symposium. The neutron was discovered almost 50 years ago; 40 years ago the idea of nuclear fission was born. Since then, a number of laboratories have worked hard to explain the phenomenon of fission One would expect that by now scientists would know exactly what happens in a nucleus before and during the process of fission, particularly as there are hundreds of power and research reactors in operation, and fission of uranium isotopes is the basis of their functioning. At first glance, fission seems a simple process: a neutron hits and penetrates the uranium nucleus which becomes excited, i.e. has a surplus of energy. One way to get rid of this energy is for the nucleus to split into two parts; additional products of this process are energy and more neutrons. Nature, however, seems to dislike such straightforward explanations. In the case of fission, scientists have observed a number of phenomena which disagree with a simple model. Sometimes, a nucleus will split into two parts without being 'attacked' by a neutron; this spontaneous fission opens up a new line of fission research and several contributions at the symposium reported on sophisticated experiments designed to unravel some of its specific details. Sometimes, a fissioning nucleus will emit another particle: ternary fission has become a powerful tool for studying the properties of nuclei during the fission process. For the scientist, it is fascinating to observe how the nucleus behaves during fission. They invent models which are supposed to reproduce the most probable course of events leading to fission. In one of these

  13. International handling of fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The opinion of the ministry for foreign affairs on international handling of fissionable materials is given. As an introduction a survey is given of the possibilities to produce nuclear weapons from materials used in or produced by power reactors. Principles for international control of fissionable materials are given. International agreements against proliferation of nuclear weapons are surveyed and methods to improve them are proposed. (K.K.)

  14. Theory of nuclear fission: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosel, U.

    1976-01-01

    General properties of nuclear fission are reviewed and related to our present knowledge of fission theory. For this purpose the basic reasons for the shape of the fission barriers are discussed and their consequences compared with experimental results on barrier shapes and structures. Special emphasis is put on the asymmetry of the fission barriers and mass-distributions and its relation to the shells of the nascent fragment shells. Finally the problem of calculating fission cross sections is discussed

  15. Spontaneous fission of 259Md

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Landrum, J.H.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.; Ghiorso, A.; Nitschke, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments from the spontaneous fission of th newly discovered nuclide 259 Md were obtained. 259 Md was identified as the E. C. daughter of 259 No, and was found to decay entirely (> 95%) by spontaneous fission with a 95-min half-life. From the kinetic energies measured for 397 pairs of coincident fragments, a mass distribution was derived that is symmetric with sigma = 13 amu. 259 Md, together with 258 Fm and 259 Fm, form a select group of three nuclides whose mass division in spontaneous fission is highly symmetric. Unlike the total-kinetic-energy (TKE) distributions of 258 Fm and 259 Fm, which peak at approx. = to 240 MeV, this distribution for 259 Md is broad and is 50 MeV lower in energy. Analysis of the mass and energy distributions shows that events near mass symmetry also exhibit a broad TKE distribution, with one-third of the symmetric events having TKEs less than 200 MeV. The associated of low TKEs with symmetric mass division in the fission of very heavy actinides is anomalous and inconsistent with theories based upon the emergence of fragment shells near the scission point. Either three-body fragmentation or peculiar fragment shapes are assumed as the cause for the large consumption of Coulomb energy observed for a significant fraction of symmetric fissions in 259 Md. 6 figures

  16. A stochastic approach to fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out. A strong friction coefficient, calculated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. Fission was described as a diffusion over a barrier of a collective variable, and a Langevin Equation (LE) was used to study the phenomenon. A study of the stationary flow over the saddle point with a Fokker-Planck Equation (FPE), equivalent to the LE was used to give formula for the stationary fission rate (or reaction rate for the chemistry applications). More recently, a complete study of the fission process was performed numerically with both FPE and LE. A long transient time, that could allow more pre-scission neutrons to evaporate, was pointed out. The derivation of this new LE is recalled, followed by the description of the memory dependence and by the effect of a large friction coefficient on the fission rate. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  17. Modelling isothermal fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffelen, P. van

    2002-01-01

    The present paper presents a new fission gas release model consisting of two coupled modules. The first module treats the behaviour of the fission gas atoms in spherical grains with a distribution of grain sizes. This module considers single atom diffusion, trapping and fission induced re-solution of gas atoms associated with intragranular bubbles, and re-solution from the grain boundary into a few layers adjacent to the grain face. The second module considers the transport of the fission gas atoms along the grain boundaries. Four mechanisms are incorporated: diffusion controlled precipitation of gas atoms into bubbles, grain boundary bubble sweeping, re-solution of gas atoms into the adjacent grains and gas flow through open porosity when grain boundary bubbles are interconnected. The interconnection of the intergranular bubbles is affected both by the fraction of the grain face occupied by the cavities and by the balance between the bubble internal pressure and the hydrostatic pressure surrounding the bubbles. The model is under validation. In a first step, some numerical routines have been tested by means of analytic solutions. In a second step, the fission gas release model has been coupled with the FTEMP2 code of the Halden Reactor Project for the temperature distribution in the pellets. A parametric study of some steady-state irradiations and one power ramp have been simulated successfully. In particular, the Halden threshold for fission gas release and two simplified FUMEX cases have been computed and are summarised. (author)

  18. Status of fission power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenson, M.

    1977-01-01

    Fission energy is reviewed from the viewpoints of technology, economics, politics, manufacturers, consumers, and foreign countries. Technically, the reactor program is operating and the light water reactor industry shows signs of maturing, although recent business has been disappointing. Marketing of gas-cooled reactors depends, not on technical, but economic and political issues. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors have been demonstrated worldwide, while the gas-cooled fast breeder remains an undemonstrated option. Nuclear plants, currently costing the same as coal plants with scrubbers, are the cheapest option for utilities because most of the cost is imbedded. The defeat of nuclear initiatives in seven states indicates that public feeling is not as anti-nuclear as opponents to nuclear power claim. The harshness of last winter demonstrated the advantages of a power source that is not so sensitive to the weather for reliable operation and transport, as well as low cost energy. Other nations are proceeding to build a nuclear capability, which the U.S. may jeopardize because of concerns about the fuel cycle, nuclear waste disposal, uranium reserves, and nuclear proliferation

  19. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Lou Sai

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238 U and 232 Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ( 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U, 234 U, 237 Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232 Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232 Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237 Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237 Np. This

  20. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

  1. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-01-01

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications

  2. A study of the effect of intermediate structure in the fission cross section of 239Pu on self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1978-01-01

    A set of energy dependent fission widths of 1 + spin state corresponding to the recommended fission cross sections of Sowerby et al is evaluated by adjustment in the energy region 600 ev to 25 Kev. Corresponding to these mean fission widths of 1 + spin state, the intermediate resonance parameters based on Weigmann's formulation of Struitinsky's double humped fission barrier model are then obtained. Pseudorandom resonances are generated with and without the intermediate structure in the mean fission but leading to the same value of infinite dilution fission cross section. The effect of the intermediate structure on the self shielding factors was then investigated. (author)

  3. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  4. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  5. MAIL3.1 : a computer program generating cross section sets for SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Komuro, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Ouchi, Keisuke

    1998-02-01

    This report is a user`s manual of the computer program MAIL3.1 which generates various types of cross section sets for neutron transport programs such as SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0. MAIL3.1 is a revised version of MAIL3.0 that was opened in 1990. It has all of abilities of MAIL3.0 and has two more functions as shown in following. 1. AMPX-type cross section set generating function for KENO V. 2. Enhanced function for user of 16 group Hansen-Roach library. (author)

  6. Determination of Ultra-Trace Amounts of Selenium(IV) by Flow Injection Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with On-line Preconcentration by Co-precipitation with Lanthanium Hydroxide. Part II. On-line Addition of Coprecipating Agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    -line and merged with an ammonium buffer solution of pH 9.1, which promotes precipitation and quantitative collection on the inner walls of an incorporated knotted Microline reactor. The Se(IV) preconcentrated by coprecipitation with the generated lanthanum hydroxide precipitate is subsequently eluted...... with hydrochloric acid, allowing an ensuing determination via hydride generation. At different sample flow rates, i.e., 4.8, 6.4 and 8.8 ml/min, enrichment factors of 30, 40 and 46, respectively, were obtained at a sampling frequency of 33 samples/h. The detection limit (3s) was 0.005 µg/l at a sample flow rate...

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of fission yields, kinetic energy, fission neutron spectrum and decay γ-ray spectrum for 232Th(n,f) reaction induced by 3H(d,n) 4He neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Zeen Yao; Changlin Lan; Yan Yan; Yunjian Shi; Siqi Yan; Jie Wang; Junrun Wang; Jingen Chen; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo transport code Geant4 has been successfully utilised to study of neutron-induced fission reaction for 232 Th in the transport neutrons generated from 3 H(d,n) 4 He neutron source. The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of Monte Carlo simulations for the computation of fission reaction process. For this, Monte Carlo simulates and calculates the characteristics of fission reaction process of 232 Th(n,f), such as the fission yields distribution, kinetic energy distribution, fission neutron spectrum and decay γ-ray spectrum. This is the first time to simulate the process of neutron-induced fission reaction using Geant4 code. Typical computational results of neutron-induced fission reaction of 232 Th(n,f) reaction are presented. The computational results are compared with the previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data to confirm the certain physical process model in Geant4 of scientific rationality. (author)

  8. Fission barriers in the quasi-molecular shape path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Bonilla, C.; Zbiri, K.; Gherghescu, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    New observed phenomena like asymmetric fission of intermediate mass nuclei, nuclear molecules in light nuclei, super and hyperdeformations, cluster radioactivity, fast-fission of heavy systems and fragmentation have renewed interest in investigating the fusion-like fission valley which leads rapidly to two touching spherical fragments and quasi-molecular shapes. Furthermore, rotating super and hyperdeformed nuclear states and superheavy nuclei can be formed only in heavy-ion collisions for which the initial configuration is two close quasi-spherical nuclei. For these shapes the balance between the Coulomb forces and surface tension forces does not allow to link the sheets of the potential energy surface corresponding to one-body shapes and to two separated fragments, respectively. It is necessary to add another term called proximity energy reproducing the finite-range effects of the nuclear force in the neck or the gap between the nascent fission fragments. A generalized liquid drop model has been developed to take into account this nuclear proximity energy, the mass and charge asymmetry, an accurate nuclear radius and the temperature effects. The initial value of the surface energy coefficient has been kept. Microscopic corrections have been determined within the asymmetric two center shell model or simpler algebraic approximations. With this model and deformation valley first studies had led to the following results: (i) good agreement between the potential barrier heights and the experimental fission barrier heights in the whole mass range; (ii) saddle-point corresponding to two separated fragments maintained in unstable equilibrium by the balance between the repulsive Coulomb forces and the attractive proximity forces; (iii) strong enhancement of the maximal angular momentum against fission; (iv) reasonable agreement with experimental data on the double-humped barriers of actinides. Within this same approach we have recently shown that the calculated potential

  9. Advances on fission chamber modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Geslot, Benoit; Veenhof, Rob

    2013-06-01

    In-vessel, online neutron flux measurements are routinely performed in mock-up and material testing reactors by fission chambers. Those measurements have a wide range of applications, including characterization of experimental conditions, reactor monitoring and safety. Depending on the application, detectors may experience a wide range of constraints, of several magnitudes, in term of neutron flux, gamma-ray flux, temperature. Hence, designing a specific fission chamber and measuring chain for a given application is a demanding task. It can be achieved by a combination of experimental feedback and simulating tools, the latter being based on a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics. A computation route that simulates fission chambers, named CHESTER, is presented. The retrieved quantities of interest are the neutron-induced charge spectrum, the electronic and ionic pulses, the mean current and variance, the power spectrum. It relies on the GARFIELD suite, originally developed for drift chambers, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ code to assess the drift parameters of electrons within the filling gas, and the SRIM code to evaluate the stopping range of fission products. The effect of the gamma flux is also estimated. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the experimental data available to date. In a near future, a comprehensive experimental programme will be undertaken to qualify the route using the known neutron sources, mock-up reactors and wide choice of fission chambers, with a stress on the predictiveness of the Campbelling mode. Depending on the results, a refinement of the modelling and an effort on the accuracy of input data are also to be considered. CHESTER will then make it possible to predict the overall sensitivity of a chamber, and to optimize the design for a given application. Another benefit will be to increase the

  10. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) processing speed scores as measures of noncredible responding: The third generation of embedded performance validity indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdodi, Laszlo A; Abeare, Christopher A; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D; Tyson, Bradley T; Kucharski, Brittany; Zuccato, Brandon G; Roth, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that select processing speed measures can also serve as embedded validity indicators (EVIs). The present study examined the diagnostic utility of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests as EVIs in a mixed clinical sample of 205 patients medically referred for neuropsychological assessment (53.3% female, mean age = 45.1). Classification accuracy was calculated against 3 composite measures of performance validity as criterion variables. A PSI ≤79 produced a good combination of sensitivity (.23-.56) and specificity (.92-.98). A Coding scaled score ≤5 resulted in good specificity (.94-1.00), but low and variable sensitivity (.04-.28). A Symbol Search scaled score ≤6 achieved a good balance between sensitivity (.38-.64) and specificity (.88-.93). A Coding-Symbol Search scaled score difference ≥5 produced adequate specificity (.89-.91) but consistently low sensitivity (.08-.12). A 2-tailed cutoff on the Coding/Symbol Search raw score ratio (≤1.41 or ≥3.57) produced acceptable specificity (.87-.93), but low sensitivity (.15-.24). Failing ≥2 of these EVIs produced variable specificity (.81-.93) and sensitivity (.31-.59). Failing ≥3 of these EVIs stabilized specificity (.89-.94) at a small cost to sensitivity (.23-.53). Results suggest that processing speed based EVIs have the potential to provide a cost-effective and expedient method for evaluating the validity of cognitive data. Given their generally low and variable sensitivity, however, they should not be used in isolation to determine the credibility of a given response set. They also produced unacceptably high rates of false positive errors in patients with moderate-to-severe head injury. Combining evidence from multiple EVIs has the potential to improve overall classification accuracy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Characteristics of the samples in the FNG fission deposit collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    Information concerning the samples in the Fast Neutron Generator (FNG) Group's fission deposit collection has been assembled. This includes the physical dimensions, isotopic analyses, half-lives, alpha emission rates specific activities and deposit weights. 10 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  13. Fission-product releases from a PHWR terminal debris bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Bailey, D.G., E-mail: morgan.brown@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    During an unmitigated severe accident in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) with horizontal fuel channels, the core may disassemble and relocate to the bottom of the calandria vessel. The resulting heterogeneous in-vessel terminal debris bed (TDB) would likely be quenched by any remaining moderator, and some of the decay heat would be conducted through the calandria vessel shell to the surrounding reactor vault or shield tank water. As the moderator boiled off, the solid debris bed would transform into a more homogeneous molten corium pool located between top and bottom crusts. Until recently, the severe accident code MAAP-CANDU assumed that unreleased volatile and semi-volatile fission products remained in the TDB until after calandria vessel failure, due to low diffusivity through the top crust and the lack of gases or steam to flush released fission products from the debris. However, national and international experimental results indicate this assumption is unlikely; instead, high- and medium-volatility fission products would be released from a molten debris pool, and their volatility and transport should be taken into account in TDB modelling. The resulting change in the distribution of fission products within the reactor and containment, and the associated decay heat, can have significant effects upon the progression of the accident and fission-product releases to the environment. This article describes a postulated PHWR severe accident progression to generate a TDB and the effects of fission-product releases from the terminal debris, using the simple release model in the MAAP-CANDU severe accident code. It also provides insights from various experimental programs related to fission-product releases from core debris, and their applicability to the MAAP-CANDU TDB model. (author)

  14. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaud, P.; Clair, C.; Gaudin, M.; Genin, R.; Joly, R.; Leroy, J.L.; Michaudon, A.; Ouvry, J.; Signarbieux, C.; Vendryes, G.

    1958-01-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin 10 B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of 235 U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of 235 U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of 235 U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF 3 proportional counters. c) Mean number ν of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of ν for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) α reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author) [fr

  15. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  16. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Contribution to the study of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serot, O.

    2009-09-01

    The author proposes an overview of his research activity during the past fifteen years and more particularly that dealing with nuclear fission. The first part reports works on nucleus physics at the scission via the investigation of ternary fission (experimental procedure, influence of fission modes, influence of resonance spin, influence of excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus, emission probabilities, energy spectra of ternary alphas and tritons, emission mechanism). The second part reports measurements and assessments of neutron-induced fission cross sections. The third part reports the investigation of some properties of fission products (efficiencies, branching ratios of the main delayed neutron precursors)

  18. Muon induced fission and fission track dating of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of muon induced fission on geological dating of samples by the fission track method are evaluated for the case of muscovite minerals. It is found a small but significant effect, greater for the longer ages. Since calculations are developped under the hypothesis of constant atmosphere and primary cosmic ray flux it is suggested that any discrepancy found in ages of very old material that cannot be accounted for by well known environmental influences, be taken as an indication of variation on either the atmospheric stopping power or the intensity of cosmic radiation along the ages. (author) [pt

  19. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  20. Characterization of wastes from fission 99 Mo production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Dellamano, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    This work is a preliminary study on waste-streams generated in a fission 99 Mo production plant, their characterization and quantification. The study is based on a plant whose 99 Mo production process is the alkaline dissolution of U-target. The target is made of 1 g of enriched 235 U, therefore most of radionuclides present in the waste-streams are fission products. All the radionuclides inventories were estimated based on ORIGEN-2 Code. The characterization was done as a primary stage for the establishment of waste management plan, which should be subject for further study. (author)

  1. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  2. Report of fission study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  3. Status of fission yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Blachot, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  5. Estimates of fission yields in nuclear criticality excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.S.; Thompson, J.W.; Reed, R.

    1995-06-01

    There is a need for computer simulation of hypothetical criticality excursions involving significant quantities of fissionable materials, especially in fissile aqueous system. The need arises due to the requirements for the emergency planning of facilities where the fissionable materials are handled, processed, or stored; and the regulatory requirements associated with facility operation or conversion. It is proposed here that a data base of fission yeilds for critical experiments and known accidents (both aqueous and solid) should be generated by using existing or new computer codes. The success in compiling this data base would provide useful source-terms for criticality excursions, realistic estimates of emergency-response boundary, as well as a replacement for the ''rule-of-thumb'' or ''bounding'' method. 10 refs

  6. Experimental approach to fission process of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    From experimental views, it seems likely that the mechanism of nuclear fission process remains unsolved even after the Bohr and Weeler`s study in 1939. Especially, it is marked in respect of mass distribution in unsymmetric nuclear fission. The energy dependency of mass distribution can be explained with an assumption of 2-mode nuclear fission. Further, it was demonstrated that the symmetrical fission components and the unsymmetrical ones have different saddle and fission points. Thus, the presence of the 2-mode fission mechanism was confirmed. Here, transition in the nuclear fission mechanism and its cause were investigated here. As the cause of such transition, plausible four causes; a contribution of multiple-chance fission, disappearance of shell effects, beginning of fission following collective excitation due to GDR and nuclear phase transition were examined in the condition of excitation energy of 14.0 MeV. And it was suggested that the transition in the nuclear fission concerned might be related to phase transition. In addition, the mechanism of nuclear fission at a low energy and multi-mode hypothesis were examined by determination of the energy for thermal neutron fission ({sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and spontaneous nuclear fission ({sup 252}Cf). (M.N.)

  7. LEUbased Fission Mo-99 Process with Reduced Solid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungkon; Lee, Suseung; Jung, Sunghee; Hong, Soonbog; Jang, Kyungduk; Choi, Sang Mu; Lee, Jun Sig; Lim, Incheol

    2014-01-01

    99m Tc emits 140 keV of very low gamma-ray radiation energy, as low as conventional diagnostic X-ray, and has short half-life of 6.0058 hours. Therefore, as radioactive tracer, 99m Tc provides high quality diagnostic images but keeps total patient radiation exposure low. Depending on the tagging pharmaceuticals and procedures, 99m Tc can be applied for the diagnostics of various target organs and diseases: brain, myocardium, thyroid, lungs, liver, gallbladder, kidneys, skeleton, blood and tumors. More than 95% of 99 Mo is produced through fission of 235 U worldwide because, 99m o generated from the fission (fission 99 Mo) exhibits very high specific activity (<100 Ci/g). Over 90% of fission 99 Mo producers have been used highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets so far. However, the IAEA recommends the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) to the 99 Mo producers for nonproliferation reason. These days, worldwide 99 Mo supply is not only insufficient but also unstable. Because, most of the main 99 Mo production reactors are about 50 years old and suffered from frequent and unscheduled shutdown. Planned weekly productivity of 2000 Ci fission 99 Mo, in a 6-day reference, will cover 100% domestic demand of Korea, as well as 20% of international market. It is expected to replace 4.3 million USD ($800/Ci) of 99 Mo import for domestic market while exporting 82.8 million USD for world market, annually

  8. Perspective on the fusion-fission energy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liikala, R.C.; Perry, R.T.; Teofilo, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    A concept which has potential for near-term application in the electric power sector of our energy economy is combining fusion and fission technology. The fusion-fission system, called a hybrid, is distinguished from its pure fusion counterpart by incorporation of fertile materials (uranium or thorium) in the blanket region of a fusion machine. The neutrons produced by the fusion process can be used to generate energy through fission events in the blanket or produce fuel for fission reactors through capture events in the fertile material. The performance requirements of the fusion component of hybrids is perceived as being less stringent than those for pure fusion electric power plants. The performance requirements for the fission component of hybrids is perceived as having been demonstrated or could be demonstrated with a modest investment of research and development funds. This paper presents our insights and observations of this concept in the context of why and where it might fit into the picture of meeting our future energy needs. A bibliography of hybrid research is given

  9. Trapping technology for gaseous fission products from voloxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Jung, I. H.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, G. H.; Yang, M. S.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this report is to review the different technologies for trapping the gaseous wastes containing Cs, Ru, Tc, 14 C, Kr, Xe, I and 3 H from a voloxidation process. Based on literature reviews and KAERI's experimental results on the gaseous fission products trapping, appropriate trapping method for each fission product has been selected considering process reliability, simplicity, decontamination factor, availability, and disposal. Specifically, the most promising trapping method for each fission product has been proposed for the development of the INL off-gas trapping system. A fly ash filter is proposed as a trapping media for a cesium trapping unit. In addition, a calcium filter is proposed as a trapping media for ruthenium, technetium, and 14 C trapping unit. In case of I trapping unit, AgX is proposed. For Kr and Xe, adsorption on solid is proposed. SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) is also proposed as a conversion media to HTO for 3 H. This report will be used as a useful means for analyzing the known trapping technologies and help selecting the appropriate trapping methods for trapping volatile and semi-volatile fission products, long-lived fission products, and major heat sources generated from a voloxidation process. It can also be used to design an off-gas treatment system

  10. Trapping technology for gaseous fission products from voloxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Jung, I. H.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, G. H.; Yang, M. S

    2005-05-15

    The objective of this report is to review the different technologies for trapping the gaseous wastes containing Cs, Ru, Tc, {sup 14}C, Kr, Xe, I and {sup 3}H from a voloxidation process. Based on literature reviews and KAERI's experimental results on the gaseous fission products trapping, appropriate trapping method for each fission product has been selected considering process reliability, simplicity, decontamination factor, availability, and disposal. Specifically, the most promising trapping method for each fission product has been proposed for the development of the INL off-gas trapping system. A fly ash filter is proposed as a trapping media for a cesium trapping unit. In addition, a calcium filter is proposed as a trapping media for ruthenium, technetium, and {sup 14}C trapping unit. In case of I trapping unit, AgX is proposed. For Kr and Xe, adsorption on solid is proposed. SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) is also proposed as a conversion media to HTO for {sup 3}H. This report will be used as a useful means for analyzing the known trapping technologies and help selecting the appropriate trapping methods for trapping volatile and semi-volatile fission products, long-lived fission products, and major heat sources generated from a voloxidation process. It can also be used to design an off-gas treatment system.

  11. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Gaseous Fission Products Trace Measurements in Sodium Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Pailloux, A.; Doizi, D.; Aoust, G.; Jeannot, J.-P.

    2013-06-01

    Safety and availability are key issues of the generation IV reactors. Hence, the three radionuclide confinement barriers, including fuel cladding, must stay tight during the reactor operation. During the primary gaseous failure, fission products xenon and krypton are released. Their fast and sensitive detection guarantees the first confinement barrier tightness. In the frame of the French ASTRID project, an optical spectroscopy technique - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) - is investigated for the gaseous fission products measurement. A dedicated CRDS set-up is needed to detect the rare gases with a commercial laser. Indeed, the CRDS is coupled to a glow discharge plasma, which generates a population of metastable atoms. The xenon plasma conditions are optimized to 110 Pa and 1.3 W (3 mA). The production efficiency of metastable Xe is then 0.8 %, stable within 0.5% during hours. The metastable number density is proportional to the xenon over argon molar fraction. The spectroscopic parameters of the strong 823.16 nm xenon transition are calculated and/or measured in order to optimize the fit of the experimental spectra and make a quantitative measurement of the metastable xenon. The CRDS is coupled to the discharge cell. The laser intensity inside the cavity is limited by the optical saturation process, resulting from the strong optical pumping of the metastable state. The resulting weak CRDS signal requires a fast and very sensitive photodetector. A 600 ppt xenon molar fraction was measured by CRDS. With the present set-up, the detection limits are estimated from the baseline noise to approximately 20 ppt for each even isotope, 60 ppt for the 131 Xe and 55 ppt for the 129 Xe. This sensitivity matches the specifications required for gaseous leak measurement; approximately 100 ppt for 133 Xe (4 GBq/m 3 ) and 10 ppb for stable isotopes. The odd isotopes are selectively measured, whereas the even isotopes overlap, a spectroscopic feature that applies for stable or

  12. The Sustainable Nuclear Future: Fission and Fusion E.M. Campbell Logos Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, E. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Global industrialization, the concern over rising CO2 levels in the atmosphere and other negative environmental effects due to the burning of hydrocarbon fuels and the need to insulate the cost of energy from fuel price volatility have led to a renewed interest in nuclear power. Many of the plants under construction are similar to the existing light water reactors but incorporate modern engineering and enhanced safety features. These reactors, while mature, safe and reliable sources of electrical power have limited efficiency in converting fission power to useful work, require significant amounts of water, and must deal with the issues of nuclear waste (spent fuel), safety, and weapons proliferation. If nuclear power is to sustain its present share of the world's growing energy needs let alone displace carbon based fuels, more than 1000 reactors will be needed by mid century. For this to occur new reactors that are more efficient, versatile in their energy markets, require minimal or no water, produce less waste and more robust waste forms, are inherently safe and minimize proliferation concerns will be necessary. Graphite moderated, ceramic coated fuel, and He cooled designs are reactors that can satisfy these requirements. Along with other generation IV fast reactors that can further reduce the amounts of spent fuel and extend fuel resources, such a nuclear expansion is possible. Furthermore, facilities either in early operations or under construction should demonstrate the next step in fusion energy development in which energy gain is produced. This demonstration will catalyze fusion energy development and lead to the ultimate development of the next generation of nuclear reactors. In this presentation the role of advanced fission reactors and future fusion reactors in the expansion of nuclear power will be discussed including synergies with the existing worldwide nuclear fleet. )

  13. Contribution of nonlinear acoustic to the characterization of micro-bubbles clouds in liquid sodium. Application to the generation IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaro, M.

    2010-11-01

    The SFR system chosen (Sodium Fast Reactor: fast neutron reactors cooled by liquid sodium) by France led to a fourth-generation prototype named ASTRID. The development of this kind of reactors presents several challenges, particularly in terms of improving the safety and monitoring operation. This involves, among other things, characterization of the bubbles presence in liquid sodium. The characterization of the bubbles presence is the subject of this thesis. It involves the determination of void fraction (gas volume fraction) and histogram of the radii of bubbles. The bibliographic work done has shown that linear acoustic techniques for the characterization of bubble clouds are inadequate to achieve this. However promising leads have been identified by studying nonlinear acoustic techniques. This last idea has therefore been explored. An experimental water bench for the generation and optical control of micro-bubbles cloud allowed us to validate finely the reconstruction of histograms of radii through a technique of nonlinear mixing of a high frequency with a low frequency. The potential of the mixing of two high frequencies, more interesting for the industrial point of view has also been demonstrated. Finally, the bases of the transposition of an original technique of nonlinear resonance spectroscopy applied to a bubbles cloud were explored through the introduction of acoustic resonators. The results offer many interesting opportunities, both in terms of industrial applications and for more fundamental understanding of non-linear behavior of a bubble excited by multiple frequencies and of bubbles clouds excited at low frequency. (author)

  14. NEACRP thermal fission product benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.; Taubman, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the thermal fission product benchmark was to compare the range of fission product data in use at the present time. A simple homogeneous problem was set with 200 atoms H/1 atom U235, to be burnt up to 1000 days and then decay for 1000 days. The problem was repeated with 200 atoms H/1 atom Pu239, 20 atoms H/1 atom U235 and 20 atoms H/1 atom Pu239. There were ten participants and the submissions received are detailed in this report. (author)

  15. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  16. Fission 99Mo production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Zengxing; Luo Zhifu; Ma Huimin; Liang Yufu; Yu Ningwen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a production technology of fission 99 Mo in the Department Isotope, CIAE. The irradiation target is tubular U-Al alloy containing highly enriched uranium. The target is irradiated in the swimming pool reactor core. The neutron flux is about 4x10 13 /cm 2 .sec. The production scale is 3.7-7.4 TBq (100-200Ci) of fission 99 Mo per batch. Total recovery of 99 Mo is more than 70%. The production practice proves that the process and equipment are safe and reliable. (author)

  17. 40 years of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.

    1979-01-01

    On the occasion of both the 100th birthday of the discoverer of nuclear fission, Otto Hahn, and the 40th anniversary of this outstanding scientific discovery the historical development is described, which led to nuclear fission. Aspects of scientific life in Berlin and in the whole world at that time are presented, and relations between scientists are characterized by quotations. In particular, stress is laid on the life and activities of Otto Hahn as a human being and as a scientist, and his outstanding scientific achievements are appreciated. (author)

  18. Sommerfeld-Watson transformation for nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandru, G.

    1978-01-01

    It is proved that the fission matrix element can be written like a Sommerfeld-Watson relation. This leads to a dispersion relation for the fission process in which the substraction term is uniquely determined. (author)

  19. Fission properties of the heaviest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moller, P.; Nix, R.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss fission properties of the heaviest elements. In particular they focus on stability with respect to spontaneous fission and on the prospects of extending the region of known nuclei beyond the peninsula of currently known nuclides

  20. Fission fragment distributions within dynamical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, K. [Institute of Nuclear, Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Nadtochy, P.N. [Omsk State Technical University, Omsk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Physics Department, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The review covers recent developments and achievements in the dynamical description of fission process at high excitation energy. It is shown that the dynamical approach based on multidimensional Langevin equations combined with the statistical description of nuclear decay by particles evaporation is capable of fairly well describing the formation of fission fragment mass-energy, charge, and angular distributions of fission fragments in coincidence with the pre- and post-scission particle emission. The final yields of fission and evaporation residues channels products could be obtained. The detailed description of fission dynamics allows studying different stages of fission process, indicating the most important ingredients governing fission process and studying in detail such fundamental nuclear properties as nuclear viscosity and fission timescale. The tasks and perspectives of multidimensional dynamical approach are also discussed. (orig.)

  1. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Karpf, E.

    1984-01-01

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  2. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  3. Measurement of the 235U/238U fission cross section ratio in the 235U fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Bagheri-Darbandi, M.

    1983-06-01

    Fission cross section ratio of 235 U to 238 U has been measured in the fast neutron field generated by the 235 U fission plate installed on the thermal column of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) with a Makrofol solid state nuclear track detector. The experiments were carried out with a set of total six enriched 235 U and depleted 238 U deposits with different masses and Makrofol films of 0.025mm and 0.060mm thicknesses. The chemically etched tracks were counted by an optical microscope. No significant differences were observed with the thin and the thick films. The results showed that the average fission cross section ratio is 3.83+-0.25. (author)

  4. Fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus based on fission reaction models in high energy regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of projects of new generation nuclear power plants requires the solving of material science and technological issues in developing of reactor materials. Melts of heavy metals (Pb, Bi and Pb-Bi due to their nuclear and thermophysical properties, are the candidate coolants for fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADS. In this study, α, γ, p, n and 3He induced fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus at high-energy regions for (α,f, (γ,f, (p,f, (n,f and (3He,f reactions have been investigated using different fission reaction models. Mamdouh Table, Sierk, Rotating Liquid Drop and Fission Path models of theoretical fission barriers of TALYS 1.6 code have been used for the fission cross section calculations. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the EXFOR database. TALYS 1.6 Sierk model calculations exhibit generally good agreement with the experimental measurements for all reactions used in this study.

  5. MCNP6 Fission Cross Section Calculations at Intermediate and High Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Sierk, Arnold J.; Prael, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    MCNP6 has been Validated and Verified (V&V) against intermediate- and high-energy fission cross-section experimental data. An error in the calculation of fission cross sections of 181Ta and a few nearby target nuclei by the CEM03.03 event generator in MCNP6 and a "bug: in the calculation of fission cross sections with the GENXS option of MCNP6 while using the LAQGSM03.03 event generator were detected during our V&V work. After fixing both problems, we find that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM...

  6. Investigation of exotic fission modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.; Nagame, Y.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.

    2002-01-01

    Fission approach to the cluster radioactivities and α-decay has been systematically developed during the last two decades. A more complex process, the ternary fission, was observed since 1946 both in neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. We obtained interesting results concerning the binary fission saddle-point reflection asymmetric nuclear shapes, and we can explain how a possible nuclear quasimolecular state is formed during the 10 Be accompanied cold fission of 252 Cf. The equilibrium nuclear shapes in fission theory are usually determined by minimizing the deformation energy for a given surface equation. We developed a method allowing to obtain a very general saddle-point shape as a solution of a differential equation without an a priori introduction of a shape parametrization. In the approach based on a liquid drop model (LDM), saddle-point shapes are always reflection symmetric: the deformation energy increases with the mass-asymmetry parameter η = (A 1 - A 2 )/(A 1 + A 2 ). By adding the shell corrections to the LDM deformation energy, we obtained minima at a finite mass asymmetry for parent nuclei 238 U, 232,228 Th in agreement with experiments. This correction was calculated phenomenologically. A technique based on the fragment identification by using triple γ coincidences in the large arrays of Ge-detectors, like GAMMASPHERE, was employed at Vanderbilt University to discover new characteristics of the fission process, and new decay modes. The possibility of a whole family of new decay modes, the multicluster accompanied fission, was envisaged. Besides the fission into two or three fragments, a heavy or superheavy nucleus spontaneously breaks into four, five or six nuclei of which two are asymmetric or symmetric heavy fragments and the others are light clusters, e.g. α-particles, 10 Be, 14 C, or combinations of them. Examples were presented for the two-, three- and four cluster accompanied cold fission of 252 Cf and 262 Rf, in which the emitted

  7. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  8. Nuclear fission as a macroscopic quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, N.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss nuclear fission from the point of view of a macroscopic quantum tunneling, one of whose major interests is to study the effects of environments on the tunneling rate of a macroscopic variable. We show that a vibrational excitation of the fissioning nucleus significantly enhances the fission rate. We show this effect by two different methods. The one is to treat the vibrational excitation as an environmental degree of freedom, the other treats the fission as a two dimensional quantum tunneling. (author)

  9. Controlled isotropic fission fragment sources on the base of nuclear-physical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevast'yanov, V.D.; Maslov, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Isotropic fission fragment sources (IFFS) are developed on the base of a neutron generator and pulse fast reactor. IFFS permit to calibrate fission fragment detectors. The IFFS consist of radiators with 235 U. The radiators are placed in a thermal neutron field of the neutron generator or in the reactor core center. The fragment activity is controlled by indications of an α-particle counter or by indications of a monitor of energy release in the core. 14 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  10. Neutron gamma competition in fast fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frehaut, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we analyse the data we have obtained on the distribution of the gamma-ray energy per fission, as well as on the average energy E-barγ released per fission for the neutron induced fission of several isotopes, in the energy range up to 15 MeV. 6 refs, 9 figs

  11. Fission yield data evaluation system FYDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tingjin

    1998-01-01

    Taking account of some features of fission yield data, to do the fission yield data evaluation conveniently, a fission yield data evaluation system FYDES has been developed for last two years. Outline of the system, data retrieval and data table standardization, data correction codes, data averaging code, simultaneous evaluation code and data fit programs were introduced

  12. Fission fragment mass and angular distributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... Synthesis of heavy and superheavy elements is severely hindered by fission and fission-like processes. The probability of these fission-like, non-equilibrium processes strongly depends on the entrance channel parameters. This article attempts to summarize the recent experimental findings and classify the ...

  13. Some aspects of fission and quasifission processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... In this talk, I will review an incomplete subset of the major milestones in fission research, and briefly discuss some of the topics that I have been involved in during my career. These include studies of vibrational resonances and fission isomers that are caused by the second minimum in the fission barrier in ...

  14. Charged particle-induced nuclear fission reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nuclear fission phenomenon continues to be an enigma, even after nearly 75 years of its discovery. Considerable progress has been made towards understanding the fission process. Both light projectiles and heavy ions have been employed to investigate nuclear fission. An extensive database of the properties of ...

  15. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster ... those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'. Thus ...

  16. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Nuclei in the actinide chain and beyond are prone to fission owing to ... mass nuclei are typically more difficult, because the intensity is .... j15/2 neutron alignments in a region where shell stablization effects are crucial.

  17. Space Fission System Test Effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Schmidt, Glen L.; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Harper, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Space fission technology has the potential to enable rapid access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential, however, near-term customers need to be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and utilized. One key to successful utilization is to develop reactor designs that are highly testable. Testable reactor designs have a much higher probability of being successfully converted from paper concepts to working space hardware than do designs which are difficult or impossible to realistically test. ''Test Effectiveness'' is one measure of the ability to realistically test a space reactor system. The objective of this paper is to discuss test effectiveness as applied to the design, development, flight qualification, and acceptance testing of space fission systems. The ability to perform highly effective testing would be particularly important to the success of any near-term mission, such as NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, the first mission under study within NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program

  18. Nuclear fission with inertial confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Koshkarev, D G

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of initiating the explosive fission reaction in a small quantity of fissile material through the heavy ions beam from the powerful accelerator-driver, developed for realization of the thermonuclear synthesis in the deuterium-tritium cylindrical targets with the direct ignition, is considered. The consequences of applying this method in the nuclear engineering are discussed

  19. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced ... excitation energies, there may not be sufficient nuclei near the fission barrier after the .... Dissipation in nuclear dynamics in the mean-field regime accounts for the coupling of the .... barrier for different isotopes of Fr. The lines are drawn to guide the eye.

  20. Utilization of fast reactor excess neutrons for burning long-lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kaneto, K.

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation is made on a large MOX fuel fast reactor's capability of burning long lived fission product Tc-99, which dominates the long term radiotoxicity of the high level radioactive waste. The excess neutrons generated in the fast reactor core are utilized to transmute Tc-99 to stable isotopes due to neutron capture reaction. The fission product target assemblies which consist of Tc-99 are charged to the reactor core periphery. The fission product target neutrons are moderated to a great deal to pursue the possibility of enhancing the transmutation rate. Any impacts of loading the fission product target assemblies on the core nuclear performances are assessed. A long term Tc-99 accumulation scenario is considered in the mix of fission product burner fast reactor and non-burner LWRs. (author)

  1. User's manual for computer code RIBD-II, a fission product inventory code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The computer code RIBD-II is used to calculate inventories, activities, decay powers, and energy releases for the fission products generated in a fuel irradiation. Changes from the earlier RIBD code are: the expansion to include up to 850 fission product isotopes, input in the user-oriented NAMELIST format, and run-time choice of fuels from an extensively enlarged library of nuclear data. The library that is included in the code package contains yield data for 818 fission product isotopes for each of fourteen different fissionable isotopes, together with fission product transmutation cross sections for fast and thermal systems. Calculational algorithms are little changed from those in RIBD. (U.S.)

  2. Fission track imaging of the Australian continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleadow, A.; Kohn, B.; O'Sullivan, P.; Brown, R.; Gallagher, K.

    1999-01-01

    images can be generated showing the palaeotemperature of the present surface at various times in the past. A second group of images can then be derived from these which describe the amount of surface denudation, based on estimates of thermal gradients. In turn, estimates of the amount of removed section can be 'backstacked' onto a present-day digital topographic model, and isostatically adjusted, to provide a first-order view of the evolution of palaeotopography through time. These fission-track derived images have the potential to provide a quantitative understanding of upper crustal movements and surface processes, over time scales up to hundreds of millions of years. Further calculations can then be made on the virtual landscapes constructed. For example, the denudation models can be used to predict sediment volumes and to trace the evolution of drainage basins, at least on a broad scale. This opens up a new range of mass-balance calculations on the amounts of eroded material and sediment accumulation in appropriate depocentres. The acquisition of (U-Th)/He data on a similar regional scale should provide more robust information on the lowest temperature (<60 deg C) part of the thermal history, still poorly constrained by the fission track data. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  3. Euratom innovation in nuclear fission: Community research in reactor systems and fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van; Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Manolatos, P.; Deffrennes, M.

    2007-01-01

    The following questions are naturally at the heart of the current Euratom research and training framework programme:(1)What are the challenges facing the European Union nuclear fission research community in the short (today), medium (2010) and long term (2040)? (2)What kind of research and technological development (RTD) does Euratom offer to respond to these challenges, in particular in the area of reactor systems and fuel cycles? In the general debate about energy supply technologies there are challenges of both a scientific and technological (S/T) as well as an economic and political (E/P) nature. Though the Community research programme acts mainly on the former, there is nevertheless important links with Community policy. These not only exist in the specific area of nuclear policy, but also more generally as is depicted in the following figure. It is shown in the particular area of nuclear fission, to what extent Euratom research, education and innovation ('Knowledge Triangle' in above figure) respond to the following long-term criteria: (1) sustainability, (2) economics, (3) safety, and (4) proliferation resistance. Research and innovation in nuclear fission technology has broad and extended geographical, disciplinary and time horizons:- the community involved extends to all 25 EU Member States and beyond; - the research assembles a large variety of scientific disciplines; - three generations of nuclear power technologies (called II, III and IV) are involved, with the timescales extending from now to around the year 2040. To each of these three generations, a couple of challenges are associated (six in total):- Generation II (1970-2000, today): security of supply+environmental compatibility; - Generation III (around 2010): enhanced safety and competitiveness (economics); - Generation IV (around 2040): cogeneration of heat and power, and full recycling. At the European Commission (EC), the research related to nuclear reactor systems and fuel cycles is

  4. Detector for gaseous nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Katsumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the fabrication of a precipitator type detector, as well as improve the reliability. Constitution: Gas to be measured flown in an anode is stored in a gas processing system. By applying a voltage between the anode and the cathode, if positively charged Rb or Cs which is the daughter products of gaseous fission products are present in the gas to be measured, the daughter products are successively deposited electrostatically to the cathode. The daughter products issue beta-rays and gamma-rays to ionize the argon gas at the anode, whereby ionizing current flows between both of the electrodes. Pulses are generated from the ionizing current, and presence or absence, as well as the amount of the gaseous fission products are determined by the value recorded for the number of the pulses to thereby detect failures in the nuclear fuel elements. After the completion of the detection, the inside of the anode is evacuated and the cathode is heated to evaporate and discharge the daughter products externally. This eliminates the effects of the former detection to the succeeding detection. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Mo-99 production by fission and future projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, E.C.; Novello, A.; Bronca, M.; Cestau, D.; Bavaro, R.; Centurion, R.; Bravo, C.; Bronca, P.; Gualda, E.; Fraguas, F.; Giomi, A.; Ivaldi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Description of the I-131 and Mo-99 production process: The process starts with the irradiation of uranium-aluminum mini plates in the RA-3, Argentinean Reactor No.3, Ezeiza Atomic Center. In a nuclear reactor there is a constant flow of neutrons and when a neutron with proper energy impacts on a nucleus of U-235, it is absorbed at the same time generate an unstable configuration nuclear. For this reason, the nucleus formed is fission, getting two different atoms. Approximately 6% of the fissions produce Mo-99 and 3% produce I-131; the percentage remaining corresponds to formation of atoms without interest for use in medicine. In conclusion, the objective of the process developed in the Fission Plant, is starting from uranium mini plates, separate the Mo-99 and I-131 generated, the remaining elements formed. - Evolution of Mo-99 Production in the last 10 years: The Fission Mo-99 Plant Production begins routine production of Mo-99 in 1985, using targets made of uranium enriched at 90% U-235. In the 1990s, global concern regarding the use of highly enriched uranium, due to non-proliferation issues, caused the interruption of supply of nuclear material (HEU enriched at 90% of U-235). Following this, Argentina developed target based on low-enriched uranium (less than 20% U-235), becoming in 2002 the first country in the world to produce Mo-99 with LEU targets. From 2002 to date, the activity produced of Mo-99 has been tripled annually (author)

  6. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1976-05-01

    The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on Fission Product Nuclear Data, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. This report consists of reproductions of essentially unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat

  7. Fission dynamics in the proton induced fission of heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubchenya, V.A. E-mail: rubchen@phys.jyu.fi; Trzaska, W.H.; Itkis, I.M.; Itkis, M.G.; Kliman, J.; Kniajeva, G.N.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Krupa, L.; Pokrovski, I.V.; Voskressenski, V.M.; Hanappe, F.; Materna, T.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Chubarian, G.; Khlebnikov, S.V.; Vakhtin, D.N.; Lyapin, V.G

    2004-04-05

    Multi-parameter correlation study of the reaction {sup 242}Pu(p, f) at E{sub p} 13, 20 and 55 MeV has been carried out. Fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions and the double differential neutron spectra have been measured. It was observed that the two-humped shape of mass distributions prevailed up to highest proton energy. Manifestation of the nuclear shell Z 28 near fragment mass A{sub fr} = 70 has been detected. The experimental results were analyzed in the framework of a time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of nuclear friction effects in the fission process. The multi-parameter correlation study of the reaction.

  8. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokiniemi, J.; Auvinen, A.; Maekynen, J.; Valmari, T.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  9. A critical review on some aspects of the theory of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    The lecture notes display briefly some of the facets which eventually will be part of a theory for the fission process. They cover some important aspects of our present understanding in a qualitative fashion and complement the existing review articles rather than replacing them. The notes include sections on (I) The Bohr-Wheeler Fission of a Drop, (II) The Strutinsky-Swiatecki Quantum Droplet, (III) The Question of Inertias of a Fluid in Motion, (IV) Some Selected Aspects of the Distributions of Mass and Kinetic Energy, and (V) Possible Relations Between the Phenomenological Models and Self-Consistent Field Approximations. (author)

  10. HETFIS: High-Energy Nucleon-Meson Transport Code with Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    A model that includes fission for predicting particle production spectra from medium-energy nucleon and pion collisions with nuclei (Z greater than or equal to 91) has been incorporated into the nucleon-meson transport code, HETC. This report is primarily concerned with the programming aspects of HETFIS (High-Energy Nucleon-Meson Transport Code with Fission). A description of the program data and instructions for operating the code are given. HETFIS is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM computers and is readily adaptable to other systems

  11. Material synergism fusion-fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankara Rao, K.B.; Raj, B.; Cook, I.; Kohyama, A.; Dudarev, S.

    2007-01-01

    In fission and fusion reactors the common features such as operating temperatures and neutron exposures will have the greatest impact on materials performance and component lifetimes. Developing fast neutron irradiation resisting materials is a common issue for both fission and fusion reactors. The high neutron flux levels in both these systems lead to unique materials problems like void swelling, irradiation creep and helium embitterment. Both fission and fusion rely on ferritic-martensitic steels based on 9%Cr compositions for achieving the highest swelling resistance but their creep strength sharply decreases above ∝ 823K. The use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys is envisaged to increase the operating temperature of blanket systems in the fusion reactors and fuel clad tubes in fast breeder reactors. In view of high operating temperatures, cyclic and steady load conditions and the long service life, properties like creep, low cycle fatigue,fracture toughness and creepfatigue interaction are major considerations in the selection of structural materials and design of components for fission and fusion reactors. Currently, materials selection for fusion systems has to be based upon incomplete experimental database on mechanical properties. The usage of fairly well developed databases, in fission programmes on similar materials, is of great help in the initial design of fusion reactor components. Significant opportunities exist for sharing information on technology of irradiation testing, specimen miniaturization, advanced methods of property measurement, safe windows for metal forming, and development of common materials property data base system. Both fusion and fission programs are being directed to development of clean steels with very low trace and tramp elements, characterization of microstructure and phase stability under irradiation, assessment of irradiation creep and swelling behaviour, studies on compatibility with helium and developing

  12. Solubility study of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under oxidizing conditions technetium exists as the anionic species TcO 4 - whereas under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Hence, the mobility of Tc(IV) in reducing groundwater may be limited by the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O under these conditions. Due to this fact it is important to investigate the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2 + . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is about (1.49-1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L·d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The

  13. Solubility of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 .nH 2 O. The solubility of Tc(IV) is used as a source term in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2+ . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is about (1.49∼1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L.d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide decreases with the increase of pH at pH 10 and is pH independent in the range 2 -8 to 10 -9 mol/L at 2 3 2- concentration. These data could be used to estimate the Tc(IV) solubility for cases where solubility limits transport of technetium in reducing environments of high-level waste repositories. (authors)

  14. Fast fission assisted ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the requirements for fast ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions can be substantially relaxed if the deuterium-tritium (DT) hot spot is placed inside a shell of U-238 (Th-232). An intense laser - or particle beam-projected into the shell leads to a large temperature gradient between the hot DT and the cold U-238 (Th-232), driving thermomagnetic currents by the Nernst effect, with magnetic fields large enough to entrap within the hot spot the α-particles of the DT fusion reaction. The fast fission reactions in the U-238 (Th-232) shell implode about 1/2 of the shell onto the DT, increasing its density and reaction rate. With the magnetic field generated by the Nernst effect, there is no need to connect the target to a large current carrying transmission line, as it is required for magnetized target fusion, solving the so-called ''stand off'' problem for thermonuclear microexplosions. (orig.)

  15. The future of fission-electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morowski, J.V.

    1983-06-01

    Future worldwide electricity supply needs dictate the necessity of maintaining a sound capability for electricity and electric power generating facilities, including nuclear, as viable export commodities. A survey of fission-power plant types and the status of worldwide nuclear electric power illustrates the primary emphasis on LWR's and HWR's as two leading types in the export market. This survey examines the factors affecting the market prospects for the next five to fifteen years and provides a discussion on some possible improvements to current market circumstances. A comparative description is provided for some of the types of LWR and CANDU characteristics such as quantities, schedules, constructability factors, and equipment and system. Important factors in the selection process for future nuclear power plants are discussed. Some factors included are seismic design requirements; plant design description and possible site layout; plant protection, control and instrumentation; thermal cycle design and arrangement; and special construction and rigging requirements

  16. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs

  17. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Fission fragment spins and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durell, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Prompt γ-ray coincidence experiments have been carried out on γ-rays emitted from post-neutron emission fission fragments produced by the aup 19F + 197 Au and 18 O + 232 Th reactions. Decay schemes have been established for even-even nuclei ranging from 78 Se to 148 Nd. Many new states with spin up to ∼ 12h have been observed. Apart from providing a wealth of new information on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, the data have been analyzed to determine the average spin of primary fission fragments as a function of fragment mass. The results suggest that the fragment spins are determined by the temperature and shape of the primary fragments at or near to scission

  19. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission γ-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T ∼ 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k red ∼ 0.45 ± 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  20. The fusion-fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    As the history of the development of fusion energy shows, a sustained controlled fusion reaction is much more difficult to produce than rapid uncontrolled release of fusion energy. Currently, the ''magnetic bottle'' technique shows sufficient progress that it might applied for the commercial fuel production of /sup 233/U, suitable for use in fission reactors, by developing a fusion-fission hybrid. Such a device would consist of a fusion chamber core surrounded by a region containing cladded uranium pellets cooled by helium, with lithium salts also present to produce tritium to refuel the fusion process. Successful development of this hybrid might be possible within 10 y, and would provide both experience and funds for further development of controlled fusion energy

  1. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  2. Theories of fission gas behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J W.C. [Companhia Brasileira de Tecnologia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Diretoria de Tecnologia e Desenvolvimento; Merckx, K R

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of the theoretical developments and experimental evidence that have helped to evolve current models used to describe the behavior of inert fission gases created during the irradiation of reactor fuel materials. The phenomena which are stressed relate primarily to steady state behavior of fuel elements but are also relevant to an understanding of transient behavior. The processes considered include gas atom solubility; gas atom diffusivity; bubble nucleation; and bubble growth by bubble coalescence.

  3. Fission tracks dating for obsidian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picon, C.

    1991-01-01

    Obsidian from South America are dated by fission tracks methods. Samples are irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a flux of 10 15 n/cm 2 . Results, corrected by 'Plateau' methods, are the following: obsidian from Bolivia: 4.14 x 10 6 yr., Ecuador: 8.79 x 10 5 yr., Colombia: 3.52 x 10 6 yr., Peru: 6.55 x 10 6 yr., Chile: 1.13 x 10 6 yr. (MMZ). 5 refs., 3 tabs

  4. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  5. The discovery of uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, P.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  6. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  7. Hafnium(IV) complexation with oxalate at variable temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, Mitchell T.; Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullmanm, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-08-01

    Appropriate management of fission products in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is crucial in developing advanced reprocessing schemes. The addition of aqueous phase complexing agents can prevent the co-extraction of these fission products. A solvent extraction technique was used to study the complexation of Hf(IV) - an analog to fission product Zr(IV) - with oxalate at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4} utilizing a {sup 175+181}Hf radiotracer. The mechanism of the solvent extraction system of 10{sup -5} M Hf(IV) in 1 M HClO{sub 4} to thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene demonstrated a 4{sup th}-power dependence in both TTA and H{sup +}, with Hf(TTA){sub 4} the only extractable species. The equilibrium constant for the extraction of Hf(TTA){sub 4} was determined to be log K{sub ex}=7.67±0.07 (25±1 C, 1 M HClO{sub 4}). The addition of oxalate to the aqueous phase decreased the distribution ratio, indicating aqueous Hf(IV)-oxalate complex formation. Polynomial fits to the distribution data identified the formation of Hf(ox){sup 2+} and Hf(ox){sub 2(aq)} and their stability constants were measured at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4}. van't Hoff analysis was used to calculate Δ{sub r}G, Δ{sub r}H, and Δ{sub r}S for these species. Stability constants were observed to increase at higher temperature, an indication that Hf(IV)-oxalate complexation is endothermic and driven by entropy.

  8. Reference and standard benchmark field consensus fission yields for U.S. reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, D.M.; Helmer, R.G.; Greenwood, R.C.; Rogers, J.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Popek, R.J.; Kellogg, L.S.; Lippincott, E.P.; Hansen, G.E.; Zimmer, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Measured fission product yields are reported for three benchmark neutron fields--the BIG-10 fast critical assembly at Los Alamos, the CFRMF fast neutron cavity at INEL, and the thermal column of the NBS Research Reactor. These measurements were carried out by participants in the Interlaboratory LMFBR Reaction Rates (ILRR) program. Fission product generation rates were determined by post-irradiation analysis of gamma-ray emission from fission activation foils. The gamma counting was performed by Ge(Li) spectrometry at INEL, ANL, and HEDL; the sample sent to INEL was also analyzed by NaI(Tl) spectrometry for Ba-140 content. The fission rates were determined by means of the NBS Double Fission Ionization Chamber using thin deposits of each of the fissionable isotopes. Four fissionable isotopes were included in the fast neutron field measurements; these were U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Np-237. Only U-235 was included in the thermal neutron yield measurements. For the fast neutron fields, consensus yields were determined for three fission product isotopes--Zr-95, Ru-103, and Ba-140. For these fission product isotopes, a separately activated foil was analyzed by each of the three gamma counting laboratories. The experimental standard deviation of the three independent results was typically +- 1.5%. For the thermal neutron field, a consensus value for the Cs-137 yield was also obtained. Subsidiary fission yields are also reported for other isotopes which were studied less intensively (usually by only one of the participating laboratories). Comparisons with EBR-II fast reactor yields from destructive analysis and with ENDF/B recommended values are given

  9. JEFF-3T. Decay data and fission yield libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersillon, O.; Blachot, J.; Dean, C.J.; Mills, R.W.; Nichols, A.L.; Nouri, A.

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive decay-data and fission-yield libraries provide important input to a wide range of nuclear physics codes for nuclear applications. A new initiative has begun under the auspices of the NEA/OECD to generate improved data sets that will constitute the JEFF-3 libraries in ENDF-6 format, primarily for nuclear power, fuel reprocessing and waste management needs. Various sources of decay data have been accessed in order to assemble these files: NUBASE, ENSDF, UKPADD-6 and UKHEDD-2. Efforts have also focused on the evaluation of decay data for a number of important short-lived fission products, so that artificial adjustments to some of the relevant decay data and fission yields are not required to accommodate a previous lack of such data. Fission yields were adopted from UK evaluations recently undertaken to create the UKFY3 library. Decay-data files for 3 755 nuclides have been prepared, including sets of data for the stable nuclides (i.e. mass, natural abundance, spin and parity). Problems in the assignment of ENDF material numbers were addressed, while format and consistency tests were made using CHECKR and FIZCON, respectively. The assembly processes are discussed and reviewed, and the contents of the JEFF-3T starter libraries are described. (author)

  10. Hybrid nuclear cycles for nuclear fission sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fission can play and must play an important role in paving the road to Energy Sustainability. Nuclear Fission does not produce CO 2 emissions, and it is already exploited at commercial level with the current NPP (Nuclear Power Plants). Most of them are based on LWR reactors, which have a very good safety record. It must be noted, however, that all LWR (including the advanced or evolutionary ones) have some drawbacks, particularly their very poor efficiency in exploiting the natural resources of nuclear fuels. In this paper, an analysis is presented on how to maximize the energy actually generated from the potential contents of fission natural resources. The role of fertile-to-fissile breeding is highlighted, as well as the need of attaining a very high safety performance in the reactors and other installations of the fuel cycle. The proposal presented in this paper is to use advanced and evolutionary LWR as energy producing reactors, and to use subcritical fast assemblies as breeders. The main result would be to increase by two orders of magnitude the percentage of energy effectively exploited from fission natural resources, while keeping a very high level of safety standards in the full fuel cycle. Breeders would not be intended for energy production, so that safety standards could rely on very low values of the thermal magnitudes, so allowing for very large safety margins for emergency cooling. Similarly, subcriticality would offer a very large margin for not to reach prompt criticality in any event. The main drawback of this proposal is that a sizeable fraction of the energy generated in the cycle (about 1/3, maybe a little more) would not be useful for the thermodynamic cycle to produce electricity. Besides that, a fraction of the generated electricity, between 5 and 10 %, would have to be recirculated to feed the accelerator activating the neutron source. Even so, the overall result would be very positive, because more than 50 % of the natural

  11. Studies on tin based inorganic ion exchangers for fission products separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, A.; Balasubramanian, K.R.; Murthy, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    Tin(IV) antimonate and hydrous tin(IV) oxide have been prepared and their characteristics are evaluated. A new method has been finalized for the separation of 95 Zr- 95 Nb from irradiated uranium using hydrous tin(IV) oxide. In this process, the irradiated sample is dissolved in concentrated HNO 3 , evaporated to near dryness and taken up in 0.5 M HNO 3 . The solution is passed over tin(IV) oxide column and the isotope eluted with 10 M HNO 3 . The product is obtained in pure nitrate form which is generally preferred for different applications. A method has been finalized for the separation of 106 Ru from fission product solution using tin(IV) antimonate. In this method fission product solution is adjusted to 2 M with respect to nitric acid, 137 Cs is separated on a column of ammonium phosphomolybdate, the effluent after adjustment of acidity to 0.2 M is then passed over a column of tin(IV) antimonate where the effluent contains pure 106 Ru. (author). 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Design considerations of fission and corrosion product in primary system of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Akagane, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    General influence of fission and corrosion products in primary system on MONJU plant design is reviewed. Various research and development works are now in progress to decrease the generation rate, to remove the products more effectively and to develop the methods of evaluation the behaviour of radioactive products. The inventory and distribution of fission and corrosion products in the primary circuit of MONJU are given. The radiation levels on the primary components are estimated to be several roentgens per hour. (author)

  13. K2 ZnSn3 Se8 : A Non-Centrosymmetric Zinc Selenidostannate(IV) Featuring Interesting Covalently Bonded [ZnSn3 Se8 ]2- Layer and Exhibiting Intriguing Second Harmonic Generation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Molin; Jiang, Xingxing; Yang, Yi; Guo, Yangwu; Lin, Zheshuai; Yao, JJiyong; Wu, Yicheng

    2017-06-19

    Non-centrosymmetric zinc selenidostannate(IV) K 2 ZnSn 3 Se 8 was synthesized. It features interesting covalently bonded [ZnSn 3 Se 8 ] 2- layers with K + cations filling in the interlayer voids. The phonon spectrum was calculated to clarify its structural stability. Based on the X-ray diffraction data along with the Raman spectrum, the major bonding features of the title compound were identified. According to the UV/vis-NIR spectroscopy, K 2 ZnSn 3 Se 8 possesses a typical direct band gap of 2.10 eV, which is in good agreement with the band structure calculations. Moreover, our experimental measurements and detailed theoretical calculations reveal that K 2 ZnSn 3 Se 8 is a new phase-matchable nonlinear optical material with a powder second harmonic generation (SHG) signal about 0.6 times of that of AgGaS 2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Device for measuring fission product density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Mitsunori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the fission product density of xenon or the like and enable measurement of real time of fission product density in a reactor by calculating the disintegration and annihilation of the fission product on the basis of neutron detected output. Constitution: The neutron flux in a reactor is detected by a detector, and applied to first and second density calculators. Second fission product density signal of xenon or the like outputted from first device is again inputted to the device to form an annihilation signal due to disintegration to determine the present density of the second fission product of xenon or the like corresponding to the decrease of the neutron due to the poison of xeron or the like. Similarly, second device determines the first fission product density of iodine or the like. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. The resonance neutron fission on heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopach, Yu.N.; Popov, A.B.; Furman, V.I.; Alfimenkov, V.P.; Lason', L.; Pikel'ner, L.B.; ); Gonin, N.N.; Kozlovskij, L.K.; Tambovtsev, D.I.; Gagarskij, A.M.; Petrov, G.A.; Sokolov, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to the description of the fission, similar to the well-known reaction theory and based on the helicity representation for the exit fission channels, is briefly summarized. This approach allows one to connect the multimodal fission representation with A. Bohr's concept of the fission transition states and to obtain formulae for the partial and differential fission cross sections. The formulae are used for analysis of the angular anisotropy of fragments in the neutron resonance induced fission of aligned 235 U nuclei and of the P-even angular forward-backward and right-left correlations of fragments oe the P-odd correlations caused by the interference of s- and p-wave neutron resonances [ru

  16. Fission product release modelling for application of fuel-failure monitoring and detection - An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.J., E-mail: lewibre@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, K7K 7B4 (Canada); Chan, P.K.; El-Jaby, A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, K7K 7B4 (Canada); Iglesias, F.C.; Fitchett, A. [Candesco Division of Kinectrics Inc., 26 Wellington Street East, 3rd Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5E 1S2 (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    A review of fission product release theory is presented in support of fuel-failure monitoring analysis for the characterization and location of defective fuel. This work is used to describe: (i) the development of the steady-state Visual-DETECT code for coolant activity analysis to characterize failures in the core and the amount of tramp uranium; (ii) a generalization of this model in the STAR code for prediction of the time-dependent release of iodine and noble gas fission products to the coolant during reactor start-up, steady-state, shutdown, and bundle-shifting manoeuvres; (iii) an extension of the model to account for the release of fission products that are delayed-neutron precursors for assessment of fuel-failure location; and (iv) a simplification of the steady-state model to assess the methodology proposed by WANO for a fuel reliability indicator for water-cooled reactors.

  17. Status of recent fast capture cross section evaluations for important fission product nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison is made between recent evaluations of fission-product cross sections as given in the CNEN/CEA, ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/V-V, JENDL-1, RCN-2 and RCN-3 data libraries. The intercomparison is restricted to 24 important fission products in a fast power reactor. The evaluation methods used to obtain the various data files are reviewed and possible shortcomings are indicated. A survey is given of the experimental data based used in the various evaluations. Some graphs are included showing the new ENDF/B-V and RCN-3 fastcapture cross-section evaluations. Further intercomparisons are made by means of multi-group and one-group cross sections. It is shown that lumped fission-product cross sections calculated from the most recent versions of the data files are in quite good agreement with each other. This review concludes with a discussion on observed discrepancies and requests for new measurements. 78 references

  18. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  19. Fission-energy release for 16 fissioning nuclides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, R.

    1981-03-01

    Results are presented of a least-squares evaluation of the components of energy release per fission in 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu. For completeness, older (1978) results based on systematics are presented for these and ten other isotopes of interest. There have been recent indications that the delayed energy components may be somewhat higher than those used previously, but the LSQ results do not seem to change significantly when modest (approx. 1 MeV) increases in the total delayed energy are included in the inputs. Additional measurements of most of the energy components are still needed to resolve remaining discrepancies

  20. What do we learn on the dynamics of fission from α-accompanied fission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.; Asghar, M.; Nifenecker, H.; Perrin, P.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the angular distribution of α-particles emitted by thermal fission of 236 U are presented. Also the dependence of the angular distribution on the kinetic energy of the fission products is studied. (WL) [de