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Sample records for generate in-flight turns

  1. Fruit flies modulate passive wing pitching to generate in-flight turns

    CERN Document Server

    Bergou, Attila J; Guckenheimer, John; Cohen, Itai; Wang, Z Jane

    2009-01-01

    Flying insects execute aerial maneuvers through subtle manipulations of their wing motions. Here, we measure the free flight kinematics of fruit flies and determine how they modulate their wing pitching to induce sharp turns. By analyzing the torques these insects exert to pitch their wings, we infer that the wing hinge acts as a torsional spring that passively resists the wing's tendency to flip in response to aerodynamic and inertial forces. To turn, the insects asymmetrically change the spring rest angles to generate rowing motions of their wings. Thus, insects can generate these maneuvers using only a slight active actuation that biases their wing motion.

  2. Strategy in Generative Planning of Turning Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Kals, H.J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the process and operations planning system ROUND and the strategies which underlie the decision making processes in the planning of turning operations. At first, an outline is given about the environment for which generative systems like ROUND are being developed. The

  3. Strategy in Generative Planning of Turning Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.; Kals, H.J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the process and operations planning system ROUND and the strategies which underlie the decision making processes in the planning of turning operations. At first, an outline is given about the environment for which generative systems like ROUND are being developed. The differenc

  4. Strategy in Generative Planning of Turning Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Kals, H.J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the process and operations planning system ROUND and the strategies which underlie the decision making processes in the planning of turning operations. At first, an outline is given about the environment for which generative systems like ROUND are being developed. The differenc

  5. Turning tryptophanase into odor-generating biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaqin; Zhang, Zhuyuan; Ali, M Monsur; Sauder, Joanna; Deng, Xudong; Giang, Karen; Aguirre, Sergio D; Pelton, Robert; Li, Yingfu; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2014-03-01

    An odor-based sensor system that exploits the metabolic enzyme tryptophanase (TPase) as the key component is reported. This enzyme is able to convert an odorless substrate like S-methyl-L-cysteine or L-tryptophan into the odorous products methyl mercaptan or indole. To make a biosensor, TPase was biotinylated so that it could be coupled with a molecular recognition element, such as an antibody, to develop an ELISA-like assay. This method was used for the detection of an antibody present in nM concentrations by the human nose. TPase can also be combined with the enzyme pyridoxal kinase (PKase) for use in a coupled assay to detect adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). When ATP is present in the low μM concentration range, the coupled enzymatic system generates an odor that is easily detectable by the human nose. Biotinylated TPase can be combined with various biotin-labeled molecular recognition elements, thereby enabling a broad range of applications for this odor-based reporting system.

  6. Density of Plutonium Turnings Generated from Machining Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, John Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vigil, Duane M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jachimowski, Thomas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arellano, Gerald Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Melton, Vince Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The purpose of this project was to determine the density of plutonium (Pu) turnings generated from the range of machining activities, using both surrogate material and machined Pu turnings. Verify that 500 grams (g) of plutonium will fit in a one quart container using a surrogate equivalent volume and that 100 grams of Pu will fit in a one quart Savy container.

  7. TRAJECTORY GENERATION AND CONTROL FOR NON-CIRCULAR CNC TURNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Simin; YAN Han; WANG Xiankui

    2008-01-01

    A trajectory generation method which is based on NURBS interpolation is studied to improve the fitting accuracy and smoothness of non-circular cross section and obtain higher accuracy of the final non-circular profile control. After using the NURBS, the most optimized and smooth trajectory for the linear actuator can be obtained. For the purpose of machining the non-circular cross section by CNC turning, the fast response linear actuator has been used. The control algorithm which is compound control of proportional-integral-differential (PID) and iterative learning control has been developed for non-circular profile generation. By using the NURBS interpolation and the compound control of PID and iterative learning control, the final motion accuracy of linear actuator has been improved, therefore, the machining accuracy of the non-circular turning can be improved.

  8. Generation of deep eddies by a turning baroclinic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutyrin, Georgi

    2015-07-01

    The North Atlantic Current (NAC) travels northward east of the Grand Banks until approximately 50°N where it makes a sharp turn to the east. Previous analysis of sea level variability in this region, known as the Northwest Corner, showed large-amplitude meandering and a quasi-regular production of anticyclonic eddies playing an important role in the air-sea heat exchange. Here we investigate key physical mechanisms of meandering of an idealized upper ocean turning jet using a two-layer model. The existing reduced-gravity thin jet theory is modified to take into account the crossjet velocity in the lower layer induced by the jet meanders. Such coupled system is capable to describe realistically baroclinic instability and to reduce the two-dimensional initial value problem to a rather simple one-dimensional formulation. Its linearized version is solved here to describe the fluid motion in both layers in terms of jet curvature. It is found that transient meander growth is enhanced in the vicinity of turning point owing to vertical coupling with deep eddies generated due to stretching in water column beneath growing meanders. Scaling for initial growth of deep cyclone-anticyclone pair is suggested based on a generalized thin jet theory. Patterns of further nonlinear evolution resembling observational data are described.

  9. Collision free path generation in 3D with turning and pitch radius constraints for aerial vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, F.; La Cour-Harbo, A.; Bisgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    assumes that most of the aircraft structural and dynamic limitations can be formulated as a turn radius constraint, and that any two consecutive waypoints have line-of-sight. The generated trajectories are collision free and also satisfy a constraint on the minimum admissible turning radius, while...

  10. Full-turn symplectic map from a generator in a Fourier-spline basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S.; Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Forest, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Given an arbitrary symplectic tracking code, one can construct a full-turn symplectic map that approximates the result of the code to high accuracy. The map is defined implicitly by a mixed-variable generating function. The implicit definition is no great drawback in practice, thanks to an efficient use of Newton`s method to solve for the explicit map at each iteration. The generator is represented by a Fourier series in angle variables, with coefficients given as B-spline functions of action variables. It is constructed by using results of single-turn tracking from many initial conditions. The method has been appliedto a realistic model of the SSC in three degrees of freedom. Orbits can be mapped symplectically for 10{sup 7} turns on an IBM RS6000 model 320 workstation, in a run of about one day.

  11. Spectral turning bands for efficient Gaussian random fields generation on GPUs and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, L.; Cosenza, B.; Kimeswenger, S.; Fahringer, T.

    2015-11-01

    A random field (RF) is a set of correlated random variables associated with different spatial locations. RF generation algorithms are of crucial importance for many scientific areas, such as astrophysics, geostatistics, computer graphics, and many others. Current approaches commonly make use of 3D fast Fourier transform (FFT), which does not scale well for RF bigger than the available memory; they are also limited to regular rectilinear meshes. We introduce random field generation with the turning band method (RAFT), an RF generation algorithm based on the turning band method that is optimized for massively parallel hardware such as GPUs and accelerators. Our algorithm replaces the 3D FFT with a lower-order, one-dimensional FFT followed by a projection step and is further optimized with loop unrolling and blocking. RAFT can easily generate RF on non-regular (non-uniform) meshes and efficiently produce fields with mesh sizes bigger than the available device memory by using a streaming, out-of-core approach. Our algorithm generates RF with the correct statistical behavior and is tested on a variety of modern hardware, such as NVIDIA Tesla, AMD FirePro and Intel Phi. RAFT is faster than the traditional methods on regular meshes and has been successfully applied to two real case scenarios: planetary nebulae and cosmological simulations.

  12. From Enumerating to Generating: A Linear Time Algorithm for Generating 2D Lattice Paths with a Given Number of Turns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Kuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a linear time algorithm, called G2DLP, for generating 2D lattice L(n1, n2 paths, equivalent to two-item  multiset permutations, with a given number of turns. The usage of turn has three meanings: in the context of multiset permutations, it means that two consecutive elements of a permutation belong to two different items; in lattice path enumerations, it means that the path changes its direction, either from eastward to northward or from northward to eastward; in open shop scheduling, it means that we transfer a job from one type of machine to another. The strategy of G2DLP is divide-and-combine; the division is based on the enumeration results of a previous study and is achieved by aid of an integer partition algorithm and a multiset permutation algorithm; the combination is accomplished by a concatenation algorithm that constructs the paths we require. The advantage of G2DLP is twofold. First, it is optimal in the sense that it directly generates all feasible paths without visiting an infeasible one. Second, it can generate all paths in any specified order of turns, for example, a decreasing order or an increasing order. In practice, two applications, scheduling and cryptography, are discussed.

  13. In-flight lift and drag measurements on a first generation jet transport equipped with winglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    A KC-135A aircraft equipped with wing tip winglets was flight tested to demonstrate and validate the potential performance gain of the winglet concept as predicted from analytical and wind tunnel data. Flight data were obtained at cruise conditions for Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.75, and 0.80 at a nominal altitude of 36,000 ft. and winglet configurations of 15 deg cant/-4 deg incidence, 0 deg cant/-4 deg incidence, and baseline. For the Mach numbers tested the data show that the addition of winglets did not affect the lifting characteristics of the wing. However, both winglet configurations showed a drag reduction over the baseline configuration, with the best winglet configuration being the 15 deg cant/-4 deg incidence configuration. This drag reduction due to winglets also increased with increasing lift coefficient. It was also shown that a small difference exists between the 15 deg cant/-4 deg incidence flight and wind tunnel predicted data. This difference was attributed to the pillowing of the winglet skins in flight which would decrease the winglet performance.

  14. Role of turn-over in active stress generation in a filament network

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of turnover of cross linkers, motors and filaments on the generation of a contractile stress in a network of filaments connected by passive crosslinkers and subjected to the forces exerted by molecular motors. We perform numerical simulations where filaments are treated as rigid rods and molecular motors move fast compared to the timescale of exchange of crosslinkers. We show that molecular motors create a contractile stress above a critical number of crosslinkers. When passive crosslinkers are allowed to turn over, the stress exerted by the network vanishes, due to the formation of clusters. When both filaments and passive crosslinkers turn over, clustering is prevented and the network reaches a dynamic contractile steady-state. A maximum stress is reached for an optimum ratio of the filament and crosslinker turnover rates.

  15. Quantification of wing and body kinematics in connection to torque generation during damselfly yaw turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyghami, Samane; Bode-Oke, Ayodeji T.; Dong, HaiBo

    2017-01-01

    This study provides accurate measurements of the wing and body kinematics of three different species of damselflies in free yaw turn flights. The yaw turn is characterized by a short acceleration phase which is immediately followed by an elongated deceleration phase. Most of the heading change takes place during the latter stage of the flight. Our observations showed that yaw turns are executed via drastic rather than subtle changes in the kinematics of all four wings. The motion of the inner and outer wings were found to be strongly linked through their orientation as well as their velocities with the inner wings moving faster than the outer wings. By controlling the pitch angle and wing velocity, a damselfly adjusts the angle of attack. The wing angle of attack exerted the strongest influence on the yaw torque, followed by the flapping and deviation velocities of the wings. Moreover, no evidence of active generation of counter torque was found in the flight data implying that deceleration and stopping of the maneuver is dominated by passive damping. The systematic analysis carried out on the free flight data advances our understanding of the mechanisms by which these insects achieve their observed maneuverability. In addition, the inspiration drawn from this study can be employed in the design of low frequency flapping wing micro air vehicles (MAV's).

  16. Educating the Next Generation of Leading Scientists: Turning Ideas into Action

    CERN Document Server

    Wood-Vasey, Michael; Blair, William; Borne, Kirk; Clampin, Mark; Gatley, Ian; Graf, Paul; Ivezic, Zeljko; Magnier, Eugene; Mather, John; Stubbs, Christopher; Schweitzer, Andrea; Spadafora, Tony; Stahl, Phil; Tyson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The core of scientific research is turning new ideas into reality. From the school science fair to the search for the secrets of dark energy, high-quality research consists of scientific investigation constrained within the scope of a well-defined project. Large or small, generously funded or just scraping by,scientific projects use time, money, and information to turn ideas into plans, plans into action, and action into results. While we, as a community, do much to educate students in the techniques of research, we do not systematically train students in the nature and organization of scientific projects or in the techniques of project management. We propose a two-pronged attack to address this issue in the next decade. First, to generate a broad base of future scientists who have a basic familiarity with the ideas of projects, we propose that the community develop standards for the content of a project design and management course in astronomy and astrophysics. Second, to train future scientists to assume l...

  17. Generation of vertical angular momentum in single, double, and triple-turn pirouette en dehors in ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jemin; Wilson, Margaret A; Singhal, Kunal; Gamblin, Sarah; Suh, Cha-Young; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical angular momentum generation strategies used by skilled ballet dancers in pirouette en dehors. Select kinematic parameters of the pirouette preparation (stance depth, vertical center-of-mass motion range, initial shoulder line position, shoulder line angular displacement, and maximum trunk twist angle) along with vertical angular momentum parameters during the turn (maximum momentums of the whole body and body parts, and duration and rate of generation) were obtained from nine skilled collegiate ballet dancers through a three-dimensional motion analysis and compared among three turn conditions (single, double, and triple). A one-way ('turn') multivariate analysis of variance of the kinematic parameters and angular momentum parameters of the whole body and a two-way analysis of variance ('turn' × 'body') of the maximum angular momentums of the body parts were conducted. Significant 'turn' effects were observed in the kinematic/angular momentum parameters (both the preparation and the turn) (p <  0.05). As the number of turns increased, skilled dancers generated larger vertical angular momentums by predominantly increasing the rate of momentum generation using rotation of the upper trunk and arms. The trail (closing) arm showed the largest contribution to whole-body angular momentum followed by the lead arm.

  18. Effects of Vortex Generator Jet on Corner Separation/Stall in High-Turning Compressor Cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华坪; 李得英; 陈焕龙; 张东飞

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the vortex generator jet(VGJ)attached at the endwall on the corner separation/stall con-trol are investigated by numerical simulation in a high-turning linear compressor cascade. The results show that the corner separation could be reduced significantly, which results in a wider operation range as well as a more uniform exit flow angle and total pressure profile. At the near-stall operation point, the maximum relative reduction of the total pressure loss is up to 32.5%,, whereas the jet mass ratio is less than 0.4%,. Based on the analysis of the detailed flow structure, three principal effects of the VGJ on the endwall cross flow and corner separation are identified. One is to increase the tangential velocity component opposite to cross flow, thus inhibiting the endwall secondary flow near the jet exit. The second is to suppress the pitchwise extension of the passage vortex as an air fence. The third is to sweep the low energy fluids towards the mainstream on the up-washed side and to transport the mainstream flu-ids to the endwall to reenergize the boundary layer on the down-washed side.

  19. Turning point revisited: launching the next generation of performance management in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Julia W; Beitsch, Leslie M; Beaudry, Margaret L; Corso, Liza C; Estes, Larissa J; Bialek, Ron G

    2014-01-01

    A decade ago, the Turning Point Performance Management Excellence Collaborative (Turning Point) developed the first public health-specific performance management (PM) system, with accompanying resource materials, assisted by the Public Health Foundation. Since then, dramatic advancements in PM and quality improvement activities have occurred in public health. Public Health Foundation gathered data that revealed Turning Point was still relevant but difficult to implement within public health. To reflect recent advances and current challenges, Public Health Foundation refreshed the Turning Point model and related guidance tools and developed new resources to facilitate PM implementation. In addition, a new fifth component, "Visible Leadership," was added to the 4-quadrant model and the Self-Assessment Tool. In the future, public health organizations should take an active leadership role in innovating and sustaining PM systems, ensuring they become accountable for producing outcomes, leveraging technology advances, and incorporating best practices from all stakeholders.

  20. Numerical simulation of dispersion generated by a 180°turn in a microchannel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhao-Hui(姚朝晖); G.L.Yoder; C.T.Culbertson; J.M.Ramsey

    2002-01-01

    A numerical scheme is developed to simulate electro-osmotic flow and mass transport in a microchannel which includes a 180° turn. The model has been used to predict the behaviour of electro-osmotically driven flows. The detailed structure of the flow field in a microchannel in combination with species mass diffusion can explain the concentration dispersion introduced by a 180° turn. The results of our simulations agree both qualitatively and quantitatively observation.It is demonstrated that an improved electro-osmotic force model could simulate the with experimental electrokinetically driven flow well without making detailed calculations of the electric charge density distribution within the electrical double layer. Additionally, because this model applies forces to the liquid as opposed to imposing local velocities, it should also be appropriate for use where pressure gradients exist in the flow field.

  1. Discursive turns from 'Bildung' to managerialism: Memory-work of the Finnish adult education generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Filander

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the struggles over ethos in academic adult education tradition that grows from the frameworks of student generations in Finnish adult education. It brings together elements of present-day analysis and historically sensitizing memory data on generations of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. My interest here lies in how the rhetoric of lifelong learning and education has revised the basic assumptions of adult education. The data suggest that the dominant narrative of adult education is increasingly the discourse of marketization. Finnish present-day student generations seem to have lost their intrinsic connections with the Scandinavian traditions of popular enlightenment and the values of equality and basic logics enabling 'second chances' for all adult citizens within the Nordic welfare state. One of the results of the analysis was the following question: Should we reinvent adult education again from the standpoint of sustainable development of 'ordinary people'?

  2. Collision free path generation in 3D with turning and pitch radius constraints for aerial vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, F.; La Cour-Harbo, A.; Bisgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    allowing faster flight if appropriate. The work has been carried out with reference to the Bergen Industrial Twin helicopter and the 3D path planner from the Autonomous Vehicle Group at Aalborg University. Simulation results for the trajectory generation are presented, which are obtained using a detailed...

  3. The turn angle gauge of generating type with an element on surface acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepikh Ya. I.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of intellectualized angle of rotation sensor with an element on the surface acoustic waves (SAW development are presented. The generating type sensor block diagram, in which the element on SAW plays a role of the appropriate line of a delay is described. The sensor basic characteristics are given and the area of its application are shown.

  4. Clean Power Generation from the Intractable Natural Coalfield Fires: Turn Harm into Benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bobo; Su, Hetao; Li, Jinshi; Qi, Haining; Zhou, Fubao; Torero, José L; Chen, Zhongwei

    2017-07-13

    The coal fires, a global catastrophe for hundreds of years, have been proved extremely difficult to control, and hit almost every coal-bearing area globally. Meanwhile, underground coal fires contain tremendous reservoir of geothermal energy. Approximately one billion tons of coal burns underground annually in the world, which could generate ~1000 GW per annum. A game-changing approach, environmentally sound thermal energy extraction from the intractable natural coalfield fires, is being developed by utilizing the waste energy and reducing the temperature of coalfield fires at the same time. Based on the Seebeck effect of thermoelectric materials, the temperature difference between the heat medium and cooling medium was employed to directly convert thermal energy into clean electrical energy. By the time of December 2016, the power generation from a single borehole at Daquan Lake fire district in Xinjiang has been exceeded 174.6 W. The field trial demonstrates that it is possible to exploit and utilize the waste heat resources in the treated coal fire areas. It promises a significant impact on the structure of global energy generation and can also promote progress in thermoelectric conversion materials, geothermal exploration, underground coal fires control and other energy related areas.

  5. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. I. Anticipatory compensation for self-generated coriolis and interaction torques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2003-01-01

    rotation, the finger movement generally occurred entirely during the trunk movement, indicating that the CNS did not minimize Coriolis forces incumbent on trunk rotation by sequencing the arm and trunk motions into a turn followed by a reach. A simplified model of the arm/trunk system revealed that additional interaction torques generated on the arm during voluntary turning and reaching were equivalent to Coriolis forces as small as 0.2 g greatly deflect movement trajectories and endpoints. We conclude that compensatory motor innervations are engaged in a predictive fashion to counteract impending self-generated interaction torques during voluntary reaching movements.

  6. Interaction of Lamb mode (A(o)) with structural discontinuity and generation of "Turning modes" in a T-joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadas, C; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Joshi, M; Krishnamurthy, C V

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the interaction of the fundamental anti-symmetric guided Lamb mode (A(o)) with a structural discontinuity in a composite structure was studied through Finite Element numerical simulations and experiments. The structural component selected for this study was a T-joint section made from glass/epoxy material. This co-cured composite structure is made-up of an upper shell (skin) and a spar as the sub-components. It was observed that when A(o) mode interacts with the junction (structural discontinuity) of these sub-components, a mode-converted S(o) mode is generated. Experiments were conducted using air-coupled ultrasound to validate the numerical simulations. The back-propagating "Turning modes", which propagate from the thin region to the spar web and vice versa, were also numerically simulated and experimentally verified.

  7. An all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator based on fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer and anti-resonance network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Yang, Jianhua; Cheng, Xinbing; Pan, Zilong

    2017-03-01

    High voltage pulse generators are widely applied in a number of fields. Defense and industrial applications stimulated intense interests in the area of pulsed power technology towards the system with high power, high repetition rate, solid state characteristics, and compact structure. An all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator based on a fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer and anti-resonance network is proposed in this paper. This generator consists of a charging system, a step-up system, and a modulating system. In this generator, the fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer is the key component since it acts as a step-up transformer and a main switch during the working process. Demonstrative experiments show that if the primary storage capacitors are charged to 400 V, a quasi-square pulse with amplitude of about 29 kV can be achieved on a 3500 Ω resistive load, as well as the pulse duration (full width at half maximum) of about 1.3 μs. Preliminary repetition rate experiments are also carried out, which indicate that this pulse generator could work stably with the repetition rates of 30 Hz and 50 Hz. It can be concluded that this kind of all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator can not only lower both the operating voltage of the primary windings and the saturable inductance of the secondary windings, thus ideally realizing the magnetic switch function of the fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer, but also achieve a quasi-square pulse with high quality and fixed flat top after the modulation of a two-section anti-resonance network. This generator can be applied in areas of large power microwave sources, sterilization, disinfection, and wastewater treatment.

  8. An all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator based on fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer and anti-resonance network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Yang, Jianhua; Cheng, Xinbing; Pan, Zilong

    2017-03-01

    High voltage pulse generators are widely applied in a number of fields. Defense and industrial applications stimulated intense interests in the area of pulsed power technology towards the system with high power, high repetition rate, solid state characteristics, and compact structure. An all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator based on a fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer and anti-resonance network is proposed in this paper. This generator consists of a charging system, a step-up system, and a modulating system. In this generator, the fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer is the key component since it acts as a step-up transformer and a main switch during the working process. Demonstrative experiments show that if the primary storage capacitors are charged to 400 V, a quasi-square pulse with amplitude of about 29 kV can be achieved on a 3500 Ω resistive load, as well as the pulse duration (full width at half maximum) of about 1.3 μs. Preliminary repetition rate experiments are also carried out, which indicate that this pulse generator could work stably with the repetition rates of 30 Hz and 50 Hz. It can be concluded that this kind of all-solid-state microsecond-range quasi-square pulse generator can not only lower both the operating voltage of the primary windings and the saturable inductance of the secondary windings, thus ideally realizing the magnetic switch function of the fractional-turn ratio saturable pulse transformer, but also achieve a quasi-square pulse with high quality and fixed flat top after the modulation of a two-section anti-resonance network. This generator can be applied in areas of large power microwave sources, sterilization, disinfection, and wastewater treatment.

  9. Taking Turns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  10. How coastal surges may be generated by mesoscale atmospheric disturbances that in turn are related to propagating convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlic, M.; Belusic, D.; Janekovic, I.; Pasaric, M.

    2010-09-01

    On the morning of 21 June 1978, exceptional sea-level oscillations with a trough-to-crest height of 6 m and a period of 10-20 min were observed in Vela Luka Bay. Slightly less pronounced variability was observed in a wider Middle and South Adriatic east coastal area and, with some delay, along the west coast. In the presentation, one of the original hypotheses put forward to interpret the event, relating it to a mesoscale air-pressure disturbance, is reconsidered by using all the available data as well as state-of-the-art meteorological and oceanographic models. A fresh look at the meteorological data confirms that the atmospheric disturbance propagated at about 22 m/s in a northeastward direction. Additionally, the data suggest that it had the shape of the boxcar function characterized by an air-pressure offset of 3 mbar and duration of 10 min. The meteorological model employed (WRF-ARW) proves unable to reproduce the mesoscale disturbance coinciding with the surge, but it shows that the background atmospheric conditions were favorable for the development of convective systems and therefore also for the formation of mesoscale disturbances. The oceanographic model ADCIRC-2DDI, forced by the described air-pressure disturbance, successfully reproduces sea-level variability in Vela Luka Bay reaching a few meters and thus surpassing the inverted barometer response by two orders of magnitude. The enhancement appears to be due to a four-phase process. The model also suggests that the scattering due to the variable bathymetry and the reflection from the east Adriatic coast resulted in waves that returned towards the west coast and generated considerable sea-level activity there. Similar surges that were observed in the Adriatic more recently (Stari Grad and Mali Ston, 2003; Ist, 2007; Mali Losinj, 2008; Stari Grad, 2010) are also mentioned and the dynamics revealed is used as the basis for a brief discussion of terminology appropriate for such processes.

  11. Tight Turns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer Sutherland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plain text was task-oriented in a roundabout way, providing detailed instructions for how NOT to build an elaborate sequence of bridges, each one bound to produce, according to chapters one through twenty-three, disastrous results. Graphic novels disguised as illuminated letters twisted the tent-dwelling decipherer into painful self-recognition. The flashlight followed the phases of the moon. Meanwhile one strand of marginalia, written in anxious back-slant, pleaded for some kind of adjustable form for managing the confluence, especially during flood season. I like what we came up with. 'We' is a little big word. In fact the tent turns out to be one of those Borgesian core-tech structures allowing for astonishing internal expansion. There's not much we didn't get in there and not much in there that didn't get us. So I suppose that's it. This tent. This confluence. These children who found me here, turned text into life and made life home.

  12. Turned on/turned off

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eva Bendix

    2016-01-01

    position, it attempts to sense into the lived experience of being subject to, and of, turns in social theory. As a whole the paper seeks to work with and allow for multiplicity in tone, focus, researcher positioning, reader positioning, and more, to see what knowledge that does not seek confident closure......Through cacophonic story-telling, emerging from ethnographic observations from academic scenes in Australia and elsewhere, the article seeks to explore the timeliness and untimeliness of feminist knowledge production. Rather than arguing a particular point or making a claim for a particular...

  13. DAST in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone with Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1), a supercritical airfoil, during a 1980 research flight. The remotely-piloted vehicle, which was air launched from NASA's NB-52B mothership, participated in the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program which ran from 1977 to 1983. The DAST 1 aircraft (Serial #72-1557), pictured, crashed on 12 June 1980 after its right wing ripped off during a test flight near Cuddeback Dry Lake, California. The crash occurred on the modified drone's third free flight. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of

  14. Fast Calculation Model and Theoretical Analysis of Rotor Unbalanced Magnetic Pull for Inter-Turn Short Circuit of Field Windings of Non-Salient Pole Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangtao Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Inter-turn short circuit of field windings (ISCFW may cause the field current of a generator to increase, output reactive power to decrease, and unit vibration to intensify, seriously affecting its safe and stable operation. Full integration of mechanical and electrical characteristics can improve the sensitivity of online monitoring, and detect the early embryonic period fault of small turns. This paper studies the calculations and variations of unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP, of which the excitation source of rotor vibration is the basis and key to online fault monitoring. In grid load operation, ISCFW are first calculated with the multi-loop method, so as to obtain the numerical solutions of the stator and the rotor currents during the fault. Next, the air-gap magnetic field of the ISCFW is analyzed according to the actual composition modes of the motor loops in the fault, so as to obtain the analytic expressions of the air-gap magnetic motive force (MMF and magnetic density. The UMP of the rotor is obtained by solving the integral of the Maxwell stress. The correctness of the electric quantity calculation is verified by the ISCFW experiment, conducted in a one pair-pole non-salient pole model machine. On this basis, comparing the simulation analysis with the calculation results of the model in this paper not only verifies the accuracy of the electromagnetic force calculation, but also proves that the latter has the advantages of a short time consumption and high efficiency. Finally, the influencing factors and variation law of UMP are analyzed by means of an analytic model. This develops a base for the online monitoring of ISCFW with the integration of mechanical and electrical information.

  15. Spatial Orientation in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    cone cells, the bipolar and horizontal cells that comprise the intraretinal afferent pathway from the rods and cones, and the multipolar Fanglion cells...axons that synapse with the dendiites .,r cell bodies of the multipolar ganglion cells, whose axons in turn course parallel to the retinal surface and...area. Sect.nil ,,er neurons from the lateral geniculate body comprise the 14 geniculocalcarine tract, which becomes the optic radiation and terminates in

  16. X-1 in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-1 (#46-062) in flight. The shock wave pattern in the exhaust plume is visible. The X-1 series aircraft were air-launched from a modified Boeing B-29 or a B-50 Superfortress bombers. The X-1-1 was painted a bright orange by Bell Aircraft. It was thought that the aircraft would be more visable to those doing the tracking during a flight. When NACA received the airplanes they were painted white, which was an easier color to find in the skies over Muroc Air Field in California. This particular craft was nicknamed 'Glamorous Glennis' by Chuck Yeager in honor of his wife, and is now on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all

  17. Turning in a Bipedal Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jau-Ching Lu; Jing-Yi Chen; Pei-Chun Lin

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of turning behavior on a child-size bipedal robot that addresses two common scenarios:turning in place and simultaneous walking and turning.About turning in place,three strategies are investigated and compared,including body-first,leg-first,and body/leg-simultaneous.These three strategies are used for three actions,respectively:when walking follows turning immediately,when space behind the robot is very tight,and when a large turning angle is desired.Concerning simultaneous walking and turning,the linear inverted pendulum is used as the motion model in the single-leg support phase,and the polynomial-based trajectory is used as the motion model in the double-leg support phase and for smooth motion connectivity to motions in a priori and a posteriori single-leg support phases.Compared to the trajectory generation of ordinary walking,that of simultaneous walking and turning introduces only two extra parameters:one for determining new heading direction and the other for smoothing the Center of Mass (COM) trajectory.The trajectory design methodology is validated in both simulation and experimental environments,and successful robot behavior confirms the effectiveness of the strategy.

  18. Nematode Chemotaxis: Gradual Turns, Sharp Turns, and Modulated Turn Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amar; Padmanabhan, Venkat; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-03-01

    We examine strategies used by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans for chemotaxis in complex environments. The proposed description is based on our recently developed piecewise-harmonic-curvature model of nematode locomotion [PLoS ONE, 7(7) e40121 (2012)], where random harmonic-curvature modes represent elementary locomotory movements. We show that the previously described gradual-turn and sharp-turn chemotaxis strategies can be unified in our model. The gradual-turn mechanism relies on crawling amplitude changes commensurate with the undulation frequency. The sharp-turn mechanism consists in modulation of the frequency of jumps to large-amplitude modes. We hypothesize that there exists a third strategy, where the nematode adjusts the variance of the amplitude distribution. Such adjustments result in a modulation of the magnitude of random turns, with smaller turns performed when the nematode moves toward the increasing chemoatractant concentration. Experiments are proposed to determine if the third strategy is present in the nematode behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant No. CBET 1059745.

  19. Turning towards History: Turning towards Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2004-01-01

    Turning towards history--to be contrasted with turning away from history--captures the Marxian sense of education. Marx worked out the elements of a theory of political education in relation to history by equating education with the coincidence of the changing of circumstances and people. This theory received its most comprehensive yet succinct…

  20. In-flight Medical Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Chandra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research and data regarding in-flight medical emergencies during commercial air travel are lacking. Although volunteer medical professionals are often called upon to assist, there are no guidelines or best practices to guide their actions. This paper reviews the literature quantifying and categorizing in-flight medical incidents, discusses the unique challenges posed by the in-flight environment, evaluates the legal aspects of volunteering to provide care, and suggests an approach to managing specific conditions at 30,000 feet.Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search using search terms relevant to aviation medical emergencies and flight physiology. The reference lists of selected articles were reviewed to identify additional studies.Results: While incidence studies were limited by data availability, syncope, gastrointestinal upset, and respiratory complaints were among the most common medical events reported. Chest pain and cardiovascular events were commonly associated with flight diversion.Conclusion: When in-flight medical emergencies occur, volunteer physicians should have knowledge about the most common in-flight medical incidents, know what is available in on-board emergency medical kits, coordinate their therapy with the flight crew and remote resources, and provide care within their scope of practice. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:499–504.

  1. In-Flight System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed and studied whereby the system identification cycle consisting of experiment design and data analysis can be repeatedly implemented aboard a test aircraft in real time. This adaptive in-flight system identification scheme has many advantages, including increased flight test efficiency, adaptability to dynamic characteristics that are imperfectly known a priori, in-flight improvement of data quality through iterative input design, and immediate feedback of the quality of flight test results. The technique uses equation error in the frequency domain with a recursive Fourier transform for the real time data analysis, and simple design methods employing square wave input forms to design the test inputs in flight. Simulation examples are used to demonstrate that the technique produces increasingly accurate model parameter estimates resulting from sequentially designed and implemented flight test maneuvers. The method has reasonable computational requirements, and could be implemented aboard an aircraft in real time.

  2. The Translator's Turn: in the Cultural Turn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐玮玮

    2003-01-01

    @@ Introduction: Douglas Robinson rose to the defense of the " atheoretical" American literary translator in The Translator's Turn (1991). Here, I borrowed the title from him, but I will write my paper in the thought of the translator's role in translating. In his book, Robinson argued that the literary translator embodies an integration of feeling and thought, of intuition and systematization. In analyzing the " turn" that the translator take from the source text to the target text, Robinson offered a " dialogical" model, that is the translator's dialogical engagement with the source language and with the ethic of the target language. Robinson allows for the translator to intervene, subvert, divert, even entertain, emphasizing the creative aspect of literary translation. The translation linguists, scientists, and philosophers have had their chance at translation theory; now it is time, he argued, for the literary translators to have their " turn".

  3. Formational Turning Points in the Transition to College: Understanding How Communication Events Shape First-Generation Students' Pedagogical and Interpersonal Relationships with Their College Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiffany R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, I explored student-teacher interaction, student-teacher relationship formation and development, and the ways in which student-teacher interaction and relationships facilitated support and persistence for first-generation (FG) students during the transition to college. Using transition theory as a sensitizing framework, I took…

  4. Formational Relational Turning Points in the Transition to College: Understanding How Communication Events Shape First-Generation Students' Relationships with Their College Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiffany Rose

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore teacher-student interaction, teacher-student relationship formation and development, and the ways in which teacher-student interaction and relationships facilitated support and ultimately persistence to graduation for first-generation students in the transition to college. In this study I sought to…

  5. Slow light in flight imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Kali; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow-light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single photon avalanche diode camera-array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapour. Light-in-flight imaging of slow light propagation enables direct visualisation of a series of physical effects including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  6. The Digital Turn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Westera, W. (2013, 22 May). The Digital Turn. How the internet transforms our existence. Invited presentation at the symposium "Onderwijsvernieuwen in crisistijd", Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit.

  7. Review Essay: Turn, Turn, Turn Around—Till Categories Blur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Allolio-Näcke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available I begin this review by introducing the book and discussing its manifest content chapter by chapter (see 2.1, focusing particularly on the author's argumentation concerning the development of new orientations in cultural studies and on how, in relation to the turns discussed, the names of the researchers and central categories involved are collected. In a second step, I give a close reading of the book's latent content, which I consider to be more important (see 2.2. In this context I discuss several questions of scientific politics—especially the issue of hegemonic claims. Thirdly, I read the book from the critical standpoint of a psychologist, a sociologist and a theologian and show the shortcomings of BACHMANN-MEDICK's outsider perspective on these disciplines. In this regard I read the book again and provide a critique of the quality of the author's scientific performance (see 3. Finally, I state the reasons I do not recommend reading this book (see 4. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801266

  8. Wind Corrections in Flight Path Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Selecký

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available When operating autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs in real environments it is necessary to deal with the effects of wind that causes the aircraft to drift in a certain direction. In such conditions it is hard or even impossible for UAVs with a bounded turning rate to follow certain trajectories. We designed a method based on an Accelerated A* algorithm that allows the trajectory planner to take the wind effects into account and to generate states that are reachable by UAV. This method was tested on hardware UAV and the reachability of its generated trajectories was compared to the trajectories computed by the original Accelerated A*.

  9. Wind Corrections in Flight Path Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Selecký

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract When operating autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs in real environments it is necessary to deal with the effects of wind that causes the aircraft to drift in a certain direction. In such conditions it is hard or even impossible for UAVs with a bounded turning rate to follow certain trajectories. We designed a method based on an Accelerated A* algorithm that allows the trajectory planner to take the wind effects into account and to generate states that are reachable by UAV. This method was tested on hardware UAV and the reachability of its generated trajectories was compared to the trajectories computed by the original Accelerated A*.

  10. The Local Turn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Carol; Visser, Leontine

    2016-01-01

    The local turn in good governance theory and practice responded to critiques of the ineffectiveness of state management and the inequity of privatization alternatives in natural resource management. Confounding expectations of greater effectiveness from decentralised governance, including communi

  11. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  12. Wind tunnel studies of turns by flying dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D E

    1986-05-01

    High-speed movies of dragonflies turning in flight on flexible tethers show that there are two distinct modes of turning. In the 'conventional' mode, dragonflies use left-right asymmetries in the wing stroke amplitude, and occasionally in the angle of attack, to produce more lift and thrust on one side than the other. This causes the animal to roll into a bank, so that the lift vector has a sideward component; this sideward component produces the turn, much as in an airplane. This type of turn is probably most useful during fast forward flight. The second mode of turning in the 'yaw turn'. Yaw turns are accomplished without banking, and the dragonfly's long axis may turn more than 90 degrees in the period of two wing strokes. The kinematics of this turn could not be as closely analysed, but it appears that dragonflies use drag on the inner wing upstroke and the outer wing downstroke to turn, much like pivoting a rowing boat. This turn may be hampered by drag on the abdomen during fast forward flight and would be most useful at low speeds or during hovering.

  13. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Tyson J G; Segre, Paolo S; Middleton, Kevin M; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-03-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left-right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius.

  14. Turning Marrow into Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In unexpected testimony2 to the versatility3 of the body's cells,researchers have found they can make bone marrow cells turn into muscle, causing mice with muscular dystrophy4 to produce correctly working muscle cells. The experiment suggests that a form of bone marrow transplant- - a well established surgical procedure5- - could in principle treat patients with a variety of diseases.

  15. In-Flight Armature Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Cates, Michael R [ORNL; Goedeke, Shawn [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    A feasibility demonstration is reported for a method of determining instantaneous temperature and velocity of an armature in flight. Instantaneous diagnostics such as this could be critical for achieving further improvements in railgun operation. Such activity has the potential to enable design enhancements by providing information on the state of the armature and its relationship to the rail as it proceeds down the bore. The method exploits the temperature dependence of fluorescence from a phosphor coating applied to the armature. The demonstration used both a very small-scale portable railgun and a small-scale benchtop railgun. For these tests, the output of a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser is delivered by optical fiber through an access port drilled into the insulator between the rails. As the armature passes, the UV light illuminates a small area of phosphor on the armature. The phosphor fluoresces and decays at a rate dependent on the temperature of the phosphor. A second optical fiber in close proximity collects the fluorescence and conveys it to a detector and associated data acquisition system. Temperature is determined from a measurement of the decay time. To provide for velocity measurement on the small-scale railgun, light from a red diode laser, delivered by fiber probe inserted into the bore, produced distinctive reflections at the leading and trailing edges of the armature as it passed. Also, two grooves cut into the armature produced fiducial pulses that enabled velocity measurement.

  16. Without Turning A Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立

    2003-01-01

    [英语对话] A:You see,our happiness depends on other people,and theirs depends on us, too. B:I know the philosophy.but in practice many things do not work that way. A:You don’t care?What about when people are trying to enrage you? B:I remain as what I am without turning a hair,of course.[对话译文

  17. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  18. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuan, J.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Xirgu, X.; Araujo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Grimani, C.; Puigdengoles, C.; Wass, P.; García-Berro, E.; García, S.; Martínez, L. M.; Montero, G.

    2006-11-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least during the commissioning phase, the latter will be used to identify feed-through coefficients between diagnostics sensor readings and associated actual noise contributions. A brief progress report of the current state of development of the diagnostics subsystem will be given as well.

  19. In-flight Diagnostics in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Conchillo, A; Ortega, J A; Xirgu, X; Araujo, H; Boatella, C; Chmeissani, M; Grimani, C; Puigdengoles, C; Wass, P; García-Berro, E; García, S; Martínez, L; Montero, G; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Conchillo, Aleix; Ortega, Jose Antonio; Xirgu, Xevi; Araujo, Henrique; Boatella, Cesar; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Grimani, Catia; Puigdengoles, Carles; Wass, Peter; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Garcia, Sergi; Martinez, Lluis; Montero, Gustau

    2007-01-01

    LISA PathFinder (LPF) will be flown with the objective to test in space key technologies for LISA. However its sensitivity goals are, for good reason, one order of magnitude less than those which LISA will have to meet, both in drag-free and optical metrology requirements, and in the observation frequency band. While the expected success of LPF will of course be of itself a major step forward to LISA, one might not forget that a further improvement by an order of magnitude in performance will still be needed. Clues for the last leap are to be derived from proper disentanglement of the various sources of noise which contribute to the total noise, as measured in flight during the PathFinder mission. This paper describes the principles, workings and requirements of one of the key tools to serve the above objective: the diagnostics subsystem. This consists in sets of temperature, magnetic field, and particle counter sensors, together with generators of controlled thermal and magnetic perturbations. At least durin...

  20. Toward Direct Reaction-in-Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmy, Jerry; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Gooden, Matthew; Hayes, Anna; Rusev, Gencho; Caggiano, Joseph; Hatarik, Robert; Henry, Eugene; Tonchev, Anton; Yeaman, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Krishi; Tornow, Werner

    2016-03-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutrons having energies greater than the equilibrium 14.1 MeV value can be produced via Reaction-in-Flight (RIF) interactions between plasma atoms and upscattered D or T ions. The yield and spectrum of these RIF produced neutrons carry information on the plasma properties as well as information on the stopping power of ions under plasma conditions. At NIF the yield of these RIF neutrons is predicted to be 4-7 orders of magnitude below the peak 14 MeV neutron yield. The current generation of neutron time of flight (nTOF) instrumentation has so far been incapable of detecting these low-yield neutrons primarily due to high photon backgrounds. To date, information on RIF neutrons has been obtained in integral activation experiments using reactions with high energy thresholds such as 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm and 209Bi(n,4n) 206Bi. Initial experiments to selectively suppress photon backgrounds have been performed at TUNL using pulsed monoenergetic neutron beams of 14.9, 18.5, 24.2, and 28.5 MeV impinging on a Bibenzyl scintillator. By placing 5 cm of Pb before the scintillator we were able to selectively suppress the photons from the flash occurring at the production target and enhance the n/_signal by ~6 times.

  1. Do benzodiazepines mimic reverse-turn structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Marshall, Garland R.

    2006-05-01

    The role of benzodiazepine derivatives (BZD) as a privileged scaffold that mimics β-turn structures (Ripka et al. (1993) Tetrahedron 49:3593-3608) in peptide/protein recognition was reexamined in detail. Stable BZD ring conformers were determined with MM3, and experimental reverse-turn structures were extracted from the basis set of protein crystal structures previously defined by Ripka et al. Ideal β-turns were also modeled and similarly compared with BZD conformers. Huge numbers of conformers were generated by systematically scanning the torsional degrees of freedom for BZDs, as well as those of ideal β-turns for comparison. Using these structures, conformers of BZDs were fit to experimental structures as suggested by Ripka et al., or modeled classical β-turn conformers, and the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values were calculated for each pairwise comparison. Pairs of conformers with the smallest RMSD values for overlap of the four α-β side-chain orientations were selected. All overlaps of BZD conformers with experimental β-turns yielded one or more comparisons where the least RMSD was significantly small, 0.48-0.86 Å, as previously suggested. Utilizing a different methodology, the overall conclusion that benzodiazepines could serve as reverse-turn mimetics of Ripka et al. is justified. The least RMSD values for the overlap of BZDs and modeled classical β-turns were also less than 1 Å. When comparing BZDs with experimental or classical β-turns, the set of experimental β-turns selected by Ripka et al. fit the BZD scaffolds better than modeled classical β-turns; however, all the experimental β-turns did not fit a particular BZD scaffold better. A single BZD ring conformation, and/or chiral orientation, can mimic some, but not all, of the experimental β-turn structures. BZD has two central ring conformations and one chiral center that explains why the four variations of the BZD scaffold can mimic all types of β-turn structure examined. It was

  2. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals...... is not to accumulate state or market wealth, but for entrepreneurial skills to become tools towards the liberation of the individual from oppressive systems of control – essentially to add public value rather than economic value. In this presentation I will sketch an anarchist perspective on entrepreneurship, looking...

  3. Virtual turning points

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Naofumi; Takei, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a virtual turning point truly is a breakthrough in WKB analysis of higher order differential equations. This monograph expounds the core part of its theory together with its application to the analysis of higher order Painlevé equations of the Noumi–Yamada type and to the analysis of non-adiabatic transition probability problems in three levels. As M.V. Fedoryuk once lamented, global asymptotic analysis of higher order differential equations had been thought to be impossible to construct. In 1982, however, H.L. Berk, W.M. Nevins, and K.V. Roberts published a remarkable paper in the Journal of Mathematical Physics indicating that the traditional Stokes geometry cannot globally describe the Stokes phenomena of solutions of higher order equations; a new Stokes curve is necessary.

  4. Fermilab turns 50! Congratulations!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    This year Fermilab turns 50 and the celebrations are ongoing. The ties between CERN and Fermilab are numerous and have been ranging from competition between two labs at the forefront of their field, e.g. with the chase of the top quark, finally discovered by Fermilab, to outright collaboration, e.g. on LHC low-beta quadrupole magnet development and production and in the CMS collaboration. In June, in the name of the CERN staff and scientific community, the CERN Staff Association sent a message to the Fermilab staff and scientific community, through Dr. Nigel Lockyer, Fermilab Director. The letter, and the assurance from Nigel Lockyer that the message has been passed onto the Fermilab community can be found on our website. Congratulations to Fermilab on its fiftieth Anniversary, and to the staff and collaborators who made this laboratory through their hard work, dedication and vision!

  5. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has discovered a quasar the brightly-shining, active nucleus of a galaxy abruptly turning on in what appears to be the fastest such transition ever seen in such an object.A Rapid TransitionQuasars are expected to show variations in brightness on timescales of hours to millions of years, but its not often that we get to study their major variability in real time! So far, weve discovered only a dozen changing-look quasars active galactic nuclei that exhibit major changes in their spectral class and brightness between observations. Roughly half of these were quasars that turned on and half were quasars that turned off, generally on timescales of maybe 5 or 10 years.The dramatic change in spectrum of iPTF 16bco between the archival SDSS data from 2004 (bottom) and the follow-up spectroscopy from Keck 2+DEIMOS in 2016 (top). [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]In June 2016, however, a team of scientists led by Suvi Gezari (University of Maryland) discovered iPTF 16bco, a nuclear transient that wasnt there the last time Palomar checked in 2012. A search through archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX data in addition to some follow-up X-ray imaging and spectroscopic observations told the team what they needed to know: iPTF 16bco is a quasar that only just turned on within the 500 days preceding the iPTF observations.This source, in fact, is a 100-million-solar-mass black hole located at the center of a galaxy at a redshift of z= 0.237. In just over a year, the source changed classification from a galaxy with weak narrow-line emission to a quasar with characteristic strong, broad emission lines and a ten-fold increase in continuum brightness! What caused this sudden transition?Instabilities at Fault?iPTF 16bco and the other known changing-look quasars with disappearing (red circles) and appearing (blue circles) broad-line emission. [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]Gezari and collaborators used the large number of recent

  6. The Affective Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alí Lara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade studies on affect and emotions have become relevant in the social sciences. This is not just a fad guideline, but instead a simultaneous reader of public life changes and subjective experience, from which it is also being transformed the knowledge production. Such a trend has been known as ‘The Affective Turn’ within the Anglophone Academy. Here we will translate it as ‘El Giro Afectivo’. This turn, so far, has not dabbled in the social science literature that is written in Spanish. This paper draws on a singular panorama of discussions about contemporary social studies of affect and emotion, and it’s vertebrate by some of its expressions in the contemporary academy.

  7. White Layer of Hard Turned Surface by Sharp CBN Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-ping; SONG He-chuan; C.Richard Liu

    2005-01-01

    White layers in hard turned surfaces were identified and measured as a function of turning parameters based on the Taguchi method. It reveals that white layers generate on the machine surface in the absence of tool flank wear, and white layer depth varies with the different combinations of hard turning parameters. Turning speed has the most important impact on white layer depth, feed rate follows, and cutting depth at last. The white layer generation consequently suggests a strong couple relation to the heat generation and thermal process of hard turning operation. White layer disappears under an optimal combination of turning parameters by Taguchi method. It suggests that a superior surface integrity without white layer is feasible under some selected combinations of turning parameters by a sharp CBN cutting tool.

  8. Clock-turning gait synthesis for humanoid robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe TANG; Zengqi SUN; Hongbo LIU; Meng Joo ER

    2007-01-01

    Turning gait is a basic motion for humanoid robots.This paper presents a method for humanoid turning.i.e.clock-turning.The objective of clock-turning is to change robot direction at a stationary spot.The clock-turning planning consists of four steps:ankle trajectory generation,hip trajectory generation,knee trajectory generation,and inverse kinematics calculation.Our proposed method is based on a typical humanoid structure with 12 DOFs(degrees of freedom).The final output of clock-turning planning is 12 reference trajectories.which are used to control a humanoid robot wim 12 DOFs.ZMP(zero moment point)is used as stability criterion for the planning.Simulation experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness of our proposed clock-turning method.

  9. Turn by Turn Measurements at the KEK-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Renier, Y; Tomas, R; Wendt, M; Eddy, N; Kubo, K; Kuroda, S; Naito, T; Okugi, T; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2013-01-01

    The ATF damping ring has been upgraded with new read-out electronics for the beam position monitors (BPM), capable to acquire the beam orbits on a turn-by-turn basis, as well as in a high resolution averaging mode. The new BPM system allows to improve optic corrections and to achieve an even smaller vertical emittance (<2pm). Experimental results are presented based on turn-by-turn beam orbit measurements in the ring, for estimating the β functions and dispersion along the lattice. A fast method to measure spectral line amplitude in a few turns is also presented, including the evaluation of chromaticity.

  10. Do Someolle a Good Turn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程炜

    2000-01-01

    "You've done a number of favors for me," Brewster said,"so allow me to do you a good turn. Let me take you out to lunch today." Slightly dizzy, Brewster's friend agreed. He hadn't expected Brewster to do him a good turn. To do someone a good turn is to do something nice or helpful for someone.

  11. Turning to the wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, B.

    1981-10-01

    Consideration is given the economic and technological aspects of both free-stream (horizontal-axis) and cross-wind (vertical-axis) wind energy conversion systems, with attention to operational devices ranging in rotor diameter from 10 to 40 m and in output from 22 to 630 kW. After a historical survey of wind turbine design and applications development, the near-term technical feasibility and economic attractiveness of combined wind/fossil-fueled generator and wind/hydroelectric systems are assessed. Also presented are estimates of wind energy potential extraction in the U.S. and Denmark, the industrial requirements of large-scale implementation, energy storage possibilities such as pumped hydro and flywheels, and cost comparisons of electrical generation by large and small wind systems, coal-fired plants, and light-water fission reactors.

  12. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  13. Phase Coherence Zones in Flight Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonik, P.M.; Valente Pais, A.R.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2011-01-01

    In flight simulation detailed knowledge of human motion perception is crucial. Phase differences between inertial and visual motion introduced by motion filters might have negative effects on the fidelity of flight simulation. This study investigated human visual- vestibular phase-error detection. A

  14. Research on an Intelligent Automatic Turning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichong Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Equipment manufacturing industry is the strategic industries of a country. And its core part is the CNC machine tool. Therefore, enhancing the independent research of relevant technology of CNC machine, especially the open CNC system, is of great significance. This paper presented some key techniques of an Intelligent Automatic Turning System and gave a viable solution for system integration. First of all, the integrated system architecture and the flexible and efficient workflow for perfoming the intelligent automatic turning process is illustrated. Secondly, the innovated methods of the workpiece feature recognition and expression and process planning of the NC machining are put forward. Thirdly, the cutting tool auto-selection and the cutting parameter optimization solution are generated with a integrated inference of rule-based reasoning and case-based reasoning. Finally, the actual machining case based on the developed intelligent automatic turning system proved the presented solutions are valid, practical and efficient.

  15. Turning the page

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This year will see some fundamental changes at the Annals – changes that are aimed at both enhancing and maintaining its appeal across the broad range of surgical specialties. In this respect, there have already been some important refinements to the structure of the Editorial board. The Annals will now have representatives on its panel from the diapason of subspecialties. It is hoped that this will ensure an equitable apportionment of high-quality original research, review articles and case reports from across the surgical spectrum. It represents the single most tangible adjustment to the structure of the Annals in a generation and one of which I am sure Sir Cecil Wakeley would have approved. I would like to take this opportunity to formally welcome our new board members and invite them to join with our other long-term stalwarts into what is a uniquely collegiate editorial team. As many of our fellows and members will already be aware, there has been a significant shift made over the last few months in the handling of research contributions to the Annals. In recent weeks we have completed the transition to our new submissions portal and it is encouraging that reviewers and authors alike have commended it in equal measure. While we are sadly not in a position to accept much of the material submitted to the journal (we currently accept only one tenth of all the articles subjected to peer review) we can at least aim to improve and enhance the experience for all those involved. In many ways this digital migration is a precursor to a number of innovations that will fundamentally transform the way in which we produce the Annals, the most significant of which is the launch of our new digital platform this month. These innovations signal a gradual move away from the printed version as the principal conduit by which the Annals is distributed. Inevitably, there will be those who will lament the passing of this hitherto more familiar and tactile media and so measures are

  16. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  17. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    OpenAIRE

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.

    2012-01-01

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement r...

  18. Optimal Covering Tours with Turn Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Arkin, Esther M.; Bender, Michael A.; Demaine, Erik D.; Fekete, Sandor P.; Mitchell, Joseph S.B.; Sethia, Saurabh

    2003-01-01

    We give the first algorithmic study of a class of ``covering tour'' problems related to the geometric Traveling Salesman Problem: Find a polygonal tour for a cutter so that it sweeps out a specified region (``pocket''), in order to minimize a cost that depends mainly on the number of em turns. These problems arise naturally in manufacturing applications of computational geometry to automatic tool path generation and automatic inspection systems, as well as arc routing (``postman'') problems w...

  19. Paresev in flight with pilot Milt Thompson

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    This movie clip runs 37 seconds in length and begins with a shot from the chase plane of NASA Dryden test pilot Milt Thompson at the controls of the Paresev, then the onboard view from the pilot's seat and finally bringing the Paresev in for a landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB. The Paresev (Paraglider Rescue Vehicle) was an indirect outgrowth of kite-parachute studies by NACA Langley engineer Francis M. Rogallo. In early 1960's the 'Rogallo wing' seemed an excellent means of returning a spacecraft to Earth. The delta wing design was patented by Mr. Rogallo. In May 1961, Robert R. Gilruth, director of the NASA Space Task Group, requested studies of an inflatable Rogallo-type 'Parawing' for spacecraft. Several companies responded; North American Aviation, Downey, California, produced the most acceptable concept and development was contracted to that company. In November 1961 NASA Headquarters launched a paraglider development program, with Langley doing wind tunnel studies and the NASA Flight Research Center supporting the North American test program. The North American concept was a capsule-type vehicle with a stowed 'parawing' that could be deployed and controlled from within for a landing more like an airplane instead of a 'splash down' in the ocean. The logistics became enormous and the price exorbitant, plus NASA pilots and engineers felt some baseline experience like building a vehicle and flying a Parawing should be accomplished first. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) was used to gain in-flight experience with four different membranes (wings), and was not used to develop the more complicated inflatable deployment system. The Paresev was designed by Charles Richard, of the Flight Research Center Vehicle and System Dynamics Branch, with the rest of the team being: engineers, Richard Klein, Gary Layton, John Orahood, and Joe Wilson; from the Maintenance and Manufacturing Branch: Frank Fedor, LeRoy Barto; Victor Horton as Project Manager, with

  20. Paresev in flight with pilot Milt Thompson

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    This movie clip runs 37 seconds in length and begins with a shot from the chase plane of NASA Dryden test pilot Milt Thompson at the controls of the Paresev, then the onboard view from the pilot's seat and finally bringing the Paresev in for a landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB. The Paresev (Paraglider Rescue Vehicle) was an indirect outgrowth of kite-parachute studies by NACA Langley engineer Francis M. Rogallo. In early 1960's the 'Rogallo wing' seemed an excellent means of returning a spacecraft to Earth. The delta wing design was patented by Mr. Rogallo. In May 1961, Robert R. Gilruth, director of the NASA Space Task Group, requested studies of an inflatable Rogallo-type 'Parawing' for spacecraft. Several companies responded; North American Aviation, Downey, California, produced the most acceptable concept and development was contracted to that company. In November 1961 NASA Headquarters launched a paraglider development program, with Langley doing wind tunnel studies and the NASA Flight Research Center supporting the North American test program. The North American concept was a capsule-type vehicle with a stowed 'parawing' that could be deployed and controlled from within for a landing more like an airplane instead of a 'splash down' in the ocean. The logistics became enormous and the price exorbitant, plus NASA pilots and engineers felt some baseline experience like building a vehicle and flying a Parawing should be accomplished first. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) was used to gain in-flight experience with four different membranes (wings), and was not used to develop the more complicated inflatable deployment system. The Paresev was designed by Charles Richard, of the Flight Research Center Vehicle and System Dynamics Branch, with the rest of the team being: engineers, Richard Klein, Gary Layton, John Orahood, and Joe Wilson; from the Maintenance and Manufacturing Branch: Frank Fedor, LeRoy Barto; Victor Horton as Project Manager, with

  1. Characteristics of Five Propellers in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Mixson, R E

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was made for the purpose of determining the characteristics of five full-scale propellers in flight. The equipment consisted of five propellers in conjunction with a VE-7 airplane and a Wright E-2 engine. The propellers were of the same diameter and aspect ratio. Four of them differed uniformly in thickness and pitch and the fifth propeller was identical with one of the other four with exception of a change of the airfoil section. The propeller efficiencies measured in flight are found to be consistently lower than those obtained in model tests. It is probable that this is mainly a result of the higher tip speeds used in the full-scale tests. The results show also that because of differences in propeller deflections it is difficult to obtain accurate comparisons of propeller characteristics. From this it is concluded that for accurate comparisons it is necessary to know the propeller pitch angles under actual operating conditions. (author)

  2. Quenching of the Deuteron in Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the Lorentz contraction of a deuteron in flight. Our starting point is the Blankenbecler-Sugar projection of the Bethe-Salpeter equation to a 3-dimensional quasi potential equation, wqhich we apply for the deuteron bound in an harmonic oscillator potential (for an analytical result) and by the Bonn NN potential for a more realistic estimate. We find substantial quenching with increasing external momenta and a significant modification of the high momentum spectrum of the deuteron.

  3. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography: turns and amplitude analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statham, Melissa McCarty; Rosen, Clark A; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D; Munin, Michael C

    2010-10-01

    Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is primarily a qualitative examination, with no standardized approach to interpretation. The objectives of our study were to establish quantitative norms for motor unit recruitment in controls and to compare with interference pattern analysis in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (VFP). Retrospective case-control study We performed LEMG of the thyroarytenoid-lateral cricoarytenoid muscle complex (TA-LCA) in 21 controls and 16 patients with unilateral VFP. Our standardized protocol used a concentric needle electrode with subjects performing variable force TA-LCA contraction. To quantify the interference pattern density, we measured turns and mean amplitude per turn for ≥10 epochs (each 500 milliseconds). Logarithmic regression analysis between amplitude and turns was used to calculate slope and intercept. Standard deviation was calculated to further define the confidence interval, enabling generation of a linear-scale graphical "cloud" of activity containing ≥90% of data points for controls and patients. Median age of controls and patients was similar (50.7 vs. 48.5 years). In controls, TA-LCA amplitude with variable contraction ranged from 145-1112 μV, and regression analysis comparing mean amplitude per turn to root-mean-square amplitude demonstrated high correlation (R = 0.82). In controls performing variable contraction, median turns per second was significantly higher compared to patients (450 vs. 290, P = .002). We first present interference pattern analysis in the TA-LCA in healthy adults and patients with unilateral VFP. Our findings indicate that motor unit recruitment can be quantitatively measured within the TA-LCA. Additionally, patients with unilateral VFP had significantly reduced turns when compared with controls.

  4. Turning Points: Priorities for Teacher Education in a Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Rosalie M.

    2009-01-01

    Every generation has its moment, some turning point that will mark its place in the historical record. Such points provide the direction of our history and our future. Turning points are, characteristically, times of turmoil based on a fundamental change in models or events--what Thomas Kuhn called a "paradigm shift." In terms of a democratic…

  5. Reactive In-flight Multisensor Security System (RIMSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for in-flight event detection and monitoring systems is clear. To address this and other safety and security needs, IEM proposed the Reactive In-flight...

  6. Turning around Newton's Second Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual and quantitative difficulties surrounding Newton's second law often arise among introductory physics students. Simply turning around how one expresses Newton's second law may assist students in their understanding of a deceptively simple-looking equation.

  7. Determining Geometric Accuracy in Turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong; Chi; Kit; A; Geddam

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical components machined to high levels of ac cu racy are vital to achieve various functional requirements in engineering product s. In particular, the geometric accuracy of turned components play an important role in determining the form, fit and function of mechanical assembly requiremen ts. The geometric accuracy requirements of turned components are usually specifi ed in terms of roundness, straightness, cylindricity and concentricity. In pract ice, the accuracy specifications achievable are infl...

  8. Ontological turns, turnoffs and roundabouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    There has been much talk of an 'ontological turn' in Science and Technology Studies. This commentary explores some recent work on multiple and historical ontologies, especially articles published in this journal, against a background of constructivism. It can be tempting to read an ontological turn as based and promoting a version of perspectivism, but that is inadequate to the scholarly work and opens multiple ontologies to serious criticisms. Instead, we should read our ontological turn or turns as being about multiplicities of practices and the ways in which these practices shape the material world. Ontologies arise out of practices through which people engage with things; the practices are fundamental and the ontologies derivative. The purchase in this move comes from the elucidating power of the verbs that scholars use to analyze relations of practices and objects--which turn out to be specific cases of constructivist verbs. The difference between this ontological turn and constructivist work in Science and Technology Studies appears to be a matter of emphases found useful for different purposes.

  9. What 'empirical turn in bioethics'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Samia

    2010-10-01

    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the 'empirical turn' in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand 'empirical turn'. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a 'turn'. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative reasoning is the usual meaning given to the term 'empirical turn'. In this sense, however, the turn is incomplete. Bioethics has imported methodological tools from empirical disciplines, but too often it has not imported the standards to which researchers in these disciplines are held. Integrating empirical and normative approaches also represents true added difficulties. Addressing these issues from the standpoint of debates on the fact-value distinction can cloud very real methodological concerns by displacing the debate to a level of abstraction where they need not be apparent. Ideally, empirical research in bioethics should meet standards for empirical and normative validity similar to those used in the source disciplines for these methods, and articulate these aspects clearly and appropriately. More modestly, criteria to ensure that none of these standards are completely left aside would improve the quality of empirical bioethics research and partly clear the air of critiques addressing its theoretical justification, when its rigour in the particularly difficult context of interdisciplinarity is what should be at stake.

  10. Advanced in-flight measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Nicholas; Jentink, Henk; Kompenhans, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The book presents a synopsis of the main results achieved during the 3 year EU-project "Advanced Inflight Measurement Techniques (AIM)" which applied advanced image based measurement techniques to industrial flight testing. The book is intended to be not only an overview on the AIM activities but also a guide on the application of advanced optical measurement techniques for future flight testing. Furthermore it is a useful guide for engineers in the field of experimental methods and flight testing who face the challenge of a future requirement for the development of highly accurate non-intrusive in-flight measurement techniques.

  11. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Boeddeker

    Full Text Available Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns ("saccades" are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees' head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves.

  12. Turn the Resolutions into Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Can you remember each New Year's resolutions you made at the beginning of a year? Did you make good on them or did you forget about them by June? Here are 6 tips that will help you turn those resolutions into reality.

  13. The Physics of Ski Turns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonle, John I.; Nordick, Douglas L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the application of basic dynamics of rotations to the case of turning on skis, first without and then with external torques. Various elements are combined in different techniques and suggestions for further extensions and a list of laboratory exercises based on skiing are included. (DF)

  14. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  15. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  16. The Philosophy of Turning Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses the concept of turning points from the ontological, epistemological, and methodological perspectives, applying it to the de-internationalization phenomenon to exemplify its deployment. As a concept that adds to the variance and complexity of the international b...

  17. Turning points in climate change adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Elisabeth. Werners

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Concerned decision makers increasingly pose questions as to whether current management practices are able to cope with climate change and increased climate variability. This signifies a shift in the framing of climate change from asking what its potential impacts are to asking whether it induces policy failure and unacceptable change. In this paper, we explore the background, feasibility, and consequences of this new framing. We focus on the specific situation in which a social-political threshold of concern is likely to be exceeded as a result of climate change, requiring consideration of alternative strategies. Action is imperative when such a situation is conceivable, and at this point climate change becomes particularly relevant to decision makers. We call this situation an "adaptation turning point." The assessment of adaptation turning points converts uncertainty surrounding the extent of a climate impact into a time range over which it is likely that specific thresholds will be exceeded. This can then be used to take adaptive action. Despite the difficulty in identifying adaptation turning points and the relative newness of the approach, experience so far suggests that the assessment generates a meaningful dialogue between stakeholders and scientists. Discussion revolves around the amount of change that is acceptable; how likely it is that unacceptable, or more favorable, conditions will be reached; and the adaptation pathways that need to be considered under these circumstances. Defining and renegotiating policy objectives under climate change are important topics in the governance of adaptation.

  18. HLS Turn-By-Turn System and Its Application

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jun H; Liu, Jian H; Liu, Zu-ping; Sun Bao Gen; Yang Yong Li; Zheng, Kai

    2005-01-01

    Design and experimental application of the turn-by-turn system of Hefei Light Source (HLS) are presented in this paper. The front-end signal measurement adopts a log-ratio electronics circuitry. The system is designed to be capable of up to 2 seconds data acquisition. Injection kickers are used to excite beam for monitoring ß oscillation and damping rate. Some of experimental applications are also illustrated, in commission of both the upgraded injection system of HLS and the lower frequency feedback system. The results shows that in order to improve the accumulation of the injected beam, it is very necessary to investigate integral magnet fields equilibrium of injected system and proper measures to control restrain remnants ß-oscillation caused by the injected system error.

  19. In-flight AHS MTF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallefont-Robinet, Françoise; Fontanilles, Guillaume; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    The disposal of couples of images of the same landscape acquired with two spatial resolutions gives the opportunity to assess the in-flight Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the lower resolution sensor in the common spectral bands. For each couple, the higher resolution image stands for the landscape so that the ratio of the spectra obtained by FFT of the two images, gives the lower resolution sensor MTF. This paper begins with a brief recall of the method including the aliasing correction. The next step presents the data to be processed, provided by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). The model of the AHS MTF is described. The presentation of the corresponding AHS results naturally follows. Last part of the paper consists in a comparison with other measurements: measurements obtained with the edge method and laboratory measurements.

  20. Opposed turns at signalized intersections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akcelik, R.

    1989-06-01

    The 1985 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) brought the U.S. and Australian methodologies for signalized intersections closer together. An important element in this methodology is the techniques used for the estimation of opposed (permissive) turn saturation flows. Although the basic modeling philosophies of the HCM and Australian methods are similar, there are significant differences in the procedures used and therefore in the results from the two methods. In particular, the latest methodology employed in the SIDRA software has eliminated the use of opposed turn adjustment factors for lane groups and adopted an explicit and direct method of modeling individual lanes. The purpose of this paper is to bring these new methods to the attention of the U.S. researchers since it is understood that efforts are being made to improve the 1985 HCM method.

  1. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  2. In-flight spectrometers status and new developments

    CERN Document Server

    Geissel, H; Weick, H

    2002-01-01

    In-flight spectrometers have been successfully used for the investigation of exotic nuclei from low energies near the Coulomb barrier up to the A GeV regime. The in-flight method takes advantage of the reaction kinematics to efficiently separate short-lived nuclei at the limits of stability down to a sensitivity of single atoms. Modern in-flight separators are combined with high-resolution devices such as electromagnetic spectrometers, storage-cooler rings, and ion traps. Atomic interaction in matter is a versatile tool to tailor the phase space of nuclear reaction products for efficient separation in flight.

  3. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  4. Turning points in reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  5. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  6. Machine-tool control system for turning nonaxisymmetric surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, S.S.; Green, W.L.

    1979-09-01

    A development program has been initiated to allow on-axis turning of nonaxisymmetric surfaces. A short-travel high-speed slide is mounted on a precision, numerically controlled, two-axis turning machine. The motion of the auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle and the two remaining slides. The report defines the workpiece geometry and requirements, calculations for the slide motion, techniques for real-time command generation, and planned equipment set.

  7. 3D surface topography formation in ultra-precision turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽伟; 董申; 程凯

    2004-01-01

    The generation process of 3 D surface topography in ultra-precision turning is analyzed, as the result of superimposing between actual roughness surface, waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface. From the viewpoints of machine technical system and manufacturing process, factors influencing on roughness surface,waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface in ultra-precision turning are discussed further. The 3D topography of ideal roughness surface and actual surface affected by cutting vibration are simulated respectively.

  8. The affective turn in ethnomusicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofman Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The affective turn, which has already questioned dominant paradigms in many disciplinary fields including cultural studies, philosophy, political theory, anthropology, psychology and neuroscience, has started to attract more attention in the field of ethnomusicology, becoming a particularly vibrant stream of thought. Drawing on the voices that call for the historicisation of and critical deliberation on the field of affect studies, the article strives to show how theories of affect might expand dominant paradigms in ethnomusicology and also points to their limitations.

  9. Turning theGolden Key

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI YANSHUO

    2011-01-01

    When Wu Bangguo,Chairman of the Standing Committee of the 11th National People's Congress,turned the “golden key” to officially open the 15th China International Fair for Investment and Trade (CIFTT)on September 7,John Delaney was standing at the Xiamen International Conference and Exhibition Center to watch the opening ceremony.It was the fifth time Delaney,Vice President of Large Industry Investment Asia of Air Products and Chemicals (China) Investment Co.Ltd.,was in Xiamen for the CIFIT.

  10. In-flight radiation exposure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barish, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    During high-altitude flight, the cosmic radiation dose rate in an airliner is greater than it is at ground level. For a casual traveler, the impact on pregnancy from cosmic radiation exposure during flight is trivial. Pregnant frequent flyers, pilots, and flight attendants can, however, receive exposures that exceed current recommended values if they do not appropriately modify their work schedules. In addition to the galactic cosmic-ray background that is the source of this radiation, severe disturbances on the sun may cause eruptions that significantly raise radiation levels at airliner altitudes for brief periods, possibly having an impact even on casual travelers. This article will help obstetrician-gynecologists provide advice to their pregnant patients about in-flight radiation risks. That advice should be influenced by an understanding of recommended radiation exposure limits and a perspective on how those limits relate to the potential for real harm. Resources provided by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and others to help pregnant women and their physicians make informed decisions about the acceptability of this type of exposure are described.

  11. AltiKa in-flight performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Francois; Desjonquères, Jean-Damien; Steunou, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    The SARAL/AltiKa satellite has been launched the 25th of February 2013 from the launch pad of Sriharikota (India). Since this date, AltiKa provides measurements and affords the first altimetry results in Ka band. This paper recalls the instrument design and assesses the in-flight performance. The SARAL/AltiKa mission has been developed in the frame of a cooperation between CNES (French Space Agency) and ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization). AltiKa is a single frequency Ka-band altimeter with a bi-frequency radiometer embedded. Both altimeter and radiometer share the same antenna. Altimeter expertise and routine calibrations performed during assessment phase demonstrate the stability of the instrument. Moreover the performance assessed over ocean are noteworthy such as 0.9 cm on epoch 1 Hz noise for 2 m of SWH, which is fully consistent with simulations and ground pre-flight tests results. The data availability is also very good and very few altimeter measurements are lost due to rain attenuation. Radiometer data analysis shows that the instrument is very stable and its performances are consistent with pre-flight tests results.

  12. Structure from Fleeting Illumination of Faint Spinning Objects in Flight with Application to Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Russell; Saldin, Dilano K; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    There are many instances when the structure of a weakly-scattering spinning object in flight must be determined to high resolution. Examples range from comets to nanoparticles and single molecules. The latter two instances are the subject of intense current interest. Substantial progress has recently been made in illuminating spinning single particles in flight with powerful X-ray bursts to determine their structure with the ultimate goal of determining the structure of single molecules. However, proposals to reconstruct the molecular structure from diffraction "snapshots" of unknown orientation require ~1000x more signal than available from next-generation sources. Using a new approach, we demonstrate the recovery of the structure of a weakly scattering macromolecule at the anticipated next-generation X-ray source intensities. Our work closes a critical gap in determining the structure of single molecules and nanoparticles by X-ray methods, and opens the way to reconstructing the structure of spinning, or ra...

  13. Visualisation turns down energy demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Ole Michael [Danish Building and Urban Research, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    After many energy saving campaigns, Danish families give the impression that they are conscious of energy consumption. Children have learned to turn off the light and adults to buy low-energy bulbs and household appliances. Questioned about their energy consumption and its fluctuations, the same people nevertheless confess to not really knowing. You pay your energy bill but pay no attention to the current consumption, or its level. Unlike other types of consumption, energy consumption is an almost invisible type of consumption. Nevertheless, as a secondary consumption it is much affected by primary consumption in the form of white goods, appliances, cars, food etc., the main purpose of which usually is visibility. This paper presents the result of an experiment to make the energy consumption visible. Meters in the flats showing actual electricity, heat and water consumption confront tenants with the consequences of their own behaviour. The experiment also investigates different set-ups concerning information and communication about energy consumption. Monthly consumption and levels of consumption compared within the neighbourhood are elements of this information. Also quarterly eco-accounting, with key-figures of consumption and environmental considerations like CO{sub 2} emission, are part of the information set-up. Within the first year of visualisation one case shows a 9% reduction of heat and a 22% reduction of electricity. The other cases seem to follow the same tendency. The philosophy of the experiment is that you must know your position in order to change it. You must know about the level of your own energy consumption in order to turn down energy demand. The visible meters are elements in 'Urban Ecological Renewal of a Housing Block' (Hedebygade Block) in a central district of Copenhagen.

  14. In-Flight Personalized Medication Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peletskaya, E.; Griko, Y. V.

    2016-01-01

    , technologies capable of predicting and managing medication side effects, interactions, and toxicity of drugs during spaceflight are needed. We propose to develop and customize for NASAs applications available on the market Personalized Prescribing System (PPS) that would provide a comprehensive, non-invasive solution for safer, targeted medication management for every crew member resulting in safer and more effective treatment and, consequently, better performance. PPS will function as both decision support and record-keeping tool for flight surgeons and astronauts in applying the recommended medications for situations arising in flight. The information on individual drug sensitivity will translate into personalized risk assessment for adverse drug reactions and treatment failures for each drug from the medication kit as well as predefined outcome of any combination of them. Dosage recommendations will also be made individually. The mobile app will facilitate ease of use by crew and medical professionals during training and flight missions.

  15. Next speakers plan their turn early and speak after turn-final "go-signals"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, M.; Meyer, A.S.; Levinson, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    In conversation, turn-taking is usually fluid, with next speakers taking their turn right after the end of the previous turn. One reason for this fluency is early content planning of the next turn, if possible while the current turn is still coming in, as found by Barthel et al. (2016) using the

  16. Notes on the Spatial Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stipe Grgas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ever-mounting evidence, amongst which is the “zone” problematic of the Zadar conference that occassioned these notes, it can be concluded that the spatial turn has insinuated itself as an all-pervading heuristic tool throughout the humanities and the social sciences. The extent to which space and spatiality have usurped the central stage in the various branches of reasearch can be gauged by admonishments that what we are witnessing is a new fundamentalism that has simply inverted the terms of the dualism of time and space (May and Thrift 2001: “Introduction”. According to Michael Dear the sway of space is manifested in multifold ways: in the ubiquity of spatial analysis in social theories and practices; in the explosion of publications devoted to the exploration of the interface of the social and the spatial; in the reintegration of human geography into various domains of knowledge; in the focus given to difference and the consequent diversification of theoretical and empirical practices; in a theoretically informed exploration of the relation between geographical knowledge and social action; and, finally, in the unprecedented proliferation of research agendas and publications pertaining to these isuuses (Dear 2001: 24. Two recent collections of papers are indicative of the ubiquity of spatial issues in scholarly work.

  17. William Friedman, Geneticist Turned Cryptographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Irwin L

    2017-05-01

    William Friedman (1891-1969), trained as a plant geneticist at Cornell University, was employed at Riverbank Laboratories by the eccentric millionaire George Fabyan to work on wheat breeding. Friedman, however, soon became intrigued by and started working on a pet project of Fabyan's involving the conjecture that Francis Bacon, a polymath known for the study of ciphers, was the real author of Shakespeare's plays. Thus, beginning in ∼1916, Friedman turned his attention to the so called "Baconian cipher," and developed decryption techniques that bore similarity to approaches for solving problems in population genetics. His most significant, indeed pathbreaking, work used ideas from genetics and statistics, focusing on analysis of the frequencies of letters in language use. Although he had transitioned from being a geneticist to a cryptographer, his earlier work had resonance in his later pursuits. He soon began working directly for the United States government and produced solutions used to solve complex military ciphers, in particular to break the Japanese Purple code during World War II. Another important legacy of his work was the establishment of the Signal Intelligence Service and eventually the National Security Agency. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Struggling Communities Turn to Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karin

    2008-01-01

    In economically struggling communities, small private colleges are helping generate development projects in large part as a matter of survival. Unlike research universities and land-grant institutions, which have long viewed regional economic development as central to their missions, most liberal-arts colleges are relative newcomers to this work,…

  19. Retrospective turn continuations in Mandarin Chinese conversation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    How the status of further talk past the point of a turn's possible completion should he described, and what functions different kinds of turn continuation might serve - these are questions that have engaged many scholars since Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson's turn-taking model (1974). In this paper, a general scheme is proposed with which one can tease out four interlocking strands in analyzing different kinds of turn continuation: Syntactic continuity vs. discontinuity, main vs. subordinate ...

  20. Morphological and physiological idiosyncrasies lead to interindividual variation in flight metabolic rate in worker bumblebees (Bombus impatiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalis, Dimitri A; Darveau, Charles-A

    2012-01-01

    Although intraspecific variation in metabolic rate is associated with variation in body size, similarly sized individuals nonetheless vary greatly. At similar masses, hovering bumblebee workers (Bombus impatiens) can differ in metabolic rate up to twofold. We examined how such interindividual variation arises by studying covariation of flight metabolic rate with morphological and other physiological parameters. Body size alone explained roughly half the variation in flight metabolic rate. The remaining variation could be explained as the outcome of variation in wing morphology and possibly an association with variation in flight muscle metabolic enzyme activities. As shown using statistical models, for a given mass, higher metabolic rate was correlated with both higher thoracic temperature and higher wing stroke frequency, in turn resulting from smaller wing surface area. When organismal and cellular metabolism for a given mass were linked, variation in metabolic rate was positively correlated with the activities of trehalase and hexokinase. Altogether, covariation with morphology and other physiological parameters explains up to 75% of the variation in metabolic rate. We also investigated the role of flight experience and show that neither flight restriction nor the number of lifetime flights affected flight energetics or flight muscle phenotype. Additionally, manipulating the level of wing asymmetry increased flight wing stroke frequency, metabolic rate, and thoracic temperature, but it did not alter enzyme activity. We conclude that idiosyncrasies in body morphology largely explained interindividual variation in flight metabolic rate but flight muscle metabolic phenotype shows little variation associated with differences in flight experience.

  1. In-Flight Diagnosis and Anomaly Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In flight diagnosis and anomaly detection is a difficult challenge that requires sufficient observation and real-time processing of health information. Our approach...

  2. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be turned about in any canal, except: (a) With permission from the traffic controller; and (b) At the locations set out in the table to this section. Table 1. South Shore Canal: (a) Turning Basin No. 1—Opposite Brossard. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut for vessels up...

  3. Ku Band Hemispherical Fully Electronic Antenna for Aircraft in Flight Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Catalani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained in the frame of the ESA activity “Advanced Antenna Concepts For Aircraft In Flight Entertainment” are presented. The aim of the activity consists in designing an active antenna able to guarantee the Ku band link between an aircraft and a geostationary satellite in order to provide in flight entertainment services. The transmit-receive antenna generates a single narrow beam to be steered electronically in a half sphere remaining compliant with respect to stringent requirements in terms of pattern shape, polarization alignment, EIRP, G/T, and using customized electronic devices. At the same time, the proposed solution should be competitive in terms of cost and complexity.

  4. Recent progress of in-flight separators and rare isotope beam production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Toshiyuki, E-mail: kubo@ribf.riken.jp

    2016-06-01

    New-generation in-flight separators are being developed worldwide, including the Super-FRS separator at the GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), the ARIS separator at the Michigan State University (MSU) Facility for Rare Isotopes Beams (FRIB), and the BigRIPS separator at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF), each of which is aimed at expanding the frontiers of rare isotope (RI) production and advancing experimental studies on exotic nuclei far from stability. Here, the recent progress of in-flight separators is reviewed, focusing on the advanced features of these three representative separators. The RI beam production that we have conducted using the BigRIPS separator at RIKEN RIBF is also outlined.

  5. Solar-powered Gossamer Penguin in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Gossamer Penguin in flight above Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards, California, showing the solar panel perpendicular to the wing and facing the sun. Background The first flight of a solar-powered aircraft took place on November 4, 1974, when the remotely controlled Sunrise II, designed by Robert J. Boucher of AstroFlight, Inc., flew following a launch from a catapult. Following this event, AeroVironment, Inc. (founded in 1971 by the ultra-light airplane innovator--Dr. Paul MacCready) took on a more ambitious project to design a human-piloted, solar-powered aircraft. The firm initially took the human-powered Gossamer Albatross II and scaled it down to three-quarters of its previous size for solar-powered flight with a human pilot controlling it. This was more easily done because in early 1980 the Gossamer Albatross had participated in a flight research program at NASA Dryden in a program conducted jointly by the Langley and Dryden research centers. Some of the flights were conducted using a small electric motor for power. Gossamer Penguin The scaled-down aircraft was designated the Gossamer Penguin. It had a 71-foot wingspan compared with the 96-foot span of the Gossamer Albatross. Weighing only 68 pounds without a pilot, it had a low power requirement and thus was an excellent test bed for solar power. AstroFlight, Inc., of Venice, Calif., provided the power plant for the Gossamer Penguin, an Astro-40 electric motor. Robert Boucher, designer of the Sunrise II, served as a key consultant for both this aircraft and the Solar Challenger. The power source for the initial flights of the Gossamer Penguin consisted of 28 nickel-cadmium batteries, replaced for the solar-powered flights by a panel of 3,920 solar cells capable of producing 541 Watts of power. The battery-powered flights took place at Shafter Airport near Bakersfield, Calif. Dr. Paul MacCready's son Marshall, who was 13 years old and weighed roughly 80 pounds, served as the initial pilot for these flights to

  6. Solar-powered Gossamer Penguin in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Gossamer Penguin in flight above Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards, California, showing the solar panel perpendicular to the wing and facing the sun. Background The first flight of a solar-powered aircraft took place on November 4, 1974, when the remotely controlled Sunrise II, designed by Robert J. Boucher of AstroFlight, Inc., flew following a launch from a catapult. Following this event, AeroVironment, Inc. (founded in 1971 by the ultra-light airplane innovator--Dr. Paul MacCready) took on a more ambitious project to design a human-piloted, solar-powered aircraft. The firm initially took the human-powered Gossamer Albatross II and scaled it down to three-quarters of its previous size for solar-powered flight with a human pilot controlling it. This was more easily done because in early 1980 the Gossamer Albatross had participated in a flight research program at NASA Dryden in a program conducted jointly by the Langley and Dryden research centers. Some of the flights were conducted using a small electric motor for power. Gossamer Penguin The scaled-down aircraft was designated the Gossamer Penguin. It had a 71-foot wingspan compared with the 96-foot span of the Gossamer Albatross. Weighing only 68 pounds without a pilot, it had a low power requirement and thus was an excellent test bed for solar power. AstroFlight, Inc., of Venice, Calif., provided the power plant for the Gossamer Penguin, an Astro-40 electric motor. Robert Boucher, designer of the Sunrise II, served as a key consultant for both this aircraft and the Solar Challenger. The power source for the initial flights of the Gossamer Penguin consisted of 28 nickel-cadmium batteries, replaced for the solar-powered flights by a panel of 3,920 solar cells capable of producing 541 Watts of power. The battery-powered flights took place at Shafter Airport near Bakersfield, Calif. Dr. Paul MacCready's son Marshall, who was 13 years old and weighed roughly 80 pounds, served as the initial pilot for these flights to

  7. Airline policy for passengers requiring supplemental in-flight oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jacqueline; Kelly, Paul T; Beckert, Lutz

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current Australian/New Zealand airline policy on supplemental in-flight oxygen for passengers with lung disease. Fifty-four commercial airlines servicing international routes were surveyed. Information was gathered from airline call centres and web sites. The survey documented individual airline policy on in-flight oxygen delivery, approval schemes, equipment and cost. Of the 54 airlines contacted, 43 (81%) were able to support passengers requiring in-flight oxygen. The majority (88%) of airlines provided a cylinder for passengers to use. Airline policy for calculating the cost of in-flight oxygen differed considerably between carriers. Six (14%) airlines supplied oxygen to passengers free of charge; however, three of these airlines charged for an extra seat. Fifteen airlines (35%) charged on the basis of oxygen supplied, that is, per cylinder. Fourteen airlines (33%) had a flat rate charge per sector. This study confirmed that most airlines can accommodate passengers requiring supplemental oxygen. However, the findings highlight inconsistencies in airline policies and substantial cost differences for supplemental in-flight oxygen. We advocate an industry standardization of policy and cost of in-flight oxygen.

  8. Turning skin into dopamine neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin Parmar; Johan Jakobsson

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to generate neurons from fibroblasts became a reality with the development of iPS technology a few years ago.By reprogramming somatic cells using transcription factor (TF) overexpression,it is possible to generate pluripotent stem cells that then can be differentiated into any somatic cell type including various subtypes of neurons.This raises the possibility of using donor-matched or even patientspecific cells for cell therapy of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD),Huntington's disease and stroke.Supporting this idea,dopamine neurons,which are the cells dying in PD,derived from human iPS cells have been demonstrated to survive transplantation and reverse motor symptoms in animal models of PD [1].

  9. As the Third World turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerman, E

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the 3rd World, family planners have turned to television in order to spread their message. Combining education and entertainment in the form of advertisements and soap operas, television offers a way to provide clear and memorable information about an otherwise sensitive issue. In 1977, Mexico's Miguel Sabido developed the idea of using television as a means of social instruction. His initial soap opera dealt with adult literacy, and the success of that program led him to develop a show focusing on family planning called "Come Along with Me." Following the airing of this soap opera, attendance to family planning clinics increased by 32%. Since then, Mexico has produced a series of soap operas dealing with sex education, women's status, and the treatment of children. Soon, Mexican viewers will see a soap opera addressing the issue of AIDS. Family planners in other countries have also begun employing television. Conventional communication methods require trained counselors travelling villages, and most often, those most in need of family planning are the most difficult to reach. But over the last 10 years, the number of televisions in the Third World has doubled, and there is now approximately 1 television for every 12 people in the developing nations. In Turkey, advertisements have been used to promote modern methods of contraception. In Brazil, vasectomy has been one of the topics of ad campaigns. Mexico, the Philippines, and Nigeria have also experimented with the use of music videos. Nigeria has already had great success in integrating family planning themes to an already existing variety show. Family planning visits have increased by 47%. International agencies have recognized the value of television and have provided financial support.

  10. A review on the on-line analysis of inter-turn short circuit faults in field winding of synchronous generators%同步发电机励磁绕组匝间短路故障在线分析方法综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩力; 欧先朋; 高友; 周光厚

    2016-01-01

    The inter-turn short circuit in field winding is one of the common faults of synchronous generators.To ensure the safe and reliable operation of the generator unit and the power grid,it is necessary to detect this kind of fault on-line.We firstly introduced the status quo of current research methods for the on-line detection of inter-turn short circuit faults in field winding of synchronous generators,including the magnetic-current harmonics analysis method,the probing coil method,the multi-loop method,the output electrical parameter analysis method and the vibration analysis method.These methods and their diagnostic effects were discussed and compared.Then,two new ideas for the output electrical parameter analysis method were provided and the developing tendency of on-line detection methods was forecasted.Finally,it was pointed out on-line analysis method should be practical and multi-functional.%励磁绕组匝间短路是同步发电机常见故障之一。为保证机组和电网的安全可靠运行,有必要对该故障进行在线分析检测。首先介绍了应用于同步发电机励磁绕组匝间短路故障在线分析的磁场-电流谐波分析法、探测线圈法、多回路法、输出电气量分析法、振动分析法等的研究现状,并对几种方法进行了比较,然后对未来在线分析方法的发展方向进行了展望,对输出电气量分析法提出了两条研究思路,最后说明了在线分析方法应具有实际可行性和多用途性。

  11. In-Flight Simulator for IFR Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled unit feeds navigation signals to airplane instruments. Electronic training system allows students to learn to fly according to instrument flight rules (IFR) in uncrowded airspace. New system self-contained IFR simulator carried aboard training plane. Generates signals and commands for standard instruments on airplane, including navigational receiver, distance-measuring equipment, automatic direction finder, a marker-beacon receiver, altimeter, airspeed indicator, and heading indicator.

  12. Non-Poissonian run-and-turn motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detcheverry, Francois

    Swimming bacteria exhibit a variety of motion patterns (run-and-tumble, run-reverse, run-reverse-flick), in which persistent runs are punctuated by sudden turning events. What are the properties of such random motions? If a complete answer has been given when the turning events follow a Poisson process, it has remained elusive outside this particular case. We present a generic framework for such non-Poissonian run-and-turn random motions. We obtain the generating function of moments by building on the framework of continuous time random walks and using non-commutative calculus. The approach is applied to a bimodal model of persistent motion that is directly applicable to swimming patterns and cell motility.

  13. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  14. Revisiting GNRA and UNCG folds: U-turns versus Z-turns in RNA hairpin loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    When thinking about RNA three-dimensional structures, coming across GNRA and UNCG tetraloops is perceived as a boon since their folds have been extensively described. Nevertheless, analyzing loop conformations within RNA and RNP structures led us to uncover several instances of GNRA and UNCG loops that do not fold as expected. We noticed that when a GNRA does not assume its “natural” fold, it adopts the one we typically associate with a UNCG sequence. The same folding interconversion may occur for loops with UNCG sequences, for instance within tRNA anticodon loops. Hence, we show that some structured tetranucleotide sequences starting with G or U can adopt either of these folds. The underlying structural basis that defines these two fold types is the mutually exclusive stacking of a backbone oxygen on either the first (in GNRA) or the last nucleobase (in UNCG), generating an oxygen–π contact. We thereby propose to refrain from using sequences to distinguish between loop conformations. Instead, we suggest using descriptors such as U-turn (for “GNRA-type” folds) and a newly described Z-turn (for “UNCG-type” folds). Because tetraloops adopt for the largest part only two (inter)convertible turns, we are better able to interpret from a structural perspective loop interchangeability occurring in ribosomes and viral RNA. In this respect, we propose a general view on the inclination for a given sequence to adopt (or not) a specific fold. We also suggest how long-noncoding RNAs may adopt discrete but transient structures, which are therefore hard to predict. PMID:27999116

  15. Crew Factors in Flight Operations X: Alertness Management in Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gander, Philippa H.; Connell, Linda J.; Co, Elizabeth L.

    2001-01-01

    In response to a 1980 congressional request, NASA Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue/Jet Lag Program to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in aviation. Research has examined fatigue in a variety of flight environments using a range of measures (from self-report to performance to physiological). In 1991, the program evolved into the Fatigue Countermeasures Program, emphasizing the development and evaluation of strategies to maintain alertness and performance in operational settings. Over the years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has become a collaborative partner in support of fatigue research and other Program activities. From the inception of the Program, a principal goal was to return the information learned from research and other Program activities to the operational community. The objectives of this Education and Training Module are to explain what has been learned about the physiological mechanisms that underlie fatigue, demonstrate the application of this information in flight operations, and offer some specific fatigue countermeasure recommendations. It is intended for all segments of the aeronautics industry, including pilots, flight attendants, managers, schedulers, safety and policy personnel, maintenance crews, and others involved in an operational environment that challenges human physiological capabilities because of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption.

  16. Turns and Increments: A Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Kang-kwong; Thompson, Sandra A.; Ono, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a surge of interest in "increments" among students of conversational interaction. This article first outlines "incrementing" as an analytical problem (i.e., as turn constructional unit [TCU] extensions) by tracing its origins back to Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson's (1974) famous turn-taking article. Then, the article…

  17. [Review of visual display system in flight simulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang-hui; Wei, Shao-ning

    2003-06-01

    Visual display system is the key part and plays a very important role in flight simulators and flight training devices. The developing history of visual display system is recalled and the principle and characters of some visual display systems including collimated display systems and back-projected collimated display systems are described. The future directions of visual display systems are analyzed.

  18. What to Expect During In-Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosobud, Beth; Perry, Marc; Schwanbeck, Nichole

    2017-01-01

    Executing human research on ISS has to navigate a unique risk environment. NASA planning efforts focus on an investigation's in-flight success but much of the threats to research objectives are not mitigated. A balanced requirement set affords the ability to remain flexible for each subject's data set while protecting the study's integrity across all subjects.

  19. In-Flight Parameter Estimation for Multirotor Aerial Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Castro Davi Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method for in-flight parameter estimation for Multirotor Aerial Vehicles (MAV. This task is important because it provides parameters with better accuracy for the actual vehicle operation. In order to simulate a flight it is adopted a simulation environment Software-In-the-Loop (SIL.

  20. Local transverse coupling impedance measurements in a synchrotron light source from turn-by-turn acquisitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlà, Michele; Benedetti, Gabriele; Günzel, Thomas; Iriso, Ubaldo; Martí, Zeus

    2016-01-01

    .... Beam position monitor turn-by-turn analysis for impedance characterization has been usually employed in large circumference machines, while synchrotron light sources have mainly used slow orbit based techniques...

  1. FLYSAFE, nowcasting of in flight icing supporting aircrew decision making process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, A.; Le Bot, C.

    2009-09-01

    FLYSAFE is an Integrated Project of the 6th framework of the European Commission with the aim to improve flight safety through the development of a Next Generation Integrated Surveillance System (NGISS). The NGISS provides information to the flight crew on the three major external hazards for aviation: weather, air traffic and terrain. The NGISS has the capability of displaying data about all three hazards on a single display screen, facilitating rapid pilot appreciation of the situation by the flight crew. Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) were developed to provide the NGISS and the flight crew with weather related information on in-flight icing, thunderstorms, wake-vortex and clear-air turbulence. These products are generated on the ground from observations and model forecasts. WIMS supply relevant information on three different scales: global, regional and local (over airport Terminal Manoeuvring Area). Within the flysafe program, around 120 hours of flight trials were performed during February 2008 and August 2008. Two aircraft were involved each with separate objectives : - to assess FLYSAFE's innovative solutions for the data-link, on-board data fusion, data-display, and data-updates during flight; - to evaluate the new weather information management systems (in flight icing and thunderstorms) using in-situ measurements recorded on board the test aircraft. In this presentation we will focus on the in-flight icing nowcasting system developed at Météo France in the framework of FLYSAFE: the local ICE WIMS. The local ICE WIMS is based on data fusion. The most relevant information for icing detection is extracted from the numerical weather prediction model, the infra-red and visible satellite imagery and the ground weather radar reflectivities. After a presentation of the local ICE WIMS, we detail the evaluation of the local ICE WIMS performed using the winter and summer flight trial data.

  2. Next Speakers Plan Their Turn Early and Speak after Turn-Final "Go-Signals".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Mathias; Meyer, Antje S; Levinson, Stephen C

    2017-01-01

    In conversation, turn-taking is usually fluid, with next speakers taking their turn right after the end of the previous turn. Most, but not all, previous studies show that next speakers start to plan their turn early, if possible already during the incoming turn. The present study makes use of the list-completion paradigm (Barthel et al., 2016), analyzing speech onset latencies and eye-movements of participants in a task-oriented dialogue with a confederate. The measures are used to disentangle the contributions to the timing of turn-taking of early planning of content on the one hand and initiation of articulation as a reaction to the upcoming turn-end on the other hand. Participants named objects visible on their computer screen in response to utterances that did, or did not, contain lexical and prosodic cues to the end of the incoming turn. In the presence of an early lexical cue, participants showed earlier gaze shifts toward the target objects and responded faster than in its absence, whereas the presence of a late intonational cue only led to faster response times and did not affect the timing of participants' eye movements. The results show that with a combination of eye-movement and turn-transition time measures it is possible to tease apart the effects of early planning and response initiation on turn timing. They are consistent with models of turn-taking that assume that next speakers (a) start planning their response as soon as the incoming turn's message can be understood and (b) monitor the incoming turn for cues to turn-completion so as to initiate their response when turn-transition becomes relevant.

  3. Ramping turn-to-turn loss and magnetization loss of a No-Insulation (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductor pancake coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Song, H.; Yuan, W.; Jin, Z.; Hong, Z.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is to study ramping turn-to-turn loss and magnetization loss of a no-insulation (NI) high temperature superconductor (HTS) pancake coil wound with (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox (REBCO) conductors. For insulated (INS) HTS coils, a magnetization loss occurs on superconducting layers during a ramping operation. For the NI HTS coil, additional loss is generated by the "bypassing" current on the turn-to-turn metallic contacts, which is called "turn-to-turn loss" in this study. Therefore, the NI coil's ramping loss is much different from that of the INS coil, but few studies have been reported on this aspect. To analyze the ramping losses of NI coils, a numerical method is developed by coupling an equivalent circuit network model and a H-formulation finite element method model. The former model is to calculate NI coil's current distribution and turn-to-turn loss, and the latter model is to calculate the magnetization loss. A test NI pancake coil is wound with REBCO tapes and the reliability of this model is validated by experiments. Then the characteristics of the NI coil's ramping losses are studied using this coupling model. Results show that the turn-to-turn loss is much higher than the magnetization loss. The NI coil's total ramping loss is much higher than that of its insulated counterpart, which has to be considered carefully in the design and operation of NI applications. This paper also discusses the possibility to reduce NI coil's ramping loss by decreasing the ramping rate of power supply or increasing the coil's turn-to-turn resistivity.

  4. DAST in Flight just after Structural Failure of Right Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones

  5. Turning points the nature of creativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chaomei

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on a critical concept of intellectual turning points in the context of critical thinking, scientific discovery, and problem solving. The author presents a novel analytical and experimental system that applies to both past and future data.

  6. MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10! Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH's MedlinePlus.gov , the popular, consumer-friendly health Web site produced ...

  7. Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164250.html Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice Elderly rodents treated with cellular therapy regained lost fur, became ... 2017 THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Aging mice became more youthful following a new cellular therapy ...

  8. Establishment of a corner turning test capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcraft, R.W.; West, G.T.

    1978-11-01

    A corner turning test capability has been established. While the test is not suited to be the sole criterion for lot qualification, it provides valuable information regarding explosive behavior near failure. Light enhancement and film record analysis techniques are discussed.

  9. Turning university professors into competent learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanova, Eliza; Ilieva, Miroslava; Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Stefanova, E., Ilieva, M., Nikolova, N, & Stefanov, K. (2008). Turning university professors into competent learners. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: pedagogical, organisational and techno

  10. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, D. N.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of alpha and ^{20}O cluster emissions from ^{228}Th have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenologic...

  11. Derrida’s Turn to Franciscan Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Zlomislic

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary French philosophers such as Levinas, Bataille, and Derrida, along with the existentialists Kierkegaard and Nietzsche have all made use of Franciscan insights in order to safeguard the ipseity that cannot be reduced or totalized. In keeping with the taste that concerns me, this paper will examine Derrida’s turn to the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins and how such a turn may place Derrida within a catholic and Franciscan tradition.

  12. Optimal turning climb-out and descent of commercial jet aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, F.; Kreindler, E.

    1982-01-01

    Optimal turning climb-out and descent flight-paths from and to runway headings are derived to provide the missing elements of a complete flight-path optimization for minimum fuel consumption. The paths are derived by generating a field of extremals, using the necessary conditions of optimal control. Results show that the speed profiles for straight and turning flight are essentially identical, except for the final horizontal accelerating or decelerating turn. The optimal turns, which require no abrupt maneuvers, could easily be integrated with present climb-cruise-descent fuel-optimization algorithms.

  13. 77 FR 4989 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... photovoltaic panels mounted on fixed solar racking equipment and the construction of access roads, a powerhouse...) ground- mounted solar photovoltaic generating facility in Noble County, Ohio. Turning Point Solar LLC...

  14. Aerodynamics in arbitrarily accelerating frames: application to high-g turns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifth-generation missilies accelerate up to 100 g in turns, and higher accelerations are expected as agility increases. The authors have developed the theory of aerodynamics for arbitrary accelerations, and have validated modelling in a...

  15. Aerodynamics in arbitrarily accelerating frames: application to high-g turns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifth-generation missiles accelerate up to 100 g in turns, and higher accelerations are expected as agility increases. The auhtors have developed the theory of aerodynamics for arbitrary accelerations, and have validated modelling in a Computational...

  16. Envelope Protection for In-Flight Ice Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, David R.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Fatal loss-of-control (LOC) accidents have been directly related to in-flight airframe icing. The prototype system presented in this paper directly addresses the need for real-time onboard envelope protection in icing conditions. The combinations of a-priori information and realtime aerodynamic estimations are shown to provide sufficient input for determining safe limits of the flight envelope during in-flight icing encounters. The Icing Contamination Envelope Protection (ICEPro) system has been designed and implemented to identify degradations in airplane performance and flying qualities resulting from ice contamination and provide safe flight-envelope cues to the pilot. Components of ICEPro are described and results from preliminary tests are presented.

  17. InFlight Weather Forecasts at Your Fingertips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A new information system is delivering real-time weather reports to pilots where they need it the most - inside their aircraft cockpits. Codeveloped by NASA and ViGYAN, Inc., the WSI InFlight(trademark) Cockpit Weather System provides a continuous, satellite-based broadcast of weather information to a portable or panel-mounted display inside the cockpit. With complete coverage and content for the continental United States at any altitude, the system is specifically designed for inflight use.

  18. In-Flight Performance of Wide Field Camera 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new UVNisible/IR imager, was installed into HST during Servicing Mission 4. After a successful commissioning in the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program, WFC3 has been engaged in an exciting program of scientific observations. I review here the in-flight scientific performance of the instrument, addressing such topics as image quality, sensitivity, detector performance, and stability.

  19. Turn-on and turn-off voltages of an avalanche p—n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoqing, Zhang; Dejun, Han; Changjun, Zhu; Xuejun, Zhai

    2012-09-01

    Characteristics of the turn-on and turn-off voltage of avalanche p—n junctions were demonstrated and studied. As opposed to existing reports, the differences between the turn-on and turn-off voltage cannot be neglected when the size of the p—n junction is in the order of microns. The difference increases inversely with the area of a junction, exerting significant influences on characterizing some parameters of devices composed of small avalanche junctions. Theoretical analyses show that the mechanism for the difference lies in the increase effect of the threshold multiplication factor at the turn-on voltage of a junction when the area of a junction decreases. Moreover, the “breakdown voltage" in the formula of the avalanche asymptotic current is, in essence, the avalanche turn-off voltage, and consequently, the traditional expression of the avalanche asymptotic current and the gain of a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode were modified.

  20. Turning points in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Hardy

    2015-01-01

    This book explores some of the major turning points in the history of mathematics, ranging from ancient Greece to the present, demonstrating the drama that has often been a part of its evolution. Studying these breakthroughs, transitions, and revolutions, their stumbling-blocks and their triumphs, can help illuminate the importance of the history of mathematics for its teaching, learning, and appreciation. Some of the turning points considered are the rise of the axiomatic method (most famously in Euclid), and the subsequent major changes in it (for example, by David Hilbert); the “wedding,” via analytic geometry, of algebra and geometry; the “taming” of the infinitely small and the infinitely large; the passages from algebra to algebras, from geometry to geometries, and from arithmetic to arithmetics; and the revolutions in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that resulted from Georg Cantor’s creation of transfinite set theory. The origin of each turning point is discussed, along with...

  1. Error analysis of linear optics measurements via turn-by-turn beam position data in circular accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced techniques have been developed, tested and implemented in the last decades in almost all circular accelerators across the world to measure the linear optics. However, the greater availability and accuracy of beam diagnostics and the ever better correction of linear magnetic lattice imperfections (beta beating at 1% level and coupling at 0.1%) are reaching what seems to be the intrinsic accuracy and precision of different measurement techniques. This paper aims to highlight and quantify, when possible, the limitations of one standard method, the harmonic analysis of turn-by-turn beam position data. To this end, new analytic formulas for the evaluation of lattice parameters modified by focusing errors are derived. The unexpected conclusion of this study is that for the ESRF storage ring (and possibly for any third generation light source operating at ultra-low coupling and with similar diagnostics), measurement and correction of linear optics via orbit beam position data are to be preferred to the...

  2. Behavioural mimicry in flight path of Batesian intraspecific polymorphic butterfly Papilio polytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tasuku; Imafuku, Michio

    2015-06-22

    Batesian mimics that show similar coloration to unpalatable models gain a fitness advantage of reduced predation. Beyond physical similarity, mimics often exhibit behaviour similar to their models, further enhancing their protection against predation by mimicking not only the model's physical appearance but also activity. In butterflies, there is a strong correlation between palatability and flight velocity, but there is only weak correlation between palatability and flight path. Little is known about how Batesian mimics fly. Here, we explored the flight behaviour of four butterfly species/morphs: unpalatable model Pachliopta aristolochiae, mimetic and non-mimetic females of female-limited mimic Papilio polytes, and palatable control Papilio xuthus. We demonstrated that the directional change (DC) generated by wingbeats and the standard deviation of directional change (SDDC) of mimetic females and their models were smaller than those of non-mimetic females and palatable controls. Furthermore, we found no significant difference in flight velocity among all species/morphs. By showing that DC and SDDC of mimetic females resemble those of models, we provide the first evidence for the existence of behavioural mimicry in flight path by a Batesian mimic butterfly.

  3. Behavioural mimicry in flight path of Batesian intraspecific polymorphic butterfly Papilio polytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tasuku; Imafuku, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Batesian mimics that show similar coloration to unpalatable models gain a fitness advantage of reduced predation. Beyond physical similarity, mimics often exhibit behaviour similar to their models, further enhancing their protection against predation by mimicking not only the model's physical appearance but also activity. In butterflies, there is a strong correlation between palatability and flight velocity, but there is only weak correlation between palatability and flight path. Little is known about how Batesian mimics fly. Here, we explored the flight behaviour of four butterfly species/morphs: unpalatable model Pachliopta aristolochiae, mimetic and non-mimetic females of female-limited mimic Papilio polytes, and palatable control Papilio xuthus. We demonstrated that the directional change (DC) generated by wingbeats and the standard deviation of directional change (SDDC) of mimetic females and their models were smaller than those of non-mimetic females and palatable controls. Furthermore, we found no significant difference in flight velocity among all species/morphs. By showing that DC and SDDC of mimetic females resemble those of models, we provide the first evidence for the existence of behavioural mimicry in flight path by a Batesian mimic butterfly. PMID:26041360

  4. Eye and head turning indicates cerebral lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsbourne, M

    1972-05-05

    When solving verbal problems, right-handed people usually turn head and eyes to the right, whereas with numerical and spatial problems, these people look up and left. Left-handed people differ in all these respects. The results suggest that the direction in which people look while thinking reflects the lateralization of the underlying cerebral activity.

  5. Zigzag turning preference of freely crawling cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Park, Jin-Sung; Choi, Youngwoon; Choi, Wonshik; Ko, Tae-Wook; Lee, Kyoung J

    2011-01-01

    The coordinated motion of a cell is fundamental to many important biological processes such as development, wound healing, and phagocytosis. For eukaryotic cells, such as amoebae or animal cells, the cell motility is based on crawling and involves a complex set of internal biochemical events. A recent study reported very interesting crawling behavior of single cell amoeba: in the absence of an external cue, free amoebae move randomly with a noisy, yet, discernible sequence of 'run-and-turns' analogous to the 'run-and-tumbles' of swimming bacteria. Interestingly, amoeboid trajectories favor zigzag turns. In other words, the cells bias their crawling by making a turn in the opposite direction to a previous turn. This property enhances the long range directional persistence of the moving trajectories. This study proposes that such a zigzag crawling behavior can be a general property of any crawling cells by demonstrating that 1) microglia, which are the immune cells of the brain, and 2) a simple rule-based model cell, which incorporates the actual biochemistry and mechanics behind cell crawling, both exhibit similar type of crawling behavior. Almost all legged animals walk by alternating their feet. Similarly, all crawling cells appear to move forward by alternating the direction of their movement, even though the regularity and degree of zigzag preference vary from one type to the other.

  6. Turning Around along the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun

    2016-01-01

    A bound-violation designates a case that the turn-around radius of a bound object exceeds the upper limit put by the spherical collapse model based on the standard $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm. Given that the turn-around radius of a bound object is a stochastic quantity and that the spherical model overly simplifies the true gravitational collapse which actually proceeds anisotropically along the cosmic web, the rarity of the occurrence of a bound violation may depend on the web environment. Assuming a Planck cosmology, we numerically construct the bound-zone peculiar velocity profiles along the cosmic web (filaments and sheets) around the isolated groups with virial mass $M_{\\rm v}\\ge 3\\times 10^{13}\\,h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ identified in the Small MultiDark Planck simulations and determine the radial distances at which their peculiar velocities equal the Hubble expansion speed as the turn-around radii of the groups. We find that although the average turn-around radii of the isolated groups are well below the spherical bo...

  7. Leadership Helps Turn around a Troubled School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Von

    2013-01-01

    The author tells how he employed leadership skills to help turn around a failing school loaded with at-risk students. Dayton's Bluff Elementary School was one of the worst in St. Paul when Von Sheppard took over as principal in 2001. Changing the staff and attitudes at the largely low-income, minority majority school in a tough neighborhood…

  8. Can Language Classrooms Take the Multilingual Turn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet-Gauthier, Myriam; Beaulieu, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    For the past three decades, momentum has gathered in favour of a multilingual turn in second language acquisition research and teaching. "Multicompetence" has been proposed to replace "nativeness" and "monolingualism" to measure L2 learners' success. This proposed shift has not made its way into L2 teaching settings.…

  9. U turn to venous air embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Harsimran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a definitive risk of venous air embolism when the fluid infusion is complete and the drip set is still open in a glass bottle.We have devised a novel way of preventing the chances of air embolism when the fluid in the glass bottle finishes. It really gives a "U" turn to the chances of venous air embolism.

  10. Zigzag turning preference of freely crawling cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseok Daniel Yang

    Full Text Available The coordinated motion of a cell is fundamental to many important biological processes such as development, wound healing, and phagocytosis. For eukaryotic cells, such as amoebae or animal cells, the cell motility is based on crawling and involves a complex set of internal biochemical events. A recent study reported very interesting crawling behavior of single cell amoeba: in the absence of an external cue, free amoebae move randomly with a noisy, yet, discernible sequence of 'run-and-turns' analogous to the 'run-and-tumbles' of swimming bacteria. Interestingly, amoeboid trajectories favor zigzag turns. In other words, the cells bias their crawling by making a turn in the opposite direction to a previous turn. This property enhances the long range directional persistence of the moving trajectories. This study proposes that such a zigzag crawling behavior can be a general property of any crawling cells by demonstrating that 1 microglia, which are the immune cells of the brain, and 2 a simple rule-based model cell, which incorporates the actual biochemistry and mechanics behind cell crawling, both exhibit similar type of crawling behavior. Almost all legged animals walk by alternating their feet. Similarly, all crawling cells appear to move forward by alternating the direction of their movement, even though the regularity and degree of zigzag preference vary from one type to the other.

  11. Circuit Controls Turn-On Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Single choke used in primary circuit with diode arrangement, maintaining dc current flow through choke and setting up a unidirectional magnetic field, limits turn-on current of transformer-rectifier power supply. Technique reduces number and weight of components and minimizes effect of initial inrush surge current on source.

  12. Business Intelligence: Turning Knowledge into Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Krista

    2009-01-01

    Today, many school districts are turning to business intelligence tools to retrieve, organize, and share knowledge for faster analysis and more effective, guided decision making. Business intelligence (BI) tools are the technologies and applications that gather and report information to help an organization's leaders make better decisions. BI…

  13. The dynamic turn in quantum logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltag, Alexandru; Smets, Sonja

    In this paper we show how ideas coming from two areas of research in logic can reinforce each other. The first such line of inquiry concerns the "dynamic turn" in logic and especially the formalisms inspired by Propositional Dynamic Logic (PDL); while the second line concerns research into the

  14. Train turn restrictions and line plan performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burggraeve, Sofie; Bull, Simon Henry; Lusby, Richard Martin

    In this paper we study the impact of the `turn conditions' in end stations on the performance of a line plan. If trains have to turn on their platform in an end station, the yoccupy the platform for several minutes. A more preferred option, from a timetabling point of view, would be that a train...... disappears from the platform in its end station after dwelling and only appears again when departing for a subsequent trip. In this case, the train will not interfere with other trains that dwell on the platform during the time between these events. However, this option is only possible if the train can stay...... in a exible and large enough shunt. Starting from a given line plan, we compare two timetables, one where trains have to turn on their platform and one where trains can turn in a shunt. We evaluate the impact on the performance of the line plan by its feasibility for timetabling,the minimum overall buffer...

  15. Hamilton’s theory of turns revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Mukunda; S Chaturvedi; R Simon

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach to Hamilton’s theory of turns for the groups (3) and (2) which renders their properties, in particular their composition law, nearly trivial and immediately evident upon inspection. We show that the entire construction can be based on binary rotations rather than mirror reflections.

  16. Mechanisms in turning of metal matrix composites: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Sekhar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites have evoked a keen interest from the automobile and aerospace sectors owing to their attractive mechanical properties and applications. Over the past two decades, researchers have unearthed many secrets pertaining to these advanced materials. This paper briefly reviews the research revelations of the mechanisms that make these materials so superior. Turning of metal matrix composites is focused in particular. Mechanisms such as particle fracture, particle pullout, debonding, dislocation phenomena, thermal softening, wear modes, surface generation, cutting forces, chip formation, strains and stresses are addressed. Discussions on related phenomena such as effects of tool coatings, adhesion, friction, microstructures and strain hardening are also presented.

  17. Resonant multi-turn extraction: Principle and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gilardoni, S S; Martini, M; Métral, E; Scaramuzzi, P; Steerenberg, R; Müller, A S

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a novel approach to perform multi-turn extraction was proposed based on beam splitting in the transverse phase space by means of trapping inside stable islands. In addition to numerical simulations, aimed at assessing the feasibility of the proposed technique, an experimental campaign was launched since the year 2002 at the CERN Proton Synchrotron. During the year 2004 run, a high-intensity single-bunch beam was successfully split and the generated beamlets separated without any measurable losses. The underlying principle will be presented and discussed in details in this paper, as well as the latest experimental results and future applications.

  18. Resonant Multi-Turn Extraction Principle and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gilardoni, S S; Martini, M; Métral, E; Scaramuzzi, P; Steerenberg, R; Muller, AS

    2006-01-01

    Recently a novel approach to perform multi-turn extraction was proposed based on beam splitting in the transverse phase space by means of trapping inside stable islands. In addition to numerical simulations, aimed at assessing the feasibility of the proposed technique, an experimental campaign was launched since the year 2002 at the CERN Proton Synchrotron. During the year 2004 run, a high-intensity single-bunch beam was successfully split and the generated beamlets separated without any measurable losses. The underlying principle will be presented and discussed in details in this paper, as well as the latest experimental results and future applications.

  19. Kinematics of turning maneuvers in the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kristin L; Brim-Deforest, Whitney

    2008-06-01

    The ability to change direction is essential to any animal that moves around in a complex, 3D environment. In this study we present the first 3D description of body positions during gliding turns in a mammalian gliding specialist, the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. In addition, we used these kinematic data to estimate the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals and rotational velocities and accelerations of the body while turning. These results were compared with similar measurements of flying squirrels during straight glides. The two individuals used in this study differed significantly in limb position asymmetries between the two sides of their bodies and also were significantly different in measures of turning performance. The individual with better performance used limb positions consistent with a primarily lift-based turning mechanism (banked turn), whereas the individual with poorer performance used limb positions consistent with a primarily drag-based turning mechanism (crabbed turn). Both individuals employed limb movements continuously through the gliding turn, but these movements did not have any consistent relationships with body rotations or lateral acceleration. As compared with straight glides, squirrels used significantly higher angles of attack and had lower lift-to-drag ratios, but did not differ in glide angle. Contrary to the typical view of maneuvering during gliding as a simple, static form of locomotion, the results presented here indicate that mammalian gliding is a complex behavior comprising the interplay of many components of limb position and wing shape that affect the balance of forces that control the turn.

  20. Ground reaction forces and lower-limb joint kinetics of turning gait in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Philippe C; Stebbins, Julie; Theologis, Tim; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2014-11-28

    Turning is a common locomotor task essential to daily activity; however, very little is known about the forces and moments responsible for the kinematic adaptations occurring relative to straight-line gait in typically developing children. Thus, the aims of this study were to analyse ground reaction forces (GRFs), ground reaction free vertical torque (TZ), and the lower-limb joint kinetics of 90° outside (step) and inside (spin) limb turns. Step, spin, and straight walking trials from fifty-four typically developing children were analysed. All children were fit with the Plug-in Gait and Oxford Foot Model marker sets while walking over force plates embedded in the walkway. Net internal joint moments and power were computed via a standard inverse dynamics approach. All dependent variables were statistically analysed over the entire curves using the mean difference 95% bootstrap confidence band approach. GRFs were directed medially for step turns and laterally for spin turns during the turning phase. Directions were reversed and magnitudes decreased during the approach phase. Step turns showed reduced ankle power generation, while spin turns showed large TZ. Both strategies required large knee and hip coronal and transverse plane moments during swing. These kinetic differences highlight adaptations required to maintain stability and reorient the body towards the new walking direction during turning. From a clinical perspective, turning gait may better reveal weaknesses and motor control deficits than straight walking in pathological populations, such as children with cerebral palsy, and could potentially be implemented in standard gait analysis sessions.

  1. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel MOS-controlled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5 A/cm2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100 W/cm2 conduction and the 100 W/cm2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV and higher frequency (10 kHz are needed.

  2. Surface Corrosion Resistance in Turning of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the issues associated with implant surface modification. We propose a method to form the oxide film on implant surfaces by dry turning to generate heat and injecting oxygen-rich gas at the turning-tool flank. The morphology, roughness, composition, and thickness of the oxide films in an oxygen-rich atmosphere were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical profiling, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion resistance of the modified surfaces. The corrosion resistance trends, analyzed relative to the oxide film thickness, indicate that the oxide film thickness is the major factor affecting the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in a simulated body fluid (SBF. Turning in an oxygen-rich atmosphere can form a thick oxide film on the implant surface. The thickness of surface oxide films processed at an oxygen concentration of 80% was improved to 4.6 times that of films processed at an oxygen concentration of 21%; the free corrosion potential shifted positively by 0.357 V, which significantly improved the corrosion resistance of titanium alloys in the SBF. Therefore, the proposed method may (partially replace the subsequent surface oxidation. This method is significant for biomedical development because it shortens the process flow, improves the efficiency, and lowers the cost.

  3. In-Flight Injuries Involving Children on Commercial Airline Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo M; Nerwich, Neil; Rotta, Alexandre T

    2016-12-09

    More than 3 billion passengers are transported every year on commercial airline flights worldwide, many of whom are children. The incidence of in-flight medical events (IFMEs) affecting children is largely unknown. This study seeks to characterize pediatric IFMEs, with particular focus on in-flight injuries (IFIs). We reviewed the records of all IFMEs from January 2009 to January 2014 involving children treated in consultation with a ground-based medical support center providing medical support to commercial airlines. Among 114 222 IFMEs, we identified 12 226 (10.7%) cases involving children. In-flight medical events commonly involved gastrointestinal (35.4%), infectious (20.3%), neurological (12.2%), allergic (8.6%), and respiratory (6.3%) conditions. In addition, 400 cases (3.3%) of IFMEs involved IFIs. Subjects who sustained IFIs were younger than those involved in other medical events (3 [1-8] vs 7 [3-14] y, respectively), and lap infants were overrepresented (35.8% of IFIs vs 15.9% of other medical events). Examples of IFIs included burns, contusions, and lacerations from falls in unrestrained lap infants; fallen objects from the overhead bin; and trauma to extremities by the service cart or aisle traffic. Pediatric IFIs are relatively infrequent given the total passenger traffic but are not negligible. Unrestrained lap children are prone to IFIs, particularly during meal service or turbulence, but not only then. Children occupying aisle seats are vulnerable to injury from fallen objects, aisle traffic, and burns from mishandled hot items. The possible protection from using in-flight child restraints might extend beyond takeoff and landing operations or during turbulence.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  4. The Partners in Flight handbook on species assessment Version 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, Arvind O.; Blancher, Peter J.; Easton, Wendy E.; Stanton, Jessica C.; Demarest, Dean W.; Dettmers, Randy; Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; ,

    2017-01-01

    Partners in Flight (PIF) is a cooperative venture of federal, state, provincial, and territorial agencies, industry, non-governmental organizations, researchers, and many others whose common goal is the conservation of North American birds (www.partnersinflight.org). While PIF has focused primarily on landbirds, it works in conjunction with other bird partners to promote coordinated conservation of all birds. PIF follows an iterative, adaptive planning approach that develops a sound scientific basis for decision-making and a logical process for setting, implementing, and evaluating conservation objectives (Pashley et al. 2000, Rich et al. 2004, Berlanga et al. 2010). The steps include: 1. Assessing conservation vulnerability of all bird species;

  5. Design of an intelligent information system for in-flight emergency assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyock, Stefan; Karamouzis, Stamos

    1991-01-01

    The present research has as its goal the development of AI tools to help flight crews cope with in-flight malfunctions. The relevant tasks in such situations include diagnosis, prognosis, and recovery plan generation. Investigation of the information requirements of these tasks has shown that the determination of paths figures largely: what components or systems are connected to what others, how are they connected, whether connections satisfying certain criteria exist, and a number of related queries. The formulation of such queries frequently requires capabilities of the second-order predicate calculus. An information system is described that features second-order logic capabilities, and is oriented toward efficient formulation and execution of such queries.

  6. Strategies for bird conservation: The Partners in Flight planning process; Proceedings of the 3rd Partners in Flight Workshop; 1995 October 1-5; Cape May, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick Bonney; David N. Pashley; Robert J. Cooper; Larry Niles

    2000-01-01

    This volume represents a compilation of papers presented at the 3rd International Partners in Flight Workshop held October 1-5, 1995, at the Grand Hotel in Cape May, NJ. The title of the workshop was "Partners in Flight Conservation Plan: Building Consensus for Action." Manuscripts have been available on-line at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology web site...

  7. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, D N

    2002-01-01

    Effect of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of $\\alpha$ and $^{20} O$ cluster emissions from $^{228} Th$ have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenological and the microscopic double folding potentials. Calculations of half lives with the microscopic double folding potentials are found to be in good agreement with the observed experimental data. Present calculations put the superasymmetric fission model on a firm theoretical basis.

  8. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases.

  9. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  10. LISA and its in-flight test precursor SMART-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, S.; Bender, P.; Brillet, A.; Buchman, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Cerdonio, M.; Cruise, M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Dolesi, R.; Folkner, W.; Gianolio, A.; Jafry, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Heinzel, G.; Hogan, C.; Hueller, M.; Hough, J.; Phinney, S.; Prince, T.; Richstone, D.; Robertson, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Ruediger, A.; Sandford, M.; Schilling, R.; Shoemaker, D.; Schutz, B.; Stebbins, R.; Stubbs, C.; Sumner, T.; Thorne, K.; Tinto, M.; Touboul, P.; Ward, H.; Weber, W.; Winkler, W

    2002-07-01

    LISA will be the first space-home gravitational wave observatory. It aims to detect gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz/1 Hz range from sources including galactic binaries, super-massive black-hole binaries, capture of objects by super-massive black-holes and stochastic background. LISA is an ESA approved Cornerstone Mission foreseen as a joint ESA-NASA endeavour to be launched in 2010-11. The principle of operation of LISA is based on laser ranging of test-masses under pure geodesic motion. Achieving pure geodesic motion at the level requested for LISA, 3x10{sup -15} ms{sup -2}/{radical}Hz at 0.1 mHz, is considered a challenging technological objective. To reduce the risk, both ESA and NASA are pursuing an in-flight test of the relevant technology. The goal of the test is to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude from the LISA performance. ESA has given this test as the primary goal of its technology dedicated mission SMART-2 with a launch in 2006. This paper describes the basics of LISA, its key technologies, and its in-flight precursor test on SMART-2.

  11. Analysis of In-Flight Vibration Measurements from Helicopter Transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Marianne; Huff, Ed; Barszcz

    2004-01-01

    In-flight vibration measurements from the transmission of an OH-58C KIOWA are analyzed. In order to understand the effect of normal flight variation on signal shape, the first gear mesh components of the planetary gear system and bevel gear are studied in detail. Systematic patterns occur in the amplitude and phase of these signal components with implications for making time synchronous averages and interpreting gear metrics in flight. The phase of the signal component increases as the torque increases; limits on the torque range included in a time synchronous average may now be selected to correspond to phase change limits on the underlying signal. For some sensors and components, an increase in phase variation and/or abrupt change in the slope of the phase dependence on torque are observed in regions of very low amplitude of the signal component. A physical mechanism for this deviation is postulated. Time synchronous averages should not be constructed in torque regions with wide phase variation.

  12. In-flight calibration of the ISGRI camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrier, R.; Lebrun, F.; Belanger, G.; Blondel, C.; David, P.; Goldoni, P.; Goldwurm, A.; Gros, A.; Laurent, P.; Malaguti, G.; Sauvageon, A. [CEA Saclay - Service d' Astrophysique, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- CNR, Rome (Italy); Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- CNR, Sezione di Palermo (Italy); Malaguti, G. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- CNR, Sezione di Bologne (Italy); Bird, A.J. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom)

    2003-11-01

    ISGRI, the IBIS low energy camera (15 keV-1 MeV) on board INTEGRAL, is the first large CdTe gamma-ray imager in orbit. We present here an overview of the ISGRI in-flight calibrations performed during the first months after launch. We discuss the stability of the camera as well as the CdTe pixels response under cosmic radiation. The energy calibrations were done using lead and tungsten fluorescence lines and the {sup 22}Na calibration unit. Thermal effects and charge correction algorithm are discussed, and the resulting energy resolution is presented. The ISGRI background spatial and spectral non-uniformity is also described, and some image correction results are presented. ISGRI, despite a few unexpected features like zero rise time events, performs well with only 4,5% noisy or disabled pixels. Thermal effects are at the origin of the largest difference between ground and in-flight data. Correcting for these effects yields good spectral performances close to the expectations with 8.4% at 59.3 keV and 4.9% at 511 keV. The resolution in the high energy band is broader than before launch because of residual rise time gains uncertainties. Handling of these errors requires a larger amount of calibration data than what is available today.

  13. In-flight measurement of upwind dynamic soaring in albatrosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-03-01

    In-flight measurement results on upwind flight of albatrosses using dynamic soaring are presented. It is shown how the birds manage to make progress against the wind on the basis of small-scale dynamic soaring maneuvers. For this purpose, trajectory features, motion quantities and mechanical energy relationships as well as force characteristics are analyzed. The movement on a large-scale basis consists of a tacking type flight technique which is composed of dynamic soaring cycle sequences with alternating orientation to the left and right. It is shown how this is performed by the birds so that they can achieve a net upwind flight without a transversal large-scale movement and how this compares with downwind or across wind flight. Results on upwind dynamic soaring are presented for low and high wind speed cases. It is quantified how much the tacking trajectory length is increased when compared with the beeline distance. The presented results which are based on in-flight measurements of free flying albatrosses were achieved with an in-house developed GPS-signal tracking method yielding the required high precision for the small-scale dynamic soaring flight maneuvers.

  14. Turning customer satisfaction measurements into action

    OpenAIRE

    Lervik-Olsen, Line; Witell, Lars; Gustafsson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on customer orientation by developing and empirically testing a model that attempts to explain the elements that constitute customer orientation and that, in turn, influence customer satisfaction. In particular, this study focuses on how service firms design, collect, analyse and use customer-satisfaction data to improve service performance. This study has the following three research objectives: to understand ...

  15. Turning Around Caliban: Jimmie Durham's Caliban Codex

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Cherokee artist Jimmie Durham, the creator of the Caliban Codex, is a bricoleur and a trickster who turns around Shakespeare’s Caliban, exploring the dimensions of the system of representation in order to transform it. The Caliban Codex shows the contradictions of colonialism though Caliban’s imperfect attempt at mimicry. Caliban’s attempts to master the representational system in his efforts at writing, drawing and sculpture reveal its biases and its underlying violen...

  16. Right turn resuscitation: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, N R M; Russell, R

    2011-09-01

    In this article the process of operating room resuscitation - commonly known as Right Turn Resuscitation (RTR) when conducted in the medical treatment facility at Camp Bastion - is described. The place of RTR within the concepts of damage control resuscitation and surgery is discussed along with activation criteria and protocols. The medical leadership, team roles, advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. Finally, studies describing the impact of RTR and operating room resuscitation are briefly described.

  17. Turning customer satisfaction measurements into action

    OpenAIRE

    Lervik-Olsen, Line; Witell, Lars; Gustafsson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on customer orientation by developing and empirically testing a model that attempts to explain the elements that constitute customer orientation and that, in turn, influence customer satisfaction. In particular, this study focuses on how service firms design, collect, analyse and use customer-satisfaction data to improve service performance. This study has the following three research objectives: to understand ...

  18. Introduction: Aesthetics after the Speculative Turn

    OpenAIRE

    Askin, Ridvan; Hägler, Andreas; Schweighauser, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the turn of the century aesthetics has steadily gained momentum as a central field of study across the disciplines. No longer sidelined, aesthetics has grown in confidence. While this recent development brings with it a return to the work of the canonical authors (most notably Baumgarten and Kant), some contemporary scholars reject the traditional focus on epistemology and theorize aesthetics in its ontological connotations. It is according to this shift that speculative realists h...

  19. Turning off the central contribution to contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J C; Yates, L M; Collins, D F

    2008-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation can generate contractions through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The peripheral mechanism involves the direct activation of motor axons, while the central mechanism involves the activation of sensory axons that recruit spinal neurons through a reflex pathway. For use in functional electrical stimulation. One must have control over turning the central mechanism on and off. We investigated whether inhibition developed through antagonist muscle (tibialis anterior, TA) contractions elicited by electrical stimulation or by volition can turn off the central mechanism in triceps surae. Both electrical stimulation and voluntary contractions of TA reduced or eliminated plantar flexion torque produced by the central mechanism, indicating that inhibition induced via these contractions can effectively turn off the central contribution to force. These findings suggest that patterns of electrical stimulation may be able to generate periodic muscle contractions by turning the central contribution to muscular contractions on and off.

  20. Shadow obstacle model for realistic corner-turning behavior in crowd simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-qi HE; Yi JIN; Qi CHEN; Zhen LIU; Wen-hui YUE; Xing-jian LU

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a novel model known as the shadow obstacle model to generate a realistic corner-turning be-havior in crowd simulation. The motivation for this model comes from the observation that people tend to choose a safer route rather than a shorter one when turning a corner. To calculate a safer route, an optimization method is proposed to generate the corner-turning rule that maximizes the viewing range for the agents. By combining psychological and physical forces together, a full crowd simulation framework is established to provide a more realistic crowd simulation. We demonstrate that our model produces a more realistic corner-turning behavior by comparison with real data obtained from the experiments. Finally, we per-form parameter analysis to show the believability of our model through a series of experiments.

  1. Beam Optics Measurements Through Turn by Turn Beam Position Data in the SLS

    CERN Document Server

    Zisopoulos, P; Streun, A; Ziemann, v

    2013-01-01

    Refined Fourier analysis of turn-by-turn (TBT) transverse position data measurements can be used for determining several beam properties of a ring, such as transverse tunes, optics functions, phases, chromatic properties and coupling. In particular, the Numerical Analysis of Fundamental Frequencies (NAFF) algorithm is used to analyse TBT data from the Swiss Light Source (SLS) storage ring in order to estimate on and off-momentum beam characteristics. Of particular interest is the potential of using the full position information within one turn in order to measure beam optics properties.

  2. FCC-hh turn-around cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, Reyes; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Buffat, Xavier; Niemi, Arto; Schulte, Daniel; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Stoel, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The turn-around cycle time of a collider is defined as the time spent between the end of stable beams and the start of the next stable beams period, and its calculation is of fundamental importance. On one side it is a crucial ingredient for the computation of the optimal time spent in luminosity production, which defines the integrated luminosity per fill or store. On the other side, combined with the availability and reliability of the machine, it allows to perform a detailed breakdown of the operational performance of the collider over an operational season, i.e. percentage of time in stable beams and beam in the machine with respect to down time. This paper presents a preliminary operational cycle definition for the hadron-hadron Future Circular Collider, as a base line for estimating the corresponding turn-around time. The cycle definition is based on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operational cycle. Two turn-around times are presented, the theoretical one and a more realistic one based on the LHC exper...

  3. Vibro-acoustic behaviour of an induction machine with stator inter-turn short-circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelassi, Sana; Romary, Raphael; Brudny, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the calculation of noise and vibrations due to electromagnetic forces in rotating electrical machines in faulty conditions. The effects of a stator inter turn short circuit is analysed through an analytical model. Theoretical results give the radial forces and explain the reasons behind the noise and vibrations. They also show how inter-turn-short-circuit is responsible for additional low-mode forces, generating noise and vibrations increase. Experimental measurements are carried out to validate the theoretical results.

  4. Experimental Study of the Mechanism of Skiing Turns. I. An Uphill Turn from Straight Running Downhill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Toshio; Ichino, Shoji

    1987-07-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show, using a small model ski sliding on a flat sand slope, that by setting a ski on its left/right edge in a straight downhill run that this will lead to a left/rightward turn. The turn is assisted by an accompanying upward flex of the tip section. The result is supported by a field experiment with a real ski on snow.

  5. Turn-on and turn-off voltages of an avalanche p-n junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoqing; Han Dejun; Zhu Changjun; Zhai Xuejun

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of the turn-on and turn-off voltage of avalanche p-n junctions were demonstrated and studied.As opposed to existing reports,the differences between the turn-on and turn-off voltage cannot be neglected when the size of the p-n junction is in the order of microns.The difference increases inversely with the area of a junction,exerting significant influences on characterizing some parameters of devices composed of small avalanche junctions.Theoretical analyses show that the mechanism for the difference lies in the increase effect of the threshold multiplication factor at the turn-on voltage of a junction when the area of a junction decreases.Moreover,the "breakdown voltage" in the formula of the avalanche asymptotic current is,in essence,the avalanche turn-off voltage,and consequently,the traditional expression of the avalanche asymptotic current and the gain of a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode were modified.

  6. Local transverse coupling impedance measurements in a synchrotron light source from turn-by-turn acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlà, Michele; Benedetti, Gabriele; Günzel, Thomas; Iriso, Ubaldo; Martí, Zeus

    2016-12-01

    Transverse beam coupling impedance is a source of beam instabilities that limits the machine performance in circular accelerators. Several beam based techniques have been used to measure the transverse impedance of an accelerator, usually based on the optics distortion produced by the impedance source itself. Beam position monitor turn-by-turn analysis for impedance characterization has been usually employed in large circumference machines, while synchrotron light sources have mainly used slow orbit based techniques. Instead, the work presented in this paper uses for the first time turn-by-turn data at ALBA to advance the measurement technique into the range of the typically small impedance values of modern light sources. We have measured local impedance contributions through the observation of phase advance versus bunch charge using the betatron oscillations excited with a fast dipole kicker. The ALBA beam position monitor system and the precision of the turn-by-turn analysis allowed to characterize the main sources of transverse impedance, in good agreement with the model values, including the impedance of an in-vacuum undulator.

  7. Local transverse coupling impedance measurements in a synchrotron light source from turn-by-turn acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Carlà

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam coupling impedance is a source of beam instabilities that limits the machine performance in circular accelerators. Several beam based techniques have been used to measure the transverse impedance of an accelerator, usually based on the optics distortion produced by the impedance source itself. Beam position monitor turn-by-turn analysis for impedance characterization has been usually employed in large circumference machines, while synchrotron light sources have mainly used slow orbit based techniques. Instead, the work presented in this paper uses for the first time turn-by-turn data at ALBA to advance the measurement technique into the range of the typically small impedance values of modern light sources. We have measured local impedance contributions through the observation of phase advance versus bunch charge using the betatron oscillations excited with a fast dipole kicker. The ALBA beam position monitor system and the precision of the turn-by-turn analysis allowed to characterize the main sources of transverse impedance, in good agreement with the model values, including the impedance of an in-vacuum undulator.

  8. Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-16

    It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

  9. The postmodern turn in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, J V

    2001-10-01

    The postmodern critique, often referred to as social constructionism, has influenced nearly all disciplines, including recently the domain of psychology--and most particularly psychoanalysis. This article presents an exposition of the "postmodern turn," including some historical perspective, a description of its theoretical elements as related to psychological practice, as well as standard objections to its theories. This author believes that many of the concepts inherent to a social constructionist approach are compelling for theory and practice in group therapy. Clinical case studies are cited in describing how postmodern theories present a natural fit for group therapy. Furthermore, specific implications of this model are delineated for the arduous task of leading groups.

  10. Turning points in removable partial denture philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    This article discusses key turning points in removable partial denture (RPD) philosophy. Early advancements tended to focus upon improving the technical quality of the prosthesis itself. The beginning of the 20th century brought significant public pressure upon the dental profession due to consequences associated with poor quality fixed prostheses. The result was dramatic improvement and heavy demand for RPDs. Technical and efficiency issues conspired to temper this enthusiasm, eventually resulting in reduced respect for RPDs. By highlighting key writings and technical issues during these periods of change it is hoped the reader will gain a more precise understanding of the current status of RPD philosophy.

  11. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters.

  12. IBIS/PICsIT in-flight performances

    CERN Document Server

    Cocco, G D; Celesti, E; Foschini, L; Gianotti, F; Labanti, C; Malaguti, G; Mauri, A; Rossi, E; Schiavone, F; Spizzichino, A; Stephen, J B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M

    2003-01-01

    PICsIT (Pixellated Imaging CaeSium Iodide Telescope) is the high energy detector of the IBIS telescope on-board the INTEGRAL satellite. PICsIT operates in the gamma-ray energy range between 175 keV and 10 MeV, with a typical energy resolution of 10% at 1 MeV, and an angular resolution of 12 arcmin within a \\~100 square degree field of view, with the possibility to locate intense point sources in the MeV region at the few arcmin level. PICsIT is based upon a modular array of 4096 independent CsI(Tl) pixels, ~0.70 cm^2 in cross-section and 3 cm thick. In this work, the PICsIT on-board data handling and science operative modes are described. This work presents the in-flight performances in terms of background count spectra, sensitivity limit, and imaging capabilities.

  13. Holodiagram: elliptic visualizing interferometry, relativity, and light-in-flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Nils H

    2014-04-10

    In holographic interferometry, there is usually a static distance separating the point of illumination and the point of observation. In Special Relativity, this separation is dynamic and is caused by the velocity of the observer. The corrections needed to compensate for these separations are similar in the two fields. We use the ellipsoids of the holodiagram for measurement and in a graphic way to explain and evaluate optical resolution, gated viewing, radar, holography, three-dimensional interferometry, Special Relativity, and light-in-flight recordings. Lorentz contraction together with time dilation is explained as the result of the eccentricity of the measuring ellipsoid, caused by its velocity. The extremely thin ellipsoid of the very first light appears as a beam aimed directly at the observer, which might explain the wave or ray duality of light and entanglement. Finally, we introduce the concept of ellipsoids of observation.

  14. ATM solar array in-flight performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J. P.; Crabtree, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The physical and electrical characteristics of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) solar array are described and in-flight performance data are analyzed and compared with predicted results. Two solar cell module configurations were used. Type I module consists of 228 2 x 6 cm solar cells with two cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. Type II modules contain 684 2 x 2 cm cells with six cells in parallel and 114 cells in series. A different interconnection scheme was used for each type. Panels using type II modules with mesh interconnect system performed marginally better than those using type I module with loop interconnect system. The average degradation rate for the ATM array was 8.2% for a 271-day mission.

  15. A review of critical in-flight events research methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, W. C.; Rockwell, T. H.; Smith, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Pilot's cognitive responses to critical in-flight events (CIFE's) were investigated, using pilots, who had on the average about 2540 flight hours each, in four experiments: (1) full-mission simulation in a general aviation trainer, (2) paper and pencil CIFE tests, (3) interactive computer-aided scenario testing, and (4) verbal protocols in fault diagnosis tasks. The results of both computer and paper and pencil tests showed only 50 percent efficiency in correct diagnosis of critical events. The efficiency in arriving at a diagnosis was also low: over 20 inquiries were made for 21 percent of the scenarios diagnosed. The information-seeking pattern was random, with frequent retracing over old inquiries. The measures for developing improved cognitive skills for CIFE's are discussed.

  16. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  17. Optimal turning method of composting regarding hygienic safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masafumi Tateda; Le Duc Trung; Michihiko Ike; Masanori Fujita

    2005-01-01

    The new turning method was proposed and verified its effectiveness to pathogens by laboratory scale experiments. Considering the results obtained from the previous studies, it could be said that turning of a composting pile was essential in terms of hygienic aspects but the number of turning should be minimized. Effectiveness of inactivation was estimated for each composting run. From this estimation,turning by layers, which is different from conventional turning that mixes compost pile entirely, was proposed and investigated its performance by experiments. Composting operations with static pile method, complete mix(conventional) turning method, and proposed turning( layer turning) method were done and their effectiveness on inactivation of indicator microorganism was evaluated and compared.As results, the conventional turning method was not a proper method in terms of pathogen inactivation, whereas, the proposed turning method showed an excellent performance and should be employed in a composting operation.

  18. Evaluation of machining dispersions for turning process

    CERN Document Server

    Lefebvre, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    In this article we propose to extend the model of simulation of dispersions in turning based on the geometrical specifications. Our study is articulated around two trends of development: the first trend relates to the geometrical model. The geometrical model suggested must allow a follow-up of the geometry of the part during the simulation of machining. It is thus a question of carrying out a systematic treatment of the whole dimensioning and tolerancing process while being based on the principles of the \\DeltaL method. We also planned to integrate this type of specification in the model of simulation of machining suggested. It is more generally a question of extending the traditional model for better taking into account the multi axis specification of coaxiality and perpendicularity on the turned workpieces. The second trend of our study relates to the widening of the field of application of the model. We propose to extend the field of application of the model by taking into account the modifications of seve...

  19. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  20. Curious terminal turn of rolling rings

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Alam, Reza

    2014-01-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks have definite centers of rotation until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a similar kinematics, moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MINIMUM QUANTITY LUBRICANTS IN ALLOY STEEL TURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L B Abhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate health and environmental problems caused by using conventional cutting fluid in the metal cutting industry, a new economical and practical approach to minimum quantity of lubrication machining technique is developed. Turning is a widely used metal removal process in manufacturing industry that involves generation of high cutting forces and temperature. Lubrication becomes critical to minimize the effects of these forces and temperature on cutting tool and work piece. Strained environment is a global problem. In metalcutting industry the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8-16 % of the total production costs. Development of lubricants that is eco-friendly and economically is acquiring importance. In this context, using minimum quantity of lubrication of boric acid mixed with base oil SAE 40 has proved to be a feasible alternative to the conventional cutting fluid. In the present work 10% boric acid by weight mixed with base oil SAE 40 is used as a MQL in turning process. Variations in cutting (lubricant force, cutting temp, chip thickness and surface roughness are studied under different machining conditions. The results indicate that there is a considerable improvement in machining performance with MQL assisted machining compared to dry machining.

  2. Remaining useful tool life predictions in turning using Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaydeep M. Karandikar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tool wear is an important factor in determining machining productivity. In this paper, tool wear is characterized by remaining useful tool life in a turning operation and is predicted using spindle power and a random sample path method of Bayesian inference. Turning tests are performed at different speeds and feed rates using a carbide tool and MS309 steel work material. The spindle power and the tool flank wear are monitored during cutting; the root mean square of the time domain power is found to be sensitive to tool wear. Sample root mean square power growth curves are generated and the probability of each curve being the true growth curve is updated using Bayes’ rule. The updated probabilities are used to determine the remaining useful tool life. Results show good agreement between the predicted tool life and the empirically-determined true remaining life. The proposed method takes into account the uncertainty in tool life and the growth of the root mean square power at the end of tool life and is, therefore, robust and reliable.

  3. Turn-by-turn system and its primary experiment at HLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun-Hua; LIU Zu-Ping; LIU Jian-Hong; SUN Bao-Gen; LI Wei-Min; ZHAN Zhi-Feng

    2003-01-01

    During the Phase Ⅱ project of NSRL, a turn by turn BPM (Beam Position Monitor) system is proposedfor storage ring diagnostics which engages log-ratio electronics circuit to measure machine properties of the HLS(Hefei Light Source) storage ring. The log-ratio processor works at 408 MHz, twice the RF frequency of HLS. Mod-ern logarithmic amplifiers with wide dynamic range, great bandwidth, good logarithmic conformance, and low costare attractive for beam position measurements. Injection kicker and the stripline-electrode resonant exciting methodsare used to excite beam for nonlinear beam dynamics and phase space studies of stored beam. Up to 2 seconds of dataacquisition is ensured. In this paper we present the performance of each component and preliminary test results of theturn-by-turn BPM system.

  4. Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Hui; ZHAO Zhen-Tang

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  5. Introduction: The Participatory Turn in Urbanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroš Krivý

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Footprint examines the recent participatory turn in urban planning and urban design. It discusses the co-opting of participatory processes by planning departments, the systematic disregard of inequalities, and the empowering of the market resulting from the ‘anti-statism’ present in many participatory schemes.What is the relationship between the institutionalisation of participation and the practices of autonomy, self-organisation, and inclusion? When and how does genuine empowerment of collectives take place? Does the demand for the empowerment of local organisations and communities strengthen the market forces at the expense of central government?This issue attempts to problematise ‘participation’, to call attentions to some of its shortcomings, deficits, and limitations, not in order to necessarily bypass the demand for the democratisation of the urban, but in order to rectify and strengthen it.

  6. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  7. Hard turning micro-machine tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVor, Richard E; Adair, Kurt; Kapoor, Shiv G

    2013-10-22

    A micro-scale apparatus for supporting a tool for hard turning comprises a base, a pivot coupled to the base, an actuator coupled to the base, and at least one member coupled to the actuator at one end and rotatably coupled to the pivot at another end. A tool mount is disposed on the at least one member. The at least one member defines a first lever arm between the pivot and the tool mount, and a second lever arm between the pivot and the actuator. The first lever arm has a length that is less than a length of the second lever arm. The actuator moves the tool mount along an arc.

  8. Turning Video Resource Management into Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Kou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Big data makes cloud computing more and more popular in various fields. Video resources are very useful and important to education, security monitoring, and so on. However, issues of their huge volumes, complex data types, inefficient processing performance, weak security, and long times for loading pose challenges in video resource management. The Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS is an open-source framework, which can provide cloud-based platforms and presents an opportunity for solving these problems. This paper presents video resource management architecture based on HDFS to provide a uniform framework and a five-layer model for standardizing the current various algorithms and applications. The architecture, basic model, and key algorithms are designed for turning video resources into a cloud computing environment. The design was tested by establishing a simulation system prototype.

  9. Magic-angle turning with double acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Tatsuya; Takegoshi, K

    2017-01-01

    The double-acquisition scheme for efficient data collection of hypercomplex data (the States method) of a two-dimensional experiment is adopted to magic-angle hopping (MAH) and magic-angle turning (MAT) experiments, which are powerful methods to measure the principal values of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in a powder sample. It is shown that the double acquisition MAT (DAMAT) sequence realizes the S/N ratio comparable to or better than those of other variants of the MAH/MAT sequences. In addition, we show that DAMAT has preferable features that there are no spinning sidebands in the indirect dimension, and no spectral shearing is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Turning Forbidden Transitions into Dominant Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Nicholas; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Surface phonon polaritons are hybrid modes of photons and optical phonons that can propagate on the surface of a polar dielectric. In this work, we show that the precise combination of confinement and bandwidth offered by surface phonon polaritons allows for the ability to take forbidden transitions and turn them into the primary means by which an electron emits light. We show that high-order multipolar transitions and two-photon emission processes can be over an order of magnitude faster than competing dipole transitions, as opposed to being as much as eight to ten orders of magnitude slower in free space. Our results have direct implications for the design of fundamentally new types of emitters in the mid and far IR: ones which prefer to change their angular momentum by large amounts and also ones that prefer to emit a relatively broad spectrum of entangled photons - potentially allowing for new sources of both single and multiple photons.

  11. Turning the Appliance Market Around towards A++

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen; Brange, Birgitte; Guldbrandsen, Tom

    2007-01-01

    are described in the paper and some conclusions are drawn. The campaigns have consisted of various elements, namely 1) a general information about the campaigns, 2) a subsidy offered temporarily during some months to people buying the A, A+ and A++ models, 3) a website where people can easily find the most...... energy efficient model within their specification, and 4) in the website are also listed the shops, where consumers can get the appliances at lowest prices. The latter was the most innovative and maybe also the most effective measure in the package. Results showed up as a permanent U-turn of the market...... in the course of a few years. Where models C, D, E earlier dominated the market, the A, A+ and A++, came to dominate as the standard models in stock. Consequently, their prices dropped significantly. The theory of a rational market behavior is based on some assumptions, one being that full information...

  12. Turning the spotlight: Looking at the interviewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Randi Skovbjerg

    an explanation for variations in interviewer behaviour? The point of departure of the study is two interviewers - a female and a male - who have conducted a range of sociolinguistic interviews for the LANCHART Centre. The studies show clear differences in what the interviewers classify as their best and worst...... worst. It also seems that face-work is carried out more carefully in her best interview than in her worst. Moreover, studying the female interviewer's best and worst interview show clear differences in the number of dispreferred responses to assessments and next turn repair initiators as responses...... interviewers reveal consistencies in the two interviewers' interview style. I conclude that the female interviewer has features which may be characterized as a risky and potentially face-threatening interview style, whereas the male interviewer has a less risky and rather flexible style. I find...

  13. Scalets, wavelets and (complex) turning point quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, C. R.; Brooks, H. A.

    2001-05-01

    Despite the many successes of wavelet analysis in image and signal processing, the incorporation of continuous wavelet transform theory within quantum mechanics has lacked a compelling, first principles, motivating analytical framework, until now. For arbitrary one-dimensional rational fraction Hamiltonians, we develop a simple, unified formalism, which clearly underscores the complementary, and mutually interdependent, role played by moment quantization theory (i.e. via scalets, as defined herein) and wavelets. This analysis involves no approximation of the Hamiltonian within the (equivalent) wavelet space, and emphasizes the importance of (complex) multiple turning point contributions in the quantization process. We apply the method to three illustrative examples. These include the (double-well) quartic anharmonic oscillator potential problem, V(x) = Z2x2 + gx4, the quartic potential, V(x) = x4, and the very interesting and significant non-Hermitian potential V(x) = -(ix)3, recently studied by Bender and Boettcher.

  14. The experience turn as ‘bandwagon’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars; Eide, Dorthe

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the bandwagon metaphor to analyse, in two rural contexts, how small tourism firms become engaged in the idea of the experience economy and how the idea is turned into practice through network formation and innovation. In developing a practice-based approach we use the bandwagon...... metaphor to conceptualize network formation and innovation in terms of a ‘journey’. Following the practice-based literature on bandwagons, the journey starts by labelling an idea that is broad enough to give meaning to, and pull together, a number of diverse supporters. The journey also depends on two...... further central processes, namely appropriation and narrowing the workspace. One Norwegian and one Danish network are studied using a case methodology. They are two rural networks of mainly small tourism firms. The empirical study confirms and illustrates how the bandwagon effect involves these three core...

  15. Turning on gravity with the Higgs mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Stephon; Magueijo, Joao

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how a Higgs mechanism could be responsible for the emergence of gravity in extensions of Einstein theory. In this scenario, at high energies, symmetry restoration could "turn off" gravity, with dramatic implications for cosmology and quantum gravity. The sense in which gravity is muted depends on the details of the implementation. In the most extreme case gravity's dynamical degrees of freedom would only be unleashed after the Higgs field acquires a non-trivial vacuum expectation value, with gravity reduced to a topological field theory in the symmetric phase. We might also identify the Higgs and the Brans-Dicke fields in such a way that in the unbroken phase Newton's constant vanishes, decoupling matter and gravity. We discuss the broad implications of these scenarios.

  16. LHC One-turn Delay Feedback Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Molendijk, J

    2012-01-01

    The LHC One-Turn delay FeedBack (OTFB) is an FPGA based feedback system part of the LHC cavity controller, which produces gain only around the revolution frequency (frev = 11.245 kHz) harmonics. As such, it helps reduce the transient beam loading and effective cavity impedance. Consequently, it increases the stability margin for Longitudinal Coupled Bunch Instabilities driven by the cavity impedance at the fundamental and allows reliable operation at higher beam currents. The OTFB was commissioned on all sixteen cavities in mid-October 2011 and has been used in operation since. The commissioning procedure and algorithms for setting-up are presented. The resulting improvements in transient beam loading, beam stability, and required klystron power are analyzed. The commissioning of the OTFB reduced the cavity voltage phase modulation from approximately six degrees peak-to-peak to below one degree at 400 MHz with nominal bunch intensity of 1.1e11 protons.

  17. MEDIACRACY TURNS INTO A SYNONYM OF MEDIOCRITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina CHIPER

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The link between freedom of speech and democracy is based on ideological legitimacy report. A new phenomenon which is worth noticing is the conversion of the freedom of expression from a freedom seen in certain aspects as a solitary freedom into a communication of the masses. Another challenge is prompted by the change of the traditional communication system at the dawn of technology, Internet and its various applications, as well as of the channels used. A weak point is the change in the values scale. If a journalist or a book is deemed good or valuable in terms of competence and ideas, these values are now unfortunately inspired by what we watch on TV. In this train of thoughts, reliable opinion leaders are no longer the same. Mediacracy turns into a synonym of mediocrity with affectivity and emotion prevailing over reason and instead of the communication of thoughts and opinions.

  18. 'There's Just Nowhere Else to Turn'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertel, Troels Fibæk

    2016-01-01

    Thiis chapter presents an empirical study of the use of self-organised Facebook groups for civic participation among individuals who are sffering from incapacitating long term illness and who experience that they have, in various ways and for various reasons, been “caught up” in the Danish...... municipal system. Challenged by illness and their experiences interacting with the municipal system, these individuals have turned to groups on Facebook – often closed and secret – to communicate with others for information and support. Based on analysis of qualitative interviews grounded in online...... observation, the chapter examines the use of – and the potentials and problems associated with – networked communication in facilitating mundane, everyday civic participation among these individuals....

  19. Turning Oscillations Into Opportunities: Lessons from a Bacterial Decision Gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Daniel; Lu, Mingyang; Stavropoulos, Trevor; Onuchic, Jose'; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-04-01

    Sporulation vs. competence provides a prototypic example of collective cell fate determination. The decision is performed by the action of three modules: 1) A stochastic competence switch whose transition probability is regulated by population density, population stress and cell stress. 2) A sporulation timer whose clock rate is regulated by cell stress and population stress. 3) A decision gate that is coupled to the timer via a special repressilator-like loop. We show that the distinct circuit architecture of this gate leads to special dynamics and noise management characteristics: The gate opens a time-window of opportunity for competence transitions during which it generates oscillations that are turned into a chain of transition opportunities - each oscillation opens a short interval with high transition probability. The special architecture of the gate also leads to filtering of external noise and robustness against internal noise and variations in the circuit parameters.

  20. Folding pathways of a helix-turn-helix model protein

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, D

    1997-01-01

    A small model polypeptide represented in atomic detail is folded using Monte Carlo dynamics. The polypeptide is designed to have a native conformation similar to the central part of the helix-turn-helix protein ROP. Starting from a beta-strand conformation or two different loop conformations of the protein glutamine synthetase, six trajectories are generated using the so-called window move in dihedral angle space. This move changes conformations locally and leads to realistic, quasi-continuously evolving trajectories. Four of the six trajectories end in stable native-like conformations. Their folding pathways show a fast initial development of a helix-bend-helix motif, followed by a dynamic behaviour predicted by the diffusion-collision model of Karplus and Weaver. The phenomenology of the pathways is consistent with experimental results.

  1. 76 FR 37313 - Turning Point Solar LLC; Notice of Intent To Hold a Public Scoping Meeting and Prepare an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... monocrystalline photovoltaic panels mounted on fixed solar racking equipment and the construction of access roads... photovoltaic generating facility in Noble County, Ohio. Turning Point Solar LLC is requesting that RUS...

  2. Ground-based and in-flight simulator studies of flight characteristics of a twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane during approach and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Neely, W. R., Jr.; Deal, P. L.; Yenni, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom ground-based and in-flight simulator studies were conducted to evaluate the low-speed flight characteristics of a twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane and to compare these characteristics with those of a large, single-fuselage (reference) transport configuration similar to the Lockheed C-5A airplane. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing task. The results of this study indicated that the twin-fuselage transport concept had acceptable but unsatisfactory longitudinal and lateral-directional low-speed flight characteristics, and that stability and control augmentation would be required in order to improve the handling qualities. Through the use of rate-command/attitude-hold augmentation in the pitch and roll axes, and the use of several turn coordination features, the handling qualities of the simulated transport were improved appreciably. The in-flight test results showed excellent agreement with those of the six-degree-of-freedom ground-based simulator handling qualities tests. As a result of the in-flight simulation study, a roll-control-induced normal-acceleration criterion was developed. The handling qualities of the augmented twin-fuselage passenger transport airplane exhibited an improvement over the handling characteristics of the reference (single-fuselage) transport.

  3. Robust linear coupling correction with N-turn maps

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram Fischer

    2003-01-01

    The linear one-turn map of a storage ring contains coupling information on which a correction algorithm can be based. In principal, the one-turn matrix can be fitted from turn-by-turn data of beam position monitors. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the coupling information can be greatly enhanced by fitting maps for larger turn numbers N. Furthermore, by using a number of beam position monitors in a region with only small coupling sources, the determination of the N-turn map can be made ...

  4. First simultaneous measurement of sextupolar and octupolar resonance driving terms in a circular accelerator from turn-by-turn beam position monitors data

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, A; Ewald, F; Bec, G Le; Scheidt, K B

    2014-01-01

    Beam lifetime in storage rings and colliders is affected by, among other effects, lattice nonlinearities. Their control are of great benefit to the dynamic aperture of an accelerator, whose enlargement leads in general to more efficient injection and longer lifetime. This article describes a procedure to evaluate and correct unwanted nonlinearities by using turn-by-turn beam position monitor data, which is an evolution of previous works on the resonance driving terms (RDTs). Effective sextupole magnetic errors and tilts at the ESRF electron storage ring are evaluated and corrected (when possible) by using this technique. For the first time, also octupolar RDTs could be measured and used to define an octupolar model for the main quadrupoles. Most of the deviations from the model observed in the sextupolar RDTs of the ESRF storage ring turned out to be generated by focusing errors rather than by sextupole errors. These results could be achieved thanks to new analytical formulas describing the harmonic content o...

  5. Turning to ontology in STS? Turning to STS through ‘ontology’?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heur, B.; Leydesdorff, L.; Wyatt, S.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the claim of an ‘ontological turn’ in science and technology studies (STS). Despite an increase in references to ‘ontology’ in STS since 1989, we show that there has not so much been an ontological turn as multiple discussions deploying the language of ontology, consistin

  6. Turning to Ontology in STS? Turning to STS through ‘Ontology’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heur, B.; Leydesdorff, L.; Wyatt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the claim of an ‘ontological turn’ in science and technology studies (STS). Despite an increase in references to ‘ontology’ in STS since 1989, we show that there has not so much been an ontological turn as multiple discussions deploying the language of ontology, consistin

  7. Turn-by-Turn Imaging of the Transverse Beam Profile in PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Alan A.; Petree, Mark; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    During injection or instability, the transverse profile of an individual bunch in a storage ring can change significantly in a few turns. However, most synchrotron-light imaging techniques are not designed for this time scale. We have developed a novel diagnostic that enhances the utility of a fast gated camera by adding, inexpensively, some features of a dual-axis streak camera, in order to watch the turn-by-turn evolution of the transverse profile, in both x and y. The beam's elliptical profile is reshaped using cylindrical lenses to form a tall and narrow ellipse--essentially the projection of the full ellipse onto one transverse axis. We do this projection twice, by splitting the beam into two paths at different heights, and rotating the ellipse by 90{sup o} on one path. A rapidly rotating mirror scans these vertical ''pencils'' of light horizontally across the photocathode of the camera, which is gated for 3 ns on every Nth ring turn. A single readout of the camera captures 100 images, looking like a stroboscopic photograph of a moving object. We have observed the capture of injected charge into a bunch and the rapid change of beam size at the onset of a fast instability.

  8. Why Critical Literacy Should Turn to "The Affective Turn": Making a Case for Critical Affective Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2016-01-01

    The central argument of this essay is that critical literacy with a rationalistic bent may not enable us to cope with ethical dilemmas in our responsiveness to human sufferings. I argue that critical literacy education would benefit from turning to the recent scholarship on affect/emotion studies. I draw upon the works of Sara Ahmed--one of the…

  9. Experimental nonlinear beam dynamics studies with turn- by-turn phase space monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terebilo, Andrei Gennadyevich

    1999-10-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of single particle and collective beam dynamics undertaken by the author in SPEAR electron storage ring. The technique used for measurement consists of exciting transverse oscillations of a bunch circulating in the ring with a fast kicker and observing the center of mass oscillations every turn for several thousand turns. The goal of this study was to develop new applications of the turn-by-turn technique to accelerator diagnostics. One innovation introduced is the use of a collective mode of the beam motion as a phase space probe. When in this mode the bunch behaves similar to a macroparticle and oscillates coherently. It is possible to control the growth/damping rate of this oscillation by adjusting the accelerator parameters. Another new tool proposed is the analysis of phase space trajectories in the time-frequency domain. This technique makes it possible to conduct nonlinear dynamics experiments such as observation of high order resonances in the frequency map and single-kick measurement of the tune dependence on the amplitude of oscillations.

  10. In-flight observation of long duration gamma-ray glows by aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; (Lex) van Deursen, A. P. J.; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Allasia, Cedric; Boissin, Jean Francois; Ostgaard, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    The Gamma-Ray Glow is a long-lasting (several seconds to minutes) X- and gamma radiation presumably originated from high-electric field of thunderclouds. Such glows were previously observed by aircraft, balloons, and from the ground. When detected on ground with other particles, i.e. electrons and neutrons, they are usually called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). Their measured spectra are often consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) mechanism. That is why RREA is a commonly accepted explanation for their existence. The gamma-ray glows are observed to be interrupted by lightning discharge, which terminates the high-electric field region. In January 2016 an Airbus A340 factory test aircraft was performing intentional flights through thunderstorms over Northern Australia. The aircraft was equipped with a dedicated in-flight lightning detection system called ILDAS (http://ildas.nlr.nl). The system also contained two scintillation detectors each with 38x38 mm cylinder LaBr3 crystals. While being at 12 km altitude the system detected a gamma-ray flux enhancement 30 times the background counts. It lasted for 20 seconds and was abruptly terminated by a lightning flash. The flash hit the aircraft and its parameters were recorded with 10 ns sampling time including gamma radiation. Ground-based lightning detection network WWLLN detected 4 strikes in the nearby region, all in association with the same flash. The ILDAS system recorded the time-resolved spectrum of the glow. In 6 minutes, after making a U-turn, the aircraft passed the same glow region. Smaller gamma-ray enhancement was again detected. In this presentation we will show the mapped event timeline including airplane, gamma-ray glow, WWLLN, and cloud data. We will discuss the glow's properties, i.e. intensity and differential spectrum, and its possible origin. This result will also be compared to previously reported observations.

  11. Set Down Study of Projectile in Flight Through Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kumar Choudhury

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deformation study of projectile immediately after firing is essential for its successful impact. A projectile that undergoes more than the tolerated amount of deformation in the barrel may not produce the requisite results. The study of projectile deformation before its impact requires it to be imaged in flight and perform some computation on the acquired image. Often the deformation tolerance is of the order of tens of micrometer and the acquired image cannot produce image with such accuracy because of photographic limitations. Therefore, it demands sub-pixel manipulation of the captured projectile image. In this work the diameter of a projectile is estimated from its image which became blur because of slow shutter speed. First the blurred image is restored and then various interpolation methods are used for sub-pixel measurement. Two adaptive geometrical texture based interpolation schemes are also proposed in this research. The proposed methods produce very good results as compared to the existing methods.Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 6, November 2014, pp.530-535, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.8114

  12. Duty hours and incidents in flight among commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Anna Donnla; Issartel, Johann; Fletcher, Richard; Warrington, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Working long duty hours has often been associated with increased risk of incidents and accidents in transport industries. Despite this, information regarding the intermediate relationship between duty hours and incident risk is limited. This study aimed to test a work hours/incident model to identify the interplay of factors contributing to incidents within the aviation industry. Nine hundred and fifty-four European-registered commercial airline pilots completed a 30-item survey investigating self-report attitudes and experiences of fatigue. Path analysis was used to test the proposed model. The fit indices indicated this to be a good fit model (χ(2) = 11.066, df = 5, p = 0.05; Comparative Fit Index = 0.991; Normed Fit Index = 0.984; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.962; Root Mean Square of Approximation = 0.036). Highly significant relationships were identified between duty hours and sleep disturbance (r = 0.18, p < 0.001), sleep disturbance and fatigue in the cockpit (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), and fatigue in the cockpit and microsleeps in the cockpit (r = 0.43, p < 0.001). A critical pathway from duty hours through to self-reported incidents in flight was identified. Further investigation employing both objective and subjective measures of sleep and fatigue is needed.

  13. LISA and its in-flight test precursor SMART-2

    CERN Document Server

    Vitale, S; Brillet, A; Buchman, S; Cavalleri, A; Cerdonio, M; Cruise, M; Cutler, C; Danzmann, K; Dolesi, R; Folkner, W; Gianolio, A; Jafry, Y; Hasinger, G; Heinzel, G; Hogan, C; Hüller, M; Hough, J; Phinney, S; Prince, T; Richstone, D O; Robertson, D; Rodrigues, M; Rüdiger, A; Sandford, M; Schilling, R; Shoemaker, D; Schutz, B; Stebbins, R; Stubbs, C; Sumner, T; Thorne, K; Tinto, M; Touboul, P; Ward, H; Weber, W; Winkler, W

    2002-01-01

    LISA will be the first space-home gravitational wave observatory. It aims to detect gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz/1 Hz range from sources including galactic binaries, super-massive black-hole binaries, capture of objects by super-massive black-holes and stochastic background. LISA is an ESA approved Cornerstone Mission foreseen as a joint ESA-NASA endeavour to be launched in 2010-11. The principle of operation of LISA is based on laser ranging of test-masses under pure geodesic motion. Achieving pure geodesic motion at the level requested for LISA, 3x10 sup - sup 1 sup 5 ms sup - sup 2 /sq root Hz at 0.1 mHz, is considered a challenging technological objective. To reduce the risk, both ESA and NASA are pursuing an in-flight test of the relevant technology. The goal of the test is to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude from the LISA performance. ESA has given this test as the primary goal of its technology dedicated mission SMART-2 with a launch in 2006. This paper describes the basi...

  14. In-Flight Calibration Processes for the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromund, K. R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Anderson, B. J.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Chutter, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.

    2015-12-01

    The calibration effort for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Analog Fluxgate (AFG) and Digital Fluxgate (DFG) magnetometers is a coordinated effort between three primary institutions: University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria (IWF); and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Since the successful deployment of all 8 magnetometers on 17 March 2015, the effort to confirm and update the ground calibrations has been underway during the MMS commissioning phase. The in-flight calibration processes evaluate twelve parameters that determine the alignment, orthogonalization, offsets, and gains for all 8 magnetometers using algorithms originally developed by UCLA and the Technical University of Braunschweig and tailored to MMS by IWF, UCLA, and GSFC. We focus on the processes run at GSFC to determine the eight parameters associated with spin tones and harmonics. We will also discuss the processing flow and interchange of parameters between GSFC, IWF, and UCLA. IWF determines the low range spin axis offsets using the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI). UCLA determines the absolute gains and sensor azimuth orientation using Earth field comparisons. We evaluate the performance achieved for MMS and give examples of the quality of the resulting calibrations.

  15. SPOT4 HRVIR first in-flight image quality results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Philippe; Breton, Eric; Meygret, Aime; Cabrieres, Bernard; Hazane, Philippe; Leger, Dominique

    1998-12-01

    The SPOT4 remote sensing satellite was successfully launched at the end of March 1998. It was designed first of all to guarantee continuity of SPOT services beyond the year 2000 but also to improve the mission. Its two cameras are now called HRVIR since a short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral band has been added. Like their predecessor HRV cameras, they provide 20-meter multispectral and 10-meter monospectral images with a 60 km swath for nadir viewing. SPOT4's first two months of life in orbit were dedicated to the evaluation of its image quality performances. During this period of time, the CNES team used specific target programming in order to compute image correction parameters and estimate the performance, at system level, of the image processing chain. After a description of SPOT4 system requirements and new features of the HRVIR cameras, this paper focuses on the performance deduced from in-flight measurements, methods used and their accuracy: MTF measurements, refocusing, absolute calibration, signal-to-noise Ratio, location, focal plane cartography, dynamic disturbances.

  16. Interferometric radiometer for in-flight detection of aviation hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L.; Kireev, Stanislav; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Cornman, Larry; Feltz, Wayne; Perram, Glen; Daniels, Taumi

    2008-08-01

    The Forward-Looking Interferometer (FLI) is a new instrument concept for obtaining the measurements required to alert flight crews to potential weather hazards to safe flight. To meet the needs of the commercial fleet, such a sensor should address multiple hazards to warrant the costs of development, certification, installation, training, and maintenance. The FLI concept is based on high-resolution Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) technologies that have been developed for ground based, airborne, and satellite remote sensing. The FLI concept is being evaluated for its potential to address multiple hazards including clear air turbulence (CAT), volcanic ash, wake vortices, low slant range visibility, dry wind shear, and icing, during all phases of flight. This project has three major elements: further sensitivity studies and applications of EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function) Regression; development of algorithms to estimate the hazard severity; and field measurements to provide an empirical demonstration of the FLI aviation hazard detection and display capability. These theoretical and experimental studies will lead to a specification for a prototype airborne FLI instrument for use in future in-flight validation. The research team includes the Georgia Tech Research Institute, Hampton University, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Air Force Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin.

  17. In-Flight Calibration Processes for the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromund, K. R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Anderson, B. J.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Chutter, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, E. L.

    2015-01-01

    The calibration effort for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) Analog Fluxgate (AFG) and DigitalFluxgate (DFG) magnetometers is a coordinated effort between three primary institutions: University of California, LosAngeles (UCLA); Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria (IWF); and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Since thesuccessful deployment of all 8 magnetometers on 17 March 2015, the effort to confirm and update the groundcalibrations has been underway during the MMS commissioning phase. The in-flight calibration processes evaluatetwelve parameters that determine the alignment, orthogonalization, offsets, and gains for all 8 magnetometers usingalgorithms originally developed by UCLA and the Technical University of Braunschweig and tailored to MMS by IWF,UCLA, and GSFC. We focus on the processes run at GSFC to determine the eight parameters associated with spin tonesand harmonics. We will also discuss the processing flow and interchange of parameters between GSFC, IWF, and UCLA.IWF determines the low range spin axis offsets using the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI). UCLA determines the absolutegains and sensor azimuth orientation using Earth field comparisons. We evaluate the performance achieved for MMS andgive examples of the quality of the resulting calibrations.

  18. In-Flight Self-Alignment Method Aided by Geomagnetism for Moving Basement of Guided Munitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-biao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to power-after-launch mode of guided munitions of high rolling speed, initial attitude of munitions cannot be determined accurately, and this makes it difficult for navigation and control system to work effectively and validly. An in-flight self-alignment method aided by geomagnetism that includes a fast in-flight coarse alignment method and an in-flight alignment model based on Kalman theory is proposed in this paper. Firstly a fast in-flight coarse alignment method is developed by using gyros, magnetic sensors, and trajectory angles. Then, an in-flight alignment model is derived by investigation of the measurement errors and attitude errors, which regards attitude errors as state variables and geomagnetic components in navigation frame as observed variables. Finally, fight data of a spinning projectile is used to verify the performance of the in-flight self-alignment method. The satisfying results show that (1 the precision of coarse alignment can attain below 5°; (2 the attitude errors by in-flight alignment model converge to 24′ at early of the latter half of the flight; (3 the in-flight alignment model based on Kalman theory has better adaptability, and show satisfying performance.

  19. Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely ... medicine. The pharmacist has filled the prescription. Now it's up to you to take the medicine safely. ...

  20. TOOL FORCE MODEL FOR DIAMOND TURNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongxiang; Sun Tao; Li Dan; Dong Shen

    2004-01-01

    A new tool force model to be presented is based upon process geometry and the characteristics of the force system,in which the forces acting on the tool rake face,the cutting edge rounding and the clearance face have been considered,and the size effect is accountable for the new model.It is desired that the model can be well applicable to conventional diamond turning and the model may be employed as a tool in the design of diamond tools.This approach is quite different from traditional investigations primarily based on empirical studies.As the depth of cut becomes the same order as the rounded cutting edge radius,sliding along the clearance face due to elastic recovery of workpiece material and plowing due to the rounded cutting edge may become important in micro-machining,the forces acting on the cutting edge rounding and the clearance face can not be neglected.For this reason,it is very important to understand the influence of some parameters on tool forces and develop a model of the relationship between them.

  1. IMPLEMENTATION PRINCIPLES – TURNING INTENTIONS INTO OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Faull

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Companies sometimes fail to take effective action even when they know what they should do. Recent research shows that this surprising situation is more common than one would expect. How can the track record of companies in achieving the outcomes targeted by manufacturing strategy be improved? This article proposes a set of eight principles to improve the chances of taking effective action to turn intentions into outcomes. Rooted in the literature, the principles have also surfaced in case based research and commented on in the context of international consulting activities.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Dit gebeur partykeer dat maatskappye nie doelgerig optree nie, ook al weet hulle wat hulle moet doen. Onlangse navorsing dui aan dat so 'n verrassende situasie meer algemeen is as wat mens sou verwag. Hoe kan die baanrekord van maatskapye verbeter word om doelwitte wat in bedryfsstrategie gestel word werklik te beryk? Hierdie artikel stel ‚n reeks van agt beginsels voor om die kans dat effektiewe aksie geneem word om wense in uitslae te omskep, te verbeter. Die beginsels, gewortel in die literatuur, het ook in gevallestudie-gebaseerde navorsing ter sprake gekom en word hier bespreek in die konteks van internasionale raadgewende werk.

  2. [TURNING THE PYRAMID IN PRENATAL CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohel-Shani, Iris; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty

    2015-10-01

    Most complications of pregnancy manifest towards the latter part of pregnancy. Nevertheless, present day diagnostic techniques, such as sonography, Doppler, biochemical screening tests, and the newly developed ability to study free fetal DNA in maternal blood, enables early identification of high risk groups for maternal and fetal morbidity, as well as fetal genetic and anatomical pathology. Dr. Nicolaides has coined this changing trend with the term "Turning the Pyramid". Early screening enables earlier and more directed follow-up with the application of relevant diagnostic tests. Obvious advantages include the potential to reduce maternal-fetal morbidity before it becomes apparent clinically. Additionally, the earlier diagnosis of fetal pathology, allows more time for parents and medical staff to assess the situation, and reach a decision regarding the continuation of the pregnancy. A possible drawback of such an approach, of early identification of high risk groups, is the uncertainty it arouses, sometimes for a long duration, with the accompanying apprehension and stress parents have to endure. A multidisciplinary team, consisting of specialists in fetal-maternal medicine, genetics, ultrasound, and perinatology, will be needed in order to best deal with the often complex information, which is becoming increasingly available at a very early stage of pregnancy.

  3. Cosmopolitan Pluralism: Beyond the Cultural Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Lawson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The ‘cultural turn’ has had a profound influence across the humanities and social sciences in the last few decades. In calling into question the universalist basis on which conventional methodological and normative assumptions have been based, the cultural turn has focused on the extent to which specificity and particularity underpin what we can know, how we can know it, and how this affects our being-in-the world. This has opened the way to a range of insights, from issues of pluralism and difference, both within political communities and between them, to the instability if not impossibility of foundations for knowledge. Too few studies embracing this ‘cultural turn’, however, pay more than cursory attention to the culture concept itself. This article suggests that conceptions of culture derived mainly from the discipline of anthropology dominate in political studies, including international relations, while humanist conceptions have been largely ignored or rejected. It argues further that we would do well to reconsider what humanist ideas can contribute to how ‘culture’ is both conceptualized and deployed in political thought and action, especially in countering the overparticularization of social and political phenomena that marks contemporary culturalist approaches.

  4. Diseases that turn African hair silky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajose, Frances O A

    2012-11-01

    African hair in its natural state poses tenacious grooming challenges; consequently a large portion of the African cosmetic industry is focused on means to relax the tight curls of African hair to make the hair more manageable. In malnourished and hypoproteinemic states, African hair straightens in an uncomplimentary manner. Recently, we observed that in certain diseases African hair changes to a desirable silky wavy texture. To identify the diseases that turn African hair silky and their parameters we examined 5612 dermatology patients at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. We then studied the clinical and basic laboratory parameters of those patients whose diseases were accompanied by the silky hair change. Silky hair change similar to the hair of the African neonatal child was observed in five diseases, namely AIDS, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, pulmonary tuberculosis with cachexia, and Behçet's disease. Our study identified retrogression of African hair to the neonatal structure in five diseases. Anemia of chronic illness, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and mild hypocalcemia were significant laboratory parameters. This is an important observation, which should excite and advance research into the nature and structure of African hair. The causes of structural hair changes should include these five diseases. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Rite of passage: the Seaway turns 40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.A.

    1999-10-01

    The 2,038-mile waterway stretching from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the Great Lakes has its 40th anniversary this year. Earlier this year, seaway management unveiled a computerized traffic management system that provides ship controllers along the waterway with rapidly updated ship location and movement information. The next step in the new Seaway Traffic Management system will be to install satellite-tracked transponders on Seaway vessels. Coal shipments in the Montreal-Lake Ontario section of the waterway fell last year 26% from 124,000 mt to 91,000 mt while coal movement along the Welland Canal rose 1.7% to 2,148,000 mt. The Seaway has felt the punch of reduced US coal exports. Shipping operators are concerned about what they characterise as US government subsidization of the Mississippi River waterway which they view as a direct competitor. Shipping companies have improved unloading equipment to improve turn-around time. The Interlake Steamship Co., for example, has recently converted a freighter to a self-loading configuration using high-angle conveyor (HAC) technology, making a self-contained unit that does not depend on the vessel's structure for support. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  6. Notes towards a surfacing of feminist theoretical turns

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that feminist theoretical turns are illuminating to study, as they make explicit how Western feminist theory is interested not only in the content of different theoretical turns, but also, relatedly, in how these turns move feminist theory in particular directions. Exploring some of the current and historical debate about turns in feminist theory, I pay particular attention to how these debates might be understood in terms of a wide range of work on the non-linear tempor...

  7. How Agents' Turn-taking Strategies Influence Impressions and Response Behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, ter Mark; Truong, Khiet P.; Heylen, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Different turn-taking strategies of an agent influence the impression that people have of it and the behaviors that they display in response. To study these influences, we carried out several studies. In the first study, subjects listened as bystanders to computer-generated, unintelligible conversat

  8. Europe joins the race to turn the Internet into one vast computer

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2000-01-01

    CERN is coordinating an European proposal to design internet and software protocols to turn the internet into a single gigantic computer - a 'grid'. The impetus has come from the challenges surrounding the analysis of the vast amounts of data which will be generated by the LHC (1 page).

  9. 77 FR 25131 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... proposal involves the installation of high-efficiency monocrystalline photovoltaic panels mounted on fixed... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY... Assessment (EA) associated with a solar generation project. The EA was prepared in accordance with...

  10. History of Education in Canada: Historiographic "Turns" and Widening Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Jofré, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores major historiographic "turns" in history of education with a focus, although not exclusively, on English-speaking Canada. It addresses the transformative intellectual impact of the turn toward social history on the history of education, the impact of cultural history and the linguistic turn, the reception of Michel…

  11. Turn Openings in Academic Talk: Where Goals and Roles Intersect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evison, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study uses Corpus Linguistic (CL) techniques to explore multiple turn openings in conjunction with comparative measures of turn-initial priming (the proportion of occurrences of a form that are turn-initial). Using a benchmark corpus of casual conversation as a point of comparison, six frequent items which have a particularly strong affinity…

  12. TURNING-OVER OF THE ELECTRIC DIPOLE IN A POLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-qi Li; Xin Suna; Sheng Li

    2001-01-01

    The transition from the biexciton to the exciton can turn over the direction of the electric dipole of a polymeric molecule. This turning-over action combined with the photoinduced polarization reversion can be used as a switch. The switching speed is governed by the relaxation time of the turning-over process, which can be determined by a dynamical simulation.

  13. History of Education in Canada: Historiographic "Turns" and Widening Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Jofré, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores major historiographic "turns" in history of education with a focus, although not exclusively, on English-speaking Canada. It addresses the transformative intellectual impact of the turn toward social history on the history of education, the impact of cultural history and the linguistic turn, the reception of Michel…

  14. Pragmatic Strategies of Turn-taking in Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁; 张玉珊

    2014-01-01

    Conversation is one of the basic forms of daily communication, while the research of turn-taking is the central issue in conversation analysis. In class the pragmatic strategies in turn-taking between teachers and students are the important interaction abilities. The good use of turn-taking helps students express themselves effectively and enhances the interactive communications successfully.

  15. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  16. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  17. In-flight degradation results for the UARS SOLSTICE instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1998-10-01

    The Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment is a three channel spectrometer designed for measuring the solar UV irradiance from 119 to 420 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 to 0.3 nm. The three channels are designated as the G, F, and N channels that cover the 119-190 nm, 170-320 nm, and 280-420 nm regions respectively. The SOLSTICE is aboard the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) which was launched on September 12, 1991. The degradation of the SOLSTICE sensitivity is primarily tracked in-flight by measuring a set of bright, early-type stars with the same optics and detectors and by only changing slit sizes and integration times. While the Sun changes by 1 percent in the near UV and by as much as a factor of 2 in the far UV, early-type main sequence stars are not expected to change by more than 1 percent in the UV for long time periods. The ensemble average of the SOLSTICE stellar observation indicate that these stars are indeed stable to 2 percent or better. Since the launch of UARS, the SOLSTICE sensitivity has decreased by a few percent per year. We attribute the degradation primarily to again effects for the photomultiplier tubes for all three channels and to diffusion between layers in the broadband interference filters for the F and N channels. There also appears degradation for the G channel diffraction grating related to excessive heating of the grating on a few days during the UARS mission. There appears only minor degradation associated with optical contamination, mainly because of the strict use of low-outgassing materials in the SOLSTICE instrument and maintenance of class 10,000 clean rooms and oil-free vacuum systems for all pre-flight testing of the SOLSTICE instrument.

  18. In-flight observations of electromagnetic interferences emitted by satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO JinBin; YANG JunYing; YUAN ShiGan; SHEN XuHui; LIU YuanMo; YAN ChunXiao; LI WenZhen; CHEN Tao

    2009-01-01

    Using the data from STAFF/TC-1, this paper for the first time analyzes the electromagnetic interferences of Chinese scientific satellite. The electromagnetic interference of satellite exists mainly below 30 Hz,but can extend to 190 Hz with an obviously decreasing power spectral density. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies below 190 Hz have good correlation with the solar aspect angle. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies between 190 and 830 Hz have also correlation with solar aspect angle. However, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies above 830 Hz have no correlation with the solar aspect angle. The correlation coefficient between solar aspect angel and electromagnetic interferences is around 0.90. The larger the solar aspect angle, the stronger the satellite electromagnetic interference. When the solar aspect angle increases from 90.6° to 93.6°, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies <10 Hz increase by 8 times and those at frequencies 190-830 Hz increase by 60%. This close association of electromagnetic interferences with the solar aspect angle indicates that the solar aspect angle is the main factor to determine the electromagnetic interferences.The electromagnetic interferences of satellite in sunlight are larger than those in eclipse. The electromagnetic interference produced by solar panel occupies about 87% in the low frequency bend (<100 Hz)and 94% in the high frequency band (>100 Hz) of the total electromagnetic interference produced by satellite. These in flight observations of electromagnetic radiation of satellites will be very helpful to the designs of future satellites of space sciences or earthquake sciences.

  19. In-flight observations of electromagnetic interferences emitted by satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using the data from STAFF/TC-1, this paper for the first time analyzes the electromagnetic interferences of Chinese scientific satellite. The electromagnetic interference of satellite exists mainly below 30 Hz, but can extend to 190 Hz with an obviously decreasing power spectral density. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies below 190 Hz have good correlation with the solar aspect angle. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies between 190 and 830 Hz have also correlation with solar as-pect angle. However, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies above 830 Hz have no correlation with the solar aspect angle. The correlation coefficient between solar aspect angel and electromagnetic interferences is around 0.90. The larger the solar aspect angle, the stronger the satellite electromagnetic interference. When the solar aspect angle increases from 90.6° to 93.6°, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies <10 Hz increase by 8 times and those at frequencies 190―830 Hz increase by 60%. This close association of electromagnetic interferences with the solar aspect angle indicates that the solar aspect angle is the main factor to determine the electromagnetic interferences. The electromagnetic interferences of satellite in sunlight are larger than those in eclipse. The electro-magnetic interference produced by solar panel occupies about 87% in the low frequency band (<100 Hz) and 94% in the high frequency band (>100 Hz) of the total electromagnetic interference produced by satellite. These in flight observations of electromagnetic radiation of satellites will be very helpful to the designs of future satellites of space sciences or earthquake sciences.

  20. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  1. Turn-Based War Chess Model and Its Search Algorithm per Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Nan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available War chess gaming has so far received insufficient attention but is a significant component of turn-based strategy games (TBS and is studied in this paper. First, a common game model is proposed through various existing war chess types. Based on the model, we propose a theory frame involving combinational optimization on the one hand and game tree search on the other hand. We also discuss a key problem, namely, that the number of the branching factors of each turn in the game tree is huge. Then, we propose two algorithms for searching in one turn to solve the problem: (1 enumeration by order; (2 enumeration by recursion. The main difference between these two is the permutation method used: the former uses the dictionary sequence method, while the latter uses the recursive permutation method. Finally, we prove that both of these algorithms are optimal, and we analyze the difference between their efficiencies. An important factor is the total time taken for the unit to expand until it achieves its reachable position. The factor, which is the total number of expansions that each unit makes in its reachable position, is set. The conclusion proposed is in terms of this factor: Enumeration by recursion is better than enumeration by order in all situations.

  2. Breaking New Ground with High Resolution Turn-By-Turn BPMs at the ESRF

    CERN Document Server

    Farvacque, L; Scheidt, K

    2001-01-01

    This High-Resolution, Turn-by-Turn BPM system is a low-cost extension to the existing BPM system, based on the RF-multiplexing concept, used for slow Closed-Orbit measurements. With this extension Beam Position measurements in both planes, at all (224) BPMs in the 844 m ESRF Storage Ring, for up to 2048 Orbit Turns with 1 μm resolution are performed. The data acquisition is synchronised to a single, flat 1 μs, transverse deflection kick to the 1μs beamfill in the 2.8μs revolution period. The high quality of this synchronisation, together with the good reproducibility of the deflection kick and the overall stability of the Closed Orbit beam allows to repeat the kick and acquisition in many cycles. The subsequent averaging of the data obtained in these cycles yields the 1um resolution. The latter allows lattice measurements with high precision such as the localisation of very small focussing errors and modulation in Beta values and phase advances. It also finds an unique ...

  3. Pedestrian safety under permissive left-turn signal control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Qi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At intersections with permissive only signal control, pedestrians will move at the phase with the parallel through vehicular movement and the permissive left-turn movement. The left-turn vehicles have to yield to both opposing vehicles and pedestrians at the crosswalk. Under such complicated driving conditions, collision risks rise if left-turn vehicles make misjudgments and fail to yield to the pedestrians. In this research, driving-simulation based experiments were conducted for identifying and assessing the impacts of the factors that contribute to the collision between the left-turn vehicles and the pedestrians during the permissive left-turn phase. The results of this study showed that the percentage of left-turn trucks and the pedestrian volume has significant impacts on the pedestrian safety under permissive left-turn signal control.

  4. First in-flight synchrotron X-ray absorption and photoemission study of carbon soot nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouf, F.-X.; Parent, P.; Laffon, C.; Marhaba, I.; Ferry, D.; Marcillaud, B.; Antonsson, E.; Benkoula, S.; Liu, X.-J.; Nicolas, C.; Robert, E.; Patanen, M.; Barreda, F.-A.; Sublemontier, O.; Coppalle, A.; Yon, J.; Miserque, F.; Mostefaoui, T.; Regier, T. Z.; Mitchell, J.-B. A.; Miron, C.

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the environmental impacts of combustion generated aerosols. Due to their complex composition and morphology, their chemical reactivity is not well understood and new developments of analysis methods are needed. We report the first demonstration of in-flight X-ray based characterizations of freshly emitted soot particles, which is of paramount importance for understanding the role of one of the main anthropogenic particulate contributors to global climate change. Soot particles, produced by a burner for several air-to-fuel ratios, were injected through an aerodynamic lens, focusing them to a region where they interacted with synchrotron radiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy were performed and compared to those obtained for supported samples. A good agreement is found between these samples, although slight oxidation is observed for supported samples. Our experiments demonstrate that NEXAFS characterization of supported samples provides relevant information on soot composition, with limited effects of contamination or ageing under ambient storage conditions. The highly surface sensitive XPS experiments of airborne soot indicate that the oxidation is different at the surface as compared to the bulk probed by NEXAFS. We also report changes in soot’s work function obtained at different combustion conditions.

  5. Displacement Theories for In-Flight Deformed Shape Predictions of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. L.; Tran, Van t.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement theories are developed for a variety of structures with the goal of providing real-time shape predictions for aerospace vehicles during flight. These theories are initially developed for a cantilever beam to predict the deformed shapes of the Helios flying wing. The main structural configuration of the Helios wing is a cantilever wing tubular spar subjected to bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The displacement equations that are formulated are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. Displacement theories for other structures, such as tapered cantilever beams, two-point supported beams, wing boxes, and plates also are developed. The accuracy of the displacement theories is successfully validated by finite-element analysis and classical beam theory using input-strains generated by finite-element analysis. The displacement equations and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) create a powerful means for in-flight deformation monitoring of aerospace structures. This method serves multiple purposes for structural shape sensing, loads monitoring, and structural health monitoring. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed to the ground-based pilot or used as input to the control system to actively control the shape of structures during flight.

  6. Hyperquarks and generation number

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmann, Alfons J

    2013-01-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin 1/2 preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  7. Discovery of Abnormal Flight Patterns in Flight Track Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Airspace System (NAS) is an ever changing and complex engineering system. As the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is developed, there...

  8. ASRM - Turning in a solid performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce; Thomas, John; Levinsky, Charles

    1992-07-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), currently in its design and development phase, will become the higher reliability/performance next-generation booster for the Space Shuttle. The ASRM design improves safety through the elimination of 229 potential leak paths, thereby eliminating a total of 312 causes of failure. The ASRM will also allow an additional 12,000 lb of payload to be carried by the Shuttle Orbiter. Construction of the ASRM will promote competition through the use of a government owned/contractor operated manufacturing facility. Continuous-mix propellant grain manufacture will be used to enhance safety, quality, and efficiency.

  9. ASRM - Turning in a solid performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce; Thomas, John; Levinsky, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), currently in its design and development phase, will become the higher reliability/performance next-generation booster for the Space Shuttle. The ASRM design improves safety through the elimination of 229 potential leak paths, thereby eliminating a total of 312 causes of failure. The ASRM will also allow an additional 12,000 lb of payload to be carried by the Shuttle Orbiter. Construction of the ASRM will promote competition through the use of a government owned/contractor operated manufacturing facility. Continuous-mix propellant grain manufacture will be used to enhance safety, quality, and efficiency.

  10. In-flight measurements of space count in the AVHRR solar reflectance bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, Alexander; Cao, Changyong; Sullivan, Jerry T.; Levin, Robert H.; Wu, Xiangqian; Galvin, Roy P.

    2005-01-01

    The solar reflectance bands (SRB) of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) flown onboard NOAA satellites are often referred to as non-calibrated in-flight. In contrast, the Earth emission bands (EEB) are calibrated using two reference points, deep space and the internal calibration target. In the SRBs, measurements of space count (SC) are also available, however, historically they are not used to specify the calibration offset ("zero count", ZC), which does not even appear in the calibration equation. A regression calibration formulation is used instead, equivalent to setting the ZC to a constant, whose value is specified from pre-launch measurements. Our analyses supported by a review of the instrument design and a wealth of historical SC information show that the SC varies in-flight and it differs from its pre-launch value. We therefore suggest that (1) the AVHRR calibration equation in the SRBs be re-formulated to explicitly use the ZC, consistently with the EEBs, and (2) the value of ZC be specified from the onboard measurements of SC. This study emphasizes the importance of clear discrimination between the SC (which is a measured quantity and therefore takes on a range of values, characterized by the empirical probability density function, PDF), from the ZC (which is a parameter in the calibration equation, i.e. a number whose value needs to be estimated from the measured SC as a mean, median or other statistic of the measured PDF). The ZC-formulation of the calibration equation is physically solid, and it minimizes human-induced calibration errors resulting from the use of a regression formulation with an un-constrained intercept. Specifying the calibration offset improves radiances, most notably at the low end of radiometric scale, and subsequently provides for more accurate vicarious determinations of the calibration slope (inverse gain). These calibration improvements are important for the products derived from the AVHRR low-radiances, such

  11. Georg Groddeck's maternal turn: its evolution and influence on early psychoanalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristeva, Galina; Poster, Mark F

    2013-09-01

    The paper examines the biographical, cultural and clinical influences on the "maternal turn" of Georg Groddeck, a German physician and correspondent of Sigmund Freud. It demonstrates Groddeck's influence on Sándor Ferenczi, Frieda Fromm-Reichmann and Karen Horney, each of whom influenced generations of psychoanalysts. The authors explore the resonance of Groddeck's work with several concepts of contemporary psychoanalysis and raise the question as to whether the roots of these psychoanalytic concepts were seeded by Groddeck's "maternal turn", passed on by the above psychoanalysts through intergenerational psychoanalytic training and further elaborated by later investigators who were not necessarily familiar with the work of Groddeck.

  12. Tracking the Turn Maneuvering Target Using the Multi-Target Bayes Filter with an Adaptive Estimation of Turn Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Xiang; Wu, De-Hui; Xie, Wei-Xin; Li, Liang-Qun

    2017-02-15

    Tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate is a challenging problem. The traditional solution for this problem is the use of the switching multiple models technique, which includes several dynamic models with different turn rates for matching the motion mode of the target at each point in time. However, the actual motion mode of a target at any time may be different from all of the dynamic models, because these models are usually limited. To address this problem, we establish a formula for estimating the turn rate of a maneuvering target. By applying the estimation method of the turn rate to the multi-target Bayes (MB) filter, we develop a MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, in order to track multiple maneuvering targets. Simulation results indicate that the MB filter with an adaptive estimation of the turn rate, is better than the existing filter at tracking the target that maneuvers at a variable turn rate.

  13. Convective heat transfer measurements from a NACA 0012 airfoil in flight and in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Van Fossen, G. James; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured on a smooth and roughened NACA 0012 airfoil. Heat transfer measurements on the 0.533 m chord airfoil were made both in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft and in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Roughness was obtained by the attachment of uniform 2 mm diameter hemispheres to the airfoil surface in 4 distinct patterns. Flight data were taken for the smooth and roughened airfoil at various Reynolds numbers based on chord in the range 1.24 to 2.50 x 10 (exp 6) and at various angles of attack up to 4 deg. During these flight tests, the free stream velocity turbulence intensity was found to be very low (less than 0.1 percent). Wind tunnel data were acquired in the Reynolds number range 1.20 to 4.25 x 10 (exp t) and at angles of attack from -4 to 8 deg. The turbulence intensity in the IRT was 0.5 to 0.7 percent with the cloud generating sprays off. A direct comparison was made between the results obtained in flight and in the IRT. The higher level of turbulence in the IRT vs. flight had little effect on the heat transfer for the lower Reynolds numbers but caused a moderate increase in heat transfer at the high Reynolds numbers. Roughness generally increased the heat transfer.

  14. How to turn industrial biotechnology into reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Manfred

    2012-01-15

    The emerging bioeconomy is pulled by consumers asking for sustainable products and processes, governments enforcing climate protection and industries demanding feedstock flexibility and last but not least it is pushed by progress in basic and applied science. It will use renewable carbon sources not only from agri- and silviculture, but potentially also from industrial flue gases - for example, from power generation and steel production. Connecting such industries with the future bio-chemical industry results in a challenging new value chain which connects thus far separated industries. Realising this value chain needs disruptive technologies in providing sustainable carbon sources and transforming them into precursors for biochemical production up to consumer products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  16. Wide Range Flow and Heat Flux Sensors for In-Flight Flow Characterization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The tracking of critical flow features (CFFs) such as stagnation point, flow separation, shock, and transition in flight provides insight into actual aircraft...

  17. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight OFDR Structural Health Monitoring Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a cost-effective, robust, tunable, miniaturized, ruggedized, and flight tested swept laser for in-flight structural health monitoring. The objective...

  18. The effect of familiarity of conversation partners on conversation turns contributed by augmented and typical speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Ju

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this current research was to determine the effect of familiarity of conversation partners on contributed conversation turns to dyadic conversation between individuals who use AAC and typically speaking conversation partners. Three groups (G1-G3) participated in this study. Each group contained seven participants, including an individual who used a speech-generating device (SGD) and familiar and unfamiliar conversation partners. Each 20-min dyadic conversation was video-recorded for analysis of contributed conversation turns. The findings of the current study showed that the asymmetries of contributed conversation turns exist in both familiar and unfamiliar dyadic conversation between AAC users and typically speaking conversation partners. In addition, the asymmetry in the familiar dyadic conversation did not differ from that in the unfamiliar dyadic conversation.

  19. The turning point in the number of traffic fatalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüde, Ulf; Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The number of traffic fatalities reached a peak in many highly motorised countries around 1970. Some previous studies have suggested that the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities was inevitable and did not reflect a change in the underlying trends influencing the number of traffic...... fatalities. Other studies suggest that trends in traffic growth and fatality rate changed from before to after the turning point. This paper proposes two hypotheses about the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities. One hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate...... were the same before and after the turning point. The other hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate were different before and after the turning point was reached, in particular that the annual percentage decline in fatality rate became greater after the turning point...

  20. Effects of Right-Turn Vehicles on Traffic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hua-Yan; Huang, Hai-Jun; Wu, Wen-Xiang

    In real traffic, the right-turn vehicles at intersections are not controlled by signal lights and their effects are neglected. In this paper, we develop a cellular automaton model to formulate the complicated turning behaviors of vehicles at intersections. Simulation results are quite in accord with the observation on the Beijing's 4th ring road. It is found that the right-turn vehicles may produce queue near the intersection, a short lane designed for right-turn has prominent effect in improving traffic flow, but, a too long lane for right-turn cannot further decrease the stop ratio as expected. These findings deepen our understanding on the effects of right-turn vehicles and may help the design and management of intersections.

  1. Turn-Taking in Conversations for Language Learnin

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrie, Butterfield

    2015-01-01

    In their pioneering study Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson (1974) outlined the basic features of turn-taking in conversations between native speakers. Some researchers (e.g., Heritage & Clayman, 2010) have detailed how turns are taken among native speakers in news interviews, emergency calls, and a variety of other institutional settings. Other researchers have focused on how turn-taking is organized in educational settings such as language classrooms (e.g., Hosoda & Aline, 2006, 2010, 2013). ...

  2. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time we...

  3. Kant and the Turn to Romanticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Lakshmipathy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It frequently happens in philosophy that a philosopher, in trying to resolve a long-standing dispute between two opposing schools of thought, comes up with a schema that not only resolves the targeted dispute, but in addition necessarily imposes a residual set of regulations and norms, to which it had to subscribe in its attempt to solve the dispute, given its own presuppositions and points of departure. This residual set of norms is then viewed by the subsequent generation of thinkers, who start off their philosophy from a slightly different set of presuppositions, as being superfluous to what they conceive as the real project of the previous thinker. Hence, these subsequent philosophers build their philosophy by fundamentally modifying the stance of the previous thinker, all the while acknowledging the resolution of the dispute the latter carried out in his philosophy. One can view this process of fundamental shifts in orientation as the process of transition from one revolution to another in the history of philosophy.

  4. Biomass to energy : turning residue to revenue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, A. [DynaMotive Energy Systems Corp., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    A business overview of DynaMotive Energy Systems Corp. was presented. The company was founded in 1990 and has developed a fast pyrolysis process called BioTherm{sup TM}, which converts forest and agricultural biomass residue into char and a liquid fuel called BioOil. Fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor involves the rapid heating of biomass in the absence of oxygen. Feedstocks include bark and whitewood, sugar cane residue, wheat straw, and rice hulls. The environmental advantage of BioTherm technology is that it reduces undesirable emissions to the atmosphere and promotes the use of renewable energy, and waste product utilization. It has been predicted that biomass demand in the future will exceed gas, oil or coal. Other market drivers for the BioTherm process include energy security, energy cost, biomass residue management, and climate change objectives. BioOils can be used as an industrial fuel for boilers, kilns and for district heating. They can also be used as fuel for turbines in power generation. In time, BioOils can be used as a transportation fuel and in chemical refining. This paper described projects currently under development, project financing and output values. It also listed project development partners. 5 tabs., 12 figs.

  5. Temperature Measurement Challenges and Limitations for In-Flight Particles in Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Bishoy; Gougeon, Patrick; Moreau, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) acquires a significant interest from the industry. The deposited coatings using this technique were proved to have unique microstructural features compared to those built by conventional plasma spraying techniques. In order to optimize this process, in-flight particle diagnostics is considered a very useful tool that helps to control various spraying parameters and permits better coating reproducibility. In that context, the temperature of in-flight particles is one of the most important key elements that helps to optimize and control the SPS process. However, the limitations and challenges associated with this process have a significant effect on the accuracy of two-color pyrometric techniques used to measure the in-flight particle temperature. In this work, the influence of several nonthermal radiation sources on the particle temperature measurement is studied. The plasma radiation scattered by in-flight particles was found to have no significant influence on temperature measurement. Moreover, the detection of the two-color signals at two different locations was found to induce a significant error on temperature measurement. Finally, the plasma radiation surrounding the in-flight particles was identified as the main source of error on the temperature measurement of in-flight particles.

  6. Reductive potential - a savior turns stressor in protein aggregation cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is essential for basal signaling of several physiological processes, but a unilateral shift towards an 'oxidative' or 'reductive' trait will alter intracellular redox milieu. Typically, such an event influences the structure and the native function of a cell or an organelle. Numerous experimental research and clinical trials over the last 6 decades have demonstrated that enhanced oxygen-derived free radicals constitute a major stimulus to trigger damage in several human diseases, including cardiovascular complications supporting the theory of oxidative stress (OS). However, until our key discovery, the dynamic interrelationship between "Reductive Stress (RS)" and cardiac health has been obscured by overwhelming OS studies (Rajasekaran et al., 2007). Notably, this seminal finding spurred considerable interest in investigations of other mechanistic insights, and thus far the results indicate a similar or stronger role for RS, as that of OS. In addition, from our own findings we strongly believe that constitutive activation of pathways that enable sustained generation of reducing equivalents of glutathione (GSH), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) will cause RS and impair the basal cellular signaling mechanisms operating through harmless pro-oxidative events, in turn, disrupting single and/or a combination of key cellular processes such as growth, maturation, differentiation, survival, death etc., that govern healthy cell physiology. Here, we have discussed the role of RS as a causal or contributing factor in relevant pathophysiology of a major cardiac disease of human origin.

  7. Field gradient calculation of HTS double-pancake coils considering the slanted turns and the splice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Geon Woo; Kim, Jin Sub; Song, Seung Hyun; Ko, Tae Kuk [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Seung [JH ENGINEERING CO., LTD., Gunpo (Korea, Republic of); Lee, On You [Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To obtain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurement of membrane protein, an NMR magnet is required to generate high intensity, homogeneity, and stability of field. A High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnet is a promising alternative to a conventional Low-Temperature Superconducting (LTS) NMR magnet for high field, current density, and stability margin. Conventionally, an HTS coil has been wound by several winding techniques such as Single-Pancake (SP), Double-Pancake (DP), and layer-wound. The DP winding technique has been frequently used for a large magnet because long HTS wire is generally difficult to manufacture, and maintenance of magnet is convenient. However, magnetic field generated by the slanted turns and the splice leads to field inhomogeneity in Diameter of Spherical Volume (DSV). The field inhomogeneity degrades performance of NMR spectrometer and thus effect of the slanted turns and the splice should be analyzed. In this paper, field gradient of HTS double-pancake coils considering the slanted turns and the splice was calculated using Biot-Savart law and numerical integration. The calculation results showed that magnetic field produced by the slanted turns and the splice caused significant inhomogeneity of field.

  8. CONNECTION OF TURN AHEAD AND TURN BACK WITH MOTORIC ABILITIES OF THE FOURTH GRADE OF HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovica Petković

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The research is done for the purpose of determination and defining of the level of connection between some motoric abilities with success in realization of programmed contents from the area of gymnastics (turn ahead and turn back. The research is done on the sample of fifty students from the fourth grade of High School, on ten motoric tests and on two specific motoric assignments – turn ahead and turn back. The results of this research clearly point that there exist the multitude of statistically important coefficients of correlation between treated motoric abilities and applied motoric assignments.

  9. 拼贴的历史叙事与暴力的魔幻呈现--第六代的叙事转向与《天注定》的文化解析%Historical Montage and Violent Fantasy-Narrative Turn of the 6 th Generation and Cultural Interpretation of A Touch of Sin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昌奇

    2016-01-01

    《天注定》摘得2013年戛纳电影节最佳编剧奖,是贾樟柯里程碑式的新作品。影片保持了贾樟柯一贯的纪实风格和底层视角,是贾樟柯聚焦当下中国、书写民间记忆的延续和发展。然而,影片拼贴的叙事方式与纪实风格追求的“真实”却产生了难以缝合的断裂,也让个体化的历史叙事消弭在后现代的拼贴叙事之中。大量的动物形象、常常隐现的宗教意象,让电影关于“现实”暴力的言说呈现出更加复杂多元的荒诞与魔幻意味。%A Touch of Sin won the Best Screenplay Award at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival , which is a milestone film of Jia Zhangke ’ s works.The film maintains Jia ’ s consistent documentary style and unprivileged perspective , continuing and developing his focus on the current state of China and writing of folk memories .However , an irreparable breakage was generated between the montaged narration and pursuit of “reality” through documentary style in the film , as a result of which individ-ualized historical narration disappears among post-modern montage .A large number of animals and religious images that often appear indistinctly have endowed the cinematic language about “realistic”violence with more complex and multi-component implication of absurd and fantasy .

  10. Cutting forces during turning with variable depth of cut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadílek

    2016-03-01

    The proposed research for the paper is an experimental work – measuring cutting forces and monitoring of the tool wear on the cutting edge. It compares the turning where standard roughing cycle is used and the turning where the proposed roughing cycle with variable depth of cut is applied.

  11. Turn-Final or in English: A Conversation Analytic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Anna Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Or is commonly understood to be a conjunction linking two or more constituents. Ending a sentence with "or" is considered non-canonical in written interaction, but ending a turn with "or" occurs regularly in spoken interaction. This dissertation investigates the interactional work of turn-final or as in "Did his oxygen get…

  12. Synthesis of conformationally restricted beta-turn mimics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsselstijn, Maarten

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aims at developing methods for introducing conformational restriction in Beta-turns, the turn elements present in Beta-sheets. A conformationally restricted peptide might either be formed via incorporation of a bridging diamino acids in a growing peptide chain, or via covalent bond formi

  13. Contact tracing of in-flight measles exposures: lessons from an outbreak investigation and case series, Australia, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Selvey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a 2010 outbreak of nine cases of measles in Australia possibly linked to an index case who travelled on an international flight from South Africa while infectious.Methods: Three Australian state health departments, Victoria, Queensland and New South Wales, were responsible for the investigation and management of this outbreak, following Australian public health guidelines.Results: An outbreak of measles occurred in Australia after an infectious case arrived on a 12-hour flight from South Africa. Only one of four cases in the first generation exposed to the index case en route was sitting within the two rows recommended for contact tracing in Australian and other guidelines. The remaining four cases in subsequent generations, including two health care workers, were acquired in health care settings. Seven cases were young adults. Delays in diagnosis and notification hampered disease control and contact tracing efforts.Conclusion: Review of current contact tracing guidelines following in-flight exposure to an infectious measles case is required. Alternative strategies could include expanding routine contact tracing beyond the two rows on either side of the case’s row or expansion on a case-by-case basis depending on cabin layout and case and contact movements in flight. Releasing information about the incident by press release or providing generic information to everyone on the flight using e-mail or text messaging information obtained from the relevant airline, may also be worthy of consideration. Disease importation, inadequately vaccinated young adults and health care-related transmission remain challenges for measles control in an elimination era.

  14. Experience sharing, emotional reciprocity, and turn-taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa eStevanovic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective article, we consider the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking. There is much evidence suggesting that human social interaction is permeated by two temporal organizations: (1 the sequential framework of turn-taking and (2 the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity. From this perspective, we introduce two alternative hypotheses about how the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking could be viewed. According to the first hypothesis, the home environment of experience sharing is in the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity, while the motivation to share experiences is in tension with the sequential framework of turn-taking. According to the second hypothesis, then again, people’s inclination to coordinate their actions in terms of turn-taking is motivated precisely by their propensity to share experiences. We consider theoretical and empirical ideas in favor of both of these hypotheses and discuss their implications for future research.

  15. Simulation and Optimization of Turning-Milling Complex Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihong Guo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the turning-milling complex processing simulation platform is established based on the simulation and optimization platform of VERICUT NC machining, with WFL M65 turning-milling complex machining center as the research object; taking barrel body parts as an example, the simulation machining and related process issues checking in machining process is made and the analysis and optimization of effect factors is made for processing efficiency. The application indicates that: the research results effectively realize the simulation of the turning-milling complex machining process and the correctness verification and process optimization of the NC machining program, improve the processing efficiency and the processing quality, well improve the application level of enterprise turning-milling complex machining center, promote the development of the turning-milling complex machining technology.

  16. Body side-specific control of motor activity during turning in a walking animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Matthias; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Bockemühl, Till; Büschges, Ansgar

    2016-04-27

    Animals and humans need to move deftly and flexibly to adapt to environmental demands. Despite a large body of work on the neural control of walking in invertebrates and vertebrates alike, the mechanisms underlying the motor flexibility that is needed to adjust the motor behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated optomotor-induced turning and the neuronal mechanisms underlying the differences between the leg movements of the two body sides in the stick insect Carausius morosus. We present data to show that the generation of turning kinematics in an insect are the combined result of descending unilateral commands that change the leg motor output via task-specific modifications in the processing of local sensory feedback as well as modification of the activity of local central pattern generating networks in a body-side-specific way. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the specificity of such modifications in a defined motor task.

  17. Turn-by-Turn and Bunch-by-Bunch Transverse Profiles of a Single Bunch in a Full Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.; /Nevada U., Reno; Fisher, A.S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The apparatus described in this paper can image the evolution of the transverse profile of a single bunch, isolated from a full PEP-II ring of 1500 bunches. Using this apparatus there are two methods of single bunch imaging; bunch-by-bunch beam profiling can image every bunch in the ring a single bunch at a time with the images of sequential bunches being in order, allowing one to see variations in beam size along a train. Turn-by-turn beam profiling images a single bunch on each successive turn it makes around the ring. This method will be useful in determining the effect that an injected bunch has on a stable bunch as the oscillations of the injected bunch damp out. Turn-by-turn imaging of the synchrotron light uses a system of lenses and mirrors to image many turns of both the major and minor axis of a single bunch across the photocathode of a gateable camera. The bunch-by-bunch method is simpler: because of a focusing mirror used in porting the light from the ring, the synchrotron light from the orbiting electrons becomes an image at a certain distance from the mirror; and since the camera does not use a lens, the photocathode is set exactly at this image distance. Bunch-by-bunch profiling has shown that in the Low Energy Ring (LER) horizontal bunch size decreases along a train. Turn-by-turn profiling has been able to image 100 turns of a single bunch on one exposure of the camera. The turn-by-turn setup has also been able to image 50 turns of the minor axis showing part of the damping process of an oscillating injected charge during a LER fill. The goal is to image the damping of oscillations of injected charge for 100 turns of both the major and minor axis throughout the damping process during trickle injection. With some changes to the apparatus this goal is within reach and will make turn-by-turn imaging a very useful tool in beam diagnostics.

  18. Water and side-chain embedded π-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Dey, Sucharita; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2014-05-01

    Elucidating protein function from its structure is central to the understanding of cellular mechanisms. This involves deciphering the dependence of local structural motifs on sequence. These structural motifs may be stabilized by direct or water-mediated hydrogen bonding among the constituent residues. π-Turns, defined by interactions between (i) and (i + 5) positions, are large enough to contain a central space that can embed a water molecule (or a protein moiety) to form a stable structure. This work is an analysis of such embedded π-turns using a nonredundant dataset of protein structures. A total of 2965 embedded π-turns have been identified, as also 281 embedded Schellman motif, a type of π-turn which occurs at the C-termini of α-helices. Embedded π-turns and Schellman motifs have been classified on the basis of the protein atoms of the terminal turn residues that are linked by the embedded moiety, conformation, residue composition, and compared with the turns that have terminal residues connected by direct hydrogen bonds. Geometrically, the turns have been fitted to a circle and the position of the linker relative to its center analyzed. The hydroxyl group of Ser and Thr, located at (i + 3) position, is the most prominent linker for the side-chain mediated π-turns. Consideration of residue conservation among homologous sequences indicates the terminal and the linker positions to be the most conserved. The embedded π-turn as a binding site (for the linker) is discussed in the context of "nest," a concave depression that is formed in protein structures with adjacent residues having enantiomeric main-chain conformations.

  19. In-flight photogrammetric measurement of wing ice accretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcknight, R. C.; Palko, R. L.; Humes, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A photographic instrumentation system was developed for the Lewis icing research aircraft to measure wind ice accretions during flight. The system generates stereo photographs of the accretions which are then photogrammetrically measured by the Air Force Arnold Engineering and Development Center. The measurements yield a survey of spatial coordinates of an accretion's surface to an accuracy of at least + or - 0.08 cm. The accretions can then be matched to corresponding icing cloud and aerodynamic measurements. The system is being used to measure rime, mixed, and clear natural ice accretions.

  20. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting

  1. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model for Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting

  2. Study of transverse beam splitting for multi-turn extraction for the CERN PS2 ring

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannozzi, Massimo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a layout for the elements needed to split transversely the beam for a multi-turn extraction system in the PS2 ring is proposed and discussed. Additional sextupoles and octupoles are installed in one of the straight sections to generate the stable islands in the horizontal phase space. Scans over various beam dynamics quantities were performed to provide hints for an optimisation of the scheme. The results are presented and discussed in details.

  3. An investigation into the effects of hard turning surface integrity on component service life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen Ray

    Hard machining is the machining of materials at 45 HRC or greater. Recent improvements in machine tools and tool material have made hard machining a viable option. In order for hard machining to gain acceptance, it must be shown that as a finishing process, it will provide surfaces that meet the same quality standards as grinding. This research addressed the relationship between surface integrity generated by finishing processes and component service life. Fatigue and wear testing were utilized to determine the impact of hard turning as compared to the traditional finishing process of grinding. Test specimens were generated under controlled manufacturing processes and included five distinct surface conditions: hard turned with continuous white layer on the surface, hard turned with no white layer, ground, and hard turned and ground specimens subsequently superfinished. Extensive fatigue and wear testing was conducted to determine the performance of each surface condition relative to the other conditions. The surface integrity of each surface condition was thoroughly characterized through surface topography mapping, metallographic inspection, residual stress measurement, TEM analysis, and nanoindentation hardness measurements. The most significant conclusions were that the presence of white layers generated using new tooling did not affect the fatigue life or wear characteristics of the specimens. In fact, the physical evidence resulting from this investigation suggests that under controlled conditions (i.e. limited tool wear), the white layer is nothing more than an artifact resulting from the manufacturing process and does not contribute to the service life of the specimen. While the phase and crystallographic structure of the white layer is identical to the bulk material, the grains within the white layer have undergone significant grain refinement and the white layer is harder. Experiments were conducted that demonstrated that the physical characteristics of

  4. Process planning optimization on turning machine tool using a hybrid genetic algorithm with local search approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A turning machine tool is a kind of new type of machine tool that is equipped with more than one spindle and turret. The distinctive simultaneous and parallel processing abilities of turning machine tool increase the complexity of process planning. The operations would not only be sequenced and satisfy precedence constraints, but also should be scheduled with multiple objectives such as minimizing machining cost, maximizing utilization of turning machine tool, and so on. To solve this problem, a hybrid genetic algorithm was proposed to generate optimal process plans based on a mixed 0-1 integer programming model. An operation precedence graph is used to represent precedence constraints and help generate a feasible initial population of hybrid genetic algorithm. Encoding strategy based on data structure was developed to represent process plans digitally in order to form the solution space. In addition, a local search approach for optimizing the assignments of available turrets would be added to incorporate scheduling with process planning. A real-world case is used to prove that the proposed approach could avoid infeasible solutions and effectively generate a global optimal process plan.

  5. Glocal Features of In-flight Magazines: when Local Becomes Global. An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Maria Maci

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In-flights are magazines distributed by commercial airlines to their passengers and contain news items concerning travel, business and general-interest features, including tourist resorts. The choice of resorts to be described in in-flight magazines seems to depend on the destinations reached by the flights and apparently reflects a cultural and business tendency to focus tourists’ attention not just on popular destinations but also on less frequently advertised or less traditional tourism localities, and to invest in the rediscovery of local identities. Such rediscovery allows the exportation of local tourism to an international audience, thus providing considerable financial advantages. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the multimodal and linguistic strategies adopted by in-flight magazines so as to allow the local to become global. The analysis, based on a corpus of ten monthly in-flight magazines published in English and collected between 2009 and 2010, will try to define the linguistic conventions and constraints of this genre. In addition, attention will focus on the extent to which iconicity and interdiscursivity permeate the discourse of tourism in in-flight magazines. The resulting data seem to suggest that the airline industry tends to adopt marketing strategies aimed at promoting and differentiating national interests in an international context. The easiest way to do so is to present themselves as global. By highlighting this characteristic, airline companies construct a global reality which the international, and therefore global, traveller experiences

  6. Hybrid Kalman Filter: A New Approach for Aircraft Engine In-Flight Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a uniquely structured Kalman filter is developed for its application to in-flight diagnostics of aircraft gas turbine engines. The Kalman filter is a hybrid of a nonlinear on-board engine model (OBEM) and piecewise linear models. The utilization of the nonlinear OBEM allows the reference health baseline of the in-flight diagnostic system to be updated to the degraded health condition of the engines through a relatively simple process. Through this health baseline update, the effectiveness of the in-flight diagnostic algorithm can be maintained as the health of the engine degrades over time. Another significant aspect of the hybrid Kalman filter methodology is its capability to take advantage of conventional linear and nonlinear Kalman filter approaches. Based on the hybrid Kalman filter, an in-flight fault detection system is developed, and its diagnostic capability is evaluated in a simulation environment. Through the evaluation, the suitability of the hybrid Kalman filter technique for aircraft engine in-flight diagnostics is demonstrated.

  7. How many hydrogen-bonded α-turns are possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Anette; Schramm, Peter; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The formation of α-turns is a possibility to reverse the direction of peptide sequences via five amino acids. In this paper, a systematic conformational analysis was performed to find the possible isolated α-turns with a hydrogen bond between the first and fifth amino acid employing the methods of ab initio MO theory in vacuum (HF/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-311 + G*) and in solution (CPCM/HF/6-31G*). Only few α-turn structures with glycine and alanine backbones fulfill the geometry criteria for the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond satisfactorily. The most stable representatives agree with structures found in the Protein Data Bank. There is a general tendency to form additional hydrogen bonds for smaller pseudocycles corresponding to β- and γ-turns with better hydrogen bond geometries. Sometimes, this competition weakens or even destroys the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond leading to very stable double β-turn structures. This is also the reason why an "ideal" α-turn with three central amino acids having the perfect backbone angle values of an α-helix could not be localized. There are numerous hints for stable α-turns with a distance between the C(α)-atoms of the first and fifth amino acid smaller than 6-7 Å, but without an i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond.

  8. Recent developments in turning hardened steels - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, V.; Prakash, S.

    2017-05-01

    Hard materials ranging from HRC 45 - 68 such as hardened AISI H13, AISI 4340, AISI 52100, D2 STL, D3 STEEL Steel etc., need super hard tool materials to machine. Turning of these hard materials is termed as hard turning. Hard turning makes possible direct machining of the hard materials and also eliminates the lubricant requirement and thus favoring dry machining. Hard turning is a finish turning process and hence conventional grinding is not required. Development of the new advanced super hard tool materials such as ceramic inserts, Cubic Boron Nitride, Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride etc. enabled the turning of these materials. PVD and CVD methods of coating have made easier the production of single and multi layered coated tool inserts. Coatings of TiN, TiAlN, TiC, Al2O3, AlCrN over cemented carbide inserts has lead to the machining of difficult to machine materials. Advancement in the process of hard machining paved way for better surface finish, long tool life, reduced tool wear, cutting force and cutting temperatures. Micro and Nano coated carbide inserts, nanocomposite coated PCBN inserts, micro and nano CBN coated carbide inserts and similar developments have made machining of hardened steels much easier and economical. In this paper, broad literature review on turning of hardened steels including optimizing process parameters, cooling requirements, different tool materials etc., are done.

  9. Centurion solar-powered high-altitude aircraft in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    , or about 11.5 inches, with no taper or sweep. Solar arrays that will cover most of the upper wing surface will provide up to 31 kilowatts of power at high noon on a summer day to power the aircraft's 14 electric motors, avionics, communications and other electronic systems. Centurion also has a backup lithium battery system that can provide power for between two and five hours to allow limited-duration flight after dark. Initial low-altitude test flights at Dryden in 1998 were conducted on battery power alone, prior to installation of the solar cell arrays. Centurion flies at an airspeed of only 17 to 21 mph, or about 15 to 18 knots. Although pitch control is maintained by the use of a full-span 60-segment elevator on the trailing edge of the wing, turns and yaw control are accomplished by applying differential power -- slowing down or speeding up the motors -- on the outboard sections of the wing. The video clip depicts the aircraft on the lakebed prior to and during its first low-altitude check flight under battery power on November 10, 1998.

  10. TPS In-Flight Health Monitoring Project Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyk, Chris; Richards, Lance; Hudston, Larry; Prosser, William

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the development of new thermal protection systems (TPS) is reported. New approaches use embedded lightweight, sensitive, fiber optic strain and temperature sensors within the TPS. Goals of the program are to develop and demonstrate a prototype TPS health monitoring system, develop a thermal-based damage detection algorithm, characterize limits of sensor/system performance, and develop ea methodology transferable to new designs of TPS health monitoring systems. Tasks completed during the project helped establish confidence in understanding of both test setup and the model and validated system/sensor performance in a simple TPS structure. Other progress included complete initial system testing, commencement of the algorithm development effort, generation of a damaged thermal response characteristics database, initial development of a test plan for integration testing of proven FBG sensors in simple TPS structure, and development of partnerships to apply the technology.

  11. Experimental Investigation of White Layer formation in Hard Turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, D.; Rotella, G.; Crea, F.

    2011-05-01

    Hard turning with super hard cutting tools, like PCBN or Ceramics inserts, represents an interesting advance in the manufacturing industry, regarding the finishing of hardened steels. This innovative machining technique is considered an attractive alternative to traditional finish grinding operations because of the high flexibility, the ability to achieve higher metal removal rates, the possibility to operate without the use of coolants, and the capability to achieve comparable workpiece quality. However, the surface integrity effects of hard machining need to be taken into account due to their influence on the life of machined components. In particular, the formation of a usually undesirable white layer at the surface needs further investigation. Three different mechanisms have been proposed as main responsible of the white layer genesis: (i) microstructural phase transformation due to a rapid heating and quenching, (ii) severe plastic deformation resulting in a homogenous structure and/or a very fine grain size microstructure; (iii) surface reaction with the environment. In this research, an experimental campaign was carried out and several experimental techniques were used in order to analyzed the machined surface and to understand which of the above mentioned theories is the main cause of the white layer formation when AISI 52100 hardened steel is machined by PCBN inserts. In particular, the topography characterization has obtained by means of optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while microstructural phase composition and chemical characterization have been respectively detected using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The results prove that the white layer is the result of microstructural alteration, i.e. the generation of a martensitic structure.

  12. Straight-line and turning locomotion of Paramecia

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, Saikat; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we investigate the flow field around straight-line swimming and right and left turning Paramecia using micro- particle image velocimetry ({\\mu}PIV). A Paramecium controls its ciliary beating to produce different fluid velocities on either side of its body. This phenomenon is visualized by applying {\\mu}PIV to images in which Paramecia swim in a dilute suspension of 1 {\\mu}m polystyrene spheres. Paramecia that swim straight exhibit similar magnitudes of velocity on either side of their bodies. In contrast, right-turning Paramecia exhibit greater magnitudes of velocity on their right sides, while left-turning organisms show the opposite.

  13. Fuzzy-grey Prediction of Cutting Force Uncertainty in Turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To predict the extent of turning force uncertainty quantitatively,this paper proposes a fuzzy-grey prediction procedure based on the symmetric fuzzy number and linear planning theory and grey set theory.To ve rify the developed procedure,a measuring system of turning force is schematized to acquire the evaluating data.The comparison between the prediction results a nd measured data demonstrates that the prediction is an extent of variable force rather than a certain point for the given turning condition...

  14. Beam polarization during a Siberian snake turn-on

    CERN Document Server

    Anferov, V A

    1999-01-01

    Installing Siberian snakes in a circular proton accelerator allows one to overcome all spin depolarizing resonances even at very high energies. However, Siberian snake application at low energies is technically rather difficult. Turning snake on at some energy during acceleration would allow using Siberian snakes even in rings with low injection energies. It is shown that the beam polarization would be preserved during the snake ramp, provided that the snake is turned on in more than ten turns, and the energy is set near a half-integer G gamma.

  15. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  16. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  17. A cognitive Analysis of truck Drivers' right-hand Turns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Sieker, Tobias; G. Skulason, Thorgeir; Sletting, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of truck drivers’ performance during right-hand turns performed in intersections with traffic lights in order to elicit the truck drivers’ domain, decision-making processes, and the strategies used while executing the turn. To gain knowledge about this, a truck...... using several brief glances in mirrors, and that the front and near-zone mirrors are never used during right-hand turns. Controlling the vehicle is found to be more or less automatic, whereas their focus is on the orientation about surroundings. Lastly, the drivers’ behavior is discussed in relation...

  18. A Cognitive Analysis of Truck Drivers’ Right-hand Turns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieker, Tobias Grønborg; G. Skulason, Thorgeir; Sletting, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of truck drivers’ performance during right-hand turns performed in intersections with traffic lights in order to elicit the truck drivers’ domain, decision-making processes, and the strategies used while executing the turn. To gain knowledge about this, a truck...... using several brief glances in mirrors, and that the front and near-zone mirrors are never used during right-hand turns. Controlling the vehicle is found to be more or less automatic, whereas their focus is on the orientation about surroundings. Lastly, the drivers’ behavior is discussed in relation...

  19. Investigation on in-flight particle velocity in supersonic plasma spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Changqing; Ma Shining; Ye Xionglin

    2005-01-01

    In-flight particle velocity and flux distribution were measured using CCD thermal spray monitor system during supersonic plasma spray processing with nano-structured Al203-TiO2 feed stocks. According to the results of particle flux measurement, the largest radian of the divergent particle stream is about 0. 2. Within the measuring range, top speed of inflight particles reached 800 m/s. Particle acceleration was accomplished within 4 cm down stream of the nozzle. Average particle velocity ( about 450 m/s) exceeded local sound speed (340 m/s) even at a mean standoff distance of 17 cm. With increasing mean standoff distance, average velocity of in-flight particle decreased according to a parabolic rule approximately.Image diagnosis showed that the result of in-flight particle velocity measurement is credible.

  20. The effects of in-flight treadmill exercise on postflight orthostatic tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, Steven F.; Charles, John B.

    1992-01-01

    In-flight aerobic exercise is thought to decrease the deconditioning effects of microgravity. Two deconditioning characteristics are the decreases in aerobic capacity (maximum O2 uptake) and an increased cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress (supine to standing). Changes in both parameters were examined after Shuttle flights of 8 to 11 days in astronauts who performed no in-flight exercise, a lower than normal volume of exercise, and a near-normal volume of exercise. The exercise regimen was a traditional continuous protocol. Maximum O2 uptake was maintained in astronauts who completed a near-normal exercise volume of in-flight exercise. Cardiovascular responses to stand test were equivocal among the groups. The use of the traditional exercise regimen as a means to maintain adequate orthostatic responses produced equivocal responses. A different exercise prescription may be more effective in maintaining both exercise capacity and orthostatic tolerance.

  1. In-flight food delivery and waste collection service: the passengers’ perspective and potential improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romli, F. I.; Rahman, K. Abdul; Ishak, F. D.

    2016-10-01

    Increased competition in the commercial air transportation industry has made service quality of the airlines as one of the key competitive measures to attract passengers against their rivals. In-flight services, particularly food delivery and waste collection, have a notable impact on perception of the overall airline's service quality because they are directly and interactively provided to passengers during flight. An online public survey is conducted to explore general passengers' perception of current in-flight food delivery and waste collection services, and to identify potential rooms for improvement. The obtained survey results indicate that in-flight service does have an effect on passengers' choice of airlines. Several weaknesses of the current service method and possible improvements have been established from the collected responses.

  2. In-Flight Winds from the Drift of a Rocket Exhaust Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolas, Prakash M.

    1991-12-01

    The study presents an analysis of free drift of the exhaust trail obtained from television photos of India's satellite launch vehicle, ASLV-D2, in flight. Triangulation is not possible, necessitating the use of in-flight trajectory data and a wind model for line-of-sight drift correction in the analysis. The crosswind component, up to the height of 11.7 km where the mission tailed, and the associated vertical wind shears have been estimated. The crosswind magnitude above 9 km appears close to the summer extreme (95th percentile) for the launch station. On a 300-m vertical scale, the in-flight estimate of wind velocity is observed to be significantly different from the only available rawin data obtained 6 h prior to launch. The analysis points to a possibility of the launch vehicle passing through a turbulence zone between the altitude range of 7.4-7.6 km.

  3. Protein prosthesis: β-peptides as reverse-turn surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Ulrich; Huck, Bayard R; Gellman, Samuel H; Raines, Ronald T

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of non-natural modules could provide unprecedented control over folding/unfolding behavior, conformational stability, and biological function of proteins. Success requires the interrogation of candidate modules in natural contexts. Here, expressed protein ligation is used to replace a reverse turn in bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) with a synthetic β-dipeptide: β²-homoalanine-β³-homoalanine. This segment is known to adopt an unnatural reverse-turn conformation that contains a 10-membered ring hydrogen bond, but one with a donor-acceptor pattern opposite to that in the 10-membered rings of natural reverse turns. The RNase A variant has intact enzymatic activity, but unfolds more quickly and has diminished conformational stability relative to native RNase A. These data indicate that hydrogen-bonding pattern merits careful consideration in the selection of beneficial reverse-turn surrogates. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  4. Printed Multi-Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    Printed multi-turn loop antennas have been designed for contactless powering of, and reception of radio signals transmitted by, surgically implantable biotelemetric sensor units operating at frequencies in the vicinity of 300 MHz.

  5. ANALYSIS OF CHIP FORMATION DURING HARD TURNING THROUGH ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Neslušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysis of chip formation and related aspects of the chip formation during turning hardened steel 100Cr6. The paper draws a comparison of some aspects of the chip formation between turning annealed and hardened roll bearing steel. The results of the analysis show that there is the formation of a segmented chip in the case of hard turning. Frequency of segmentation is very high. A conventional piezoelectric dynamometer limits the frequency response to about 3.5 kHz. On the other hand, the frequency of process fluctuation may by obtained by using accelerometers or acoustic emission. This paper reports about the dynamic character of cutting process when hard turning and correlation among the calculated segmentation frequencies and the experimental analysis.

  6. Remaking "Nature" The Ecological Turn in Dutch Water Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disco, Cornelis

    2002-01-01

    The ecological turn in water management has usually been interpreted as a political andcultural rather than technical and professional accomplishment. The dynamics of theuptake of ecological expertise into hydraulic engineering bureaucracies have not beenwell described. Focusing on the controversy a

  7. Models and Algorithms for Tracking Target with Coordinated Turn Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghui Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracking target with coordinated turn (CT motion is highly dependent on the models and algorithms. First, the widely used models are compared in this paper—coordinated turn (CT model with known turn rate, augmented coordinated turn (ACT model with Cartesian velocity, ACT model with polar velocity, CT model using a kinematic constraint, and maneuver centered circular motion model. Then, in the single model tracking framework, the tracking algorithms for the last four models are compared and the suggestions on the choice of models for different practical target tracking problems are given. Finally, in the multiple models (MM framework, the algorithm based on expectation maximization (EM algorithm is derived, including both the batch form and the recursive form. Compared with the widely used interacting multiple model (IMM algorithm, the EM algorithm shows its effectiveness.

  8. Grip and limb force limits to turning performance in competition horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huiling; Wilson, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Manoeuverability is a key requirement for successful terrestrial locomotion, especially on variable terrain, and is a deciding factor in predator–prey interaction. Compared with straight-line running, bend running requires additional leg force to generate centripetal acceleration. In humans, this results in a reduction in maximum speed during bend running and a published model assuming maximum limb force as a constraint accurately predicts how much a sprinter must slow down on a bend given his maximum straight-line speed. In contrast, greyhounds do not slow down or change stride parameters during bend running, which suggests that their limbs can apply the additional force for this manoeuvre. We collected horizontal speed and angular velocity of heading of horses while they turned in different scenarios during competitive polo and horse racing. The data were used to evaluate the limits of turning performance. During high-speed turns of large radius horizontal speed was lower on the bend, as would be predicted from a model assuming a limb force limit to running speed. During small radius turns the angular velocity of heading decreased with increasing speed in a manner consistent with the coefficient of friction of the hoof–surface interaction setting the limit to centripetal force to avoid slipping. PMID:21147799

  9. Grip and limb force limits to turning performance in competition horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huiling; Wilson, Alan M

    2011-07-22

    Manoeuverability is a key requirement for successful terrestrial locomotion, especially on variable terrain, and is a deciding factor in predator-prey interaction. Compared with straight-line running, bend running requires additional leg force to generate centripetal acceleration. In humans, this results in a reduction in maximum speed during bend running and a published model assuming maximum limb force as a constraint accurately predicts how much a sprinter must slow down on a bend given his maximum straight-line speed. In contrast, greyhounds do not slow down or change stride parameters during bend running, which suggests that their limbs can apply the additional force for this manoeuvre. We collected horizontal speed and angular velocity of heading of horses while they turned in different scenarios during competitive polo and horse racing. The data were used to evaluate the limits of turning performance. During high-speed turns of large radius horizontal speed was lower on the bend, as would be predicted from a model assuming a limb force limit to running speed. During small radius turns the angular velocity of heading decreased with increasing speed in a manner consistent with the coefficient of friction of the hoof-surface interaction setting the limit to centripetal force to avoid slipping.

  10. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  11. Canard solutions at non-generic turning points

    OpenAIRE

    De Maesschalck, Peter; Dumortier, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with singular perturbation problems for vector fields on 2-dimensional manifolds. "Canard solutions" are solutions that, starting near an attracting normally hyperbolic branch of the singular curve, cross a "turning point" and follow for a while a normally repelling branch of the singular curve. Following the geometric ideas developed by Dumortier and Roussarie in 1996 for the study of canard solutions near a generic turning point, we study canard solutions near non-generic t...

  12. Airport Logistics : Modeling and Optimizing the Turn-Around Process

    OpenAIRE

    Norin, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this licentiate thesis is air transportation and especially the logistics at an airport. The concept of airport logistics is investigated based on the following definition: Airport logistics is the planning and control of all resources and information that create a value for the customers utilizing the airport. As a part of the investigation, indicators for airport performance are considered. One of the most complex airport processes is the turn-around process. The turn-around is...

  13. Extended phenotype: nematodes turn ants into bird-dispersed fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, D P; Kronauer, D J C; Boomsma, J J

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs.......A recent study has discovered a novel extended phenotype of a nematode which alters its ant host to resemble ripe fruit. The infected ants are in turn eaten by frugivorous birds that disperse the nematode's eggs....

  14. Dal Mythos al Logos. Genealogia della Pedagogical Turn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Segreto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to identify an original pedagogical turn starting from classical world, when the theoretical thinking and the organization of a shared public space involve in the constitution of pedagogical science, which must found an educational model useful in the new theoretical and political context. The turning point is located in the devaluation of religious-mythical education, thinking image as false, and in the founding of the paradigm of identity, based on word as true.

  15. Performances of cutting fluids in turning. Mineral oil - RM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axinte, Dragos Aurelian; Belluco, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Scope of the present measurement campaign is the evaluation of the cutting fluid performance. The report presents the standard routine and the results obtained when turning stainless steel and brass with a commercial vegetable based oil called RM. The methods were developed to be applicable...... in normal workshop conditions using common equipment for turning as well as in a test laboratory. The evaluation tests can be carried out using the desired number of repetitions in terms of workpiece materials and tools....

  16. CJ828 In-flight Entertainment System Design%CJ828机载娱乐系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王书勇

    2014-01-01

    机载娱乐系统(In-flight entertainment,IFE)内容的丰富性和更新的及时性,不仅能让旅客有好的飞行体验,还能赢得更大的市场份额。此外,IFE 服务的相关广告或其他收费,也可为航空公司带来额外收入。在对北航大飞机班所设计的飞机CJ828的IFE系统构成研究的基础上,引入了IFE设备故障检测系统。该系统可诊断IFE软硬件故障,实时反馈IFE系统的运行状态,并将IFE系统故障和诊断报告写入日志,快速传达到地面,节省了维修人员故障排查时间,降低了维修成本。%In-flight entertainment system richness and timeliness of updates content, not only allow visitors to have a good flight experience, but also to win a bigger market share. In addition, advertising IFE services or other charges, but also generate additional revenue for the airline. Based on the Northern large aircraft designed classes of aircraft CJ828 IFE system constitutes research, introduced the IFE equipment failure detection system. The system can diagnose IFE hardware and software failures, real-time feedback IFE system operating state and IFE system failure and diagnostic reports written to the log, quickly communicated to the ground, saving maintenance personnel troubleshooting time and reduce maintenance costs.

  17. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites.

  18. BolA is a transcriptional switch that turns off motility and turns on biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressaire, Clémentine; Moreira, Ricardo Neves; Barahona, Susana; Alves de Matos, António Pedro; Arraiano, Cecília Maria

    2015-02-17

    Bacteria are extremely versatile organisms that rapidly adapt to changing environments. When bacterial cells switch from planktonic growth to biofilm, flagellum formation is turned off and the production of fimbriae and extracellular polysaccharides is switched on. BolA is present in most Gram-negative bacteria, and homologues can be found from proteobacteria to eukaryotes. Here, we show that BolA is a new bacterial transcription factor that modulates the switch from a planktonic to a sessile lifestyle. It negatively modulates flagellar biosynthesis and swimming capacity in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, BolA overexpression favors biofilm formation, involving the production of fimbria-like adhesins and curli. Our results also demonstrate that BolA is a protein with high affinity to DNA and is able to regulate many genes on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, we show that the most significant targets of this protein involve a complex network of genes encoding proteins related to biofilm development. Herein, we propose that BolA is a motile/adhesive transcriptional switch, specifically involved in the transition between the planktonic and the attachment stage of biofilm formation. Escherichia coli cells possess several mechanisms to cope with stresses. BolA has been described as a protein important for survival in late stages of bacterial growth and under harsh environmental conditions. BolA-like proteins are widely conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Although their exact function is not fully established at the molecular level, they seem to be involved in cell proliferation or cell cycle regulation. Here, we unraveled the role of BolA in biofilm development and bacterial motility. Our work suggests that BolA actively contributes to the decision of bacteria to arrest flagellar production and initiate the attachment to form structured communities, such as biofilms. The molecular studies of different lifestyles coupled with the comprehension of the BolA functions may

  19. High-Precision Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a pulse generator with subnanosecond resolution implemented with a low-cost field-programmable gate array (FPGA) at low power levels. The method used exploits the fast carry chains of certain FPGAs. Prototypes have been built and tested in both Actel AX and Xilinx Virtex 4 technologies. In-flight calibration or control can be performed by using a similar and related technique as a time interval measurement circuit by measuring a period of the stable oscillator, as the delays through the fast carry chains will vary as a result of manufacturing variances as well as the result of environmental conditions (voltage, aging, temperature, and radiation).

  20. Ultrafast imaging method to measure surface tension and viscosity of inkjet-printed droplets in flight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staat, H.J.J.; Bos, van der J.A.; Berg, van den M.; Reinten, H.; Wijshoff, H.; Versluis, M.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    In modern drop-on-demand inkjet printing, the jetted droplets contain a mixture of solvents, pigments and surfactants. In order to accurately control the droplet formation process, its in-flight dynamics, and deposition characteristics upon impact at the underlying substrate, it is key to quantify t

  1. Review Of Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Entry In-Flight Instrumentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrich, Georg; Fertig, Markus; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Lohle, Stefan; Lein, Sebastian; Preci, Arianit; Steinbeck, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    The paper gives a very brief overview on non- equilibrium in-flight instrumentation. However, the limitation of the paper length leads to the fact that the authors concentrate on examples in which they were involved either by participating in the development of the instrumentation or by the performance of data analysis.

  2. In-flight calibration methods used for the Ørsted mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Risbo, Torben; Brauer, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Several methods have been developed for the in-flight calibration of the Ørsted vector magnetometer. They are based on one of the following principles: a) estimating of the magnetometer constants by means of a scalar calibration (comparison of the vector magnetometer (CSC) with the scalar Overhau...... mission....

  3. REPORT OF THE AOU CONSERVATION COMMITTEE ON THE PARTNERS IN FLIGHT SPECIES PRIORITIZATION PLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEVEN R. J. BEISSINGER; MICHAEL REED; JR. WUNDERLE; DEBORAH M. FINCH

    2000-01-01

    Partners in Flight (PIF) is a coalition of federal, state, and local government agencies; nongovernmental organizations (NGOs); philanthropic foundations; and industry that is working to conserve the birds of the Western Hemisphere. PIF was launched in 1990 in response to growing concerns about declines in the populations of many landbirds, and to spearhead the...

  4. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  5. In-flight calibration methods used for the Ørsted mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Risbo, Torben; Brauer, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Several methods have been developed for the in-flight calibration of the Ørsted vector magnetometer. They are based on one of the following principles: a) estimating of the magnetometer constants by means of a scalar calibration (comparison of the vector magnetometer (CSC) with the scalar Overhau...

  6. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs ...

  7. Preparing Flight Attendants for In-Flight Psychiatric Emergencies: A Training Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    While in-flight psychiatric emergencies occur at a lower rate than other medical emergencies (Matsumoto & Goebert, 2001), they tend to cause a higher degree of disruption for passengers (Gordan, Kingham, & Goodwin, 2004). However, flight attendants often receive training that is too basic, minimal, and insufficient to effectively manage…

  8. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-01-01

    This photo of the X-1A includes graphs of the flight data from Maj. Charles E. Yeager's Mach 2.44 flight on December 12, 1953. (This was only a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.) After reaching Mach 2.44, then the highest speed ever reached by a piloted aircraft, the X-1A tumbled completely out of control. The motions were so violent that Yeager cracked the plastic canopy with his helmet. He finally recovered from a inverted spin and landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Among the data shown are Mach number and altitude (the two top graphs). The speed and altitude changes due to the tumble are visible as jagged lines. The third graph from the bottom shows the G-forces on the airplane. During the tumble, these twice reached 8 Gs or 8 times the normal pull of gravity at sea level. (At these G forces, a 200-pound human would, in effect, weigh 1,600 pounds if a scale were placed under him in the direction of the force vector.) Producing these graphs was a slow, difficult process. The raw data from on-board instrumentation recorded on oscillograph film. Human computers then reduced the data and recorded it on data sheets, correcting for such factors as temperature and instrument errors. They used adding machines or slide rules for their calculations, pocket calculators being 20 years in the future. Three second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s were built, though four were requested. They were the X-1A (48-1384); X-1B (48-1385); X-1C (canceled and never built); X-1D (48-1386). These aircraft were similar to the X-1s, except they were five feet longer, had conventional canopies, and were powered by Reaction Motors, Inc. XLR11-RM-5 rocket engines. The RM-5, like the previous engines, had no throttle and was controlled by igniting one or more of the four thrust chambers at will. The original program outline called for the X-1A and X-1B to be used for dynamic stability and air loads investigations. The X-1D was to be used

  9. EFFECT OF CUTTING PARAMETERS ON SUPER ALLOY IN TURNING OPERATION UNDER DRY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Marimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-base super alloys are widely used in several industrial sectors, like petrochemical and power generation due to their high performance in aggressive environments. Inconel625 is primarily a Ni–Cr– Mo alloy used in different applications for its strength, excellent fabric ability and outstanding corrosion resistance. Machining of super alloy has been found to be a challenging task it has attracted considerable research. So, it is essential to know the cutting parameters for effective machining of super alloys. The present work focuses on finding the optimal cutting parameters for turning Inconel625 to achieve minimum surface roughness (SR, tool wear (TW and maximum material removal rate (MRR in CNC turning under dry conditions using TiAlN coated cutting tool. Single response optimization is performed by Taguchi method and multi response optimization is performed by desirability function analysis.

  10. Surface Improvement of Shafts by Turn-Assisted Deep Cold Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that mechanical surface enhancement methods can significantly improve the characteristics of highly-stressed metallic components. Deep cold rolling is one of such technique which is particularly attractive since it is possible to generate, near the surface, deep compressive residual stresses and work hardened layers while retaining a relatively smooth surface finish. In this paper, the effect of turn-assisted deep cold rolling on AISI 4140 steel is examined, with emphasis on the residual stress state. Based on the X-ray diffraction measurements, it is found that turn-assisted deep cold rolling can be quite effective in retarding the initiation and initial propagation of fatigue cracks in AISI 4140 steel.

  11. Study of turning takeoff maneuver in free-flying dragonflies: effect of dynamic coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zeyghami, Samane

    2015-01-01

    Turning takeoff flights of several dragonflies were recorded during which a dragonfly takes off while changing the flight direction at the same time. Center of mass was elevated about 1-2 body lengths. Five of these maneuvers were selected for 3D body surface reconstruction and the body orientation measurement. In oppose to conventional banked turn model, which neglects interactions between the rotational motions, in this study we investigated the strength of the dynamic coupling by dividing pitch, roll and yaw angular accelerations into two contributions: one from aerodynamic torque and one from dynamic coupling effect. The latter term is referred to as Dynamic Coupling Acceleration (DCA). The DCA term can be measured directly from instantaneous rotational velocities of the insect. We found a strong correlation between pitch and yaw velocities at the end of each wingbeat and the time integral of the corresponding DCA term. Generation of pitch, roll and yaw torques requires different aerodynamic mechanisms an...

  12. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation.

  13. Saving our shared birds: Partners in Flight tri-national vision for landbird conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Humberto; Kennedy, Judith A.; Rich, Terrell D.; Arizmendi, Maria del Coro; Beardmore, Carol J.; Blancher, Peter J.; Butcher, Gregory S.; Couturier, Andrew R.; Dayer, Ashley A.; Demarest, Dean W.; Easton, Wendy E.; Gustafson, Mary; Iñigo-Elias, Eduardo E.; Krebs, Elizabeth A.; Panjabi, Arvind O.; Rodriguez Contreras, Vicente; Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; Ruth, Janet M.; Santana Castellon, Eduardo; Vidal, Rosa Ma.; Will, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Landbirds are the most abundant and diverse group of birds in North America, with nearly 900 species distributed across every major terrestrial habitat. Birds are indicators of environmental health; their populations track changes in habitat, water, disease, and climate. They are providers of invaluable ecosystem services, such as pest control, seed dispersal, and pollination. As the focus of bird watching, they help generate billions of dollars for national economies. Yet, we are in danger of losing this spectacular and irreplaceable bird diversity: landbirds are experiencing significant declines, ominous threats, and shrinking habitats across a continent with growing human populations, increasing resource consumption, and changing climate. Saving Our Shared Birds presents for the first time a comprehensive conservation assessment of landbirds in Canada, Mexico, and the continental United States. This new tri-national vision encompasses the complete range of many migratory species and highlights the vital links among migrants and highly threatened resident species in Mexico. It points to a set of continent-scale actions necessary to maintain the landbird diversity and abundance that are our shared responsibility. This collaborative effort of Partners in Flight (PIF) is the next step in linking the countries of the Western Hemisphere to help species at risk and keep common birds common through voluntary partnerships—our mission since 1990. Saving Our Shared Birds builds upon PIF’s 2004 North American Landbird Conservation Plan, which presented science-based priorities for the conservation of 448 landbird species in Canada and the United States. Our three nations have expressed their commitment to cooperative conservation through numerous international treaties, agreements, and programs, including formation of the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI) a decade ago. The NABCI partnership recognizes that effective conservation requires a concerted

  14. The effect of knee-flexion angle on wheelchair turning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A H; Kirby, R L; Bell, A C; MacLeod, D A

    2001-05-01

    The increasingly popular hyperflexed knee-flexion angle was evaluated to determine its effects on wheelchair turning. Twenty able-bodied subjects were tested comparing the effect of full knee extension and full knee flexion on a number of parameters. We empirically measured the angular velocity of subjects spinning 720 degrees in place, subjects' perceived ease of wheelchair turning, the overall length of the wheelchair, the anteroposterior position of the center of mass (COM), rolling resistance, turning resistance and rear-wheel traction. The combined moment of inertia of the wheelchair and system was modeled. We found that, in comparison with full extension, fully flexing the knees increased angular velocity by 40% and was perceived to be 66% easier by subjects. Overall length decreased by 39%, COM moved rearward 38%, rolling and turning resistance decreased by 21% and 17% respectively, rear-wheel traction increased by 12% and moment of inertia decreased by 42%. All empirically tested parameters were statistically significant (pwheelchair turning. The implications of these findings for wheelchair design and prescription will need to be validated on actual wheelchair users and for smaller increments in knee-flexion range.

  15. Semiautomatic machine for turning inside out industrial leather gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Gonzalez, G.; Cano-Blanco, M.; León-Galicia, A.; Medrano-Sierra, L. F.; Morales-Gómez, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The last step in the industrial leather gloves manufacturing is to turn the inside out so that the sewing be in the inside of the glove. This work presents the design and testing of a machine for that purpose. In order to quantify the relevant variables, testing was performed with a prototype glove. The employed devices and the testing proceeding were developed experimentally. The obtained information was used to build the turning inside out machine. This machine works with pneumatic power to carry the inside out turning by means of double effect lineal actuators. It has two independent work stations that could be operated simultaneously by two persons, one in each station or in single mode operating one station by one person. The turning inside out cycle is started by means of directional control valves operated with pedals. The velocity and developed force by the actuators is controlled with typical pneumatic resources. The geometrical dimensions of the machine are: 1.15 m length; 0.71 m width and 2.15 m high. Its approximated weight is 120 kg. The air consumption is 5.4 fps by each working station with 60 psig work pressure. The turning inside out operation is 40 s for each industrial leather glove.

  16. Missing the (question) mark? What is a turn to ontology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolgar, Steve; Lezaun, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Our introductory essay in this journal's 2013 Special Issue on the 'turn to ontology' examined the shift from epistemology to ontology in science and technology studies and explored the implications of the notion of enactment. Three responses to that Special Issue argue that (I) there is no fundamental qualitative difference between the ontological turn and social constructivism, (2) we need to be wary of overly generic use of the term 'ontology' and (3) the language of 'turns' imposes constraints on the richness and diversity of science and technology studies. In this brief reply, we show how each of those critiques varies in its commitment to circumspection about making objective determinations of reality and to resisting reification. We illustrate our point by considering overlapping discussions in anthropology. This brings out the crucial difference between the science and technology studies slogan 'it could be otherwise' and the multinaturalist motto 'it actually is otherwise'.

  17. Turning points in long distance grandparent-grandchild relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Waldron, Vincent R

    2014-04-01

    This study examines changes in long-distance relationships between grandparents and their adolescent grandchildren by identifying relational turning points and trajectories. Qualitative analysis of data collected from interviews with grandparents yielded 100 unique turning points. Constant comparative analysis revealed eight distinct categories of relational turning points; Spending Time Together, Family Relational Dynamics, Geographic Distance, Lack of Relational Investment, Use of Technology, Relational Investment, Lack of Free Time, and Grandchild Gaining Independence. These varied in the degree to which they positively or negatively impacted relational closeness. Application of the Retrospective Interview Technique (RIT) yielded five distinctive relational trajectories: Decrease in Closeness, Increase in Closeness, Multidimensional Changes in Closeness, Minimal Changes in Closeness, and Consistent Relational Closeness. The results expose the communicative challenges faced by long-distance-grandparents, the diversity of these relationships, and the ways in which grandparenting bonds change over time. Implications for an enriched understanding of grandparenting relationships and practical applications for families are explored.

  18. A Cognitive Analysis of Truck Drivers’ Right-hand Turns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieker, Tobias Grønborg; G. Skulason, Thorgeir; Sletting, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    using several brief glances in mirrors, and that the front and near-zone mirrors are never used during right-hand turns. Controlling the vehicle is found to be more or less automatic, whereas their focus is on the orientation about surroundings. Lastly, the drivers’ behavior is discussed in relation......This paper presents an investigation of truck drivers’ performance during right-hand turns performed in intersections with traffic lights in order to elicit the truck drivers’ domain, decision-making processes, and the strategies used while executing the turn. To gain knowledge about this, a truck...... driving instructor is interviewed, and four truck drivers are observed and interviewed. This results in a cognitive work analysis with the phases work domain analysis, control task analysis and strategies analysis. Through this study it is indicated that many different types of information are sought...

  19. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  20. A hybrid model of a subminiature helicopter in horizontal turn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Gong Zhenbang; Liu Liang

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid model of a subminiature helicopter in horizontal turn is presented. This model is based on a mechanism model and its compensated neural network (NN). First, the nonlinear dynamics of a subminiature helicopter is established. Through the linearization of the nonlinear dynamics on a trim point, the linear time-invariant mechanism model in horizontal turn is obtained. Then a diagonal recursive neural network is used to compensate the model error between the mechanism model and the nonlinear model, thus the hybrid model of a subminiature helicopter in horizontal turn is achieved. Simulation results show that the hybrid model has higher accuracy than the mechanism model and the obtained compensated-NN has good generalization capability.

  1. 78 FR 68775 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Composite Fuselage In-Flight Fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ...; Composite Fuselage In-Flight Fire/Flammability Resistance AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... associated with the in-flight fire and flammability resistance of the composite fuselage. Experience has shown that eliminating fire propagation on the surface of interior and insulating materials enhances...

  2. Optimizing feed force for turned parts through the Taguchi technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Singh; Pradeep Kumar

    2006-12-01

    The objective of the paper is to obtain an optimal setting of turning process parameters (cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut) resulting in an optimal value of the feed force when machining EN24 steel with TiC-coated tungsten-carbide inserts. The effects of the selected turning process parameters on feed force and the subsequent optimal settings of the parameters have been accomplished using Taguchi’s parameter design approach. The results indicate that the selected process parameters significantly affect the selected machining characteristics. The results are confirmed by further experiments.

  3. Evaluation of cutting force uncertainty components in turning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axinte, Dragos Aurelian; Belluco, Walter; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for the evaluation of those uncertainty components of a single cutting force measurement in turning that are related to the contributions of the dynamometer calibration and the cutting process itself. Based on an empirical model including errors form both sources......, the uncertainty for a single measurement of cutting force is presented, and expressions for the expected uncertainty vs. cutting parameters are proposed. This approach gives the possibility of evaluating cutting force uncertainty components in turning, for a defined range of cutting parameters, based on few...

  4. Spatial turn and animation practices inspired by cultural anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wieszaczewska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial turn is one of the cultural turns, which have recently occurred in the humanities. It stresses the importance of issues such as space and place and can be successfully used as a theoretical perspective gaining use in thought over issues such as globalisation, transnationality, mapping but also education. In the discourses of pedagogical science space and place are considered through their multidimensional impact on education and learning. As significant concepts rooting pedagogy or pedagogy of borderland. The pedagogical reflection on space could be also used in the field of animation practices, especially in activities, which are related to place somehow colonised.

  5. Relational narrative: the postmodern turn in nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, S

    1999-01-01

    A philosophy of nursing requires an ethical cornerstone. I describe three dialectical layers of an ethical cornerstone: subjective immersion, objective detachment, and relational narrative. Dialectically, the move from immersion to detachment is the turn from communitarian to rational ethics, replacing traditions with universal principles. The move from universalism to engagement is the turn from rational to relational ethics, replacing detached reason with engagement between particular selves. Conceptually, the three layers correspond to premodern, modern, and postmodern ethics. I propose that the layers be viewed not as stages, but as elements that coexist in an ethically vital profession, and I conclude with an illustration of their coexistence in a clinical situation.

  6. Investigation of sequential cryogenic hard turning and ball burnishing processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Żak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sequential machining process which incorporates CBN hard turning with cryogenic pre-cooling of the workpiece (CHT and ball burnishing (BB. The main goal of this study was to select machining conditions enhancing the quality of parts machined by hard turning including the surface roughness Ra of about 0,2 μm, good bearing properties and reducing the white layer. Changes of surface roughness, surface texture, microstructure alterations and micro-hardness distribution are discusses.

  7. Comments on the paper "Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings"

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Karavaev, Yury L

    2016-01-01

    Mir Abbas Jalali et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032913(2015)] explained the retrograde turn of rings by aerodynamic phenomena due to the presence of a central hole in the ring as opposed to a disk. The results of our experiments suggest that the drag torque is not the main reason for the retrograde turn of the rings, and the results of theoretical research have shown that such a motion is possible for both the ring and the disk in the case of rolling without slipping.

  8. Safety of the Las Vegas left-turn display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Ozlem; Tian, Zong Z; Gibby, A Reed

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a safety evaluation of a special protected/permitted left turn signal control (Las Vegas LT Display) that has been implemented in the urbanized area of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Las Vegas LT Display eliminates the yellow trap condition for leading approach in lead/lag operation. It provides protected only left turns during certain times of day by suppressing the permitted green ball and yellow ball displays. Before and after studies were conducted using the crash data from 10 intersections. Results from the analyses indicated that no obvious safety concerns due to use of the special display. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DAST Mated to B-52 in Flight - Close-up from Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones

  10. Visualization of boundary layer separation and passive flow control on airfoils and bodies in wind-tunnel and in-flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, Lukas; Kuklova, Jana; Simurda, David; Souckova, Natalie; Matejka, Milan; Uruba, Vaclav

    2012-04-01

    Infrared camera, Particle Image Velocimetry, smoke-wire, tuft filaments and oil-flow visualization techniques were used for wind-tunnel and in-flight investigation of boundary layer separation, both stall and separation bubbles, related to the low-Reynolds numbers transition mechanism. Airfoils of Wortmann FX66 series and FX66 series wing-fuselage interaction, as well as modern airfoils and their wing-fuselage geometry were subject to study. The presence of previously identified structures in the CFD modelling, such as horse-shoe vortices, was confirmed in the flow. Wind-tunnels and in-flight measurements on sailplanes were carried out and effect of passive flow control devices - vortex generators - was surveyed; namely counter-rotating vortex generators and Zig-zag type turbulators were applied. Separation suppression and consequent drag coefficient reduction of test aircrafts was reached. PIV investigation was further extended by Time-Resolved techniques. An important study on structure of the turbulent flow in the lower atmosphere, creating an environment of the soaring flight, was presented.

  11. Visualization of boundary layer separation and passive flow control on airfoils and bodies in wind-tunnel and in-flight experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matejka Milan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Infrared camera, Particle Image Velocimetry, smoke-wire, tuft filaments and oil-flow visualization techniques were used for wind-tunnel and in-flight investigation of boundary layer separation, both stall and separation bubbles, related to the low-Reynolds numbers transition mechanism. Airfoils of Wortmann FX66 series and FX66 series wing-fuselage interaction, as well as modern airfoils and their wing-fuselage geometry were subject to study. The presence of previously identified structures in the CFD modelling, such as horse-shoe vortices, was confirmed in the flow. Wind-tunnels and in-flight measurements on sailplanes were carried out and effect of passive flow control devices - vortex generators - was surveyed; namely counter-rotating vortex generators and Zig-zag type turbulators were applied. Separation suppression and consequent drag coefficient reduction of test aircrafts was reached. PIV investigation was further extended by Time-Resolved techniques. An important study on structure of the turbulent flow in the lower atmosphere, creating an environment of the soaring flight, was presented.

  12. Fabrication of continuous diffractive optical elements using a fast tool servo diamond turning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Li, Lei; Naples, Neil; Sun, Tao; Yi, Allen Y.

    2013-07-01

    Continuous diffractive optical elements (CDOEs) can be used for laser-beam reshaping, pattern generation and can help reduce large angle scattering. Lithography, the method for the production of binary diffractive surfaces, is not suitable for fabrication of CDOEs. Diamond turning using fast tool servo, on the other hand, is a non-cleanroom method for generating continuous microstructures with high precision and efficiency. In this paper, an algorithm for designing CDOEs is introduced. The moving least-squares (MLS) method is then used to obtain the local fitting equation of the diffractive surface. Based on the MLS fitting equation, the selection of diamond cutting tool geometries (including the tool nose radius, rake angle and clearance angle) is discussed and a tool nose radius compensation algorithm is included. This algorithm is a general method for the diamond turning of complex surfaces that can be represented by a point cloud. Surface measurements and diffractive patterns generated on test samples have shown that continuous diffractive surfaces were successfully machined. In the future, CDOEs can be machined on an optical mold surface for high-volume industrial production using methods such as injection molding.

  13. On Kinesic Triadic Relations in Turn-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Kenneth L.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses three characteristics useful in defining the relations between speakers in the turn-taking aspects of conversation: the derivational history of personal relationships, stop-action pseudo-history versus dynamic compacted posing, and the criss-crossing of verbal versus kinetic axes. (Available from Semiotica, Co-Libri, P.O.…

  14. The Digital Turn. How the internet transforms our existence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The presentation is based on my book The Dital Turn. The swift virtualisation of the world implies a radical change of the conditions of life. We have to cope with the fact that our experiences of the world will largely be mediated experiences, fuelled by data, cameras, sensors, indicators and virtu

  15. Turn me on 100 easy ways to use solar energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kodis, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    HERE COMES THE SUN! With page after page of creative and innovative ideas for using this limitless form of energy, as well as thoughtfully compiled lists of useful resources, Turn Me On is an introductory guide to understanding the exciting advances in a progressing technology that harnesses the boundless power of the sun to bring us clean, renewable energy.

  16. Turning shopping habits of young consumers into green

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, Svetlana; Bialkova, Svetlana; van 't Erve, Sanne; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.; Bigné, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Consumers have strong shopping habits, and although being aware of sustainable issues, they hardly do green shopping. Therefore, a challenging question is: how to break the old shopping habits and turn those into green? The current study addresses this question looking at barriers and potential

  17. Diamond turning and polishing tests on new RSP aluminium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, R. ter; Haan, M. de; Gubbels, G.P.H.; Senden, R.; Venrooy, B.W.H. van; Hoogstrate, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    For years now conventional aluminium 6061 T6 has widely been used for mirrors in astronomical instruments, being diamond turned or since a few years also being optically polished. This allows the development of optical systems that can be tested and operated at any temperature, without being affecte

  18. The 'Turn to Parenting': Paradigm shift or work in progress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, M.; Knijn, G.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of child and youth support, preventive and parent-oriented support programs are currently emphasized. This is understood as a new paradigm of parenting support, which is sometimes referred to as “the turn to parenting.” Using Campbell’s (Annual Review of Sociology, 28:21–38, 2002), Yee’

  19. CNC Turning Technician. A Competency-Based Instructional System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Kelly; Hilley, Robert

    This competency-based curriculum guide for instructing students in using computer numerically controlled (CNC) turning machines is one of a series of instructional guides for the machinist field developed in Oklahoma. Although developed jointly with Baxter Technologies Corporation and oriented toward the Baxter Vo-Tec 2000 Future Builder CNC…

  20. Poets and Book Design at the Turn of the Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depas, Rosalind

    1979-01-01

    Considers influences on the design and production of books at the turn of the century, including the influences of symbolists and other European poets (e.g., Blake, Wilde, Verhaeren, Maeterlinck, Baudelaire, Mallarme, Huysmans, George, von Hofmannsthal, and Rilke); book designers, typographers, and printers; and the Art Nouveau school. (DMM)

  1. The spin turning in ferromagnetic Gd studied by positive muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, O. (Physics Dept., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Karlsson, E. (Physics Dept., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Waeppling, R. (Physics Dept., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Asch, L. (Physics Dept., TU Munich, Garching (Germany)); Henneberger, S. (Physics Dept., TU Munich, Garching (Germany)); Kalvius, G.M. (Physics Dept., TU Munich, Garching (Germany)); Kratzer, A. (Physics Dept., TU Munich, Garching (Germany)); Klauss, H.H. (Inst. for Metal Physics, TU Braunschweig (Germany)); Litterst, F.J. (Inst. for Metal Physics, TU Braunschweig (Germany)); Melo, M.A.C. de (Inst. for Metal Physics, TU Braunschweig (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    We have studied the muon precession frequency in a ferromagnetic single crystal of Gd metal. The overall features of our findings are compatible with earlier results on polycrystalline material. In the temperature region between 245 and 220 K where the Gd magnetization starts to turn away from the c-axis, we observe an increase in the muon depolarization rate, and a complex precession signal which can be separated into two frequency components meaning that spin turning does not occur simultaneously in different parts of the sample (domains). From these more detailed data follows that previously obtained values for B[sub fc] and B[sub dip] can not both be correct. Two explanations for our new result are possible: Either B[sub fc] undergoes a change around 230 K which is directly coupled to the spin turning angle, or the value of the dipolar field contribution used in the earlier evaluation is too low. This imposes some uncertainty as to the value of the angle at the onset of spin turning derived from [mu]SR frequencies. (orig.)

  2. Body saccades of Drosophila consist of stereotyped banked turns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijres, F.T.; Elzinga, M.J.; Iwasaki, N.A.; Dickinson, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The flight pattern of many fly species consists of straight flight segments interspersed with rapid turns called body saccades, a strategy that is thought to minimize motion blur. We analyzed the body saccades of fruit flies (Drosophila hydei), using high-speed 3D videography to track body and wing

  3. Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Tanya; Enfield, N. J.; Brown, Penelope; Englert, Christina; Hayashi, Makoto; Heinemann, Trine; Hoymann, Gertie; Rossano, Federico; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Yoon, Kyung-Eun; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Informal verbal interaction is the core matrix for human social life. A mechanism for coordinating this basic mode of interaction is a system of turn-taking that regulates who is to speak and when. Yet relatively little is known about how this system varies across cultures. The anthropological literature reports significant cultural differences in the timing of turn-taking in ordinary conversation. We test these claims and show that in fact there are striking universals in the underlying pattern of response latency in conversation. Using a worldwide sample of 10 languages drawn from traditional indigenous communities to major world languages, we show that all of the languages tested provide clear evidence for a general avoidance of overlapping talk and a minimization of silence between conversational turns. In addition, all of the languages show the same factors explaining within-language variation in speed of response. We do, however, find differences across the languages in the average gap between turns, within a range of 250 ms from the cross-language mean. We believe that a natural sensitivity to these tempo differences leads to a subjective perception of dramatic or even fundamental differences as offered in ethnographic reports of conversational style. Our empirical evidence suggests robust human universals in this domain, where local variations are quantitative only, pointing to a single shared infrastructure for language use with likely ethological foundations. PMID:19553212

  4. Getting 'Entangled': Reflexivity and the 'Critical Turn' in Tourism Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateljevic, I.; Harris, C.; Wilson, E.; Collins, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Reflecting a broader postmodern shift to unmask the cultural politics of research and knowledge-making in academia, tourism studies as a field is demonstrating a notable `critical turn¿ ¿ a shift in thought that serves to provide and legitimise a space for more interpretative and critical modes of t

  5. Turning shopping habits of young consumers into green

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, Svetlana; Erve, van 't Sanne; Hoof, van Joris; Pruyn, Ad; Bigné, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Consumers have strong shopping habits, and although being aware of sustainable issues, they hardly do green shopping. Therefore, a challenging question is: how to break the old shopping habits and turn those into green? The current study addresses this question looking at barriers and potential stim

  6. Beyond Cultural History? The Material Turn, Praxiography, and Body History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruberg, Willemijn|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183926587; Clever, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The body came to be taken seriously as a topic of cultural history during the “corporeal” or “bodily” turn in the 1980s and 1990s. Soon, however, critique was raised against these studies’ conceptualization of the body as discursively shaped and socially disciplined: individual bodily agency and

  7. On Kinesic Triadic Relations in Turn-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Kenneth L.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses three characteristics useful in defining the relations between speakers in the turn-taking aspects of conversation: the derivational history of personal relationships, stop-action pseudo-history versus dynamic compacted posing, and the criss-crossing of verbal versus kinetic axes. (Available from Semiotica, Co-Libri, P.O.…

  8. CNC Turning Technician. A Competency-Based Instructional System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Kelly; Hilley, Robert

    This competency-based curriculum guide for instructing students in using computer numerically controlled (CNC) turning machines is one of a series of instructional guides for the machinist field developed in Oklahoma. Although developed jointly with Baxter Technologies Corporation and oriented toward the Baxter Vo-Tec 2000 Future Builder CNC…

  9. Student Wellbeing and the Therapeutic Turn in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article considers current concerns with promoting student mental health and wellbeing against the backdrop of critiques of the "therapeutic turn" in education. It begins by situating accounts of "therapeutic education" within broader theorisation of therapeutic culture. In doing so, the importance of this work is…

  10. Diplomas Count 2013: Second Chances--Turning Dropouts into Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Week, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 edition of "Diplomas Count," entitled "Second Chances: Turning Dropouts into Graduates," examines dropout recovery and innovative strategies for returning to the educational fold the 1 million students who leave school without a diploma each year. "Education Week's" journalists investigate interventions that…

  11. Numerical simulation of a turning alpine ski during recreational skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Y; Tada, N

    1996-09-01

    While downhill snow skiing, recreational alpine skiers enjoy making turning motions with their skis. These motions are mainly induced by skidding, while turning by alpine ski racers is made by carving a trace in the snow. In the present study we treat the turning motions by recreational alpine skiers. This "skidding" turning motion is made possible by centripetal forces acting on the ski and skier dynamic motion systems, with these forces arising due to the skier placing the ski's longitudinal axis at an angle that is inclined away from the velocity vector and edging the ski into the snow. When snow is soft, the edged ski creates a snow impacting force, whereas a snow cutting force occurs when it is hard. Here, we calculate the former force using a three-dimensional water jet analogy, while the latter one using conventional metal cutting theory, after which the corresponding equations of motion for each system are derived and numerically solved. This methodology enables simulating the curvilinear and rotational motion of the ski and skier systems. Resultant simulations quantitatively show for the first time that the resultant radius of curvature of a ski track while downhill skiing is strongly dependent on the location of the ski boot on the ski's longitudinal axis and also on its side-cut (midlength taper).

  12. Freeform turning lathe with direct drives and aerostatic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chao-liang; Dai, Yi-fan; Yin, Zi-qiang; Yang, Fan

    2009-05-01

    More and more precision freeform parts are required by defense technology and national economy today and in the future. The applications of freeform parts have traditionally conformed to the limitations imposed by practical limits on high effective fabricating technology. Single point diamond turning is one of the important methods of machining freeform surface parts. Generally speaking, optical freeform surfaces have complex geometrical surface shapes and require ultra smooth surface (roughness down to 10nm) and high form accuracy (form accuracy down to several ten nanometers). So, the ultra precision turning lathe must improve the motion accuracy, dynamic stiffness and bandwidth of every axis. Direct drive technology combined with aerostatic bearing do not affect by frication and eliminate the micro-backlash and creeping; reduce the number of transmission element, shorten the transmitted chains and be propitious to improve dynamic stiffness and bandwidth. This paper presents a ultra precision diamond turning lathe with linear motor and aerostatic guide drive system. Combined with the lathe a FTS (Fast Tool Servo) system driven by voice coil actor is use to machining free form surface. The turning experiments show that this lathe can satisfy the requirement of machine freeform surface.

  13. Online Memorials 2.0: When Mourning Turns Social

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotved, Stine

    This paper investigates the turn from individual to social online mourning rituals and introduces a research project that follows a new memorial platform where the best from both sides are sought combined. The Danish online memorial site from 2000, mindet.dk, is about to launch in a version 2...

  14. Simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. The fitting results are used for lattice correction. The method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  15. Data-driven battery product development: Turn battery performance into a competitive advantage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholklapper, Tal [Voltaiq, Inc.

    2016-04-19

    Poor battery performance is a primary source of user dissatisfaction across a broad range of applications, and is a key bottleneck hindering the growth of mobile technology, wearables, electric vehicles, and grid energy storage. Engineering battery systems is difficult, requiring extensive testing for vendor selection, BMS programming, and application-specific lifetime testing. This work also generates huge quantities of data. This presentation will explain how to leverage this data to help ship quality products faster using fewer resources while ensuring safety and reliability in the field, ultimately turning battery performance into a competitive advantage.

  16. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR CHIP FORMATION IN HIGH SPEED TURNING OPERATIONS BY ARBITRARY LAGRANGIAN EULERIAN METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    USAMA Umer; XIE Lijing; WANG Xibin

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the high speed turning operations when orthogonally machining AISI H13 tool steel at 49HRC using poly crystalline cubic boron nitride(PCBN) is described. An arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method has been adopted which does not need any chip separation criteria as opposed to the traditional Lagrangian approach. Through FE simulations temperature and stresses distributions are presented that could be helpful in predicting tool life and improving process parameters. The results show that high temperatures are generated along the tool rake face as compared to the shear zone temperatures due to high thermal conductivity of PCBN tools.

  17. The Turn Over of the Odd-even Pattern in Mass Spectra of Carbon Cluster Anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Guoquan; LIU Bingchen; ZHAI Huajin

    2000-01-01

    @@ Although investigations by many authorsd on the properties of carbon cluster anions by mass spectrometry and photoelectron spectroscopy last more than a decade[1~3], a general conclusion concerning the various features of the carbon clusters generated most commonly in laser vaporization/molecular beam sources has not yet been reached. In this Letter we report that the turn-over of the odd-even patter in relative abundance in the mass spectra of carbon clusters and the "manipulation" of the pattern can be realized in a controlled way by altering the vaporizing laser intensity, the backing pressure and the conductance of carries gas.

  18. - and -turns in proteins revisited: A new set of amino acid turn-type de-pendent positional preferences and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kunchur Guruprasad; Sasidharan Rajkumar

    2000-06-01

    The number of -turns in a representative set of 426 protein three-dimensional crystal structures selected from the recent Protein Data Bank has nearly doubled and the number of -turns in a representative set of 320 proteins has increased over seven times since the previous analysis. -turns (7153) and -turns (911) extracted from these proteins were used to derive a revised set of type-dependent amino acid positional preferences and potentials. Compared with previous results, the preference for proline, methionine and tryptophan has increased and the preference for glutamine, valine, glutamic acid and alanine has decreased for -turns. Certain new amino acid preferences were observed for both turn types and individual amino acids showed turn-type dependent positional preferences. The rationale for new amino acid preferences are discussed in the light of hydrogen bonds and other interactions involving the turns. Where main-chain hydrogen bonds of the type NH( + 3)→CO() were not observed for some -turns, other main-chain hydrogen bonds or solvent interactions were observed that possibly stabilize such -turns. A number of unexpected isolated -turns with proline at + 2 position were also observed. The NH( + 2)→CO() hydrogen bond was observed for almost all -turns. Nearly 20% classic -turns and 43% inverse -turns are isolated turns.

  19. Design and control of a fast tool servo used in noncircular piston turning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Yang, Shuyan

    2013-03-01

    Noncircular pistons are becoming more and more popular in the automotive industry. The challenge of machining this kind of pistons (e.g., middle-convex and varying ellipse piston (MCVEP)), lies in the rigorous demand of the cutting feed mechanism for large force generation, high stiffness, fast response, long stroke and high accuracy. The conventional processing methods cannot meet the challenge so a new piezoelectric actuator (PEA) based fast tool servo (FTS) mechanism was developed to incorporate additional functions to a general CNC system that will facilitate the execution of MCVEP turning. Since the desired tool trajectories are approximately periodic signals in MCVEP turning, and the repetitive control can achieve asymptotic tracking and disturbance rejection of periodic signals, a plug-in repetitive control is designed to be added on the conventional PID controller. In the experiments, the designed prototype was used to machine a MCVEP for the gasoline engine, which was equipped with the PEA-based FTS system, as well as the plug-in repetitive controller. The machining test validated the effective of the designed noncircular turning system.

  20. A Postneoliberal Turn? Variants of the Recent Penal Policy in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Sozzo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysed the connection between the emergence and consolidation of a postneoliberal political program and alliance –- Kirchnerism –- and penal policies in Argentina. Three key moments are identified in this recent period. After the experience of an intense punitive turn during the 1990s and early 2000s, Kirchnerist political alliances tried to deploy a progressive political discourse and agenda on penal issues. Nevertheless, this initially coincided with a strong wave of penal populism ‘'from below’' that continued the precedent trend towards increasing punitiviness. Since 2005, and for a brief moment, this tendency stopped. However, after that and during the presidencies of Fernandez de Kirchner a more volatile and contradictory scenario was generated. The incarceration rate between 2002 and 2014 in Argentina grew substantially as did the rate of convictions. Meanwhile the percentage of suspended sentences as part of the total convictions and the percentage of custodial sanctions both fell. Especially in relation to incarceration, these levels of change are not as stark as those of the preceding decades. However, the trends persist. Therefore, the question of how to transcend the dynamics of the punitive turn remains a pending and urgent political subject. The article argues the importance of analysing why a punitive turn is interrupted and presents an explanation of it.

  1. HybridSil Icephobic Nanocomposites for Next Generation Aircraft In-Flight Icing Measurement and Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this Phase I SBIR program is to adapt NanoSonic's HybridSil™ nanocomposites that combine high levels of erosion resistance and anti-icing...

  2. HybridSil Icephobic Nanocomposites for Next Generation Aircraft In-Flight Icing Measurement and Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this SBIR program is to adapt NanoSonic's HybridSil® nanocomposites and combine high erosion resistance, low ice adhesion, and passive anti-icing...

  3. The Peak Structure in the In-Flight ${}^{3}\\text{He} ( K^{-} , \\, \\Lambda p ) n$ Reaction Around the $\\bar{K} N N$ Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Sekihara, Takayasu; Ramos, Angels

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the origin of the peak structure around the $K^{-} p p$ threshold observed in the in-flight ${}^{3}\\text{He} ( K^{-} , \\, \\Lambda p ) n$ reaction in the recent E15 experiment at J-PARC. For this purpose, we consider two scenarios to produce the peak. One is that the $\\Lambda (1405)$ is generated but it does not correlate with $p$, and the uncorrelated $\\Lambda (1405) p$ system subsequently decays into $\\Lambda p$. The other one is that the $\\bar{K} N N$ bound state is indeed generated and decays into $\\Lambda p$. As a result, the experimental signal is qualitatively well reproduced in the $\\bar{K} N N$ bound scenario, definitely discarding the uncorrelated $\\Lambda (1405) p$ one.

  4. In-Flight spacecraft magnetic field monitoring using scalar/vector gradiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Risbo, Torben; Merayo, José M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Earth magnetic field mapping from planetary orbiting satellites requires a spacecraft magnetic field environment control program combined with the deployment of the magnetic sensors on a boom in order to reduce the measurement error caused by the local spacecraft field. Magnetic mapping missions...... (Magsat, Oersted, CHAMP, SAC-C MMP and the planned ESA Swarm project) carry a vector magnetometer and an absolute scalar magnetometer for in-flight calibration of the vector magnetometer scale values and for monitoring of the inter-axes angles and offsets over time intervals from months to years...... sensors onboard the Oersted satellite. For Oersted, a large difference between the pre-flight determined spacecraft magnetic field and the in-flight estimate exists causing some concern about the general applicability of the dual sensors technique....

  5. In-Flight Calibration of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Ishibashi, K; Marshall, Herman L.; Dewey, Daniel; Ishibashi, Kazunori

    2003-01-01

    We present results from in-flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Basic grating assembly parameters such as orientation and average grating period were measured using emission line sources. These sources were also used to determine the locations of individual CCDs within the flight detector. The line response function (LRF) was modeled in detail using an instrument simulator based on pre-flight measurements of the grating alignments and periods. These LRF predictions agree very well with in-flight observations of sources with narrow emission lines. Using bright continuum sources, we test the consistency of the detector quantum efficiencies by comparing positive orders to negative orders.

  6. Effect of particle in-flight behavior on the composition of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Bai, Y., E-mail: byxjtu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Tang, J.J.; Liu, K. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Ding, C.H. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yang, J.F. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Han, Z.H., E-mail: zhhan1955@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-12-01

    In this work, 6 to 11 mol% YO{sub 1.5}-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by supersonic and conventional atmospheric plasma spraying. During spraying, the surface temperature and velocity of in-flight particles were monitored by Spray Watch 2i on-line system. The phase composition of as-sprayed coatings was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Lattice parameters, tetragonality and the content of YO{sub 1.5} (mol%) of as-sprayed coatings were calculated according to the position of (0 0 4) and (4 0 0) diffraction peaks. It was found that the as-sprayed coatings were composed of metastable non-transformable tetragonal phase (t′). However, the amount of YO{sub 1.5} (mol%) in the as-sprayed coatings decreased with the increase of melting index of in-flight particles due to the partial evaporation of YO{sub 1.5} during spraying.

  7. S.S.T.O. performance assessment with in-flight lox collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenkerckhove, J.; Czysz, P.

    1995-10-01

    Much attention has recently been given, up to harware development to in-flight oxygen collection as a means to improve considerably the performance of both TSTO & SSTO vehicles. A first assessment suggests that it permits simultaneously to improve much both gross take-off weight (by more than 30%) & dry weight (by more than 15%) of an SSTO and to lower significantly the Mach number of transition scramjet → rocket, from 15 down below 10, thereby reducing dramatically the programmatic development risks. After having compared in-flight lox collection with other SSTO concepts, this paper provides a tentative assessment of the performance of SSTO vehicles taking advantage of it, in particular their sensitivity to changes in system characteristics such as transition Mach number, vehicle slenderness (i.e. Küchemann's parameter τ) or planform loading at take-off and in collection characteristics, in particular collection ratio & specific collection plant weight.

  8. Arbitrary waveform generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Maurice; Sugawara, Glen

    1995-02-01

    A system for storing an arbitrary waveform on nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) device and generating an analog signal using the NVRAM device is described. A central processing unit is used to synthesize an arbitrary waveform and create a digital representation of the waveform and transfer the digital representation to a microprocessor which, in turn, writes the digital data into an NVRAM device which has been mapped into a portion of the microprocessor address space. The NVRAM device is removed from address space and placed into an independent waveform generation unit. In the waveform generation unit, an address clock provides an address timing signal and a cycle clock provides a transmit signal. Both signals are applied to an address generator. When both signals are present, the address generator generates and transmits to the NVRAM device a new address for each cycle of the address timing signal. In response to each new address generated, the NVRAM devices provides a digital output which is applied to a digital to analog converter. The converter produces a continuous analog output which is smoothed by a filter to produce the arbitrary waveform.

  9. Flow and structure deformation research of a composite glider in flight conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bakunowicz, Jerzy; Boden, Fritz; Groot, Klaus de; Meyer, Jörg Brüne; Meyer, Ralf; Rzucidło, Paweł; Smusz, Robert; Szewczyk, Mariusz; Szumski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The gliders exemplify a rare subject of flight test campaigns other than standard certification trials. Therefore, not many examples of research activities may be found worldwide. Nevertheless, the gliders neither have advanced flight controls, nor cruise hypersonic, flight testing might encounter barriers to break. The paper presents one of international measurement campaigns performed within the AIM² (Advanced In-Flight Measurement Techniques 2), the collaborative project co-funded by the E...

  10. Planck early results: First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    CERN Document Server

    Mennella, A; Butler, R C; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; Dick, J; Frailis, M; Galeotta, S; Gregorio, A; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Lowe, S; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Mart\\'\\inez-González, E; Meinhold, P R; Morgante, G; Pearson, D; Perrotta, F; Polenta, G; Poutanen, T; Sandri, M; Seiffert, M D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Valiviita, J; Villa, F; Watson, R; Wilkinson, A; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A; Aja, B; Artal, E; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaglia, P; Bennett, K; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cappellini, B; Chen, X; Colombo, L; Cruz, M; Danese, L; D'Arcangelo, O; Davies, R D; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Foley, S; Franceschet, C; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Génova-Santos, R T; George, D; Gómez, F; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Herranz, D; Herreros, J M; Hoyland, R J; Hughes, N; Jewell, J; Jukkala, P; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kilpia, V -H; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Laaninen, M; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Leutenegger, P; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Malaspina, M; Marinucci, D; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Miccolis, M; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moss, A; Natoli, P; Nesti, R; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Pettorino, V; Pietrobon, D; Pospieszalski, M; Prézeau, G; Prina, M; Procopio, P; Puget, J -L; Quercellini, C; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Ricciardi, S; Robbers, G; Rocha, G; Roddis, N; Rubi\; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Silvestri, R; Simonetto, A; Sjoman, P; Smoot, G F; Sozzi, C; Stringhetti, L; Tauber, J A; Tofani, G; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Watson, C; White, S; Winder, F

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main systematic effects is presented. For each of the performance parameters, we outline the methods used to obtain them from the flight data and provide a comparison with pre-launch ground assessments, which are essentially confirmed in flight.

  11. Commercial Airline In-Flight Emergency: Medical Student Response and Review of Medicolegal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Josh H; Richards, John R

    2016-01-01

    As the prevalence of air travel increases, in-flight medical emergencies occur more frequently. A significant percentage of these emergencies occur when there is no certified physician, nurse, or paramedic onboard. During these situations, flight crews might enlist the help of noncertified passengers, such as medical students, dentists, or emergency medical technicians in training. Although Good Samaritan laws exist, many health care providers are unfamiliar with the limited legal protections and resources provided to them after responding to an in-flight emergency. A 78-year-old woman lost consciousness and became pulseless onboard a commercial aircraft. No physician was available. A medical student responded and coordinated care with the flight crew, ground support physician, and other passengers. After receiving a packet (4 g) of sublingual sucrose and 1 L i.v. crystalloid, the patient regained pulses and consciousness. The medical student made the decision not to divert the aircraft based on the patient's initial response to therapy and, 45 min later, the patient had normal vital signs. Upon landing, she was met and taken by paramedics to the nearest emergency department for evaluation of her collapse. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians are the most qualified to assist in-flight emergencies, but they might not be aware of the medicolegal risks involved with in-flight care, the resources available, and the role of the flight crew in liability and decision making. This case, which involved a medical student who was not given explicit protection under Good Samaritan laws, illustrates the authority of the flight crew during these events and highlights areas of uncertainty in the legislation for volunteer medical professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Turn around management of open-cast lignite mines in Kosovo; Turn Around Management der Braunkohletagebaue im Kosovo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehna, U. [Vattenfall Europe Mining AG, Cottbus (Germany). Vattenfall Mining Consulting

    2008-03-15

    In their cooperation in turn around management of KEK, Vattenfall Europe Mining Consulting made an important contribution to supporting the Kosovo. In spite of limited resources and a short time available, many practical steps were taken, and effective, sustainable and safe operation of the open-cast mine was achieved. (orig.)

  13. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaochun Yao et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  14. An Algorithm for In-Flight Spectral Calibration of Imaging Spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Kuhlmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate spectral calibration of satellite and airborne spectrometers is essential for remote sensing applications that rely on accurate knowledge of center wavelength (CW positions and slit function parameters (SFP. We present a new in-flight spectral calibration algorithm that retrieves CWs and SFPs across a wide spectral range by fitting a high-resolution solar spectrum and atmospheric absorbers to in-flight radiance spectra. Using a maximum a posteriori optimal estimation approach, the quality of the fit can be improved with a priori information. The algorithm was tested with synthetic spectra and applied to data from the APEX imaging spectrometer over the spectral range of 385–870 nm. CWs were retrieved with high accuracy (uncertainty <0.05 spectral pixels from Fraunhofer lines below 550 nm and atmospheric absorbers above 650 nm. This enabled a detailed characterization of APEX’s across-track spectral smile and a previously unknown along-track drift. The FWHMs of the slit function were also retrieved with good accuracy (<10% uncertainty for synthetic spectra, while some obvious misfits appear for the APEX spectra that are likely related to radiometric calibration issues. In conclusion, our algorithm significantly improves the in-flight spectral calibration of APEX and similar spectrometers, making them better suited for the retrieval of atmospheric and surface variables relying on accurate calibration.

  15. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  16. Methods for In-Flight Wing Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Formulation of Ko Displacement Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2010-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory is formulated for a cantilever tubular wing spar under bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The Ko displacement equations are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. The bending and distortion strain data can then be input to the displacement equations to calculate slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the wing spar at the strain-sensing stations for generating the deformed shapes of flexible aircraft wing spars. The displacement equations have been successfully validated for accuracy by finite-element analysis. The Ko displacement theory that has been formulated could also be applied to calculate the deformed shape of simple and tapered beams, plates, and tapered cantilever wing boxes. The Ko displacement theory and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) form a powerful tool for in-flight deformation monitoring of flexible wings and tails, such as those often employed on unmanned aerial vehicles. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed in real time to the ground-based pilot for monitoring the deformed shape of unmanned aerial vehicles during flight.

  17. A feasibility study regarding the addition of a fifth control to a rotorcraft in-flight simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1992-01-01

    The addition of a large movable horizontal tail surface to the control system of a rotorcraft in-flight simulator being developed from a Sikorsky UH-60A Black Hawk Helicopter is evaluated. The capabilities of the control surface as a trim control and as an active control are explored. The helicopter dynamics are modeled using the Generic Helicopter simulation program developed by Sikorsky Aircraft. The effect of the horizontal tail on the helicopter trim envelope is examined by plotting trim maps of the aircraft attitude and controls as a function of the flight speed and horizontal tail incidence. The control power of the tail surface relative to that of the other controls is examined by comparing control derivatives extracted from the simulation program over the flight speed envelope. The horizontal tail's contribution as an active control is evaluated using an explicit model following control synthesis involving a linear model of the helicopter in steady, level flight at a flight speed of eighty knots. The horizontal tail is found to provide additional control flexibility in the longitudinal axis. As a trim control, it provides effective control of the trim pitch attitude at mid to high forward speeds. As an active control, the horizontal tail provides useful pitching moment generating capabilities at mid to high forward speeds.

  18. The Analysis of the Contribution of Human Factors to the In-Flight Loss of Control Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancel, Ersin; Shih, Ann T.

    2012-01-01

    In-flight loss of control (LOC) is currently the leading cause of fatal accidents based on various commercial aircraft accident statistics. As the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) emerges, new contributing factors leading to LOC are anticipated. The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), along with other aviation agencies and communities are actively developing safety products to mitigate the LOC risk. This paper discusses the approach used to construct a generic integrated LOC accident framework (LOCAF) model based on a detailed review of LOC accidents over the past two decades. The LOCAF model is comprised of causal factors from the domain of human factors, aircraft system component failures, and atmospheric environment. The multiple interdependent causal factors are expressed in an Object-Oriented Bayesian belief network. In addition to predicting the likelihood of LOC accident occurrence, the system-level integrated LOCAF model is able to evaluate the impact of new safety technology products developed in AvSP. This provides valuable information to decision makers in strategizing NASA's aviation safety technology portfolio. The focus of this paper is on the analysis of human causal factors in the model, including the contributions from flight crew and maintenance workers. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) taxonomy was used to develop human related causal factors. The preliminary results from the baseline LOCAF model are also presented.

  19. Acceleration of magnetic dipoles by the sequence of current turns

    CERN Document Server

    Dolya, S N

    2014-01-01

    Acceleration of magnetic dipoles is carried out by the running gradient of the magnetic field formed while sequent switching on the current turns. Magnetic dipoles, with a diameter of sixty millimeters and full length one meter, are pre-accelerated by using the gas-dynamic method to speed one kilometer per second, corresponding to the injection rate into the main accelerator. To prevent the turning of the dipoles by one hundred eighty degrees in the field of the accelerating pulse and focus them, the magnetic dipoles are accelerated inside the titanium tube. The magnetic dipoles have mass two kilograms and acquire the finite speed five kilometers per second on the acceleration length three hundreds meters.

  20. Diamond turning of aspheric steel molds for optics replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, F.; Dambon, O.; Bulla, B.

    2010-02-01

    Diamond turning of steel parts is conventionally not possible due to the high tool wear. However this process would enable several different application with high economical innovative potential. One technology that enables the direct manufacturing of steel components with monocrystalline diamond is the ultrasonic assisted diamond turning process. This technology has been investigated over years within the Fraunhofer IPT and has proven its potential. Surface roughness in the range of Ra = 5 nm are reached and the diamond wear is reduced by a factor 100 or higher. Up to now this process has been investigated in lab conditions manufacturing only plane surfaces. In order to prove its industrial suitability, two relevant aspherical shapes, convex and concave respectively, have been defined and manufactured. The reached form accuracies and surface roughness values will be described in this paper.

  1. Welcome to the revolution: The sensory turn and art history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Lauwrens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discourses concerned with the sensorially embodied subject have emerged since the 1990s in various disciplines including history, anthropology, sociology, geography, film studies and literary studies. The purpose of this article is to bring the conversation regarding audiences’ embodied engagement in culture closer to art history by investigating the implications of what has been termed the sensory turn for this discipline. One of the accusations lodged against art history by supporters of the multi-sensoriality of embodied human experience is its alleged ocularcentrism, the implication of which is a detached autonomous subject. In this article, the sensory turn is defined and contextualized, particularly in light of the body of criticism targeted at art history’s emphasis on the visual. The proposed ways in which art historians might usefully deal with audience’s embodied experiences of not only immersive installation works of art, but also artworks in traditional media, such as painting and photography, are teased apart.

  2. Surface Integrity in Turning of Annealed Brass: Hardness Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, O.; Di Graci, V.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the effects of cutting parameters (depth of cut, feed rate, and cutting speed) on the surface integrity of, in terms of superficial hardening, annealed brass during a turning process. The results indicate that no significant phase transformations occurred for any of the turning conditions evaluated; however, microstructural changes were observed, as well as changes in the superficial hardness were measured. It was found that when the studied cutting parameters increase, the superficial hardness increases, with the cutting speed having less influence (2.56%), and feed rate having the greatest effect (22.67%). Finally, a mathematical expression is proposed, which relates the cutting parameters to the maximum hardness obtained for a given cutting condition.

  3. Turning Indium Oxide into a Superior Electrocatalyst: Deterministic Heteroatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Nan Nan; Chen, Jian Fu; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Guo, Jian Wei; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-10-01

    The efficient electrocatalysts for many heterogeneous catalytic processes in energy conversion and storage systems must possess necessary surface active sites. Here we identify, from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, that controlling charge density redistribution via the atomic-scale incorporation of heteroatoms is paramount to import surface active sites. We engineer the deterministic nitrogen atoms inserting the bulk material to preferentially expose active sites to turn the inactive material into a sufficient electrocatalyst. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of N-In2O3 nanocrystals leads to higher performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) than the DSCs fabricated with Pt. The successful strategy provides the rational design of transforming abundant materials into high-efficient electrocatalysts. More importantly, the exciting discovery of turning the commonly used transparent conductive oxide (TCO) in DSCs into counter electrode material means that except for decreasing the cost, the device structure and processing techniques of DSCs can be simplified in future.

  4. Het Nationaal Historisch Museum en de emotional turn

    OpenAIRE

    P. van de Laar

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch National History Museum and the ‘Emotional Turn’Recent discussions about the Dutch National History Museum (NHM) should not be restricted to issues put forward by professional historians, be it the importance of a historical canon or nuanced historical debates. Two major, strongly intertwined developments will have to be considered. Firstly, the emotional turn in recent heritage discussions and, secondly, the increasing multi-medialisation of our daily lives. These 21st century deve...

  5. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  6. Turning telomerase into a Jekyll and Hyde case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellinger, Raymund J

    2015-01-01

    It may be possible to coerce telomerase to incorporate modified guanine nucleotides into telomeric repeat DNA, thereby seriously compromising the functionality of the telomeres. Thus, a guanine analogue such as 6-thio-dG could turn active telomerase into a chromosome de-protecting enzyme, the opposite of what it is normally, namely a chromosome-protecting enzyme. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. TRANSPORTATION IN Lhasa CITY TURNS TO A NEW PAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONAM; TSERING

    2007-01-01

    Road construction in Lhasa City has turned a new page over recent decades due to disinterested support from provincial and municipal governments in the hinterland, in particular under the auspices of the government of Beijing Municipality and Jiangsu Province.Unbelievable changes of the roads in Lhasa City not only improve the city's transportation infrastructure,but bring about direct benefits to local residents as well.

  8. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  9. Enhanced ultrasonically assisted turning of a β-titanium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurotto, Agostino; Muhammad, Riaz; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2013-09-01

    Although titanium alloys have outstanding mechanical properties such as high hot hardness, a good strength-to-weight ratio and high corrosion resistance; their low thermal conductivity, high chemical affinity to tool materials severely impair their machinability. Ultrasonically assisted machining (UAM) is an advanced machining technique, which has been shown to improve machinability of a β-titanium alloy, namely, Ti-15-3-3-3, when compared to conventional turning processes.

  10. Active Control of Chatter in Turning : The Origine of Chatter

    OpenAIRE

    Håkansson, Lars; Claesson, Ingvar; Sturesson, Per-Olof; Lagö, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    In the turning operation chatter or vibration is a frequent problem, which affects the result of the machining, and, in particular, the surface finish. Tool life is also influenced by vibration. Severe acoustic noise in the working environment frequently occurs as a result of dynamic motion between the cutting tool and the workpiece. By proper machine design, e.g. improved stiffness of the machine structure, the problem of relative dynamic motion between cutting tool and workpiece may be part...

  11. GA based CNC turning center exploitation process parameters optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Car

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents machining parameters (turning process optimization based on the use of artificial intelligence. To obtain greater efficiency and productivity of the machine tool, optimal cutting parameters have to be obtained. In order to find optimal cutting parameters, the genetic algorithm (GA has been used as an optimal solution finder. Optimization has to yield minimum machining time and minimum production cost, while considering technological and material constrains.

  12. Leibniz, Lefebvre and the spatial turn in law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isolde de Villiers

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This contribution takes as its point of departure the spatial turn in law and the notion of spatial justice. It traces the term ‘spatial justice’ as introduced through the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act and it looks at the underlying view of space that has influenced the spatial turn in law. It furthermore investigates the ways in which the spatial turn in law has been influenced by the thinking of Henri Lefebvre, who relies on a Leibnizian conception of space. Lastly the link between Leibniz and legal positivism is considered in order to reach the final conclusion in the form of a caution against merely adding the language of spatial justice to an approach to space that remains caught up in abstract space. This will only further entrench existing fault lines in society. For this conclusion the work of Roger Berkowitz is central. Berkowitz argues convincingly that the work of Leibniz was central in the development of legal positivism, despite Leibniz in general being considered as a natural law thinker. The same applies to spatial justice theory, where the work of Leibniz is central: it may present the possibilities of another law – the law as it ought to be. The law conceptualised as ‘ought’ instead of ‘is’ would promote reconciliation. Alternatively, spatial justice can simply present the law as it ‘is’ and reconfirm and deepen the chasms in our world.

  13. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  14. Generational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  15. Adaptive tool servo diamond turning for enhancing machining efficiency and surface quality of freeform optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet

    2015-08-10

    Fast tool servo/ slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning is a very promising technique for the generation of freeform optics. However, the currently adopted constant scheme for azimuth sampling and side-feeding motion possesses no adaptation to surface shape variation, leading to the non-uniform surface quality and low machining efficiency. To overcome this defect, this paper reports on a novel adaptive tool servo (ATS) diamond turning technique which is essentially based on the novel two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FTS/STS. In the ATS, the sampling interval and the side-feeding motion are actively controlled at any cutting point to adapt the machining process to shape variation of the desired surface, making both the sampling induced interpolation error and the side-feeding induced residual tool mark be within the desired tolerances. Characteristic of the required cutting motion suggests that besides the conventional z-axis servo motion, another servo motion along the x-axis synthesizing by the c-axis is mandatory for implementing the ATS. Comparative studies of surface generation of typical micro-structured surfaces in FTS/STS and ATS are thoroughly conducted both theoretically and experimentally. The result demonstrates that the ATS outperforms the FTS/STS with improved surface quality while simultaneously enhanced machining efficiency.

  16. Development of an In Flight Vision Self-Assessment Questionnaire for Long Duration Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Vicky E.; Gibson, Charles R.; Pierpoline, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    OVERVIEW A NASA Flight Medicine optometrist teamed with a human factors specialist to develop an electronic questionnaire for crewmembers to record their visual acuity test scores and perceived vision assessment. It will be implemented on the International Space Station (ISS) and administered as part of a suite of tools for early detection of potential vision changes. The goal of this effort was to rapidly develop a set of questions to help in early detection of visual (e.g. blurred vision) and/or non-visual (e.g. headaches) symptoms by allowing the ISS crewmembers to think about their own current vision during their spaceflight missions. PROCESS An iterative process began with a Space Shuttle one-page paper questionnaire generated by the optometrist that was updated by applying human factors design principles. It was used as a baseline to establish an electronic questionnaire for ISS missions. Additional questions needed for the ISS missions were included and the information was organized to take advantage of the computer-based file format available. Human factors heuristics were applied to the prototype and then they were reviewed by the optometrist and procedures specialists with rapid-turn around updates that lead to the final questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS With about only a month lead time, a usable tool to collect crewmember assessments was developed through this cross-discipline collaboration. With only a little expenditure of energy, the potential payoff is great. ISS crewmembers will complete the questionnaire at 30 days into the mission, 100 days into the mission and 30 days prior to return to Earth. The systematic layout may also facilitate physicians later data extraction for quick interpretation of the data. The data collected along with other measures (e.g. retinal and ultrasound imaging) at regular intervals could potentially lead to early detection and treatment of related vision problems than using the other measures alone.

  17. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-09

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  18. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-08-15

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  19. On the structure observed in the in-flight ${}^{3}\\text{He} ( K^{-} , \\, \\Lambda p ) n$ reaction at J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Sekihara, Takayasu; Ramos, Angels

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is done to clarify the origin of the peak structure observed near the $K^{-} p p$ threshold in the in-flight ${}^{3}\\text{He} ( K^{-}, \\, \\Lambda p ) n$ reaction of the J-PARC E15 experiment, which could be a signal of the lightest kaonic nuclei, that is, the $\\bar{K} N N (I=1/2)$ state. For the investigation, we evaluate the $\\Lambda p$ invariant mass spectrum assuming two possible scenarios to interpret the experimental peak. One assumes that the $\\Lambda (1405)$ resonance is generated after the emission of an energetic neutron from the absorption of the initial $K^-$, not forming a bound state with the remaining proton. This uncorrelated $\\Lambda (1405) p$ system subsequently decays into the final $\\Lambda p$. The other scenario implies that, after the emission of the energetic neutron, a $\\bar{K} N N$ bound state is formed, decaying eventually into a $\\Lambda p$ pair. Our results show that the experimental signal observed in the in-flight ${}^{3}\\text{He} ( K^{-} , \\, \\Lambda p...

  20. Nanostructural Evolution of Hard Turning Layers in Carburized Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedekar, Vikram

    The mechanisms of failure for components subjected to contact fatigue are sensitive to the structure and properties of the material surface. Although, the bulk material properties are determined by the steel making, forming and the heat treatment; the near surface material properties are altered during final material removal processes such as hard turning or grinding. Therefore, the ability to optimize, modulate and predict the near surface properties during final metal removal operations would be extremely useful in the enhancement of service life of a component. Hard machining is known to induce severely deformed layers causing dramatic microstructural transformations. These transformations occur via grain refinement or thermal phenomena depending upon cutting conditions. The aim of this work is to engineer the near surface nanoscale structure and properties during hard turning by altering strain, strain rate, temperature and incoming microstructure. The near surface material transformations due to hard turning were studied on carburized SAE 8620 bearing steel. Variations in parent material microstructures were introduced by altering the retained austenite content. The strain, strain rate and temperature achieved during final metal cutting were altered by varying insert geometry, insert wear and cutting speed. The subsurface evolution was quantified by a series of advanced characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), X-ray stress evaluation and nanoindentation which were coupled with numerical modeling. Results showed that the grain size of the nanocrystalline near surface microstructure can be effectively controlled by altering the insert geometry, insert wear, cutting speed and the incoming microstructure. It was also evident that the near surface retained austenite decreased at lower cutting speed indicating transformation due to plastic deformation, while it increased at higher cutting

  1. Design and Performance Evaluation of Residual Generators for the FDI of an Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcello Bonfè; Paolo Castaldi; Walter Geri; Silvio Simani

    2007-01-01

    In this work, several procedures for the fault detection and isolation (FDI) on general aviation aircraft sensors are presented.In order to provide a comprehensive wide-spectrum treatment, both linear and nonlinear, mode~based and data-driven methodologies are considered. The main contributions of the paper are related to the development of both FDI polynomial method (PM) and FDI scheme based on the nonLinear geometric approach (NLGA). As to the PM, the obtained results highlight a good trade-off between solution complexity and resulting performances. Moreover, the proposed PM is especially useful when robust solutions are required for minimising the effects of modelling errors and noise, while maximising fault sensitivity. As to the NLGA, the proposed work is the first development and robust application of the NLGA to an aircraft model in flight conditions characterised by tight-coupled longitudinal and lateral dynamics. In order to verify the robustness of the residual generators related to the previous FDI techniques,the simulation results adopt a typical aircraft reference trajectory embedding several steady-state flight conditions, such as straight flight phases and coordinated turns. Moreover, the simulations are performed in the presence of both measurement and modelling errors. Finally, extensive simulations are used for assessing the overall capabilities of the developed FDI schemes and a comparison with neural networks (NN) and unknown input Kalman filter (UIKF) diagnosis methods is performed.

  2. Investigating the Electrothermal Characteristics of a Gate Turn Off Thyristor During Turn-Off Using SILVACO ATLAS(TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    conduction is a physical device property commonly referred to as the “holding current” [7]. pnp transistor npn transistor 9 2. Operating Characteristics... Transistor Representation of a GTO Thyristor Unit Cell. .............. 8  Figure 3.  Nominal GTO Thyristor Turn-off Waveforms (From [6...P+ P+ 8 The four-layer structure of a GTO thyristor allows each unit cell to operate like a pair of coupled bipolar junction transistors as shown

  3. Medium dependent dual turn on/turn off fluorescence sensing for Cu2 + ions using AMI/SDS assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, Varsha B.; Ottoor, Divya

    2017-02-01

    Behavior of Amiloride (AMI) as a metal ion sensor in anionic surfactant assemblies of varying concentrations at different pH is depicted in this work. From a non-sensor fluorophore, AMI has been transformed in to a tunable fluorosensor for Cu2 + ions in various SDS concentrations. At premicellar concentration of SDS, ion-pair complex is expected to be formed between AMI and SDS due to electrostatic interactions between them. However at CMC concentrations of SDS, fluorescence intensity of AMI is greatly enhanced with red shift in emission, due to the incorporation of AMI molecule in the hydrophobic micellar interface. The behavior of metal sensing by AMI-SDS assemblies gives rise to several interesting observations. Micellation of SDS has been greatly enhanced by increasing copper ion concentrations, as these counter ions screens the charge on monomers of SDS which lead to the aggregation at premicellar concentrations only. Concentrations and pH dependent discrete trends of interactions between SDS-AMI and SDS-Cu2 + ions, have given tunable fluorescence responses (fluorescence turn on/turn off) of AMI for added Cu2 + ions. The electrostatic interaction between the metal cations and the anionic surfactants is the driving force for bringing the metal ions near to the vicinity of micelle where AMI resides. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism related to the 'turn on-turn off' fluorescence response of AMI with respect to pH and SDS concentration for effective Cu2 + ion sensing is illustrated in this work.

  4. Simulation of turn-by-turn passage of protons through the H-minus stripping foil in booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-07-06

    Equations for transverse emittance growth due to multiple passes of circulating proton beam through the H-minus stripping foil in Booster were developed in [1]. These were based on simple principles of statistics and simple assumptions about the initial distribution of particles incident on the foil. It was assumed there that the foil dimensions and position of the incoming beam are such that all particles hit the foil on every turn around the machine. In the present note we assume only that all incoming H-minus ions from Linac hit the foil and are stripped of their electrons. The resulting protons circulate indefinitely around the machine. Setups in which the foil width is reduced so that not all protons hit the foil on every turn are studied here by simulation. The aim is to determine the effectiveness of such setups in reducing the emittance growth of circulating proton beam during the injection of H-minus beam. The simulations also serve as a check of the equations developed in [1], and vice versa. The particulars of the simulation setup are given in Sections 1 through 11. Figures 1 through 12 show simulation results for the case in which all particles hit the foil on every turn. The results are in good agreement with those obtained from the equations of reference [1]. Figures 13 through 19 show simulation results for various setups in which the foil width is reduced. These results are summarized in Section 12. In all gures the horizontal axis gives the turn number. The unit of the vertical axis is micrometers ( m) in all plots of emittance.

  5. Turn-By Beam Extraction during Acceleration in a Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2014-02-01

    A synchrotron to accelerate protons or carbon ions for medical applications is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single beam bunches with maximum beam energy of 1.18 GeV and 400 MeV/u for protons and carbon ions respectively will be extracted from the synchrotron at 15 Hz. For protons, the maximum required energy for irradiating a tumor is ˜206 MeV. A pencil-like proton beam containing ˜5.4×107 p/bunch delivers a therapeutic dose of 2.5 Gy in ˜1.5 minutes to treat a tumor of 1 liter volume. It will take ˜80 minutes with bunches containing 4.5×104 ions/bunch to deliver the same dose of 2.5 Gy with a 400 MeV/u pencil-like carbon beam. This extended treatment time when using carbon ions is not acceptable. In addition, the synchrotron cannot be controlled with a beam bunch containing such a low number of carbon ions. To overcome these two problems of the extended treatment time and the low bunch intensity required for the treatment when carbon ions are used, we have devised a method to “peel” the required 4.5×104 carbon-ions/bunch from the accelerating carbon beam bunch containing ˜108 ions/bunch and deliver them to the tumor on a “turn-by-turn” basis. Unlike other methods of beam extraction from a synchrotron, such as resonance extraction, this method does not allow for any beam losses during the extraction and the carbon beam can be peeled off in less than 15 ms during the acceleration or deceleration cycle of the synchrotron. Thus, this turn-by-turn beam extraction method provides beam with variable energy and precisely controlled beam current during the 30 ms acceleration or deceleration time.

  6. Estimating intersection turning volumes from actuated traffic signal information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gholami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Actuated traffic signals usually use loop detectors. The current practice in many cities is to install four consecutive loop detectors in each lane to reduce the chance of undetected vehicles. Due to practical reasons, all four loop detectors in each lane and other detectors referring to the same phase are spliced together. Thus, it is possible for several vehicles to be counted as one single car. This way of detector wiring to the cabinet reduces the accuracy of detectors for collecting traffic volumes. Our preliminary studies show cases with an error greater than 75 percent. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to provide a simple method to obtain turning volumes from signal information in actuated non-coordinated traffic signals without using loop detector data. To produce the required data, a simulation was performed in VISSIM with different input volumes. To change turning volumes, a code was developed in COM interface. With this code, the inputs did not have to be changed manually. In addition, the COM code stored the outputs. Data were then exported to a single Excel file. Afterwards, regression and the adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS were used to build models to obtain turning volumes. The accuracy of models is defined in terms of mean absolute percent error (MAPE. Results of our two case studies show that during peak hours, there is a high correlation between actuated green time and volumes. This method does not need extensive data collection and is easy to be employed. The results also show that ANFIS produces more accurate models compared to regression.

  7. Use Of The Operational Air Quality Monitor (AQM) For In-Flight Water Testing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    A primary requirement for manned spaceflight is Environmental Health which ensures air and water contaminants, acoustic profiles, microbial flora, and radiation exposures within the cabin are maintained to levels needed for crew health and for vehicle system functionality. The reliance on ground analyses of returned samples is a limitation in the current environmental monitoring strategy that will prevent future Exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. This proposal attempts to address this shortcoming by advancing in-flight analyses of water and air. Ground analysis of in-flight, air and water samples typically employ vapor-phase analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify and quantify organic compounds present in the samples. We envision the use of newly-developed direct ionization approaches as the most viable avenue leading towards an integrated analytical platform for the monitoring of water, air, and, potentially bio-samples in the cabin environment. Development of an in-flight instrument capable of analyzing air and water samples would be the logical next step to meeting the environmental monitoring needs of Exploration missions. Currently, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) on-board ISS provides this specific information for a number of target compounds in the air. However, there is a significant subset of common target compounds between air and water. Naturally, the following question arises, "Can the AQM be used for both air and water quality monitoring?" Previous directorate-level IR&D funding led to the development of a water sample introduction method for mass spectrometry using electrothermal vaporization (ETV). This project will focus on the integration of the ETV with a ground-based AQM. The capabilities of this integrated platform will be evaluated using a subset of toxicologically important compounds.

  8. Prognostic Factors for Outcomes of In-Flight Sudden Cardiac Arrest on Commercial Airlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo M; DeJohn, Charles A; Ricaurte, Eduard M; Mills, William D

    In-flight cardiac arrest (IFCA) is a relatively rare but challenging event. Outcomes and prognostic factors are not entirely understood for victims of IFCAs in commercial aviation. This was a retrospective cohort study of airline passengers who experienced IFCA. Demographic and operational variables were studied to identify association in a multivariate logistic regression model with the outcome of survival-to-hospital. In-flight medical emergencies were processed by a ground-based medical center. Subsequent comparisons were made between reported shockable-rhythm (RSR) and reported non-shockable-rhythm (RNSR) groups. Logistic regression was also used to identify predictors for shock advised and flight diversions using a case control study design. Significant predictors for survival-to-hospital were RSR and remaining flight time to destination. The percentage of RSR cases was 24.6%. The survival to hospital admission was 22.7% (22/97) for passengers in RSR compared with 2.4% (7/297) in the RNSR group. The adjusted odds ratio for survival-to-hospital for the RSR group compared to the RNSR group was 13.6 (5.5-33.5). The model showed odds for survival to hospital decreased with longer scheduled remaining flight duration with adjusted OR = 0.701 (0.535-0.920) per hour increase. No correlation between diversions and survival for RSR cases was found. Survival-to-hospital from IFCAs is best when an RSR is present. The percentage of RSR cases was lower than in other out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) settings, which suggests delayed discovery. Flight diversions did not significantly affect resuscitation outcome. We emphasize good quality cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation as key factors for IFCA survival. Alves PM, DeJohn CA, Ricaurte EM, Mills WD. Prognostic factors for outcomes of in-flight sudden cardiac arrest on commercial airlines. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(10):862-868.

  9. In Flight Calibration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Fast Plasma Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Alexander C.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Gliese, Ulrik; Dorelli, John C.; Avanov, Levon A.; Salo, Chad L.; Tucker, Corey J.; Holland, Mathew P.; Pollock, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) combines data from eight spectrometers, each with four deflection states, into a single map of the sky. Any systematic discontinuity, artifact, noise source, etc. present in this map may be incorrectly interpreted as legitimate data and incorrect conclusions reached. For this reason it is desirable to have all spectrometers return the same output for a given input, and for this output to be low in noise sources or other errors. While many missions use statistical analyses of data to calibrate instruments in flight, this process is difficult with FPI for two reasons: 1. Only a small fraction of high resolution data is downloaded to the ground due to bandwidth limitations and 2: The data that is downloaded is, by definition, scientifically interesting and therefore not ideal for calibration. FPI uses a suite of new tools to calibrate in flight. A new method for detection system ground calibration has been developed involving sweeping the detection threshold to fully define the pulse height distribution. This method has now been extended for use in flight as a means to calibrate MCP voltage and threshold (together forming the operating point) of the Dual Electron Spectrometers (DES) and Dual Ion Spectrometers (DIS). A method of comparing higher energy data (which has low fractional voltage error) to lower energy data (which has a higher fractional voltage error) will be used to calibrate the high voltage outputs. Finally, a comparison of pitch angle distributions will be used to find remaining discrepancies among sensors.

  10. Bombs, flyin' high. In-flight dynamics of volcanic bombs from Strombolian to Vulcanian eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, Jacopo; Alatorre, Miguel; Cruz Vázquez, Omar; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Ricci, Tullio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Palladino, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Bomb-sized (larger than 64 mm) pyroclasts are a common product of explosive eruptions and a considerable source of hazard, both from directly impacting on people and properties and from wildfires associated with their landing in vegetated areas. The dispersal of bombs is mostly modeled as purely ballistic trajectories controlled by gravity and drag forces associated with still air, and only recently other effects, such as the influence of eruption dynamics, the gas expansion, and in-flight collisions, are starting to be quantified both numerically and observationally. By using high-speed imaging of explosive volcanic eruptions here we attempt to calculate the drag coefficient of free-flying volcanic bombs during an eruption and at the same time we document a wide range of in-flight processes affecting bomb trajectories and introducing deviations from purely ballistic emplacement. High-speed (500 frames per second) videos of explosions at Stromboli and Etna (Italy), Fuego (Gatemala), Sakurajima (Japan), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Batu Tara (Indonesia) volcanoes provide a large assortment of free-flying bombs spanning Strombolian to Vulcanian source eruptions, basaltic to andesitic composition, centimeters to meters in size, and 10 to 300 m/s in fly velocity. By tracking the bombs during their flying trajectories we were able to: 1) measure their size, shape, and vertical component of velocity and related changes over time; and 2) measure the different interactions with the atmosphere and with other bombs. Quantitatively, these data allow us to provide the first direct measurement of the aerodynamic behavior and drag coefficient of volcanic bombs while settling, also including the effect of bomb rotation and changes in bomb shape and frontal section. We also show how our observations have the potential to parameterize a number of previously hypothesized and /or described but yet unquantified processes, including in-flight rotation, deformation, fragmentation, agglutination

  11. The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner.......I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research...

  12. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    at the Høvsøre site in Denmark, which is a flat farmland area with a nearly homogeneous easterly upstream sector. Therefore, within that sector, the turning of the wind is caused by a combination of atmospheric stability, Coriolis, roughness, horizontal pressure gradient and baroclinity effects. Atmospheric...... stability was measured using sonic anemometers placed at different heights on the mast. Horizontal pressure gradients and baroclinity are derived from outputs of a numerical weather prediction model and are used to estimate the geostrophic wind. It is found, for these specific and relatively short periods...

  13. Turning a remotely controllable observatory into a fully autonomous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, Scott; Johnson, Chris; Gabor, Paul; Zareba, Grzegorz; Kubánek, Petr; Prouza, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We describe a complex process needed to turn an existing, old, operational observatory - The Steward Observatory's 61" Kuiper Telescope - into a fully autonomous system, which observers without an observer. For this purpose, we employed RTS2,1 an open sourced, Linux based observatory control system, together with other open sourced programs and tools (GNU compilers, Python language for scripting, JQuery UI for Web user interface). This presentation provides a guide with time estimates needed for a newcomers to the field to handle such challenging tasks, as fully autonomous observatory operations.

  14. Geometry of single-point turning tools and drills

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, Viktor P

    2010-01-01

    Tools for metal cutting have many shapes and features, each of which is described by its angles or geometries. The selection of the right cutting tool geometry is critical because it directly affects the integrity of the machined surface, tool life, power needed for machining, and thus the overall machining efficiency. ""Geometry of Single-Point Turning Tools and Drills"" outlines clear objectives of cutting tool geometry selection and optimization, using multiple examples to provide a thorough explanation. The establishment of clear bridges between cutting theory, tool geometry, and shop prac

  15. Turn on Fluorescent Probes for Selective Targeting of Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Dilek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Two different classes of fluorescent dyes were prepared as a turn off/on sensor system for aldehydes. Amino derivatives of a boron dipyrromethene (BDP fluorophore and a xanthene-derived fluorophore (rosamine were prepared. Model compounds of their product with an aldehyde were prepared using salicylaldehyde. Both amino boron dipyrromethene and rosamine derivatives are almost non-fluorescent in polar and apolar solvent. However, imine formation with salicylaldehyde on each fluorophore increases the fluorescence quantum yield by almost a factor of 10 (from 0.05 to 0.4. These fluorophores are therefore suitable candidates for development of fluorescence-based sensors for aldehydes.

  16. The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research...... on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner....

  17. Multi-turn, printed surface coil inductance, and Q optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, A; Kan, S

    1993-03-01

    Wheeler's empirical inductance formula for a multi-turn, close-wound flat coil shows that the maximum inductance for a given length of wire occurs when the outer to inner radius ratios is equal to 15/7. A similar expression is proposed for a flat, printed spiral for surface coil antenna design by modifying one of the coefficients in Wheeler's formula. Measured inductance is in good agreement with this new formula and the optimum radius ratio for maximum inductance or Q is now of the order of 9/5.

  18. Turn over folders: a proven tool in succession management planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engells, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    The dual challenges of succession management and succession management planning are considerable. A tool, the Turn over Folder, was introduced and described in detail as a useful first step in succession management planning. The adoption of that tool will not in itself produce a succession management plan, but it will orientate the organization and its members to the reality of succession management in all important leadership and critical positions. Succession management is an important consideration in all progressive organizations and well worth the effort.

  19. Turn and jump: how time & place fell apart

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Before Thomas Edison, light and fire were thought to be one and the same. Turns out, they were separate things altogether. This book takes a similar relationship, that of time and place, and shows how they, too, were once inseparable. Time keeping was once a local affair, when small towns set their own pace according to the rising and setting of the sun. Then, in 1883, the expanding railroads necessitated the creation of Standard Time zones, and communities became linked by a universal time. Here Howard Mansfield explores how our sudden interconnectedness, both physically, as through the railroad, and through inventions like the telegraph, changed our concept of time and place forever.

  20. Turning a Poor Ion Channel into a Good Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astumian, Dean

    2003-05-01

    We consider a membrane protein that can exist in two configurations, either one of which acts as a poor ion channel, allowing ions to slowly leak across the membrane from high to low elctrochemical potential. We show that random external fluctuations can provide the energy to turn this poor channel into a good pump that drives ion transport from low to high electrochemical potential. We discuss this result in terms of a gambling analogy, and point to possible implications for fields as far ranging as population biology, economics, and actuarial science.

  1. Feed Drive Based upon Linear Motor for Ultraprecision Turning Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of several different linear motors have been investigated, and the feed drive system with linear motor instead of screw-nut mechanism has been built for a submicro ultraprecision turning machine. In the control system for the feed drive system arranged as "T", both P-position and PI-speed control loops are used. The feedback variable is obtained from a double frequecy laser interferometor. Experiments show that the feed drive with linear motor is simple in construction, and that its dynamics is better than others. So the machining accuracy of the workpiece machined has been successfully improved.

  2. Dynamic characterization of the cutting conditions in dry turning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R [ENI Val de Loire, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, B.P. 3410, 41034 Blois Cedex (France); Chibane, H [Universite Francois Rabelais, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, B.P. 3410, 41034 Blois Cedex (France); Leroy, R, E-mail: roger.serra@univ-tours.f [Universite Francois Rabelais, Polytech' Tours, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, 7 Avenue Marcel Dassault, 37200 Tours (France)

    2009-08-01

    Machining instability in the form of violent vibrations or chatter is a physical process characterized by extreme cutting force at the cutting point. The process has very negative impact on machine integrity, tool life, surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Thus it could significantly compromise productivity and manufacturing quality. In the present paper, the importance of characterization and identification of dynamic instability in dry turning operation are shown. The stability behaviour of machine vibration or chatter has been examined and the various relevant parameters are studied and discuted. For chatter detection and identification of the transition between stable and unstable states, different methods are used. Results obtained proof the accuracy of these methods.

  3. Why nature doesn't turn off neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamenti, Anthony F

    2013-03-01

    This paper develops an integration of psychoanalytic and wisdom tradition concepts to answer the question as to why nature does not turn off neurosis, The proposed answer is that nature wants a person to exploit the neurosis for two gains, one being the increase in adaptive capacity resulting from releasing it and the second involving the difficulty in the release itself, the latter related to gains proffered by the world's wisdom traditions. These see a movement from the psyche's creation by passive, unconscious means of finite promise rooted in parental love to creation by active, consciously chosen means of unlimited promise involving a direct relationship with nature and the Cosmos.

  4. The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Andreas; Koch, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the opportunities and threats which arise when turning origin/destination airports into hubs. The analysis focuses on market development trends, competitive structures, especially in the light of airline network strategies and the growing rivalry between airports, and finally the potential financial impacts for the airport, including both investment efforts and the financial results from hub operations. We argue that in most cases a decision against converting a traditional origin/destination airport into a major transfer point is preferable to the transformation into a hub.

  5. Big data analytics turning big data into big money

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlhorst, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Unique insights to implement big data analytics and reap big returns to your bottom line Focusing on the business and financial value of big data analytics, respected technology journalist Frank J. Ohlhorst shares his insights on the newly emerging field of big data analytics in Big Data Analytics. This breakthrough book demonstrates the importance of analytics, defines the processes, highlights the tangible and intangible values and discusses how you can turn a business liability into actionable material that can be used to redefine markets, improve profits and identify new business opportuni

  6. Serials cataloging at the turn of the century

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, James W

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the research topics and trends that have appeared over the last five years, Serials Cataloging at the Turn of the Century doesn't just tell you that there has been a lot of change--that the information environment is something of a chameleon, always beguiling and slipping out of grasp. Instead, it gives you the plain facts on the specific challenges serials catalogers have been facing and how they're meeting adversity head-on, ready to gain the advantage in the rumble with proliferating information and formats.Comprehensive, resource-packed, and easy-to-digest, Serials Catalogin

  7. Impacts of transmission lines on birds in flight: proceedings of a workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Michael L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress to alleviate the national and world energy problem will come as individual issues are identified and acceptable solutions implemented. One of the specific issues to emerge in the last few years in the United States is the impact of electric power transmission lines on birds in flight. Therefore, the National Power Plant Team, Office of Biological Services, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, requested Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to organized and convene a workshop of knowledgeable experts to examine this issue and options for dealing with it. The participants are listed at the end of this report.

  8. Bigness is in the eye of the beholder. [size and distance perception of pilots in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report reviews an investigation of judgments of size and distance as required of pilots in flight. The experiments covered a broad spectrum of basic psychophysiological issues involving the measurement of visual accommodation and its correlation with various other dependent variables. Psychophysiological issues investigated included the size-distance invariance hypothesis, the projection of afterimages, the moon illusion, night and empty-field myopia, the dark focus and its so-called Mandelbaum effect, the nature and locus of the accommodative stimulus, the relation between accommodation, retinal size, and perceived size, and possible relationships among accommodative responses, autonomic balance, and personality variables.

  9. Cassini Attitude Control Flight Software: from Development to In-Flight Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) Flight Software (FSW) has achieved its intended design goals by successfully guiding and controlling the Cassini-Huygens planetary mission to Saturn and its moons. This paper describes an overview of AACS FSW details from early design, development, implementation, and test to its fruition of operating and maintaining spacecraft control over an eleven year prime mission. Starting from phases of FSW development, topics expand to FSW development methodology, achievements utilizing in-flight autonomy, and summarize lessons learned during flight operations which can be useful to FSW in current and future spacecraft missions.

  10. Doppler broadening of in-flight positron annihilation radiation due to electron momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A W; Cassidy, D B; Sterne, P A; Cowan, T E; Howell, R H; Lynn, K G; Golevchenko, J A

    2001-06-11

    We report the first observation of electron momentum contributions to the Doppler broadening of radiation produced by in-flight two-photon annihilation in solids. In these experiments an approximately 2.5 MeV positron beam impinged on thin polyethylene, aluminum, and gold targets. Since energetic positrons easily penetrate the nuclear Coulomb potential and do not cause a strong charge polarization, the experimental annihilation line shapes agree well with calculations based on a simple independent-particle model. Moreover, annihilations with the deepest core electrons are greatly enhanced.

  11. Cassini Attitude Control Flight Software: from Development to In-Flight Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) Flight Software (FSW) has achieved its intended design goals by successfully guiding and controlling the Cassini-Huygens planetary mission to Saturn and its moons. This paper describes an overview of AACS FSW details from early design, development, implementation, and test to its fruition of operating and maintaining spacecraft control over an eleven year prime mission. Starting from phases of FSW development, topics expand to FSW development methodology, achievements utilizing in-flight autonomy, and summarize lessons learned during flight operations which can be useful to FSW in current and future spacecraft missions.

  12. Cross-Sectional Survey of Physicians on Providing Volunteer Care for In-Flight Medical Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Eric; Bond, William F; McCay, Bradley; Thibeault, Claude; Alves, Paulo M; Squillante, Marc; Timpe, Joshua; Cook, Courtney J; Bertino, Raymond E

    2017-09-01

    Airline carriers have equipment, procedures, and protocols in place to handle in-flight medical events (IFMEs). Community physicians may be asked for aid during IFMEs. Cross-Sectional Survey of Physicians on Providing Volunteer Care for In-Flight Medical Events surveyed self-assessed awareness and knowledge, perceived barriers, and suggestions for improving responses to IFMEs. We composed a survey regarding clinicians' self-assessed understanding of in-flight resources, procedures, flight environmental issues, and Good Samaritan protections. The survey was distributed primarily via electronic mail to medical staff list serves to a total of approximately 1300 physicians representing 2 health networks that serve urban, suburban, and rural areas in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Total number of responses was 418. Physician response rate was 29.2% (379/1300). In 3% (39/1300), the responder either failed to indicate their background or was another type of health care professional (e.g., dentist, medical student, physician assistant). Of the physicians, 37.5% (142/379) were primary care and 42% (177/418) of responders reported at least one experience of being asked to volunteer. When asked how well they understand the protocols with which medical events are handled, 64% (262/412) responded "not at all" and 23% (94/412) reported "a little" knowledge. Only 56% (223/397) answered that 75% or more of U.S. flights have ground medical support available. There were 73% (298/411) who believed airlines were required to have medical supplies, but 54% (222/410) reported no knowledge of supplies available. A total of 69% (279/403) believed or were sure that the U.S. has a Good Samaritan law that applies to IFMEs. Many physicians lack basic knowledge about IFMEs. Responders may assist more effectively if better informed about protocols and the availability of ground medical support. Education and timely information support are recommended.Chatfield E, Bond WF, McCay B

  13. Hot-wire anemometry for in-flight measurement of aircraft wake vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A development program has demonstrated that hot-wire anemometry can be used successfully on an aircraft in flight to make measurements of wake vortices produced by another aircraft. The probe, whose wires were made of platinum/rhodium, 10 microns in diameter, provides unambiguous results for inflow angles less than about 35 deg. off the probe axis. The high frequency response capability of the hot-wire system allows detailed measurement of the flow structure, and the study of aircraft hazards associated with wake turbulence.

  14. Real-time In-Flight Strain and Deflection Monitoring with Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Dryden's efforts to develop in-flight monitoring based on Fiber Optics. One of the motivating factors for this development was the breakup of the Helios aircraft. On Ikhana the use of fiber optics for wing shape sensing is being developed. They are being used to flight validate fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions on NASA's Ikhana vehicle; validate fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; Assess technical viability and, if applicable, develop methodology and approach to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system, and develop and flight validate advanced approaches to perform active wing shape control.

  15. In-flight simulation with pilot-center of gravity offset and velocity mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Similarity transformations which preserve modal characteristics and pilot's acceleration cues in in-flight simulation are presented. The model transformation for lateral acceleration matching is developed. A velocity-mismatch example, based on a VRA simulation of the Space Shuttle, illustrates that acceleration matching is achieved at the expense of mismatching in cues which are secondary to the simulated piloting task, while primarily cues are preserved. The approach is applicable for both implicit and explicit model-following, and it can easily be extended to the longitudinal case.

  16. ENTERTAINMENT GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China has the largest population of young netizens in the world, but they turn to the Internet mostly to play games Step into any Internet cafe in China and you are bound to see this sight: rows of young faces, their eyes fixed on computer screens, earphones over their heads, their fingers moving rapidly on the keyboards. A chorus of mouse clicks provides the background music. Take a closer look and you will see guns shooting, grenades exploding, monsters

  17. Instant Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Elaina

    2017-01-01

    Generation Z students (born between 1995-2010) have replaced millennials on college campuses. Generation Z students are entrepreneurial, desire practical skills with their education, and are concerned about the cost of college. This article presents what need to be known about this new generation of students.

  18. Improved Turn-on Characteristics of Fast High Current Thyristors

    CERN Document Server

    Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    1999-01-01

    The beam dumping system of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is equipped with fast solid state closing switches, designed for a hold-off voltage of 30 kV and a quasi half sine wave current of 20 kA, with 3 ms rise time, a maximum di/dt of 12 kA/ms and 2 ms fall time. The design repetition rate is 20 s. The switch is composed of ten Fast High Current Thyristors (FHCT’s), which are modified symmetric 4.5 kV GTO thyristors of WESTCODE. Recent studies aiming at improving the turn-on delay, switching speed and at decreasing the switch losses, have led to test an asymmetric not fully optimised GTO thyristor of WESTCODE and an optimised device of GEC PLESSEY Semiconductor (GPS), GB. The GPS FHCT, which gave the best results, is a non irradiated device of 64 mm diameter with a hold-off voltage of 4.5 kV like the symmetric FHCT. Tests results of the GPS FHCT show a reduction in turn-on delay of 40 % and in switching losses of almost 50 % with respect to the symmetric FHCT of WESTCODE. The GPS device can sustain an i...

  19. Development of a Low Cost MQL Setup for Turning Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Sumaiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of MQL application on the tool wear, surface roughness and chip formation in turning Aluminum alloy 6061 is investigated. Experiments were carried out by plain turning of an Aluminum bar with varying depth of cut, cutting speeds (spindle speed and cutting environments (Dry, Wet and MQL. A newly designed, cost efficient and portable MQL setup was developed for this study. For each experimental trial, five passes were carried out in order to promote the formation of tool wear. After each pass, the tool surface was examined under a microscope and the surface roughness was measured using a stylus based surface tester. The extent of tool wear from each pass is measured by using ImageJ software. Chips were collected after the five passes and were physically examined. The newly designed MQL delivery system was successful in delivering a fine mist of lubricant at the cutting point. MQL lubrication provided lower surface roughness and tool wear values compared to wet and dry conditions due to effective temperature reduction and improved lubrication penetration of cutting zones, as well as better chip flushing. Chip formed under MQL conditions had reduced chip thickness due to reduced temperatures. MQL was found to have the greatest positive impact on tool wear and surface roughness parameters based on ANOVA results.

  20. Squeezed light from a diamond-turned monolithic cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Brieussel, A; Campbell, G; Guccione, G; Janousek, J; Hage, B; Buchler, B C; Treps, N; Fabre, C; Fang, F Z; Li, X Y; Symul, T; Lam, P K

    2016-01-01

    For some crystalline materials, a regime can be found where continuous ductile cutting is feasible. Using precision diamond turning, such materials can be cut into complex optical components with high surface quality and form accuracy. In this work we use diamond-turning to machine a monolithic, square-shaped, doubly-resonant $LiNbO_3$ cavity with two flat and two convex facets. When additional mild polishing is implemented, the Q-factor of the resonator is found to be limited only by the material absorption loss. We show how our monolithic square resonator may be operated as an optical parametric oscillator that is evanescently coupled to free-space beams via birefringent prisms. The prism arrangement allows for independent and large tuning of the fundamental and second harmonic coupling rates. We measure $2.6\\pm0.5$ dB of vacuum squeezing at 1064 nm using our system. Potential improvements to obtain higher degrees of squeezing are discussed.