WorldWideScience

Sample records for general surface features of the earth

  1. The Cool Surfaces of Binaries Near-Earth Asteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, Marco; Walsh, K.; Mueller, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from thermal-infrared observations of binary near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). These objects, in general, have surface temperatures cooler than the average values for non-binary NEAs. We discuss how this may be evidence of higher-than-average surface thermal inertia. The comparison of

  2. Earthing: Health Implications of Reconnecting the Human Body to the Earth's Surface Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétan Chevalier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental medicine generally addresses environmental factors with a negative impact on human health. However, emerging scientific research has revealed a surprisingly positive and overlooked environmental factor on health: direct physical contact with the vast supply of electrons on the surface of the Earth. Modern lifestyle separates humans from such contact. The research suggests that this disconnect may be a major contributor to physiological dysfunction and unwellness. Reconnection with the Earth's electrons has been found to promote intriguing physiological changes and subjective reports of well-being. Earthing (or grounding refers to the discovery of benefits—including better sleep and reduced pain—from walking barefoot outside or sitting, working, or sleeping indoors connected to conductive systems that transfer the Earth's electrons from the ground into the body. This paper reviews the earthing research and the potential of earthing as a simple and easily accessed global modality of significant clinical importance.

  3. HELGES: Helmholtz Laboratory for the Geochemistry of the Earth Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Friedhelm von Blanckenburg; Hella Wittmann; Schuessler, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    New developments in Geochemistry during the last two decades have revolutionized our understanding of the processes that shape Earth's surface. Here, complex interactions occur between the tectonic forces acting from within the Earth and the exogenic forces like climate that are strongly modulated by biota and, increasingly today, by human activity. Within the Helmholtz Laboratory for the Geochemistry of the Earth Surface (HELGES) of the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for...

  4. Improving the safety features of general practice computer systems

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Avery; Boki Savelyich; Sheila Teasdale

    2003-01-01

    General practice computer systems already have a number of important safety features. However, there are problems in that general practitioners (GPs) have come to rely on hazard alerts when they are not foolproof. Furthermore, GPs do not know how to make best use of safety features on their systems. There are a number of solutions that could help to improve the safety features of general practice computer systems and also help to improve the abilities of healthcare professionals to use these ...

  5. The energy balance of the earth' surface : a practical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This

  6. The energy balance of the earth's surface : a practical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This

  7. Metacatalog of Planetary Surface Features for Multicriteria Evaluation of Surface Evolution: the Integrated Planetary Feature Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    We have created a metacatalog, or catalog or catalogs, of surface features of Mars that also includes the actual data in the catalogs listed. The goal is to make mesoscale surface feature databases available in one place, in a GIS-ready format. The databases can be directly imported to ArcGIS or other GIS platforms, like Google Mars. Some of the catalogs in our database are also ingested into the JMARS platform.All catalogs have been previously published in a peer-reviewed journal, but they may contain updates of the published catalogs. Many of the catalogs are "integrated", i.e. they merge databases or information from various papers on the same topic, including references to each individual features listed.Where available, we have included shapefiles with polygon or linear features, however, most of the catalogs only contain point data of their center points and morphological data.One of the unexpected results of the planetary feature metacatalog is that some features have been described by several papers, using different, i.e., conflicting designations. This shows the need for the development of an identification system suitable for mesoscale (100s m to km sized) features that tracks papers and thus prevents multiple naming of the same feature.The feature database can be used for multicriteria analysis of a terrain, thus enables easy distribution pattern analysis and the correlation of the distribution of different landforms and features on Mars. Such catalog makes a scientific evaluation of potential landing sites easier and more effective during the selection process and also supports automated landing site selections.The catalog is accessible at https://planetarydatabase.wordpress.com/.

  8. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  9. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  10. Aspects of the atmospheric surface layers on Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Landberg, L.

    2002-01-01

    The structures of mean flow and turbulence in the atmospheric surface boundary layer have been extensively studied on Earth, and to a far less extent on Mars, where only the Viking missions and the Pathfinder mission have delivered in-situ data. Largely the behaviour of surface-layer turbulence a...

  11. HELGES: Helmholtz Laboratory for the Geochemistry of the Earth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedhelm von Blanckenburg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available New developments in Geochemistry during the last two decades have revolutionized our understanding of the processes that shape Earth's surface. Here, complex interactions occur between the tectonic forces acting from within the Earth and the exogenic forces like climate that are strongly modulated by biota and, increasingly today, by human activity. Within the Helmholtz Laboratory for the Geochemistry of the Earth Surface (HELGES of the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, it is our goal to quantify the rates and fluxes of these processes in detail and to develop new techniques to fingerprint them over various temporal and spatial scales. We use mass spectrometry facilities to analyze metal stable isotopes, element concentrations and cosmogenic nuclides to fingerprint and quantify geomorphological changes driven by erosion and weathering processes. We use these novel geochemical tools, to quantify, for example, the recycling of metals in plants after their release during weathering of rocks and soils, soil formation and its erosion rates, and mechanisms and speed of sediment transport through drainage basins. Our research is thus dedicated towards understanding material turnover rates at the Earth's surface by using geochemical fingerprints.

  12. The Vegetation Red Edge Spectroscopic Feature as a Surface Biomarker

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2002-01-01

    The search for Earth-like extrasolar planets is in part motivated by the potential detection of spectroscopic biomarkers. Spectroscopic biomarkers are spectral features that are either consistent with life, indicative of habitability, or provide clues to a planet's habitability. Most attention so far has been given to atmospheric biomarkers, gases such as O2, O3, H2O, CO, and CH4. Here we discuss surface biomarkers. Surface biomarkers that have large, distinct, abrupt changes in their spectra may be detectable in an extrasolar planet's spectrum at wavelengths that penetrate to the planetary surface. Earth has such a surface biomarker: the vegetation "red edge" spectroscopic feature. Recent interest in Earth's surface biomarker has motivated Earthshine observations of the spatially unresolved Earth and two recent studies may have detected the vegetation red edge feature in Earth's hemispherically integrated spectrum. A photometric time series in different colors should help in detecting unusual surface feature...

  13. Daily monitoring of the land surface of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, J.

    2016-12-01

    Planet is an integrated aerospace and data analytics company that operates the largest fleet of Earth-imaging satellites. With more than 140 cube-sats successfully launched to date, Planet is now collecting approximately 10 million square kilometers of imagery per day (3-5m per pixel, in red, green, blue and near infrared spectral bands). By early 2017, Planet's constellation will image the entire land surface of the Earth on a daily basis. Due to investments in cloud storage and computing, approximately 75% of imagery collected is available to Planet's partners within 24 hours of capture through an Application Program Interface. This unique dataset has enormous applications for monitoring the status of Earth's natural ecosystems, as well as human settlements and agricultural welfare. Through our Ambassadors Program, Planet has made data available for researchers in areas as disparate as human rights monitoring in refugee camps, to assessments of the impact of hydroelectric installations, to tracking illegal gold mining in Amazon forests, to assessing the status of the cryosphere. Here, we share early results from Planet's research partner network, including enhanced spatial and temporal resolution of NDVI data for agricultural health in Saudi Arabia, computation of rates of illegal deforestation in Southern Peru, estimates of tropical forest carbon stocks based on data integration with active sensors, and estimates of glacial flow rates. We synthesize the potentially enormous research and scientific value of Planet's persistent monitoring capability, and discuss methods by which the data will be disseminated into the scientific community.

  14. The clinical features of ankle syndesmosis injuries: a general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John J

    2011-11-01

    To review the research conclusions relating to clinical aspects of syndesmosis, the incidence and prognosis of syndesmosis injuries, and the effectiveness of the history and clinical examination to reliably diagnose ankle syndesmosis injury. Google Scholar search: Syndesmosis paired with incidence, prognosis, history, and examination in turn. There was no time limit for the search. Articles were selected by reading titles, abstracts, and the full article, if indicated, seeking original articles determining these clinical aspects of syndesmosis injuries. Further articles were derived from the references of the primary articles. The prognosis for isolated syndesmosis injuries, including the time to functional recovery, is unknown. The incidence of acute syndesmosis injury in moderate to severe ankle injuries requiring imaging is of the order of 5%. Historical features and special clinical tests of syndesmosis injury have not been proven reliable by clinical studies using evidence-based diagnostic criteria. Acute local tenderness of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament will indicate significant syndesmosis injury in only approximately half of nonspecific ankle injuries. There is limited, evidence-based, standard, published literature from which to draw conclusions regarding the validity or reliability of various clinical special tests for syndesmosis injury. Literature assessing the incidence, prognosis, and clinical features is generally not based on definitively confirmed syndesmosis injuries, which is a critical aspect of evidence-based medicine before valid conclusions can be drawn.

  15. A General Study on the Major Features of CALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻晖

    2009-01-01

    As Computer Assisted language Learning (CALL) has become a hot issue in the second language acquisition, this paper attempts to discuss two of the important features of CALL: the student-centered and interactiveness. It is ex-plained in the paper that these two features are the most important features characterized by CALL and they can be bet-ter realized in a CALL class than in a traditional class.

  16. About the geometry of the Earth geodetic reference surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husár, Ladislav; Švaral, Peter; Janák, Juraj

    2017-10-01

    The paper focuses on the comparison of metrics of three most common reference surfaces of the Earth used in geodesy (excluding the plane which also belongs to reference surfaces used in geodesy when dealing with small areas): a sphere, an ellipsoid of revolution and a triaxial ellipsoid. The two latter surfaces are treated in a more detailed way. First, the mathematical form of the metric tensors using three types of coordinates is derived and the lengths of meridian and parallel arcs between the two types of ellipsoids are compared. Three kinds of parallels, according to the type of latitude, can be defined on a triaxial ellipsoid. We show that two types of parallels are spatial curves and one is represented by ellipses. The differences of curvature of both kinds of ellipsoid are analysed using the normal curvature radii. Priority of the chosen triaxial ellipsoid is documented by its better fit with respect to the high-degree geoid model EIGEN6c4 computed up to degree and order 2160.

  17. Publications of the Western Earth Surface Processes Team, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Powell, Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    The Western Earth Surfaces Processes Team (WESPT) of the U.S. Geological Survey, Geologic Division (USGS, GD), conducts geologic mapping and related topical earth- science studies in the western United States. This work is focused on areas where modern geologic maps and associated earth-science data are needed to address key societal and environmental issues such as ground-water quality, potential geologic hazards, and land-use decisions. Areas of primary emphasis currently include southern California, the San Francisco Bay region, and the Pacific Northwest. The team has its headquarters in Menlo Park, California, and maintains field offices at several other locations in the western United States. The results of research conducted by the WESPT are released to the public as a variety of databases, maps, text reports, and abstracts, both through the internal publication system of the USGS and in diverse external publications such as scientific journals and books. This report lists publications of the WESPT released in 1999 as well as additional 1997 and 1998 publications that were not included in the previous list (USGS Open-file Report 99-302). Most of the publications listed were authored or coauthored by WESPT staff. The list also includes some publications authored by non-USGS cooperators with the WESPT, as well as some authored by USGS staff outside the WESPT in cooperation with WESPT projects.

  18. Earth encounters as the origin of fresh surfaces on near-Earth asteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard P; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Merouane, Sihane; Demeo, Francesca E; Birlan, Mirel; Vernazza, Pierre; Thomas, Cristina A; Rivkin, Andrew S; Bus, Schelte J; Tokunaga, Alan T

    2010-01-21

    Telescopic measurements of asteroids' colours rarely match laboratory reflectance spectra of meteorites owing to a 'space weathering' process that rapidly reddens asteroid surfaces in less than 10(6) years. 'Unweathered' asteroids (those having spectra matching the most commonly falling ordinary chondrite meteorites), however, are seen among small bodies the orbits of which cross inside Mars and the Earth. Various explanations have been proposed for the origin of these fresh surface colours, ranging from collisions to planetary encounters. Less reddened asteroids seem to cross most deeply into the terrestrial planet region, strengthening the evidence for the planetary-encounter theory, but encounter details within 10(6) years remain to be shown. Here we report that asteroids displaying unweathered spectra (so-called 'Q-types') have experienced orbital intersections closer than the Earth-Moon distance within the past 5 x 10(5) years. These Q-type asteroids are not currently found among asteroids showing no evidence of recent close planetary encounters. Our results substantiate previous work: tidal stress, strong enough to disturb and expose unweathered surface grains, is the most likely dominant short-term asteroid resurfacing process. Although the seismology details are yet to be worked out, the identification of rapid physical processes that can produce both fresh and weathered asteroid surfaces resolves the decades-long puzzle of the difference in colour of asteroids and meteorites.

  19. Modeling the surface temperature of Earth-like planets

    CERN Document Server

    Vladilo, G; Murante, G; Filippi, L; Provenzale, A

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface Energy Balance Model complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically-based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (epsilon >= 45^o). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ~5K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5 <= Omega/Omega_o <= 2, 0.75 <= S/S_o <= 1.25, 0.3 <= p/(1 bar) <= 10, and 0.5 <= R/R_o <= 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely l...

  20. Concept of a space optoelectronic system for environmental monitoring of the near-earth space, atmosphere, and earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltsov, Anatoli V.; Karasev, Vladimir I.; Kolotkov, Vjacheslav V.; Kondranin, Timothy V.

    1997-06-01

    how large the space (from several meters to hundreds of kilometers) and time (from an hour to several months) scales of the above monitoring might be there is a common dominating factor which could favor creation of a general- purpose observation and control system based on passive optoelectronic instrumentation of different levels of sophistication. This dominating factor refers to the possibility of obtaining information about the state of objects by way to recording parameters of radiation emitted by them in wavelengths of 250 nm to tens of microns. The fact that phenomena and processes occurring in the atmosphere are closely interrelated gives implications as to the structure of such a system which is supposed to be a common information network basically consisting of an orbiting constellation of a number of small-size spacecraft equipped with optoelectronic instrumentation of different complexity, and a ground segment to provide acquisition and processing of information about the status of every ecosphere shell including comprehensive thematic analysis. The existing domestic (based on the `Meteor', `Resurs-O', `Okean', etc. spacecraft) and foreign (NOAA, SPOT, LANDSAT, ERS, etc.) space systems are designed for solution of only a limited number of atmosphere monitoring issues, namely those related to meteorology and studies of natural resources. As for the near-Earth space there are at present only ground facilities whose monitoring capabilities are also limited. It should be noted that in recent years in the USA similar activities have been in full swing targeted at creation of a system like the one mentioned above (the Earth Observation System). A system comprising four spacecraft of the NOAA series and a distributed ground network for receiving analog (with 4 km spatial resolution) and digital (with 1 km spatial resolution) multispectral data pertaining to the status of the atmosphere and the underlying surface is currently operational. This system presents

  1. Exploiting surface features for the prediction of podcast preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Larson, M.; de Rijke, M.

    2009-01-01

    Podcasts display an unevenness characteristic of domains dominated by user generated content, resulting in potentially radical variation of the user preference they enjoy. We report on work that uses easily extractable surface features of podcasts in order to achieve solid performance on two podcast

  2. Bioeffectiveness of Cosmic Rays Near the Earth Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisheva, N. K.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental studies of the dynamics of morphological and functional state of the diverse biosystems (microflora, plant Maranta leuconeura «Fascinator», cell cultures, human peripheral blood, the human body ) have shown that geocosmical agents modulated the functional state of biological systems Belisheva 2006; Belisheva et all 2007 ) . First time on the experimental data showed the importance of the increase in the fluxes of solar cosmic rays (CRs ) with high energies (Belisheva et all 2002; 2012; Belisheva, Lammer, Biernat, 2004) and galactic cosmic ray variations (Belisheva et al, 2005; 2006; Vinnichenko Belisheva, 2009 ) near the Earth surface for the functional state of biosystems. The evidence of the presence of the particles with high bioeffectiveness in the secondary cosmic rays was obtained by simulating the particle cascades in the atmosphere, performed by using Geant4 (Planetocosmics, based on the Monte Carlo code (Maurchev et al, 2011), and experimental data, where radiobiological effects of cosmic rays were revealed. Modeling transport of solar protons through the Earth's atmosphere, taking into account the angular and energy distributions of secondary particles in different layers of the atmosphere, allowed us to estimate the total neutron flux during three solar proton events, accompanied by an increase in the intensity of the nucleon component of secondary cosmic rays - Ground Level Enhancement GLE (43, 44, 45) in October 1989 (19, 22, 24 October). The results obtained by simulation were compared with the data of neutron monitors and balloon measurements made during solar proton events. Confirmation of the neutron fluxes near the Earth surface during the GLE (43, 44, 45) were obtained in the experiments on the cellular cultures (Belisheva et al. 2012). A direct evidence of biological effects of CR has been demonstrated in experiments with three cellular lines growing in culture during three events of Ground Level Enhancement (GLEs) in the

  3. Laws, Place, History and the Interpretation of Earth Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The state of an Earth surface system (ESS is determined by three sets of factors: Laws, place, and history. Laws (L = L1, L2, . . . , Ln) are the n general principles, relationships, and representations applicable to any such system at any time. Place factors (P = P1, P2, . . . , Pm) are the m relevant properties or characteristics of the local or regional environment - e.g., climate, tectonic setting, geology, traits of the local biota, etc. History factors (H = H1 , H2, . . . , Hq) include the previous evolutionary pathway of the ESS, its stage of development, past disturbance, and in some contexts initial conditions. Geoscience investigation may be focused on laws (e.g., theoretical deductions, process modeling, laboratory experiments), place (e.g., regional geology or geography, soil-landscape studies), or history (e.g., paleoenvironmental studies, environmental history, historical geology or geography). Ultimately, however, all three sets of factors are necessary to fully understand and explain ESS. Beyond providing a useful checklist (analogous to the factorial models often used in pedology and ecology), the LPH framework gives us analytical traction to some difficult research problems. For example, studies of the avulsions of three southeast Texas rivers showed substantial differences in avulsion regimes and resulting alluvial morphology, despite the proximity and superficial similarity of the systems. Avulsion dynamics are governed by the same laws in all three cases [L(A) = L(B) = L(C)], and the three rivers, once part of a single system at lower sea-levels, have undergone the same sea-level, climate, and tectonic histories, as well as the same general types of anthropic impacts [H(A) ≈ H(B) ≈ H(C)]. Though the regional-scale environmental controls are similar, local details such as the location of the modern main channel relative to Pleistocene meander channels differ, and thus these place factors explain the differences between the rivers. The LPH

  4. The cool surfaces of binary near-Earth asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Delbo, Marco; Walsh, Kevin; Mueller, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Howell, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Here we show results from thermal-infrared observations of km-sized binary Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). We combine previously published thermal properties for NEAs with newly derived values for three binary NEAs. The ?value derived from the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM) for each object is then used to estimate an average thermal inertia for the population of binary NEAs and compared against similar estimates for the population of non-binaries. We find that thes...

  5. A New Estimate of the Earth's Land Surface Temperature History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, R. A.; Curry, J. A.; Groom, D.; Jacobsen, B.; Perlmutter, S.; Rohde, R. A.; Rosenfeld, A.; Wickham, C.; Wurtele, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature team has re-evaluated the world's atmospheric land surface temperature record using a linear least-squares method that allow the use of all the digitized records back to 1800, including short records that had been excluded by prior groups. We use the Kriging method to estimate an optimal weighting of stations to give a world average based on uniform weighting of the land surface. We have assembled a record of the available data by merging 1.6 billion temperature reports from 16 pre-existing data archives; this data base will be made available for public use. The former Global Historic Climatology Network (GHCN) monthly data base shows a sudden drop in the number of stations reporting monthly records from 1980 to the present; we avoid this drop by calculating monthly averages from the daily records. By using all the data, we reduce the effects of potential data selection bias. We make an independent estimate of the urban heat island effect by calculating the world land temperature trends based on stations chosen to be far from urban sites. We calculate the effect of poor station quality, as documented in the US by the team led by Anthony Watts by estimating the temperature trends based solely on the stations ranked good (1,2 or 1,2,3 in the NOAA ranking scheme). We avoid issues of homogenization bias by using raw data; at times when the records are discontinuous (e.g. due to station moves) we break the record into smaller segments and analyze those, rather than attempt to correct the discontinuity. We estimate the uncertainties in the final results using the jackknife procedure developed by J. Tukey. We calculate spatial uncertainties by measuring the effects of geographical exclusion on recent data that have good world coverage. The results we obtain are compared to those published by the groups at NOAA, NASA-GISS, and Hadley-CRU in the UK.

  6. Features of the Generalized Dynamics of Quasiparticles in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprun, Anatol D.; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V.

    2017-03-01

    The general dynamic properties of the electron, as quasiparticle in conduction band of graphene, were analyzed. It is shown that in graphene, these properties essentially differ from similar base properties for crystals with a simple lattice, despite insignificant, on the first sight, difference of dispersion law ɛ( p). Primarily, crystals with an elementary cell of arbitrary complexity of structure were considered. The obtained general relations were applied further to graphene. Herewith two-dimensional lattice of graphene has been considered as consisting of elementary cells with two atoms. Typically, graphene is considered as crystals consisting of two simple nested sublattices. It has been shown that both considerations lead to the analogous basic results. On the basis of obtained wave Hamiltonian, all the dynamic characteristics of the injected electron, considered as a quasiparticle, were found: speed, tensor of effective dynamic mass, and wave Lagrangian. Also, for some physically actual situations, the dynamic characteristics of an alternative description have been found: a mechanical momentum p m , mechanical Hamiltonian, and mechanical Lagrangian. For these situations, a generalized Louis de Broglie relationship between mechanical p m and wave p momenta was found also.

  7. Feature aware Digital Surface Model analysis and generalization based on the 3D Medial Axix Transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Modern Digital Surface Models (DSMs) are highly detailed and cover large areas. This brings great advantages for applications such as flood modeling, crisis management and 3D city modeling. Unfor- tunately, and despite recent developments on this subject, current methods are unable to fully take ad-

  8. Relating Major Surface Processes to the Deep EarthThe Importance of the Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, P. E.; Szatmari, P.

    2012-12-01

    Many global scale tectonic, oceanic and climate changes began in the Tertiary with global tectonics as the underlying driving force and changed the world. In full flower by the beginning of the Middle Miocene around 16 Ma, these changes continued through the Late Miocene into the present so we can firmly say that most of our modern world, continental glaciations excepted, began in the Middle and Late Miocene. We summarize in a flow diagram how the major earth surface processes active in the Miocene are related to the Deep Earth as understood by recent advances in seismic tomography. This 11 Ma interval had two global orogenic zones, the Alpine-Tethyan orogen from Gibraltar across southern Asia into Vietnam and around the Pacific Rim, both crustal expressions of downwellings taking place, especially in the upper mantle. These downwellings are balanced by upwellings in the lower mantle in and on the rim of the African and Pacific superplumes, which are large, low-shear velocity provinces; part of the rising plumes originated from the most extensively melted regions of the core-mantle boundary layer, D", where heat flow from the outer core is highest. Together these up-and downwellings indicate that mantle convection extended, at least periodically, through the whole mantle and reflected lateral variations in convection and heat flow in the cooling and slowly crystallizing outer core. Correlation of mantle convection with surface features is most evident in the uppermost mantle whose dynamic topography is readily reflected by the subsidence and tilting of continents moving toward the downwelling zones. Because they are closely synchronous, these two orogenic belts had enormous consequences for the earth's surface, and because they are close to us in time, they are easy to study and sample. Thus the Miocene is ideal to study for both its many global intra connections and for their link to the Deep Earth. As these two orogenies developed, they changed a global warm

  9. Ultraviolet radiation climatology of the Earth`s surface and lower atmosphere. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Atmospheric Chemistry Div.; Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1999-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the driving force of tropospheric chemistry and is furthermore detrimental to most living tissues. A three year modeling program was carried out to characterize the UV radiation in the lower atmosphere, with the objective of development a climatology of UV biologically active radiation, and of photo-dissociation reaction rates that are key to tropospheric chemistry. A comprehensive model, the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model, was developed and made available to the scientific community. The model incorporates updated spectroscopic data, recent advances in radiative transfer theory, and allows flexible customization for the needs of different users. The TUV model has been used in conjunction with satellite-derived measurements of total atmospheric ozone and cloud amount, to develop a global climatology of UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Initial validation studies are highly encouraging, showing that model predictions agree with direct measurements to ca. 5--10% at times when environmental conditions are well known, and to 10--30% for monthly averages when local environmental conditions can only be estimated remotely from satellite-based measurements. Additional validation studies are continuing.

  10. Quantitative Modeling of Earth Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    This textbook describes some of the most effective and straightforward quantitative techniques for modeling Earth surface processes. By emphasizing a core set of equations and solution techniques, the book presents state-of-the-art models currently employed in Earth surface process research, as well as a set of simple but practical research tools. Detailed case studies demonstrate application of the methods to a wide variety of processes including hillslope, fluvial, aeolian, glacial, tectonic, and climatic systems. Exercises at the end of each chapter begin with simple calculations and then progress to more sophisticated problems that require computer programming. All the necessary computer codes are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521855976. Assuming some knowledge of calculus and basic programming experience, this quantitative textbook is designed for advanced geomorphology courses and as a reference book for professional researchers in Earth and planetary science looking for a quantitative approach to Earth surface processes. More details...

  11. The rotational motion of an earth orbiting gyroscope according to the Einstein theory of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoots, F. R.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The classical Poisson equations of rotational motion are used to study the attitude motions of an earth orbiting, rapidly spinning gyroscope perturbed by the effects of general relativity (Einstein theory). The center of mass of the gyroscope is assumed to move about a rotating oblate earth in an evolving elliptic orbit which includes all first-order oblateness effects produced by the earth. A method of averaging is used to obtain a transformation of variables, for the nonresonance case, which significantly simplifies the Poisson differential equations of motion of the gyroscope. Long-term solutions are obtained by an exact analytical integration of the simplified transformed equations. These solutions may be used to predict both the orientation of the gyroscope and the motion of its rotational angular momentum vector as viewed from its center of mass. The results are valid for all eccentricities and all inclinations not near the critical inclination.

  12. What can the surface of the Earth tell us about environmental changes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel MENTLIK

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphology is a science dealing with the landforms of the Earth. Origin and development of the landforms are influenced by many factors which are dependent on climate and strongly influenced by its change. Therefore, analysis of the surface of the Earth provides relevant information about climate and environmental changes in the past.

  13. Sensitivity of near field GIA response with respect to rheological features of the Earth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, Jan M.; Klemann, Volker; Sasgen, Ingo; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    One task of the German National Climate Modeling Initiative PalMod will be to couple earth system models representing the atmospere, ocean and ice dynamics during the last glacial cycle with the dynamic loading response of a viscoelastic earth model. In preparation, we discuss in this study the influence of viscosity stratification and of lateral heterogeneities in the Earth structure on the solid-earth response to glacial loading. As discussed in literature, there is a controversy about the impact of lateral heterogeneity on the prediction of present and past GIA signals. The influence of the Earth structure on the far-field response is governed by the flexural behaviour of the regional lithosphere and upper-mantle structure in response to the varying ocean load. The influence at and around the glacial ice sheets is substantial with respect to the amplitudes and also with respect to the temporal evolution of the earth's response. Depending on the region of interest, lithospheric variations are present over the extent of the glacial ice sheets varying between 40 and 200 km, and lateral variations in viscosity can vary by one or two orders of magnitude. The focus will be to what extent the behaviour of a laterally heterogeneous viscosity structure can be parameterised by an adjusted spherical earth model representation. Accordingly, we apply predefined ice-sheet histories (like ICE5G and ICE6G) and analyse ensemble runs representing the variability of relative sea-level and palaeo-topography predictions. Spatial pattern of deformation fields will be discussed as the behaviour at specific sea-level curves. Furthermore, we compare the sensitivity on earth structure during the evolution of sea level and palaeo topography during the termination phase of the last glaciation to present-day rates of relative sea-level height and radial displacement.

  14. Surface Features of Nanocrystalline Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Miglierini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline alloys are prepared by controlled annealing of metallic glass precursors. The latter are obtained by rapid quenching of a melt on a rotating wheel. This process leads to structural deviation of the produced ribbons’ surfaces. Structural features of as-quenched and thermally annealed 57Fe81Mo8Cu1B10 ribbons were studied employing Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectrometry (CEMS and Conversion X-ray Mössbauer Spectrometry (CXMS. Enrichment of the alloy’s composition in 57Fe helped in identification of surface crystallites that were formed even during the production process. Magnetite and bcc-Fe were found at the wheel side of the as-quenched ribbons whereas only bcc-Fe nanocrystals were uncovered at the opposite air side. Accelerated formation of bcc-Fe was observed in this side of the ribbons after annealing. The relative content of magnetite at the wheel side was almost stable in near surface areas (CEMS and in more deep subsurface regions (CXMS. It vanished completely after annealing at 550 °C. No magnetite was observed at the air side of the ribbons regardless the annealing temperature and/or depth of the scanned regions.

  15. Evaluation of the Surface Representation of the Greenland Ice Sheet in a General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullather, Richard I.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.; Zhao, Bin; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulated surface conditions of the Goddard Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS 5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) are examined for the contemporary Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). A surface parameterization that explicitly models surface processes including snow compaction, meltwater percolation and refreezing, and surface albedo is found to remedy an erroneous deficit in the annual net surface energy flux and provide an adequate representation of surface mass balance (SMB) in an evaluation using simulations at two spatial resolutions. The simulated 1980-2008 GrIS SMB average is 24.7+/-4.5 cm yr(- 1) water-equivalent (w.e.) at.5 degree model grid spacing, and 18.2+/-3.3 cm yr(- 1) w.e. for 2 degree grid spacing. The spatial variability and seasonal cycle of the simulation compare favorably to recent studies using regional climate models, while results from 2 degree integrations reproduce the primary features of the SMB field. In comparison to historical glaciological observations, the coarser resolution model overestimates accumulation in the southern areas of the GrIS, while the overall SMB is underestimated. These changes relate to the sensitivity of accumulation and melt to the resolution of topography. The GEOS-5 SMB fields contrast with available corresponding atmospheric models simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). It is found that only a few of the CMIP5 AGCMs examined provide significant summertime runoff, a dominant feature of the GrIS seasonal cycle. This is a condition that will need to be remedied if potential contributions to future eustatic change from polar ice sheets are to be examined with GCMs.

  16. Effect of the Earth's surface topography on the quasi-dynamic earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, M.; Hirahara, K.

    2014-12-01

    For quasi-dynamic earthquake cycle simulations (ECSs) using BIEM, we have developed a method of calculating slip response function (SRF) in a homogeneous elastic medium with an arbitrary shaped Earth's surface topography (Ohtani and Hirahara, 2013; Paper1). In this study, we report the improvement in our method. Following Hok and Fukuyama (2011), we set the Earth's surface as a free surface, in addition to the fault interface, in a homogeneous full-space medium. Then, using the analytic solution in full-space, we can calculate the Earth's surface deformation, then the SRF change. The surface cell setting determines the accuracy. For reducing the computational amount, we use the different sizes of the surface region and its divided subfault cells, depending on the fault depth. Paper1 used the uniform size for surface cells. Here, we improved our method where the Earth's surface cells closer to the trench have the finer sizes for achieving more accuracy. With such numerical SRF, we performed the quasi-dynamic ECS on a model, where the Earth's surface is convex upward. Basically, with this topography, the slip behavior approaches the full-space case, from the half-space with flat surface case. This is because the distance from the Earth's surface to the fault becomes large. When we set two asperities with negative A - B in the positive A - B background at 10km and 35km depths, the two asperities rupture independently. The recurrence time of the shallow asperity is Trshalf = 34.95, Trsflat = 34.89, and Trsactual =32.82 years, when using analytic SRF in half-space, and numerical SRF with flat surface and with actual topography, respectively. For each case, the recurrence time of the deep asperity is Tr1_dhalf = 26.80, Tr1_dflat = 26.89, and Tr1_dactual =26.69 years. Thus, the shallower asperity is more affected by the Earth's surface topography than the deeper one, because the distance change rate from the surface to the fault is larger. On the other hand, when we set

  17. Comparisons of observed seasonal climate features with a winter and summer numerical simulation produced with the GLAS general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, M.; Shukla, J.; Mintz, Y.; Wu, M. L.; Godbole, R.; Herman, G.; Sud, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented from numerical simulations performed with the general circulation model (GCM) for winter and summer. The monthly mean simulated fields for each integration are compared with observed geographical distributions and zonal averages. In general, the simulated sea level pressure and upper level geopotential height field agree well with the observations. Well simulated features are the winter Aleutian and Icelandic lows, the summer southwestern U.S. low, the summer and winter oceanic subtropical highs in both hemispheres, and the summer upper level Tibetan high and Atlantic ridge. The surface and upper air wind fields in the low latitudes are in good agreement with the observations. The geographical distirbutions of the Earth-atmosphere radiation balance and of the precipitation rates over the oceans are well simulated, but not all of the intensities of these features are correct. Other comparisons are shown for precipitation along the ITCZ, rediation balance, zonally averaged temperatures and zonal winds, and poleward transports of momentum and sensible heat.

  18. Features of surface topography and the geological activity of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    According to the data "New Horizons" of the spacecraft, researchers were able to specify the diameter of Pluto-2374 km. Its surface temperature in the equatorial region varies from 33 to 55 K over the planet's orbital period around the Sun in ~248 years. Presumably the surface of Pluto has a rocky base covered with a mantle of water ice, of frozen methane, nitrogen, ammonia and CO. Due to the large eccentricity of the orbit of Pluto, as it approaches the Sun, the ice melts, and the atmosphere is formed mainly of nitrogen and methane; while removing of the planet from the Sun - the atmosphere freezes out again.

  19. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  20. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  1. Earthlike planets: Surfaces of Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Malin, M. C.; Greeley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The surfaces of the earth and the other terrestrial planets of the inner solar system are reviewed in light of the results of recent planetary explorations. Past and current views of the origin of the earth, moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars are discussed, and the surface features characteristic of the moon, Mercury, Mars and Venus are outlined. Mechanisms for the modification of planetary surfaces by external factors and from within the planet are examined, including surface cycles, meteoritic impact, gravity, wind, plate tectonics, volcanism and crustal deformation. The origin and evolution of the moon are discussed on the basis of the Apollo results, and current knowledge of Mercury and Mars is examined in detail. Finally, the middle periods in the history of the terrestrial planets are compared, and future prospects for the exploration of the inner planets as well as other rocky bodies in the solar system are discussed.

  2. Earthlike planets: Surfaces of Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Malin, M. C.; Greeley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The surfaces of the earth and the other terrestrial planets of the inner solar system are reviewed in light of the results of recent planetary explorations. Past and current views of the origin of the earth, moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars are discussed, and the surface features characteristic of the moon, Mercury, Mars and Venus are outlined. Mechanisms for the modification of planetary surfaces by external factors and from within the planet are examined, including surface cycles, meteoritic impact, gravity, wind, plate tectonics, volcanism and crustal deformation. The origin and evolution of the moon are discussed on the basis of the Apollo results, and current knowledge of Mercury and Mars is examined in detail. Finally, the middle periods in the history of the terrestrial planets are compared, and future prospects for the exploration of the inner planets as well as other rocky bodies in the solar system are discussed.

  3. A general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Mingli; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification is an essential step in engineering materials that can withstand the increasingly aggressive environments encountered in various modern energy-conversion systems and chemical processing industries. However, most traditional technologies exhibit disadvantages such as slow diffusion kinetics, processing difficulties or compatibility issues. Here, we present a general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals inspired by electromigration, using aluminizing au...

  4. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Museo della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome (Italy); Pavlis, Erricos C. [University of Maryland, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore County (United States); Koenig, Rolf [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Ries, John [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Space Research, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas at Austin, Theory Center, Austin (United States); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sindoni, Giampiero [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity. (orig.)

  5. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  6. Surface structure of the Ag-In-(rare earth) complex intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hars, S. S.; Sharma, H. R.; Smerdon, J. A.; Yadav, T. P.; Al-Mahboob, A.; Ledieu, J.; Fournée, V.; Tamura, R.; McGrath, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of the surface structure of the Ag-In-RE (RE: rare-earth elements Gd, Tb, and Yb) complex intermetallics using scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The surface of the Ag-In-Yb approximant prepared by sputter-annealing methods under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions produces a flat (100) surface with no facets. However, the Ag-In-Gd and Ag-In-Tb 1/1 approximants, which have a surface miscut of about 12∘ relative to the (100) plane, develop surface facets along various crystallographic directions. The structure of each facet can be explained as a truncation of the rhombic triacontahedral clusters, i.e., the main building blocks of these systems. Despite their differences in atomic structure, symmetry, and density, the facets show common features. The facet planes are In rich. The analysis of the nearest-neighbor atom distances suggests that In atoms form bonds with the RE atoms, which we suggest is a key factor that stabilizes even low-density facet planes.

  7. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voigt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (~635 million years before present with the state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM. This is the most sophisticated model ever applied to Snowball initiation. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global-mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI, whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI is prevented by doubling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global-mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. While uncertainties in important processes and parameters such as clouds and sea-ice albedo suggest that the Snowball Earth bifurcation point differs between climate models, our results contradict previous findings that Snowball Earth initiation would require much stronger forcings.

  8. The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A.

    1986-11-01

    The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad is a mountain-slide type of movement. Estimations of the thickness of the layer which is moving range between 10 and 100 m. There is no proof that the movement is water induced, but it could be influenced by the water household. The slope of the slide area is H: D = 1: 2. The height difference in the moving area studied, according to this paper, is 1 km. The actual rate of movement is about 12 cm/yr.

  9. The Surface Features of Four Microcomputer Reading Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Virginia N.

    1984-01-01

    Uses the Bradley Inventory of Reading Comprehension Software to evaluate surface characteristics (including documentation and instructional design) of microcomputer reading comprehension programs produced by Scott Foresman, Random House, Control Data Corporation, and Basic Learning Systems. All four programs received high scores, but the Scott…

  10. The Electromagnetic Fields Under, On and Up Earth Surface As Precursor of Local Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chterev Mavrodiev, Strachimir

    The analysis of accurasy measured Earth magnetic field gives a signal for near future near enîugh and strong enough eartquake. The correlation wit the tide gravitational potential derivatives permits to predict the day of the earthquake. It is formulated a Programm for electromagnetic field monitoring under on and up Earth surface and data analysis for investigation of possibilities for predicting the time, place, Magnitude and destractive power of future earthquake in Balkan and Black Sea region.

  11. The surface temperatures of the earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  12. Importance of landscape features and Earth observation derived habitat maps for modelling amphibian distribution in the Alta Murgia National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Adamo, Maria; Bonardi, Anna; De Pasquale, Vito; Liuzzi, Cristiano; Lovergine, Francesco; Marcone, Francesco; Mastropasqua, Fabio; Tarantino, Cristina; Blonda, Palma; Padoa-Schioppa, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, analyses of relationships between amphibians and habitat focused on breeding environments (i.e., pond features) more than on the features of the surrounding environment. Nevertheless, for most amphibians the terrestrial phase is longer than the aquatic phase, and consequently landscape features (i.e., habitat mosaics) may have an important role for modelling amphibian distribution. There were different aims in this analysis. Firstly, we compared the effectiveness of the information provided by land cover/use (LC/LU) classes and habitat classes defined according to a new habitat taxonomy named General Habitat Category (GHC), which is based on the concept of biological forms of dominant vegetation and class naturalness. The GHC map used was obtained from a pre-existing validated LC/LU map, by integrating spectral and spatial measurements from very high resolution Earth observation data according to ecological expert rules involving concepts related to spatial and temporal relationships among LC/LU and habitat classes. Then, we investigated the importance for amphibians of the landscape surrounding ponds within the Italian Alta Murgia National Park. The work assessed whether LC/LU classes in pond surrounds are important for the presence/absence of amphibians in this area, and identified which classes are more important for amphibians. The results obtained can provide useful indications to management strategies aiming at the conservation of amphibians within the study area. An information-theoretic approach was adopted to assess whether GHC maps allow to improve the performance of species distribution models. We used the Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc) to compare the effectiveness of GHC categories versus LC/LU categories in explaining the presence/absence of pool frogs. AICc weights suggest that GHC categories can better explain the distribution of frogs, compared to LC/LU classes.

  13. Simulation of Ultra-Long Wavelength interferometer in the Earth orbit and on the lunar surface

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mo; Huang, Maohai; Yan, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    We present simulations for interferometer arrays in Earth orbit and on the lunar surface to guide the design and optimization of space-based Ultra-Long Wavelength missions, such as those of China's Chang'E program. We choose parameters and present simulations using simulated data to identify inter-dependencies and constraints on science and engineering parameters. A regolith model is created for the lunar surface array simulation, the results show that the lunar regolith will have an undesira...

  14. Modeling difference of reference surfaces of the Earth's body to solve the problem of vertical positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucikešić Sanja S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is modeling difference of reference surfaces of the Earth's body to solve the problem of vertical positioning. With development of GNSS technology determining geoid undulation obtained scientific and practical significance especially in the vertical position with the aim of replacing the traditional geometrical leveling. The paper presents the modeling corrective surface based on GNSS measurements through a practical example of Local Spatial Reference Network (PLRM Mrkonjic Grad where the measurements were made with GNSS observations. The modeling was performed onedimensional similarity transformation and the average differences between orthometric height of a GNSS measurements and transformed height were determined.

  15. The Surface Temperatures of the Earth: Steps towards Integrated Understanding of Variability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, Stephan; Merchant, Chris; Rayner, Nick; Remedios, John; Høyer, Jacob L.; Jones, Phil; Olesen, Folke; Roquet, Hervé; Sobrino, José; Thorne, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, relevant to human health, agriculture and leisure, ecosystem services, infrastructure development and economic activity. In a community-based activity, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from 5 continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The Network idenitified key needs for progress towards meeting societal needs for surface temperature understanding and information, which will be reviewed and discussed in this contribution. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships of different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information. Steps are also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  16. Global water cycle and the coevolution of the Earth's interior and surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun; Planavsky, Noah J; Evans, David A D

    2017-05-28

    The bulk Earth composition contains probably less than 0.3% of water, but this trace amount of water can affect the long-term evolution of the Earth in a number of different ways. The foremost issue is the occurrence of plate tectonics, which governs almost all aspects of the Earth system, and the presence of water could either promote or hinder the operation of plate tectonics, depending on where water resides. The global water cycle, which circulates surface water into the deep mantle and back to the surface again, could thus have played a critical role in the Earth's history. In this contribution, we first review the present-day water cycle and discuss its uncertainty as well as its secular variation. If the continental freeboard has been roughly constant since the Early Proterozoic, model results suggest long-term net water influx from the surface to the mantle, which is estimated to be 3-4.5×10(14) g yr(-1) on the billion years time scale. We survey geological and geochemical observations relevant to the emergence of continents above the sea level as well as the nature of Precambrian plate tectonics. The global water cycle is suggested to have been dominated by regassing, and its implications for geochemical cycles and atmospheric evolution are also discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Global water cycle and the coevolution of the Earth's interior and surface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun; Planavsky, Noah J.; Evans, David A. D.

    2017-04-01

    The bulk Earth composition contains probably less than 0.3% of water, but this trace amount of water can affect the long-term evolution of the Earth in a number of different ways. The foremost issue is the occurrence of plate tectonics, which governs almost all aspects of the Earth system, and the presence of water could either promote or hinder the operation of plate tectonics, depending on where water resides. The global water cycle, which circulates surface water into the deep mantle and back to the surface again, could thus have played a critical role in the Earth's history. In this contribution, we first review the present-day water cycle and discuss its uncertainty as well as its secular variation. If the continental freeboard has been roughly constant since the Early Proterozoic, model results suggest long-term net water influx from the surface to the mantle, which is estimated to be 3-4.5×1014 g yr-1 on the billion years time scale. We survey geological and geochemical observations relevant to the emergence of continents above the sea level as well as the nature of Precambrian plate tectonics. The global water cycle is suggested to have been dominated by regassing, and its implications for geochemical cycles and atmospheric evolution are also discussed. This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'.

  18. Waveform synthesis of surface waves in a laterally heterogeneous earth by the Gaussian beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomogida, K.; Aki, K.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an application of the Gaussian beam method to surface waves in the laterally heterogeneous earth. The employed method has been developed for ray tracing and synthesizing seismograms of surface waves in cases involving the laterally heterogeneous earth. The procedure is based on formulations derived by Yomogida (1985). Vertical structure of the wave field is represented by the eigenfunctions of normal mode theory, while lateral variation is expressed by the parabolic equation as in two-dimensional acoustic waves or elastic body waves. It is demonstrated that a large-amplitude change can result from a slight perturbation in the phase velocity model.

  19. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voigt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (635 million years before present with the most sophisticated atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ever used for this purpose, ECHAM5/MPI-OM. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI, whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI is prevented by quadrupling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. In summary, our results contradict previous claims that Snowball Earth initiation would require "extreme" forcings.

  20. Fourier power spectra of the geomagnetic field for circular paths on the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, L.R.; Benton, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Fourier power spectra of geomagnetic component values, synthesized from spherical harmonic models, have been computed for circular paths on the Earth's surface. They are not found to be more useful than is the spectrum of magnetic energy outside the Earth for the purpose of separating core and crustal sources of the geomagnetic field. The Fourier power spectra of N and E geomagnetic components along nearly polar great circle paths exhibit some unusual characteristics that are explained by the geometric perspective of Fourier series on spheres developed by Yee. -Authors

  1. Thermal neutrons' flux near the Earth's surface as an evidence of the crustal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaeva, Ekaterina; Nechayev, Oleg; Volodichev, Nikolay; Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Chubenko, Alexander; Shchepetov, Alexander

    There are some ideas about the Earth’s global seismic activity appearance due to tidal forces. At the same time, the correlations between the big series of the earthquakes and the New and Full Moons and between the New and Full Moons and the increasings of the thermal neutrons’ flux from the Earth’s crust were observed. It is as though there are internal links between these three natural phenomena and the physical reasons for their appearance are the same. The paper presents the results of the ground-based thermal neutrons observations during different time periods characterized with phenomena in the near-Earth space (for instance, the New and Full Moon). Basing on the up-to-date conception of the tidal waves influence on the Earth's crust the authors confirm the role of the Moon in the production of the neutron flux near the Earth's surface.

  2. A general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-12-01

    Surface modification is an essential step in engineering materials that can withstand the increasingly aggressive environments encountered in various modern energy-conversion systems and chemical processing industries. However, most traditional technologies exhibit disadvantages such as slow diffusion kinetics, processing difficulties or compatibility issues. Here, we present a general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals inspired by electromigration, using aluminizing austenitic stainless steel as an example. Our strategy facilitates the rapid formation of a favourable ductile surface layer composed of FeCrAl or β-FeAl within only 10 min compared with several hours in conventional processes. This result indicates that electromigration can be used to achieve the ultrafast surface modification of metals and can overcome the limitations of traditional technologies. This strategy could be used to aluminize ultra-supercritical steam tubing to withstand aggressive oxidizing environments.

  3. A general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingli; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-12-07

    Surface modification is an essential step in engineering materials that can withstand the increasingly aggressive environments encountered in various modern energy-conversion systems and chemical processing industries. However, most traditional technologies exhibit disadvantages such as slow diffusion kinetics, processing difficulties or compatibility issues. Here, we present a general strategy for the ultrafast surface modification of metals inspired by electromigration, using aluminizing austenitic stainless steel as an example. Our strategy facilitates the rapid formation of a favourable ductile surface layer composed of FeCrAl or β-FeAl within only 10 min compared with several hours in conventional processes. This result indicates that electromigration can be used to achieve the ultrafast surface modification of metals and can overcome the limitations of traditional technologies. This strategy could be used to aluminize ultra-supercritical steam tubing to withstand aggressive oxidizing environments.

  4. The spectrum of histopathological features in acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis : a study of 102 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halevy, S.; Kardaun, S. H.; Davidovici, B.; Wechsler, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare severe pustular reaction pattern with a typical clinical picture. Objectives To characterize the histopathological features of AGEP in a large series of cases with a validated diagnosis. Methods A multinational retrospective hist

  5. The surface temperatures of Earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information, which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  6. Why did life develop on the surface of the Earth in the Cambrian?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Doglioni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Life was limited for most of Earth's history, remaining at a primitive stage and mostly marine until about 0.55 Ga. In the Paleozoic, life eventually exploded and colonized the continental realm. Why had there been such a long period of delayed evolution of life? Early life was dominated by Archaea and Bacteria, which can survive ionizing radiation better than other organisms. The magnetic field preserves the atmosphere, which is the main shield of UV radiation. We explore the hypothesis that the Cambrian explosion of life could have been enabled by the increase of the magnetic field dipole intensity due to the solidification of the inner core, caused by the cooling of the Earth, and the concomitant decrease with time of the high-energy solar flux since the birth of the solar system. Therefore, the two phenomena could be responsible for the growth and thickening of the atmosphere and the development of land surface life.

  7. A Test of General Relativity Using the LARES and LAGEOS Satellites and a GRACE Earth's Gravity Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth's gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth's gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity.

  8. Thermal oxidation of the surface of binary aluminum alloys with rare-earth metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashev, L. A.; Popov, N. A.; Kuznetsov, M. V.; Shevchenko, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of the surface of Al alloys with 1-2.5 at % rare-earth metals (REMs) at 400-500°C in air was studied by ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The addition (1-2.5 at % REM) of all rare-earth metals to aluminum was shown to increase the thickness of the oxide layer. The addition of surfactant and chemically active REMs (Yb, Sm, La, and Ce) increased the rate of oxidation of solid aluminum most effectively. The oxidation can be accelerated by the polymorphic transformations of the individual REM oxides in the film. The surface activity of Sm with respect to solid Al was confirmed by XRS.

  9. Causes of twentieth-century temperature change near the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tett, Simon F. B.; Stott, Peter A.; Allen, Myles R.; Ingram, William J.; Mitchell, John F. B.

    1999-06-01

    Observations of the Earth's near-surface temperature show a global-mean temperature increase of approximately 0.6K since 1900 (ref. 1), occurring from 1910 to 1940 and from 1970 to the present. The temperature change over the past 30-50 years is unlikely to be entirely due to internal climate variability and has been attributed to changes in the concentrations of greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols due to human activity. Attribution of the warming early in the century has proved more elusive. Here we present a quantification of the possible contributions throughout the century from the four components most likely to be responsible for the large-scale temperature changes, of which two vary naturally (solar irradiance and stratospheric volcanic aerosols) and two have changed decisively due to anthropogenic influence (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols). The patterns of time/space changes in near-surface temperature due to the separate forcing components are simulated with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, and a linear combination of these is fitted to observations. Thus our analysis is insensitive to errors in the simulated amplitude of these responses. We find that solar forcing may have contributed to the temperature changes early in the century, but anthropogenic causes combined with natural variability would also present a possible explanation. For the warming from 1946 to 1996 regardless of any possible amplification of solar or volcanic influence, we exclude purely natural forcing, and attribute it largely to the anthropogenic components.

  10. Simulation of Ultra-Long Wavelength interferometer in the Earth orbit and on the lunar surface

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Mo; Yan, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    We present simulations for interferometer arrays in Earth orbit and on the lunar surface to guide the design and optimization of space-based Ultra-Long Wavelength missions, such as those of China's Chang'E program. We choose parameters and present simulations using simulated data to identify inter-dependencies and constraints on science and engineering parameters. A regolith model is created for the lunar surface array simulation, the results show that the lunar regolith will have an undesirable effect on the observation. We estimate data transmission requirement, calculate sensitivities for both cases, and discuss the trade-off between brightness temperature sensitivity and angular resolution for the Earth orbit array case.

  11. Generalizations of the subject-independent feature set for music-induced emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Pin; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Lin, Chin-Teng; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based emotion recognition has been an intensely growing field. Yet, how to achieve acceptable accuracy on a practical system with as fewer electrodes as possible is less concerned. This study evaluates a set of subject-independent features, based on differential power asymmetry of symmetric electrode pairs [1], with emphasis on its applicability to subject variability in music-induced emotion classification problem. Results of this study have evidently validated the feasibility of using subject-independent EEG features to classify four emotional states with acceptable accuracy in second-scale temporal resolution. These features could be generalized across subjects to detect emotion induced by music excerpts not limited to the music database that was used to derive the emotion-specific features.

  12. NAGT: Partnering to Expand and Improve the Teaching of Earth Sciences at all Levels of Instruction while Increasing Earth Literacy to the General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstrith, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Now more than ever, we need an Earth literate public and a workforce that can develop and be engaged in viable solutions to current and future environmental and resource challenges. The National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) is a member driven organization dedicated to fostering improvement in the teaching of the Earth Sciences at all levels of formal and informal instruction, to emphasizing the cultural significance of the Earth sciences and to disseminating knowledge in this field to the general public. NAGT offers a number of ways to partner and collaborate including our sponsored sessions, events and programs; two publications; workshop programming; three topical focused divisions; educational advocacy; and website offerings hosted through the Science Education Resource Center (SERC). A growing number of associations, institutions, projects, and individual educators are strengthening their professional networks by partnering with NAGT. Locating and connecting members of the Earth education community with shared values and interest is an important part of collaborating and NAGT's topical divisions assist community members who wish to work on the topics of 2-year college faculty, geoscience education research, and teacher preparation. The NAGT website and the linked websites of its collaborating partners provides a peer reviewed venue for educators to showcase their pedagogy and to learn best practices of others. The annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous is an opportunity to network face-to-face with the Earth education community, strengthening our relationships while working with those who share our interests and challenges while also learning from those who have divergent experiences. NAGT is a non-profit organization that advocates for the advancement of the geosciences and supports the work of Earth educators and geoscience education researchers. For more information about NAGT, visit our website at www.nagt.org

  13. A generalized bayesian inference method for constraining the interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, C; Khan, A; Heng, K; Alibert, Y; Helled, R; Rivoldini, A; Benz, W

    2016-01-01

    We aim to present a generalized Bayesian inference method for constraining interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes. Our methodology succeeds in quantifying the degeneracy and correlation of structural parameters for high dimensional parameter spaces. Specifically, we identify what constraints can be placed on composition and thickness of core, mantle, ice, ocean, and atmospheric layers given observations of mass, radius, and bulk refractory abundance constraints (Fe, Mg, Si) from observations of the host star's photospheric composition. We employed a full probabilistic Bayesian inference analysis that formally accounts for observational and model uncertainties. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we computed joint and marginal posterior probability distributions for all structural parameters of interest. We included state-of-the-art structural models based on self-consistent thermodynamics of core, mantle, high-pressure ice, and liquid water. Furthermore, we tested and compared two different atmosp...

  14. Features of developmental dyspraxia in the general speech-impaired population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, P; Rosenthal, J B; McLeod, S

    1998-01-01

    A typical clinical population with speech impairment was investigated to determine the extent of the presence of features of developmental dyspraxia and its interaction between the severity of impairment. Thirty diagnostic features of developmental dyspraxia were identified from the post-1981 literature and two scales of severity were devised. First the severity of these 30 features was measured (feature severity rating, FSR), and secondly severity of speech impairment was based on percentage of consonants correct (PCC). Using these features and severity ratings a retrospective file audit was conducted of 50 paediatric clients aged 2-8 years with impaired articulation or phonology. It was found that many characteristics regarded as diagnostic for developmental dyspraxia occur in the general speech-impaired population. The relationship between the variables was analysed, and support was found for the hypotheses that: (a) there is a relationship between the number of dyspraxic features expressed and the severity of impairment of speech production and (b) developmental dyspraxia is not characterized by severe impairment, but may occur in a range of severities from mild to severe.

  15. Features of wind field over the sea surface in the coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzikova, A. K.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Myasoedov, A. G.; Chapron, B.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze SAR wind field features, in particular the effects of wind shadowing. These effects represent the dynamics of the internal atmospheric boundary layer, which is formed due to the transition of the air flow arriving from the rough land surface to the "smooth" water surface. In the wind-shadowed area, the flow accelerates, and a surface wind stress increases with fetch. The width of the shadow depends not only on the wind speed and atmospheric boundary layer stratification, but also on geographic features such as windflow multiple transformations over the complex surface land-Lake Chudskoe-land-Gulf of Finland. Measurements showed that, in the area of wind acceleration, the surface stress normalized by an equilibrium value (far from the coast) is a universal function of dimensionless fetch Xf/G. Surface wind stress reaches an equilibrium value at Xf/G ≈ 0.4, which is the scale of the planetary-boundary-layer relaxation.

  16. Interaction of mantle plume heads with the earth's surface and onset of small-scale convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R. W.; Campbell, I. H.

    1991-10-01

    The interaction of a mantle plume head with the earth's surface was examined by studying the behavior of a spherical blob of a buoyant fluid under the effect of gravity which forces it toward either a rigid horizontal boundary or a free surface. In the experiments, buoyant spheres of diapir fluid having no surface tension and extremely small Reynolds numbers but diameters as large as are practical in the laboratory were injected into wide cylindrical tanks filled with viscous (nu = 149 sq cm/sec) glucose syrup. Experimental results are presented for the thinning and lateral spreading of the bouyant fluid and for the thinning of the squeeze layer for both the case of a rigid, nonslip boundary (a rigid Perspex lid) and that of a free surface. These are compared with similarity scaling laws based on a balance between the buoyancy of the diapir and the viscous stresses in the diapir's surroundings.

  17. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  18. Application of precise altimetry to the study of precise leveling of the sea surface, the Earth's gravity field, and the rotation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, J.; Ganeko, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Mori, T.; Ooe, M.; Nakagawa, I.; Ishii, H.; Hagiwara, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Our program includes five research items: (1) determination of a precision geoid and gravity anomaly field; (2) precise leveling and detection of tidal changes of the sea surface and study of the role of the tide in the global energy exchange; (3) oceanic effect on the Earth's rotation and polar motion; (4) geological and geophysical interpretation of the altimetry gravity field; and (5) evaluation of the effectiveness of local tracking of TOPEX/POSEIDON by use of a laser tracker.

  19. Kinetics of surface dissolution: A coupled thermodynamics-climatic approach for Titan and the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Cordier, Daniel; Le Bahers, Tangui; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Titan, Saturn's major icy moon, like the Earth, possesses large bodies of present liquids on its surface under the form of seas, lakes and rivers, and likely of past liquids in currently empty topographic depressions. Titan's seas and lacustrine depressions strongly differ in shape, which likely suggests a difference in terms of geological formation processes. On the one hand, the seas have dendritic contours, are several hundreds of kilometers in width, and seem to develop in areas with significant reliefs and fluvial networks. On the other hand, lacustrine depressions, be they filled currently or not, are typically isolated, have rounded or lobate contours and seem to grow by coalescence. Their sizes vary from a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers in diameter, and they seem to develop in relatively flat areas without visible connection with fluvial networks. The depths of the seas and lacustrine depressions have been evaluated to several hundreds of meters for the seas (recent estimates from the Cassini RADAR altimeter echoes analysis over Ligeia Mare indicates a depth of about 170 m), when they are a few hundred/tens of meters for the lacustrine depressions. Given the above morphological settings, several formation mechanisms have been proposed for Titan's lacustrine depressions, the most likely one being associated with the dissolution of the surface, such as what is seen in karstic or karsto-evaporitic areas on Earth. However, due to Titan's surface physical properties (T=90-95 K) and composition, the materials that would be involved in such dissolution processes are exotic. In karstic terrains on Earth, the solvent is water and the solutes are rock minerals (e.g., calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite and halite). On Titan, the solvent is mainly composed of liquid hydrocarbons (methane and/or ethane) and the solutes are probably made of solid hydrocarbons (acetylene, benzene, butane,...), nitriles (hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen,...), tholins and ices

  20. Monitoring of the Earth's surface deformation in the area of water dam Zarnowiec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzes, Marcel; Wozniak, Marek; Habel, Branislav; Macak, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Mathematical and physical research directly motivates geodetic community which can provide very accurate measurements for testing of the proposed models Earth's surface motion near the water dams should be monitored due to the security of the area. This is a process which includes testing of existing models and their physical parameters. Change of the models can improve the practical results for analyzing the trends of motion in the area of upper reservoir of water dam Zarnowiec. Since 1998 Warsaw University of Technology realized a research focused on the horizontal displacements of the upper reservoir of water dam Zarnowiec. The 15 selected control points located on the upper reservoir crown of the water dam were monitored by classical distance measurements. It was found out that changes in the object's geometry occur due to the variation of the water level. The control measurements of the changes in the object's geometry occurring during the process of emptying and filling of the upper reservoir of water dam were compared with the deformations computed using improved Boussinesqués method programmed in the software MATLAB and ANSYS for elastic and isotropic half space as derivation of suitable potentials extended to the loaded region. The details and numerical results of this process are presented This presentation was prepared within the project "National Centre for Diagnostic of the Earth's Surface Deformations in the Area of Slovakia", ITMS code: 26220220108.

  1. Generalized Lymphadenopathy as Presenting Feature of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Wais; Arab, Talal; Ullah, Tofura; Teller, Katerina; Doshi, Kaushik J.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy could represent a vast spectrum of etiologies including infectious and non-infectious diseases. Besides proper history taking, physical examination, and laboratory investigations, a tissue diagnosis is often necessary to unmask the cause of generalized lymphadenopathy. Here we present a 23-year-old woman who was admitted for diffuse generalized lymphadenopathy, fatigue, malaise, weight loss, nausea, and bilateral lower extremity edema. She reported a history of seizures as well as stroke 2 years prior with no other medical conditions present. Although malignant and infectious etiologies were initially the primary targets for workup, her history of seizures and stroke remained a dilemma. Extensive workup for malignant and infectious diseases was unrevealing; however, rheumatologic workup was eventually positive for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This case illustrates that extensive generalized diffuse lymphadenopathy may be a presenting feature of SLE and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with diffuse lymphadenopathy and constitutional symptoms. PMID:27738484

  2. PANIC - A surface science package for the in situ characterization of a near-Earth asteroid

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Karsten; Reddy, Vishnu; Weber, Andreas; Gruska, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a mission concept study for an autonomous micro-scale surface lander also referred to as PANIC - the Pico Autonomous Near-Earth Asteroid In Situ Characterizer. The lander is based on the shape of a regular tetrahedron with an edge length of 35 cm, has a total mass of approximately 12 kg and utilizes hopping as a locomotion mechanism in microgravity. PANIC houses four scientific instruments in its proposed baseline configuration which enable the in situ characterization of an asteroid. It is carried by an interplanetary probe to its target and released to the surface after rendezvous. Detailed estimates of all critical subsystem parameters were derived to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept. The study illustrates that a small, simple landing element is a viable alternative to complex traditional lander concepts, adding a significant science return to any near-Earth asteroid (NEA) mission while meeting tight mass budget constraints.

  3. EarthShape: A Strategy for Investigating the Role of Biota on Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Übernickel, Kirstin; Ehlers, Todd Alan; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Paulino, Leandro

    2017-04-01

    EarthShape - "Earth surface shaping by biota" is a 6-year priority research program funded by the German science foundation (DFG-SPP 1803) that performs soil- and landscape-scale critical zone research at 4 locations along a climate gradient in Chile, South America. The program is in its first year and involves an interdisciplinary collaboration between geologists, geomorphologists, ecologists, soil scientists, microbiologists, geophysicists, geochemists, hydrogeologists and climatologists including 18 German and 8 Chilean institutions. EarthShape is composed of 4 research clusters representing the process chain from weathering of substrate to deposition of eroded material. Cluster 1 explores micro-biota as the "weathering engine". Investigations in this cluster quantify different mechanisms of biogenic weathering whereby plants, fungi, and bacteria interact with rock in the production of soil. Cluster 2 explores bio-mediated redistribution of material within the weathering zone. Studies in this cluster focus on soil catenas along hill slope profiles to investigate the modification of matter along its transport path. Cluster 3 explores biotic modulation of erosion and sediment routing at the catchment scale. Investigations in this cluster explore the effects of vegetation cover on solute and sediment transport from hill slopes to the channel network. Cluster 4 explores the depositional legacy of coupled biogenic and Earth surface systems. This cluster investigates records of vegetation-land surface interactions in different depositional settings. A final component of EarthShape lies in the integration of results from these 4 clusters using numerical models to bridging between the diverse times scales used by different disciplines. The Chilean Coastal Cordillera between 25° and 40°S was selected to carry out this research because its north-south orientation captures a large ecological and climate gradient. This gradient ranges from hyper-arid (Atacama desert) to

  4. Interpretation of Impact Features on the Surface of the WFPC-2 Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was the predominance of impact features resident only in the thermal paint layer; similar phenomenology was observed during a prior survey of the WFPC-1 radiator. As well, larger impact features displayed spallation zones, darkened areas, and other features not encountered in impacts onto bare surfaces. Whereas the characterization of impact features by depth and diameter on unpainted surfaces has been long established, the mitigation provided by the painted layer presented a challenge to further analysis of the WFPC-2 features; a literature search revealed no systematic characterization of the ballistic limit equations of painted or coated surfaces. In order to characterize the impactors responsible for the observed damage, an understanding of the cratering and spallation phenomenology of the painted surface was required. To address that challenge, NASA sponsored a series of hypervelocity calibration shots at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This effort required the following activities: the production, painting, and artificial ageing of test coupons in a manner similar to the actual radiator; the determination of the test matrix parameters projectile diameter and material (mass density), impact velocity, and impact angle, so as to enable both an adequate characterization of the impact by projectile and impact geometry and support hydrocode modeling to fill in and extend the applicability of the calibration shots; the selection of suitable projectiles; logistics; and an analysis of feature characteristics upon return of the coupons. This paper reports the results of the test campaign and presents ballistic limit equations for painted surfaces. We also present initial results of our interpretation methodologies.

  5. The clinical and demographic features of dizziness related to general health among the Saudi population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Saif, Amer; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the validity, demographic features of the newly developed Amer Dizziness Diagnostic Scale (ADDS), provide differential diagnosis of the vestibular disorders, assist in the clinical research and practice activities of health workers as well as to understand the probability of the utilization of the ADDS as a first-line evaluation tool in general clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Two hundred subjects of various ages including both male and female patients with a history of vertigo and/or dizziness were included in the study and evaluated once using the ADDS. [Results] There were more female (59.5%) than male (49.5) patients in this study. Additionally, we found that most patients (64.4%) had a central mediated problem. In addition, the Amer Dizziness Diagnostic Scale has been found to have both a sensitivity and specificity of 96% that can adequately determine the possible diagnosis of vestibular disorders. [Conclusion] This study has demonstrated the validity of the ADDS scale, the predominance of female involvement related to supplementary medication, vitamin D deficiency, general lifestyle factors, and fluid retention, high sensitivity and specificity, provide differential diagnosis of vestibular disorders that could be used as a first-line evaluation tool in general clinics. PMID:26644673

  6. Why did life develop on the surface of the Earth in the Cambrian?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Doglioni; Johannes Pignatti; Max Coleman

    2016-01-01

    Life was limited for most of Earth’s history, remaining at a primitive stage and mostly marine until about 0.55 Ga. In the Paleozoic, life eventually exploded and colonized the continental realm. Why had there been such a long period of delayed evolution of life? Early life was dominated by Archaea and Bacteria, which can survive ionizing radiation better than other organisms. The magnetic field preserves the at-mosphere, which is the main shield of UV radiation. We explore the hypothesis that the Cambrian ex-plosion of life could have been enabled by the increase of the magnetic field dipole intensity due to the solidification of the inner core, caused by the cooling of the Earth, and the concomitant decrease with time of the high-energy solar flux since the birth of the solar system. Therefore, the two phenomena could be responsible for the growth and thickening of the atmosphere and the development of land surface life.

  7. Communications via the radio artificial earth satellite: Design of the tracking diagram and features for conducting QSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrozhanskiy, V.; Rybkin, V.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the operation of a transmitting artifical Earth satellite. A tracking diagram for the satellite is constructed. The zone of radio visibility can be determined based on the techniques proposed.

  8. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  9. Features of Representations in General Chemistry Textbooks: A Peek through the Lens of the Cognitive Load Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.; Gillaspie, Merry

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) determine the prevalence of various features of representations in five general chemistry textbooks used in the United States, and (2) use cognitive load theory to draw implications of the various features of analyzed representations. We adapted the Graphical Analysis Protocol (GAP) (Slough et al., 2010) to look at…

  10. How can we understand the global distribution of the solar cycle signal on the Earth's surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Kunihiko; Thiéblemont, Rémi; Yukimoto, Seiji; Matthes, Katja

    2016-10-01

    To understand solar cycle signals on the Earth's surface and identify the physical mechanisms responsible, surface temperature variations from observations as well as climate model data are analysed to characterize their spatial structure. The solar signal in the annual mean surface temperature is characterized by (i) mid-latitude warming and (ii) no overall tropical warming. The mid-latitude warming during solar maxima in both hemispheres is associated with a downward penetration of zonal mean zonal wind anomalies from the upper stratosphere during late winter. During the Northern Hemisphere winter this is manifested by a modulation of the polar-night jet, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere, the upper stratospheric subtropical jet plays the major role. Warming signals are particularly apparent over the Eurasian continent and ocean frontal zones, including a previously reported lagged response over the North Atlantic. In the tropics, local warming occurs over the Indian and central Pacific oceans during high solar activity. However, this warming is counterbalanced by cooling over the cold tongue sectors in the southeastern Pacific and the South Atlantic, and results in a very weak zonally averaged tropical mean signal. The cooling in the ocean basins is associated with stronger cross-equatorial winds resulting from a northward shift of the ascending branch of the Hadley circulation during solar maxima. To understand the complex processes involved in the solar signal transfer, results of an idealized middle atmosphere-ocean coupled model experiment on the impact of stratospheric zonal wind changes are compared with solar signals in observations. Model integration of 100 years of strong or weak stratospheric westerly jet condition in winter may exaggerate long-term ocean feedback. However, the role of ocean in the solar influence on the Earth's surface can be better seen. Although the momentum forcing differs from that of solar radiative forcing, the model results

  11. Evaluation of surface EMG features for the recognition of American Sign Language gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Panas, Stavros M

    2006-01-01

    In this work, analysis of the surface electromyogram (sEMG) signal is proposed for the recognition of American sign language (ASL) gestures. To this purpose, sixteen features are extracted from the sEMG signal acquired from the user's forearm, and evaluated by the Mahalanobis distance criterion. Discriminant analysis is used to reduce the number of features used in the classification of the signed ASL gestures. The proposed features are tested against noise resulting in a further reduced set of features, which are evaluated for their discriminant ability. The classification results reveal that 97.7% of the inspected ASL gestures were correctly recognized using sEMG-based features, providing a promising solution to the automatic ASL gesture recognition problem.

  12. Dynamic Paleogeography of the Jurassic Andean Basin: pattern of regression and general considerations on main features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-C. Vicente

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following examination of the evolution of the Jurassic Andean retroarc basin at a global scale for the Central Andes, this paper analyses the pattern of the regressive process, and discusses some general features concerning Andean Jurassic Paleogeography. The early Upper Jurassic regression obeys to an exactly reverse pattern as the one evidenced for the Lower Jurassic transgressive process. Sectors with late transgressions become those with early regressions while those with early transgressions show later regressions. This fact may indicate that the Norte Chico Isthmus (29°S to 30°30'S was a precociously emerged zone from the Bajocian. This carries again a split up between the Tarapacá and Aconcagua-Neuquén basins until their complete drying up in the Late Oxfordian following their restricted circulation. This evaporitic late stage presents great analogy with the Mediterranean «Messinian crisis» and gives evidence of a general tectonic and magmatic control on the straits. The local transgressions observed on the cratonic margin of the central part of these shrinking basins were due to shifting of water masses resulting from the regressive process on the northern and southern margins. Comparison between the main stages of transgression and regression allows some quantification concerning velocities of displacement of coastlines, specifically lengthwise. The permanence of paleogeographic and structural features over the time argues for an indisputable tectonic heritage. In the dynamic framework of this typical barred retroarc basin where arc magmatic activity has contributed considerably to variation on sediment supply and changing bathymetry of the seaways connecting with the Pacific Ocean, evidence for an assumed global eustatic cycle remains questionable or very subordinated.

  13. Earth survey applications division: Research leading to the effective use of space technology in applications relating to the Earth's surface and interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and future plans are described for the following areas: (1) geology - geobotanical indicators and geopotential data; (2) modeling magnetic fields; (3) modeling the structure, composition, and evolution of the Earth's crust; (4) global and regional motions of the Earth's crust and earthquake occurrence; (5) modeling geopotential from satellite tracking data; (6) modeling the Earth's gravity field; (7) global Earth dynamics; (8) sea surface topography, ocean dynamics; and geophysical interpretation; (9) land cover and land use; (10) physical and remote sensing attributes important in detecting, measuring, and monitoring agricultural crops; (11) prelaunch studies using LANDSAT D; (12) the multispectral linear array; (13) the aircraft linear array pushbroom radiometer; and (14) the spaceborne laser ranging system.

  14. Mirador - Earth Surface and Interior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. The goal of the Earth Surface and Interior focus area is to assess, mitigate and forecast the natural hazards that affect...

  15. Potential of Ozone Formation by the Smog Mechanism to shield the surface of the Early Earth from UV radiation?

    CERN Document Server

    Grenfell, J L; Patzer, B; Titz, R; Rauer, H; Grenfell, John Lee; Stracke, Barbara; Patzer, Beate; Titz, Ruth; Rauer, Heike

    2006-01-01

    We propose that the photochemical smog mechanism produced substantial ozone (O3) in the troposphere during the Proterozoic, which contributed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation shielding hence favoured the establishment of life. The smog mechanism is well-established and is associated with pollution hazes which sometimes cover modern cities. The mechanism proceeds via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methane (CH4) in the presence of UV radiation and nitrogen oxides (NOx). It would have been particularly favoured during the Proterozoic given the high levels of CH4 (up to 1000 ppm) recently suggested. Proterozoic UV levels on the surface of the Earth were generally higher compared with today, which would also have favoured the mechanism. On the other hand, Proterozoic O2 required in the final step of the smog mechanism to form O3 was less abundant compared with present times. Further, results are sensitive to Proterozoic NOx concentrations, which are challenging to predict, since they depen...

  16. A generalized Bayesian inference method for constraining the interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Caroline; Venturini, Julia; Khan, Amir; Heng, Kevin; Alibert, Yann; Helled, Ravit; Rivoldini, Attilio; Benz, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to present a generalized Bayesian inference method for constraining interiors of super Earths and sub-Neptunes. Our methodology succeeds in quantifying the degeneracy and correlation of structural parameters for high dimensional parameter spaces. Specifically, we identify what constraints can be placed on composition and thickness of core, mantle, ice, ocean, and atmospheric layers given observations of mass, radius, and bulk refractory abundance constraints (Fe, Mg, Si) from observations of the host star's photospheric composition. Methods: We employed a full probabilistic Bayesian inference analysis that formally accounts for observational and model uncertainties. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we computed joint and marginal posterior probability distributions for all structural parameters of interest. We included state-of-the-art structural models based on self-consistent thermodynamics of core, mantle, high-pressure ice, and liquid water. Furthermore, we tested and compared two different atmospheric models that are tailored for modeling thick and thin atmospheres, respectively. Results: First, we validate our method against Neptune. Second, we apply it to synthetic exoplanets of fixed mass and determine the effect on interior structure and composition when (1) radius; (2) atmospheric model; (3) data uncertainties; (4) semi-major axes; (5) atmospheric composition (i.e., a priori assumption of enriched envelopes versus pure H/He envelopes); and (6) prior distributions are varied. Conclusions: Our main conclusions are: (1) given available data, the range of possible interior structures is large; quantification of the degeneracy of possible interiors is therefore indispensable for meaningful planet characterization. (2) Our method predicts models that agree with independent estimates of Neptune's interior. (3) Increasing the precision in mass and radius leads to much improved constraints on ice mass fraction, size of rocky interior, but

  17. Characterization of an earth-filled dam through the combined use of electrical resistivity tomography, P- and SH-wave seismic tomography and surface wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, E.; Cercato, M.; De Donno, G.

    2014-07-01

    The determination of the current state of buildings and infrastructures through non-invasive geophysical methods is a topic not yet covered by technical standards, since the application of high resolution geophysical investigations to structural targets is a relatively new technology. Earth-filled dam investigation is a typical engineering application of this type. We propose the integration of Electrical Resistivity Tomography and P- and SH-wave seismic measurements for imaging the geometry of the dam's body and the underlying soil foundations and to characterize the low strain elastic properties. Because S-wave velocity is closely tied to engineering properties such as shear strength, low-velocity zones in the S-wave velocity models are of particular interest. When acquiring seismic data on earth filled dams, it is not uncommon to encounter highly attenuative surface layers. If only lightweight seismic sources are available, the seismic data generally exhibit a narrow frequency bandwidth: the lack of high frequency components generally prevents from having good quality shallow reflections. If there is no possibility to increase the power as well as the frequency content of the seismic source, the integration of other seismic methods than reflection may be the only available way to achieve a reliable near surface seismic characterization. For these reasons, we combined P- and SH-wave tomography with Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves to image the internal and the underlying soil foundations of an earth filled dam located in Central Italy. In the presence of moderate velocity contrasts, tomographic methods have proven successful in imaging near surface variations along both the horizontal and vertical directions. On the other hand, body wave propagation is severely affected by attenuation under the previously described conditions, so that the quality of picked traveltimes dramatically decreases with offset and, consequently, the tomographic investigation

  18. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition of facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormaz, Mladen; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical accounts of face processing often emphasise feature shapes as the primary visual cue to the recognition of facial expressions. However, changes in facial expression also affect the surface properties of the face. In this study, we investigated whether this surface information can also be used in the recognition of facial expression. First, participants identified facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) from images that were manipulated such that they varied mainly in shape or mainly in surface properties. We found that the categorization of facial expression is possible in either type of image, but that different expressions are relatively dependent on surface or shape properties. Next, we investigated the relative contributions of shape and surface information to the categorization of facial expressions. This employed a complementary method that involved combining the surface properties of one expression with the shape properties from a different expression. Our results showed that the categorization of facial expressions in these hybrid images was equally dependent on the surface and shape properties of the image. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that both feature shape and surface information make significant contributions to the recognition of facial expressions.

  19. Multivariate anomaly detection for Earth observations: a comparison of algorithms and feature extraction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Milan; Gans, Fabian; Brenning, Alexander; Denzler, Joachim; Reichstein, Markus; Rodner, Erik; Bathiany, Sebastian; Bodesheim, Paul; Guanche, Yanira; Sippel, Sebastian; Mahecha, Miguel D.

    2017-08-01

    Today, many processes at the Earth's surface are constantly monitored by multiple data streams. These observations have become central to advancing our understanding of vegetation dynamics in response to climate or land use change. Another set of important applications is monitoring effects of extreme climatic events, other disturbances such as fires, or abrupt land transitions. One important methodological question is how to reliably detect anomalies in an automated and generic way within multivariate data streams, which typically vary seasonally and are interconnected across variables. Although many algorithms have been proposed for detecting anomalies in multivariate data, only a few have been investigated in the context of Earth system science applications. In this study, we systematically combine and compare feature extraction and anomaly detection algorithms for detecting anomalous events. Our aim is to identify suitable workflows for automatically detecting anomalous patterns in multivariate Earth system data streams. We rely on artificial data that mimic typical properties and anomalies in multivariate spatiotemporal Earth observations like sudden changes in basic characteristics of time series such as the sample mean, the variance, changes in the cycle amplitude, and trends. This artificial experiment is needed as there is no gold standard for the identification of anomalies in real Earth observations. Our results show that a well-chosen feature extraction step (e.g., subtracting seasonal cycles, or dimensionality reduction) is more important than the choice of a particular anomaly detection algorithm. Nevertheless, we identify three detection algorithms (k-nearest neighbors mean distance, kernel density estimation, a recurrence approach) and their combinations (ensembles) that outperform other multivariate approaches as well as univariate extreme-event detection methods. Our results therefore provide an effective workflow to automatically detect anomalies

  20. Quantizing Earth surface deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Bowin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global analysis of Bowin (2010 used the global 14 absolute Euler pole set (62 Myr history from Gripp and Gordon (1990 and demonstrated that plate tectonics conserves angular momentum. We herein extend that analysis using the more detailed Bird (2003 52 present-day Euler pole set (relative to a fixed Pacific plate for the Earth's surface, after conversion to absolute Euler poles. Additionally, new analytical results now provide new details on upper mantle mass anomalies in the outer 200 km of the Earth, as well as an initial quantizing of surface deformations.

  1. Perihelion advances for the orbits of Mercury, Earth and Pluto from Extended Theory of General Relativity (ETGR)

    CERN Document Server

    Ridao, Luis Santiago; De Cicco, Martín Daniel; Bellini, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    We explore the geodesic movement on a effective 4D hypersurface which is embedded in a 5D Ricci-flat Manifold described by a canonical metric, in order to applying to planetary orbits in our solar system. Some important solutions are given, which provide the standard solutions of General Relativity without any extra force component. We study the perihelion advances of Mercury, the Earth and Pluto using the Extended Theory of General Relativity (ETGR). Our results are in very good agreement with observations and show how the foliation is determinant to the value of the perihelion's advances. The possible applications are not limited to these kinds of orbits.

  2. Uncertainty of diagnostic features measured by laser vibrometry: The case of optically non-cooperative surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, G.; Paone, N.

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the uncertainty in the measurement of characteristic features by laser Doppler vibrometry useful to industrial diagnostics when measuring on polished, highly reflective, low diffusive surfaces, such as the enamelled metal sheet of the cabinet of electrical household appliances. This case is relevant to on-line quality control applications, where it is not possible to adopt any surface treatment to improve optical scattering properties. The paper illustrates in particular the effect of drop-out noise on the measured vibration signal and develops a joint analysis of drop-out noise due to poor optical properties and its effect on the diagnostic process, presented in statistical terms. A non-dimensional quantity is introduced to describe the amplitude of the Doppler signal and the presence of drop-out noise is shown to be correlated to its amplitude. Starting from the consideration that drop-out noise is impulsive, with a pseudo-random occurrence, this paper presents an experimental assessment of uncertainty in the measurement of some spectral features used for the diagnosis of electrical appliances on the production line. It can be seen that the effect of drop-out leads to an increase in scatter and to a systematic shift in the distribution of the features examined; this effect is relatively larger for features with low amplitude. The Monte Carlo simulation of measurement uncertainty propagation confirms the same trend and allows statistical distributions to be obtained for the features, thereby enabling us to draw some conclusions as regards diagnostic errors. This study shows that in the presence of pseudo-random drop-out noise a diagnosis based on spectral features with low amplitude has poor reliability and false-positives are highly probable. An analysis of this occurrence is made for cases of production exhibiting features with different statistical distributions and possible actions to limit such problem are highlighted.

  3. Effect of surface topographic features on the optical properties of skin: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhao, Zuhua; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Erbao; Chu, Jiaru; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms are used to validate and calibrate optical imaging systems and to understand light transport in biological tissue. Light propagation in a strongly turbid medium such as skin tissue experiences multiple scattering and diffuse reflection from the surface. Surface roughness introduces phase shifts and optical path length differences for light which is scattered within the skin tissue and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we study the effect of mismatched surface roughness on optical measurement and subsequent determination of optical properties of skin tissue. A series of phantoms with controlled surface features and optical properties corresponding to normal human skin are fabricated. The fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with known surface roughness follows a standard soft lithography process. Surface roughness of skin-simulating phantoms are measured with Bruker stylus profiler. The diffuse reflectance of the phantom is validated by a UV/VIS spectrophotometer. The results show that surface texture and roughness have considerable influence on the optical characteristics of skin. This study suggests that surface roughness should be considered as an important contributing factor for the determination of tissue optical properties.

  4. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  5. Bright sand/dark dust: The identification of active sand surfaces on the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, H. G., II; Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Arvidson, R.

    1987-05-01

    Field studies and analysis of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data in the Gran Desierto, Mexico may shed light on a technique to distinguish active from inactive (relict) sand surfaces. Active sand bodies in the study area are consistently brighter (by an average of 20%) at visual and near infrared wavelengths and darker at thermal infrared wavelengths than compositionally similar inactive sands. The reasons for the albedo difference between active and inactive sands are reviewed and the mixing model of Johnson et al. is examined for tracing the provenance of sands based on albedo and spectral variations. Portions of the wavelengths covered by the Mars Orbiter correspond to the Thematic Mapper data. The identification of active sands on Earth, with a priori knowledge of bulk composition and grain size distribution, may allow the remote mapping of active sand surfaces on Mars. In conjuction with thermal infrared remote sensing for composition, it may also provide a method for the remote determination of grain size distributions within sand/silt mixtures.

  6. The role of GMES / Sentinels in Land-Surface Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J.

    2009-04-01

    A general trend in the current status of representation of Land Surface schemes into Earth System models is driven by the parameterisation of "cycles" instead of individual processes. Particular emphasis is made to account for couplings among the individual cycles, as between the carbon and water cycles. Moreover, the current tendency is to use the measured data -time series in most cases- together with models, in a data assimilation scenario where inputs from multiple sources are integrated. Such approach is more and more necessary as land models tend to be more complex, and particularly due to the fact that land surface variability is not just driven by physical and chemical processes, but intricate biological processes also altered by anthropogenic influences. Human influences in the land system (land use changes, urban development, etc.) and the impacts of natural disasters are becoming also part of land models, but critical data in high spatial and temporal resolutions are needed to properly model such processes. Until now, problems with data availability, data inconsistency and lack of adequate temporal sampling have limited the potential usefulness of such observations in modelling land surface processes. The availability of the GMES / Sentinel series of satellites represents a quite unique opportunity for consolidation of current tendencies and development of new science based on the new type of data that soon will become available. The usefulness of the different Sentinel missions for Land science has been recognised. Although the Sentinel satellite series were primarily designed to provide observations for operational services and routine applications, there is a growing interest in the scientific community towards the usage of Sentinel data for more advanced and innovative science. Moreover, the availability of consistent time series covering a period of over 20 years opens possibilities never explored before, such as systematic data assimilation

  7. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF DEFORMATION OF THE CONTINENTAL AND OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF THE EARTH CORE NORTHERN DRIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Goncharov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drifting and submeridional compression of the continental and oceanic lithosphere, both with the northward vector (Figure 1 are revealed at the background of various directions of horizontal displacement combined with deformations of horizontal extension, compression and shear of the lithosphere (Figures 7–14. Among various structural forms and their paragenezises, indicators of such compression, the north vergence thrusts play the leading role (Figures 15–17, 19, and 22–24. This process was discontinuous, manifested discretely in time, and superimposed on processes of collisional orogenesis and platform deformations of the continental lithosphere and accretion of the oceanic lithosphere in spreading zones. Three main stages of submeridional compression of the oceanic lithosphere are distinguished as follows: Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous, Late Miocene, and the contemporary stages.Based on the concept of balanced tectonic flow in the Earth’s body, a model of meridional convection (Figure 25 is proposed. In this case, meridional convection is considered as an integral element of the overglobal convective geodynamic system of the largest-scale rank, which also includes the western component of the lithosphere drift (Figure 6 and the Earth’s ‘wrenching’. At the background of this system, geodynamic systems of smaller scale ranks are functioning (Table 1; Figures 2, and 3. The latters are responsible for the periodic creation and break-up of supercontinents, plate tectonics and regional geodynamical processes; they also produce the ‘structural background’, in the presence of which it is challenging to reveal the above mentioned submeridional compression structures. Formation of such structures is caused by the upper horizontal flow of meridional convection.Meridional convection occurs due to drifting of the Earth core towards the North Pole (which is detected by a number of independent methods and resistance of the mantle to

  8. The complex dynamics of the seasonal component of Earth's surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vecchio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the climate system has been investigated by analyzing the complex seasonal oscillation of monthly averaged temperatures recorded at 1167 stations covering the whole USA. We found the presence of an orbit-climate relationship on time scales remarkably shorter than the Milankovitch period related to the nutational forcing. The relationship manifests itself through occasional destabilization of the phase of the seasonal component due to the local changing of balance between direct insolation and the net energy received by the Earth. Quite surprisingly, we found that the local intermittent dynamics is modulated by a periodic component of about 18.6 yr due to the nutation of Earth, which represents the main modulation of the Earth's precession. The global effect in the last century results in a cumulative phase-shift of about 1.74 days towards earlier seasons, in agreement with the phase shift expected from Earth's precession. The climate dynamics of the seasonal cycle can be described through a nonlinear circle-map, indicating that the destabilization process can be associated to intermittent transitions from quasi-periodicity to chaos.

  9. Thermal Analysis of Unusual Local-scale Features on the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Ammannito, E.; Blewett, D. T.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Denevi, B. W.; Li, J.-Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Palmer, E.; Sunshine, J. M.; Titus, T. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    At 525 km in mean diameter, Vesta is the second-most massive object in the main asteroid belt of our Solar System. At all scales, pyroxene absorptions are the most prominent spectral features on Vesta and overall, Vesta mineralogy indicates a complex magmatic evolution that led to a differentiated crust and mantle [1]. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen on the surface at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) [2] hyperspectral images are routinely used, by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms, to compute surface temperatures along with spectral emissivities. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features of Vesta that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times.

  10. The middle atmospheric circulation of a tidally locked Earth-like planet and the role of the sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proedrou, Elisavet; Hocke, Klemens; Wurz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the sea surface temperature (SST) changes on the middle atmosphere of a tidally locked Earth-like planet orbiting a G star using the coupled 3D chemistry-climate model CESM1(WACCM). We perform three 90 day simulations. The first simulation is a present-day Earth (PDE) simulation, the second is a simulation of a tidally locked Earth-like planet with a tidally locked aquaplanet sea surface temperature (cold TLE (CLTE)) and the third is a hybrid simulation of a tidally locked Earth-like planet with a present-day Earth sea surface temperature (warm TLE (WTLE)). Our results show that changes in the SST have an influence on the lower stratospheric temperature and the secondary ozone layer. Both atmospheres exhibit a dayside upwelling and a nightside downwelling extending from the surface to the mesosphere. They are also characterised by comparable lower and middle stratospheric horizontal winds and relatively different mesospheric horizontal winds. The temperature of the WTLE atmosphere is altered as a result of the SST changes, compared to the CTLE. Specifically, the WTLE lower tropospheric temperature is increased by 3.7 K on average, due to the absorption of the increased upwelling longwave radiation and the increased sensible and latent heat. The WTLE upper troposphere temperature is decreased by 4 K on average, is adiabatic in nature, and is generated by the increased WTLE upwelling. The WLTE lower stratospheric temperature is increased by 3.8 K on average due to the absorption of the increased upwelling longwave radiation. The lower mesospheric temperature is decreased by 1.13 K on average due to increased mesospheric wave breaking. The upper mesospheric temperature is increased by 4.3 K, and its generation mechanism is currently unknown. Furthermore, the secondary ozone volume mixing ratio is increased by 40.5 %. The occurrence of large-scale vortices and variable jet streams depends, to some extent, on the SST distribution.

  11. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  12. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition and neural representation of facial identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Timothy J; Baseler, Heidi; Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A Mike; Young, Andrew W

    2016-10-01

    A full understanding of face recognition will involve identifying the visual information that is used to discriminate different identities and how this is represented in the brain. The aim of this study was to explore the importance of shape and surface properties in the recognition and neural representation of familiar faces. We used image morphing techniques to generate hybrid faces that mixed shape properties (more specifically, second order spatial configural information as defined by feature positions in the 2D-image) from one identity and surface properties from a different identity. Behavioural responses showed that recognition and matching of these hybrid faces was primarily based on their surface properties. These behavioural findings contrasted with neural responses recorded using a block design fMRI adaptation paradigm to test the sensitivity of Haxby et al.'s (2000) core face-selective regions in the human brain to the shape or surface properties of the face. The fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA) showed a lower response (adaptation) to repeated images of the same face (same shape, same surface) compared to different faces (different shapes, different surfaces). From the behavioural data indicating the critical contribution of surface properties to the recognition of identity, we predicted that brain regions responsible for familiar face recognition should continue to adapt to faces that vary in shape but not surface properties, but show a release from adaptation to faces that vary in surface properties but not shape. However, we found that the FFA and OFA showed an equivalent release from adaptation to changes in both shape and surface properties. The dissociation between the neural and perceptual responses suggests that, although they may play a role in the process, these core face regions are not solely responsible for the recognition of facial identity.

  13. Constraints on the lithospheric structure of Venus from mechanical models and tectonic surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1987-01-01

    The evidence for the extensional or compressional origins of some prominent Venusian surface features disclosed by radar images is discussed. Using simple models, the hypothesis that the observed length scales (10-20 km and 100-300 km) of deformations are controlled by dominant wavelengths arising from unstable compression or extension of the Venus lithosphere is tested. The results show that the existence of tectonic features that exhibit both length scales can be explained if, at the time of deformation, the lithosphere consisted of a crust that was relatively strong near the surface and weak at its base, and an upper mantle that was stronger than or nearly comparable in strength to the upper crust.

  14. Journey to the Center of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David

    2014-03-01

    The center of Earth is at about the temperature of the surface of the Sun (about 6000K) but frozen because of the extreme pressure. I will place the Earth in a more general context of planets (including exoplanets) and explain how it is that the materials deep in Earth can behave differently from the same composition at low pressure.I will describe the sequence of layers and materials and conditions as one travels in a hypothetical probe from the surface to the center, emphasizing the things we do not understand well. I will talk about he extent to which Earth's mantle is imperfectly mixed and may have a bottom layer above the core that is different in composition. I will discuss the Urey number puzzle (what explains Earth's heat flow?). I will focus on the puzzle that Earth's magnetic field presents: How is it generated and how has this worked for billions of years? It seems that we need another energy source. I will talk about how Earth has a memory of how it formed, in particulate the high temperatures resulting from events such as the giant impact that led to our Moon. I will end with a discussion of what to do about the remaining puzzles, in particular the possible value of the geoneutrino experiment and attempts to directly probe the interior.

  15. Sensitivities of surface wave velocities to the medium parameters in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth and inversion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar N. Bhattacharya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity kernels or partial derivatives of phase velocity (c and group velocity (U with respect to medium parameters are useful to interpret a given set of observed surface wave velocity data. In addition to phase velocities, group velocities are also being observed to find the radial anisotropy of the crust and mantle. However, sensitivities of group velocity for a radially anisotropic Earth have rarely been studied. Here we show sensitivities of group velocity along with those of phase velocity to the medium parameters VSV, VSH , VPV, VPH , h and density in a radially anisotropic spherical Earth. The peak sensitivities for U are generally twice of those for c; thus U is more efficient than c to explore anisotropic nature of the medium. Love waves mainly depends on VSH while Rayleigh waves is nearly independent of VSH . The sensitivities show that there are trade-offs among these parameters during inversion and there is a need to reduce the number of parameters to be evaluated independently. It is suggested to use a nonlinear inversion jointly for Rayleigh and Love waves; in such a nonlinear inversion best solutions are obtained among the model parameters within prescribed limits for each parameter. We first choose VSH, VSV and VPH within their corresponding limits; VPV and h can be evaluated from empirical relations among the parameters. The density has small effect on surface wave velocities and it can be considered from other studies or from empirical relation of density to average P-wave velocity.

  16. A Generalized Stability Analysis of the AMOC in Earth System Models: Implication for Decadal Variability and Abrupt Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, Alexey V. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-01-14

    The central goal of this research project was to understand the mechanisms of decadal and multi-decadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as related to climate variability and abrupt climate change within a hierarchy of climate models ranging from realistic ocean models to comprehensive Earth system models. Generalized Stability Analysis, a method that quantifies the transient and asymptotic growth of perturbations in the system, is one of the main approaches used throughout this project. The topics we have explored range from physical mechanisms that control AMOC variability to the factors that determine AMOC predictability in the Earth system models, to the stability and variability of the AMOC in past climates.

  17. A generalized equation of state with an application to the Earth's mantle

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Robles-Gutiérrez; J. M. A. Robles-Domínguez; C. Lomnitz

    2010-01-01

    This study analizes the pertinency of including in the state equation of Kamerlingh-Onnes, non additive, potentials of multiple-interactiions of particles. These forces are indeed real and of a electrodinamic character. From the state equation no gerenalized, we obtained the isotherms in the vecinity of the critical point, and of the triple point for polar (or no polar) systems. We developed the example of water. We generalized the state equation for the mantle developed by Birch, and in part...

  18. The Features of Pyhsics Course Programmes in Terms Of Total Quality in General Secondary Schools (Lycees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk AKAY

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management dates back to 19th century and it is not only a key factor in production sector but also a directing steer in education. Quality approach in education is fictialised on input-process-output trio. Stating a quality apprehension is directly proportional with the output. What effects the quality of output are everything related with education and school. There are different types of data collection instruments to present the tone constructed by existing situtation in education. The features of the pyhsics course programme in terms of total quality are founded by Six Sigma model in eight lycees in Mersin. The research showed that the features of the existing programme are not sufficient to answer the needs of the students, teachers and the director staff in schools. The study unearthed the substantial structure in schools and provided some solution offers for deficiencies in terms of total quality.

  19. Monitoring perturbations of earth surface process after the 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Christoff; Hovius, Niels; Cook, Kristen; Turowski, Jens; Illien, Luc; Sense-Schönfelder, Christoph; Rössner, Sigrid; Parajuli, Binod; Bajracharya, Krishna; Adi=hikari, Basanta

    2017-04-01

    Large earthquakes can substantially perturb a wide range of Earth surface processes. The strong shaking caused by large earthquakes weakens rockmass, causes extensive landsliding, and alter the hydrological conductivity of the near surface. This leads to subsequent responses that include sediment loading of rivers and changes in subsurface water flow paths. The long term perturbation often last several years and even might outstrip the immediate co-seismic impact in their magnitude. Over time the system restores to background conditions, and the recovery process and transient timescales of different systems provide particularly valuable insights for predicting natural risks associated with the aftermath of earthquakes. Here we will present results of the first 2 years of monitoring surface processes in the epicentral area of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake. The observations started immediately after the event and are planned to continue for a total of four monsoon seasons, in order to capture the full recovery process of the system until pre-earthquake conditions have been reached. We have installed a comprehensive network of twelve river sampling stations for daily water and sediment sampling, covering all major rivers draining the earthquake-affected areas. Nested within this regional network, we have installed an array of 16 seismometers and 6 weather stations in the upper Bhotekoshi catchment. The field measurements are accompanied by repeated mapping of landslide activities using satellite imagery. Our results show pronounced changes of the hydrological regime, underpinned by a marked change of seismic noise velocities, both indications of significant changes of the subsurface rock properties. Alongside, our landslide mapping documents about ten times greater landslide activity during the 2015 monsoon season than typically expected for this monsoon season. Very preliminary estimates for the exceptionally strong 2016 monsoon season are also elevated. This

  20. The Earth-Moon Lagrangian points as a testbed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-01-01

    In the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid, we take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. We then evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the longdistance form of the potential among two point masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for ...

  1. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  2. Hyperspectral Feature Detection Onboard the Earth Observing One Spacecraft using Superpixel Segmentation and Endmember Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; Bornstein, Benjamin; Bue, Brian D.; Tran, Daniel Q.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We present a demonstration of onboard hyperspectral image processing with the potential to reduce mission downlink requirements. The system detects spectral endmembers and then uses them to map units of surface material. This summarizes the content of the scene, reveals spectral anomalies warranting fast response, and reduces data volume by two orders of magnitude. We have integrated this system into the Autonomous Science craft Experiment for operational use onboard the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Spacecraft. The system does not require prior knowledge about spectra of interest. We report on a series of trial overflights in which identical spacecraft commands are effective for autonomous spectral discovery and mapping for varied target features, scenes and imaging conditions.

  3. Analyzing earth's surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. J.; Elifrits, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Manual discusses simple inexpensive image analysis technique used to interpret photographs and scanner of data of Earth's surface. Manual is designed for those who have no need for sophisticated computer-automated analysis procedures.

  4. Modeling of rare earth element sorption to the Gram positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Raul E; Pourret, Olivier; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, rare earth element (REE) binding constants and site concentration on the Gram+ bacteria surfaces were quantified using a multi-site Langmuir isotherm model, along with a linear programming regression method (LPM), applied to fit experimental REE sorption data. This approach found one discrete REE binding site on the Gram+ Bacillus subtilis surface for the pH range of 2.5-4.5. Average log10 REE binding constants for a site j on these bacteria ranged from 1.08±0.04 to 1.40±0.04 for the light REE (LREE: La to Eu), and from 1.36±0.03 to 2.18±0.14 for the heavy REE (HREE: Gd to Lu) at the highest biomass concentration of 1.3 g/L of B. subtilis bacteria. Similar values were obtained for bacteria concentrations of 0.39 and 0.67 g/L indicating the independence of REE sorption constants on biomass concentration. Within the experimental pH range in this study, B. subtilis was shown to have a lower affinity for LREE (e.g. La, Ce, Pr, Nd) and a higher affinity for HREE (e.g. Tm, Yb, Lu) suggesting an enrichment of HREE on the surface of Gram+ bacteria. Total surface binding site concentrations of 6.73±0.06 to 5.67±0.06 and 5.53±0.07 to 4.54±0.03 mol/g of bacteria were observed for LREE and HREE respectively, with the exception of Y, which showed a total site concentration of 9.53±0.03, and a log K(REE,j) of 1.46±0.02 for a biomass content of 1.3 g/L. The difference in these values (e.g. a lower affinity and increased binding site concentration for LREE, and the contrary for the HREE) suggests a distinction between the LREE and HREE binding modes to the Gram+ bacteria reactive surface at low pH. This further implies that HREE may bind more than one monoprotic reactive group on the cell surface. A multisite Langmuir isotherm approach along with the LPM regression method, not requiring prior knowledge of the number or concentration of cell surface REE complexation sites, were able to distinguish between the sorption constant and binding site concentration

  5. Surface Rupture and Geotechnical Features of The July 2, 2013 Tanah Gayo Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudrik Rahmawan Daryono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of surface rupture and collateral ground failures can help to evaluate the impact of future earthquakes. This paper presents the results of a field survey conducted to map the surface rupture and geotechnical phenomena associated with the ground shaking during the July 2, 2013 earthquakes in Tanah Gayo Highland. The objectives of this survey are to document and to characterize the surface ruptures as well as to identify types of earthquake-induced ground failures. Results of the survey identified four best sites of possible surface rupture. Two locations are obvious surface ruptures that can be traced on primary topographic feature of the active fault segment from the north to the south, crossing Pantan Terong Hill. The fault segment has a total mapped length of 19 km, with WNW trending zone and a dextral rupture offset. The ground shaking also resulted in landslides and liquefaction in areas underlain by very fine-grained tuffaceous sands. Based on the field survey, it can be concluded that the newly defined active fault segment, the Pantan Terong segment, is likely the segment that ruptured at the July 2, 2013 Tanah Gayo earthquake. Due to the soil types and unstable rocky slopes in the hilly Central Aceh region, large-scale landslides are primary risks during an earthquake event in this region.

  6. An Integrated Account of Generalization across Objects and Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles; Shafto, Patrick; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans routinely make inductive generalizations about unobserved features of objects. Previous accounts of inductive reasoning often focus on inferences about a single object or feature: accounts of causal reasoning often focus on a single object with one or more unobserved features, and accounts of property induction often focus on a single…

  7. Feature Extraction by Wavelet Decomposition of Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor array design and data processing for recognition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs based on transient responses. The array is constructed of variable thickness single polymer-coated SAW oscillator sensors. The thickness of polymer coatings are selected such that during the sensing period, different sensors are loaded with varied levels of diffusive inflow of vapour species due to different stages of termination of equilibration process. Using a single polymer for coating the individual sensors with different thickness introduces vapour-specific kinetics variability in transient responses. The transient shapes are analysed by wavelet decomposition based on Daubechies mother wavelets. The set of discrete wavelet transform (DWT approximation coefficients across the array transients is taken to represent the vapour sample in two alternate ways. In one, the sets generated by all the transients are combined into a single set to give a single representation to the vapour. In the other, the set of approximation coefficients at each data point generated by all transients is taken to represent the vapour. The latter results in as many alternate representations as there are approximation coefficients. The alternate representations of a vapour sample are treated as different instances or realisations for further processing. The wavelet analysis is then followed by the principal component analysis (PCA to create new feature space. A comparative analysis of the feature spaces created by both the methods leads to the conclusion that both methods yield complimentary information: the one reveals intrinsic data variables, and the other enhances class separability. The present approach is validated by generating synthetic transient response data based on a prototype polyisobutylene (PIB coated 3-element SAW sensor array exposed to 7 VOC vapours: chloroform, chlorobenzene o

  8. Examining the Impact of Question Surface Features on Students' Answers to Constructed-Response Questions on Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michele; Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Merrill, John

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in science education assessment is that students often focus on surface features of questions rather than the underlying scientific principles. We investigated how student written responses to constructed-response questions about photosynthesis vary based on two surface features of the question: the species of plant and the order of…

  9. Influence of the atmosphere on the evaluation of the geopotential from global models on the surface of the Earth: implications for the realization of a World Height System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko

    2016-04-01

    Outside the atmosphere, the potential of a standard atmosphere can with high accuracy be approximated with the potential of a surface layer with the same mass, independently of the scale height of the atmosphere. Not so when the potential is evaluated on the surface of the Earth. In a spherically symmetric approximation and assuming a scale height of 7.6 km, the potential at zero height is in a back-of-the-envelope calculation 0.12 percent less than the potential of the surface laýer. This corresponds to a difference of -1.2 ppb in the total geopotential evaluated on the surface of the Earth, the equivalent of a difference of +8 mm in height. Using a realistic atmospheric and Earth model, the difference is not constant. This has obvious implications for the geopotential values associated with a World Height System. The question has in fact already been extensively analyzed in the context of geoid determination.

  10. Accretion of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  11. Theory connecting nonlocal sediment transport, earth surface roughness, and the Sadler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Rina; Taloni, Alessandro; Furbish, David Jon

    2017-03-01

    Earth surface evolution, like many natural phenomena typified by fluctuations on a wide range of scales and deterministic smoothing, results in a statistically rough surface. We present theory demonstrating that scaling exponents of topographic and stratigraphic statistics arise from long-time averaging of noisy surface evolution rather than specific landscape evolution processes. This is demonstrated through use of "elastic" Langevin equations that generically describe disturbance from a flat earth surface using a noise term that is smoothed deterministically via sediment transport. When smoothing due to transport is a local process, the geologic record self organizes such that a specific Sadler effect and topographic power spectral density (PSD) emerge. Variations in PSD slope reflect the presence or absence and character of nonlocality of sediment transport. The range of observed stratigraphic Sadler slopes captures the same smoothing feature combined with the presence of long-range spatial correlation in topographic disturbance.

  12. The effect of earth's atmosphere on contrast reduction for a nonuniform surface albedo and 'two-halves' field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a model for contrast reduction by atmospheric haze developed for the 'two-halves' field of the earth's surface and other geometries of the earth's surface albedo. The model is based on a simplified solution of the equation of radiative transfer in two dimensions, resulting in a method for calculation of the upward zenith intensity in the atmosphere as a function of the distance from the border between the two half planes, for an unabsorbing atmosphere. The adjacency effect between two infinitesimal areas of different albedos is calculated; the resultant simplified solution is used to develop expressions for the line-spread function of the atmosphere and the modulation transfer function. The line-spread function is used to calculate the point spread function, which can be used to compute the intensity above any surface with given spatial dependence of the reflectivity.

  13. Modeling viscoelastic deformation of the earth due to surface loading by commercial finite element package - ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit Wong, Ching; Wu, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Wu (2004) developed a transformation scheme to model viscoelatic deformation due to glacial loading by commercial finite element package - ABAQUS. Benchmark tests confirmed that this method works extremely well on incompressible earth model. Bangtsson & Lund (2008),however, showed that the transformation scheme would lead to incorrect results if compressible material parameters are used. Their study implies that Wu's method of stress transformation is inadequate to model the load induced deformation of a compressible earth under the framework of ABAQUS. In light of this, numerical experiments are carried out to find if there exist other methods that serve this purpose. All the tested methods are not satisfying as the results failed to converge through iterations, except at the elastic limit. Those tested methods will be outlined and the results will be presented. Possible reasons of failure will also be discussed. Bängtsson, E., & Lund, B. (2008). A comparison between two solution techniques to solve the equations of glacially induced deformation of an elastic Earth. International journal for numerical methods in engineering, 75(4), 479-502. Wu, P. (2004). Using commercial finite element packages for the study of earth deformations, sea levels and the state of stress. Geophysical Journal International, 158(2), 401-408.

  14. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects and can aid in predicting dispersal of materials throughout the ocean or in predicting long-term climate change. Parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of turbulent eddies. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and may take advantage of animations of sea surface height, in which quasi- circular, westward-propagating eddies can easily be seen.

  15. High-resolution numerical simulation of Venus atmosphere by AFES (Atmospheric general circulation model For the Earth Simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; AFES project Team

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) and performed a high-resolution simulation (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a). The highest resolution is T639L120; 1920 times 960 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 20 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state.Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k > 10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). We will show recent results of the high-resolution run, e.g., small-scale gravity waves attributed to large-scale thermal tides. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968.Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  16. Understanding the General Feature of Microvariability in ${\\it Kepler}$ Blazar W2R 1926$+$42

    CERN Document Server

    Sasada, Mahito; Yamada, Shinya; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the ${\\it Kepler}$ monitoring light curve of a blazar W2R 1926$+$42 to examine features of microvariability by means of the "shot analysis" technique. We select 195 intra-day, flare-like variations (shots) for the continuous light curve of Quarter 14 with a duration of 100 d. In the application of the shot analysis, an averaged profile of variations is assumed to converge with a universal profile which reflects a physical mechanism generating the microvariability in a blazar jet, although light-variation profiles of selected shots show a variety. A mean profile, which is obtained by aligning the peaks of the 195 shots, is composed of a spiky-shape shot component at $\\pm$0.1 d (with respect to the time of the peak), and two slow varying components ranging from $-$0.50 d to $-$0.15 d and from 0.10 d to 0.45 d of the peak time. The former spiky feature is well represented by an exponential rise of 0.043$\\pm$0.001 d and an exponential decay of 0.061$\\pm$0.002 d. These timescales are consistent with tha...

  17. Understanding the general feature of microvariability in Kepler blazar W2R 1926+42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, Mahito; Mineshige, Shin; Yamada, Shinya; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the Kepler monitoring light curve of a blazar W2R 1926+42 to examine features of microvariability by means of the "shot analysis" technique. We select 195 intra-day, flare-like variations (shots) for the continuous light curve of Quarter 14 with a duration of 100 d. In the application of the shot analysis, an averaged profile of variations is assumed to converge with a universal profile which reflects a physical mechanism generating the microvariability in a blazar jet, although light-variation profiles of selected shots show a variety. A mean profile, which is obtained by aligning the peaks of the 195 shots, is composed of a spiky-shaped shot component at ± 0.1 d (with respect to the time of the peak), and two slow varying components ranging from -0.50 d to -0.15 d and from 0.10 d to 0.45 d of the peak time. The former spiky feature is well represented by an exponential rise of 0.043 ± 0.001 d and an exponential decay of 0.061 ± 0.002 d. These timescales are consistent with that corresponding to a break frequency of a power spectrum density calculated from the obtained light curve. After verification with the Monte Carlo method, the exponential shape, but not the observed asymmetry, of the shot component can be explained by noise variation. The asymmetry is difficult to explain through a geometrical effect (i.e., changes of the geometry of the emitting region), but is more likely to be caused by the production and dissipation of high-energy accelerated particles in the jet. Additionally, the durations of the detected shots show a systematic variation with a dispersion caused by a statistical randomness. A comparison with the variability of Cygnus X-1 is also briefly discussed.

  18. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Johansson, Börje; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1995-01-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occ...... played by the initial and the different final states of the core-excitation process, permitted by the fact that the so-called initial-state effect is identical upon 4f removal and 4f addition. Surface energy and work function calculations are also reported....

  19. Surface Features Parameterization and Equivalent Roughness Height Estimation of a Real Subglacial Conduit in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Manko ff, K. D.; Gulley, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The surfaces of subglacial conduits are very complex, coupling multi-scale roughness, large sinuosity, and cross-sectional variations together. Those features significantly affect the friction law and drainage efficiency inside the conduit by altering velocity and pressure distributions, thus posing considerable influences on the dynamic development of the conduit. Parameterizing the above surface features is a first step towards understanding their hydraulic influences. A Matlab package is developed to extract the roughness field, the conduit centerline, and associated area and curvature data from the conduit surface, acquired from 3D scanning. By using those data, the characteristic vertical and horizontal roughness scales are then estimated based on the structure functions. The centerline sinuosities, defined through three concepts, i.e., the traditional definition of a fluvial river, entropy-based sinuosity, and curvature-based sinuosity, are also calculated and compared. The cross-sectional area and equivalent circular diameter along the centerline are also calculated. Among those features, the roughness is especially important due to its pivotal role in determining the wall friction, and thus an estimation of the equivalent roughness height is of great importance. To achieve such a goal, the original conduit is firstly simplified into a straight smooth pipe with the same volume and centerline length, and the roughness field obtained above is then reconstructed into the simplified pipe. An OpenFOAM-based Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is then performed based on the reconstructed pipe. Considering that the Reynolds number is of the order 106, and the relative roughness is larger than 5% for 60% of the conduit, we test the validity of the resistance law for completely rough pipe. The friction factor is calculated based on the pressure drop and mean velocity in the simulation. Working together, the equivalent roughness height can be calculated. However, whether the

  20. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura

    2016-02-10

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ∼ 45–150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ∼ 45–150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ∼ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ∼20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ∼ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT\\'s phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T

  1. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Laura; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-04-01

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ˜ 45-150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ˜ 45-150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ˜ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ˜20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ˜ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT's phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T ˜ 45 s and

  2. Features of Afterbody Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Brandis, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Radiative heating is identified as a major contributor to afterbody heating for Earth entry capsules at velocities above 10 km/s. Because of rate-limited electron-ion recombination processes, a large fraction of the electronically-excited N and O atoms produced in the high temperature/pressure forebody remain as they expand into the afterbody region, which results in significant afterbody radiation. Large radiative heating sensitivities to electron-impact ionization rates and escape factors are identified. Ablation products from a forebody ablator are shown to increase the afterbody radiation by as much as 40%. The tangent-slab radiation transport approach is shown to over-predict the radiative flux by as much as 40% in the afterbody, therefore making the more computationally expensive ray-tracing approach necessary for accurate radiative flux predictions. For the Stardust entry, the afterbody radiation is predicted to be nearly twice as large as the convective heating during the peak heating phase of the trajectory. Comparisons between simulations and the Stardust Echelle observation measurements, which are shown to be dominated by afterbody emission, indicate agreement within 20% for various N and O lines. Similarly, calorimeter measurements from the Fire II experiment are identified as a source of validation data for afterbody radiation. For the afterbody calorimeter measurement closest to the forebody, which experiences the largest afterbody radiative heating component, the convective heating alone is shown to under-predict the measurement, even for the fullycatalytic assumption. Agreement with the measurements is improved with the addition of afterbody radiation. These comparisons with Stardust and Fire II measurements provide validation that the significant afterbody radiation values proposed in this work are legitimate.

  3. The Topographic Torque on a Bounding Surface of a Rotating Gravitating Fluid and the Excitation by Core Motions of Decadal Fluctuations in the Earth's Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond

    1995-01-01

    General expressions (with potential applications in several areas of geophysical fluid dynamics) are derived for all three components of the contribution made by the geostrophic part of the pressure field associated with flow in a rotating gravitating fluid to the topographic torque exerted by the fluid on a rigid impermeable bounding surface of any shape. When applied to the Earth's liquid metallic core, which is bounded by nearly spherical surfaces and can be divided into two main regions, the "torosphere" and "polosphere," the expressions reduce to formulae given previously by the author, thereby providing further support for his work and that of others on the role of topographic coupling at the core-mantle boundary in the excitation by core motions of Earth rotation fluctuations on decadal time scales. They also show that recent criticisms of that work are vitiated by mathematical and physical errors. Contrary to these criticisms, the author's scheme for exploiting Earth rotation and other geophysical data (either real or simulated in computer models) in quantitative studies of the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) by intercomparing various models of (a) motions in the core based on geomagnetic secular variation data and (b) CMB topography based on seismological and gravity data has a sound theoretical basis. The practical scope of the scheme is of course limited by the accuracy of real data, but this is a matter for investigation, not a priori assessment.

  4. AB-INITIO SIMULATION OF ELECTRONIC FEATURES OF HYPERFINE RARE EARTH OXIDE FILMS FOR SENSORY NANOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gulay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab-Initio simulation of electronic features of sensoring nanomaterials based on rare earth oxides has been made by the example of yttrium oxide. The simulation method for thin films of nanometer scale consisted in the simulation of the material layer of the thickness equal to unit crystal cell size has been proposed within the VASP simulation package. The atomic bond breakdown in the crystal along one of the coordinate axes is simulated by the increase of a distance between the atomic layers along this axis up to values at which the value of free energy is stabilized. It has been found that the valence and conductivity bands are not revealed explicitly and the band gap is not formed in the hyperfine rare earth oxide film (at the film thickness close to 1 nm. In fact the hyperfine rare earth oxide film loses dielectric properties which were exhibited clear enough in continuum.

  5. The hills are alive: Earth surface dynamics in the University of Arizona Landscape Evolution Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, S.; Troch, P. A.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Huxman, T. E.; Pelletier, J. D.; Dontsova, K.; Niu, G.; Chorover, J.; Zeng, X.

    2012-12-01

    To meet the challenge of predicting landscape-scale changes in Earth system behavior, the University of Arizona has designed and constructed a new large-scale and community-oriented scientific facility - the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO). The primary scientific objectives are to quantify interactions among hydrologic partitioning, geochemical weathering, ecology, microbiology, atmospheric processes, and geomorphic change associated with incipient hillslope development. LEO consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1 meter of basaltic tephra ground to homogenous loamy sand and contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. Each ~1000 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation), to facilitate better quantification of evapotraspiration. Each landscape has an engineered rain system that allows application of precipitation at rates between3 and 45 mm/hr. These landscapes are being studied in replicate as "bare soil" for an initial period of several years. After this initial phase, heat- and drought-tolerant vascular plant communities will be introduced. Introduction of vascular plants is expected to change how water, carbon, and energy cycle through the landscapes, with potentially dramatic effects on co-evolution of the physical and biological systems. LEO also provides a physical comparison to computer models that are designed to predict interactions among hydrological, geochemical, atmospheric, ecological and geomorphic processes in changing climates. These computer models will be improved by comparing their predictions to physical measurements made in

  6. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  7. The ability to induce microtubule acetylation is a general feature of formin proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Thurston

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic microtubules exist as distinct dynamic and stable populations within the cell. Stable microtubules direct and maintain cell polarity and it is thought that their stabilization is dependent on coordinative organization between the microtubule network and the actin cytoskeleton. A growing body of work suggests that some members of the formin family of actin remodeling proteins also regulate microtubule organization and stability. For example, we showed previously that expression of the novel formin INF1 is sufficient to induce microtubule stabilization and tubulin acetylation, but not tubulin detyrosination. An important issue with respect to the relationship between formins and microtubules is the determination of which formin domains mediate microtubule stabilization. INF1 has a distinct microtubule-binding domain at its C-terminus and the endogenous INF1 protein is associated with the microtubule network. Surprisingly, the INF1 microtubule-binding domain is not essential for INF1-induced microtubule acetylation. We show here that expression of the isolated FH1 + FH2 functional unit of INF1 is sufficient to induce microtubule acetylation independent of the INF1 microtubule-binding domain. It is not yet clear whether or not microtubule stabilization is a general property of all mammalian formins; therefore we expressed constitutively active derivatives of thirteen of the fifteen mammalian formin proteins in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells and measured their effects on stress fiber formation, MT organization and MT acetylation. We found that expression of the FH1 + FH2 unit of the majority of mammalian formins is sufficient to induce microtubule acetylation. Our results suggest that the regulation of microtubule acetylation is likely a general formin activity and that the FH2 should be thought of as a dual-function domain capable of regulating both actin and microtubule networks.

  8. Rupture features of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile earthquake extracted from surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ling; Hwang, Ruey-Der; Jhuang, Yi-Shan; Lin, Cai-Yi

    2017-03-01

    This study used the rupture directivity theory to derive the fault parameters of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile earthquake on the basis of the azimuth-dependent source duration obtained from the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity. Results revealed that the 2010 Chile earthquake featured asymmetric bilateral faulting. The two rupture directions were N171°E (northward) and N17°E (southward), with rupture lengths of approximately 313 and 118 km, respectively, and were related to the locking degree in the source region. The entire source duration was approximately 187 s. After excluding the rise time from the source duration, the northward rupture velocity was approximately 2.02 km/s, faster than the southward rupture velocity (1.74 km/s). On average, the rupture velocity derived from this study was slower than that estimated from finite-fault inversion; however, several historical earthquakes in the Chile region also showed slow rupture velocity when using low-frequency signals, as surface waves do. Two earlier studies through global-positioning-system data analysis showed that the static stress drop of 50-70 bars for the 2010 Chile earthquake was higher than that for subduction-zone earthquakes. Hence, a remarkable feature was that the 2010 Chile earthquake had a slow rupture velocity and a high static stress drop, which suggested an inverse relationship between rupture velocity and static stress drop.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Generalized surface momentum balances for the analysis of surface dilatational data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dilatational rheological properties of interfaces are often determined using drop tensiometers, in which the interface of the droplet is subjected to oscillatory area changes. A dynamic surface tension is determined either by image analysis of the droplet profile or by measuring the capillary pressu

  10. Manufacturing of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop a technology that will enable nanoscale and microscale superhydrophobic (SHP) features to be imaged onto surfaces for the high-volume manufacturing of water-repellent components and coatings.

  11. The Chinese Society of Rare Earth is Studying The Feasibility of Marketing Rare Earth Futures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Lin Donglu,secretary-general of the Chinese Society of Rare Earth recently said,the Chinese Society of Rare Earth undertook the research on subject of the National Social Science Fund Foundation on the reform of Chinese rare earth trading pricing mechanism on promoting RMB globalization,and is focusing on studying the feasibility of marketing rare earth futures variety.

  12. On testing of the photometer-polarimeter UVP layout using a telescope on Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Morozhenko, O. V.; Zbrutskyi, O.; Ivakhiv, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    One of the causes of climate change (changing of concentration of stratospheric ozone) - is variations due to aerosol optical thickness in the upper layers of Earth's atmosphere. To solve the problem is necessary to make a space experiment to receive polarization observational data. Their analysis will: determine the value of the real part of the refractive index, the size of the stratospheric aerosol, optical thickness of the stratospheric aerosol layer, investigate aerosol's layer horizontal structure and its changes over time. Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine jointly with the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" and National University "Lviv Polytechnic" for a long time working on the design of polarimeter to study the stratospheric layer of the Earth from board of artificial satellites. During this time accumulated a great experience in such work, and created a layout of compact board ultraviolet polarimeter UFP [1-4]. For testing of ground variant of layout of UFP, it is installed on the telescope AZT-2 of the Main Astronomical Observatory NAS of Ukraine (Kyiv). Using it we plan to investigate the possibility of determining the degree of polarization of the twilight glow of Earth's atmosphere, and implementation of this technique in the development of space experiment on investigation of the stratospheric aerosol from space. For this purpose we develop a special set of equipment that will adapt the layout for working of UFP with telescope AZT-2, and carry out the above mentioned work (see. in [5-7]). References. 1. P. Nevodovskyi, O. Morozhenko, A. Vidmachenko, O. Ivakhiv, M. Geraimchuk, O. Zbrutskyi. Tiny Ultraviolet Polarimeter for Earth Stratosphere from Space Investigation // Proceedings of 8th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications (IDAACS'2015). 24-26 September 2015, Proceedings. Warsaw, Poland. Vol.81, p. 28-32. 2. Nevodovsksiy P. V., Morozhenko A

  13. Analysis of a Permo-Triassic polarity transition in different absolute reconstructions of Pangaea, considering a model with features of the present Earth magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Van Zele

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to show that the distribution of transitional palaeomagnetic data recorded at 250 Ma are in agreement with simulated data that depend on the sampling site, using a model that considers features of the Present Earth magnetic field. The analysis was performed comparing simulated reversals with the Permo-Triassic polarity transition recorded in the Siberian Trap Basalts. The palaeomagnetic data were corrected according to the Palaeo-latitude and Palaeo-longitude of Siberia (absolute reconstruction at 250 Ma using hotspot tracks. To obtain the motion of Siberia relative to hotspots from the Present time back to 250 Ma, three different Pangaea models were considered (Pangaea A, Pangaea A2, Pangaea B. In spite of the uncertainties associated with the use of hotspot frameworks and Pangaea configurations, both the modelled and recorded data show a remarkable fit when absolute reconstructions of Pangaea A and A2 configurations are performed. The agreement between both simulated and recorded data suggests that similar features to that of the Present Earth magnetic field could have been involved in reversals since the Permo-Triassic.

  14. Applications of surface analytical techniques in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Gujie; Li, Yubiao; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers a wide range of surface analytical techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM), photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), dynamic and static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Others that are relatively less widely used but are also important to the Earth Sciences are also included: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). All these techniques probe only the very top sample surface layers (sub-nm to several tens of nm). In addition, we also present several other techniques i.e. Raman microspectroscopy, reflection infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy (QEMSCAN) that penetrate deeper into the sample, up to several μm, as all of them are fundamental analytical tools for the Earth Sciences. Grazing incidence synchrotron techniques, sensitive to surface measurements, are also briefly introduced at the end of this review. (Scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) is a special case that can be applied to characterisation of mineralogical and geological sample surfaces. Since TEM/STEM is such an important technique for Earth Scientists, we have also included it to draw attention to the capability of TEM/STEM applied as a surface-equivalent tool. While this review presents most of the important techniques for the Earth Sciences, it is not an all-inclusive bibliography of those analytical techniques. Instead, for each technique that is discussed, we first give a very brief introduction about its principle and background, followed by a short section on approaches to sample preparation that are important for researchers to appreciate prior to the actual sample analysis. We then use examples from publications (and also some of our known unpublished results) within the Earth Sciences

  15. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  16. Use of advanced earth observation tools for the analyses of recent surface changes in Kalahari pans and Namibian coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Robert; Milewski, Robert; Chabrillat, Sabine; Völkel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The remote sensing analyses in the BMBF-SPACES collaborative project Geoarchives - Signals of Climate and Landscape Change preserved in Southern African Geoarchives - focuses on the use of recent and upcoming Earth Observation Tools for the study of climate and land use changes and its impact on the ecosystem. It aims at demonstrating the potential of recently available advanced optical remote sensing imagery with its extended spectral coverage and temporal resolution for the identification and mapping of sediment features associated with paleo-environmental archives as well as their recent dynamic. In this study we focus on the analyses of two ecosystems of major interest, the Kalahari salt pans as well as the lagoons at Namibia's west coast, that present high dynamic caused by combined hydrological and surface processes linked to climatic events. Multitemporal remote sensing techniques allow us to derive the recent surface dynamic of the salt pans and also provide opportunities to get a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal development of the coastal lagoons. Furthermore spaceborne hyperspectral analysis can give insight to the current surface mineralogy of the salt pans on a physical basis and provide the intra pan distribution of evaporites. The soils and sediments of the Kalahari salt pans such as the Omongwa pan are a potentially significant storage of global carbon and also function as an important terrestrial climate archive. Thus far the surface distribution of evaporites have been only assessed mono-temporally and on a coarse regional scale, but the dynamic of the salt pans, especially the formation of evaporites, is still uncertain and poorly understood. For the salt pan analyses a change detection is applied using the Iterative-reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD) method to identify and investigate surface changes based on a Landsat time-series covering the period 1984-2015. Furthermore the current spatial distribution of

  17. The effects of geomagnetic disturbances on electrical systems at the earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, D. H.; Pirjola, R. J.; Nevanlinna, H.

    Geomagnetic disturbances have affected electrical systems on the ground for over 150 years. The first effects were noted on the early telegraph in the 1840s and in this century magnetic storms have caused power system blackouts and phone system outages. Affected systems include all those that use electrical conductors: whether for transmission of power or signals or where the conducting properties are incidental to their use such as with pipelines and railway tracks. In power systems geomagnetically induced currents cause partial saturation of power transformers producing transformer heating and distortion of the ac waveform leading to misoperation of relays and other equipment. On pipelines, induced currents may contribute to corrosion but also present a problem with the electrical surveys of the pipe performed to monitor the corrosion prevention systems. Severity of these effects depends on disturbance size, proximity to the auroral zone, and the conductivity structure of the Earth. Also significant are system parameters such as the use of higher resistance coatings on pipelines and the linking of power systems into larger networks. In this paper we have attempted to catalogue all the published reports of geomagnetic effects on electrical systems and show their occurrence in the context of the solar cycle and geomagnetic activity variations for the years 1844 to 1996.

  18. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Frank D [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 883, Kenmore, Qld. 4069 (Australia)], E-mail: Frank.Stacey@csiro.au

    2010-04-15

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 x 10{sup 12} W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>10{sup 4} : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical

  19. Numerical validation of the generalized Harvey-Shack surface scatter theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Narak; Harvey, James E.

    2013-11-01

    The generalized Harvey-Shack (GHS) surface scatter theory is numerically compared to the classical small perturbation method, the Kirchhoff approximation method, and the rigorous method of moments for one-dimensional ideally conducting surfaces whose surface power spectral density function is Gaussian or exhibits an inverse power law (fractal) behavior. In spite of its simple analytic form, our numerical comparison shows that the new GHS theory is valid (with reasonable accuracy) over a broader range of surface parameter space than either of the two classical surface scatter theories.

  20. Bones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  1. Features of the Bible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘隽

    2008-01-01

    Every literature has its features in some aspects,so is the Bible,one of the greatest literary works in the world that has great impact on western literature.This paper summarizes two features of the Bible,namely,cultural feature and literary feature.

  2. OUT-OF-FOCUS REGION SEGMENTATION OF 2D SURFACE IMAGES WITH THE USE OF TEXTURE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anding

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A segmentation method of out-of-focus image regions for processed metal surfaces, based on focus textural features is proposed. Such regions contain small amount of useful information. The object of study is a metal surface, which has a cone shape. Some regions of images are blurred because the depth of field of industrial cameras is limited. Automatic removal of out-of-focus regions in such images is one of the possible solutions to this problem. Focus texture features were used to calculate characteristics that describe the sharpness of particular image area. Such features are used in autofocus systems of microscopes and cameras, and their application for segmentation of out-of-focus regions of images is unusual. Thirty-four textural features were tested on a set of metal surface images with out-of-focus regions. The most useful features, usable for segmentation of an image more accurately, are an average grey level and spatial frequency. Proposed segmentation method of out-of-focus image regions for metal surfaces can be successfully applied for evaluation of processing quality of materials with the use of industrial cameras. The method has simple implementation and high calculating speed.

  3. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  4. Evidences of a threshold system as the source for magnetic storms detected on Earth s surface

    CERN Document Server

    Papa, A R R; Seixas, N A B; Papa, Andres R. R.; Barreto, Luiz M.; Seixas, Ney A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Threshold systems appear to underlie the global behaviour of physical phenomena very unlike at a first look. The usual experimental fingerprint of threshold system grounded phenomena is the presence of power laws. Experimental evidence has been found, for example, in superconductor vortex avalanches, sand piles, the brain, 4He superfluidity and earthquakes. Double power-laws have been found in social networks, in the luminosity of some galactic nuclei and, very recently, in solar flares, among others. Here we show evidences that point to a threshold system as the source for magnetic storms detected on the Earth. We based our analysis on series of data acquired during many years in the network of magnetic observatories of the National Observatory (Brazil). In particular we focused our attention on October 2000 month of the Vassouras Observatory (RJ, Brazil), which have been active since 1915. We have found both power laws and double power laws for some relevant distributions.

  5. SAR Analysis of the ocean surface : aplication to the NW mediterranean marine pollution and dynamic features

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo Apraiz, José Manuel; Platonov, A.; Grau Barceló, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between multiple scales in nature and mainly in turbulent flows produces fractals or multifractal structures. We use multi-fractal analysis to investigate the scales and influence of stratification in different types of surface eddies in the ocean, and specially, near the coastline. We will also show and discuss the structure and residence time in oil spills and slicks in the ocean surface. This method, of multifractal analysis on the intensity SAR signals, as an example will ...

  6. Optics of the average normal cornea from general and canonical representations of its surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael; González, Luis; Hernández, José L

    2006-02-01

    Generally, the analysis of corneal topography involves fitting the raw data to a parametric geometric model that includes a regular basis surface, plus some sort of polynomial expansion to adjust the more irregular residual component. So far, these parametric models have been used in their canonical form, ignoring that the observation (keratometric) coordinate system is different from corneal axes of symmetry. Here we propose, instead, to use the canonical form when the topography is referenced to the intrinsic corneal system of coordinates, defined by its principal axes of symmetry. This idea is implemented using the general expression of an ellipsoid to fit the raw data given by the instrument. Then, the position and orientation of the three orthogonal semiaxes of the ellipsoid, which define the intrinsic Cartesian system of coordinates for normal corneas, can be identified by passing to the canonical form, by standard linear algebra. This model has been first validated experimentally obtaining significantly lower values for rms fitting error as compared with previous standard models: spherical, conical, and biconical. The fitting residual was then adjusted by a Zernike polynomial expansion. The topographies of 123 corneas were analyzed obtaining their radii of curvature, conic constants, Zernike coefficients, and the direction and position of the optical axis of the ellipsoid. The results were compared with those obtained using the standard models. The general ellipsoid model provides more negative values for the conic constants and lower apex radii (more prolate shapes) than the standard models applied to the same data. If the data are analyzed using standard models, the resulting mean shape of the cornea is consistent with previous studies, but when using the ellipsoid model we find new interesting features: The mean cornea is a more prolate ellipsoid (apical power 50 D), the direction of the optical axis is about 2.3 degrees nasal, and the residual term shows

  7. Optics of the average normal cornea from general and canonical representations of its surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael; González, Luis; Hernández, José L.

    2006-02-01

    Generally, the analysis of corneal topography involves fitting the raw data to a parametric geometric model that includes a regular basis surface, plus some sort of polynomial expansion to adjust the more irregular residual component. So far, these parametric models have been used in their canonical form, ignoring that the observation (keratometric) coordinate system is different from corneal axes of symmetry. Here we propose, instead, to use the canonical form when the topography is referenced to the intrinsic corneal system of coordinates, defined by its principal axes of symmetry. This idea is implemented using the general expression of an ellipsoid to fit the raw data given by the instrument. Then, the position and orientation of the three orthogonal semiaxes of the ellipsoid, which define the intrinsic Cartesian system of coordinates for normal corneas, can be identified by passing to the canonical form, by standard linear algebra. This model has been first validated experimentally obtaining significantly lower values for rms fitting error as compared with previous standard models: spherical, conical, and biconical. The fitting residual was then adjusted by a Zernike polynomial expansion. The topographies of 123 corneas were analyzed obtaining their radii of curvature, conic constants, Zernike coefficients, and the direction and position of the optical axis of the ellipsoid. The results were compared with those obtained using the standard models. The general ellipsoid model provides more negative values for the conic constants and lower apex radii (more prolate shapes) than the standard models applied to the same data. If the data are analyzed using standard models, the resulting mean shape of the cornea is consistent with previous studies, but when using the ellipsoid model we find new interesting features: The mean cornea is a more prolate ellipsoid (apical power 50 D), the direction of the optical axis is about 2.3° nasal, and the residual term shows three

  8. General Features of Supersymmetric Signals at the ILC: Solving the LHC Inverse Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Carola F.; Gainer, James S.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2007-12-19

    We examine whether the {radical}s = 500 GeV International Linear Collider with 80% electron beam polarization can be used to solve the LHC Inverse Problem within the framework of the MSSM. We investigate 242 points in the MSSM parameter space, which we term models, that correspond to the 162 pairs of models found by Arkani-Hamed et al. to give indistinguishable signatures at the LHC. We first determine whether the production of the various SUSY particles is visible above the Standard Model background for each of these parameter space points, and then make a detailed comparison of their various signatures. Assuming an integrated luminosity of 500 fb{sup -1}, we find that only 82 out of 242 models lead to visible signatures of some kind with a significance {ge} 5 and that only 57(63) out of the 162 model pairs are distinguishable at 5(3){sigma}. Our analysis includes PYTHIA and CompHEP SUSY signal generation, full matrix element SM backgrounds for all 2 {yields} 2, 2 {yields} 4, and 2 {yields} 6 processes, ISR and beamstrahlung generated via WHIZARD/GuineaPig, and employs the fast SiD detector simulation org.lcsim.

  9. The response of the Earth's surface and the regolith to climatic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; Herman, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    The regolith is a major component of the critical zone in part because it is the main fresh water reservoir that is necessary for the development and sustainability of many ecosystems. Along its upper surface, the regolith is subjected to a wide range of erosional and transport processes. Along its based, chemical and physical processes combine to transform intact bedrock into a porous medium through water is able to flow. If we wish to understand how the regolith and thus the critical zone respond, over geological time scales, to changes in climate, tectonic uplift and/or erosion, it is therefore important that we not only identify the processes responsible for its formation and evolution, but that we develop adequate parameterisations of these processes to evaluate the spatial and temporal scales at which they are susceptible to respond to external forcing. To address part of this problem, we have investigated how surface processes, including fluvial and glacial erosion, as well as chemical weathering that controls the propagation of a chemical front at the base of the regolith, respond to periodic variations in climate forcing. To do so we have used existing and relatively well established parameterisations of these processes to predict their response time scales to external perturbations. These analytical solutions have been tested using numerical models that are based on similar parameterisations (equations). We show that each of these processes can only respond to climate forcing over a range of periods that is set by the response time scale(s) of the process. For each process, we also compute the shape of the gain and lag functions. The gain tells us how the climate forcing might be amplified or damped as a function of the forcing period, while the lag function informs us on whether the response of the system is in phase or not with the forcing. We conclude by showing how important such an approach is to study not only under which conditions the regolith and

  10. General Regularities of Wood Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGOSS, Endre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface roughness of wood products is depending on many factors related both towood properties and wood working operational parameters. Probably this is the reason why there areno generally valid correlation determining surface roughness parameters as a function of influencingfactors. In particular, the account of wood structure in the surface roughness interpretation proved tobe difficult.In the last years an important progress was made in recognizing the role of the anatomicalstructure of wood species in the attainable surface roughness. The introduction of a structure numbermade it possible to express and characterize the different wood species numerically.The aim of these studies was the separation of roughness components due to the anatomicalstructure and the woodworking operation. Using a special finishing technique, the roughnesscomponent due to woodworking operations was not significant and could be separated. The samespecimens were also subjected to different woodworking operations using cutting velocities between10 and 50 m/s. The processing of experimental data resulted in a chart showing the minimumroughness component due to different woodworking operations. Special experimental investigationwas conducted to clear the influence of edge dullness on the surface roughness, especially on itsAbbott-parameters. The measurements showed that the Rk-parameter is a good indicator to predictedge dullness.

  11. Gross Morphological Features of the Organ Surface Primo-Vascular System Revealed by Hemacolor Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Jeong Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primo-vascular system (PVS, which consists of primo-vessels (PVs and primo-nodes (PNs, is a novel thread-like structure identified in many animal species. Various observational methods have been used to clarify its anatomical properties. Here, we used Hemacolor staining to examine the gross morphology of organ-surface PVS in rats. We observed a sinus structure (20–50 μm with a remarkably low cellularity within PNs and PVs and several lines of ductules (3–5 μm filled with single cells or granules (~1 μm in PV. Both sinuses and ductules were linearly aligned along the longitudinal axis of the PVS. Such morphology of the PVS was further confirmed by acridine orange staining. In PN slices, there was a honeycomb-like structure containing the granules with pentagonal lumens (~10 μm. Both PVs and PNs were densely filled with WBCs, RBCs, and putative mast cells (MCs, which were 90.3%, 5.9%, and 3.8% of the cell population, respectively. Granules in putative MCs showed spontaneous vibrating movements. In conclusion, the results show that Hemacolor, a simple and rapid staining system, can reveal the gross morphological features reported previously. Our findings may help to elucidate the structure and function of the PVS in normal and disease states in future studies.

  12. Effect of the measurement size on the robustness of the assessment of the features specific for cylinder liner surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimkovski, Z.; Ohlsson, R.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the cylinder liner surface is of great importance due to its impact on the fuel/oil consumption and emissions of the internal combustion engine. A good liner function depends on the size and distribution of the deep honing grooves and the amount of the cold work material (Blechmantel) left inside the grooves after finishing. A fast evaluation of these features requires optical three-dimensional measurements with a large area and good resolution, but many interferometers used today have limited resolution when measuring larger areas. To find out how the measurement size and resolution would affect the quantification and the variation of the parameters, two objectives, 2.5 × and 10 × , were used for measuring a cylinder liner from a truck engine. The Blechmantel was of special interest as it first comes into contact with piston/rings, detaches as particles and wears the running surfaces. The 2.5 × objective showed more robust assessment than the 10 × one, manifested by a lower coefficient of variation for the parameters describing the features: Blechmantel, groove width and height, groove balance and number of grooves. This means that fewer measurements are required if a 2.5 × objective is used in production and hence the time and cost of the liner would be decreased.

  13. The SBAS Sentinel-1 Surveillance service for automatic and systematic generation of Earth surface displacement within the GEP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Francesco; De Luca, Claudio; Lanari, Riccardo; Manunta, Michele; Zinno, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform (GEP) is an ESA activity of the Earth Observation (EO) ground segment to demonstrate the benefit of new technologies for large scale processing of EO data. GEP aims at providing both on-demand processing services for scientific users of the geohazards community and an integration platform for new EO data analysis processors dedicated to scientists and other expert users. In the Remote Sensing scenario, a crucial role is played by the recently launched Sentinel-1 (S1) constellation that, with its global acquisition policy, has literally flooded the scientific community with a huge amount of data acquired over large part of the Earth on a regular basis (down to 6-days with both Sentinel-1A and 1B passes). Moreover, the S1 data, as part of the European Copernicus program, are openly and freely accessible, thus fostering their use for the development of tools for Earth surface monitoring. In particular, due to their specific SAR Interferometry (InSAR) design, Sentinel-1 satellites can be exploited to build up operational services for the generation of advanced interferometric products that can be very useful within risk management and natural hazard monitoring scenarios. Accordingly, in this work we present the activities carried out for the development, integration, and deployment of the SBAS Sentinel-1 Surveillance service of CNR-IREA within the GEP platform. This service is based on a parallel implementation of the SBAS approach, referred to as P-SBAS, able to effectively run in large distributed computing infrastructures (grid and cloud) and to allow for an efficient computation of large SAR data sequences with advanced DInSAR approaches. In particular, the Surveillance service developed on GEP platform consists on the systematic and automatic processing of Sentinel-1 data on selected Areas of Interest (AoI) to generate updated surface displacement time series via the SBAS-InSAR algorithm. We built up a system that is

  14. Bullying among Jordanian schoolchildren, its effects on school performance, and the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bitar, Zaid B; Al-Omari, Iyad K; Sonbol, Hawazen N; Al-Ahmad, Hazem T; Cunningham, Susan J

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the experience of bullying in a representative sample of Jordanian schoolchildren in Amman, to look at its effect on school attendance and perception of academic performance, and to look at the contribution of general physical and dentofacial features to this phenomenon. This was a cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of sixth-grade students (11-12 years of age) from randomly selected schools was asked to complete questionnaires distributed in the classroom in the presence of the researchers. The final sample size was 920 children (470 girls, 450 boys). The prevalence of bullying was 47% (n = 433); significantly more boys reported being bullied than girls (P bullying reported playing truant from school and disliking school than those who were not bullied. Teeth were the number 1 feature targeted for bullying, followed by strength and weight. The 3 most commonly reported dentofacial features targeted by bullies were spacing between the teeth or missing teeth, shape or color of the teeth, and prominent maxillary anterior teeth. This study demonstrated a high prevalence of bullying in Jordanian schools, with many children experiencing bullying because of their dental or facial appearance. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in analytic model and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, James G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D. R.; Chason, E.; Sethna, James P.; Cooper, B. H.

    1996-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented which provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the specia...

  16. Reconstructing NURBS Surface with Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chunhua

    2006-01-01

    The method of reconstructing NURBS surface with features is proposed in this paper. Features including boundary curves and feature points are recognized from the scanned data. An initial surface is constructed with boundary curves. The desired NURBS is determined by modifying the initial surface to pass through feature points. Lagrange multiplier is used to find the solution. The error analysis is then done. Examples are given to verify the algorithm at last. The method can keep some features fixed and be widely used in CAD modeling.

  17. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Contrasting results on the magnitude of the dynamic component of topography motivate us to analyse the sources of uncertainties affecting long wavelength topography modelling. We obtain a range of mantle density structures from thermo-chemical interpretation of available seismic tomography models...... too large. A truly interdisciplinary approach, combining constraints from the geological record with a multi-methodological interpretation of geophysical observations, is required to tackle the challenging task of linking the surface topography to deep processes....

  18. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in an analytic model and a simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, J.G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D.R. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-2501 (United States); Chason, E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Sethna, J.P.; Cooper, B.H. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-2501 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented that provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the special geometry of {open_quotes}stacked{close_quotes} islands. In these limiting cases, isolated features are predicted to decay in size with a power-law scaling in time: A{proportional_to}(t{sub 0}{minus}t){sup n}, where A is the area of the feature, t{sub 0} is the time at which the feature disappears, and n=2/3 or 1. The constant of proportionality is related to parameters describing both the kinetic and equilibrium properties of the surface. A continuous-time Monte Carlo simulation is used to test the application of this theory to generic surfaces with atomic scale features. A method is described to obtain macroscopic kinetic parameters describing interfaces in such simulations. Simulation and analytic theory are compared directly, using measurements of the simulation to determine the constants of the analytic theory. Agreement between the two is very good over a range of surface parameters, suggesting that the analytic theory properly captures the necessary physics. It is anticipated that the simulation will be useful in modeling complex surface geometries often seen in experiments on physical surfaces, for which application of the analytic model is not straightforward. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in an analytic model and a simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, James G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D. R.; Chason, E.; Sethna, James P.; Cooper, B. H.

    1997-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented that provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the special geometry of ``stacked'' islands. In these limiting cases, isolated features are predicted to decay in size with a power-law scaling in time: A~(t0-t)n, where A is the area of the feature, t0 is the time at which the feature disappears, and n=2/3 or 1. The constant of proportionality is related to parameters describing both the kinetic and equilibrium properties of the surface. A continuous-time Monte Carlo simulation is used to test the application of this theory to generic surfaces with atomic scale features. A method is described to obtain macroscopic kinetic parameters describing interfaces in such simulations. Simulation and analytic theory are compared directly, using measurements of the simulation to determine the constants of the analytic theory. Agreement between the two is very good over a range of surface parameters, suggesting that the analytic theory properly captures the necessary physics. It is anticipated that the simulation will be useful in modeling complex surface geometries often seen in experiments on physical surfaces, for which application of the analytic model is not straightforward.

  20. The TOPOMOD-ITN project: unravel the origin of Earth's topography from modelling deep-surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.

    2012-04-01

    EC-Marie Curie Initial Training Networks (ITN) projects aim to improve the career perspectives of young generations of researchers. Institutions from both academic and industry sectors form a collaborative network to recruit research fellows and provide them with opportunities to undertake research in the context of a joint research training program. In this frame, TOPOMOD - one of the training activities of EPOS, the new-born European Research Infrastructure for Geosciences - is a funded ITN project designed to investigate and model how surface processes interact with crustal tectonics and mantle convection to originate and develop topography of the continents over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The multi-disciplinary approach combines geophysics, geochemistry, tectonics and structural geology with advanced geodynamic numerical/analog modelling. TOPOMOD involves 8 European research teams internationally recognized for their excellence in complementary fields of Earth Sciences (Roma TRE, Utrecht, GFZ, ETH, Cambridge, Durham, Rennes, Barcelona), to which are associated 5 research institutions (CNR-Italy, Univ. Parma, Univ. Lausanne, Univ. Montpellier, Univ. Mainz) , 3 high-technology enterprises (Malvern Instruments, TNO, G.O. Logical Consulting) and 1 large multinational oil and gas company (ENI). This unique network places emphasis in experience-based training increasing the impact and international visibility of European research in modeling. Long-term collaboration and synergy are established among the overmentioned research teams through 15 cross-disciplinary research projects that combine case studies in well-chosen target areas from the Mediterranean, the Middle and Far East, west Africa, and South America, with new developments in structural geology, geomorphology, seismology, geochemistry, InSAR, laboratory and numerical modelling of geological processes from the deep mantle to the surface. These multidisciplinary projects altogether aim to

  1. Rare earth elements in tropical surface water,soil and sediments of the Terengganu River Basin,Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar; Sultan; Noor; Azhar; Shazili

    2009-01-01

    The 14 stable rare earth element(REE) concentrations and distribution patterns were investigated for surface waters(n=51),soils(n=52) and sediments(n=42) from the tropical Terengganu River basin,Malaysia.The chondrite normalized REE patterns of soils developed on four geological units showed enrichment of LREE,a pronounced negative Eu,and depletion of HREE with an enrichment order granite>>metasedimentary>alluvium>volcanic.The REE patterns in sediments reflected the soil REE patterns with an overall order o...

  2. Specific features of heat transfer on the external surface of smoke stacks blown by wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneev, A. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    Results of a full-scale experiment on studying heat transfer on the surface of a reinforced-concrete smoke stack blown by wind at the value of Reynolds number Re = 1.05 × 107 are presented. Comparison of the experimental results with the experimental data obtained previously by other researchers under laboratory conditions at Re cylinder in a transcritical streamlining mode. The data obtained in the present study open the possibility to estimate the average values of heat transfer coefficient on the surface of smoke stacks in a flow of atmospheric air at 4 × 106 < Re < 107.

  3. Computation of fractal features based on the fractal analysis of surface electromyogram to estimate force of contraction of different muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the fractal properties of surface Electromyogram (sEMG) to estimate the force levels of contraction of three muscles with different cross-sectional areas (CSA): m. quadriceps--vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, andm. flexor digitorum superficialis. The fractal features were computed based on the fractal analysis of sEMG, signal recorded while performing sustained muscle contraction at different force levels. A comparison was performed between the fractal features and five other features reported in the literature. Linear regression analysis was carried out to determine the relationship between the force of contraction (20-100%) and features of sEMG. The results from the coefficients of regression r² show that the new fractal feature, maximum fractal length of the signal has highest correlation (range 0.88-0.90) when compared with other features which ranges from 0.34 to 0.74 for the three different muscles. This study suggests that the estimation of various levels of sustained contraction of muscles with varied CSA will provide a better insight into the biomechanics model that involves muscle properties and muscle activation.

  4. Crew Earth Observations: Twelve Years of Documenting Earth from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kimberley; Runco, Susan; Wilkinson, M. Justin; Dawson, Melissa; Trenchard, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload was one of the initial experiments aboard the International Space Station, and has been continuously collecting data about the Earth since Expedition 1. The design of the experiment is simple: using state-of-the-art camera equipment, astronauts collect imagery of the Earth's surface over defined regions of scientific interest and also document dynamic events such as storms systems, floods, wild fires and volcanic eruptions. To date, CEO has provided roughly 600,000 images of Earth, capturing views of features and processes on land, the oceans, and the atmosphere. CEO data are less rigorously constrained than other remote sensing data, but the volume of data, and the unique attributes of the imagery provide a rich and understandable view of the Earth that is difficult to achieve from the classic remote sensing platforms. In addition, the length-of-record of the imagery dataset, especially when combined with astronaut photography from other NASA and Russian missions starting in the early 1960s, provides a valuable record of changes on the surface of the Earth over 50 years. This time period coincides with the rapid growth of human settlements and human infrastructure.

  5. An analysis of the moon's surface using reflected illumination from the earth during a waning crescent lunar phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Linton-Petza, Maggie

    1989-01-01

    There have been many articles written concerning the lunar after-glow, the spectacular reflection from the moon's surface, and the possible observation of luminescence on the dark side of the moon. The researcher, using a 600 mm cassegrain telescope lense and Kodak 400 ASA T-Max film, photographed the crescent moon whose dark side was clearly visible by the reflected light from earth. The film was digitized to a Perkin-Elmer 1010M microdensitometer for enhancement and enlargement. The resulting pictures indicate a completely different land pattern formation than observed during a full moon. An attempt is made to analyze the observed structures and to compare them to the pictures observed during the normal full moon. There are boundaries on the digitized dark section of the moon that can be identified with structures seen during the normal full moon. But, these variations do change considerably under enhancement.

  6. Generalized potentiometric-surface map of the High Plains aquifer in Wyoming, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles; Pettijohn, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A potentiometric-surface map shows the general configuration of the water surface for the High Plains Aquifer, which is composed of Oligocene age and younger rocks in southeastern Wyoming. The potentiometric contours are shown at 100-foot intervals on a map at a scale of 1:250,000. The High Plains Aquifer in Wyoming underlies an area of 8,190 square miles and geologically consists of the White River Formation of Oligocene age, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age, the Ogallala Formation of late Miocene age, and alluvial deposits of Quaternary age. The altitude of the potentiometric surface declines from about 7 ,100 feet in southwestern Laramie County to about 4,100 feet in eastern Goshen County. Typically, the slope is between 20 and 30 feet per mile; the general direction of flow is eastward. (USGS)

  7. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  8. Bones of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Correa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The film Bones of the Earth (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014 is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective creation is built. A sense of community, on-going inquiry, connections and social commitment inform the creative process. As a result, the video’s nearly five intense minutes are a metaphor for the search for personal meaning, connection with nature and intersubjective positioning in a world that undergoes constant change.

  9. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  10. WAVE TECTONICS OF THE EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Yu. Tveretinova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Earth's lithosphere, wavy alternation of positive and negative heterochronous structures is revealed; such structures are variable in ranks and separated by vergence zones of fractures and folds. In the vertical profile of the lithosphere, alternating are layers characterized by relatively plastic or fragile rheological properties and distinguished by different states of stress. During the Earth’s evolution, epochs of compression and extension are cyclically repeated, including planetary-scale phenomena which are manifested by fluctuating changes of the planet’s volume. Migration of geological and geophysical (geodynamic processes takes place at the Earth's surface and in its interior. The concept of the wave structure and evolution of the Earth's lithosphere provides explanations to the abovementioned regularities. Wavy nature of tectonic structures of the lithosphere, the cyclic recurrence of migration and geological processes in space and time can be described in terms of the multiple-order wave geodynamics of the Earth's lithosphere that refers to periodical variations of the state of stress. Effects of structure-forming tectonic forces are determined by «interference» of tangential and radial stresses of the Earth. The tangential stresses, which occur primarily due to the rotational regime of the planet, cause transformations of the Earth’s shape, redistributions of its substance in depths, the westward drift of the rock mass in its upper levels, and changes of structural deformation plans. The radial stresses, which are largely impacted by gravity, determine the gravitational differentiation of the substance, vertical flattening and sub-horizontal flow of the rock masses, and associated fold-rupture deformation. Under the uniform momentum geodynamic concept proposed by [Vikulin, Tveritinova, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008], it is possible to provide consistent descriptions of seismic and volcanic, tectonic and geological processes

  11. Generalized formula for the surface stiffness of fluid-saturated porous media containing parallel pore channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, P.B.; Nayfeh, A.H. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    1995-09-25

    The surface stiffness of a fluid-saturated porous solid is defined as the ratio between a small change in capillary pressure and the average displacement of the boundary due to the resulting rise or fall of the fluid level in the pore channels. When the surface pores are structurally open, the surface stiffness is entirely due to the stiffness of the microscopic fluid membranes extended by capillary forces over the surface pores. Due to interfacial tension between the immiscible wetting fluid in the pores and nonwetting fluid (air) above the surface, essentially closed-pore boundary conditions can prevail at the interface. It has recently been shown that the surface stiffness of a porous material containing cylindrical pores can be calculated simply as the surface tension of the saturating fluid divided by the static permeability of the porous solid [P. B. Nagy, Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 60}, 2735 (1992)]. In this letter, we show that the same simple relationship can be generalized for the surface stiffness of fluid-saturated porous media containing parallel prismatic pore channels of any number, size, or shape. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Radar Observations and the Shape of Near-Earth Asteroid 2008 EV5

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Michael W; Benner, Lance A M; Brozovic, Marina; Giorgini, Jon D; Jao, Joseph S; Scheeres, Daniel J; Magri, Christopher; Nolan, Michael C; Howell, Ellen S; Taylor, Patrick A; Margot, Jean-Luc; Brisken, Walter

    2011-01-01

    We observed the near-Earth asteroid 2008 EV5 with the Arecibo and Goldstone planetary radars and the Very Long Baseline Array during December 2008. EV5 rotates retrograde and its overall shape is a 400 /pm 50 m oblate spheroid. The most prominent surface feature is a ridge parallel to the asteroid's equator that is broken by a concavity 150 m in diameter. Otherwise the asteroid's surface is notably smooth on decameter scales. EV5's radar and optical albedos are consistent with either rocky or stony-iron composition. The equatorial ridge is similar to structure seen on the rubble-pile near-Earth asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4 and is consistent with YORP spin-up reconfiguring the asteroid in the past. We interpret the concavity as an impact crater. Shaking during the impact and later regolith redistribution may have erased smaller features, explaining the general lack of decameter-scale surface structure.

  13. Symmetry plays a key role in the erasing of patterned surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, UMR CNRS Gulliver 7083, ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, 75005 Paris (France); Ilton, Mark; Massa, Michael V.; Fowler, Paul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Dalnoki-Veress, Kari, E-mail: dalnoki@mcmaster.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, UMR CNRS Gulliver 7083, ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-08-03

    We report on how the relaxation of patterns prepared on a thin film can be controlled by manipulating the symmetry of the initial shape. The validity of a lubrication theory for the capillary-driven relaxation of surface profiles is verified by atomic force microscopy measurements, performed on films that were patterned using focused laser spike annealing. In particular, we observe that the shape of the surface profile at late times is entirely determined by the initial symmetry of the perturbation, in agreement with the theory. The results have relevance in the dynamical control of topographic perturbations for nanolithography and high density memory storage.

  14. Ultrasonic Nanocoining of Sub-micrometer Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, William John, Jr.

    The goal of this work is to develop a machining process to rapidly generate large areas of sub-micrometer surface features in industrially-feasible amounts of time. These surface features, inspired by designs found in nature, can be sized to produce desired behavior including anti-reflective (AR), superhydrophobic, or syperhydrophilic properties. Current methods of producing these features produce high-fidelity replications, but often require several steps to complete and are not economically feasible in a mass-production setting. This process uses a diamond die containing thousands of subwavelength features mounted to a high speed actuator on the axis of a diamond turning machine. The die is pressed into the workpiece with an elliptical path that matches the surface speed of the moving workpiece and minimizes distortion caused by mismatches in velocity. These die indents are tiled together to create large areas of uniform features, which can then be easily transferred to pliable coatings. Because the die is small (20x20 im), the indentations must occur rapidly (40 kHz) to make nanocoining an industrially feasible process. To produce the ultrasonic 2-D motion for indenting, an actuator was designed that resonates in two orthogonal directions at the same frequency. Analytical solutions were first used to determine the approximate geometry to achieve the desired resonant behavior. Finite element analysis (FEA) is then employed to fine-tune the geometry of the device to meet amplitude requirements. Prototypes were constructed and measured to demonstrate the utility of the proposed design method. A controller is designed and implemented to automatically track the resonant frequency and maintain the desired actuator behavior to ensure the indents are formed uniformly over large areas despite piezoelectric self-heating effects and other environmental affects that impact device resonance. Other control strategies that are required for maintaining uniform spacing of

  15. Excitation of surface waves on the interfaces of general bi-isotropic media

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Seulong

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the characteristics of surface waves excited at the interface between a metal and a general bi-isotropic medium, which includes isotropic chiral media and Tellegen media as special cases. We derive an analytical dispersion relation for surface waves, using which we calculate the effective index and the propagation length numerically. We also calculate the absorptance, the cross-polarized reflectance and the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic fields for plane waves incident on a bilayer system consisting of a metal layer and a bi-isotropic layer in the Kretschmann configuration, using the invariant imbedding method. The results obtained using the invariant imbedding method agree with those obtained from the dispersion relation perfectly. In the case of chiral media, the effective index is an increasing function of the chirality index, whereas in Tellegen media, it is a decreasing function of the Tellegen parameter. The propagation length for surface waves in both cases increase ...

  16. The General Assessment of Personality Disorder (GAPD) as an Instrument for Assessing the Core Features of Personality Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, H.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Verheul, R.; Larstone, R.; Livesley, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a psychometric evaluation of the General Assessment of Personality Disorder (GAPD), a self-report questionnaire for assessing the core components of personality dysfunction on the basis of Livesley's (2003) adaptive failure model. Analysis of samples from a general (n = 196) and

  17. Computation and Evaluation of Features of Surface Electromyogram to Identify the Force of Muscle Contraction and Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5, median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS, and increase in synchronization (IIS index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P0.05.

  18. General fusion approaches for the age determination of latent fingerprint traces: results for 2D and 3D binary pixel feature fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-03-01

    Determining the age of latent fingerprint traces found at crime scenes is an unresolved research issue since decades. Solving this issue could provide criminal investigators with the specific time a fingerprint trace was left on a surface, and therefore would enable them to link potential suspects to the time a crime took place as well as to reconstruct the sequence of events or eliminate irrelevant fingerprints to ensure privacy constraints. Transferring imaging techniques from different application areas, such as 3D image acquisition, surface measurement and chemical analysis to the domain of lifting latent biometric fingerprint traces is an upcoming trend in forensics. Such non-destructive sensor devices might help to solve the challenge of determining the age of a latent fingerprint trace, since it provides the opportunity to create time series and process them using pattern recognition techniques and statistical methods on digitized 2D, 3D and chemical data, rather than classical, contact-based capturing techniques, which alter the fingerprint trace and therefore make continuous scans impossible. In prior work, we have suggested to use a feature called binary pixel, which is a novel approach in the working field of fingerprint age determination. The feature uses a Chromatic White Light (CWL) image sensor to continuously scan a fingerprint trace over time and retrieves a characteristic logarithmic aging tendency for 2D-intensity as well as 3D-topographic images from the sensor. In this paper, we propose to combine such two characteristic aging features with other 2D and 3D features from the domains of surface measurement, microscopy, photography and spectroscopy, to achieve an increase in accuracy and reliability of a potential future age determination scheme. Discussing the feasibility of such variety of sensor devices and possible aging features, we propose a general fusion approach, which might combine promising features to a joint age determination scheme

  19. Colors of a Second Earth: Estimating the fractional areas of ocean, land, and vegetation of Earth-like exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Y; Suto, Y; Taruya, A; Fukuda, S; Nakajima, T; Turner, E L

    2009-01-01

    Characterizing the surfaces of rocky exoplanets via the scattered light will be an essential challenge to investigate the existence of life on habitable exoplanets. We present a simple reconstruction method for fractional areas of different surface types from photometric variations, or colors, of a second Earth. We create mock light curves for Earth without clouds using empirical data. Then these light curves are fitted to the isotropic scattering model consisting of 4 surface types: ocean, soil, snow and vegetation. In an idealized situation where the photometric errors are only photon shot noise, we are able to reproduce the fractional areas of those components fairly well. We may be even able to detect a signature of vegetation from the distinct feature of photosynthesis on the Earth, known as the red edge. In our reconstruction method, Rayleigh scattering due to the atmosphere has an important effect, and for terrestrial exoplanets with atmosphere similar to our Earth, it is possible to estimate the prese...

  20. Surface Textures and Features Indicative of Endogenous Growth at the McCartys Flow Field, NM, as an Analog to Martian Volcanic Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Self, S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes, which are recognized on the Earth and Mars. Although largely unrecognized in the planetary community, terrestrial inflated sheet flows also display morphologies that share many commonalities with lava plains on Mars. The McCartys lava flow field is among the youngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic flows in the continental United States. The southwest sections of the flow displays smooth, flat-topped plateaus with irregularly shaped pits and hummocky inter-plateau units that form a polygonal surface. Plateaus are typically elongate in map view, up to 20 m high and display lineations within the glassy crust. Lineated surfaces occasionally display small < 1m diameter lava coils. Lineations are generally straight and parallel each other, sometimes for over 100 meters. The boundaries between plateaus and depressions are also lineated and tilted to angles sometimes approaching vertical. Plateau-parallel cracks, sometimes containing squeeze-ups, mark the boundary between tilted crust and plateau. Some plateau depressions display level floors with hummocky surfaces, while some are bowl shaped with floors covered in broken lava slabs. The lower walls of pits sometimes display lateral, sagged lava wedges. Infrequently, pit floors display the upper portion of a tumulus from an older flow. In some places the surface crust has been disrupted forming a slabby texture. Slabs are typically on the scale of a meter or less across and no less than 7-10 cm thick. The slabs preserve the lineated textures of the undisturbed plateau crust. It appears that this style of terrain represents the emplacement of an extensive sheet that experiences inflation episodes within preferred regions where lateral spreading of the sheet is inhibited, thereby forming plateaus. Rough surfaces represent inflation-related disruption of pahoehoe lava and not a a lava. Depressions are often the result of non-inflation and can be clearly identified by lateral

  1. A framework for high-resolution global forecasts of the impacts of climatic and land use changes on Earth surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J. D.; Russell, J. L.; McGuire, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth System Modeling (ESM) community has been very effective at forecasting primary climatic and land-use change forcing variables, but "downstream" scientific communities (principally hydrologists, ecologists, and geomorphologists) have arguably been less effective at translating available ESM-derived forecasts into assessments of the changes that are likely to occur in the rates of Earth surface processes and the probabilities of Earth surface hazards including floods, debris flows, soil erosion, and dust storms. In this talk I propose a framework for forecasting changes in surface process rates and natural hazard probabilities. This framework uses global, gridded reanalysis data (1980-present) for primary climatic and land use change forcing variables (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture, land cover, and wind speed) to calibrate and validate geomorphic models that are applied globally within a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. Ensemble ESM forecasts (from the present to 2100) of primary climatic and land use change forcing variables are then used to forecast changes in the rates of geomorphic processes and hazard probabilities. We demonstrate this framework using wind erosion and dust storms as examples. However, the framework is general and is designed for application to a wide variety of geomorphic processes and hazards. We address the challenges with this approach, such as downscaling reanalysis and ESM model output to the scales necessary to resolve the spatial and temporal variations in the driving and resisting forces necessary for accurate forecasts. We also address the variability among forecasts obtained using different ESM model forecasts. The results highlight the nonlinear, threshold nature of many geomorphic processes and hazards and the resulting sensitivity of forecasts to differences in ESM forecasts of the primary climatic and land use change variables.

  2. The deep Earth origin of the Iceland plume and its effects on regional surface uplift and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hassan, Rakib; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, Dietmar

    2017-02-01

    The present-day seismic structure of the mantle under the North Atlantic Ocean indicates that the Iceland hotspot represents the surface expression of a deep mantle plume, which is thought to have erupted in the North Atlantic domain during the Palaeocene. The spatial and temporal evolution of the plume since its eruption is still highly debated, and little is known about its deep mantle history. Here, we use palaeogeographically constrained global mantle flow models to investigate the evolution of deep Earth flow beneath the North Atlantic since the Jurassic. The models show that over the last ˜ 100 Myr a remarkably stable pattern of convergent flow has prevailed in the lowermost mantle near the tip of the African Large Low-Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP), making it an ideal plume nucleation site. We extract model dynamic topography representative of a plume beneath the North Atlantic region since eruption at ˜ 60 Ma to present day and compare its evolution to available offshore geological and geophysical observations across the region. This comparison confirms that a widespread episode of Palaeocene transient uplift followed by early Eocene anomalous subsidence can be explained by the mantle-driven effects of a plume head ˜ 2500 km in diameter, arriving beneath central eastern Greenland during the Palaeocene. The location of the model plume eruption beneath eastern Greenland is compatible with several previous models. The predicted dynamic topography is within a few hundred metres of Palaeocene anomalous subsidence derived from well data. This is to be expected given the current limitations involved in modelling the evolution of Earth's mantle flow in 3-D, particularly its interactions with the base of a heterogeneous lithosphere as well as short-wavelength advective upper mantle flow, not captured in the presented global models.

  3. The role of land surface dynamics in glacial inception: a study with the UVic Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, K.J.; Weaver, A.J.; Matthews, H.D. [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria (Canada); Cox, P.M. [Hadley Centre, Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    The first results of the UVic Earth System Model coupled to a land surface scheme and a dynamic global vegetation model are presented in this study. In the first part the present day climate simulation is discussed and compared to observations. We then compare a simulation of an ice age inception (forced with 116 ka BP orbital parameters and an atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration of 240 ppm) with a preindustrial run (present day orbital parameters, atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] = 280 ppm). Emphasis is placed on the vegetation's response to the combined changes in solar radiation and atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. A southward shift of the northern treeline as well as a global decrease in vegetation carbon is observed in the ice age inception run. In tropical regions, up to 88% of broadleaf trees are replaced by shrubs and C{sub 4} grasses. These changes in vegetation cover have a remarkable effect on the global climate: land related feedbacks double the atmospheric cooling during the ice age inception as well as the reduction of the meridional overturning in the North Atlantic. The introduction of vegetation related feedbacks also increases the surface area with perennial snow significantly. (orig.)

  4. On the genesis of the Earth's magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul H; King, Eric M

    2013-09-01

    Few areas of geophysics are today progressing as rapidly as basic geomagnetism, which seeks to understand the origin of the Earth's magnetism. Data about the present geomagnetic field pours in from orbiting satellites, and supplements the ever growing body of information about the field in the remote past, derived from the magnetism of rocks. The first of the three parts of this review summarizes the available geomagnetic data and makes significant inferences about the large scale structure of the geomagnetic field at the surface of the Earth's electrically conducting fluid core, within which the field originates. In it, we recognize the first major obstacle to progress: because of the Earth's mantle, only the broad, slowly varying features of the magnetic field within the core can be directly observed. The second (and main) part of the review commences with the geodynamo hypothesis: the geomagnetic field is induced by core flow as a self-excited dynamo. Its electrodynamics define 'kinematic dynamo theory'. Key processes involving the motion of magnetic field lines, their diffusion through the conducting fluid, and their reconnection are described in detail. Four kinematic models are presented that are basic to a later section on successful dynamo experiments. The fluid dynamics of the core is considered next, the fluid being driven into motion by buoyancy created by the cooling of the Earth from its primordial state. The resulting flow is strongly affected by the rotation of the Earth and by the Lorentz force, which alters fluid motion by the interaction of the electric current and magnetic field. A section on 'magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo theory' is devoted to this rotating magnetoconvection. Theoretical treatment of the MHD responsible for geomagnetism culminates with numerical solutions of its governing equations. These simulations help overcome the first major obstacle to progress, but quickly meet the second: the dynamics of Earth's core are too complex

  5. Features of surface enhanced Raman scattering in the systems with «hot spots»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovyeva E.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we demonstrate the features of SERS on the substrates with «hot spots» on the example of system «diaminostilbene - colloidal silver». We found that «hot spots» forming on aggregated nanoparticles exist on the metal substrates only at low concentration of ligand. This effect caused by the gradual filling of first monolayer by adsorbate molecules. Significantly higher enhancement factor is obtained for substrates with «hot spots», for which the participation of resonance processes in the formation of SERS signal is revealed also.

  6. Features of surface enhanced Raman scattering in the systems with «hot spots»

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, E. V.; Khazieva, D. A.; Denisova, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate the features of SERS on the substrates with «hot spots» on the example of system «diaminostilbene - colloidal silver». We found that «hot spots» forming on aggregated nanoparticles exist on the metal substrates only at low concentration of ligand. This effect caused by the gradual filling of first monolayer by adsorbate molecules. Significantly higher enhancement factor is obtained for substrates with «hot spots», for which the participation of resonance processes in the formation of SERS signal is revealed also.

  7. Use of the discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum with feature-level post-processing for surface electromyographic signal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinpu; Zhu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Dingguo

    2009-12-01

    Myoelectrical pattern classification is a crucial part in multi-functional prosthesis control. This paper investigates a discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum (DFC) and feature-level post-processing (FLPP) to discriminate hand and wrist motions using the surface electromyographic signal. The Fourier-derived cepstrum takes advantage of the Fourier magnitude or sub-band power energy of signals directly and provides flexible use of spectral information changing with different motions. Appropriate cepstral coefficients are selected by a proposed separability criterion to construct DFC features. For the post-processing, FLPP which combines features from several analysis windows is used to improve the feature performance further. In this work, two classifiers (a linear discriminant classifier and quadratic discriminant classifier) without hyper-parameter optimization are employed to simplify the training procedure and avoid the possible bias of feature evaluation. Experimental results of the 11-motion problem show that the proposed DFC feature outperforms traditional features such as time-domain statistics and autoregressive-derived cepstrum in terms of the classification accuracy, and it is a promising method for the multi-functionality and high-accuracy control of myoelectric prostheses.

  8. A model of the general ocean circulation determined from a joint solution for the Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; Tapley, B. D.; Shum, C. K.; Yuan, D. N.

    1989-01-01

    If the geoid and the satellite position are known accurately, satellite altimetry can be used to determine the geostrophic velocity of the surface ocean currents. The purpose of this investigation is to simultaneously estimate the sea surface topography, zeta, the model for the gravity field, and the satellite orbit. Satellite tracking data from fourteen satellites were used; along with Seasat and Geosat altimeter data as well as surface gravity data for the solution. The estimated model of zeta compares well at long wavelengths with the hydrographic model of zeta. Covariance studies show that the geoid is separable from zeta up to degree 9, at which point geoid error becomes comparable to the signal of zeta.

  9. The Benefit of Surface Uniformity for Encoding Boundary Features in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jung-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Using a change detection paradigm, the present study examined an object-based encoding benefit in visual working memory (VWM) for two boundary features (two orientations in Experiments 1-2 and two shapes in Experiments 3-4) assigned to a single object. Participants remembered more boundary features when they were conjoined into a single object of…

  10. Surface Characteristics of Rare Earth Treated Carbon Fibers and Interfacial Properties of Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhiwei; Huang Yudong; Song Yuanjun; Zhang Chunhua; Liu Li

    2007-01-01

    Effect of rare earth treatment on surface physicochemical properties of carbon fibers and interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites was investigated, and the interfacial adhesion mechanism of treated carbon fiber/epoxy composite was analyzed. It was found that rare earth treatment led to an increase of fiber surface roughness, improvement of oxygen-containing groups, and introduction of rare earth element on the carbon fiber surface. As a result, coordination linkages between fibers and rare earth, and between rare earth and resin matrix were formed separately, thereby the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of composites increased, which indicated the improvement of the interfacial adhesion between fibers and matrix resin resulting from the increase of carboxyl and carbonyl.

  11. Image structural analysis in the tasks of automatic navigation of unmanned vehicles and inspection of Earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsiv, Vadim; Malyshev, Igor

    2013-10-01

    The automatic analysis of images of terrain is urgent for several decades. On the one hand, such analysis is a base of automatic navigation of unmanned vehicles. On the other hand, the amount of information transferred to the Earth by modern video-sensors increases, thus a preliminary classification of such data by onboard computer becomes urgent. We developed an object-independent approach to structural analysis of images. While creating the methods of image structural description, we did our best to abstract away from the partial peculiarities of scenes. Only the most general limitations were taken into account, that were derived from the laws of organization of observable environment and from the properties of image formation systems. The practical application of this theoretic approach enables reliable matching the aerospace photographs acquired from differing aspect angles, in different day-time and seasons by sensors of differing types. The aerospace photographs can be matched even with the geographic maps. The developed approach enabled solving the tasks of automatic navigation of unmanned vehicles. The signs of changes and catastrophes can be detected by means of matching and comparison of aerospace photographs acquired at different time. We present the theoretical proofs of chosen strategy of structural description and matching of images. Several examples of matching of acquired images with template pictures and maps of terrain are shown within the frameworks of navigation of unmanned vehicles or detection of signs of disasters.

  12. Do Planetary Encounters Reset Surfaces of Near Earth Asteroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Chapman, Clark R; Rafkin, Scot

    2010-01-01

    Processes such as the solar wind sputtering and micrometeorite impacts can modify optical properties of surfaces of airless bodies. This explains why spectra of the main belt asteroids, exposed to these `space weathering' processes over eons, do not match the laboratory spectra of ordinary chondrite (OC) meteorites. In contrast, an important fraction of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), defined as Q-types in the asteroid taxonomy, display spectral attributes that are a good match to OCs. Here we study the possibility that the Q-type NEAs underwent recent encounters with the terrestrial planets and that the tidal gravity (or other effects) during these encounters exposed fresh OC material on the surface (thus giving it the Q-type spectral properties). We used numerical integrations to determine the statistics of encounters of NEAs to planets. The results were used to calculate the fraction and orbital distribution of Q-type asteroids expected in the model as a function of the space weathering timescale, t_sw (see m...

  13. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jöckel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup up to 0.01 hPa was used at spectral T42 resolution to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. With the high vertical resolution the model simulates the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. In the simulations presented here a Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998–2005. This allows an efficient and direct evaluation with satellite and in-situ data. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated well, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of inter-annual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy

  14. Generalization mediates sensitivity to complex odor features in the honeybee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine A Wright

    Full Text Available Animals use odors as signals for mate, kin, and food recognition, a strategy which appears ubiquitous and successful despite the high intrinsic variability of naturally-occurring odor quantities. Stimulus generalization, or the ability to decide that two objects, though readily distinguishable, are similar enough to afford the same consequence, could help animals adjust to variation in odor signals without losing sensitivity to key inter-stimulus differences. The present study was designed to investigate whether an animal's ability to generalize learned associations to novel odors can be influenced by the nature of the associated outcome. We use a classical conditioning paradigm for studying olfactory learning in honeybees to show that honeybees conditioned on either a fixed- or variable-proportion binary odor mixture generalize learned responses to novel proportions of the same mixture even when inter-odor differences are substantial. We also show that the resulting olfactory generalization gradients depend critically on both the nature of the stimulus-reward paradigm and the intrinsic variability of the conditioned stimulus. The reward dependency we observe must be cognitive rather than perceptual in nature, and we argue that outcome-dependent generalization is necessary for maintaining sensitivity to inter-odor differences in complex olfactory scenes.

  15. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  16. Modelling Earth's surface topography: Decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, M.; Cammarano, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Contrasting results on the magnitude of the dynamic component of topography motivate us to analyse the sources of uncertainties affecting long wavelength topography modelling. We obtain a range of mantle density structures from thermo-chemical interpretation of available seismic tomography models. We account for pressure, temperature and compositional effects as inferred by mineral physics to relate seismic velocity with density. Mantle density models are coupled to crustal density distributions obtained with a similar methodology. We compute isostatic topography and associated residual topography maps and perform instantaneous mantle flow modelling to calculate the dynamic topography. We explore the effects of proposed mantle 1-D viscosities and also test a 3D pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity model. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust, with an average correlation coefficient (r) of respectively ∼0.74 and ∼0.71, upper-lower quartile ranges of 0.86-0.65 for residual topography and 0.83-0.62 for dynamic topography maps. The amplitudes are, on the contrary, poorly constrained. For the static component, the inferred density models of lithospheric mantle give an interquartile range of isostatic topography that is always higher than 100 m, reaching 1.7 km in some locations, and averaging ∼720 m. Crustal density models satisfying the same compressional velocity structure lead to variations in isostatic topography averaging 350 m, with peaks of 1 km in thick crustal regions, and always higher than 100 m. The uncertainties on isostatic topography are strong enough to mask, if present, the contribution of mantle convection to surface topography. For the dynamic component, we obtain a peak-to-peak dynamic topography amplitude exceeding 3 km for all our mantle density and viscosity models. These extremely high values would be associated with a magnitude of geoid undulations that is not in agreement with observations

  17. Modeling and Zoning Solar Energy Received at the Earth's Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions of Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam gholamnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Solar radiation (Rs energy received at the Earth's surface is measured usingclimatological variables in horizontal surface and is widely used in various fields. Domination of hot and dry climates especially in the central regions of Iran results from decreasing cloudiness and precipitation and increasing sunshine hours, which shows the high potential of solar energy in Iran. There is a reasonable climatic field and solar radiation in most of regions and seasons which have provided an essential and suitable field to use and extend new and pure energy. Materials and Methods: One of the common methods to estimate the solar energy received by the earthis usingtemperature variables in any place . An empirical model is proposed to estimate the solar energy as a function of other climatic variables (maximum temperature recorded in 50 climatological, conventional stations; this model is helpful inextending the climatological solar-energy estimation in the study area. The mean values of both measured and estimated solar energy wereobjectively mapped to fill the observation gaps and reduce the noise associated with inhomogeneous statistics and estimation errors. This analysis and the solar irradiation estimation method wereapplied to 50 different climatologicalstations in Iran for monthly data during1980–2005. The main aim of this study wasto map and estimate the solar energy received in four provinces of Yazd, Esfahan, Kerman and Khorasan-e-Jonoubi.The data used in this analysis and its processing, as well as the formulation of an empirical model to estimate the climatological incident of solar energy as a function of other climatic variables, which is complemented with an objective mapping to obtain continuous solar-energy maps. Therefore, firstly the Rswasestimated using a valid model for 50 meteorological stations in which the amounts of solar radiation weren't recorded for arid and semi-arid areas in Iran. Then, the appropriate method

  18. Absorption features caused by oscillations of electrons on the surface of a quark star

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R X; Weber, F; Yu, J W; Molodtsova, I V

    2011-01-01

    If quark stars exist, they may be enveloped in thin electron layers (electron seas), which uniformly surround the entire star. These layers will be affected by the magnetic fields of quark stars in such a way that the electron seas would transmit hydromagnetic cyclotron waves, as studied in this paper. Particular attention is devoted to vortex hydrodynamical oscillations of the electron sea. The frequency spectrum of these oscillations is derived in analytic form. If the thermal X-ray spectra of quark stars are modulated by vortex hydrodynamical vibrations, the thermal spectra of compact stars, foremost cental compact objects (CCOs) and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs), could be used to verify the existence of these vibrational modes observationally. The central compact object 1E 1207.4-5209 appears particularly interesting in this context, since its absorption features at 0.7 keV and 1.4 keV can be comfortably explained in the framework of the hydro-cyclotron oscillation model.

  19. The surface velocity feature of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The movement of a glacier can redistribute glacier mass balance and change water and thermal conditions of the glacier.Thus,the glacier can maintain its dynamic balance.Surface velocity of a glacier is a basic feature of glacier movement.With successive monthly observations from 2006 to 2008,we obtained spatial and temporal variations for surface velocity of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain.Dynamic simulation was used to verify the findings.Results show that altitudinal distribution of glacier velocity was influenced by synthetic effects such as glacier thickness,slope,and bedrock morphology.However,seasonal variation was influenced by changing glacier thickness.

  20. Technical report series on global modeling and data assimilation. Volume 1: Documentation of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) General Circulation Model, version 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Takacs, Lawrence L.; Molod, Andrea; Wang, Tina

    1994-01-01

    This technical report documents Version 1 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) General Circulation Model (GCM). The GEOS-1 GCM is being used by NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) to produce multiyear data sets for climate research. This report provides a documentation of the model components used in the GEOS-1 GCM, a complete description of model diagnostics available, and a User's Guide to facilitate GEOS-1 GCM experiments.

  1. The Presenting Feature and Role of General Practitioners and Non-neurosurgeon Physicians in Recognizing Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihasto Suryaningtyas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the presenting features and role of non-neurosurgeon physician in recognizing the signs and symptoms of brain tumours in children. METHOD: Medical records of 31 pediatric brain tumor patients treated in Department of Neurosurgery, Soetomo General Hospital, Airlangga University Faculty of Medicine, Surabaya from August 2005 to September 2006 were reviewed. RESULTS: Thirty five percents f parents went to pediatrician as their first contact physician, 25% to general practitioner, 20% neurologist, 20% to neurosurgeon. Neurosurgeon was the second and third contact physician receiving refferal from non-neurosurgeon physician. The most common symptoms were headache (71%, vomiting (61%, motor weakness (48%, visual disturbance (45%, decrease level of consciousness (45% and seizures (38%, unsteadiness (35%. The most common symptoms that led the parents to find medical help at any time were motor disturbance (48%, vomiting (48%, visual disturbance (45%, unsteadiness (35%, decrease level of consciousness (32%, seizures (32%, headache (32%. All patients had neurological signs at diagnosis; 58% had papilloedema, 48% cranial nerve abnormalities, 35% cerebellar signs, 32% motor disturbance, 29% a reduced level of consciousness, 12% cranial enlargement. Duration of symptoms at admission was 1 months (32%, 2 months (42%, 3-6 months (19%, more than 6 months (7%. A short symptom interval was significantly associated with high grade tumours and patient age 3 years or younger. CONCLUSION: The symptoms and signs are often nonspecific, mimicking more common diseases. Therefore, the possibility of a brain neoplasm should always be considered, it materializes very rarely. Benign neurologic symptoms such as headache, which last for 2 months or more, should indicate the need of additional studies. Our results higlighted the neurologic impairments which might facilitate early recognition of a brain neoplasm. Neurologic problems as the only symptom of brain

  2. Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Modeling for Analysis of Flood Design Features at the Picayune Strand Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6 -1 4 Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Modeling for Analysis of Flood Design Features at the Picayune...impacting the level of flood protection of adjacent landowners. To ensure the current level of flood protection is maintained, a hydrologic model was...Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model was selected for this effort. The GSSHA model simulates fully coupled rainfall distribution, extraction

  3. Theoretical study on the role of surface basicity and Lewis acidity on the etherification of glycerol over alkaline earth metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calatayud, M.; Ruppert, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314003398; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal oxides (MO) are catalytically active in the etherification of glycerol. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been used to examine the reactivity of glycerol with MO surfaces with M=Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba. More specifically, the optimum glycerol adsorption mode and the str

  4. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  5. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  6. Abnormal changes in the density of thermal neutron flux in biocenoses near the earth surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, N V; Smirnov, A N; Kolesnikov, M V; Semenov, D S; Frolov, V A; Lapshin, V B; Syroeshkin, A V

    2007-04-01

    We revealed an increase in the density of thermal neutron flux in forest biocenoses, which was not associated with astrogeophysical events. The maximum spike of this parameter in the biocenosis reached 10,000 n/(sec x m2). Diurnal pattern of the density of thermal neutron flux depended only on the type of biocenosis. The effects of biomodulation of corpuscular radiation for balneology are discussed.

  7. The effect of surface OH-population on the photocatalytic activity of rare earth-doped P25-TiO2 in methylene blue degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, P.; Bueno-López, A.; Verbaas, M.; Almeida, A.R.; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.; Mul, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Commercial TiO2 (P25, from Degussa) was modified with variable amounts of La, Ce, Y, Pr, Sm (generally rare earth (RE)), by thermal treatment of physical mixtures of TiO2 and the nitrates of the various RE. Doping of P25 with RE, combined with calcination at 600 or 800 °C, yields materials with

  8. Towards a Theory of Tropical/Midlatitude Mass Exchange from the Earth's Surface through the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Dana

    1998-01-01

    The main findings of this research project have been the following: (1) there is a significant feedback from the stratosphere on tropospheric dynamics, and (2) a detailed analysis of the interaction between tropical and polar wave breaking in controlling stratospheric mixing. Two papers are were written and are included. The first paper is titled, "A New Perspective on the Dynamical Link Between the Stratosphere and Troposphere." Atmospheric processes of tropospheric origin can perturb the stratosphere, but direct feedback in the opposite direction is usually assumed to be negligible, despite the troposphere's sensitivity to changes in the release of wave activity into the stratosphere. Here, however, we present evidence that such a feedback exists and can be significant. We find that if the wintertime Arctic polar stratospheric vortex is distorted, either by waves propagating upward from the troposphere or by eastward-travelling stratospheric waves, then there is a concomitant redistribution of stratospheric potential vorticity that induces perturbations in key meteorological fields in the upper troposphere. The feedback is large despite the much greater mass of the troposphere: it can account for up to half of the geopotential height anomaly at the tropopause. Although the relative strength of the feedback is partly due to a cancellation between contributions to these anomalies from lower altitudes, our results imply that stratospheric dynamics and its feedback on the troposphere are more significant for climate modelling and data assimilation than was previously assumed. The second article is titled "Diagnosing the Polar Excitation of Subtropical Waves in the Stratosphere". The poleward migration of planetary scale tongues of subtropical air has often been associated with intense polar vortex disturbances in the stratosphere. This question of vortex influence is reexamined from a potential vorticity (PV) perspective. Anomalous geopotential height and wind fields

  9. General aspects of surface alloy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbreiter, Andreas; Engstfeld, Albert K.; Roetter, Ralf T.; Hoster, Harry E.; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Berko, Andras

    2010-07-01

    Surface confined alloys are excellent model systems for studies of structure-property relationships of bimetallic surfaces. They are formed by deposition of a guest metal B onto a substrate A, followed by annealing to a temperature, where place exchange between adatoms and atoms from the underlying surface layer becomes possible and diffusion into the bulk is sufficiently slow. We exemplarily confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy for PtRu/Ru(0001), PdRu/Ru(0001), AuPt/Pt(111), AgPt/Pt(111), and AgPd/Pd(111), surface alloys are obtained for systems where metal B has a negative surface segregation energy within metal A. By exchanging A and B, however, AB surface alloys are most likely overgrown by metal B, which we demonstrate for RuPt/Pt(111) in comparison to PtRu/Ru(0001).

  10. The physics and chemistry of Earth's dynamic surface (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, James W.

    2013-04-01

    Ralph Alger Bagnold became a Fellow of the Royal Society and one of the founders of modern geomorphology despite having no formal academic affiliation, no cadre of students or postdocs under his command, no steady financial support, and no scientific training beyond a second-class honors degree in engineering. What he did have, and used to great effect, were a deep curiosity about natural phenomena, a powerful physical intellect, a talent for clever experimentation, extensive opportunities to observe geomorphic processes at work in the field, and - perhaps most important of all - the time and freedom to focus his energies on significant scientific challenges. A hallmark of Bagnold's work is the artful compromise between the goal of simple, general, physical laws describing natural phenomena, and the practical necessity for observational empiricisms to account for the real-world complexities that cannot be incorporated explicitly into such simple laws. Efforts to find these sorts of artful compromises continue to the present day. Typically, both in Bagnold's work and in present-day geomorphology, one seeks mathematical process laws whose form embodies the "pure physics" of the problem, and whose coefficients subsume the inevitable observational empiricisms. Present-day geomorphologists have an array of new tools that open our eyes to temporal and spatial scales that were invisible to Bagnold and his contemporaries. These observations, in turn, have yielded new surprises and challenges, sometimes confounding our intuition about how geomorphic systems "should" behave. One surprise has been that decadal-scale erosion rates, as reflected in stream sediment loads and reservoir sedimentation rates, often differ from longer-term erosion rates by large multiples. In some agricultural landscapes, modern-day erosion rates greatly exceed the long-term background rate, as one might intuitively expect. In other landscapes, however, contemporary erosion rates can be a small

  11. Surface-treatment of Alkaline Earth Sulfides Based Phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chong-feng; CHU Ben-li; XU Jian; SU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth sulfides based phosphors Ca0.8Sr0.2S∶Eu2+, Tm3+ were covered with a layer of protective coating with alkaline earth fluorides by heating the mixture of phosphor and NH4HF2 at elevated temperatures. The coatings were characterized by means of XRD and SEM. The optical properties of the coated phosphors and the influences of the coating on their properties have been discussed extensively. The stabilities of the coated and uncoated phosphors have been compared.

  12. Comparison between Duncan and Chang’s EB Model and the Generalized Plasticity Model in the Analysis of a High Earth-Rockfill Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear elastic model and elastoplastic model are two main kinds of constitutive models of soil, which are widely used in the numerical analyses of soil structure. In this study, Duncan and Chang's EB model and the generalized plasticity model proposed by Pastor, Zienkiewicz, and Chan was discussed and applied to describe the stress-strain relationship of rockfill materials. The two models were validated using the results of triaxial shear tests under different confining pressures. The comparisons between the fittings of models and test data showed that the modified generalized plasticity model is capable of simulating the mechanical behaviours of rockfill materials. The modified generalized plasticity model was implemented into a finite element code to carry out static analyses of a high earth-rockfill dam in China. Nonlinear elastic analyses were also performed with Duncan and Chang's EB model in the same program framework. The comparisons of FEM results and in situ monitoring data showed that the modified PZ-III model can give a better description of deformation of the earth-rockfill dam than Duncan and Chang’s EB model.

  13. The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features is investigated by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd: YAG laser at various fluences ranging from 7 to 28 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6, 8 and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis that both plasma parameters, i.e., excitation temperature and electron number density initially increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. With further increase in laser fluence, a decreasing trend followed by saturation is observed which is attributable to shielding effect and self-regulating regime. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the significant enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Mg plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 8335 K and 2.4 × 1016 cm-3, respectively, whereas these values are enhanced to 12,200 K and 4 × 1016 cm-3 in the presence of the blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Mg plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning electron microscope analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser-ablated Mg. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of the blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters

  14. Analysis of EEG features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-hua WEI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, EEG and head MRI features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis, and to investigate the role of EEG in determining the relapse or fluctuation of this disease, characteristics of EEG corresponding to head MRI, and EEG features in different clinical stages. Methods A total of 23 patients with neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis were divided into ascent, climax, descent and recovery stage according to their clinical course. The relation between EEG background activity, distribution of slow wave, epileptiform discharge, extreme delta brush (EDB and relapse or fluctuation of the disease was analyzed. The relation between EEG features and head MRI abnormalities, and also EEG features in different stages were analyzed. Results There were 19 anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis patients, 3 anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody associated encephalitis and one anti-γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GABABR antibody associated encephalitis. The frequencies of clinical presentations were psychological or cognitive dysfunction, epileptic seizure, conscious disturbance, speech dysfunction and movement disorder in descending order. Within 30.50 d from onset, 6 patients demonstrated slow wave background, of whom 2 relapsed or fluctuated; 5 patients had α rhythm background and none of them relapsed or fluctuated. In patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, the difference in first hospital stay (Z = -0.785, P = 0.433 and relapse or fluctuation (Fisher's exact probability: P = 0.155 between EDB group and non-EDB group was not significant. There was no apparent correlation between EEG background activities and head MRI abnormalities in different stages. In ascent and climax stage, EEG background activities were predominantly slow wave, and the distribution of slow wave was relatively broader. EEG background changed to α rhythm from descent stage

  15. Possibility for a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong

    1982-10-01

    In this work, the effect of Earth's gravitational field on a interferometer is calculated in general relativity. The result is that an expected fringe shift, about 10/sup -10/, will occur when the interferometer is rotated through 90/sup 0/ if the length of arms are 1 meter and wavelength of light is 1 ..mu..m.

  16. Surface charge features of kaolinite particles and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal

    Kaolinite is both a blessing and a curse. As an important industrial mineral commodity, kaolinite clays are extensively used in the paper, ceramic, paint, plastic and rubber industries. In all these applications the wettability, aggregation, dispersion, flotation and thickening of kaolinite particles are affected by its crystal structure and surface properties. It is therefore the objective of this research to investigate selected physical and surface chemical properties of kaolinite, specifically the surface charge of kaolinite particles. A pool of advanced analytical techniques such as XRD, XRF, SEM, AFM, FTIR and ISS were utilized to investigate the morphological and surface chemistry features of kaolinite. Surface force measurements revealed that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH8. Based on electrophoresis measurements, the apparent iso-electric point for kaolinite particles was determined to be less than pH 3. In contrast, the point of zero charge was determined to be pH 4.5 by titration techniques, which corresponds to the iso-electric point of between pH 4 and 5 as determined by surface force measurements. Results from kaolinite particle interactions indicate that the silica face--alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low and intermediate pH values, which explains the maximum shear yield stress at pH 5-5.5. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal lattice structure of these two face surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant, whereas the alumina face showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround another hydroxyl in the center of the ring. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of kaolinite has indicated that kaolinite is indeed composed of silica/alumina bilayers

  17. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  18. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  19. Study on corrosion resistance of the BTESPT silane cooperating with rare earth cerium on the surface of aluminum-tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖围; 满瑞林; 缪畅; 彭天兰

    2010-01-01

    Bis-3-(triethoxysilyl)propyltetrasulfide(BTESPT) silane-rare earth cerium composite coatings on aluminum-tube were prepared at 60 °C by immersion method.The performance of composite coatings to protect the aluminum-tube against corrosion was investigated with potentiodynamic polarization curves,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS),and salt spray test(SST).The results of potentiodynamic polarization curves and EIS indicated that the self-corrosion current decreased by two orders of magnitude and the i...

  20. C-band RISAT-1 imagery for geospatial mapping of cryospheric surface features in the Antarctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawak, Shridhar D.; Panditrao, Satej N.; Luis, Alvarinho J.

    2016-05-01

    Cryospheric surface feature classification is one of the widely used applications in the field of polar remote sensing. Precise surface feature maps derived from remotely sensed imageries are the major requirement for many geoscientific applications in polar regions. The present study explores the capabilities of C-band dual polarimetric (HH & HV) SAR imagery from Indian Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) for land cryospheric surface feature mapping. The study areas selected for the present task were Larsemann Hills and Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica. RISAT-1 Fine Resolution STRIPMAP (FRS-1) mode data with 3-m spatial resolution was used in the present research attempt. In order to provide additional context to the amount of information in dual polarized RISAT-1 SAR data, a band HH+HV was introduced to make use of the original two polarizations. In addition to the data calibration, transformed divergence (TD) procedure was performed for class separability analysis to evaluate the quality of the statistics before image classification. For most of the class pairs the TD values were comparable, which indicated that the classes have good separability. Fuzzy and Artificial Neural Network classifiers were implemented and accuracy was checked. Nonparametric classifier Support Vector Machine (SVM) was also used to classify RISAT-1 data with an optimized polarization combination into three land-cover classes consisting of sea ice/snow/ice, rocks/landmass, and lakes/waterbodies. This study demonstrates that C-band FRS1 image mode data from the RISAT-1 mission can be exploited to identify, map and monitor land cover features in the polar regions, even during dark winter period. For better landcover classification and analysis, hybrid polarimetric data (cFRS-1 mode) from RISAT-1, which incorporates phase information, unlike the dual-pol linear (HH, HV) can be used for obtaining better polarization signatures.

  1. Surface Lander Missions to Mars: Support via Analysis of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F.C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the near-surface martian wind environment as calculated with a set of numerical simulations carried out with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Mars GCM). These wind environments are intended to offer future spacecraft missions to the martian surface a data base from which to choose those locations which meet the mission's criteria for minimal near surface winds to enable a successful landing. We also became involved in the development and testing of the wind sensor which is currently onboard the Mars-bound Pathfinder lander. We began this effort with a comparison of Mars GCM produced winds with those measured by the Viking landers during their descent through the martian atmosphere and their surface wind measurements during the 3+ martian year lifetime of the mission. Unexpected technical difficulties in implementing the sophisticated Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme of Haberle et al. (1993) within the Mars GCM precluded our carrying out this investigation with the desired improvement to the model's treatment of the PBL. Thus, our results from this effort are not as conclusive as we had anticipated. As it turns out, similar difficulties have been experienced by other Mars modelling groups in attempting to implement very similar PBL routines into their GCMs (Mars General Circulation Model Intercomparison Workshop, held at Oxford University, United Kingdom, July 22-24, 1996; organized by J. Murphy, J. Hollingsworth, M. Joshi). These problems, which arise due to the nature of the time stepping in each of the models, are near to being resolved at the present. The model discussions which follow herein are based upon results using the existing, less sophisticated PBL routine. We fully anticipate implementing the tools we have developed in the present effort to investigate GCM results with the new PBL scheme implemented, and thereafter producing the technical document detailing results from the analysis tools developed during this

  2. Computer Graphics Meets Image Fusion: the Power of Texture Baking to Simultaneously Visualise 3d Surface Features and Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    Since a few years, structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo pipelines have become omnipresent in the cultural heritage domain. The fact that such Image-Based Modelling (IBM) approaches are capable of providing a photo-realistic texture along the threedimensional (3D) digital surface geometry is often considered a unique selling point, certainly for those cases that aim for a visually pleasing result. However, this texture can very often also obscure the underlying geometrical details of the surface, making it very hard to assess the morphological features of the digitised artefact or scene. Instead of constantly switching between the textured and untextured version of the 3D surface model, this paper presents a new method to generate a morphology-enhanced colour texture for the 3D polymesh. The presented approach tries to overcome this switching between objects visualisations by fusing the original colour texture data with a specific depiction of the surface normals. Whether applied to the original 3D surface model or a lowresolution derivative, this newly generated texture does not solely convey the colours in a proper way but also enhances the smalland large-scale spatial and morphological features that are hard or impossible to perceive in the original textured model. In addition, the technique is very useful for low-end 3D viewers, since no additional memory and computing capacity are needed to convey relief details properly. Apart from simple visualisation purposes, the textured 3D models are now also better suited for on-surface interpretative mapping and the generation of line drawings.

  3. First-principles modeling of geomagnetically induced electromagnetic fields and currents from upstream solar wind to the surface of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pulkkinen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our capability to model the near-space physical phenomena has gradually reached a level enabling module-based first-principles modeling of geomagnetically induced electromagnetic fields and currents from upstream solar wind to the surface of the Earth. As geomagnetically induced currents (GIC pose a real threat to the normal operation of long conductor systems on the ground, such as high-voltage power transmission systems, it is quite obvious that success in accurate predictive modeling of the phenomenon would open entirely new windows for operational space weather products.

    Here we introduce a process for obtaining geomagnetically induced electromagnetic fields and currents from the output of global magnetospheric MHD codes. We also present metrics that take into account both the complex nature of the signal and possible forecasting applications of the modeling process. The modeling process and the metrics are presented with the help of an actual example space weather event of 24–29 October 2003. Analysis of the event demonstrates that, despite some significant shortcomings, some central features of the overall ionospheric current fluctuations associated with GIC can be captured by the modeling process. More specifically, the basic spatiotemporal morphology of the modeled and "measured" GIC is quite similar. Furthermore, the presented user-relevant utility metrics demonstrate that MHD-based modeling can outperform simple GIC persistence models.

  4. The Characteristic States of the Magnetotelluric Impedance Tensor: Construction, Analytic Properties and Utility in the Analysis of General Earth Conductivity Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Tzanis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the Magnetotelluric (MT) impedance tensor admits an anti-symmetric generalized eigenvalue - eigenstate decomposition consistent with the anti-symmetry of electric and magnetic fields referred to the same coordinate frame: this is achieved by anti-diagonalization through rotation by 2x2 complex operators of the SU(2) rotation group. The eigenstates comprise simple proportional relationships between linearly polarized eigenvalues of the input magnetic and output electric field along the locally resistive and conductive propagation path into the Earth, respectively mediated by the maximum and minimum characteristic values of the tensor (eigen-impedances). It is shown from first principles that the eigen-impedances are expected to be positive real (passive) functions, analytic in the entire lower-half complex frequency plane and with singularities confined on the positive imaginary frequency axis. Insofar as the impedance tensor is generated by isometric transformation of the eigen-impedances, it...

  5. Surface biosignatures of exo-earths: remote detection of extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Siddharth; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G; Kent, Ryan; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rothschild, Lynn

    2015-03-31

    Exoplanet discovery has made remarkable progress, with the first rocky planets having been detected in the central star's liquid water habitable zone. The remote sensing techniques used to characterize such planets for potential habitability and life rely solely on our understanding of life on Earth. The vegetation red edge from terrestrial land plants is often used as a direct signature of life, but it occupies only a small niche in the environmental parameter space that binds life on present-day Earth and has been widespread for only about 460 My. To more fully exploit the diversity of the one example of life known, we measured the spectral characteristics of 137 microorganisms containing a range of pigments, including ones isolated from Earth's most extreme environments. Our database covers the visible and near-infrared to the short-wavelength infrared (0.35-2.5 µm) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum and is made freely available from biosignatures.astro.cornell.edu. Our results show how the reflectance properties are dominated by the absorption of light by pigments in the visible portion and by strong absorptions by the cellular water of hydration in the infrared (up to 2.5 µm) portion of the spectrum. Our spectral library provides a broader and more realistic guide based on Earth life for the search for surface features of extraterrestrial life. The library, when used as inputs for modeling disk-integrated spectra of exoplanets, in preparation for the next generation of space- and ground-based instruments, will increase the chances of detecting life.

  6. Earth on the Move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  7. Generalized Topological Simplification of Scalar Fields on Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierny, J; Pascucci, V

    2012-12-01

    We present a combinatorial algorithm for the general topological simplification of scalar fields on surfaces. Given a scalar field f, our algorithm generates a simplified field g that provably admits only critical points from a constrained subset of the singularities of f, while guaranteeing a small distance ||f - g||∞ for data-fitting purpose. In contrast to previous algorithms, our approach is oblivious to the strategy used for selecting features of interest and allows critical points to be removed arbitrarily. When topological persistence is used to select the features of interest, our algorithm produces a standard ϵ-simplification. Our approach is based on a new iterative algorithm for the constrained reconstruction of sub- and sur-level sets. Extensive experiments show that the number of iterations required for our algorithm to converge is rarely greater than 2 and never greater than 5, yielding O(n log(n)) practical time performances. The algorithm handles triangulated surfaces with or without boundary and is robust to the presence of multi-saddles in the input. It is simple to implement, fast in practice and more general than previous techniques. Practically, our approach allows a user to arbitrarily simplify the topology of an input function and robustly generate the corresponding simplified function. An appealing application area of our algorithm is in scalar field design since it enables, without any threshold parameter, the robust pruning of topological noise as selected by the user. This is needed for example to get rid of inaccuracies introduced by numerical solvers, thereby providing topological guarantees needed for certified geometry processing. Experiments show this ability to eliminate numerical noise as well as validate the time efficiency and accuracy of our algorithm. We provide a lightweight C++ implementation as supplemental material that can be used for topological cleaning on surface meshes.

  8. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

  9. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  10. Detailed gravimetric geoid confirmation of short wavelength features of sea surface topography detected by the Skylab S-193 altimeter in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.; Mcclinton, A. T.; Chang, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid was computed for the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea area in support of the calibration and evaluation of the GEOS-C altimeter. This geoid, computed on a 15 ft. x 15 ft. grid was based upon a combination of surface gravity data with the GSFC GEM-6 satellite derived gravity data. A comparison of this gravimetric geoid with 10 passes of SKYLAB altimeter data is presented. The agreement of the two data types is quite good with the differences generally less than 2 meters. Sea surface manifestations of numerous short wavelength (approximately 100 km) oceanographic features are now indicated in the gravimetric geoid and are also confirmed by the altimetry data.

  11. Active microwave remote sensing research program plan. Recommendations of the Earth Resources Synthetic Aperture Radar Task Force. [application areas: vegetation canopies, surface water, surface morphology, rocks and soils, and man-made structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A research program plan developed by the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications to provide guidelines for a concentrated effort to improve the understanding of the measurement capabilities of active microwave imaging sensors, and to define the role of such sensors in future Earth observations programs is outlined. The focus of the planned activities is on renewable and non-renewable resources. Five general application areas are addressed: (1) vegetation canopies, (2) surface water, (3) surface morphology, (4) rocks and soils, and (5) man-made structures. Research tasks are described which, when accomplished, will clearly establish the measurement capabilities in each area, and provide the theoretical and empirical results needed to specify and justify satellite systems using imaging radar sensors for global observations.

  12. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  13. Evolution of the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1994-01-01

    The tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system is reexamined. Several models of tidal friction are first compared in an averaged Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. With one of these models, full integrations of the tidally evolving Earth-Moon system are carried out in the complete, fully interacting, and chaotically evolving planetary system. Classic results on the history of the lunar orbit are confirmed by our more general model. A detailed history of the obliquity of the Earth which takes into account the evolving lunar orbit is presented.

  14. Atmospheric Torques on the Solid Earth and Oceans Based on the GEOS-1 General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Braulio

    1999-01-01

    The GEOS-1 general circulation model has been used to compute atmospheric torques on the oceans and solid Earth for the period 1980-1995. The time series for the various torque components have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform techniques. It was determined that the wind stress torque over land is more powerful than the wind stress torque over water by 55\\%, 42\\%, and 80\\t for the x, y, and z components respectively. This is mainly the result of power in the high frequency range. The pressure torques due to polar flattening, equatorial ellipticity, marine geoid, and continental orography were computed. The orographic or "mountain torque" components are more powerful than their wind stress counterparts (land plus ocean) by 231\\% (x), 191\\% (y), and 77\\% (z). The marine pressure torques due to geoidal undulations are much smaller than the orographic ones, as expected. They are only 3\\% (x), 4\\% (y), and 5\\% (z) of the corresponding mountain torques. The geoidal pressure torques are approximately equal in magnitude to those produced by the equatorial ellipticity of the Earth. The pressure torque due to polar flattening makes the largest contributions to the atmospheric'torque budget. It has no zonal component, only equatorial ones. Most of the power of the latter, between 68\\% and 69 %, is found in modes with periods under 15 days. The single most powerful mode has a period of 361 days. The gravitational torque ranks second in power only to the polar flattening pressure torque. Unlike the former, it does produce a zonal component, albeit much smaller (1\\ ) than the equatorial ones. The gravitational and pressure torques have opposite signs, therefore, the gravitational torque nullifies 42\\% of the total pressure torque. Zonally, however, the gravitational torque amounts to only 6\\% of the total pressure torque. The power budget for the total atmospheric torque yields 7595 and 7120 Hadleys for the equatorial components and 966 Hadleys for the

  15. Engineering Geological Structures of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, V. T.; Averkina, T. I.

    The term "engineering geological structure" has been defined. Contents, causes, and distinguishing features and hierarchic classification of these structures and the logical set of engineering geological structures of the globe are also discussed. The regularities of spatial distribution of engineering geological super-, mega-, macro-, and meso-structures of the Earth and its continents have been described.

  16. Grain surface features and clay mineralogy of the quaternary sediments from Western Deccan Trap Region, India, and their palaeoclimatic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena U. Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quartz sand grains obtained from a deeply gullied topography along the banks of two tributaries of River Pravara in Maharashtra (India have been examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Quartz grains have been selected after a heavy mineral separation and micro-photographs of each grain were taken at various angles and magnifications. The sediments reveal features resulting from mechanical grinding as well as from chemical alteration. Conchoidal fractures, cleavage planes, grooves, v-shaped indentations etc. are the mechanical features documented on the grains whereas solution pits of varying sizes and intensity, precipitation surfaces, oriented v-pits, solution crevasses and etching are the features of chemical origin. Several evidences indicate that the samples have undergone digenetic changes. Few grains show the features of intense chemical breakdown. The overall assemblages of the grain surface features suggest that the samples have been subjected to subaqueous transport for a considerable period of time. The minor chemical features such as solution pits or semi circular arcuate steps found in abundance on these grains are due to the dissolution of the sediments in a low energy fluviatile environment. For clay mineralogy, fractions between <2 and <0.2 mm were separated out from the sediments. The clay fractions were then subjected to examination by X-ray diffraction (XRD of oriented K/Ca saturated samples using a Philips Diffractometer and Ni-filtered Cu Ka radiation with the scanning speed of 10 2Ө min -1. The main clay minerals for all the samples are identical and show the presence of hydroxy-interlayered smectites with minor quantities of mica, kaolinite, smectites, quartz and feldspar. The first weathering product of the Deccan Basalt (DB is the dioctahedral smectite. Since the present semi aridic climatic condition of the study area can not transform a smectite to HIS and either smectite to kaolin, it is quite likely that

  17. Combination of 3D skin surface texture features and 2D ABCD features for improved melanoma diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; John, Nigel W; Smith, Lyndon; Sun, Jiuai; Smith, Melvyn

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation and diameter (ABCD) features are important indicators currently used for computer-assisted diagnosis of malignant melanoma (MM); however, they often prove to be insufficient to make a convincing diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that 3D skin surface normal features in the form of tilt and slant pattern disruptions are promising new features independent from the existing 2D ABCD features. This work investigates that whether improved lesion classification can be achieved by combining the 3D features with the 2D ABCD features. Experiments using a nonlinear support vector machine classifier show that many combinations of the 2D ABCD features and the 3D features can give substantially better classification accuracy than using (1) single features and (2) many combinations of the 2D ABCD features. The best 2D and 3D feature combination includes the overall 3D skin surface disruption, the asymmetry and all the three colour channel features. It gives an overall 87.8 % successful classification, which is better than the best single feature with 78.0 % and the best 2D feature combination with 83.1 %. These demonstrate that (1) the 3D features have additive values to improve the existing lesion classification and (2) combining the 3D feature with all the 2D features does not lead to the best lesion classification. The two ABCD features not selected by the best 2D and 3D combination, namely (1) the border feature and (2) the diameter feature, were also studied in separate experiments. It found that inclusion of either feature in the 2D and 3D combination can successfully classify 3 out of 4 lesion groups. The only one group not accurately classified by either feature can be classified satisfactorily by the other. In both cases, they have shown better classification performances than those without the 3D feature in the combinations. This further demonstrates that (1) the 3D feature can be used to

  18. A Social Portrait of the Young People of Russia: General Features and Regional Specifics of Property Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasovets, Iu. M.

    2011-01-01

    Survey data on young people in Russia show that there is a weak relationship between their assessment of where they are in the system of stratification and their position according to material indicators. Young people are in general optimistic about improving their position and see upward mobility as possible for those willing to work hard.…

  19. Some feature of interpretation of tension single pulsed electromagnetic field of the Earth to create the model parameter fields physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokritskaya T.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic analysis of the results of different methods of obtaining and processing of information allows us to solve problems on a qualitatively different level. This is important when creating complex earth models and fields of its parameters, particularly the physical properties. Application of remote sensing methods (geophysical investigations with the registration of a single pulse intensity of the electromagnetic field of the Earth (EIEMPZ seismic profiling, is expanding. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. Interesting results of the joint interpretation of the results of geophysical and laboratory studies of physical soil. For the first time a methodology for assessing the state of the soil [3] applied for a joint interpretation of materials determine the field strength EMPZ, seismic profiling, and laboratory techniques. This has allowed to characterize the state of the geological environment and to build a model of inhomogeneous density distribution of fractured rocks at depth. In this paper we made a mathematical analysis of the results of research and talus deposits eluvial clay Taurian series, studied at one of the construction sites southern coast at a depth of 12.0 -25.0 m. Methods of statistical analysis, assessment of homogeneity and symmetrically distributed, rank correlation and multiple regression analysis described in [3]. The analysis of the spatial distribution of areas extrem value of EMPZ, heterogeneity of seismic rigidity. Statistical characteristics of indicators of physical properties reflect the genetic characteristics of the formation and the current state of silty-clay sediments of different genesis.It is proved that the regression model can be applied to interpret the state of the array in the construction of geodynamic model. It is established that the creation of forward-looking (dynamic models for the distribution of the physical

  20. The retrieval of two-dimensional distribution of the earth's surface aerodynamic roughness using SAR image and TM thermal infrared image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Renhua; WANG; Jinfeng; ZHU; Caiying; SUN; Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    After having analyzed the requirement on the aerodynamic earth's surface roughness in two-dimensional distribution in the research field of interaction between land surface and atmosphere, this paper presents a new way to calculate the aerodynamic roughness using the earth's surface geometric roughness retrieved from SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and TM thermal infrared image data. On the one hand, the SPM (Small Perturbation Model) was used as a theoretical SAR backscattering model to describe the relationship between the SAR backscattering coefficient and the earth's surface geometric roughness and its dielectric constant retrieved from the physical model between the soil thermal inertia and the soil surface moisture with the simultaneous TM thermal infrared image data and the ground microclimate data. On the basis of the SAR image matching with the TM image, the non-volume scattering surface geometric information was obtained from the SPM model at the TM image pixel scale, and the ground pixel surface's equivalent geometric roughness-height standard RMS (Root Mean Square) was achieved from the geometric information by the transformation of the typical topographic factors. The vegetation (wheat, tree) height retrieved from spectrum model was also transferred into its equivalent geometric roughness. A completely two-dimensional distribution map of the equivalent geometric roughness over the experimental area was produced by the data mosaic technique. On the other hand, according to the atmospheric eddy currents theory, the aerodynamic surface roughness was iterated out with the atmosphere stability correction method using the wind and the temperature profiles data measured at several typical fields such as bare soil field and vegetation field. After having analyzed the effect of surface equivalent geometric roughness together with dynamic and thermodynamic factors on the aerodynamic surface roughness within the working area, this paper first establishes a scale

  1. Coherent flow structures at earth's surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venditti, J.G; Best, J.L; Church, M; Hardy, R.J

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the recent progress in the study of the turbulent flows that sculpt the Earth's surface, focusing in particular on the organized structures that have been identified in recent years...

  2. UV SURFACE ENVIRONMENT OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING FGKM STARS THROUGH GEOLOGICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugheimer, S.; Sasselov, D. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden st., 02138 MA Cambridge (United States); Segura, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México (Mexico); Kaltenegger, L., E-mail: srugheimer@cfa.harvard.edu [Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars in the circumstellar Habitable Zone for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early-Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present-day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago, and modern Earth. In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth–Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ 581 (M3.5 V) receives 300 times less biologically effective radiation, about 2 times modern Earth–Sun levels. The UV fluxes calculated here provide a grid of model UV environments during the evolution of an Earth-like planet orbiting a range of stars. These models can be used as inputs into photo-biological experiments and for pre-biotic chemistry and early life evolution experiments.

  3. Oxide cathode mechanisms: Electronic and structural features of oxide cathode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J.; Nunan, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes studies made upon systems selected for their ability to model various important features of oxide cathodes and the mechanisms which enable them to function as efficient thermionic emitters at moderate temperatures. An account is given of experiments which aimed to simulate conditions upon the surfaces of polycrystalline samples of alkaline earth oxides (e.g., SrO and BaO/SrO or MgO and BaO/MgO) at various stages of their preparation in similiar fashion to that used in the thermal activation of oxide cathodes. Accounts are given of experiments which examined the interaction between the gases O2, N2O, H2 or Ch4 and appropriately preactivated surface of pure and mixed alkaline earth oxide samples. Accounts are given of experiments involving the controlled deposition in UHV conditions of zero-valent Ba ad-atoms-in amounts ranging from submonolayer to multilayer coverage - upon layers of SrO or BaO previously prepared in UHV conditions by evaporation of the corresponding metal and its subsequent oxidation. UPS spectra have been undertaken in order to examine surfaces of samples prepared by evaporation of barium metal or strontium metal and to study effects upon the UPS spectra by exposures to the gases N20, O2 and CH4.

  4. Feature-based handling of surface faults in compact disc players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a novel method called feature-based control is presented. The method is designed to improve compact disc players’ handling of surface faults on the discs. The method is based on a fault-tolerant control scheme, which uses extracted features of the surface faults to remove those from...... the detector signals used for control during the occurrence of surface faults. The extracted features are coefficients of Karhunen–Loève approximations of the surface faults. The performance of the feature-based control scheme controlling compact disc players playing discs with surface faults has been...

  5. Assessing the radiative impacts of precipitating clouds on winter surface air temperatures and land surface properties in general circulation models using observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Lee, Wei-Liang; Wang, Yi-Hui; Richardson, Mark; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Suhas, E.; Fetzer, Eric; Lo, Min-Hui; Yue, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Using CloudSat-CALIPSO ice water, cloud fraction, and radiation; Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) radiation; and long-term station-measured surface air temperature (SAT), we identified a substantial underestimation of the total ice water path, total cloud fraction, land surface radiative flux, land surface temperature (LST), and SAT during Northern Hemisphere winter in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. We perform sensitivity experiments with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) in fully coupled modes to identify processes driving these biases. We found that biases in land surface properties are associated with the exclusion of downwelling longwave heating from precipitating ice during Northern Hemisphere winter. The land surface temperature biases introduced by the exclusion of precipitating ice radiative effects in CESM1 and CMIP5 both spatially correlate with winter biases over Eurasia and North America. The underestimated precipitating ice radiative effect leads to colder LST, associated surface energy-budget adjustments, and cooler SAT. This bias also shifts regional soil moisture state from liquid to frozen, increases snow cover, and depresses evapotranspiration (ET) and total leaf area index in Northern Hemisphere winter. The inclusion of the precipitating ice radiative effects largely reduces the model biases of surface radiative fluxes (more than 15 W m-2), SAT (up to 2-4 K), and snow cover and ET (25-30%), compared with those without snow-radiative effects.

  6. Planimetric Features Generalization for the Production of Small-Scale Map by Using Base Maps and the Existing Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiri, M.; Mohebbi, M.; Masoumi, M.; Khanlu, H.; Eftekhari, A.

    2014-11-01

    Land reform is identified as a key tool in fostering development in South Africa. With two decades after the advent of democracy in South Africa, the land question remains a critical issue for policy makers. A number of frameworks have been put in place by the government to identify land which is strategically located for land reform. However, many of these frameworks are not well aligned and have hampered the government's land reform initiative in promoting inclusive development. Strategically located land is herein defined as land parcels that are well positioned for the promotion of agriculture, human settlements, rural and tourism development. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a decision tool which facilitates the identification of strategically located land for development. This study proposes the use of geographic information systems (GIS), earth observation (EO) data and multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) to develop a spatial decision support system (SDSS) to identify strategically located land for land reform. The SDDS was therefore designed using GIS, EO data and MCDM to create an index for identification of strategically located land. Expert-led workshops were carried out to ascertain criteria for identifying strategically located land and the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was utilised used to weight the criteria. The study demonstrates that GIS and EO are invaluable tools in facilitating evidence-based decisions for land reform. However, there is need for capacity building on GIS and EO in government departments responsible for land reform and development planning. The study suggests that there is an urgent need to develop sector specific criteria for the identification of strategically located land for inclusive development.

  7. General survey and conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Publikatie die bestaat uit twee delen: 1. General survey of the relation between water quantity and water quality; 2. Conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

  8. UV Surface Environment of Earth-like Planets Orbiting FGKM Stars Through Geological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rugheimer, S; Kaltenegger, L; Sasselov, D

    2015-01-01

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars at the 1AU equivalent distance for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago and modern Earth (Following Kaltenegger et al. 2007). In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth-Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ...

  9. About the article by M.A. Goncharov, Yu.N. Raznitsin, Yu.V. Barkin «SPECIFIC FEATURES OF DEFORMATION OF THE CONTINENTAL AND OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF THE EARTH CORE NORTHERN DRIFT»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri G. Leonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The review summary states that studies of the hierarchical subordination of geodynamic systems is top in the scientific agenda, and researches of orientation of the Earth’s surface deformation structures in relation to the elements of the stress field are important. It is noted that the proposed classification of geological objects by ranks is ambiguous, and there is a need for a geodynamic model to provide a basis for studying relationships between the fields of forces, stresses and strains on the surface and processes which take place deep in the core and mantle of the Earth.

  10. EEG features of absence seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Impact of syndrome, age, and state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadleir, L.G.; Scheffer, I.E.; Smith, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Factors influencing the electroencephalography (EEG) features of absence seizures in newly presenting children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have not been rigorously studied. We examined how specific factors such as state, provocation, age, and epilepsy syndrome affect the E...

  11. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigui Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  12. Minding the gap: Thinking through spatiotemporal scaling challenges in Earth surface dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viles, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Research into the dynamics of Earth's surface is diverse, interdisciplinary and challenging, but also an important geoscience contribution to understanding human-landscape interactions in the Anthropocene. Scale issues often thwart our ability to provide answers to important questions of how the Earth's surface has changed in the past and may change in the future. This paper reflects on four major common components of Earth surface dynamics research projects (i.e. how to identify and frame a research question, how to design a study to answer that question, difficulties with data, how to use data to answer the question) and identifies the most important spatiotemporal scale challenges. A case study of an experimental study of rock breakdown in arid environments is used to illustrate these challenges, and to demonstrate the importance of clear conceptualisation and critical thinking in overcoming them.

  13. Examining the Impact of Question Surface Features on Students’ Answers to Constructed-Response Questions on Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michele; Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Merrill, John

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in science education assessment is that students often focus on surface features of questions rather than the underlying scientific principles. We investigated how student written responses to constructed-response questions about photosynthesis vary based on two surface features of the question: the species of plant and the order of two question prompts. We asked four versions of the question with different combinations of the two plant species and order of prompts in an introductory cell biology course. We found that there was not a significant difference in the content of student responses to versions of the question stem with different species or order of prompts, using both computerized lexical analysis and expert scoring. We conducted 20 face-to-face interviews with students to further probe the effects of question wording on student responses. During the interviews, we found that students thought that the plant species was neither relevant nor confusing when answering the question. Students identified the prompts as both relevant and confusing. However, this confusion was not specific to a single version. PMID:25999312

  14. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    . We account for pressure, temperature and compositional effects as inferred by mineral physics to relate seismic velocity with density. Mantle density models are coupled to crustal density distributions obtained with a similar methodology. We compute isostatic topography and associated residual...... topography maps and perform instantaneous mantle flow modelling to calculate the dynamic topography. We explore the effects of proposed mantle 1-D viscosities and also test a 3D pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity model. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust...... mantle density and viscosity models. These extremely high values would be associated with a magnitude of geoid undulations that is not in agreement with observations. Considering chemical heterogeneities in correspondence with the lower mantle Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) helps...

  15. Tensile Properties of Surface-Treated Glass Fiber Reinforced PTFE Composite with Rare Earth Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛玉君; 程先华

    2003-01-01

    The optimum amount of rare earth elements (RE) for treating glass fiber surface and its effect on the tensile properties of glass fiber reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GF/PTFE) composites were investigated. The tensile properties of GF/PTFE composites with different surface treatment conditions were measured. The fracture surface morphologies were observed and analyzed by SEM. The results indicate that rare earth elements can effectively promote the interfacial adhesion between the glass fiber and PTFE, owing to the effects of rare earth elements on the compatibility. The tensile properties of GF/PTFE composites can be improved considerably when the content of RE in surface modifier is 0.2%~0.4%, and the optimum performance of GF/PTFE composites is obtained at 0.3%RE content.

  16. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  17. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  18. On Two Kinds of Differential Operators on General Smooth Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xi-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Two kinds of differential operators that can be generally defined on an arbitrary smooth surface in a finite dimensional Euclid space are studied, one is termed as surface gradient and the other one as Levi-Civita gradient. The surface gradient operator is originated from the differentiability of a tensor field defined on the surface. Some integral and differential identities have been theoretically studied that play the important role in the studies on continuous mediums whose geometrical configurations can be taken as surfaces and on interactions between fluids and deformable boundaries. The definition of Levi-Civita gradient is based on Levi-Civita connections generally defined on Riemann manifolds. It can be used to set up some differential identities in the intrinsic/coordiantes-independent form that play the essential role in the theory of vorticity dynamics for two dimensional flows on general fixed smooth surfaces.

  19. On the influence of Aerosols in measurement of electric field from Earth surface using a Field-Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Sundar De, Syam; Paul, Suman; Hazra, Pranab; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles influence the electrical conductivity of air. The value is reduced through the removal of small ions responsible for the conductivity. The metropolitan city, Kolkata (latitude 22.56° N, longitude 88.5° E) is densely populated surrounded by various types of Industries. Air is highly invaded by pollutant particles here for which the city falls under small-scale fair-weather condition where electric field and air-earth current get perturbed by ionization and different aerosols produced locally. Fine particles having diameter measurement of potential gradient and air-earth current will be presented. Different parameters like air-conductivity, relative abundance of smoke, visibility would offer new signatures of aerosol-influence on electric potential gradient. Some of those will be reported here.

  20. Techniques for integrating the animations, multimedia, and interactive features of NASA’s climate change website, Climate Change: NASA’s Eyes on the Earth, into the classroom to advance climate literacy and encourage interest in STEM disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, L. F.; Jackson, R.; Greene, M.

    2009-12-01

    I developed a variety of educational content for the "Climate Change: NASA’s Eyes on the Earth" website, notably an interactive feature for the "Key Indicators: Ice Mass Loss" link that includes photo pair images of glaciers around the world, changes in Arctic sea ice extent videos, Greenland glacial calving time lapse videos, and Antarctic ice shelf break up animations, plus news pieces and a Sea Level Quiz. I integrated these resources and other recent NASA and JPL climate and oceanography data and information into climate change components of Oceanography Lab exercises, Oceanography lectures and Introduction to Environmental Technology courses. I observed that using these Internet interactive features in the classroom greatly improved student participation, topic comprehension, scientific curiosity and interest in Earth and climate science across diverse student populations. Arctic Sea Ice Extent Summer 2007 Credit: NASA

  1. Distribution of major, trace and rare-earth elements in surface sediments of the Wharton Basin, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Higgs, N.C.; Colley, S.; Parthiban, G.

    lithologies (including calcareous ooze, siliceous and red clays) with variable pro- ductivity, aeolian input and influence of Antarc- tic Bottom Water have been studied to address the source, abundance, mode of incorporation and factors controlling....G. and Bruland, K.W., 1985. Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlan- tic Oceans. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 49: 1943-1957. Dehairs, F., Chesselet, R. and Jedwab, J., 1980. Discrete sus- pended particles of barite and the barium cycle in the open ocean...

  2. Surface and sub-surface anatomy of the landscape: integrating Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Structure from Motion (UAV-SfM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GRP) to investigate sedimentary features in the field. - an example from NW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, Nik; Leopold, Matthias; May, Simon Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphology is confronted by the challenge of reconstructing landscape features at appropriate scales, resolution and accuracy, that allows meaningful analysis of environmental processes and their implications. Field geomorphology offers a discrete snapshot (i.e. one or two field campaigns) to reconstruct how features have changed, evolved or responded over time. We explore the application of an emerging photogrammetry technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM), which uses multiple photographs of the same feature (but taken at different locations) to create high-accuracy three-dimensional models of surface of sedimentary fans formed by extreme wave events. This approach is complimented by investigation of the sub-surface morphology using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Using an UAV "octocopter", we captured 1208 photos with a DSLR camera (Canon EoS-M) at the height of 50m with a ground pixel resolution of 9mm, above a cyclone wash-over fan in the Exmouth Gulf (Western Australia) that measured about 500m inland by 300m wide. Based on 38 ground control point targets (with between 4 and 45 individual photographs per target) the SfM surface had an absolute total (XYZ) accuracy of 51mm (39mm X, 29mm Y and 14mm Y), based on RTK-DGPS surveying from a local ground reference station (with an absolute AUSPOS accuracy of 57mm X, 6mm Y, 50mm Z to AHD) and an overall relative point accuracy of 7mm. A sparse point cloud of over 5.5 million data points was generated using only points with a reconstruction accuracy of RGB colour of each XYZ pixel) using K-Means clustering within Python. The output was then manually classified into ground and non-ground points, and the geostatistical analyst functionality of ArcGIS used to produce a final bare-earth DEM. This approach has allowed the study team to economically collect an unprecedented high-resolution and accuracy topographic model of this feature to compliment on-ground sediment, geophysics and dating work to analyse the

  3. Zolfino landrace (Phaseolus vulgaris L. from Pratomagno: general and specific features of a functional food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Balestri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Zolfino bean is a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, which is cultivated in a limited area of Tuscany, Italy, and is widely appreciated for its flavor and culinary uses. Objectives: A yellow Zolfino landrace cultivated in the Leccio-Reggello area was characterized and compared with three other varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris (i.e. the Borlotto, Cannellino, and Corona beans in terms of its general features and potential as an antioxidant/anti-inflammatory agent. Design: The length, width, thickness, equatorial section surface, weight, volume, and seed coat section were measured in all the beans. The seed surface area was also estimated by an original empirical method. The ability of the different beans to interfere with the enzymes of the polyol pathway (that is, aldose reductase (AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase was tested using the supernatant after soaking the beans at room temperature and after thermal treatment, which simulated the bean-cooking process in a controlled fashion. Results: Concerning the general features, Zolfino was comparable with other beans, except Corona, in terms of surface–volume ratio, which possesses the lowest tegument thickness. Moreover, Zolfino appears the most effective in inhibiting AR activity. The inhibitory ability is unaffected by thermal treatment and appears to be associated with compound(s present in the coat of the bean. Conclusions: The ability of Zolfino to inhibit AR, thus reducing the flux of glucose through the polyol pathway, highlights the features of Zolfino as a functional food, potentially useful in treating the dysfunctions linked to the hyperactivity of AR, such as diabetic complications or inflammatory responses.

  4. Zolfino landrace (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Pratomagno: general and specific features of a functional food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestri, Francesco; Rotondo, Rossella; Moschini, Roberta; Pellegrino, Mario; Cappiello, Mario; Barracco, Vito; Misuri, Livia; Sorce, Carlo; Andreucci, Andrea; Del-Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Background The Zolfino bean is a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, which is cultivated in a limited area of Tuscany, Italy, and is widely appreciated for its flavor and culinary uses. Objectives A yellow Zolfino landrace cultivated in the Leccio-Reggello area was characterized and compared with three other varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris (i.e. the Borlotto, Cannellino, and Corona beans) in terms of its general features and potential as an antioxidant/anti-inflammatory agent. Design The length, width, thickness, equatorial section surface, weight, volume, and seed coat section were measured in all the beans. The seed surface area was also estimated by an original empirical method. The ability of the different beans to interfere with the enzymes of the polyol pathway (that is, aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase) was tested using the supernatant after soaking the beans at room temperature and after thermal treatment, which simulated the bean-cooking process in a controlled fashion. Results Concerning the general features, Zolfino was comparable with other beans, except Corona, in terms of surface–volume ratio, which possesses the lowest tegument thickness. Moreover, Zolfino appears the most effective in inhibiting AR activity. The inhibitory ability is unaffected by thermal treatment and appears to be associated with compound(s) present in the coat of the bean. Conclusions The ability of Zolfino to inhibit AR, thus reducing the flux of glucose through the polyol pathway, highlights the features of Zolfino as a functional food, potentially useful in treating the dysfunctions linked to the hyperactivity of AR, such as diabetic complications or inflammatory responses. PMID:27415159

  5. Light and electron microscopy of the European beaver (Castor fiber stomach reveal unique morphological features with possible general biological significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ziółkowska

    Full Text Available Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG, located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented <0.1% of cells in the CGG gastric glands and 22-32% of cells in the proper gastric glands of the mucosa lining the stomach lumen. These data suggest that chief cells in the CGG develop from undifferentiated cells that migrate through the gastric gland neck rather than from mucous neck cells. Classical chief cell formation (i.e., arising from mucous neck cells occurred in the mucosa lining the stomach lumen, however. The muscularis around the CGG consisted primarily of skeletal muscle tissue. The cardiac region was rudimentary while the fundus/corpus and pyloric regions were equally developed. Another unusual feature of the beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus.

  6. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Richard L; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasad, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have contributed to delineating regional and temporal differences due to aerosols, clouds, and ozone. Improvements in radiative transfer modelling capability now enable more accurate characterization of clouds, snow-cover, and topographical effects. A standardized scale for reporting UV to the public has gained wide acceptance. There has been increased use of satellite data to estimate geographic variability and trends in UV. Progress has been made in assessing the utility of satellite retrievals of UV radiation by comparison with measurements at the Earth's surface. Global climatologies of UV radiation are now available on the Internet. Anthropogenic aerosols play a more important role in attenuating UV irradiances than has been assumed previously, and this will have implications for the accuracy of UV retrievals from satellite data. Progress has been made inferring historical levels of UV radiation using measurements of ozone (from satellites or from ground-based networks) in conjunction with measurements of total solar radiation obtained from extensive meteorological networks. We cannot yet be sure whether global ozone has reached a minimum. Atmospheric chlorine concentrations are beginning to decrease. However, bromine concentrations are still increasing. While these halogen concentrations remain high, the ozone layer remains vulnerable to further depletion from events such as volcanic eruptions that inject material into the stratosphere. Interactions between global warming and

  7. General methodology for evaluating the adhesion force of drops and bubbles on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Carmona, F J; Pierce, E; Marengo, M; Amirfazli, A

    2009-06-01

    The shortcomings of the current formulation for calculating the adhesion force for drops and bubbles with noncircular contact lines are discussed. A general formulation to evaluate the adhesion force due to surface forces is presented. Also, a novel methodology, that is, IBAFA, image based adhesion force analysis, was developed to allow implementation of the general formulation. IBAFA is based on the use of multiple profile images of a drop. The images are analyzed (1) to accurately reconstruct the contact line shape, which is analytically represented by a Fourier cosine series, and (2) to measure contact angles at multiple locations along the contact line and determine the contact angle distribution based on a linear piecewise interpolation routine. The contact line shape reconstruction procedure was validated with both actual experiments and simulated experiments. The procedure for the evaluation of the adhesion force was tested using simulated experiments with synthetic drops of known shapes. A comparison with current methods showed that simplifying assumptions (e.g., elliptical contact line or linear contact angle distribution) used in these methods result in errors up to 76% in the estimated adhesion force. However, the drop adhesion force evaluated using IBAFA results in small errors on the order of 1%.

  8. General Education Engagement in Earth and Planetary Science through an Earth-Mars Analog Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Kahmann-Robinson, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The successes of NASA rovers on Mars and new remote sensing imagery at unprecedented resolution can awaken students to the valuable application of Earth analogs to understand Mars processes and the possibilities of extraterrestrial life. Mars For Earthlings (MFE) modules and curriculum are designed as general science content introducing a pedagogical approach of integrating Earth science principles and Mars imagery. The content can be easily imported into existing or new general education courses. MFE learning modules introduce students to Google Mars and JMARS software packages and encourage Mars imagery analysis to predict habitable environments on Mars drawing on our knowledge of extreme environments on Earth. "Mars Mission" projects help students develop teamwork and presentation skills. Topic-oriented module examples include: Remote Sensing Mars, Olympus Mons and Igneous Rocks, Surface Sculpting Forces, and Extremophiles. The learning modules package imagery, video, lab, and in-class activities for each topic and are available online for faculty to adapt or adopt in courses either individually or collectively. A piloted MFE course attracted a wide range of non-majors to non-degree seeking senior citizens. Measurable outcomes of the piloted MFE curriculum were: heightened enthusiasm for science, awareness of NASA programs, application of Earth science principles, and increased science literacy to help students develop opinions of current issues (e.g., astrobiology or related government-funded research). Earth and Mars analog examples can attract and engage future STEM students as the next generation of earth, planetary, and astrobiology scientists.

  9. Light and electron microscopy of the European beaver (Castor fiber) stomach reveal unique morphological features with possible general biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natalia; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Petryński, Wojciech; Palkowska, Katarzyna; Prusik, Magdalena; Targońska, Krystyna; Giżejewski, Zygmunt; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG), located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented stomach lumen. These data suggest that chief cells in the CGG develop from undifferentiated cells that migrate through the gastric gland neck rather than from mucous neck cells. Classical chief cell formation (i.e., arising from mucous neck cells) occurred in the mucosa lining the stomach lumen, however. The muscularis around the CGG consisted primarily of skeletal muscle tissue. The cardiac region was rudimentary while the fundus/corpus and pyloric regions were equally developed. Another unusual feature of the beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections) that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus.

  10. What K-12 Teachers of Earth Science Need from the Earth Science Research Community: Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES), a Minnesota Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Pound, K. S.; Rosok, K.; Baumtrog, J.

    2009-12-01

    NSF-style Broader Impacts activities in the Earth Sciences take many forms, from long term partnerships between universities and informal science institutions to one-time K-12 classroom visits by scientists. Broader Impacts that include K-12 teachers range from those that convey broad Earth Science concepts to others stressing direct connections to very specific current research methods and results. Design of these programs is often informed by prior successful models and a broad understanding of teacher needs, but is not specifically designed to address needs expressed by teachers themselves. In order to better understand teachers’ perceived needs for connections to Earth Science research, we have formed the Science Teaching and Professional Learning in the Earth Sciences (STAPLES) research team. Our team includes a geology faculty member experienced in undergraduate and professional Earth Science teacher training, two in-service middle school Earth Science teachers, and the Education Director of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. Members of the team have designed, taught and experienced many of these models, from the Andrill ARISE program to NCED’s summer institutes and teacher internship program. We are administering the STAPLES survey to ask Earth Science teachers in our own state (Minnesota) which of many models they use to 1) strengthen their own understanding of current Earth Science research and general Earth Science concepts and 2) deepen their students’ understanding of Earth Science content. Our goal is to share survey results to inform more effective Broader Impacts programs in Minnesota and to stimulate a wider national discussion of effective Broader Impacts programs that includes teachers’ voices.

  11. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  12. Nonlinear reflection from the surface of neutron stars and features of radio emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    There are no explanations for the high-frequency component of the emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula, but it may be a manifestation of instability in nonlinear reflection from the star's surface. Radiation from relativistic positrons flying from the magnetosphere to the star and accelerated by the electric field of the polar gap is reflected. The instability involves stimulated scattering on surface waves.

  13. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities--implications for mixing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects. Geostrophic turbulence models show that parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of a turbulent eddy. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and is currently underway.

  14. Feature selective temporal prediction of Alzheimer's disease progression using hippocampus surface morphometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Zhou, Jiayu; Shi, Jie; Ye, Jieping; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present our results of using machine learning to predict temporal behavior changes in Alzheimers Disease using entire topological feature maps of the hippocampus surface (2100 feature points...

  15. Building the Platform of Digital Earth with Sphere Split Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jinxin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Discrete global grids, a modeling framework for big geo-spatial data, is always used to build the Digital Earth platform. Based on the sphere split bricks (Earth system spatial grids, it can not only build the true three-dimensional digital Earth model, but also can achieve integration, fusion, expression and application of the spatial data which locates on, under or above the Earth subsurface. The theoretical system of spheroid geodesic QTM octree grid is discussed, including the partition principle, analysis of grid geometry features and coding/ decoding method etc, and a prototype system of true-3D digital Earth platform with the sphere split bricks is developed. The functions of the system mainly include the arbitrary sphere segmentation and the visualization of physical models of underground, surface and aerial entities. Results show that the sphere geodesic QTM octree grid has many application advantages, such as simple subdivision rules, the grid system neat, clear geometric features, strong applicability etc. In particular, it can be extended to the ellipsoid, so it can be used for organization, management, integration and application of the global spatial big data.

  16. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. III - General energy dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Le Roux, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The time-dependent cosmic-ray transport equation is solved numerically in an axially symmetric heliosphere. Gradient and curvature drifts are incorporated, together with an emulated wavy neutral sheet. This model is used to simulate heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation for the period 1985-1989 during which drifts are considered to be important. The general energy dependence of the modulation of Galactic protons is studied as predicted by the model for the energy range 1 MeV to 10 GeV. The corresponding instantaneous radial and latitudinal gradients are calculated, and it is found that, whereas the latitudinal gradients follow the trends in the waviness of the neutral sheet to a large extent for all energies, the radial gradients below about 200 MeV deviate from this general pattern. In particular, these gradients increase when the waviness decreases for the simulated period 1985-1987.3, after which they again follow the neutral sheet by increasing rapidly.

  17. The atmospheric chemistry general circultation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: Consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Brülh, Ch.; Buchholz, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Hoor, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Lawrence, M.G.; Sander, R.; Steil, B.; Stiller, G.; Tanarhte, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; Aardenne, van J.A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-01-01

    The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup

  18. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  19. General models for the spectra of surface area scaling strategies of cells and organisms: fractality, geometric dissimilitude, and internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okie, Jordan G

    2013-03-01

    Surface areas and volumes of biological systems-from molecules to organelles, cells, and organisms-affect their biological rates and kinetics. Therefore, surface area-to-volume ratios and the scaling of surface area with volume profoundly influence ecology, physiology, and evolution. The zeroth-order geometric expectation is that surface area scales with body mass or volume as a power law with an exponent of two-thirds, with consequences for surface area-to-volume (SA : V) ratios and constraints on size; however, organisms have adaptations for altering the surface area scaling and SA : V ratios of their bodies and structures. The strategies fall into three groups: (1) fractal-like surface convolutions and crinkles; (2) classic geometric dissimilitude through elongating, flattening, fattening, and hollowing; and (3) internalization of surfaces. Here I develop general quantitative theory to model the spectra of effects of these strategies on SA : V ratios and surface area scaling, from exponents of less than two-thirds to superlinear scaling and mixed-power laws. Applying the theory to cells helps quantitatively evaluate the effects of membrane fractality, shape-shifting, vacuoles, vesicles, and mitochondria on surface area scaling, informing understanding of cell allometry, morphology, and evolution. Analysis of compiled data indicates that through hollowness and surface internalization, eukaryotic phytoplankton increase their effective surface area scaling, attaining near-linear scaling in larger cells. This unifying theory highlights the fundamental role of biological surfaces in metabolism and morphological evolution.

  20. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  1. Crossing the dividing surface of transition state theory. IV. Dynamical regularity and dimensionality reduction as key features of reactive trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    energies, these characteristics persist, but to a lesser degree. Recrossings of the dividing surface then become much more frequent and the phase space volumes of initial conditions that generate recrossing-free trajectories decrease. Altogether, one ends up with an additional illustration of the concept of reactive cylinder (or conduit) in phase space that reactive trajectories must follow. Reactivity is associated with dynamical regularity and dimensionality reduction, whatever the shape of the potential energy surface, no matter how strong its anharmonicity, and whatever the curvature of its reaction path. Both simplifying features persist during the entire reactive process, up to complete separation of fragments. The ergodicity assumption commonly assumed in statistical theories is inappropriate for reactive trajectories.

  2. Diseases of the Earth's skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The German Government's Scientific Advisory Council on Global Climate Change recently diagnosed a score of ailments of theEarth's skin,” according to the German Research Service. Like numerous viral and bacterial diseases, many of the earthidermal diseases are named for the regions where scientists first discovered them. For some symptoms, the German Council has also recommended therapeutic treatments, such as terracing of slopes near rivers. It remains to be seen whether universities worldwide will start cranking out specialists in Earth dermatology. But judging by the condition of many regions of the world, it appears this field may offer great growth potential for the Earth sciences, which is welcome news in the current tight job market.

  3. [Research on the spectral feature and identification of the surface vegetation stressed by stored CO2 underground leakage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Hao; Jiang, Jin-Bao; Steven, Michael D; Gong, A-Du; Li, Yi-Fan

    2012-07-01

    With the global climate warming, reducing greenhouse gas emissions becomes a focused problem for the world. The carbon capture and storage (CCS) techniques could mitigate CO2 into atmosphere, but there is a risk in case that the CO2 leaks from underground. The objective of this paper is to study the chlorophyll contents (SPAD value), relative water contents (RWC) and leaf spectra changing features of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress through field experiment. The result shows that the chlorophyll contents and RWC of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress become lower than the control beetroot', and the leaf reflectance increases in the 550 nm region and decreases in the 680nm region. A new vegetation index (R550/R680) was designed for identifying beetroot under CO2 leakage stress, and the result indicates that the vegetation index R550/R680 could identify the beetroots after CO2 leakage for 7 days. The index has strong sensitivity, stability and identification for monitoring the beetroots under CO2 stress. The result of this paper has very important meaning and application values for selecting spots of CCS project, monitoring and evaluating land-surface ecology under CO2 stress and monitoring the leakage spots by using remote sensing.

  4. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: I. General features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, B. J.; Goold, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Reid, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with two mode entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. Entanglement is a key quantum feature of composite systems in which the probabilities for joint measurements on the composite sub-systems are no longer determined from measurement probabilities on the separate sub-systems. There are many aspects of entanglement that can be studied. This two-part review focuses on the meaning of entanglement, the quantum paradoxes associated with entangled states, and the important tests that allow an experimentalist to determine whether a quantum state—in particular, one for massive bosons is entangled. An overall outcome of the review is to distinguish criteria (and hence experiments) for entanglement that fully utilize the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules that can be applied to bosonic massive particles. In the first paper (I), the background is given for the meaning of entanglement in the context of systems of identical particles. For such systems, the requirement is that the relevant quantum density operators must satisfy the symmetrization principle and that global and local super-selection rules prohibit states in which there are coherences between differing particle numbers. The justification for these requirements is fully discussed. In the second quantization approach that is used, both the system and the sub-systems are modes (or sets of modes) rather than particles, particles being associated with different occupancies of the modes. The definition of entangled states is based on first defining the non-entangled states—after specifying which modes constitute the sub-systems. This work mainly focuses on the two mode entanglement for massive bosons, but is put in the context of tests of local hidden variable theories, where one may not be able to make the above restrictions. The review provides the detailed

  5. SAR imagery of the Grand Banks (Newfoundland) pack ice pack and its relationship to surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, S. D.; Carsey, F. D.

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and aerial photographs were obtained over pack ice off the East Coast of Canada in March 1987 as part of the Labrador Ice Margin Experiment (LIMEX) pilot project. Examination of this data shows that although the pack ice off the Canadian East Coast appears essentially homogeneous to visible light imagery, two clearly defined zones of ice are apparent on C-band SAR imagery. To identify factors that create the zones seen on the radar image, aerial photographs were compared to the SAR imagery. Floe size data from the aerial photographs was compared to digital number values taken from SAR imagery of the same ice. The SAR data of the inner zone acquired three days apart over the melt period was also examined. The studies indicate that the radar response is governed by floe size and meltwater distribution.

  6. Features in Energy Accumulation in Double Layer on the surface of Graphene Material

    CERN Document Server

    Kompan, Mikhail Evgenievich; Maslov, Alexander Yurievich; Kuznetsov, Viktor Petrovich; Krivchenko, Viktor Aleksandrovich

    2015-01-01

    An application of quantum size carbon structures--graphenes as electrodes of supercapacitors is studied. A fundamental limit of energy and power density arising from quantum nature of objects due to singularity in graphene density of states near Dirac point is determined and technical solutions to partially offset the negative factors are considered. The maximum possible specific capacitance of nanostructured electrode materials is determined.

  7. Maghemite soil nodules reveal the impact of fire on mineralogical and geochemical differentiation at the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, Stefan C.; Murphy, David T.; Nothdurft, Luke D.; Bolhar, Robert; Piazolo, Sandra; Siegel, Coralie

    2017-03-01

    Fires occur frequently over large parts of the Earth's surface. They potentially exert a significant influence on the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of an environment that is otherwise considered to be dominated by low temperature processes. We test this hypothesis by comparing the mineralogy and geochemistry of (i) magnetic, iron-rich soil nodules, (ii) non-magnetic iron soil nodules and (iii) a published dataset of surficial sediments from eastern Australia. Maghemite-rich nodules are present in soils from around the world. It has been argued that they are thermal alteration products of non-magnetic precursors, but this remains controversial. We use detailed petrographic and mineralogical analyses to demonstrate that maghemite occurs as part of a high temperature mineral assemblage including hematite and χ-alumina, within a magnetic nodule microfabric indicative of fire-induced dehydroxylation and sintering of non-magnetic precursors at temperatures of up to 600 °C. The genetic link between magnetic and non-magnetic nodules means that their comparison offers insights into the geochemical impact of fire. Our results show that magnetic nodules are depleted in Si, Y, Zr and HREE but enriched in Fe and Cr relative to non-magnetic nodules that occur in close spatial proximity. Magnetic nodules also show variable but distinctly low Y/Ho (21.4 ± 0.4) and Zr/Hf (29.3 ± 0.8) as well as anomalously low La relative to the other LREE. In situ laser ablation analyses show that this is largely due to the presence of χ-alumina that is depleted in HREEs and has extremely low Y/Ho (mainly magnetic nodule precursors into proto-magnetic nodules. This is associated with thermal transformation of clays as well as Fe and Al oxyhydroxides, followed by isochemical segregation into a sintered core with low Si, Y/Ho, Zr/Hf and La/Gd and a reciprocal cortex. Preferential loss of the weathering-sensitive cortex, which is rarely preserved on the magnetic nodules, then

  8. Intercomparison and interpretation of surface energy fluxes in atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.; Cess, R. D.; Blanchet, J. P.; Boer, G. J.; Dazlich, D. A.; Del Genio, A. D.; Deque, M.; Dymnikov, V.; Galin, V.; Ghan, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Responses of the surface energy budgets and hydrologic cycles of 19 atmospheric general circulation models to an imposed, globally uniform sea surface temperature perturbation of 4 K were analyzed. The responses of the simulated surface energy budgets are extremely diverse and are closely linked to the responses of the simulated hydrologic cycles. The response of the net surface energy flux is not controlled by cloud effects; instead, it is determined primarily by the response of the latent heat flux. The prescribed warming of the oceans leads to major increases in the atmospheric water vapor content and the rates of evaporation and precipitation. The increased water vapor amount drastically increases the downwelling IR radiation at the earth's surface, but the amount of the change varies dramatically from one model to another.

  9. Features of molten pool free surface in laser processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of static characteristics of free surface of molten pools in laser processing, starting with the change of surface tension, the uniform numerical models are developed for both the liquid and solid regions of metals by applying the enthalpy source method and the porous region model. The flow and heat transfer characteristics in the molten pools and the distribution of surface tension on free surface are disclosed. The shape of free surface is analyzed by considering the static forces on the free surface and by combining with the calculated results of the molten pool. The model is applied to analyzing the laser processing of AISI 304 stainless steel, and the effects of different processing tech nics and material properties on shaping of free surface are discussed.

  10. Earth surface dynamics - dispatches from the flats (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Earth's surface is shaped by the physical, chemical and biological processes operating on it and the interactions amongst them. No single discipline can lay claim to this surface, nor offer a full explanation of its dynamics. Only interdisciplinary approaches can unlock answers to key questions such as how do erosion and tectonics interact to build mountains, how do landscapes respond to climate change, how can we read processes from the sedimentary record, what is the role of erosion in Earth's carbon cycle, and how can we give reliable early warning of damaging earth surface process events? The wastelands between established academic fields are rich and bountiful and replete with steep learning curves and pitfalls for the naïve. In this lecture, I shall scour the interfaces of geophysics, geochemistry and geomorphology for understanding of the mechanisms, controls and impacts of mass wasting in steep mountain settings, ending up in remarkably flat places to find new insight into the dynamics of Earth's surface.

  11. The features of steel surface hardening with high energy heating by high frequency currents and shower cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancivsky, V. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Bataev, I. A.; Lobanov, D. V.; Martyushev, N. V.; Sakha, O. V.; Khlebova, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper examines the process of surface hardening of steel 45 with the help of high energy heating by high frequency currents with simultaneous shower water cooling. We theoretically justified and experimentally proved a possibility of liquid phase forming in the course of heating not on the surface, but in the depth of the surface layer.

  12. Characteristics, seasonal distribution and surface degradation features of microplastic pellets along the Goa coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Saha, M.; Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; Rodrigues, A.C.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Naik, B.G.

    are generated when macro-sized plastics in the marine environment are physically (wind, wave and current), chemically (UV radiation) and biologically (microbial activity) degraded and fragmented into micro-sized (<5 mm) particles (Cole et al., 2011; GESAMP...-oxidation (Endo et al., 2005). Photo-oxidation increases the rate of chemical reaction and generates greater degradation. This degradation continues until MPPs become nano-plastics (Acosta-Coley and Olivero-Verbel, 2015). The relative abundance of carbonyl...

  13. Morphodynamical geodiversity of the Earth's crust, relief, and landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastochkin, Alexander; Zhirov, Andrey; Boltramovich, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Morphodynamical geodiversity of the Earth's crust is determined by tectonic flows, which create various folded, faulted and injective dislocations. Folded dislocations (plicatives) correspond in plan to the eight types of conic cross-sections and in profile - to variation of the amplitudes. Faulted dislocations (disjunctives) are reflected in the angles of fault planes and the amplitudes of displacements. Injective dislocations vary in size and amplitudes of their vertical penetrations inside sedimentary layers and on the Earth's surface. In turn, surface and above-the-surface material and energy flows, or geoflows, create geotops - elementary landscapes that are tied up to corresponding elementary surfaces. Geotops are responsible for the morphodynamical geodiversity of relief and landscapes. Within the three-dimensional space of the geotop each geoflow can be divided into currents and links. The first of which are transverse to the front of the geoflow, the second - the longitudinal. Geotops and geoflows, mainly descending and lateral, influence each other according to their specifics: lithological, biological, hydrological, thermobaric features, etc. This interaction determines the geodiversity as a whole. By their altitude, gradient and dip azimuth, geotops can be classified as initial (upper), transit (slope) and terminal (lower) - with respect to descending geoflows. By their functional role, geotops can also be divided into: 1) flat-topped and flat-bottomed geotops that are out of the descending geoflows; 2) upper disintegrating geotops (apices, ridges); 3) translators (geotops of faces and feet); 4) vertical barriers (cliffs); 5) intermediate accumulators (terraces); 6) lower accumulators (basins) and conductors (valleys). Geotops and their elementary surfaces influence also the geometry of geoflows, performing the function of disintegrators (centrifugal and bilateral ones), concentrators (centripetal and bilateral ones) or just conductors (straight ones

  14. Combining nutation and surface gravity observations to estimate the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Yann; Lambert, Sébastien; Rosat, Séverine; Nurul Huda, Ibnu; Bizouard, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nutation time series derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and time varying surface gravity data recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SG) have long been used separately to assess the Earth's interior via the estimation of the free core and inner core resonance effects on nutation or tidal gravity. The results obtained from these two techniques have been shown recently to be consistent, making relevant the combination of VLBI and SG observables and the estimation of Earth's interior parameters in a single inversion. We present here the intermediate results of the ongoing project of combining nutation and surface gravity time series to improve estimates of the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies. We use VLBI nutation time series spanning 1984-2016 derived by the International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) as the result of a combination of inputs from various IVS analysis centers, and surface gravity data from about 15 SG stations. We address here the resonance model used for describing the Earth's interior response to tidal excitation, the data preparation consisting of the error recalibration and amplitude fitting for nutation data, and processing of SG time-varying gravity to remove any gaps, spikes, steps and other disturbances, followed by the tidal analysis with the ETERNA 3.4 software package, the preliminary estimates of the resonant periods, and the correlations between parameters.

  15. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-01

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution dot{ω }= - ω ^2 along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4809593 this outcome will be naturally

  16. A high-resolution model of the external and induced magnetic field at the Earth's surface in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R. M.; Freeman, M. P.; Wild, J. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a method of producing high-resolution models of the Earth's combined external and induced magnetic field using the method of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) applied to the SuperMAG archive of ground-based magnetometer data. EOFs partition the variance of a system into independent modes, allowing us to extract the spatiotemporal patterns of greatest dynamical importance without applying the a priori assumptions of other methods (such as spherical harmonic analysis, parameterized averaging, or multivariate regression). We develop an approach based on that of Beckers and Rixen (2003) and use the EOF modes to infill missing data in a self-consistent manner. Applying our method to a north polar case study spanning February 2001 (chosen for its proximity to solar maximum and good data coverage), we demonstrate that 41.7% and 9.4% of variance is explained by the leading two modes, respectively, describing the temporal variations of the disturbance polar types 2 and 1 (DP2 and DP1) patterns. A further 14.1% of variance is explained by four modes that describe separate aspects of the motion of the DP1 and DP2 systems. Thus, collectively over 65% of variance is described by the leading six modes and is attributable to DP1 and DP2. This attribution is based on inspection of the spatial morphology of the modes and analysis of the temporal variation of the mode amplitudes with respect to solar wind measures and substorm occurrence. This study is primarily a demonstration of the technique and a prelude to a model spanning the full solar cycle.

  17. An overview of the Gulf of Batabanó (Cuba): Environmental features as revealed by surface sediment characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Conte, Fabio; Misic, Cristina; Barsanti, Mattia; Gómez-Batista, Miguel; Díaz-Asencio, Misael; Covazzi-Harriague, Anabella; Pannacciulli, Federica G.

    2011-05-01

    The main environmental features of the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba, Caribbean, were investigated through the analyses of surface sediments collected at 23 sites. In order to highlight the potential threats affecting the sedimentary compartment of this area, samples were analysed for: granulometry, mineralogy, heavy metals concentration (As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn), organic carbon, total nitrogen and radionuclides. Findings were compared with published data and "grey" literature. Results showed: granulometric homogeneity and a widespread carbonatic condition all over the gulf, probably due to stable bathymetry and lack of terrigenous input (except for the La Coloma basin); a rather pristine environment for what concerns heavy metals pollution, except for La Coloma where a large arsenic input was recorded; very low levels of natural and artificial radioactivity; a relevant quantity of sedimentary organic matter, providing biota with useful substrate for feeding and enhancing the food-web development while indirectly supplying lobster fisheries. Combined data highlighted the impact of the Dique Sur in reducing terrigenous input in the coastal area. Future studies should focus on dating of sediment cores for identifying and quantifying the changes acting in the gulf and on investigating the origins of the large arsenic input to La Coloma.

  18. Earth from Space: The Power of Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalati, W.

    2016-12-01

    Throughout history, humans have always valued the view from above, seeking high ground to survey the land, find food, assess threats, and understand their immediate environment. The advent of aircraft early in the 20th century took this capability literally to new levels, as aerial photos of farm lands, hazards, military threats, etc. provided new opportunities for security and prosperity. And in 1960, with the launch of the first weather satellite, TIROS, we came to know our world in ways that were not possible before, as we saw the Earth as a system of interacting components. In the decades since, our ability to understand the Earth System and its dynamic components has been transformed profoundly and repeatedly by satellite observations. From examining changes in sea level, to deformation of the Earth surface, to ozone depletion, to the Earth's energy balance, satellites have helped us understand our changing planet in ways that would not have otherwise been possible. The challenge moving forward is to continue to evolve beyond watching Earth processes unfold and understanding the underlying mechanisms of change, to anticipating future conditions, more comprehensively than we do today, for the benefit of society. The capabilities to do so are well within our reach, and with appropriate investments in observing systems, research, and activities that support translating observations into societal value, we can realize the full potential of this tremendous space-based perspective. Doing so will not just change our views of the Earth, but will improve our relationship with it.

  19. The research of air pollution based on spectral features in leaf surface of Ficus microcarpa in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xu, Ruisong; Ma, Yueliang; Miao, Li; Cai, Rui; Chen, Yu

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays development of industry and traffic are the main contributor to city air pollution in the city of GuangZhou, China. Conventional methods for investigating atmosphere potentially harmful element pollution based on sampling and chemical analysis are time and labor consuming and relatively expensive. Reflectance spectroscopy within the visible-near-infrared region of vegetation in city has been widely used to predict atmosphere constituents due to its rapidity, convenience and accuracy. The objective of this study was to examine the possibility of using leaves reflectance spectra of vegetation as a rapid method to simultaneously assess pollutant (S, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, XCl, XF) in the atmosphere of the Guangzhou area. This article has studied the spectral features of polluted leaf surface of Ficus microcarpa in 1985 and 1998. According to the analysis, comprehensive assessment for the change of atmospheric condition and degrees of pollution were given. This conclusion was confirmed by the monitored data got from chemical analysis. Future study with real remote sensing data and field measurements were strongly recommended.

  20. Features of the method for mapping of physical characteristics of lunar surface according to the data of ultraviolet polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozhenko, O. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2017-08-01

    Polarization measurements are relative and therefore do not require a very important and often complex standardization procedure. At a non-zero angle of incidence of light on the surface of the mineral, reflected and refracted rays - are partially polarized. The degree of polarization of radiation depends on the angle of incidence of light and in the reflection - reaches the maximum value at the Brewster angle. Visible Moon's details are grouped by value of the parameter Pmax.

  1. In the Red Shadow of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.; Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Carroll, Joshua; Sawell, David; Wilson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A technique is described for calculating the brightness of the atmosphere of the Earth that shines into the Earth's umbra during a total lunar eclipse making the Moon red. This "Rim of Fire" is due to refracted unscattered light from all the sunrises and sunsets rimming the Earth. In this article, a photograph of the totally eclipsed…

  2. In the Red Shadow of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.; Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Carroll, Joshua; Sawell, David; Wilson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A technique is described for calculating the brightness of the atmosphere of the Earth that shines into the Earth's umbra during a total lunar eclipse making the Moon red. This "Rim of Fire" is due to refracted unscattered light from all the sunrises and sunsets rimming the Earth. In this article, a photograph of the totally eclipsed…

  3. Inversion of the Chelyabinsk seismic surface waves and comparative constraints on the generation of seismic waves by atmospheric Impacts on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, F. G.; Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Meteor impacts are a very important seismic source for planetary seismology, since their locations and, in some cases, their occurence times can be accurately known from orbiters, tracking or optical observations. Their importance becomes greater in the case of a seismic experiment with one seismometer, as the SEIS (Seismic Experiment of Interior Structure) of the future Martian mission "InSight", as the known location allows a direct inversion of differential travel times and wave forms in terms of structure. Meteor impacts generate body and surface seismic waves when they reach the surface of a planet. But when they explode into the atmosphere, due to ablation, they generate shock waves, which are converted into linear, seismic waves in the solid part and acoustic waves in the atmosphere. This effect can be modeled when the amplitude of Rayleigh and other Spheroidal normal modes is made with the atmospheric/ground coupling effects. In this study, meteor impacts are modeled as seismic sources in a comparative analysis for the cases of Earth and Mars. Using the computed seismograms, calculated by the summation of the normal modes of the full planet (e.g. with atmosphere) the properties of the seismic source can be obtained. Its duration is typically associated to the radiation duration of shock waves until they reach the linear regime of propagation. These transition times are comparatively analyzed, for providing constraints on the seismic source duration on Earth and Mars. In the case of Earth, we test our approach with the Chelyabinsk superbolide. The computed seismograms are used in order to perform the inversion of the source, by comparison with the data of the Global Seismographic Network. The results are interpreted and compared with other observations. In the case of Mars, equivalent sources are similarly modeled in different atmospheric, impact size and lithospheric conditions.

  4. Earth Surface Deformation in the North China Plain Detected by Joint Analysis of GRACE and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C.K.; Li, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1–4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1–2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%–98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements. PMID:25340454

  5. Earth surface deformation in the North China Plain detected by joint analysis of GRACE and GPS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C K; Li, Zhao

    2014-10-22

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1-4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1-2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%-98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements.

  6. Earth Surface Deformation in the North China Plain Detected by Joint Analysis of GRACE and GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renli Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1–4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1–2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%–98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements.

  7. A general scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on binary transition metal surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    A simple scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on transition metal surface alloys is presented. It is shown that a d-band center model of the alloy surfaces is a convenient and appropriate basis for this scheme; variations in chemical composition, strain effects, and ligand effects...... for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on a wide variety of transition metal alloys. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Does The Principle Of Equivalence Prevent Trapped Surfaces From Being Formed In The General Relativistic Collapse Process?

    CERN Document Server

    Leiter, D; Robertson, S; Leiter, Darryl; Mitra, Abhas; Robertson, Stanley

    2001-01-01

    It has been recently shown (Mitra, 2000 - astro-ph/9910408) that the timelike spherical collapse of a radiating, physical fluid in General Relativity, as seen by an interior co-moving observer at rest in the physical fluid, does not permit formation of ``trapped surfaces''. This followed from the fact that the formation of a trapped surface in a physical fluid would cause the timelike world lines of the collapsing fluid to become null at the would be trapped surface, thus violating the Principle of Equivalence in General Theory of Relativity. In this paper we generalize and extend this result by studying the problem from the point of view of the exterior Vaidya metric of a collapsing radiating fluid as seen by an exterior stationary observer, and find that the "no trapped surface condition" becomes g00 > 0 consistent with that obtained for the interior co-moving metric. Since we have shown that the Principle of Equivalence prevents trapped surfaces from being formed in collapsing, radiating objects, then true...

  9. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  10. Disaster of the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Around 8 p.m.on June 8,a villager's toilet suddenly became a 5-meter-wide sinkhole in Qingquan Village of Ningxiang County in central China's Hunan Province. The villager,according to the Xiaoxiang Morning Herald,said he could even hear the sound of flowing water in the sinkhole.

  11. Emergence of global scaling behaviour in the coupled Earth-atmosphere interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fallah, Bijan; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Scale invariance property in the global geometry of Earth may lead to a coupled interactive behaviour between various components of the climate system. One of the most interesting correlations exists between spatial statistics of the global topography and the temperature on Earth. Here we show that the power-law behaviour observed in the Earth topography via different approaches, resembles a scaling law in the global spatial distribution of independent atmospheric parameters. We report on observation of scaling behaviour of such variables characterized by distinct universal exponents. More specifically, we find that the spatial power-law behaviour in the fluctuations of the near surface temperature over the lands on Earth, shares the same universal exponent as of the global Earth topography, indicative of the global persistent role of the static geometry of Earth to control the steady state of a dynamical atmospheric field. Such a universal feature can pave the way to the theoretical understanding of the chao...

  12. NERO: General concept of a Near-Earth object Radiometric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellino, A.; Somma, R.; Tommasi, L.; Paolinetti, R.; Muinonen, K.; Virtanen, J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Delbò, M.

    Near-Earth objects Radiometric Observatory (NERO) is one of the six studies for possible missions dedicated to near-Earth objects, that were funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2002 2003. It is a further development of some previous studies already submitted to ESA (Sysiphos, Spaceguard-1). The general concept is that a small satellite equipped with both a detector for visible wavelengths and an array for thermal IR measurements around 10 μm would be an ideal platform to obtain simultaneously two of the major objectives of current NEO science, namely the physical characterization of the objects and the discovery of those NEOs that are difficult to detect from the ground because their orbits are entirely or partly inside the Earth’s orbit. The NERO study includes a comprehensive analysis of the advantages and drawbacks of different orbital options for the satellite (including L2 of Earth and L2 of Venus) and a preliminary simulation of the effectiveness of orbit determination based on NERO observations of newly detected objects. The main results of this study, including also a preliminary sketch of the payload design (optics, detectors, cooling system, etc.) are briefly summarized.

  13. Friends of the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The world is now focusing on sustainable development, which has economic development, social progress and environmental protection as interactive and indispensable components. China, with a huge population of 1.3 billion, has achieved remarkable economic growth. But the ensuing environmental problems also sparked worldwide concerns. In an article published in 21st Century Business Herald,Pan Yue, Vice Minister of the State Environmental Protection Administration, discusses creating an environment-friendl...

  14. On Neutrino Absorption Tomography of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Reynoso, M M; Reynoso, Matias M.; Sampayo, Oscar A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the passage of UHE neutrinos through the Earth in order to perform an absorption tomography of its inner structure. The aim of this work is to study the extraction methods of the Earth's density, in this conditions, we do not need to implement a realistic Monte Carlo simulation, as we are only interested in comparing the goodness of a standard method \\cite{ralston} with the one we propose. The Earth's density is reconstructed using the 2-d Radon transform and we compare the density obtained considering neutral current regeneration through the complete transport equation, with the one obtained making use of the effective cross section approximation (standard method). We see that the effective cross section leads in general to inaccurate results, especially for flat initial neutrino fluxes, while the full transport equation method works regardless of the initial flux. Finally, an error propagation analysis made for different uncertainties in the surviving neutrino flux shows that the recovered density ...

  15. Sequential modulation of distractor-interference produced by semantic generalization of stimulus features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Sequential modulations of distractor-related interference (i.e., reduced congruency effect after incongruent as compared to congruent predecessor trials, a.k.a. Gratton effect) have been taken to reflect conflict-induced attentional focusing. To dismiss an alternative interpretation based on integration and retrieval of low-level features, it is important to exert experimental control of stimulus and response feature sequences. This has been achieved by considering only trials associated with complete feature changes. Furthermore, distractors from two different perceptual dimensions, such as stimulus location and shape, have been combined in the same experiment to investigate the question of specificity vs. generality of conflict adaptation. With this method feature sequence control can be exerted, in principle, without disregarding data from feature repetition trials. However, such control may be insufficient when the distractor dimensions overlap semantically. In two experiments we found evidence consistent with the assumption that semantic generalization of stimulus features, such as between a stimulus presented at a left-sided location and a stimulus shape pointing to the left, may yield a between-dimension Gratton effect. These findings raise doubts about inferring generalized attentional conflict adaptation when semantically related distractor dimensions are used. PMID:25452735

  16. Assessment of strain effect of strong-motion (focus zones of earthquakes on earth's surface displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.L. Khamidov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strain effect of focal zones on fore-seismic displacements of earth's surface is studied in the paper for real conditions of focus zones of the earthquakes. The width of the interval of maximum displacements is determined by the conditions of potential focus of tectonic earthquake. The solution of elastic problem for half-space with soft inclusion is used. Calculations are conducted also by empirical formulas, obtained for similar stress states. Possible radius of the zone of maximum revelation of strain anomaly is determined on the basis of the growth of rupture scale and change in heterogeneity volume. It is shown that obtained expression covers a wider range of magnitude variations with consideration of the interval of scale change in upcoming rupture-forming zone. In the example of Tashkent (1966 and Gazli (1984 strong ground motions, an analysis of possible strains occurrence on the Earth's surface was conducted.

  17. 100th anniversary special paper: Sedimentary mineral deposits and the evolution of earth's near-surface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, H.D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science

    2005-12-15

    The nature of sedimentary mineral deposits has evolved during Earth's history in concert with changes in the oxidation (redo) state of the ocean-atmosphere system, biological evolution, and the growing importance of geologically young accumulations of ore-grade material. There is now strong evidence that the atmosphere and the oceans were anoxic, or essentially anoxic, before 2.4 Ga. Banded iron formations (BIF) and the detrital uranium ores formed prior to 2.4 Ga are consistent with such a state. The period between 2.4 and 2.0 Ga is called the Great Oxidation Event by some. Its ores bear unmistakable marks of the presence of atmospheric O{sub 2}. Between 1.8 and 0.8 Ga the Earth system seems to have been remarkably stable. Sedimentary ore deposits of this period were influenced by the presence of O{sub 2}. BIF, sedimentary manganese, and phosphorites disappeared ca. 1.8 Ga, but sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) deposits and unconformity-type uranium deposits flourished, and nonsulfide zinc deposits put in an appearance. The period between 0.8 Ga and the end of the Proterozoic at 0.54 Ga was as turbulent or more so than the Paleoproterozoic. BIF returned, as did sedimentary manganese deposits and phosphorites. A further rise in the O{sub 2} content of the atmosphere and an increase in the sulfate concentration of seawater during this period brought the composition of the atmosphere and of seawater close to their present redox state. The last 540 m.y. of Earth's history have seen the system pass through two supercycles of roughly equal length. Climate, the redox stratification of the oceans ocean mixing, and the nature of sedimentary ores were influenced by tectonically and volcanically driven changes during these supercycles. The evolution of the higher land plants gave rise to coal deposits and sandstone-type uranium ores and was important for the formation of bauxites.

  18. Effects of surface current-wind interaction in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation simulation of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Heiner; Löptien, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Deoxygenation in the Baltic Sea endangers fish yields and favours noxious algal blooms. Yet, vertical transport processes ventilating the oxygen-deprived waters at depth and replenishing nutrient-deprived surface waters (thereby fuelling export of organic matter to depth) are not comprehensively understood. Here, we investigate the effects of the interaction between surface currents and winds on upwelling in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation model of the Baltic Sea. Contrary to expectations we find that accounting for current-wind effects inhibits the overall vertical exchange between oxygenated surface waters and oxygen-deprived water at depth. At major upwelling sites, however (e.g. off the southern coast of Sweden and Finland) the reverse holds: the interaction between topographically steered surface currents with winds blowing over the sea results in a climatological sea surface temperature cooling of 0.5 K. This implies that current-wind effects drive substantial local upwelling of cold and nutrient-replete waters.

  19. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  20. The habitability of a stagnant-lid Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Godolt, M.; Stracke, B.; Ruedas, T.; Grenfell, J. L.; Höning, D.; Nikolaou, A.; Plesa, A.-C.; Breuer, D.; Spohn, T.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Plate tectonics is considered a fundamental component for the habitability of the Earth. Yet whether it is a recurrent feature of terrestrial bodies orbiting other stars or unique to the Earth is unknown. The stagnant lid may rather be the most common tectonic expression on such bodies. Aims: To understand whether a stagnant-lid planet can be habitable, i.e. host liquid water at its surface, we model the thermal evolution of the mantle, volcanic outgassing of H2O and CO2, and resulting climate of an Earth-like planet lacking plate tectonics. Methods: We used a 1D model of parameterized convection to simulate the evolution of melt generation and the build-up of an atmosphere of H2O and CO2 over 4.5 Gyr. We then employed a 1D radiative-convective atmosphere model to calculate the global mean atmospheric temperature and the boundaries of the habitable zone (HZ). Results: The evolution of the interior is characterized by the initial production of a large amount of partial melt accompanied by a rapid outgassing of H2O and CO2. The maximal partial pressure of H2O is limited to a few tens of bars by the high solubility of water in basaltic melts. The low solubility of CO2 instead causes most of the carbon to be outgassed, with partial pressures that vary from 1 bar or less if reducing conditions are assumed for the mantle to 100-200 bar for oxidizing conditions. At 1 au, the obtained temperatures generally allow for liquid water on the surface nearly over the entire evolution. While the outer edge of the HZ is mostly influenced by the amount of outgassed CO2, the inner edge presents a more complex behaviour that is dependent on the partial pressures of both gases. Conclusions: At 1 au, the stagnant-lid planet considered would be regarded as habitable. The width of the HZ at the end of the evolution, albeit influenced by the amount of outgassed CO2, can vary in a non-monotonic way depending on the extent of the outgassed H2O reservoir. Our results suggest that

  1. Study of Distinctive Regional Features of Surface Solar Radiation in North and East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关福来; 郑有飞; 蔡子颖; 于长文; 张楠

    2011-01-01

    Solar radiation is an important energy source for plants on the earth and also a major component of the global energy balance.Variations in solar radiation incident at the earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment,including the climate change.To provide useful information for predicting the future climate change in China,distinctive regional features in spatial and temporal variations of the surface solar radiation (SSR) and corresponding attributions (such as cloud and aerosol) are analyzed based on SSR observations and other meteorological measurements in North and East China from 1961 to 2007.Multiple models,such as the plane-parallel radiative transfer model,empirical and statistical models,and corrclation and regrcssion analysis methods are used in the study.The results are given as follows.(1) During 1961-2007,the total SSR in North China went through a process from quickly “dimming” to slowly “dimming”,while in East China,a significant transition from “dimming” to “brightening” occurred.Although there are some differences between thc two regional variation trends,long-term variations in SSR in the two regions are basically consistent with the observation worldwide.(2) Between the 1960s and 1980s,in both North and East China,aerosols played a critical rolc in the radiation dimming.However,after 1989,different variation trends of SSR occurred in North and East China,indicating that aerosols were not the dominant factor.(3) Cloud cover contributed less to the variation of SSR in North China,but was thc major attribution in East China and played a promoting role in the reversal of SSR from dimming to brightening,especially in the “remarkable brightening” period,with its contribution as high as 70%.

  2. On the differential properties of internal magnetic field models at the Earth's surface and at satellite altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webers, Wigor A.

    2007-03-01

    The inverse theory of potential fields shows that the correspondence between the internal magnetic field of the Earth and its field sources is unique when the potential field is known in all points of the three-dimensional space including all points of the source region (cp., e.g. Diesselhorst, H., 1939. Magnetische Felder und Kräfte. Johann Ambrosius Barth Verlag, Leipzig). Thus, to determine the sources of the field it is not sufficient to know the potential field in the space external to the sources. Moreover, field models derived from finite sets of potential field observations emphasize different source properties because of measurement errors. In this study, I argue that improved internal field models can be developed from multi-altitude magnetic observations by imposing more effective constraints on the poorly conditioned downward continuation problem. In particular, the convergence behaviour of spherical harmonic field models can be used to improve the downward continuation of the higher truncation index terms. A high quality approximation of the field continuation is essential when the field models are interpreted for relatively small field contributions such as from the lithospheric sources. The relations between the potential field and its sources including the problems of potential field continuations - upward and downward - are governed by the theory of ill-posed inverse problems (cp., e.g. Anger, G., 1990. Inverse Problems in Differential Equations. Akademie/Plenum Press, Berlin/London; Anger, G., Gorenflo, R., Jochmann, H., Moritz, H., Webers, W. (Eds.), 1993. Inverse Problems: Principles and Applications in Geophysics, Technology, and Medicine. Akademie, Berlin; Huestis, S.P., Parker, R.L., 1979. Upward and downward continuations as inverse problems. Geophys. J. R. Astr. Soc. 57, 171-188; Rösler, R., 1981. Über die Fehlerfortpflanzung bei Potentialfeldtransformationen. Gerlands Beitr. Gephys. 90, 47-57).

  3. A multi-perspective dynamic feature concept in adaptive NC machining of complex freeform surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Li, Yingguang; Gao, James

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of feature for freeform surface machining that defines the changes in feature status during real manufacturing situations which have not been sufficiently addressed by current international standards and previous research in feature technology. These changes are multi-perspective, including (i) changes in depth-of-cut: the geometry of a feature in the depth-of-cut direction changes during different machining operations such as roughing, semi-finishing and fin...

  4. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  5. Disaster of the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sinkholes have appeared in many places in China,drawing geological concerns Around 8 p.m. on June 8,a villager’s toilet suddenly became a 5-meter-wide sinkhole in Qingquan Village of Ningxiang County in central

  6. A General Framework for Development of the Cortex-like Visual Object Recognition System: Waves of Spikes, Predictive Coding and Universal Dictionary of Features

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasenko, Sergey S

    2011-01-01

    This study is focused on the development of the cortex-like visual object recognition system. We propose a general framework, which consists of three hierarchical levels (modules). These modules functionally correspond to the V1, V4 and IT areas. Both bottom-up and top-down connections between the hierarchical levels V4 and IT are employed. The higher the degree of matching between the input and the preferred stimulus, the shorter the response time of the neuron. Therefore information about a single stimulus is distributed in time and is transmitted by the waves of spikes. The reciprocal connections and waves of spikes implement predictive coding: an initial hypothesis is generated on the basis of information delivered by the first wave of spikes and is tested with the information carried by the consecutive waves. The development is considered as extraction and accumulation of features in V4 and objects in IT. Once stored a feature can be disposed, if rarely activated. This cause update of feature repository....

  7. Contribution of Energetically Reactive Surface Features to the Dissolution of CeO2 and ThO2 Analogues for Spent Nuclear Fuel Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Corkhill, C.; Myllykyla, E.; Bailey, D. J.; Thornber, S.M.; Qi, J.; Maldonado, P.; Stennett, M.C.; Hamilton, A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    In the safety case for the geological disposal of nuclear waste, the release of radioactivity from the repository is controlled by the dissolution of the spent fuel in groundwater. There remain several uncertainties associated with understanding spent fuel dissolution, including the contribution of energetically reactive surface sites to the dissolution rate. In this study, we investigate how surface features influence the dissolution rate of synthetic CeO2 and ThO2, spent nuclear fuel analog...

  8. Thermal Behaviour of Unusual Local-Scale Surface Features on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; Titus, T. N.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the region of the infrared spectrum beyond approximately 3.5 micrometers is dominated by the thermal emission of the asteroid's surface, which can be used to determine surface temperature by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes are used to retrieve surface temperatures, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were re-observed by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. To calculate surface temperatures, we applied a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion based on the Kirchhoff law and the Planck function. These results were cross-checked through application of alternative methods. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. Some bright terrains have an overall albedo in the visible as much as 40% brighter than surrounding areas. Data from the IR channel of VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations. In particular, it is shown that during maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to

  9. FEATURES OF GEODEFORMATION CHANGES OF NEAR SURFACE SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Larionov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the deformation process in the near surface sedimentary rocks, which has been carried out in a seismically active region of Kamchatka peninsular since 2007,are presented. The peculiarity of the experiments on the registration of geodeformations is the application of a laser deformograph-interferometer constructed according to the Michelson interferometer scheme.

  10. On the impact of pacific ocean free tropospheric background aerosols at the surface of the earth-atmosphere system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFelice, T. P. [Dept. Geosciences, A.S.G., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Individual tropospheric particles (0.03 to several {mu}m in diameter) were sampled using wire impactors on a DC-864 aircraft along and within Pacific Rim, from 125 degrees E to 120 degrees W and 70 degrees S to 70 degrees N, during the November 1989 and May 1990 Global Backscattering Experiment (GLOBE) deployments of NASA. A simple radiative balance model was used to determine the first order radiative effect of this aerosol layer at the surface. The results indicate that: (i) The background (optical thickness of {approx_equal}0.005) tropospheric aerosols between 2.4 - 12.2 km exert a warming tendency on surfaces with albedos {>=}0.02 in both the visible and infrared. (ii) There is an apparent increase in the coarse mode sulfur containing aerosol abundance compared to {approx_equal} 15 years ago, suggesting that the background aerosol layer exerted a stronger tendency of planetary warming {approx_equal} 15 years ago. [Spanish] Se muestrearon particulas troposfericas individuales (0.03 a varias {mu}m de diametro) usando impactadores de alambre en un avion DC-864 a lo largo y dentro de la region del Pacifico de 125 grados E a 120 grados W y 70 grados S a 70 grados N, durante los desplegamientos de NASA del Experimento Global de Retrospeccion (GLOBE) en noviembre de 1989 y mayo de 1990. Fue usado un modelo de balance simple de radiacion para determinar el efecto radiativo de primer orden de esta capa de aerosoles en la superficie. Los resultados indican que: (i) los aerosoles troposfericos de fondo (espesor optico de {approx_equal} 0.05) entre 2.4 - 12.2 km ejercen una tendencia al calentamiento sobre superficies con albedo {>=} 0.02, tanto en el visible como en el infrarrojo. (ii) hay un aparente aumento en el modo tosco del sulfuro conteniendo abundancia de aerosoles comparado con {approx_equal} hace 15 anos, sugiriendo que la capa de trasfondo de aerosoles ejercio una tendencia mas fuerte de calentamiento planetario {approx_equal} hace 15 anos.

  11. Influence of Structural Features and Fracture Processes on Surface Roughness: A Case Study from the Krosno Sandstones of the Górka–Mucharz Quarry (Little Beskids, Southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieczara Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of analysis of surface roughness parameters in the Krosno Sandstones of Mucharz, southern Poland. It was aimed at determining whether these parameters are influenced by structural features (mainly the laminar distribution of mineral components and directional distribution of non-isometric grains and fracture processes. The tests applied in the analysis enabled us to determine and describe the primary statistical parameters used in the quantitative description of surface roughness, as well as specify the usefulness of contact profilometry as a method of visualizing spatial differentiation of fracture processes in rocks. These aims were achieved by selecting a model material (Krosno Sandstones from the Górka-Mucharz Quarry and an appropriate research methodology. The schedule of laboratory analyses included: identification analyses connected with non-destructive ultrasonic tests, aimed at the preliminary determination of rock anisotropy, strength point load tests (cleaved surfaces were obtained due to destruction of rock samples, microscopic analysis (observation of thin sections in order to determine the mechanism of inducing fracture processes and a test method of measuring surface roughness (two- and three-dimensional diagrams, topographic and contour maps, and statistical parameters of surface roughness. The highest values of roughness indicators were achieved for surfaces formed under the influence of intragranular fracture processes (cracks propagating directly through grains. This is related to the structural features of the Krosno Sandstones (distribution of lamination and bedding.

  12. Corrigendum to "Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy

    2016-06-01

    A recent paper published in Life Sciences in Space Research (El-Jaby and Richardson, 2015) presented estimates of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates, in air, from surface altitudes up to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit. These estimates were based on MCNPX (LANL, 2011) (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) radiation transport simulations of galactic cosmic radiation passing through Earth's atmosphere. During a recent review of the input decks used for these simulations, a systematic error was discovered that is addressed here. After reassessment, the neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates estimated are found to be 10 to 15% different, though, the essence of the conclusions drawn remains unchanged.

  13. Commons problems, common ground: Earth-surface dynamics and the social-physical interdisciplinary frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the archetypal "tragedy of the commons" narrative, local farmers pasture their cows on the town common. Soon the common becomes crowded with cows, who graze it bare, and the arrangement of open access to a shared resource ultimately fails. The "tragedy" involves social and physical processes, but the denouement depends on who is telling the story. An economist might argue that the system collapses because each farmer always has a rational incentive to graze one more cow. An ecologist might remark that the rate of grass growth is an inherent control on the common's carrying capacity. And a geomorphologist might point out that processes of soil degradation almost always outstrip processes of soil production. Interdisciplinary research into human-environmental systems still tends to favor disciplinary vantages. In the context of Anthropocene grand challenges - including fundamental insight into dynamics of landscape resilience, and what the dominance of human activities means for processes of change and evolution on the Earth's surface - two disciplines in particular have more to talk about than they might think. Here, I use three examples - (1) beach nourishment, (2) upstream/downstream fluvial asymmetry, and (3) current and historical "land grabbing" - to illustrate a range of interconnections between physical Earth-surface science and common-pool resource economics. In many systems, decision-making and social complexity exert stronger controls on landscape expression than do physical geomorphological processes. Conversely, human-environmental research keeps encountering multi-scale, emergent problems of resource use made 'common-pool' by water, nutrient and sediment transport dynamics. Just as Earth-surface research can benefit from decades of work on common-pool resource systems, quantitative Earth-surface science can make essential contributions to efforts addressing complex problems in environmental sustainability.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  15. Impact Wear Properties of Metal-Plastic Multilayer Composites Filled with Glass Fiber Treated with Rare Earth Element Surface Modifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程先华; 薛玉君

    2001-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of metal-plastic multilayer composites filled with glass fiber, which is treated with rare earth element surface modifier, under impact load and dry friction conditions were investigated. Experimental results show that the metal-plastic multilayer composite filled with glass fiber exhibits excellent friction and impact wear properties when using rare earth elements as surface modifier for the surface treatment of glass fiber.

  16. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  17. Reproducibility of UAV-based earth surface topography based on structure-from-motion algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapuyt, François; Vanacker, Veerle; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    A representation of the earth surface at very high spatial resolution is crucial to accurately map small geomorphic landforms with high precision. Very high resolution digital surface models (DSM) can then be used to quantify changes in earth surface topography over time, based on differencing of DSMs taken at various moments in time. However, it is compulsory to have both high accuracy for each topographic representation and consistency between measurements over time, as DSM differencing automatically leads to error propagation. This study investigates the reproducibility of reconstructions of earth surface topography based on structure-from-motion (SFM) algorithms. To this end, we equipped an eight-propeller drone with a standard reflex camera. This equipment can easily be deployed in the field, as it is a lightweight, low-cost system in comparison with classic aerial photo surveys and terrestrial or airborne LiDAR scanning. Four sets of aerial photographs were created for one test field. The sets of airphotos differ in focal length, and viewing angles, i.e. nadir view and ground-level view. In addition, the importance of the accuracy of ground control points for the construction of a georeferenced point cloud was assessed using two different GPS devices with horizontal accuracy at resp. the sub-meter and sub-decimeter level. Airphoto datasets were processed with SFM algorithm and the resulting point clouds were georeferenced. Then, the surface representations were compared with each other to assess the reproducibility of the earth surface topography. Finally, consistency between independent datasets is discussed.

  18. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  19. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  20. Multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing data for the analysis of open-pit mining earth surface dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zengwen; Chen, Jianping; Li, Ke; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Open-pit mining activities can affect the earth surface processes inducing soil erosion, landslides, and subsidence. The recognition and the analysis of mining induced Earth surface changes and the related processes represent, therefore, a challenge for a sustainable environmental planning for those regions affected by an intense mining activity. The purpose of this study is to monitor the effects of open-pit mining and the associated landform processes using multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing data. The study area consists in an open-pit mine located in Miyun county, northern Beijing. For the study area different datasets are available for different years: a GeoEye image (2011, res. 1m/pix), two pairs of Cartosat - 1 stereo pairs (2009, 2012, res. 2.5m/pix) from which we extracted two DSMs (res. 5m/pix), an UAV aerial photograph (2014, res. 0.07m) and the derived DSM (2014, res. 0.1m). We also obtained a DTM (2014, res. 1m) from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) and a DSM (2014, res. 0.5m) using the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique by a camera. These data served as the basis to recognize, through the application of morphometric indicators, the areas subject to erosion and landsliding. A volumetric estimate of soil loss from 2009 to 2014 has been also quantified using the multiple DSMs provided by the multi-platform. The recognition and the analysis of earth surface dynamics using low-cost multi-temporal and multi-platforms remote sensing such as SfM and UAVs represents a useful tool to mitigate the environmental consequences open-pit mining, and to mitigate the related natural disaster and risk.

  1. Using the level set method in geodynamical modeling of multi-material flows and Earth's free surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, B.; Thieulot, C.; Geenen, T.; Van Den Berg, A. P.; Spakman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The level set method allows for tracking material surfaces in 2-D and 3-D flow modeling and is well suited for applications of multi-material flow modeling. The level set method utilizes smooth level set functions to define material interfaces, which makes the method stable and free of oscillations

  2. Using the level set method in geodynamical modeling of multi-material flows and Earth's free surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, B.; Thieulot, C.; Geenen, T.; Van Den Berg, A. P.; Spakman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The level set method allows for tracking material surfaces in 2-D and 3-D flow modeling and is well suited for applications of multi-material flow modeling. The level set method utilizes smooth level set functions to define material interfaces, which makes the method stable and free of oscillations

  3. Application of GSMaP and MODIS/SeaWiFS Downward Surface Short Wave Radiation in the Land Simulation System: Yesterday's Earth at EORC (YEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, T.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Fujii, H.; Murakami, H.

    2010-12-01

    In the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) era, data assimilation is being recognized as a powerful tool for interpolating intermittent satellite data. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Earth Observation Research Center (EORC) established a research group on water cycle (W-RG) as one of the cross-cutting research groups over several satellite oriented missions, and the W-RG has started developing offline simulation system on water cycles over global land, which will be a basis for real-time data assimilation in the future, targeting GPM mission and the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) series. Current system does not have capability of data assimilation, but there are proposals to introduce the function in the system. The pilot system, called as the Yesterday’s Earth at EORC (YEE), is based on the “Today's Earth” from Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The Univ. of Tokyo (Yoshimura et al., 2008), and simulates energy and water balances over global domain using Iso-MATSIRO, an extended version of MATSIRO (Minimal Advanced Treatments of Surface Interaction and Runoff) land surface model (LSM) (Takata et al., 2003). In addition to water balance components such as evapotranspiration, runoff, and soil moisture, river discharge is also calculated using Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) (Oki and Sud, 1998). Currently, the system is just an offline simulation, using forecast data from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and satellite data as external forcing. Three experiments to use Iso-MATSIRO land surface model for 2003-2004. The first one is an experiment using JRA-25 as input forcing parameters (YEE-JRA25), and the second one is same as JRA25-EX but replace model rainfall to the Global Satellite Mapping for Precipitation (GSMaP) (Aonashi et al., 2009; Ushio et al., 2009) product (YEE-GSMaP), and the last one replace downward surface short wave radiation (SWR) product (Frouin and Murakami, 2006) by MODIS and SeaWiFS data (YEE

  4. Acquisition of Novel Perceptual Categories in a Third Language: The Role of Metalinguistic Awareness and Feature Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Divya Verma

    2009-01-01

    Many factors that contribute towards the perception of second language (L2) sounds and the subsequent establishment of L2 phonetic categories have been the focus of past research. However, learning a third language, unlike SLA, may be influenced by additional factors attributed to the presence of two language systems in a bilingual instead of one…

  5. Acquisition of Novel Perceptual Categories in a Third Language: The Role of Metalinguistic Awareness and Feature Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Divya Verma

    2009-01-01

    Many factors that contribute towards the perception of second language (L2) sounds and the subsequent establishment of L2 phonetic categories have been the focus of past research. However, learning a third language, unlike SLA, may be influenced by additional factors attributed to the presence of two language systems in a bilingual instead of one…

  6. Oceanic whitecaps: Sea surface features detectable via satellite that are indicators of the magnitude of the air-sea gas transfer coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E C Monahan

    2002-09-01

    Stage A whitecaps (spilling wave crests) have a microwave emissivity of close to 1. Thus if even a small fraction of the sea surface is covered by these features there will be a detectable enhancement in the apparent microwave brightness temperature of that surface as determined by satellite-borne microwave radiometers. This increase in the apparent microwave brightness temperature can as a consequence be routinely used to estimate the fraction of the sea surface covered by stage A whitecaps. For all but the very lowest wind speeds it has been shown in a series of controlled experiments that the air-sea gas transfer coeffcient for each of a wide range of gases, including carbon dioxide and oxygen, is directly proportional to the fraction of the sea surface covered by these stage A whitecaps.

  7. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  8. Building a Dashboard of the Planet with Google Earth and Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. T.; Hancher, M.

    2016-12-01

    In 2005 Google Earth, a popular 3-D virtual globe, was first released. Scientists immediately recognized how it could be used to tell stories about the Earth. From 2006 to 2009, the "Virtual Globes" sessions of AGU included innovative examples of scientists and educators using Google Earth, and since that time it has become a commonplace tool for communicating scientific results. In 2009 Google Earth Engine, a cloud-based platform for planetary-scale geospatial analysis, was first announced. Earth Engine was initially used to extract information about the world's forests from raw Landsat data. Since then, the platform has proven highly effective for general analysis of georeferenced data, and users have expanded the list of use cases to include high-impact societal issues such as conservation, drought, disease, food security, water management, climate change and environmental monitoring. To support these use cases, the platform has continuously evolved with new datasets, analysis functions, and user interface tools. This talk will give an overview of the latest Google Earth and Earth Engine functionality that allow partners to understand, monitor and tell stories about of our living, breathing Earth. https://earth.google.com https://earthengine.google.com

  9. Radar Observations and the Shape of 2008 EV5: Ridges and Craters on Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Michael W.; Ostro, S. J.; Benner, L. A. M.; Scheeres, D. J.; Giorgini, J. D.; Brozovic, M.; Nolan, M. C.; Howell, E. S.; Taylor, P. A.; Margot, J.; Magri, C.; Jao, J. S.; Brisken, W.

    2010-10-01

    The near-Earth asteroid 2008 EV5 was discovered by the Mt. Lemmon Survey on March 4 2008, and approached to within 8.4 lunar distances in December 2008, when it was a very strong radar target. We observed EV5 with the Arecibo and Goldstone planetary radars and the Very Long Baseline Array, and previously described those observations and obtaining EV5's pole direction. We have now completed a detailed model of EV5's shape. The Arecibo delay-Doppler data provided 7.5-m spatial resolution, showing that EV5's overall shape is a 400 ± 50 m spheroid. The most prominent surface feature is a ridge parallel to the asteroid's equator that is broken by a concavity 150 m in diameter. Otherwise the asteroid's surface is shows few decameter-scale features and is notably smooth - our shape model has an average surface slope of <15º. EV5's radar and optical albedos are consistent with either rocky or stony-iron composition. EV5's ridge is similar to structure seen on the rubble-pile near-Earth asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4, and is consistent with YORP spin-up reconfiguring the asteroid during an episode of more rapid rotation. We interpret the concavity as an impact crater. Shaking during the impact should have erased smaller surface features and may explain the general lack of decameter-scale surface structure.

  10. Surface mass variation monitoring from orbit information of GPS-tracked low-Earth orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, O.; Weigelt, M. L. B.; Zehentner, N.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; van Dam, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE inter-satellite observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for environmental studies. In order to bridge the likely gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects, we investigate the potential of gravity field information derived from orbit analysis for surface mass variation detection. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in the absence of GRACE. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the appropriate orbit characteristics for such an endeavour. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. In a first study, we assess the stand-alone capability of the Swarm mission for mass variation detection in a real-case environment. For this purpose, we ''approximate'' the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP constellation. In a second study, we incorporate tracking observations from a series of additional satellites (e.g., GOCE, MetOp, TanDEM-X, Swarm) and extend the length of the time series according to data availability. We will demonstrate to what extent these measures improve the inference of time-variable features from orbit information. For both studies, in the first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GPS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined time-variable gravity fields. Finally, we infer mass variation in selected areas from the gravity signal. These results are compared to the findings obtained from mass variation detection exploiting CSR-RL05 gravity fields (the latter serve as ''benchmark solutions'').

  11. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  12. ARPES investigation on the surface vs bulk electronic structures of correlated topological insulators YbB6 and other rare earth hexaborides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Matt, C. E.; Pomjakushina, E.; Dil, J. H.; Landolt, G.; Ma, J. Z.; Shi, X.; Dhaka, R. S.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Rogalev, V.; Strocov, V.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; Conder, K.; Mesot, J.; Ding, H.; Shi, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Using ARPES performed in wide photon energy range we systematically studied the bulk and surface electronic structures of a topological mixed- valence insulator candidate, YbB6. The bulk B-2p states are probed with bulk-sensitive soft X-ray ARPES, exhibiting strong three-dimensionality with the band top locating 80 meV below the EF at the X point. The measured bulk Yb-4f states are located at 1 and 2.3 eV below EF, which hybridize with the dispersive B-2p states. The bulk band structures obtained by experiments are substantially different from the first principle calculations, but it can be better described by adding a correlation parameter U = 7 eV, indicating YbB6 is a correlated system. Using surface-sensitive VUV ARPES, we revealed two-dimensional surface states which form three electron-like FSs with Dirac-cone-like dispersions. The odd number of surface FSs gives the first indication that the surface states are topological non-trivial. The spin-resolved ARPES measurements provide further evidence that these surface states are spin polarized with spin locked to the crystal momentum. Recent results on the TI phase in other rare earth hexaborides will also be shown.

  13. The Magnetic Field of Planet Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, G.; Finlay, Chris; Constable, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks h...... yr) to the longest (virtually the age of the Earth) time scales are finally reviewed, underlining the respective roles of the magnetohydodynamics at work in the core, and of the slow dynamic evolution of the planet as a whole.......The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks...... observations have been made possible from space, leading to the possibility of observing the Earth’s magnetic field in much more details than was previously possible. The progressive increase in computer power was also crucial, leading to advanced ways of handling and analyzing this considerable corpus of data...

  14. Exploring microstructure and surface features of Chinese coins using non-invasive approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Guo, Baogang; Hu, Hailong; Jiang, Linhai [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-03-30

    of high purity nickel and a good refining process was applied in general. The detectable amounts of carbon measured in some coins suggest that the refining process was not exactly alike. These coin samples are found to be highly crystalline in nature with face-centred cubic crystallographic structure. Furthermore, to shed more light on the surface features of the coins, their physical properties (e.g., interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, lattice microstrain, X-ray density, dislocation density, porosity) were investigated in detail. The results demonstrate that our protocol may be a viable adjunct or alternative to conventional analytical approaches. More importantly, unlike traditional approaches, our protocol is totally non-destructive, a highly significant factor when probing irreplaceable artefacts.

  15. Features of Ocean Surface Winds Observed by the QuikSCAT Satellite Before Tropical Cyclogenesis over the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; LAU Kai-Hon; FUNG Chi-Hung; ZHANG Qinghong

    2008-01-01

    Ocean surface winds observed by the Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) satellite prior to the geneses of 36 tropical cy- clones (TCs) in the South China Sea (SCS) are investigated in this paper. The results show that there are areas with negative mean horizontal divergence around the TC genesis locations three days prior to TC formation. The divergence term [-(f+ζ)( u/ x+ v/ y)] in the vorticity equation is calculated based upon the QuikSCAT ocean surface wind data. The calculated mean divergence term is about 10.3 times the mean relative vorticity increase rate around the TC genesis position one day prior to TC genesis, which shows the important contributions of the divergence term to the vorticity increase prior to TC formation. It is suggested that criteria related with the divergence and divergence term be applied in early detections of tropical cyclogenesis using the QuikSCAT satellite data.

  16. A new procedure for characterizing textured surfaces with a deterministic pattern of valley features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, Alessandro; Kühle, A; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there has been the development of a high number of manufacturing methods for creating textured surfaces which often present deterministic patterns of valley features. Unfortunately, suitable methodologies for characterizing them are lacking. Existing standards cannot in fact...

  17. Properties of an Earth-like planet orbiting a Sun-like star: Earth observed by the EPOXI mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Timothy A; Deming, L Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Meadows, Victoria S; Robinson, Tyler D; Seager, Sara; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-11-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission observed the disc-integrated Earth and Moon to test techniques for reconnoitering extrasolar terrestrial planets, using the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to observe Earth at the beginning and end of Northern Hemisphere spring, 2008, from a range of ∼1/6 to 1/3 AU. These observations furnish high-precision and high-cadence empirical photometry and spectroscopy of Earth, suitable as "ground truth" for numerically simulating realistic observational scenarios for an Earth-like exoplanet with finite signal-to-noise ratio. Earth was observed at near-equatorial sub-spacecraft latitude on 18-19 March, 28-29 May, and 4-5 June (UT), in the range of 372-4540 nm wavelength with low visible resolving power (λ/Δλ=5-13) and moderate IR resolving power (λ/Δλ=215-730). Spectrophotometry in seven filters yields light curves at ∼372-948 nm filter-averaged wavelength, modulated by Earth's rotation with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤20%. The spatially resolved Sun glint is a minor contributor to disc-integrated reflectance. Spectroscopy at 1100-4540 nm reveals gaseous water and carbon dioxide, with minor features of molecular oxygen, methane, and nitrous oxide. One-day changes in global cloud cover resulted in differences between the light curve beginning and end of ≤5%. The light curve of a lunar transit of Earth on 29 May is color-dependent due to the Moon's red spectrum partially occulting Earth's relatively blue spectrum. The "vegetation red edge" spectral contrast observed between two long-wavelength visible/near-IR bands is ambiguous, not clearly distinguishing between the verdant Earth diluted by cloud cover versus the desolate mineral regolith of the Moon. Spectrophotometry in at least one other comparison band at short wavelength is required to distinguish between Earth-like and Moon-like surfaces in reconnaissance observations. However, measurements at 850 nm alone, the high-reflectance side of the red edge, could be sufficient to

  18. Surface fractal dimensions and textural properties of mesoporous alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilchis-Granados, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, México, DF (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Facultad de Química, Av. Paseo Colón esquina con Paseo Tollocan s/n Toluca, México (Mexico); Granados-Correa, F., E-mail: francisco.granados@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, México, DF (Mexico); Barrera-Díaz, C.E. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Facultad de Química, Av. Paseo Colón esquina con Paseo Tollocan s/n Toluca, México (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    This work examines the surface fractal dimensions (D{sub f}) and textural properties of three different alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites. Calcium, strontium and barium hydroxyapatite compounds were successfully synthesized via chemical precipitation method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and N{sub 2}-physisorption measurements. Surface fractal dimensions were determined using single N{sub 2}-adsorption/desorption isotherms method to quantify the irregular surface of as-prepared compounds. The obtained materials were also characterized through their surface hydroxyl group content, determined by the mass titration method. It was found that the D{sub f} values for the three materials covered the range of 0.77 ± 0.04–2.33 ± 0.11; these results indicated that the materials tend to have smooth surfaces, except the irregular surface of barium hydroxyapatite. Moreover, regarding the synthesized calcium hydroxyapatite exhibited better textural properties compared with the synthesized strontium and barium hydroxyapatites for adsorbent purposes. However, barium hydroxyapatite shows irregular surface, indicating a high population of active sites across the surface, in comparison with the others studied hydroxyapatites. Finally, the results showed a linear correlation between the surface hydroxyl group content at the external surface of materials and their surface fractal dimensions.

  19. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer Featured Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-03

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature